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Sample records for metal spallation target

  1. THERMAL HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS OF A LIQUID-METAL-COOLED NEUTRON SPALLATION TARGET

    SciTech Connect

    W. GREGORY; R. MARTIN; T. VALACHOVIC

    2000-07-01

    We have carried out numerical simulations of the thermal hydraulic behavior of a neutron spallation target where liquid metal lead-bismuth serves as both coolant and as a neutron spallation source. The target is one of three designs provided by the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) in Russia. This type of target is proposed for Accelerator-driven Transmutation of Waste (ATW) to eliminate plutonium from hazardous fission products. The thermal hydraulic behavior was simulated by use of a commercial CFD computer code called CFX. Maximum temperatures in the diaphragm window and in the liquid lead were determined. In addition the total pressure drop through the target was predicted. The results of the CFX analysis were close to those results predicted by IPPE in their preliminary analysis.

  2. Radiochemical Determination of Polonium in Liquid Metal Spallation Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, B.; Schumann, D.; Neuhausen, J.; Wohlmuther, M.; Türler, A.

    2014-05-01

    The MEGAPIE target, consisting of 82 litres of lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE), was irradiated close to the megawatt range (0.8 MW) from August to December 2006 in the SINQ facility at PSI. After a cooling period of 5 years, a post-irradiation examination (PIE) program was started and samples were taken from different positions in the target. In this paper we focus on the measurement of α-emitting 208-210Po in the MEGAPIE target. The experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions obtained by FLUKA and MCNPX calculations.

  3. Initial observations of cavitation-induced erosion of liquid metal spallation target vessels at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, David A; Riemer, Bernie; Ferguson, Phillip D; Carroll, Adam J; Dayton, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    During operation of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory the mechanical properties of the AISI 316L target module are altered by high-energy neutron and proton radiation. The interior surfaces of the target vessel are also damaged by cavitation-induced erosion, which results from repetitive rapid heating of the liquid mercury by high-energy proton beam pulses. Until recently no observations of cavitation-induced erosion were possible for conditions prototypical to the SNS. Post irradiation examination (PIE) of the first and second operational SNS targets was performed to gain insight into the radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties of the 316L target material and the extent of cavitation-induced erosion to the target vessel inner surfaces. Observations of cavitation-induced erosion of the first and second operational SNS target modules are presented here, including images of the target vessel interiors and specimens removed from the target beam-entrance regions.

  4. Initial observations of cavitation-induced erosion of liquid metal spallation target vessels at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClintock, D. A.; Riemer, B. W.; Ferguson, P. D.; Carroll, A. J.; Dayton, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    During operation of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory the mechanical properties of the AISI 316L target module are altered by high-energy neutron and proton radiation. The interior surfaces of the target vessel are also damaged by cavitation-induced erosion, which results from repetitive rapid heating of the liquid mercury by high-energy proton beam pulses. Until recently no observations of cavitation-induced erosion were possible for conditions fully prototypic to the SNS. Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE) of the first and second operational SNS targets was performed to gain insight into the radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties of the 316L target material and the extent of cavitation-induced erosion to the mercury vessel inner surfaces. Observations of cavitation-induced erosion of the first and second operational SNS target modules are presented here, including images of the target vessel interiors and specimens removed from the target beam-entrance regions.

  5. Thermohydraulic behavior of the liquid metal target of a spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Y.

    1996-06-01

    The author presents work done on three main problems. (1) Natural circulation in double coaxial cylindircal container: The thermohydraulic behaviour of the liquid metal target of the spallation neutron source at PSI has been investigated. The configuration is a natural-circulation loop in a concentric double-tube-type container. The results show that the natural-circulation loop concept is valid for the design phase of the target construction, and the current specified design criteria will be fulfilled with the proposed parameter values. (2) Flow around the window: Water experiments were performed for geometry optimisation of the window shape of the SINQ container for avoiding generating recirculation zones at peripheral area and the optimal cooling of the central part of the beam entrance window. Flow visualisation technique was mainly used for various window shapes, gap distance between the window and the guide tube edge. (3) Flow in window cooling channels: Flows in narrow gaps of cooling channels of two different types of windows were studied by flow visualisation techniques. One type is a slightly curved round cooling channel and the other is hemispherical shape, both of which have only 2 mm gap distance and the water inlet is located on one side and flows out from the opposite side. In both cases, the central part of the flow area has lower velocity than peripheral area.

  6. R&D-needs and opportunities to broaden the data base on materials and technology for liquid metal spallation targets

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.S.

    1996-06-01

    Liquid metals have so far only been used to a very limited extent as spallation targets, notably at the ISOLDE-facility at CERN (Pb and La) to produce radioactive isotopes. Virtually no systematic studies have been carried out so far. The available data base is by no means sufficient to answer conclusively very important questions such as predicting reliably the service time of medium-to-high power target systems or determining precisely what technological measures are required and appropriate to maintain an optimum coolant quality, to mitigate the effects of pressure waves in short pulse sources and others. During the workshop several areas have been identified, where there exists an urgent need for improved knowledge and reliable data, and opportunities have been presented to acquire such knowledge and to generate such data. Opportunities to do such research and pertinent know-how, although scarce, are spread over institutions in several countries, and efforts to use these opportunities often require substantial resources both in man power and money. The workshop participants therefore unanimously supported the view that a coordinated and internationally concerted effort should be undertaken to make the best possible use of existing opportunities and available resources in order to develop the knowledge and technology necessary for the deployment and safe operation of target systems suitable for pulsed spallation neutron sources in the multi-megawatt range of beam power.

  7. Microscopic mechanisms of laser spallation and ablation of metal targets from large-scale molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chengping; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2014-01-01

    The microscopic mechanisms of femtosecond laser ablation of an Al target are investigated in large-scale massively parallel atomistic simulations performed with a computational model combining classical molecular dynamics technique with a continuum description of the laser excitation and subsequent relaxation of conduction band electrons. The relatively large lateral size of the computational systems used in the simulations enables a detailed analysis of the evolution of multiple voids generated in a sub-surface region of the irradiated target in the spallation regime, when the material ejection is driven by the relaxation of laser-induced stresses. The nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids take place within a broad (100 nm) region of the target, leading to the formation of a transient foamy structure of interconnected liquid regions and eventual separation (or spallation) of a thin liquid layer from the bulk of the target. The thickness of the spalled layer is decreasing from the maximum of 50 nm while the temperature and ejection velocity are increasing with increasing fluence. At a fluence of 2.5 times the spallation threshold, the top part of the target reaches the conditions for an explosive decomposition into vapor and small clusters/droplets, marking the transition to the phase explosion regime of laser ablation. This transition is signified by a change in the composition of the ablation plume from large liquid droplets to a mixture of vapor-phase atoms and clusters/droplets of different sizes. The clusters of different sizes are spatially segregated in the expanding ablation plume, where small/medium size clusters present in the middle of the plume are followed by slower (velocities of less than 3 km/s) large droplets consisting of more than 10,000 atoms. The similarity of some of the characteristics of laser ablation of Al targets (e.g., evolution of voids in the spallation regime and cluster size distributions in the phase explosion regime) to the

  8. Comments on the possibility of cavitation in liquid metal targets for pulsed spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter J.M.

    1996-06-01

    When short pulses of protons strike the volume of a liquid target, the rapid heating produces a pressurized region which relaxes as the pressure wave propagates outward. Skala and Bauer have modeled the effects of the pressure wave impinging on the container walls of a liquid mercury target under ESS conditions. They find that high pressures and high wall stresses result if the medium is uniform, nearly incompressible liquid. The pressure and the stresses are much reduced if the liquid contains bubbles of helium, due to their high compressibility. However, according to the calculation, the pressure still reaches an atmosphere or so at the surface, which reflects the compressive wave as a rarefaction wave of the same magnitude. Even such modest underpressures can lead to the growth of bubbles (cavitation) at or near the surface, which can collapse violently and erode the container surface. It is necessary to avoid this. Leighton provides a wide ranging discussion of pressure waves in bubbly media, which may provide insights into the nature and control of cavitation phenomena. The paper surveys some of the relevant information from that source.

  9. Post irradiation examination of the Spallation Neutron Source target vessels

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, David A; Ferguson, Phillip D; Mansur, Louis K

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is an accelerator-based pulsed neutron source that produces high-energy spallation neutrons by bombarding liquid mercury flowing through a stainless steel target vessel. During operation the proton beam and spallation neutrons produce radiation damage in the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel target vessel and water-cooled shroud. The beam pulses also cause rapid heating of the liquid mercury, which may produce cavitation erosion damage on the inner surface of the target vessel. The cavitation erosion rate is thought to be highly sensitive to beam power and predicted to be the primary life-limiting factor of target vessel. Though mitigation of cavitation erosion and radiation damage to the target vessel will be a critical for successful high-power operation of the SNS facility, the effects of radiation damage and cavitation erosion to target vessels in liquid metal spallation systems are not well known. Therefore preparations are being undertaken to perform post irradiation examination (PIE) of the liquid mercury target vessel and water-cooled shroud after end-of-life occurs. An overview of the planned PIE for the SNS target vessel is presented here, including proposed techniques for specimen acquisition and subsequent material properties characterization.

  10. Split-target neutronics and the MLNSC spallation target system

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; Ferguson, P.D.; Pitcher, E.J.; Court, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    The Manuel Lujan, Jr., Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is one of four operating Short-Pulse Spallation Sources worldwide. The MLNSC target system (composed of targets, moderators, and reflectors) was first installed in 1985. The target system employs a split tungsten spallation target with a void space in between (the flux-trap gap); this target system will be upgraded in 1998. The ability to efficiently split a spallation target allowed us to introduce the concept of flux-trap moderators and ultimately the notion of backscattering and upstream moderators. The upgraded MLNSC target system will employ both flux-trap and upstream/backscattering moderators to simultaneously service 16 neutron flight paths with high-intensity neutron beams for materials science research.

  11. Spallation target cryogenic cooling design challenges at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurns, J.; Ringnér, J.; Quack, H.; Arnold, P.; Weisend, J. G., II; Lyngh, D.

    2015-12-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) project is a neutron spallation source research facility currently being designed and built outside of Lund, Sweden. A linear accelerator delivers a 5 MW, 2.0 GeV, 62.5 mA proton beam to a spallation target to generate fast neutrons. Supercritical hydrogen circulates through two moderators surrounding the target, and transforms the fast neutrons emitted into slow neutrons, which are the final form of useful radiation. The supercritical hydrogen is in turn cooled from a helium cryogenic plant operating at 15-20 K. The supercritical cryogenic hydrogen circuit is a dynamic system, subject to significant changes in heat load. Proper pressure control of this system is critical to assure safe operation. The interaction between the hydrogen system and helium cryoplant poses unique challenges. This paper investigates the impact of the hydrogen system constraints on operation and control of the helium cryoplant, and suggests design options for the helium circuit.

  12. Monte Carlo modeling of spallation targets containing uranium and americium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshkin, Yury; Pshenichnov, Igor; Mishustin, Igor; Greiner, Walter

    2014-09-01

    Neutron production and transport in spallation targets made of uranium and americium are studied with a Geant4-based code MCADS (Monte Carlo model for Accelerator Driven Systems). A good agreement of MCADS results with experimental data on neutron- and proton-induced reactions on 241Am and 243Am nuclei allows to use this model for simulations with extended Am targets. It was demonstrated that MCADS model can be used for calculating the values of critical mass for 233,235U, 237Np, 239Pu and 241Am. Several geometry options and material compositions (U, U + Am, Am, Am2O3) are considered for spallation targets to be used in Accelerator Driven Systems. All considered options operate as deep subcritical targets having neutron multiplication factor of k∼0.5. It is found that more than 4 kg of Am can be burned in one spallation target during the first year of operation.

  13. Rationale for a spallation neutron source target system test facility at the 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, W.F.

    1995-12-01

    The conceptual design study for a 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center has shown the feasibility of including a spallation neutron test facility at a relatively low cost. This document presents a rationale for developing such a test bed. Currently, neutron scattering facilities operate at a maximum power of 0.2 MW. Proposed new designs call for power levels as high as 10 MW, and future transmutation activities may require as much as 200 MW. A test bed will allow assessment of target neutronics; thermal hydraulics; remote handling; mechanical structure; corrosion in aqueous, non-aqueous, liquid metal, and molten salt systems; thermal shock on systems and system components; and materials for target systems. Reliable data in these areas are crucial to the safe and reliable operation of new high-power facilities. These tests will provide data useful not only to spallation neutron sources proposed or under development, but also to other projects in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies such as the production of tritium.

  14. Post-irradiation examination of the Spallation Neutron Source target module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClintock, D. A.; Ferguson, P. D.; Mansur, L. K.

    2010-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is an accelerator-based pulsed neutron source that produces high-energy spallation neutrons by bombarding liquid mercury flowing through a stainless steel target vessel. During operation the proton beam and spallation neutrons produce radiation damage in the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel target vessel and water-cooled shroud. The beam pulses also cause rapid heating of the liquid mercury, which may produce cavitation erosion damage on the inner surface of the target vessel. The cavitation erosion rate is thought to be highly sensitive to beam power and predicted to be the primary life-limiting factor of the target module. Though cavitation erosion and radiation damage to the target vessel are expected to dictate its lifetime, the effects of radiation damage and cavitation erosion to target vessels in liquid metal spallation systems are not well known. Therefore preparations are being undertaken to perform post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the liquid mercury target vessel and water-cooled shroud after end-of-life occurs. An overview of the planned PIE for the SNS target vessel is presented here, including proposed techniques for specimen acquisition and subsequent material properties characterization.

  15. Target Operational Experience at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Janney, Jim G; Kaminskas, Saulius; McClintock, David A; Rosenblad, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has operated at unprecedented power levels for a short-pulse spallation source. Target operations have been successful but not without difficulties. Three targets out of the eight used to date have ended life unexpectedly causing interruptions to the neutron science users. The first of a kind mercury target design experiences beam-pulse induced cavitation damage that is suspected in one of the target leaks. The two other targets suffered early failures due to defective welds. Diagnosing the causes of target leaks and understanding of the progression of cavitation erosion and radiation damage effects has made use of post-irradiation examination (PIE) capabilities. As a result of PIE, review of quality assurance practices and related investigations, design changes are being implemented and manufacturing oversight improved. This paper describes SNS target operating experience, including the more important observations and lessons learned.

  16. Current status of JAERI spallation target material program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, K.; Sasa, T.; Ishikura, S.; Mukugi, K.; Kai, T.; Ouchi, N.; Ioka, I.

    2001-07-01

    In the joint project of spallation neutron source between JAERI and KEK, material technology has been developed for the mercury target in the neutron source facility, the lead-bismuth target in the transmutation test facility, superconducting accelerator, post-irradiation examination and the ion beam test. Design of target system is progressing for the mercury spallation target: a pressure test of moderator, an impacting test in mercury and a corrosion test have been carried out. For nuclear transmutation with ADS an engineering facility is proposed. A material corrosion test loop is built-up and SS316 and F82H steels are to be tested in a flowing Pb-Bi. Fracture toughness of superconducting cavity material was found to be considerably large at 4 K. Irradiated samples at SINQ are to be transported to JAERI Hot Laboratory. For simulating radiation damage small disk specimens were irradiated in single, dual and triple ion beam modes.

  17. Ductile-to-brittle transition in spallation of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X.; Ling, Z.; Dai, L. H.

    2014-10-14

    In this paper, the spallation behavior of a binary metallic glass Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. With increasing the impact velocity, micro-voids induced by tensile pulses become smaller and more concentrated. The phenomenon suggests a ductile-to-brittle transition during the spallation process. Further investigation indicates that the transition is controlled by the interaction between void nucleation and growth, which can be regarded as a competition between tension transformation zones (TTZs) and shear transformation zones (STZs) at atomic scale. As impact velocities become higher, the stress amplitude and temperature rise in the spall region increase and micro-structures of the material become more unstable. Therefore, TTZs are prone to activation in metallic glasses, leading to a brittle behavior during the spallation process.

  18. Spallation neutron source target station design, development, and commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, J. R.; McManamy, T. J.; Gabriel, T. A.; Battle, R. E.; Chipley, K. K.; Crabtree, J. A.; Jacobs, L. L.; Lousteau, D. C.; Rennich, M. J.; Riemer, B. W.

    2014-11-01

    The spallation neutron source target station is designed to safely, reliably, and efficiently convert a 1 GeV beam of protons to a high flux of about 1 meV neutrons that are available at 24 neutron scattering instrument beam lines. Research and development findings, design requirements, design description, initial checkout testing, and results from early operation with beam are discussed for each of the primary target subsystems, including the mercury target, neutron moderators and reflector, surrounding vessels and shielding, utilities, remote handling equipment, and instrumentation and controls. Future plans for the mercury target development program are also briefly discussed.

  19. Decommissioning and PIE of the MEGAPIE spallation target

    SciTech Connect

    Latge, C.; Henry, J.; Wohlmuther, M.; Dai, Y.; Gavillet, D.; Hammer, B.; Heinitz, S.; Neuhausen, J.; Schumann, D.; Thomsen, K.; Tuerler, A.; Wagner, W.; Gessi, A.; Guertin, A.; Konstantinovic, M.; Lindau, R.; Maloy, S.; Saito, S.

    2013-07-01

    A key experiment in the Accelerated Driven Systems roadmap, the MEGAwatt PIlot Experiment (MEGAPIE) (1 MW) was initiated in 1999 in order to design and build a liquid lead-bismuth spallation target, then to operate it into the Swiss spallation neutron facility SINQ at Paul Scherrer Institute. The target has been designed, manufactured, and tested during integral tests, before irradiation carried out end of 2006. During irradiation, neutron and thermo hydraulic measurements were performed allowing deep interpretation of the experiment and validation of the models used during design phase. The decommissioning, Post Irradiation Examinations and waste management phases were defined properly. The phases dedicated to cutting, sampling, cleaning, waste management, samples preparation and shipping to various laboratories were performed by PSI teams: all these phases constitute a huge work, which allows now to perform post-irradiation examination (PIE) of structural material, irradiated in relevant conditions. Preliminary results are presented in the paper, they concern chemical characterization. The following radio-nuclides have been identified by γ-spectrometry: {sup 60}Co, {sup 101}Rh, {sup 102}Rh, {sup 108m}Ag, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 172}Hf/Lu, {sup 173}Lu, {sup 194}Hg/Au, {sup 195}Au, {sup 207}Bi. For some of these nuclides the activities can be easily evaluated from γ-spectrometry results ({sup 207}Bi, {sup 194}Hg/Au), while other nuclides can only be determined after chemical separations ({sup 108m}Ag, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 195}Au, {sup 129}I, {sup 36}Cl and α-emitting {sup 208-210}Po). The concentration of {sup 129}I is lower than expected. The chemical analysis already performed on spallation and corrosion products in the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) are very relevant for further applications of LBE as a spallation media and more generally as a coolant.

  20. Target designs for the Brookhaven National Laboratory 5-MW pulsed spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Powell, J.R.

    1996-03-01

    A feasibility study of a compact high power density target for a spallation neutron source was under-taken. The target arrangement consists primarily of heavy metal, with appropriate cooling passages. A high intensity proton beam of intermediate energy is directed at the target, where it interacts with the heavy metal nuclei. The subsequent spallation reactions produce several neutrons per proton resulting in an intense neutron source. The proton beam is assumed to havean energy of 5 MW, and to be cyclic with a repetition rate of 10Hz and 50Hz. The study was divided into two broad sections. First, an analysis of preliminary target designs was undertaken to ensure the overall feasibility of the concepts involved in the design and eventual construction of such a high power density target. Second, two proposed target designs, based on the first set of analyses, are investigated in more detail. Special care is taken to ensure that the neutron fluxes in the moderator are at the desired level no material compatibility problems exist,and the target is able to operate in a reliable and safe manner. Several target materials, coolant types, and target arrangements are investigated in the first section. The second section concentrates on a single target material and geometric arrangement. However, several structural material choices continue to be investigated with the aim of minimizing the effects of structural heating, and associated thermally induced stresses. In the final section the conclusions of this preliminary study are summarized.

  1. Prototype Spallation Neutron Source Rotating Target Assembly Final Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, Thomas J; Graves, Van; Garmendia, Amaia Zarraoa; Sorda, Fernando; Etxeita, Borja; Rennich, Mark J

    2011-01-01

    A full-scale prototype of an extended vertical shaft, rotating target assembly based on a conceptual target design for a 1 to 3-MW spallation facility was built and tested. Key elements of the drive/coupling assembly implemented in the prototype include high integrity dynamic face seals, commercially available bearings, realistic manufacturing tolerances, effective monitoring and controls, and fail-safe shutdown features. A representative target disk suspended on a 3.5 meter prototypical shaft was coupled with the drive to complete the mechanical tests. Successful operation for 5400 hours confirmed the overall mechanical feasibility of the extended vertical shaft rotating target concept. The prototype system showed no indications of performance deterioration and the equipment did not require maintenance or relubrication.

  2. Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (ORSNS) target station design integration

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, T.; Booth, R.; Cleaves, J.; Gabriel, T.

    1996-06-01

    The conceptual design for a 1- to 3-MW short pulse spallation source with a liquid mercury target has been started recently. The design tools and methods being developed to define requirements, integrate the work, and provide early cost guidance will be presented with a summary of the current target station design status. The initial design point was selected with performance and cost estimate projections by a systems code. This code was developed recently using cost estimates from the Brookhaven Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source study and experience from the Advanced Neutron Source Project`s conceptual design. It will be updated and improved as the design develops. Performance was characterized by a simplified figure of merit based on a ratio of neutron production to costs. A work breakdown structure was developed, with simplified systems diagrams used to define interfaces and system responsibilities. A risk assessment method was used to identify potential problems, to identify required research and development (R&D), and to aid contingency development. Preliminary 3-D models of the target station are being used to develop remote maintenance concepts and to estimate costs.

  3. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics for the Spallation Neutron Source liquid mercury target

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, M.W.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1998-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high-power accelerator-based pulsed spallation source being designed by a multilaboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to achieve high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is being used to analyze the SNS design. The liquid-mercury target is subjected to the neutronic (internal) heat generation that results from the proton collisions with the mercury nuclei. The liquid mercury simultaneously serves as the neutronic target medium, transports away the heat generated within itself, and cools the metallic target structure. Recirculation and stagnation zones within the target are of particular concern because of the likelihood that they will result in local hot spots. These zones exist because the most feasible target designs include a complete U-turn flow redirection. Although the primary concern is that the target is adequately cooled, the pressure drop from inlet to outlet must also be considered because pressure drop directly affects structural loading and required pumping power. Based on the current design, a three-dimensional CFD model has been developed that includes the stainless steel target structure, the liquid-mercury target flow, and the liquid-mercury cooling jacket that wraps around the nose of the target.

  4. Neutronic performance of the MEGAPIE spallation target under high power proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel-Sendis, F.; Chabod, S.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S.; Zanini, L.

    2010-07-01

    The MEGAPIE project, aiming at the construction and operation of a megawatt liquid lead-bismuth spallation target, constitutes the first step in demonstrating the feasibility of liquid heavy metal target technologies as spallation neutron sources. In particular, MEGAPIE is meant to assess the coupling of a high power proton beam with a window-concept heavy liquid metal target. The experiment has been set at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland and, after a 4-month long irradiation, has provided unique data for a better understanding of the behavior of such a target under realistic irradiation conditions. A complex neutron detector has been developed to provide an on-line measurement of the neutron fluency inside the target and close to the proton beam. The detector is based on micrometric fission chambers and activation foils. These two complementary detection techniques have provided a characterization of the neutron flux inside the target for different positions along its axis. Measurements and simulation results presented in this paper aim to provide important recommendations for future accelerator driven systems (ADS) and neutron source developments.

  5. Modeling astatine production in liquid lead-bismuth spallation targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, J. C.; Boudard, A.; Cugnon, J.; Ghali, S.; Leray, S.; Mancusi, D.; Zanini, L.

    2013-03-01

    Astatine isotopes can be produced in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic targets through proton-induced double charge exchange reactions on bismuth or in secondary helium-induced interactions. Models implemented into the most common high-energy transport codes generally have difficulties to correctly estimate their production yields as was shown recently by the ISOLDE Collaboration, which measured release rates from a lead-bismuth target irradiated by 1.4 and 1 GeV protons. In this paper, we first study the capability of the new version of the Liège intranuclear cascade model, INCL4.6, coupled to the deexcitation code ABLA07 to predict the different elementary reactions involved in the production of such isotopes through a detailed comparison of the model with the available experimental data from the literature. Although a few remaining deficiencies are identified, very satisfactory results are found, thanks in particular to improvements brought recently on the treatment of low-energy helium-induced reactions. The implementation of the models into MCNPX allows identifying the respective contributions of the different possible reaction channels in the ISOLDE case. Finally, the full simulation of the ISOLDE experiment is performed, taking into account the likely rather long diffusion time from the target, and compared with the measured diffusion rates for the different astatine isotopes, at the two studied energies, 1.4 and 1 GeV. The shape of the isotopic distribution is perfectly reproduced as well as the absolute release rates, assuming in the calculation a diffusion time between 5 and 10hours. This work finally shows that our model, thanks to the attention paid to the emission of high-energy clusters and to low-energy cluster induced reactions, can be safely used within MCNPX to predict isotopes with a charge larger than that of the target by two units in spallation targets, and, probably, more generally to isotopes created in secondary reactions induced by composite

  6. Mesoscale polycrystal calculations of damage in spallation in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, Davis L; Bingert, John F; Livescu, Veronica; Luo, Shengnian; Bronkhorst, C A

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this project is to produce a damage model for spallation in metals informed by the polycrystalline grain structure at the mesoscale. Earlier damage models addressed the continuwn macroscale in which these effects were averaged out. In this work we focus on cross sections from recovered samples examined with EBSD (electron backscattered diffraction), which reveal crystal grain orientations and voids. We seek to understand the loading histories of specific sample regions by meshing up the crystal grain structure of these regions and simulating the stress, strain, and damage histories in our hydro code, FLAG. The stresses and strain histories are the fundamental drivers of damage and must be calculated. The calculated final damage structures are compared with those from the recovered samples to validate the simulations.

  7. Investigation of the optimal material type and dimension for spallation targets using simulation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feghhi, Seyed Amir Hossein; Gholamzadeh, Zohreh; Tenreiro, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Accelerator-driven systems are extensively developed to generate neutron sources for research, industrial, and medical plans. Different heavy elements are utilized as spallation targets to produce spallation neutrons. Computational methods are efficiently utilized to simulate neutronic behavior of a spallation target. MCNPX 2.6.0 is used as a powerful code based on Monte Carlo stochastic techniques for spallation process computation. This code has the ability to transport different particles using different physical models. In this paper, MCNPX has been utilized to calculate the leaked neutron yield from Pb, lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE), W, Ta, Hg, U, Th, Sn, and Cu cylindrical heavy targets. The effects of the target thickness and diameter on neutron yield value have been investigated via the thickness and diameter variations between 5 to 30 cm and 5 to 20 cm, respectively. Proton-induced radionuclide production into the targets as well as leaked neutron spectra from the targets has been calculated for the targets of an optimum determined dimension. The 1-GeV proton particle has been selected to induce spallation process inside the targets. The 2-mm spatial FWHM distribution has been considered for the 1-mA proton beam. Uranium target produced the highest leaked neutron yield with a 1.32 to 3.7 factor which overweighs the others. A dimension of 15 × 60 cm is suggested for all the cylindrical studied spallation targets. Th target experienced the highest alpha emitter radionuclide production while lighter elements such as Cu and Sn bore the lowest radiotoxicity. LBE liquid spallation target competes with the investigated solid targets in neutronic point of view while has surpass than volatile liquid Hg target.

  8. Investigation of the optimal material type and dimension for spallation targets using simulation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feghhi, S. A. H.; Gholamzadeh, Z.; Tenreiro, C.

    2014-03-01

    Accelerator-driven systems are extensively developed to generate neutron sources for research, industrial and medical plans. Different heavy elements are utilized as spallation targets to produce spallation neutrons. Computational methods are efficiently utilized to simulate neutronic behavior of a spallation target. MCNPX 2.6.0 is used as a powerful code based on Monte Carlo stochastic techniques for spallation process computation. This code has the ability to transport different particles using different physical models. In this paper, MCNPX has been utilized to calculate the leaked neutron yield from Pb, LBE, W, Ta, Hg, U, Th, Sn and Cu cylindrical heavy targets. Effects of the target thickness and diameter on neutron yield value have been investigated via the thickness and diameter variations between 5-30 and 5-20 cm, respectively. Proton-induced radionuclide production into the targets as well as leaked neutron spectra from the targets has been calculated for the targets of an optimum determined dimension. 1 GeV proton particle has been selected to induce spallation process inside the targets. 2 mm spatial FWHM distribution has been considered for the 1 mA proton beam. Uranium target produced the highest leaked neutron yield with a 1.32-3.7 factor overweigh the others. Dimension of 15 × 60 cm is suggested for all the cylindrical studied spallation targets. Th target experienced the highest alpha-emitter radionuclide production while lighter elements such as Cu and Sn bore the lowest radio-toxicity. LBE liquid spallation target competes with the investigated solid targets in neutronic point of view while has surpass than volatile liquid Hg target.

  9. Spallator - accelerator breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.

    1985-01-01

    The concept involves the use of spallation neutrons produced by interaction of a high energy proton (1 to 2 GeV) from a linear accelerator (LINAC) with a heavy metal target (uranium). The principal spallator concept is based on generating fissile fuel for use in LWR nuclear power plants. The spallator functions in conjunction with a reprocessing plant to regenerate and produce the Pu-239 or U-233 for fabrication into fresh LWR reactor fuel elements. Advances in proton accelerator technology has provided a solid base for predicting performance and optimizing the design of a reliable, continuous wave, high-current LINAC required by a fissile fuel production machine.

  10. Jet formation in spallation of metal film from substrate under action of femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inogamov, N. A.; Zhakhovskii, V. V.; Khokhlov, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that during ablation by an ultrashort laser pulse, the main contribution to ablation of the substance is determined not by evaporation, but by the thermomechanical spallation of the substance. For identical metals and pulse parameters, the type of spallation is determined by film thickness d f . An important gauge is metal heating depth d T at the two-temperature stage, at which electron temperature is higher than ion temperature. We compare cases with d f < d T (thin film) and d f ≫ d T (bulk target). Radius R L of the spot of heating by an optical laser is the next (after d f ) important geometrical parameter. The morphology of film bulging in cases where d f < d T on the substrate (blistering) changes upon a change in radius R L in the range from diffraction limit R L ˜ λ to high values of R L ≫ λ, where λ ˜ 1 μm is the wavelength of optical laser radiation. When d f < d T , R L ˜ λ, and F abs > F m, gold film deposited on the glass target acquires a cupola-shaped blister with a miniature frozen nanojet in the form of a tip on the circular top of the cupola ( F abs and F m are the absorbed energy and the melting threshold of the film per unit surface area of the film). A new physical mechanism leading to the formation of the nanojet is proposed.

  11. Parametric study of spallation targets for the MYRRHA reactor using MCNPX simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebello, A. L. P.; Martinez, A. S.; Gonçalves, A. C.

    2014-06-01

    The present work aims to evaluate the behavior of neutron multiplicity in a spallation target using MCNPX simulations, focusing on its application in the MYRRHA reactor. It was studied the two types of spallation target proposed for the MYRRHA project, windowless and windows target, in order to compare them and find saturation boundaries. Some saturation boundaries were found and the windowless target proved to be as viable as the windows one. Each one produced nearly the same number of neutrons per incident proton. Using the concept of neutron cost, it was also observed that the optimum conditions on neutron production occur at about 1GeV, for both target designs.

  12. Comparison between experiments and molecular dynamic simulations of spallation induced by ultra-short laser shock on micrometric Tantalum targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuq-Lelandais, Jean-Paul; Boustie, Michel; Soulard, Laurent; Berthe, Laurent; Sollier, Arnaud; Bontaz-Carion, Joelle; Combis, Patrick; de Resseguier, Thibaut; Lescoute, Emilien

    2009-06-01

    Shock wave propagation and the spallation within materials induced by laser shock have been investigated for roughly two decades. With the latest laser technologies evolution, one can access to shorter regimes in durations, going below the picosecond range. Shots performed with the LULI 100TW facility evidence the possibility to obtain spallation in a few microns thick metallic target. Such conditions provide an experimental data layout directly comparable with molecular dynamic simulations accessible to these scales. Molecular dynamic simulations on a single crystal of Tantalum have been performed with the CEA TERA 10 computer. First, the Hugoniot calculated by the equilibrium molecular dynamics has been compared with experimental data to check the potential (EAM) relevance to reproduce the shock wave propagation. Then, a large scale simulation on a micrometric target has been performed. We have observed the microscopic ductile damage process, the pore apparition and their time and space evolution. The results are compared with experimental results and classical one- dimensional hydrodynamic simulations.

  13. Target station design for a 1 MW pulsed spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; Baker, G.D.; Brewton, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    Target stations are vital components of the 1 MW, next generation spallation neutron source proposed for LANSCE. By and large, target stations design determines the overall performance of the facility. Many traditional concepts will probably have to be rethought, and many new concepts will have to be put forward to meet the 1 MW challenge. This article gives a brief overview of the proposed neutron spallation source from the target station viewpoint, as well as the general philosophy adopted for the design of the LANSCE-II target stations. Some of the saliant concepts and features envisioned for LANSCE-II are briefly described.

  14. Thermal-hydraulic simulation of mercury target concepts for a pulsed spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Siman-Tov, M.; Wendel, M.; Haines, J.

    1996-06-01

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (ORSNS) is a high-power, accelerator-based pulsed spallation neutron source being designed by a multi-laboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to achieve very high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. The ORSNS is projected to have a 1 MW proton beam upgradable to 5 MW. About 60% of the beam power (1-5 MW, 17-83 kJ/pulse in 0.5 microsec at 60 cps) is deposited in the liquid metal (mercury) target having the dimensions of 65x30x10 cm (about 19.5 liter). Peak steady state power density is about 150 and 785 MW/m{sup 3} for 1 MW and 5 MW beam respectively, whereas peak pulsed power density is as high as 5.2 and 26.1 GW/m{sup 3}, respectively. The peak pulse temperature rise rate is 14 million C/s (for 5 MW beam) whereas the total pulse temperature rise is only 7 C. In addition to thermal shock and materials compatibility, key feasibility issues for the target are related to its thermal-hydraulic performance. This includes proper flow distribution, flow reversals, possible {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes} and the challenge of mitigating the effects of thermal shock through possible injection of helium bubbles throughout the mercury volume or other concepts. The general computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFDS-FLOW3D was used to simulate the thermal and flow distribution in three preliminary concepts of the mercury target. Very initial CFD simulation of He bubbles injection demonstrates some potential for simulating behavior of He bubbles in flowing mercury. Much study and development will be required to be able to `predict`, even in a crude way, such a complex phenomena. Future direction in both design and R&D is outlined.

  15. Characteristics of long-pulse and short-pulse spallation-source targets

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Powell, J.

    1996-03-01

    Generation of sharp neutron pulses is the desired output of a pulsed spallation neutron source (PSNS). These pulses should be approximately 10 {mu}s. wide at half maximum, and preserve as much of the original flux as possible. A proposed PSNS has been designed to operate at an average proton beam power of 5 MW. The PSNS consists of a heavy metal target, surrounded by a reflector, and a selection of moderators. The moderators are connected to beam tubes in which the neutrons are transported to the experimental stations. Reflectors are generally made of good moderating material, in which neutrons leaking from the target are slowed down by elastic scattering, prior to moderation. It is proposed to investigate the possibility of using reflectors which slow neutrons down by inelastic scattering rather than elastic scattering. In a purely inelastic scattering medium neutron pulses leaking from the heavy metal target will tend to preserve their original shape in both energy and time. We will examine the effect of different reflectors and proton pulse lengths on the neutron pulses in the moderators. This study will be carried out using a simple target configuration. In this way effects introduced by complicated target arrangements can be avoided. All the analyses presented in this paper were carried out using the LAHET code system (LCS). This code system consists of two major modules: (1) LAHET, a modified version of the HETC intranuclear cascade code for evaluations above 20 MeV, and (2) HMCNP, a modified version of the well known MCNP transport code for calculations from 20 MeV down to thermal energies. Both modules employ a combinatorial surface/cell specification of the problem geometry which permits modeling of the target configurations with minimal approximations. In addition, HMCNP employs nuclear data from the ENDF/B files in essentially unapproximated point-wise form which avoid the complications associated with generation of group cross sections.

  16. Jet formation in spallation of metal film from substrate under action of femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Inogamov, N. A.; Zhakhovskii, V. V.; Khokhlov, V. A.

    2015-01-15

    It is well known that during ablation by an ultrashort laser pulse, the main contribution to ablation of the substance is determined not by evaporation, but by the thermomechanical spallation of the substance. For identical metals and pulse parameters, the type of spallation is determined by film thickness d{sub f}. An important gauge is metal heating depth d{sub T} at the two-temperature stage, at which electron temperature is higher than ion temperature. We compare cases with d{sub f} < d{sub T} (thin film) and d{sub f} ≫ d{sub T} (bulk target). Radius R{sub L} of the spot of heating by an optical laser is the next (after d{sub f}) important geometrical parameter. The morphology of film bulging in cases where d{sub f} < d{sub T} on the substrate (blistering) changes upon a change in radius R{sub L} in the range from diffraction limit R{sub L} ∼ λ to high values of R{sub L} ≫ λ, where λ ∼ 1 μm is the wavelength of optical laser radiation. When d{sub f} < d{sub T}, R{sub L} ∼ λ, and F{sub abs} > F{sub m}, gold film deposited on the glass target acquires a cupola-shaped blister with a miniature frozen nanojet in the form of a tip on the circular top of the cupola (F{sub abs} and F{sub m} are the absorbed energy and the melting threshold of the film per unit surface area of the film). A new physical mechanism leading to the formation of the nanojet is proposed.

  17. Target station shielding issues at the spallation neutron source.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, P D; Gallmeier, F X; Iverson, E B; Popova, I I

    2005-01-01

    Recent spallation neutron source shielding activities in support of the neutron beam shutters and the hot cell walls are presented. Existing neutron beam shutters can be replaced with concrete at low power or with concrete and steel at approximately 500 kW of beam power. Potential voids in the hot cell walls are analysed to determine the impact on dose rates as a function of void size. A change in the type of shielding work is noted as the project moved from the early design stages as a 'green field' site to the current stage as a construction project nearing completion, where issues to be addressed are approaching retrofit-type analyses. PMID:16381707

  18. A calorimetric measurement of the heat deposition in the vicinity of a spallation neutron target

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.E.; Moritz, L.; Spitzer, H.; Thorson, I.M.

    1986-07-01

    An experiment to measure the heat deposition in various materials in the vicinity of a spallation neuron target is described. This experiment has been performed at the Thermal Neutron Facility, TRIUMF. In the analysis of the data, the contributions to the heat deposition from (n,..gamma..) capture processes, fast neutron, and prompt gamma-ray scattering are separated.

  19. Comparison of Different INC Physical Models of MCNPX to Compute Spallation Neutronics of LBE Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feghhi, Seyed Amir Hossein; Gholamzadeh, Zohreh; Tenreiro, Claudio; Alipoor, Zahra

    2015-04-01

    Spallation particles can utilize in different fields such as neutron scattering studies, external source for burning spent fuel as well as running subcritical reactors. Different computational particle transport codes are widely used to model spallation process into the heavy targets. Among these codes, MCNPX 2.6.0 comprises various intra nuclear cascade models for spallation calculations. Impact of different intra nuclear cascade models on calculation of neutronic parameters of LBE target has been evaluated in this work. Escaped neutron yield, energy deposition and residual nuclei production in the spallation target has been calculated using the physical models. A comparison between the computational and experimental has been carried out to validate the computational data. The simulation data showed there is a good conformity between the obtained data from Bertini/Drenser and Isabel/Drenser. The data achieved by Bertini/Abla and Isabel/Abla models are close to each other for the studied parameters as well. Among the studied models, CEM showed more discrepancies with experimental and other computational data. According to the obtained data, INCL4/Drenser, INCL4/Abla and Isabel/Drenser models can meet more agreements with experimental data.

  20. Decay heat calculations for a 500 kW W-Ta spallation target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Quanzhi; Lu, Youlian; Hu, Zhiliang; Zhou, Bin; Yin, Wen; Liang, Tianjiao

    2015-05-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a short-pulsed neutron scattering facility. The beam power is designed to be 100 kW in Phase I, with the capability of upgrading to 500 kW. Tantalum (Ta)-cladded tungsten (W) was chosen as the spallation target due to its high neutron yield. Ta claddings can solve the problem of the corrosiveness of W plates, although they produce high decay heat after intense irradiation. This paper presents the decay heat distributions and evolutions for the future upgraded 500 kW W-Ta spallation target. The calculations are performed using the MCNPX2.5 Monte Carlo code and the CINDER'90 activation code. The decay heat distributions show that for the W plates, decay heat is mainly produced via the spallation reaction process, whereas for the Ta claddings, it is mainly produced via the neutron capture process. An effective method of reducing the decay heat in the W-Ta target is also presented and discussed.

  1. Development of a gas layer to mitigate cavitation damage in liquid mercury spallation targets

    SciTech Connect

    Felde, David K; Wendel, Mark W; Riemer, Bernie

    2008-01-01

    Establish of a gas layer between the flowing liquid and container wall is proposed for mitigating the effects of cavitation in mercury spallation targets. Previous work has shown an order of magnitude decrease in damage for a gas layer developed in a stagnant mercury target for an in-beam experiment. This work is aimed at extending these results to the more complex conditions introduced by a flowing mercury target system. A water-loop has been fabricated to provide initial insights on potential gas injection methods into a flowing liquid. An existing full-scale flow loop designed to simulate the Spallation Neutron Source target system will be used to extend these studies to mercury. A parallel analytical effort is being conducted using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling to provide direction to the experimental effort. Some preliminary simulations of gas injection through a single hole have been completed and show behavior of the models that is qualitatively meaningful.

  2. Behavior of structural and target materials irradiated in spallation neutron environments

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbins, J.F.; Wechsler, M.; Borden, M.; Sommer, W.F.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes considerations for selection of structural and target materials for accelerator-driven neutron sources. Due to the operating constraints of proposed accelerator-driven neutron sources, the criteria for selection are different than those commonly applied to fission and fusion systems. Established irradiation performance of various alloy systems is taken into account in the selection criteria. Nevertheless, only limited materials performance data are available which specifically related to neutron energy spectra anticipated for spallation sources.

  3. Neutronics performance and decay heat calculation of a solid target for a spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nio, D.; Ooi, M.; Takenaka, N.; Furusaka, M.; Kawai, M.; Mishima, K.; Kiyanagi, Y.

    2005-08-01

    A solid target is expected to give higher neutron intensity than a liquid target of mercury at a spallation neutron source with a power of around 1 MW. We have studied the neutronic performance of a target-moderator-reflector assembly with a tungsten solid target. It is found that the neutron intensities from moderators were higher in the solid target system than in the mercury liquid target. However, the tungsten target required cladding to prevent tungsten from the corrosion of cooling water. A tungsten target with tantalum cladding has been already developed although tantalum has high decay heat. Therefore, we estimated the decay heat of the target and found that the decay heat of 0.5 mm thick tantalum was still high. We need a thinner tantalum or new cladding materials. It was revealed that adoption of a thinner tantalum or new cladding material such as chrome nitride reduced the decay heat effectively.

  4. Comparison Between Experiments and Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Spallation Induced by Ultra-Short Laser Shock on Micrometric Tantalum Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuq-Lelandais, J.-P.; Boustie, M.; Soulard, L.; Berthe, L.; Sollier, A.; Bontaz-Carion, J.; Combis, P.; de Rességuier, T.; Lescoute, E.

    2009-12-01

    Shock wave propagation and the spallation within materials induced by laser shock have been investigated for roughly two decades. With the latest laser technologies evolution, one can access to shorter regimes in durations, going below the picosecond range. Shots performed with the LULI 100 TW facility evidence the possibility to obtain spallation in a few microns thick metallic target. Such conditions provide an experimental data layout which may be directly comparable with molecular dynamic simulations reachable to these scales. Molecular dynamic simulations on a single crystal of Tantalum have been performed with the CEA TERA 10 computer. First, the Hugoniot calculated by the equilibrium molecular dynamics has been compared with experimental data to check the potential (EAM) relevance to reproduce the shock wave propagation. Then, large scale simulations on a micrometric target have been performed. We have observed the microscopic ductile damage process, the pore apparition and their time and space evolution. The results are compared with experimental results and classical one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations.

  5. Target delamination by spallation and ejecta dragging: An example from the Ries crater's periphery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkmann, Thomas; Ivanov, Boris A.

    2006-11-01

    Subhorizontal shear planes (detachments) are observed in bedded limestones in the periphery of the Ries impact crater, Germany. These detachments occur at 0.8-1.8 crater radii distance from the crater center beneath deposits of the continuous ejecta blanket. Striations on detachment planes and offsets of markers indicate top-outward shearing with radial slip vectors. Detachments were found at depths between a few meters and more than 50 m beneath the target surface. The displacements along these faults range from meters to decameters and decrease with increasing depth and distance from the crater center. With increasing crater distance, detachment horizons tend to climb to shallower levels. Cross-cutting relationships to faults associated with the crater collapse indicate that detachment faulting started prior to the collapse but continued during crater modification. Numerical modeling of the cratering process shows that near-surface deformation outside the transient crater is induced by two separate mechanisms: (i) weak spallation by interference of shock and release waves near the target surface and (ii) subsequent dragging by the deposition of the ejecta curtain. Spallation causes an upward and outward directed motion of target material that increases in magnitude toward the target surface. It leads to decoupling of the uppermost target layers in the early cratering stage without totally disintegrating the rock. The subsequent arrival of the oblique impact shower of the ejecta curtain at the target surface delivers a horizontal momentum to the uppermost target area and results in a second horizontal displacement increment by dragging. With increasing depth this effect vanishes rapidly. Spallation decoupling and subsequent ejecta dragging of near-surface rocks is probably a general cratering mechanism around craters in layered targets with weak interbeds.

  6. Energy Dissipation in the Target Station of the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, L.A.; Difilippo, F.C.

    1999-09-27

    The heat distributions within the components of the target station of the Spallation Neutron Source were calculated using the Monte Carlo codes HETC, LAHET and MCNP to track the cascade of events after the introduction of 1 GeV protons in the mercury target. The boundaries of the model are the proton window and the external reflectors and includes such components as the stainless steel container, the water coolant, the thermal and cold neutron sources and the beam tubes. The calculations show that detailed heat distributions are sensitive to the proton beam profile and the curvature of the surface penetrated by the proton beam.

  7. Tensile property changes of metals irradiated to low doses with fission, fusion and spallation neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, H.L.; Hamilton, M.L.; Sommer, W.F.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1991-11-01

    Radiation effects due to low doses of spallation neutrons are compared directly to those produced by fission and fusion neutrons. Yield stress changes of pure Cu, alumina-dispersion-strengthened Cu and AISI 316 stainless steel irradiated at 36--55{degrees}C in the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) are compared with earlier results of irradiations at 90{degrees}C using 14 MeV D-T fusion neutrons at the Rotating Target Neutron Source and fission reactor neutrons in the Omega West Reactor. At doses up to 0.04 displacements per atom (dpa), the yield stress changes due to the three quite different neutron spectra correlate well on the basis of dpa in the stainless steel and the Cu alloy. However, in pure Cu, the measured yield stress changes due to spallation neutrons were anomalously small and should be verified by additional irradiations. With the exception of pure Cu, the low dose, low temperature experiments reveal no fundamental differences in radiation hardening by fission, fusion or spallation neutrons when compared on the basis of dpa.

  8. Detection of the multiple spallation parameters and the internal structure of a particle cloud during shock-wave loading of a metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Mikhailov, A. L.; Finyushin, S. A.; Kalashnikov, D. A.; Chudakov, E. A.; Butusov, E. I.; Gnutov, I. S.

    2016-04-01

    The results of experiments on studying spallation and the ejection of particles from the surfaces of copper and lead samples are presented. A laser interferometry method is used to detect the particle cloud velocity and the multiple spallation parameters. Angular detectors are used to detect the depth profile of the particle cloud velocity dispersion and the structure of metal spallation.

  9. Cavitation damage prediction for spallation target vessels by assessment of acoustic vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Ikeda, Dr. Yujiro; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W; Haines, John R; Bauer, Guenter; Naoe, Dr. Takashi; Okita, Dr. Kohei; Fujiwara, Dr. Akiko; Matsumoto, Dr. Yoichiro; Tanaka, Dr. Nobuatsu

    2008-01-01

    Liquid-mercury target systems for MW-class spallation neutron sources are being developed around the world. Proton beams are used to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. In order to estimate the cavitation erosion, i.e. the pitting damage formed by the collapse of cavitation bubbles, off-beam tests were performed by using an electric magnetic impact testing machine (MIMTM), which can impose equivalent pressure pulses in mercury. The damage potential was defined based on the relationship between the pitting damage and the time-integrated acoustic vibration induced by impact due to the bubble collapses. Additionally, the damage potential was measured in on-beam tests carried out by using the proton beam at WNR (Weapons Neutron Research) facility in Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). In this paper, the concept of the damage potential, the relationship between the pitting damage formation and the damage potential both in off-beam and on-beam tests is shown.

  10. Flowing lead spallation target design for use in an ADTT experimental facility located at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, C.A.; Bracht, R.R.; Buksa, J.J.

    1994-08-01

    A conceptual design has been initiated for a flowing lead spallation target for use in an ADTT experimental facility located at LAMPF. The lead is contained using Nb-1Zr as the structural material. This material was selected based on its favorable material properties as well as its compatibility with the flowing lead. Heat deposited in the lead and the Nb-1Zr container by the 800-MeV, 1-mA beam is removed by the flowing lead and transferred to helium via a conventional heat exchanger. The neutronic, thermal hydraulic, and stress characteristics of the system have been determined. In addition, a module to control the thaw and freeze of the lead has been developed and incorporated into the target system design. The entire primary target system (spallation target, thaw/freeze system, and intermediate heat exchanger) has been designed to be built as a contained module to allow easy insertion into an experimental ADTT blanket assembly and to provide multiple levels of containment for the lead. For the 800-MeV LAMPF beam, the target delivers a source of approximately 18 neutrons/proton. A total of 540 kW are deposited in the target. The lead temperature ranges from 400 to 500 C. The peak structural heating occurs at the beam interface, and the target is designed to maximize cooling at this point. An innovative thin-window structure has been incorporated that allows direct, convective cooling of the window by the inlet flowing lead. Safe, and reliable operation of the target has been maximized through simple, robust engineering

  11. Monitoring method for neutron flux for a spallation target in an accelerator driven sub-critical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang, He, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Cui, Wen-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Hu-Shan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study a monitoring method for neutron flux for the spallation target used in an accelerator driven sub-critical (ADS) system, where a spallation target located vertically at the centre of a sub-critical core is bombarded vertically by high-energy protons from an accelerator. First, by considering the characteristics in the spatial variation of neutron flux from the spallation target, we propose a multi-point measurement technique, i.e. the spallation neutron flux should be measured at multiple vertical locations. To explain why the flux should be measured at multiple locations, we have studied neutron production from a tungsten target bombarded by a 250 MeV-proton beam with Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation results indicate that the neutron flux at the central location is up to three orders of magnitude higher than the flux at lower locations. Secondly, we have developed an effective technique in order to measure the spallation neutron flux with a fission chamber (FC), by establishing the relation between the fission rate measured by FC and the spallation neutron flux. Since this relation is linear for a FC, a constant calibration factor is used to derive the neutron flux from the measured fission rate. This calibration factor can be extracted from the energy spectra of spallation neutrons. Finally, we have evaluated the proposed calibration method for a FC in the environment of an ADS system. The results indicate that the proposed method functions very well. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA03010000 and XDA03030000) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China(91426301).

  12. Gadolinium-148 and other spallation production cross section measurements for accelerator target facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Karen Corzine

    At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center accelerator complex, protons are accelerated to 800 MeV and directed to two tungsten targets, Target 4 at the Weapons Neutron Research facility and the 1L target at the Lujan Center. The Department of Energy requires hazard classification analyses to be performed on these targets and places limits on certain radionuclide inventories in the targets to avoid characterizing the facilities as "nuclear facilities." Gadolinium-148 is a radionuclide created from the spallation of tungsten. Allowed isotopic inventories are particularly low for this isotope because it is an alpha-particle emitter with a 75-year half-life. The activity level of Gadolinium-148 is low, but it encompasses almost two-thirds of the total dose burden for the two tungsten targets based on present yield estimates. From a hazard classification standpoint, this severely limits the lifetime of these tungsten targets. The cross section is not well-established experimentally and this is the motivation for measuring the Gadolinium-148 production cross section from tungsten. In a series of experiments at the Weapons Neutron Research facility, Gadolinium-148 production was measured for 600- and 800-MeV protons on tungsten, tantalum, and gold. These experiments used 3 mum thin tungsten, tantalum, and gold foils and 10 mum thin aluminum activation foils. In addition, spallation yields were determined for many short-lived and long-lived spallation products with these foils using gamma and alpha spectroscopy and compared with predictions of the Los Alamos National Laboratory codes CEM2k+GEM2 and MCNPX. The cumulative Gadolinium-148 production cross section measured from tantalum, tungsten, and gold for incident 600-MeV protons were 15.2 +/- 4.0, 8.31 +/- 0.92, and 0.591 +/- 0.155, respectively. The average production cross sections measured at 800 MeV were 28.6 +/- 3.5, 19.4 +/- 1.8, and 3.69 +/- 0.50 for tantalum, tungsten, and gold, respectively. These cumulative

  13. ACCELERATOR SYSTEMS MODIFICATIONS FOR A SECOND TARGET STATION AT THE OAK RIDGE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, John D; Kim, Sang-Ho; Plum, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    A second target station is planned for the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source. The ion source will be upgraded to increase the peak current from 38 to 49 mA, additional superconducting RF cavities will be added to the linac to increase the H beam energy from 938 to 1300 MeV, and the accumulator ring will receive modifications to the injection and extraction systems to accommodate the higher beam energy. After pulse compression in the storage ring one sixth of the beam pulses (10 out of 60 Hz) will be diverted to the second target by kicker and septum magnets added to the existing Ring to Target Beam Transport (RTBT) line. No further modifications will be made to the RTBT so that when the kicker and septum magnets are turned off the original beam transport lattice will be unaffected. In this paper we will discuss these and other planned modifications and upgrades to the accelerator facility.

  14. RESULTS FROM CAVITATION DAMAGE EXPERIMENTS WITH MERCURY SPALLATION TARGETS AT THE LANSCE WNR IN 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Abdou, Ashraf A; Felde, David K; Sangrey, Robert L; Wendel, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    Damage assessment from proton beam induced cavitation experiments on mercury spallation targets done at the LANSCE WNR facility has been completed. The experiments investigated two key questions for the Spallation Neutron Source target, namely, how damage is affected by flow velocity in the SNS coolant channel geometry, and how damage scales with proton beam intensity at a given constant charge per pulse. With regard to the former question, prior in-beam experiments indicated that the coolant channel geometry with stagnant mercury was especially vulnerable to damage which might warrant a design change. Yet other results indicated a reduction in damage with the introduction of flow. Using more prototypic to the SNS, the 2008 experiment damage results show the channel is less vulnerable than the bulk mercury side of the vessel wall. They also show no benefit from increasing channel flow velocity beyond nominal SNS speeds. The second question probed a consensus belief that damage scales with beam intensity (protons per unit area) by a power law dependence with exponent of around 4. Results from a 2005 experiment did not support this power law dependence but some observations were inconsistent and unexplained. These latest results show weaker damage dependence.

  15. Thermal hydraulic studies of spallation target for one-way coupled Indian accelerator driven systems with low energy proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantha, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Satyamurthy, P.

    2007-02-01

    BARC has recently proposed a one-way coupled ADS reactor. This reactor requires typically 1 GeV proton beam with 2 mA of current. Approximately 8 kW of heat is deposited in the window of the target. Circulating liquid metal target (lead/lead-bismuth{eutectic) has to extract this heat and this is a critical R&D problem to be solved. At present there are very few accelerators, which can give few mA and high-energy proton beam. However, accelerators with low energy and hundreds of micro-ampere current are commercially available. In view of this, it is proposed in this paper to simulate beam window heating of 8 kW in the target with low-energy proton beam. Detailed thermal analysis in the spallation and window region has been carried out to study the capability of heat extraction by circulating LBE for a typical target loop with a proton beam of 30 MeV energy and current of 0.267 mA. The heat deposition study is carried out using FLUKA code and flow analysis by CFD code. The detailed analysis of this work is presented in this paper.

  16. Mercury target R&D for the Oak Ridge spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, J.R.; DiStefano, J.; Farrell, K.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1996-06-01

    The conceptual design for the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (ORSNS) incorporates liquid mercury as its reference target material. A flowing liquid target was selected mainly because of the increased power handling capability possible with the convective transport process. The major reasons for choosing mercury as the liquid target material are because it: (1) is a liquid at room temperature, (2) has good heat transport properties, and (3) has a high atomic number and mass density resulting in high neutron yield and source brightness. Since liquid targets are not widely utilized in presently operating accelerator targets and because of the challenges posed by the intense, pulsed thermal energy deposition ({approximately}20-100 kJ deposited during each 1-10 {mu}s pulse), considerable R&D is planned for the mercury target concept. The key feasibility issue that will be addressed in early R&D efforts are the effects of the thermal shock environment, which will include development and testing of approaches to mitigate these effects. Materials compatiblity and ES&H issues associated with the use of liquid mercury are also of major importance in early R&D efforts. A brief description of the mercury target design concept, results of initial evaluations of its performance characteristics, identification of its critical issues, and an outline of the R&D program aimed at addressing these issues will be presented.

  17. A long-wavelength target station for the spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, J. M.; Mason, T. E.

    2005-06-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), a major new user facility for studies of the structure and dynamics of materials, funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Details about the project are available in a recent paper and on the SNS Web site [MRS Bull. 28 (12) (2003) 923]. A Long-Wavelength Target Station (LWTS) [Technical Concepts for a Long-Wavelength Target Station for the Spallation Neutron Source, Argonne National Laboratory Report ANL-02/16, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Report ORNL/SNS-TM-2001/163, November 2002. See also www.pns.anl.gov/related/] will complement the High-Power Target Station (HPTS) facility of the SNS and will build upon the significant investment in the remainder of the installation by providing important new scientific opportunities. For areas of science using the optimized long-wavelength beam lines, the LWTS will at least double the overall scientific capability of the SNS and provide for up to an order of magnitude performance gain over the initial HPTS. The fully equipped SNS has the prospect to offer capabilities for neutron-scattering studies of the structure and dynamics of materials with sensitivity, resolution, dynamic range, and speed that are unparalleled in the world. Preliminary assessments of the performance of the several instruments treated in detail in the body of the paper bear out this expectation. The LWTS concept has been developed in close consultation with the scientific community through a series of workshops and conferences jointly sponsored by DOE's Office of Basic Energy Science and the National Science Foundation. We describe the principal features of the LWTS concept, and provide a preliminary summary of some neutron scattering instruments suited to exploit the unique features of the LWTS. It remains to develop concepts and designs for a full suite of instruments that exploit the capabilities of LWTS, a process that has begun in collaboration

  18. Thick target spallation product yields from 800 MeV protons on tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.L.; Staples, P.; Butler, G.

    1994-07-01

    A number of newly-conceived accelerator based technologies will employ medium-energy particles stopping in thick targets to produce large numbers of neutrons. It is important to quantify the residual radionuclides in the target because one must understand what nuclei and decay gammas are produced in order to design adequate shielding, to estimate ultimate waste disposal problems, and to predict possible effects of accidental dispersion during operation. Because stopping-length targets are considered, radionuclide production must be known as a function of energy. Moreover, secondary particle production, mostly neutrons, implies a need to be able to calculate particle transport. To test the overall ability to calculate radionuclide yields, a thick-target measurement was carried out and the results compared to detailed calculations. Although numerous measurements of thin-target spallation yields have been made, there have been only a few measurements on thick systems. The most complete study showed results for Pb and U systems. In this contribution, the authors report on measurements made for a stopping-length W target. Special efforts were made to measure short-lived isotopes, and reliable data on isotopes with two or three minute half-lives were obtained.

  19. Design and Testing of a Prototype Spallation Neutron Source Rotating Target Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Rennich, Mark J; McManamy, Thomas J; Graves, Van; Garmendia, Amaia Zarraoa; Sorda, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical aspects of an extended vertical shaft rotating target have been evaluated in a full-scale mockup test. A prototype assembly based on a conceptual target design for a 1 to 3-MW spallation facility was built and tested. Key elements of the drive/coupling assembly implemented in the prototype include high integrity dynamic face seals, commercially available bearings, realistic manufacturing tolerances, effective monitoring and controls, and fail-safe shutdown features. A representative target disk suspended on a 3.5 meter prototypical shaft was coupled with the drive to complete the mechanical tests. After1800 hours of operation the test program has confirmed the overall mechanical feasibility of the extended vertical shaft rotating target concept. Precision alignment of the suspended target disk; successful containment of the water and verification of operational stability over the full speed range of 30 to 60 rpm were primary indications the proposed mechanical design is valid for use in a high power target station.

  20. Cavitation Damage Experiments for Mercury Spallation Targets At the LANSCE WNR in 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K

    2010-01-01

    Proton beam experiments investigating cavitation damage in short pulse mercury spallation targets were performed at LANSCE WNR in July of 2008. They included two main areas for investigation: damage dependence on mercury velocity using geometry more prototypic to the SNS target than previously employed and damage dependence on incident proton beam flux intensity. The flow dependence experiment employed six test targets with mercury velocity in the channel ranging from 0 to more than 4 m/s. Each was hit with 100 WNR beam pulses with peak proton flux equivalent to that of SNS operating at 2.7 MW. Damage dependence on incident proton beam flux intensity was also investigated with three intensity levels used on simple rectangular shaped targets without mercury flow. Intensity variation was imposed by focusing the beam differently while maintaining protons per pulse. This kept total energy deposited in each target constant. A fourth test target was hit with various beams: constant protons and varied spot size; constant spot size and varied protons. No damage will be assessed in this case. Instead, acoustic emissions associated with cavitation collapse were measured by laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) from readings of exterior vessel motions as well as by mercury wetted acoustic transducers. This paper will provide a description of the experiment and present available results. Damage assessment will require several months before surface analysis can be completed and was not available in time for IWSMT-9.

  1. Distribution and surface enrichment of radionuclides in lead-bismuth eutectic from spallation targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer-Rotzler, Bernadette; Neuhausen, Jörg; Boutellier, Viktor; Wohlmuther, Michael; Zanini, L.; David, J.-C.; Türler, Andreas; Schumann, Dorothea

    2016-07-01

    With the development of new high-power neutron spallation sources --both for scientific application and as neutron production tool for accelerator-driven systems-- the demand for experimentally obtained nuclear data on the residue nuclei production in the target is constantly increasing. In the present work, we examined two lead-bismuth-eutectic targets, irradiated with high-energy protons, concerning their radionuclide content and the spatial distribution of selected isotopes. The first one was the so-called ISOLDE target, being irradiated with 1-1.4GeV protons at CERN-ISOLDE, the second one was the MEGAPIE target, irradiated at PSI with 590MeV protons. In particular, we investigated the phenomenon of radionuclide enrichment on free surfaces in both targets. It turned out that considerable accumulation can be found especially in the case of lanthanides. The depletion process is enhanced at increased temperatures. The results are compared with theoretical predictions; some possible consequences of the findings are illustrated.

  2. R&D of A MW-class solid-target for a spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Furusaka, Michihiro; Kikuchi, Kenji; Kurishita, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Ryuzo; Li, Jing-Feng; Sugimoto, Katsuhisa; Yamamura, Tsutomu; Hiraoka, Yutaka; Abe, Katsunori; Hasegawa, Akira; Yoshiie, Masatoshi; Takenaka, Hiroyuki; Mishima, Katsuichiro; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki; Tanabe, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Naoaki; Igarashi, Tadashi

    2003-05-01

    R&D for a MW-class solid target composed of tungsten was undertaken to produce a pulsed intense neutron source for a future neutron scattering-facility. In order to solve the corrosion of tungsten, tungsten target blocks were clad with tantalum by means of HIP'ing, brazing and electrolytic coating in a molten salt bath. The applicability of the HIP'ing method was tested through fabricating target blocks for KENS (spallation neutron source at KEK). A further investigation to certify the optimum HIP conditions was made with the small punch test method. The results showed that the optimum temperature was 1500 °C at which the W/Ta interface gave the strongest fracture strength. In the case of the block with a hole for thermocouple, it was found that the fabrication preciseness of a straight hole and a tantalum sheath influenced the results. The development of a tungsten stainless-steel alloy was tried to produce a bare tungsten target, using techniques in powder metallurgy. Corrosion tests for various tungsten alloys were made while varying the water temperature and velocity. The mass loss of tungsten in very slow water at 180 °C was as low as 0.022 mg/y, but increased remarkably with water velocity. Simulation experiments for radiation damage to supplement the STIP-III experiments were made to investigate material hardening by hydrogen and helium, and microstructures irradiated by electrons. Both experiments showed consistent results on the order of the dislocation numbers and irradiation hardness among the different tungsten materials. Thermal-hydraulic designs were made for two types of solid target system of tungsten: slab and rod geometry as a function of the proton beam power. The neutronic performance of a solid target system was compared with that of mercury target based on Monte Carlo calculations by using the MCNP code.

  3. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the liquid mercury target for the national spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Siman-Tov, M.; Wendel, M.W.; Haines, J.R.; Rogers, M.

    1997-04-01

    The National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) is a high-energy, accelerator-based spallation neutron source being designed by a multi-laboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to achieve very high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. The NSNS is proposed to have a 1 MW beam of high-energy ({approximately}1 GeV) protons upgradable to 5 MW and operating at 60 Hz with a pulse duration of 0.5 {mu}s. Peak steady-state power density in the target is about 640 MW/m{sup 3} for 1 MW, whereas the pulse instantaneous peak power density is as high as 22,000 GW/m{sup 3}. The local peak temperature rise for a single pulse over it`s time-averaged value is only 6{degrees}C, but the rate of this temperature rise during the pulse is extremely fast ({approximately}12 million {degrees}C/s). In addition to the resulting thermal shock and materials compatibility concerns, key feasibility issues for the target are related to its thermal-hydraulic performance. These include proper flow distribution, flow reversals and stagnation zones, possible {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes}, cooling of the beam {open_quotes}window{close_quotes}, and the challenge of mitigating the effects of thermal shock through possible injection of helium bubbles. An analytic approach was used on the PC spreadsheet EXCEL to evaluate target design options and to determine the global T/H parameters in the current concept. The general computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFX was used to simulate the detailed time-averaged two-dimensional thermal and flow distributions in the liquid mercury. In this paper, an overview of the project and the results of this preliminary work are presented. Heat transfer characteristics of liquid mercury under wetting and non-wetting conditions are discussed, and future directions of the program in T/H analysis and R&D are outlined.

  4. Defect clusters formed from large collision cascades in fcc metals irradiated with spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Y.; Matsuda, Y.; Yoshiie, T.; Kawai, M.; Matsumura, H.; Iwase, H.; Abe, H.; Kim, S. W.; Matsunaga, T.

    2013-11-01

    Fcc pure metals were irradiated with spallation neutrons (energies up to 500 MeV) at room temperature to a neutron fluence of 1 × 1018 n m-2 at KENS, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). Defect clusters induced by large collision cascades were examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In Au, large groups of defects included more than 10 clusters, and the damage zone extended over 50 nm, which was larger than that induced by fusion neutron irradiation (<20 nm). Although small stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) are formed in subcascades by fission and fusion neutron irradiation, dislocation loops were also observed in the present experiments. Large dislocation loops (>10 nm) were identified as vacancy type by the conventional inside-outside contrast method. Because of the low neutron fluence, spatial overlapping of collision cascades was ignored. Large vacancy loops are formed through cooperative reactions among subcascades in a single collision cascade with large recoil energy.

  5. Simulation of impact/explosive driven spallation in metals: comparative study of damage and dynamic strength models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikkurthi, V. R.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2012-07-01

    Spallation refers to fracture occurring in materials due to tensile loading. This paper presents an overview of our extensive one- and two-dimensional simulations done to study spallation in impact/explosive loaded Copper or Mild Steel targets, using an Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian hydrocode. Three methods of computing the spall strength and spall thickness have been employed. The computed spall parameters have been compared with Russian spall experiments. In impact loaded targets, due to a square shock wave, only one scab has been observed. In the case of explosive loading, as the rarefaction associated with the incoming shock wave is triangular, there occur many high-tension regions leading to the formation of multiple scabs (typically 2-3 scabs). Effect of flier velocity and target temperature on spallation has been studied. These trends match with experiments. Edge effects due to finite diameter of the target attenuate the incoming shock wave by lateral release, resulting in more marked damage near the axis than on the periphery. Four damage models and three dynamic strength models have been examined to determine the best-suited model for spallation studies. It is found that the Void Growth (VG) damage model and Zerilli-Armstrong strength model yield spall parameters close to experiments.

  6. Fermilab Project X nuclear energy application: Accelerator, spallation target and transmutation technology demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Yousry; Johnson, David; Johnson, Todd; Mishra, Shekhar; /Fermilab

    2011-04-01

    The recent paper 'Accelerator and Target Technology for Accelerator Driven Transmutation and Energy Production' and report 'Accelerators for America's Future' have endorsed the idea that the next generation particle accelerators would enable technological breakthrough needed for nuclear energy applications, including transmutation of waste. In the Fall of 2009 Fermilab sponsored a workshop on Application of High Intensity Proton Accelerators to explore in detail the use of the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) accelerator technology for Nuclear Energy Applications. High intensity Continuous Wave (CW) beam from the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Linac (Project-X) at beam energy between 1-2 GeV will provide an unprecedented experimental and demonstration facility in the United States for much needed nuclear energy Research and Development. We propose to carry out an experimental program to demonstrate the reliability of the accelerator technology, Lead-Bismuth spallation target technology and a transmutation experiment of spent nuclear fuel. We also suggest that this facility could be used for other Nuclear Energy applications.

  7. Physics and technology of spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, G. S.

    2001-05-01

    A substantial body of research is necessary in order to be able to make reliable predictions on the performance and safety of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS), in particular of their spallation targets. So far, practical experience has resulted from the development of research neutron sources only. Next to fission and fusion, spallation is an efficient process for releasing neutrons from nuclei. Unlike the other two reactions, it is an endothermal process and can, therefore, not be used per se in energy generation. In order to sustain a spallation reaction, an energetic beam of particles, most commonly protons, must be supplied onto a heavy target. Spallation can, however, play an important role as a source of neutrons whose flux can be easily controlled via the driving beam. Although sophisticated Monte Carlo codes exist to compute all aspects of a spallation facility, many features can be understood on the basis of simple physics arguments. Technically a spallation facility is very demanding, not only because a reliable and economic accelerator of high power is needed to drive the reaction, but also, and in particular, because high levels of radiation and heat are generated in the target which are difficult to cope with. Radiation effects in a spallation environment are different from those commonly encountered in a reactor and are probably even more temperature dependent than the latter because of the high gas production rate. A commonly favored solution is the use of molten heavy metal targets. While radiation damage is not a problem in this case, except for the container, other issues need to be considered. R&D carried out for the development of spallation neutron sources will thus be beneficial also directly for ADS.

  8. Conceptual moderator studies for the Spallation Neutron Source short-pulse second target station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallmeier, F. X.; Lu, W.; Riemer, B. W.; Zhao, J. K.; Herwig, K. W.; Robertson, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Candidate moderator configurations for a short-pulse second target station (STS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have been identified using a global optimizer framework built around the MCNPX particle transport code. Neutron brightness metrics were selected as the figure-of-merit. We assumed that STS would use one out of six proton pulses produced by an SNS accelerator upgraded to operate at 1.3 GeV proton energy, 2.8 MW power and 60 Hz repetition rate. The simulations indicate that the peak brightness can be increased by a factor of 5 and 2.5 on a per proton pulse basis compared to the SNS first target station for both coupled and decoupled para-hydrogen moderators, respectively. Additional increases by factors of 3 and 2 were demonstrated for coupled and decoupled moderators, respectively, by reducing the area of neutron emission from 100 × 100 mm2 to 20 × 20 mm2. This increase in brightness has the potential to translate to an increase of beam intensity at the instruments' sample positions even though the total neutron emission of the smaller moderator is less than that of the larger. This is especially true for instruments with small samples (beam dimensions). The increased fluxes in the STS moderators come at accelerated poison and de-coupler burnout and higher radiation-induced material damage rates per unit power, which overall translate into lower moderator lifetimes. A first effort was undertaken to group decoupled moderators into a cluster collectively positioning them at the peak neutron production zone in the target and having a three-port neutron emission scheme that complements that of a cylindrical coupled moderator.

  9. Conceptual moderator studies for the Spallation Neutron Source short-pulse second target station.

    PubMed

    Gallmeier, F X; Lu, W; Riemer, B W; Zhao, J K; Herwig, K W; Robertson, J L

    2016-06-01

    Candidate moderator configurations for a short-pulse second target station (STS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have been identified using a global optimizer framework built around the MCNPX particle transport code. Neutron brightness metrics were selected as the figure-of-merit. We assumed that STS would use one out of six proton pulses produced by an SNS accelerator upgraded to operate at 1.3 GeV proton energy, 2.8 MW power and 60 Hz repetition rate. The simulations indicate that the peak brightness can be increased by a factor of 5 and 2.5 on a per proton pulse basis compared to the SNS first target station for both coupled and decoupled para-hydrogen moderators, respectively. Additional increases by factors of 3 and 2 were demonstrated for coupled and decoupled moderators, respectively, by reducing the area of neutron emission from 100 × 100 mm(2) to 20 × 20 mm(2). This increase in brightness has the potential to translate to an increase of beam intensity at the instruments' sample positions even though the total neutron emission of the smaller moderator is less than that of the larger. This is especially true for instruments with small samples (beam dimensions). The increased fluxes in the STS moderators come at accelerated poison and de-coupler burnout and higher radiation-induced material damage rates per unit power, which overall translate into lower moderator lifetimes. A first effort was undertaken to group decoupled moderators into a cluster collectively positioning them at the peak neutron production zone in the target and having a three-port neutron emission scheme that complements that of a cylindrical coupled moderator. PMID:27370444

  10. Impact cratering experiments into quartzite, sandstone and tuff: The effects of projectile size and target properties on spallation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelchau, Michael H.; Kenkmann, Thomas; Hoerth, Tobias; Schäfer, Frank; Rudolf, Michael; Thoma, Klaus

    2014-11-01

    Impact cratering experiments were performed on quartzite, tuff, and dry and water-saturated sandstones in the framework of the MEMIN research unit. 2.5-12 mm diameter projectiles were accelerated to ∼5 km/s. Evaluation of the resulting craters shows that crater volumes and crater efficiencies of large-scale experiments are greater than predicted by strength scaling laws. A method to approximate the transient crater volume shows that this effect is largely due to an increase in spallation. Strength scaling laws are used to determine the reduction of tensile strength in large-scale experiments and show a decrease by a factor of 1.8-3.6. This strength reduction can be correlated with a decrease in strain rate for larger projectiles, and with the Weibull theory of strength reduction for larger rock sample sizes. Further variations in spallation are observed between different target materials; a decrease in spall is suggested to be controlled by increased porosity.

  11. Evaluation of the 3-GeV proton beam profile at the spallation target of the JSNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meigo, Shin-ichiro; Noda, Fumiaki; Ishikura, Syuichi; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Ikeda, Yujiro

    2006-06-01

    At JSNS, 3-GeV protons beam is delivered from rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) to the spallation neutron target. In order to reduce the damage of pitting on the target container, the peak current density should be kept as small as possible. In this study, the beam profile at spallation neutron target is evaluated. The phase-space distribution, including the space-charge effect, is calculated with SIMPSONS code. The beam profile on the target is obtained with the transfer matrix from exit of RCS to the target. As for injection to RCS, two methods of correlated and anti-correlated painting are considered. By using anti-correlated painting for injection of beam at RCS, it is found the shape of beam becomes flatter than the distribution by using correlated painting. As other aspect for the study of target, in order to carry out target performance test especially for the study of pitting issue, it is better to have the beam profile variety from the beginning of facility. The adjustable range for the beam profile at the beginning is also studied. Although the beam shape is narrow and the duty is very low, the strong enough peak density is achievable equivalent as 1 MW.

  12. Effects of interfacial bonding on spallation in metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hixson, R.S.; Johnson, J.N.; Gray, G.T. III; Price, J.D.

    1995-09-01

    Two metal-matrix composite systems are studied to determine the influence of inclusions on the spallation strength in plate-impact experiments. The first is an aluminum/ceramic system with several volume fractions of ceramic inclusion, and the second is a copper/niobium composite consisting of 15 vol % niobium particles embedded in the copper matrix. Plate-impact experiments produce peak compressive stresses of {approximately}5 GPa in the aluminum/ceramic system and {approximately}10 GPa in the copper/niobium system. The characteristic code CHARADE is used to calculate detailed compression-release profiles in the composite systems, thus accurately quantifying the wave-evolution occurring between the spall plane and the particle velocity (VISAR) measurement at the rear free surface. The aluminum/ceramic system exhibits a strong dependence of the spall strength on inclusion concentration and morphology. In the case of the copper/niobium system, the spall strength remains essentially unchanged by the presence of 15 vol % niobium particles embedded in the copper matrix.

  13. High-energy in-beam neutron measurements of metal-based shielding for accelerator-driven spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cooper-Jensen, C. P.; Björgvinsdóttir, H.; Kokai, Z.; Bentley, P. M.

    2016-05-01

    Metal-based shielding plays an important role in the attenuation of harmful and unwanted radiation at an accelerator-driven spallation neutron source. At the European Spallation Source, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, metal-based materials are planned to be used extensively as neutron guide substrates in addition to other shielding structures around neutron guides. The usage of metal-based materials in the vicinity of neutron guides however requires careful consideration in order to minimize potential background effects in a neutron instrument at the facility. Therefore, we have carried out a combined study involving high-energy neutron measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of metal-based shielding, both to validate the simulation methodology and also to investigate the benefits and drawbacks of different metal-based solutions. The measurements were carried out at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala, Sweden, using a 174.1 MeV neutron beam and various thicknesses of aluminum-, iron-, and copper-based shielding blocks. The results were compared to geant4 simulations and revealed excellent agreement. Our combined study highlights the particular situations where one type of metal-based solution may be preferred over another.

  14. Modeling of water radiolysis at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Daemen, L.L.; Kanner, G.S.; Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.; Brun, T.O.; Sommer, W.F.

    1998-12-01

    In spallation neutron sources neutrons are produced when a beam of high-energy particles (e.g., 1 GeV protons) collides with a (water-cooled) heavy metal target such as tungsten. The resulting spallation reactions produce a complex radiation environment (which differs from typical conditions at fission and fusion reactors) leading to the radiolysis of water molecules. Most water radiolysis products are short-lived but extremely reactive. When formed in the vicinity of the target surface they can react with metal atoms, thereby contributing to target corrosion. The authors will describe the results of calculations and experiments performed at Los Alamos to determine the impact on target corrosion of water radiolysis in the spallation radiation environment. The computational methodology relies on the use of the Los Alamos radiation transport code, LAHET, to determine the radiation environment, and the AEA code, FACSIMILE, to model reaction-diffusion processes.

  15. Status of R&D on mitigating the effects of pressure waves for the Spallation Neutron Source mercury target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemer, Bernard W.; Wendel, Mark W.; Felde, David K.; Abdou, Ashraf A.; McClintock, David A.

    2012-12-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been conducting R&D on mitigating the effects of pressure waves in mercury spallation targets since 2001. More precisely, cavitation damage of the target vessel caused by the short beam pulse threatens to limit its lifetime more severely than radiation damage as well as limit its ultimate power capacity - and hence its neutron intensity performance. The R&D program has moved from verification of the beam-induced damage phenomena to study of material and surface treatments for damage resistance to the current emphasis on gas injection techniques for damage mitigation. Two techniques are being worked on: injection of small dispersed gas bubbles that mitigate the pressure waves volumetrically; and protective gas walls that isolate the vessel from the damaging effects of collapsing cavitation bubbles. The latter has demonstrated good damage mitigation during in-beam testing with limited pulses, and adequate gas wall coverage at the beam entrance window has been demonstrated with the SNS mercury target flow configuration using a full scale mercury test loop. A question on the required area coverage remains which depends on results from SNS target post irradiation examination. The small gas bubble technique has been less effective during past in-beam tests but those results were with un-optimized and un-verified bubble populations. Another round of in-beam tests with small gas bubbles is planned for 2011. The first SNS target was removed from service in mid 2009 and samples were cut from two locations at the target's beam entrance window. Through-wall damage was observed at the innermost mercury vessel wall (not a containment wall). The damage pattern suggested correlation with the local mercury flow condition which is nearly stagnant at the peak damage location. Detailed post irradiation examination of the samples is under way that will assess the erosion and measure irradiation-induced changes

  16. Status of R&D on Mitigating the Effects of Pressure Waves for the Spallation Neutron Source Mercury Target

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Abdou, Ashraf A; McClintock, David A

    2012-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been conducting R&D on mitigating the effects of pressure waves in mercury spallation targets since 2001. More precisely, cavitation damage of the target vessel caused by the short beam pulse threatens to limit its lifetime more severely than radiation damage as well as limit its ultimate power capacity and hence its neutron intensity performance. The R&D program has moved from verification of the beam-induced damage phenomena to study of material and surface treatments for damage resistance to the current emphasis on gas injection techniques for damage mitigation. Two techniques are being worked on: injection of small dispersed gas bubbles that mitigate the pressure waves volumetrically; and protective gas walls that isolate the vessel from the damaging effects of collapsing cavitation bubbles. The latter has demonstrated good damage mitigation during in-beam testing with limited pulses, and adequate gas wall coverage at the beam entrance window has been demonstrated with the SNS mercury target flow configuration using a full scale mercury test loop. A question on the required area coverage remains which depends on results from SNS target post irradiation examination. The small gas bubble technique has been less effective during past in-beam tests but those results were with un-optimized and un-verified bubble populations. Another round of in-beam tests with small gas bubbles is planned for 2011. The first SNS target was removed from service in mid 2009 and samples were cut from two locations at the target s beam entrance window. Through-wall damage was observed at the innermost mercury vessel wall (not a containment wall). The damage pattern suggested correlation with the local mercury flow condition which is nearly stagnant at the peak damage location. Detailed post irradiation examination of the samples is under way that will assess the erosion and measure irradiation-induced changes

  17. Instrument performance study on the short and long pulse options of the second Spallation Neutron Source target station

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. K.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Robertson, J. L.; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Riemer, Bernard W.

    2013-10-15

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is designed with an upgrade option for a future low repetition rate, long wavelength second target station. This second target station is intended to complement the scientific capabilities of the 1.4 MW, 60 Hz high power first target station. Two upgrade possibilities have been considered, the short and the long pulse options. In the short pulse mode, proton extraction occurs after the pulse compression in the accumulator ring. The proton pulse structure is thus the same as that for the first target station with a pulse width of ∼0.7 μs. In the long pulse mode, protons are extracted as they are produced by the linac, with no compression in the accumulator ring. The time width of the uncompressed proton pulse is ∼1 ms. This difference in proton pulse structure means that neutron pulses will also be different. Neutron scattering instruments thus have to be designed and optimized very differently for these two source options which will directly impact the overall scientific capabilities of the SNS facility. In order to assess the merits of the short and long pulse target stations, we investigated a representative suit of neutron scattering instruments and evaluated their performance under each option. Our results indicate that the short pulse option will offer significantly better performance for the instruments and is the preferred choice for the SNS facility.

  18. Topical report on a preconceptual design for the Spallation-Induced Lithium Conversion (SILC) target for the accelerator production of tritium (APT)

    SciTech Connect

    Van Tuyle, G.J.; Cokinos, D.M.; Czajkowski, C.; Franz, E.M.; Kroeger, P.; Todosow, M.; Youngblood, R.; Zucker, M.

    1993-09-30

    The preconceptual design of the APT Li-Al target system, also referred to as the Spallation-Induced Lithium Conversion (SILC), target system, is summarized in this report. The system has been designed to produce a ``3/8 Goal`` quantity of tritium using the 200-mA, 1.0 GeV proton beam emerging from the LANL-designed LINAC. The SILC target system consists of a beam expander, a heavy-water-cooled lead spallation neutron source assembly surrounded by light-water-cooled Li-Al blankets, a target window, heat removal systems, and related safety systems. The preconceptual design of each of these major components is described. Descriptions are also provided for the target fabrication, tritium extraction, and waste-steam processes. Performance characteristics are presented and discussed.

  19. Neutron-induced transmutation reactions in 237Np, 238Pu, and 239Pu at the massive natural uranium spallation target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavorka, L.; Adam, J.; Baldin, A. A.; Caloun, P.; Chilap, V. V.; Furman, W. I.; Kadykov, M. G.; Khushvaktov, J.; Pronskikh, V. S.; Solnyshkin, A. A.; Sotnikov, V.; Stegailov, V. I.; Suchopar, M.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V. M.; Tyutyunnikov, S. I.; Voronko, V.; Vrzalova, J.

    2015-04-01

    Transmutation reactions in the 237Np, 238Pu, and 239Pu samples were investigated in the neutron field generated inside a massive (m = 512 kg) natural uranium spallation target. The uranium target assembly QUINTA was irradiated with the deuteron beams of kinetic energy 2, 4, and 8 GeV provided by the Nuclotron accelerator at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna. The neutron-induced transmutation of the actinide samples was measured off-line by implementing methods of gamma-ray spectrometry with HPGe detectors. Results of measurement are expressed in the form of both the individual reaction rates and average fission transmutation rates. For the purpose of validation of radiation transport programs, the experimental results were compared with simulations of neutron production and distribution performed by the MCNPX 2.7 and MARS15 codes employing the INCL4-ABLA physics models and LAQGSM event generator, respectively. In general, a good agreement between the experimental and calculated reaction rates was found in the whole interval of provided beam energies.

  20. Heat Deposit Calculation in Spallation Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmanov, F. I.; Travleev, A. A.; Latysheva, L. N.; Vecchi, M.

    2001-11-01

    The present study concerns the calculation of the heat deposition in one of the EAP-80 basic units - the spallation module including the beam window, lead-bismuth spallation target and primary liquid metal cooling system. It is assumed that the model of sub-critical reactor under investigation is based on ANSALDO-INFN-ENEA-CRS4 reference configuration1. The calculation have been done by means of a couple computer codes: INCC 2 and GEANT3.21 3. These codes have been preliminary tested on the experimental data obtained in 4 for the case of interaction of proton beam and lead-bismuth targets at the energy Ep= 800MeV which is close to energy range relevant for ADS configuration.

  1. Correlation between simulations and cavitation-induced erosion damage in Spallation Neutron Source target modules after operation

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; McClintock, David A; Kaminskas, Saulius; Abdou, Ashraf A

    2014-01-01

    An explicit finite element (FE) technique developed for estimating dynamic strain in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) mercury target module vessel is now providing insight into cavitation damage patterns observed in used targets. The technique uses an empirically developed material model for the mercury that describes liquid-like volumetric stiffness combined with a tensile pressure cut-off limit that approximates cavitation. The longest period each point in the mercury is at the tensile cut-off threshold is denoted its saturation time. Now, the pattern of saturation time can be obtained from these simulations and is being positively correlated with observed damage patterns and is interpreted as a qualitative measure of damage potential. Saturation time has been advocated by collaborators at J-Parc as a factor in predicting bubble nuclei growth and collapse intensity. The larger the ratio of maximum bubble size to nucleus, the greater the bubble collapse intensity to be expected; longer saturation times result in greater ratios. With the recent development of a user subroutine for the FE solver saturation time is now provided over the entire mercury domain. Its pattern agrees with spots of damage seen above and below the beam axis on the SNS inner vessel beam window and elsewhere. The other simulation result being compared to observed damage patterns is mercury velocity at the wall. Related R&D has provided evidence for the damage mitigation that higher wall velocity provides. In comparison to observations in SNS targets, inverse correlation of high velocity to damage is seen. In effect, it is the combination of the patterns of saturation time and low velocity that seems to match actual damage patterns.

  2. Modeling spallation reactions in tungsten and uranium targets with the Geant4 toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshkin, Yury; Pshenichnov, Igor; Mishustin, Igor; Greiner, Walter

    2012-02-01

    We study primary and secondary reactions induced by 600 MeV proton beams in monolithic cylindrical targets made of natural tungsten and uranium by using Monte Carlo simulations with the Geant4 toolkit [1-3]. Bertini intranuclear cascade model, Binary cascade model and IntraNuclear Cascade Liège (INCL) with ABLA model [4] were used as calculational options to describe nuclear reactions. Fission cross sections, neutron multiplicity and mass distributions of fragments for 238U fission induced by 25.6 and 62.9 MeV protons are calculated and compared to recent experimental data [5]. Time distributions of neutron leakage from the targets and heat depositions are calculated. This project is supported by Siemens Corporate Technology.

  3. Summary of Mercury Compatibility Issues for the Spallation Neutron Source Target Containment and Ancillary Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, SJ

    2003-04-08

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the primary results of the Hg compatibility research in support of the SNS target. In the absence of possible synergisms resulting from beam/irradiation effects, wetting of 316L/316LN stainless steel under SNS conditions by the Hg target is expected to be very limited. As a result, significant interactions such as dissolution, mass transfer, and embrittlement affecting general compatibility are not anticipated. A wide range of experiments on 316L/316LN stainless steel, including thermal convection and pumped loops, confirmed low corrosion/penetration rates in Hg up to 305 C and little or no wetting or mass transfer below about 250 C. A variety of standard mechanical tests comparing behavior of 316L in air and Hg revealed limited wetting and no degradation of mechanical properties such as reduced elongation or development of brittle fracture features. Preliminary fatigue tests indicated a negative effect (reduced cycles to failure and intergranular cracking) at very high loads for 316LN, but little or no effect at more modest loading. Annealed 316LN was found to be somewhat susceptible to cavitation-erosion damage, but significant improvement was realized with a kolsterizing surface treatment or coldworking the material. Within the scope of these test conditions, no compatibility-limited operations were identified for type 316L/316LN stainless steel (and variations thereof) as the Hg target containment material. More limited compatibility data on other materials are also reported.

  4. Compatibility of materials with liquid metal targets for SNS

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; Pawel, S.J.; DeVan, J.H.

    1996-06-01

    Several heavy liquid metals are candidates as the target in a spallation neutron source: Hg, Pb, Bi, and Pb-Bi eutectic. Systems with these liquid metals have been used in the past and a data-base on compatibility already exists. Two major compatibility issues have been identified when selecting a container material for these liquid metals: temperature gradient mass transfer and liquid metal embrittlement or LME. Temperature gradient mass transfer refers to dissolution of material from the high temperature portions of a system and its deposition in the lower temperature areas. Solution and deposition rate constants along with temperature, {Delta}T, and velocity are usually the most important parameters. For most candidate materials mass transfer corrosion has been found to be proportionately worse in Bi compared with Hg and Pb. For temperatures to {approx}550{degrees}C, ferritic/martensitic steels have been satisfactory in Pb or Hg systems and the maximum temperature can be extended to {approx}650{degrees}C with additions of inhibitors to the liquid metal, e.g. Mg, Ti, Zr. Above {approx}600{degrees}C, austenitic stainless steels have been reported to be unsatisfactory, largely because of the mass transfer of nickel. Blockage of flow from deposition of material is usually the life-limiting effect of this type of corrosion. However, mass transfer corrosion at lower temperatures has not been studied. At low temperatures (usually < 150{degrees}C), LME has been reported for some liquid metal/container alloy combinations. Liquid metal embrittlement, like hydrogen embrittlement, results in brittle fracture of a normally ductile material.

  5. Material issues relating to high power spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futakawa, M.

    2015-02-01

    Innovative researches using neutrons are being performed at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), in which a mercury target system is installed for MW-class pulse spallation neutron sources. In order to produce neutrons by the spallation reaction, proton beams are injected into the mercury target. At the moment, when the intense proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel, leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall, i.e. on the interface between liquid and solid metals. On the other hand, the structural materials are subjected to irradiation damage due to protons and neutrons, very high cycle fatigue damages and so-called "liquid metal embrittlement". That is, the structural materials must be said to be exposed to the extremely severe environments. In the paper, research and development relating to the material issues in the high power spallation neutron sources that has been performed so far at J-PARC is summarized.

  6. Spallator: a new option for nuclear power

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.; Grand, P.; Takahashi, H.; Powell, J.R.; Kouts, H.J.

    1983-06-01

    The principles of the spallator reactor are reviewed. Advances in linear accelerator technology allow the design and construction of high current (hundreds of mA) continuous wave high energy (thousands of MeV) proton machines in the near term. Spallation neutronic calculations building on existing experimental results, indicate substantial neutron yields on uranium targets. Spallator target assembly designs based on water cooled reactor technology indicate operable efficient systems. Fuel cycles are presented which supply fissile material to thermal power reactors and reduce fission product waste. Preliminary comparative analysis indicates an economically competitive system in which a single purpose self-sufficient spallator supplies fuel to a number of LWRs. The spallator assures a long-term LWR power reactor economy. International interest in advancing the technology is indicated.

  7. European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshraqi, Mohammad; McGinnis, David; Lindroos, Mats

    The following sections are included: * Neutron usage and historical background * Spallation * History of spallation sources * The ESS facility * The ESS linac * Beam physics * The front-end and the normal conducting linac * Superconducting linac * RF sources * Summary * References

  8. The European scene regarding spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.S.

    1996-06-01

    In Europe, a short pulse spallation neutron source, ISIS, has been operating for over 10 years, working its way up to a beam power level of 200 kW. A continuous source, SINQ, designed for a beam power of up to 1 MW, is scheduled to start operating at the end of 1996, and a detailed feasibility study has been completed for a 410 kW short pulse source, AUSTRON. Each of these sources seems to have settled for a target concept which is at or near the limits of its feasibility: The ISIS depleted uranium plate targets, heavy water cooled and Zircaloy clad, have so far not shown satisfactory service time and operation is likely to continue with a Ta-plate target, which, in the past has been used successfully for the equivalent of one full-beam-year before it was taken out of service due to degrading thermal properties. SINQ will initially use a rod target, made of Zircaloy only, but plans exist to move on to clad lead rods as quickly as possible. Apart from the not yet explored effect of hydrogen and helium production, there are also concerns about the generation of 7-Be in the cooling water from the spallation of oxygen, which might result in undesirably high radioactivity in the cooling plant room. A Liquid metal target, also under investigation for SINQ, would not only reduce this problem to a level of about 10 %, but would also minimize the risk of radiolytic corrosion in the beam interaction zone. Base on similar arguments, AUSTRON has been designed for edge cooled targets, but thermal and stress analyses show, that this concept is not feasible at higher power levels.

  9. Measuring the cross sections of heavy-metal spallation induced by deuterons with energies of 2, 2.94, and 3.5 GeV per nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyushenko, M. Yu.; Baldin, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Bukhal, O. V.; Voronko, V. A.; Gusak, K. V.; Zhuk, I. V.; Kudashkin, I. V.; Paraipan, M.; Potapenko, A. S.; Safronova, A. A.; Sotnikov, V. V.; Tyutyunnikov, S. I.

    2016-07-01

    The cross sections for the spallation of the heavy-metal nuclei 181Ta, 197Au, 207Pb, 209Bi, 232Th, and 238U induced by relativistic deuterons with energies of 2, 2.94, and 3.5 GeV per nucleon are measured using the deuteron beam from the Nuclotron accelerator of the JINR Laboratory of High Energy Physics in Dubna, Russia. The cross-section measurements employ a combined experimental technique involving the solidstate nuclear-track detectors and the activation gamma spectrometry. Adding our measurements to the database of experimental nuclear data will make it possible to test the computer codes used for selecting the parameters of the ADS-type facilities.

  10. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Sangrey, Robert L; Abdou, Ashraf A; West, David L; Shea, Thomas J; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Naoe, Dr. Takashi; Farny, Dr. Caleb H.; Kaminsky, Andrew L

    2014-01-01

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  11. Neutron spallation sources in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, P. J.

    1996-11-01

    After a brief general and historical discussion, the main design features of spallation sources are described. At the present time, Europe not only has the world-leading pulsed neutron spallation source, the SNS-ISIS at RAL, UK, but it is on the point of commissioning a world-leading continuous cyclotron-driven source, the SINQ at PSI, Switzerland. Looking to the future, yet more powerful pulsed sources are actively under study and the difficult problem of high-power target design (>250 kW) is leading to a new technology for liquid targets. The accelerator designs, although basically classical, require custom-built solutions that are often at the limit of present day accelerator technology.

  12. Neutron spallation sources in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, P. J.

    1996-11-01

    After a brief general and historical discussion, the main design features of spallation sources are described. At the present time, Europe not only has the world-leading pulsed neutron spallation source, the SNS-ISIS at RAL, UK, but it is on the point of commissioning a world-leading continuous cyclotron-driven source, the SINQ at PSI, Switzerland. Looking to the future, yet more powerful pulsed sources are actively under study and the difficult problem of high-power target design (>250 kW) is leading to a new technology for liquid targets. The accelerator designs, although basically classical, require custom-built solutions that are often at the limit of presentday accelerator technology.

  13. Two-phase flow model for energetic proton beam induced pressure waves in mercury target systems in the planned European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, I. F.; Imre, A. R.; Rosta, L.; Mezei, F.

    2008-12-01

    Two-phase flow calculations are presented to investigate the thermo-hydraulical effects of the interaction between 2 ms long 1.3 GeV proton pulses with a closed mercury loop which can be considered as a model system of the target of the planned European Spallation Source (ESS) facility. The two-fluid model consists of six first-order partial differential equations that present one dimensional mass, momentum and energy balances for mercury vapor and liquid phases are capable to describe quick transients like cavitation effects or shock waves. The absorption of the proton beam is represented as instantaneous heat source in the energy balance equations. Densities and internal energies of the mercury liquid-vapor system is calculated from the van der Waals equation, but general method how to obtain such properties using arbitrary equation of state is also presented. A second order accurate high-resolution shock-capturing numerical scheme is applied with different kind of limiters in the numerical calculations. Our analysis show that even 75 degree temperature heat shocks cannot cause considerable cavitation effects in mercury.

  14. Analysis of structure and deformation behavior of AISI 316L tensile specimens from the second operational target module at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gussev, Maxim N.; McClintock, David A.; Garner, Frank

    2015-08-05

    In an earlier publication, tensile testing was performed on specimens removed from the first two operational targets of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). There were several anomalous features in the results. First, some specimens had very large elongations (up to 57%) while others had significantly smaller values. Second, there was a larger than the usual amount of data scatter in the elongation results. Third, the stress-strain diagrams of nominally similar specimens spanned a wide range of behavior ranging from expected irradiation-induced hardening to varying levels of force drop after yield point and indirect signs of "traveling deformation wave" behavior associated with strain-induced martensite formation. To investigate the cause(s) of such variable tensile behavior, several specimens from Target 2, spanning the range of observed tensile behavior, were chosen for detailed microstructural examination using electron backscattering analysis (EBSD). It was also shown that the steel employed in the construction of the target contained an unexpected bimodal grain size distribution, containing very large out-of-specification grains surrounded by necklaces of grains of within-specification sizes. The large grains were frequently comparable to the width of the gauge section of the tensile specimen. Moreover, the propensity to form martensite during deformation was shown to be accelerated by radiation but also to be very sensitive to the relative orientation of the grains with respect to the tensile axis. Specimens having large grains in the gauge that were most favorably oriented for production of martensite strongly exhibited the traveling deformation wave phenomenon, while those specimens with less favorably oriented grains had lesser or no degree of the wave effect, thereby accounting for the larger than expected data scatter.

  15. Analysis of structure and deformation behavior of AISI 316L tensile specimens from the second operational target module at the Spallation Neutron Source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gussev, Maxim N.; McClintock, David A.; Garner, Frank

    2015-08-05

    In an earlier publication, tensile testing was performed on specimens removed from the first two operational targets of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). There were several anomalous features in the results. First, some specimens had very large elongations (up to 57%) while others had significantly smaller values. Second, there was a larger than the usual amount of data scatter in the elongation results. Third, the stress-strain diagrams of nominally similar specimens spanned a wide range of behavior ranging from expected irradiation-induced hardening to varying levels of force drop after yield point and indirect signs of "traveling deformation wave" behavior associatedmore » with strain-induced martensite formation. To investigate the cause(s) of such variable tensile behavior, several specimens from Target 2, spanning the range of observed tensile behavior, were chosen for detailed microstructural examination using electron backscattering analysis (EBSD). It was also shown that the steel employed in the construction of the target contained an unexpected bimodal grain size distribution, containing very large out-of-specification grains surrounded by necklaces of grains of within-specification sizes. The large grains were frequently comparable to the width of the gauge section of the tensile specimen. Moreover, the propensity to form martensite during deformation was shown to be accelerated by radiation but also to be very sensitive to the relative orientation of the grains with respect to the tensile axis. Specimens having large grains in the gauge that were most favorably oriented for production of martensite strongly exhibited the traveling deformation wave phenomenon, while those specimens with less favorably oriented grains had lesser or no degree of the wave effect, thereby accounting for the larger than expected data scatter.« less

  16. Analysis of structure and deformation behavior of AISI 316L tensile specimens from the second operational target module at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gussev, M. N.; McClintock, D. A.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    In an earlier publication, tensile testing was performed on specimens removed from the first two operational targets of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). There were several anomalous features in the results. First, some specimens had very large elongations (up to 57%) while others had significantly smaller values (10-30%). Second, there was a larger than the usual amount of data scatter in the elongation results. Third, the stress-strain diagrams of nominally similar specimens spanned a wide range of behavior ranging from expected irradiation-induced hardening to varying levels of force drop after yield point and indirect signs of "traveling deformation wave" behavior associated with strain-induced martensite formation. To investigate the cause(s) of such variable tensile behavior, several specimens from Target 2, spanning the range of observed tensile behavior, were chosen for detailed microstructural examination using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis. It was shown that the steel employed in the construction of the target contained an unexpected bimodal grain size distribution, containing very large out-of-specification grains surrounded by "necklaces" of grains of within-specification sizes. The large grains were frequently comparable to the width of the gauge section of the tensile specimen. The propensity to form martensite during deformation was shown to be accelerated by radiation but also to be very sensitive to the relative orientation of the grains with respect to the tensile axis. Specimens having large grains in the gauge that were most favorably oriented for production of martensite strongly exhibited the traveling deformation wave phenomenon, while those specimens with less favorably oriented grains had lesser or no degree of the wave effect, thereby accounting for the observed data scatter.

  17. NOBLE GAS PRODUCTION FROM MERCURY SPALLATION AT SNS

    SciTech Connect

    DeVore, Joe R; Lu, Wei; Schwahn, Scott O

    2013-01-01

    Calculations for predicting the distribution of the products of spallation reactions between high energy protons and target materials are well developed and are used for design and operational applications in many projects both within DOE and in other arenas. These calculations are based on theory and limited experimental data that verifies rates of production of some spallation products exist. At the Spallation Neutron Source, a helium stream from the mercury target flows through a system to remove radioactivity from this mercury target offgas. The operation of this system offers a window through which the production of noble gases from mercury spallation by protons may be observed. This paper describes studies designed to measure the production rates of twelve noble gas isotopes within the Spallation Neutron Source mercury target.

  18. Xenon spallation systematics in Angra dos Reis. [meteoritic evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenberg, C. M.; Hudson, B.; Kennedy, B. M.; Podosek, F. A.

    1981-01-01

    Literature Xe data for the Angra dos Reis meteorite have been resolved into constituent spallation, fission and trapped components. The spallation Xe compositions vary over a range wider than observed in any other samples, including lunar samples. These variations are due to the mixing of spallation Xe from Ba and rare earth element targets. It is possible to infer the Ba and rare earth spallation Xe compositions. Angra dos Reis spallation Xe compositions are systematically different from those observed in lunar samples, possibly because of differences in the irradiation conditions (geometry and shielding). Thus the Angra dos Reis data appear to be superior to lunar data for predicting spallation Xe compositions in other meteorites.

  19. Effects of environment and frequency on the fatigue behavior of the spallation neutron source (SNS) target container material - 316 LN stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hongbo

    As the candidate target container material of the new Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) being designed and constructed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Type 316 low-carbon nitrogen-added (LN) stainless steel (SS) will operate in an aggressive environment, subjected to intense fluxes of high-energy protons and neutrons while exposed to liquid mercury. The current project is oriented toward materials studies regarding the effects of test environment and frequency on the fatigue behavior of 316 LN SS. In order to study the structural applications of this material and improve the fundamental understanding of the fatigue damage mechanisms, fatigue tests were performed in air and mercury environments at various frequencies and R ratios (R = sigma min/sigmamax, sigmamin and sigmamax are the applied minimum and maximum stresses, respectively). Fatigue data were developed for the structural design and engineering applications of this material. Specifically, high-cycle fatigue tests, fatigue crack-propagation tests, and ultrahigh cycle fatigue tests up to 10 9 cycles were conducted in air and mercury with test frequencies from 10 Hz to 700 Hz. Microstructure characterizations were performed using optical microscopy (OM), scanning-electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission-electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that mercury doesn't seem to have a large impact on the crack-initiation behavior of 316 LN SS. However, the crack-propagation mechanisms in air and mercury are different in some test conditions. Transgranular cracks seem to be the main mechanism in air, and intergranular in mercury. A significant specimen self-heating effect was found during high-cycle faituge. Theoretical calculation was performed to predict temperature responses of the material subjected to cyclic deformation. The predicted cyclic temperature evolution seems to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  20. Spallation radiation effects in materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, L.K.; Farrell, K.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1996-06-01

    Spallation refers to the process whereby particles (chiefly neutrons) are ejected from nuclei upon bombardment by high-energy protons. Spallation neutron sources (SNS`s) use these neutrons for neutron scattering and diffraction research, and SNS`s are proposed as the basis for systems for tritium production and transmutation of nuclear waste. Materials in SNS`s are exposed to the incident proton beam (energies typically about 1000 MeV) and to the spallation neutrons (spectrum of energies extending up to about 1000 MeV). By contrast the fission neutrons in nuclear reactors have an average energy of only about 2 MeV, and the neutrons in fusion reactors would have energies below about 14 MeV. Furthermore, the protons and neutrons in SNS`s for scattering and diffraction research are pulsed at frequencies of about 10 to 60 Hz, from which significant changes in the kinetics of point and extended defects may be expected. In addition, much higher transmutation rates occur in SNS-irradiated materials, On the whole, then, significant differences in microstructural development and macroscopic properties may result upon exposure in SNS systems, as compared with fission and fusion irradiations. In a more general sense, subjecting materials to new radiation environments has almost routinely led to new discoveries. To the extent that data are avaiable, however, the spallation environment appears to increase the degree of damage without introducing totally new effects. The first part of this presentation is an overview of radiation effects in materials, outlining essential concepts and property changes and their physical bases. This background is followed by a description of SNS irradiation environments and the effects on materials of exposure to these environments. A special discussion is given of the selection of target (e.g., liquid mercury), container (e.g., austenitic stainless steel or ferritic/martensitic steel), and structural materials in SNS systems.

  1. Process technology and effects of spallation products: Circuit components, maintenance, and handling

    SciTech Connect

    Sigg, B.; Haines, S.J.; Dressler, R.; McManamy, T.

    1996-06-01

    Working Session D included an assessment of the status of the technology and components required to: (1) remove impurities from the liquid metal (mercury or Pb-Bi) target flow loop including the effects of spallation products, (2) provide the flow parameters necessary for target operations, and (3) maintain the target system. A series of brief presentations were made to focus the discussion on these issues. The subjects of these presentations, and presenters were: (1) Spallation products and solubilities - R. Dressler; (2) Spallation products for Pb-Bi - Y. Orlov; (3) Clean/up/impurity removal components - B. Sigg; (4) {open_quotes}Road-Map{close_quotes} and remote handling needs - T. McManamy; (5) Remote handling issues and development - M. Holding. The overall conclusion of this session was that, with the exception of (i) spallation product related processing issues, (ii) helium injection and clean-up, and (iii) specialized remote handling equipment, the technology for all other circuit components (excluding the target itself) exists. Operating systems at the Institute of Physics in Riga, Latvia (O. Lielausis) and at Ben-Gurion University in Beer Shiva, Israel (S. Lesin) have demonstrated that other liquid metal circuit components including pumps, heat exchangers, valves, seals, and piping are readily available and have been reliably used for many years. In the three areas listed above, the designs and analysis are not judged to be mature enough to determine whether and what types of technology development are required. Further design and analysis of the liquid metal target system is therefore needed to define flow circuit processing and remote handling equipment requirements and thereby identify any development needs.

  2. Electron impinging on metallic thin film targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouabah, Z.; Bouarissa, N.; Champion, C.

    2010-03-01

    Based on the Vicanek and Urbassek theory [M. Vicanek, H.M. Urbassek, Phys. Rev. B 44 (1991) 7234] combined to a home-made Monte Carlo simulation, the present work deals with backscattering coefficients, mean penetration depths and stopping profiles for 1-4 keV electrons normally incident impinging on Al and Cu thin film targets. The cross-sections used to describe the electron transport are calculated via the appropriate analytical expression given by Jablonski [A. Jablonski, Phys. Rev. B 58 (1998) 16470] whose new improved version has been recently given [Z. Rouabah, N. Bouarissa, C. Champion, N. Bouaouadja, Appl. Surf. Sci. 255 (2009) 6217]. The behavior of the backscattering coefficient, mean penetration depth and stopping profiles versus the metallic film thickness at the nanometric scale and beyond is here analyzed and discussed.

  3. Determination of spallation neutron flux through spectral adjustment techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, M. A.; Engle, J. W.; Jackman, K. R.; Nortier, F. M.; Birnbaum, E. R.

    2016-08-01

    The Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility (IPF) creates medical isotopes using a proton beam impinged on a target stack. Spallation neutrons are created in the interaction of the beam with target. The use of these spallation neutrons to produce additional radionuclides has been proposed. However, the energy distribution and magnitude of the flux is not well understood. A modified SAND-II spectral adjustment routine has been used with radioactivation foils to determine the differential neutron fluence for these spallation neutrons during a standard IPF production run.

  4. Proceedings of the international workshop on spallation materials technology

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, L.K.; Ullmaier, H.

    1996-10-01

    This document contains papers which were presented at the International Workshop on Spallation Materials Technology. Topics included: overviews and thermal response; operational experience; materials experience; target station and component design; particle transport and damage calculations; neutron sources; and compatibility.

  5. Spallation modeling in tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D.L.; Hixson, R.; Zurek, A.K.; Thissell, W.

    1997-09-01

    A gas gun plate impact spallation experiment has been performed on commercial purity rolled tantalum. The shock pressure achieved was about 7 Gpa and was sufficient to induce incipient spallation. The particle velocity was measured at the free surface of the spalled plate, and the spalled sample was recovered and examined metallographically using image analysis. The quantitative image analysis results are being used to develop a damage model. The model is micromechanically based and involves novel void growth and coalescence processes. The 1D characteristics code CHARADE has been used in a preliminary simulation of the VISAR free surface particle velocity record. Implications for ductile damage modeling will be discussed.

  6. Study of 232Th(n, γ) and 232Th(n,f) reaction rates in a graphite moderated spallation neutron field produced by 1.6 GeV deuterons on lead target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asquith, N. L.; Hashemi-Nezhad, S. R.; Westmeier, W.; Zhuk, I.; Tyutyunnikov, S.; Adam, J.

    2015-02-01

    The Gamma-3 assembly of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna, Russia is designed to emulate the neutron spectrum of a thermal Accelerator Driven System (ADS). It consists of a lead spallation target surrounded by reactor grade graphite. The target was irradiated with 1.6 GeV deuterons from the Nuclotron accelerator and the neutron capture and fission rate of 232Th in several locations within the assembly were experimentally measured. 232Th is a proposed fuel for envisaged Accelerator Driven Systems and these two reactions are fundamental to the performance and feasibility of 232Th in an ADS. The irradiation of the Gamma-3 assembly was also simulated using MCNPX 2.7 with the INCL4 intra-nuclear cascade and ABLA fission/evaporation models. Good agreement between the experimentally measured and calculated reaction rates was found. This serves as a good validation for the computational models and cross section data used to simulate neutron production and transport of spallation neutrons within a thermal ADS.

  7. Atomistic simulation study of short pulse laser interactions with a metal target under conditions of spatial confinement by a transparent overlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Karim, Eaman T.; Shugaev, Maxim; Wu, Chengping; Zhigilei, Leonid V.; Lin, Zhibin; Hainsey, Robert F.

    2014-05-14

    The distinct characteristics of short pulse laser interactions with a metal target under conditions of spatial confinement by a solid transparent overlayer are investigated in a series of atomistic simulations. The simulations are performed with a computational model combining classical molecular dynamics (MD) technique with a continuum description of the laser excitation, electron-phonon equilibration, and electronic heat transfer based on two-temperature model (TTM). Two methods for incorporation of the description of a transparent overlayer into the TTM-MD model are designed and parameterized for Ag-silica system. The material response to the laser energy deposition is studied for a range of laser fluences that, in the absence of the transparent overlayer, covers the regimes of melting and resolidification, photomechanical spallation, and phase explosion of the overheated surface region. In contrast to the irradiation in vacuum, the spatial confinement by the overlayer facilitates generation of sustained high-temperature and high-pressure conditions near the metal-overlayer interface, suppresses the generation of unloading tensile wave, decreases the maximum depth of melting, and prevents the spallation and explosive disintegration of the surface region of the metal target. At high laser fluences, when the laser excitation brings the surface region of the metal target to supercritical conditions, the confinement prevents the expansion and phase decomposition characteristic for the vacuum conditions leading to a gradual cooling of the hot compressed supercritical fluid down to the liquid phase and eventual solidification. The target modification in this case is limited to the generation of crystal defects and the detachment of the metal target from the overlayer.

  8. Slow neutron leakage spectra from spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.G.; Carpenter, J.M.; Prael, R.E.

    1980-02-01

    An efficient technique is described for Monte Carlo simulation of neutron beam spectra from target-moderator-reflector assemblies typical of pulsed spallation neutron sources. The technique involves the scoring of the transport-theoretical probability that a neutron will emerge from the moderator surface in the direction of interest, at each collision. An angle-biasing probability is also introduced which further enhances efficiency in simple problems. These modifications were introduced into the VIM low energy neutron transport code, representing the spatial and energy distributions of the source neutrons approximately as those of evaporation neutrons generated through the spallation process by protons of various energies. The intensity of slow neutrons leaking from various reflected moderators was studied for various neutron source arrangements. These include computations relating to early measurements on a mockup-assembly, a brief survey of moderator materials and sizes, and a survey of the effects of varying source and moderator configurations with a practical, liquid metal cooled uranium source Wing and slab, i.e., tangential and radial moderator arrangements, and Be vs CH/sub 2/ reflectors are compared. Results are also presented for several complicated geometries which more closely represent realistic arrangements for a practical source, and for a subcritical fission multiplier such as might be driven by an electron linac. An adaptation of the code was developed to enable time dependent calculations, and investigated the effects of the reflector, decoupling and void liner materials on the pulse shape.

  9. Pulsed spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development at Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provides a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology.

  10. Pulsed spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-05-01

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development ar Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provide a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology.

  11. The European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S; Eshraqi, M; Hahn, H; Jansson, A; Lindroos, M; Ponton, A; Rathsman, K; Trahern, G; Bousso, S; Calaga, R; Devanz, G; Duperrier, R D; Eguia, J; Gammino, S; Moller, S P; Oyon, C; Ruber, R.J.M.Y.; Satogata, T

    2011-03-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a 5 MW, 2.5 GeV long pulse proton linac, to be built and commissioned in Lund, Sweden. The Accelerator Design Update (ADU) project phase is under way, to be completed at the end of 2012 by the delivery of a Technical Design Report. Improvements to the 2003 ESS design will be summarised, and the latest design activities will be presented.

  12. Spallator and APEX nuclear fuel cycle: a new option for nuclear power

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.

    1982-01-01

    A new nuclear fuel cycle is described which provides a long term supply of nuclear fuel for the thermal LWR nuclear power reactors and eliminates the need for long-term storage of radioactive waste. Fissile fuel is produced by the Spallator which depends on the production of spallation neutrons by the interaction of high-energy (1 to 2 GeV) protons on a heavy-metal target. The neutrons are absorbed in a surrounding natural-uranium or thorium blanket in which fissile Pu-239 to U-233 is produced. Advances in linear accelerator technology makes it possible to design and construct a high-beam-current continuous-wave proton linac for production purposes. The target is similar to a sub-critical reactor and produces heat which is converted to electricity for supplying the linac. The Spallator is a self-sufficient fuel producer, which can compete with the fast breeder. The APEX fuel cycle depends on recycling the transuranics and long-lived fission products while extracting the stable and short-lived fission products when reprocessing the fuel. Transmutation and decay within the fuel cycle and decay of short-lived fission products external to the fuel cycle eliminates the need for long-term geological age shortage of fission-product waste.

  13. Rarefaction after fast laser heating of thin metal film on a glass mount: spallation and inflation from one-dimensional to three-dimensional ablation flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inogamov, Nail; Khokhlov, Viktor; Petrov, Yury; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; Migdal, Kirill; Ilnitsky, Denis; Hasegawa, Noboru; Nishikino, Masaharu; Yamagiwa, Mitsuru; Ishino, Masahiko; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tatiana; Takayoshi, Shintaro; Eyama, Takashi; Kakimoto, Naoya; Tomita, Takuro; Baba, Motoyoshi; Minami, Yasuo; Suemoto, Tohru

    2015-06-01

    We numerically and experimentally consider the effect of subpicosecond Ti:sapp laser pump pulse onto 60-100 nm silver and gold films mounted onto a silica substrate. Pump pulse spalls out the film from the substrate. Influence of diameter of a laser irradiated spot 1-100 microns on a film surface is studied. A cupola like spallation shell is flying from the substrate. For the large spot the soft X-ray probe laser is used for measuring the ablation process. The research (NAI, VVZh, VAKh, DKI, YVP, KPM, AYF, TAP) has been performed under financial support from Russian Science Foundation (RSCF) (Project No. 14-19-01599).

  14. A new method of making 164Dy metal plate targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, Isao; Kato, Hajime

    1986-04-01

    164Dy metal plate targets of high purity for measurements of the electron neutrino mass were made successfully. The starting material 164DyF 3 was reduced to metal by the Ca reduction method with rf induction heating. The reduced metal was pressed with a hot-press device in argon gas atmosphere and rolled into plates of 35 mm × 10 mm in area by a new method of packing. The thicknesses were in the range from 150 to 230 mg/cm 2. The present method was also found suitable to make thin Dy targets of the order of 1 mg/cm 2 in thickness

  15. The European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, M.; Bousson, S.; Calaga, R.; Danared, H.; Devanz, G.; Duperrier, R.; Eguia, J.; Eshraqi, M.; Gammino, S.; Hahn, H.; Jansson, A.; Oyon, C.; Pape-Møller, S.; Peggs, S.; Ponton, A.; Rathsman, K.; Ruber, R.; Satogata, T.; Trahern, G.

    2011-12-01

    In 2003 the joint European effort to design a European Spallation Source (ESS) resulted in a set of reports, and in May 2009 Lund was agreed to be the ESS site. The ESS Scandinavia office has since then worked on setting all the necessary legal and organizational matters in place so that the Design Update and construction can be started in January 2011, in collaboration with European partners. The Design Update phase is expected to end in 2012, to be followed by a construction phase, with first neutrons expected in 2018-2019.

  16. Astrophysical Li-7 as a product of big bang nucleosynthesis and galactic cosmic-ray spallation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olive, Keith A.; Schramm, David N.

    1992-01-01

    The astrophysical Li-7 abundance is considered to be largely primordial, while the Be and B abundances are thought to be due to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) spallation reactions on top of a much smaller big bang component. But GCR spallation should also produce Li-7. As a consistency check on the combination of big bang nucleosynthesis and GCR spallation, the Be and B data from a sample of hot population II stars is used to subtract from the measured Li-7 abundance an estimate of the amount generated by GCR spallation for each star in the sample, and then to add to this baseline an estimate of the metallicity-dependent augmentation of Li-7 due to spallation. The singly reduced primordial Li-7 abundance is still consistent with big bang nucleosynthesis, and a single GCR spallation model can fit the Be, B, and corrected Li-7 abundances for all the stars in the sample.

  17. Linac-driven spallation-neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, A.J.

    1995-05-01

    Strong interest has arisen in accelerator-driven spallation-neutron sources that surpass existing facilities (such as ISIS at Rutherford or LANSCE at Los Alamos) by more than an order of magnitude in beam power delivered to the spallation target. The approach chosen by Los Alamos (as well as the European Spallation Source) provides the full beam energy by acceleration in a linac as opposed to primary acceleration in a synchrotron or other circular device. Two modes of neutron production are visualized for the source. A short-pulse mode produces 1 MW of beam power (at 60 pps) in pulses, of length less than 1 ms, by compression of the linac macropulse through multi-turn injection in an accumulator ring. A long-pulse mode produces a similar beam power with 1-ms-long pulses directly applied to a target. This latter mode rivals the performance of existing reactor facilities to very low neutron energies. Combination with the short-pulse mode addresses virtually all applications.

  18. Calculation of improved spallation cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, C. H.; Silberberg, R.; Letaw, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Several research groups have recently carried out highly precise measurements (to about 10 percent) of high-energy nuclear spallation cross sections. These measurements, above 5 GeV, cover a broad range of elements: V, Fe, Cu, Ag, Ta and Au. Even the small cross sections far off the peak of the isotopic distribution curves have been measured. The semiempirical calculations are compared with the measured values. Preliminary comparisons indicate that the parameters of our spallation relations (Silberberg and Tsao, 1973) for atomic numbers 20 to 83 need modifications, e.g. a reduced slope of the mass yield distribution, broader isotopic distributions, and a shift of the isotopic distribution toward the neutron-deficient side. The required modifications are negligible near Fe and Cu, but increase with increasing target mass.

  19. Influence of Zn as a spallation product on the behaviour of martensitic steel T91 and austenitic steel 316L in liquid Pb-Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloffre, Ph.; Terlain, A.

    2004-11-01

    The liquid Pb-Bi alloy is proposed as material for the spallation target in hybrid systems. During the spallation process, several chemical elements are produced in the target which could generate specific liquid metal embrittlement phenomena. Among these species, zinc is known as an element which can promote LME (liquid metal embrittlement). Corrosion tests were carried out in liquid Pb-Bi in isothermal static conditions without and with 80 wppm of zinc at 150 °C, 350 °C and 600 °C up to 6000 h. No modification of the corrosion kinetics of T91 martensitic and 316L austenitic steels was observed for either unstressed or U-bend specimens with zinc in Pb-Bi. Moreover, no sign of embrittlement was observed for any of the samples with and without zinc.

  20. Metallic and nonmetallic coatings for ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.; Crane, J.K.; Hsieh, E.J.; Meyer, S.F.

    1981-04-17

    Some fusion targets designed to be driven by 0.35 to 1 ..mu..m laser light are glass spheres coated with layers of various materials such as hydrocarbons, fluorocarbons, beryllium, copper, gold, platinum, etc. The glass shell, which is filled with gas, liquid or solid deuterium-tritium fuel, must have remarkably good surface and wall thickness uniformity. Methods for depositing the various materials will be discussed. They include plasma polymerization, electro-deposition, sputtering and evaporation. Many of the difficulties encountered in the coating processes are the result of coating on free spheres with very small radii - 35 to 500 micrometers. Several means of overcoming the problems will be described and experimental results presented.

  1. Workshop: Research and development plans for high power spallation neutron testing at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-05

    This report consists of vugraphs from presentations at the meeting. The papers covered the following topics: (1) APS as a proton source; (2) target status for NSNS (National Spallation Neutron Source); (3) spallation neutron source in Japan; (4) liquid LiBi flow loop; and (5) research and development plans for high power tests at the AGS.

  2. Fabrication of microcoined metal foil Rayleigh-Taylor targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Greg; Vecchio, James; Fitzsimmons, Paul; Knipping, Jack; Wall, Don; Vu, Matthew; Giraldez, Emilio; Remington, Tane; Blue, Brent; Farrell, Michael; Nikroo, Abbas

    2013-03-01

    Rippled metal foils are currently sought for high strain rate material strength studies. For example, the growth of these ripples by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability after a laser-induced ramped compression yields strength behavior at extremely high strain rate. Because metals of interest (iron, tantalum, steel, etc.) typically cannot be diamond turned, we employ a microcoining process to imprint the ~ 5 μm deep by ~ 50 μm long ripples into the metal surface. The process consists of nitriding a steel die, diamond turning the die, and then pressing the die into a polished metal foil of choice (Seugling et al., Proc EUSPEN Int. Conference, 2010). This work details recent process developments, characterization techniques, and important physics for fabrication of these rippled metal targets.

  3. Further considerations of spallation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, C.

    1973-01-01

    Trapped photon and cosmic ray effects on spallation in the UK-5 (hard X ray telescope) central crystal were measured. Both low dose and high dose effects were considered. Decay results are presented in tables.

  4. The thermal spallation drilling process

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Holes can be produced in very hard rock more easily and less expensively by thermal spallation than by conventional means. This drilling process has been used for producing blast holes in the taconite iron mines and for quarrying granite. It is potentially valuable for drilling holes in very hard rock for the exploitation of geothermal energy and the storage of various commodities. However, investigation and development of the thermal spallation drilling process is proceeding slowly.

  5. Metallic targets ablation by laser plasma production in a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilis, I. I.

    2016-03-01

    A model of metallic target ablation and metallic plasma production by laser irradiation is reported. The model considers laser energy absorption by the plasma, electron emission from hot targets and ion flux to the target from the plasma as well as an electric sheath produced at the target-plasma interface. The proposed approach takes into account that the plasma, partially shields the laser radiation from the target, and also converts absorbed laser energy to kinetic and potential energies of the charged plasma particles, which they transport not only through the ambient vacuum but also through the electrostatic sheath to the solid surface. Therefore additional plasma heating by the accelerated emitted electrons and target heating caused by bombardment of it by the accelerated ions are considered. A system of equations, including equations for solid heat conduction, plasma generation, and plasma expansion, is solved self-consistently. The results of calculations explain the measured dependencies of ablation yield (μ g/pulse) for Al, Ni, and Ti targets on laser fluence in range of (5-21)J/cm2 published previously by Torrisi et al.

  6. XUV spectroscopy of laser plasma from molecular coated metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanyan, Valeri O.; Nersisyan, Gagik T.; Tittel, Frank K.

    1999-12-01

    Metal targets covered by micrometer layers of metal- phthalocyanines or fullerenes are studied here. An increase in XUV yield due to the optimized absorption of the laser field is reported. Effects of high-temperature plasma rapid expansion (velocity about 106 cm/s) were observed. Moderate power nanosecond and picosecond neodymium lasers are used to produce an incident intensity of 1011 to 1013 W/cm2 on the targets. The plasma electron density was measured by fitting observed spectral profiles to the theoretical profiles. Collisional, Doppler, and Stark broadening mechanisms were considered in the calculations. Our measurement technique permits us to determine the electron density and temperature dependence on distances from the target surface from 1 mm (where Ne approximately equals 1018 cm-3 and Te approximately equals 14 eV are measured for aluminum plasma) up to approximately 5 mm (where Ne targets is greater by a factor of approximately 1.5 than measured from bulk solid metal targets.

  7. XUV spectroscopy of laser plasma from molecular coated metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanyan, Valeri O.; Nersisyan, Gagik T.; Tittel, Frank K.

    1999-10-01

    Metal targets covered by micrometer layers of metal- phthalocyanines are studied here. An increase in EUV yield due to optimized absorption of the laser field is reported. Effects of high-temperature plasma rapid expansion (velocity about 106 cm/s) were observed. Moderate power nanosecond and picosecond neodymium lasers are used to product an incident intensity of 1011 to 1013 W/cm2 on the targets. The plasma electron density was measured by fitting observed spectral profiles to theoretical profiles. Collisional, Doppler, and Stark broadening mechanisms were considered in the calculations. Our measurement technique makes it possible to determine the electron density and temperature dependence on distances from the target surface from 1 mm (where Ne equals 2.0 (+/- 0.5)1018 cm-3 and Te equals 14 eV are measured for aluminum plasma) up to approximately 5 mm (where Ne targets is greater by a factor of approximately 1.5 than measured from bulk solid metal targets.

  8. Spallation reactions: A successful interplay between modeling and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, J.-C.

    2015-06-01

    The spallation reactions are a type of nuclear reaction which occur in space by interaction of the cosmic rays with interstellar bodies. The first spallation reactions induced with an accelerator took place in 1947 at the Berkeley cyclotron (University of California) with 200MeV deuterons and 400MeV alpha beams. They highlighted the multiple emission of neutrons and charged particles and the production of a large number of residual nuclei far different from the target nuclei. In the same year, R. Serber described the reaction in two steps: a first and fast one with high-energy particle emission leading to an excited remnant nucleus, and a second one, much slower, the de-excitation of the remnant. In 2010 IAEA organized a workshop to present the results of the most widely used spallation codes within a benchmark of spallation models. If one of the goals was to understand the deficiencies, if any, in each code, one remarkable outcome points out the overall high-quality level of some models and so the great improvements achieved since Serber. Particle transport codes can then rely on such spallation models to treat the reactions between a light particle and an atomic nucleus with energies spanning from few tens of MeV up to some GeV. An overview of the spallation reactions modeling is presented in order to point out the incomparable contribution of models based on basic physics to numerous applications where such reactions occur. Validations or benchmarks, which are necessary steps in the improvement process, are also addressed, as well as the potential future domains of development. Spallation reactions modeling is a representative case of continuous studies aiming at understanding a reaction mechanism and which end up in a powerful tool.

  9. Spallation neutron source beam loss monitor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassner, D.; Witkover, R.; Cameron, P.; Power, J.

    2000-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source facility to be built at ORNL is designed to accumulate 2×1014 protons at 1.0 GeV and deliver them to the experimental target in one bunch at 60 Hz. To achieve this goal and protect the machine from excessive radiation activation, an uncontrolled loss criteria of 1 part in 104 (1 W/m) has been specified. Measured losses will be conditioned to provide machine tuning data, a beam abort trigger, and logging of loss history. The design of the distributed loss monitor system utilizing argon-filled glass ionization chambers and scintillator-photomultipliers will be presented.

  10. Theoretical investigation of the thermal hydraulic behaviour of a slab-type liquid metal target

    SciTech Connect

    Dury, T.V.; Smith, B.L.

    1996-06-01

    The thermal hydraulics codes CFDS-FLOW3D and ASTEC have been used to simulate a slabtype design of ESS spallation target. This design is single-skinned, and of tapering form (in the beam direction), with rounded sides in a cross-section through a plane normal to the beam. The coolant fluid used is mercury, under forced circulation, with an inlet temperature of 180{degrees}C. The goal of these computer studies was to understand the behaviour of the coolant flow, and hence to arrive at a design which optimises the heat extraction for a given beam power - in the sense of: (1) minimising the peak local fluid temperature within the target, (2) maintaining an acceptable temperature level and distribution over and through the target outer wall, (3) keeping the overall fluid pressure loss through the complete target to a minimum, (4) staying within the physical limits of overall size required, particularly in the region of primary spallation. Two- and three-dimensional models have been used, with different arrangements and design of internal baffles, and different coolant flow distributions at the target inlet. Nominal total inlet mass flow was 245 kg/s, and a heat deposition profile used which was based on the proton beam energy distribution. This gave a nominal total heat load of 3.23 MW - of which 8.2kW were deposited in the window steel.

  11. BEAM LOSS MITIGATION IN THE OAK RIDGE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator complex routinely delivers 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. Due to this high beam power, understanding and minimizing the beam loss is an ongoing focus area of the accelerator physics program. In some areas of the accelerator facility the equipment parameters corresponding to the minimum loss are very different from the design parameters. In this presentation we will summarize the SNS beam loss measurements, the methods used to minimize the beam loss, and compare the design vs. the loss-minimized equipment parameters.

  12. Investigation of GEV Proton-Induced Spallation Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilscher, D.; Herbach, C.-M.; Jahnke, U.; Tishchenko, V. G.; Galin, J.; Lott, B.; Letourneau, A.; Peghaire, A.; Filges, D.; Goldenbaum, F.; Nünighoff, K.; Schaal, H.; Sterzenbach, G.; Wohlmuther, M.; Pienkowski, L.; Schröder, W. U.; Toke, J.

    2004-09-01

    A reliable modeling of GeV proton-induced spallation reactions is indispensable for the design of the spallation module and the target station of future accelerator driven hybrid reactors (ADS) or spallation neutron sources (ESS), in particular, to provide precise predictions for the neutron production, the radiation damage of materials (window), and the production of radioactivity (3H, 7Be etc.) in the target medium. Detailed experimental nuclear data are needed for sensitive validations and improvements of the models, whose predictive power is strongly dependent on the correct physical description of the three main stages of a spallation reaction: (i) the Intra-Nuclear-Cascade (INC) with the fast heating of the target nucleus, (ii) the de-excitation due to pre-equilibrium emission including the possibility of multi-fragmentation, and (iii) the statistical decay of thermally excited nuclei by evaporation of light particles and fission in the case of heavy nuclei. Key experimental data for this endeavor are absolute production cross sections and energy spectra for neutrons and light charged-particles (LCPs), emission of composite particles prior and post to the attainment of an equilibrated system, distribution of excitation energies deposited in the nuclei after the INC, and fission probabilities. Systematic measurements of such data are furthermore needed over large ranges of target nuclei and incident proton energies. Such data has been measured with the NESSI detector. An overview of new and previous results will be given.

  13. China Spallation Neutron Source: Design, R&D, and outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jie; Chen, Hesheng; Chen, Yanwei; Chen, Yuanbo; Chi, Yunlong; Deng, Changdong; Dong, Haiyi; Dong, Lan; Fang, Shouxian; Feng, Ji; Fu, Shinian; He, Lunhua; He, Wei; Heng, Yuekun; Huang, Kaixi; Jia, Xuejun; Kang, Wen; Kong, Xiangcheng; Li, Jian; Liang, Tianjiao; Lin, Guoping; Liu, Zhenan; Ouyang, Huafu; Qin, Qing; Qu, Huamin; Shi, Caitu; Sun, Hong; Tang, Jingyu; Tao, Juzhou; Wang, Chunhong; Wang, Fangwei; Wang, Dingsheng; Wang, Qingbin; Wang, Sheng; Wei, Tao; Xi, Jiwei; Xu, Taoguang; Xu, Zhongxiong; Yin, Wen; Yin, Xuejun; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Zong; Zhang, Zonghua; Zhou, Min; Zhu, Tao

    2009-02-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is an accelerator based multidiscipline user facility planned to be constructed in Dongguan, Guangdong, China. The CSNS complex consists of an negative hydrogen linear accelerator, a rapid cycling proton synchrotron accelerating the beam to 1.6 GeV energy, a solid tungsten target station, and instruments for spallation neutron applications. The facility operates at 25 Hz repetition rate with an initial design beam power of 120 kW and is upgradeable to 500 kW. The primary challenge is to build a robust and reliable user's facility with upgrade potential at a fraction of "world standard" cost. We report the status, design, R&D, and upgrade outlook including applications using spallation neutron, muon, fast neutron, and proton, as well as related programs including medical therapy and accelerator-driven sub-critical reactor (ADS) programs for nuclear waste transmutation.

  14. Metal coatings for laser fusion targets by electroplating

    SciTech Connect

    Illige, J.D.; Yu, C.M.; Letts, S.A.

    1980-08-26

    Metal coated laser fusion targets must be dense, uniform spherically symmetric to within a few percent of their diameters and smooth to better than a few tenths of a micron. Electroplating offers some unique advantages including low temperature deposition, a wide choice of elements and substantial industrial plating technology. We have evaluatd electroless and electroplating systems for gold and copper, identified the factors responsible for small grain size, and plated glass microspheres with both metals to achieve smooth surfaces and highly symmetric coatings. We have developed plating cells which sustain the microspheres in continuous random motion during plating. We have established techniques for deposition of the initial conductive adherent layer on the glass microsphere surface. Coatings as thick as 15 ..mu..m have been made. The equipment is simple, relatively inexpensive and may be adopted for high volume production of laser fusion targets.

  15. Specific capture of uranyl protein targets by metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Basset, Christian; Dedieu, Alain; Guérin, Philippe; Quéméneur, Eric; Meyer, Daniel; Vidaud, Claude

    2008-03-28

    To improve general understanding of biochemical mechanisms in the field of uranium toxicology, the identification of protein targets needs to be intensified. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been widely developed as a powerful tool for capturing metal binding proteins from biological extracts. However uranyl cations (UO2(2+)) have particular physico-chemical characteristics which prevent them from being immobilized on classical metal chelating supports. We report here on the first development of an immobilized uranyl affinity chromatography method, based on the cation-exchange properties of aminophosphonate groups for uranyl binding. The cation distribution coefficient and loading capacity on the support were determined. Then the stability of the uranyl-bonded phase under our chromatographic conditions was optimized to promote affinity mechanisms. The successful enrichment of uranyl binding proteins from human serum was then proven using proteomic and mass spectral analysis. PMID:18308325

  16. Materials for spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, W.F.; Daemen, L.L.

    1996-03-01

    The Workshop on Materials for Spallation Neutron Sources at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, February 6 to 10, 1995, gathered scientists from Department of Energy national laboratories, other federal institutions, universities, and industry to discuss areas in which work is needed, successful designs and use of materials, and opportunities for further studies. During the first day of the workshop, speakers presented overviews of current spallation neutron sources. During the next 3 days, seven panels allowed speakers to present information on a variety of topics ranging from experimental and theoretical considerations on radiation damage to materials safety issues. An attempt was made to identify specific problems that require attention within the context of spallation neutron sources. This proceedings is a collection of summaries from the overview sessions and the panel presentations.

  17. Status Report on the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1998-10-12

    The purpose of the Spallation Neutron Source Project (SNS) is to generate low-energy neutrons (ambient [{approximately}200 meV] and cold [{approximately}50 meV]) which can be used by up to 18 neutron beam lines to study the structure and functionality of materials. The neutrons are generated by the spallation process initiated by the interactions of 1-GeV protons with a Hg target. These neutrons are reflected by a Pb reflector and are moderated by 2 water (ambient) and 2 super critical hydrogen (cryogenic) moderators. The pulse structure for the 1 MW proton beam is 60 Hertz and < 0.7 {micro}s/pulse. The facility must be upgradable to higher power levels (2- and 4- MW) with minimal operational interruptions. Although not included in the current funding or baseline, a second target station and associated support structure which will be designed to utilize cold neutrons is also considered to be an upgrade that must be incorporated with minimal impact on operations.

  18. The Vascular System as a Target of Metal Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Prozialeck, Walter C.; Edwards, Joshua R.; Nebert, Daniel W.; Woods, James M.; Barchowsky, Aaron; Atchison, William D.

    2009-01-01

    Vascular system function involves complex interactions among the vascular endothelium, smooth muscle, the immune system, and the nervous system. The toxic metals cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As), and lead (Pb) can target the vascular system in a variety of ways, ranging from hemorrhagic injury to subtle pathogenic remodeling and metabolic changes. Acute Cd exposure results in hemorrhagic injury to the testis, although some strains of animals are resistant to this effect. A comparison of Cd-sensitive with Cd-resistant mouse strains showed that expression of the Slc39a8 gene, encoding the ZIP8 transporter, in the testis vasculature endothelium is responsible for this difference. Endogenously, ZIP8 is a Mn2+/HCO3−symporter that may also contribute to Cd damage in the kidney. Chronic Cd exposure is associated with various cardiovascular disorders such as hypertension and cardiomyopathy and it is reported to have both carcinogenic and anticarcinogenic activities. At noncytotoxic concentrations of 10–100nM, Cd can inhibit chemotaxis and tube formation of vascular endothelial cells. These angiostatic effects may be mediated through disruption of vascular endothelial cadherin, a Ca2+-dependent cell adhesion molecule. With regard to As, ingestion of water containing disease-promoting concentrations of As promotes capillarization of the liver sinusoidal endothelium. Because capillarization is a hallmark precursor for liver fibrosis and contributes to an imbalance of lipid metabolism, this As effect on hepatic endothelial cells may be a pathogenic mechanism underlying As-related vascular diseases. With regard to Pb, perinatal exposure may cause sustained elevations in adult blood pressure, and genetically susceptible animals may show enhanced sensitivity to this effect. Taken together, these data indicate that the vascular system is a critical target of metal toxicity and that actions of metals on the vascular system may play important roles in mediating the pathophysiologic

  19. Nanostructured target fabrication with metal and semiconductor nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, M.; Antici, P.

    2015-10-01

    The development of ultra-intense high-energy (≫1 J) short (<1 ps) laser pulses in the last decade has enabled the acceleration of high-energy short-pulse proton beams. A key parameter for enhancing the acceleration regime is the laser-to-target absorption, which heavily depends on the target structure and material. In this work, we present the realization of a nanostructured target with a sub-laser wavelength nano-layer in the front surface as a possible candidate for improving the absorption. The nanostructured film was realized by a simpler and cheaper method than using conventional lithographic techniques: A colloidal solution of metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) was produced by laser ablation and, after a heating and sonication process, was spray-dried on the front surface of an aluminum target. The obtained nanostructured film with a thickness of 1 μm appears, at morphological and chemical analysis, uniformly nanostructured and distributed on the target surface without the presence of oxides or external contaminants. Finally, the size of the NPs can be tuned from tens to hundreds of nanometers simply by varying the growth parameters (i.e., irradiation time, fluence, and laser beam energy).

  20. Potential containment materials for liquid-lead and lead-bismuth eutectic spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.J.; Butt, D.P.; Beard, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    Lead (Pb) and lead-bismuth eutectic (44Pb-56Bi) have been the two primary candidate liquid-metal target materials for the production of spallation neutrons. Selection of a container material for the liquid-metal target will greatly affect the lifetime and safety of the target subsystem. For the lead target, niobium-1 (wt%) zirconium (Nb-1Zr) is a candidate containment material for liquid lead, but its poor oxidation resistance has been a major concern. The oxidation rate of Nb-1Zr was studied based on the calculations of thickness loss due to oxidation. According to these calculations, it appeared that uncoated Nb-1Zr may be used for a one-year operation at 900 C at P{sub O{sub 2}} = 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} torr, but the same material may not be used in argon with 5-ppm oxygen. Coating technologies to reduce the oxidation of Nb-1Zr are reviewed, as are other candidate refractory metals such as molybdenum, tantalum, and tungsten. For the Pb-Bi target, three candidate containment materials are suggested based on a literature survey of the materials compatibility and proton irradiation tests: Croloy 2-1/4, modified 9Cr-1Mo, and 12Cr-1Mo (HT-9) steel. These materials seem to be used only if the lead-bismuth is thoroughly deoxidized and treated with zirconium and magnesium.

  1. Management of tritium European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ene, D.; Andersson, K.; Jensen, M.; Nielsen, S.; Severin, G.

    2015-03-15

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) will produce tritium via spallation and activation processes during operational activities. Within the location of ESS facility in Lund, Sweden site it is mandatory to demonstrate that the management strategy of the produced tritium ensures the compliance with the country regulation criteria. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the different aspects of the tritium management in ESS facility. Besides the design parameter study of the helium coolant purification system of the target the consequences of the tritium releasing into the environment were also analyzed. Calculations show that the annual release of tritium during the normal operations represents a small fraction from the estimated total dose. However, more refined calculations of migration of activated-groundwater should be performed for higher hydraulic conductivities, with the availability of the results on soil examinations. With the assumption of 100% release of tritium to the atmosphere during the occurring of the extreme accidents, it was found as well that the total dose complies with the constraint. (authors)

  2. Rear surface spallation on single-crystal silicon in nanosecond laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jun; Orlov, Sergei S.; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2005-05-01

    Rear surface spallation of single-crystal silicon under 5-ns laser pulse ablation at intensities of 0.6-60GW/cm2 is studied through postablation examination of the ablated samples. The spallation threshold energy and the spallation depth's dependences on the energy and target thickness are measured. From the linear relation between the spallation threshold energy and the target thickness, an estimation of the material spall strength around 1.4GPa is obtained, in reasonable agreement with the spall strength estimation of 0.8-1.2GPa at a strain rate of 107s-1 using Grady's model for brittle materials. The experiment reveals the internal fracturing process over an extended zone in silicon, which is controlled by the competition between the shock pressure load and the laser ablation rate. The qualities of the laser microstructuring and micromachining results are greatly improved by using an acoustic impedance matching approach.

  3. Assessment of the neutron cross section database for mercury for the ORNL spallation source

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.; Spencer, R.R.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1996-06-01

    Neutron source generation based on a high energy particle accelerator has been considered as an alternative to the canceled Advanced Neutron Source project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The proposed technique consists of a spallation neutron source in which neutrons are produced via the interaction of high-energy charged particles in a heavy metal target. Preliminary studies indicate that liquid mercury bombarded with GeV protons provides an excellent neutron source. Accordingly, a survey has been made of the available neutron cross-section data. Since it is expected that spectral modifiers, specifically moderators, will also be incorporated into the source design, the survey included thermal energy, resonance region, and high energy data. It was found that data of individual isotopes were almost non-existent and that the only evaluation found for the natural element had regions of missing data or discrepant data. Therefore, it appears that to achieve the desired degree of accuracy in the spallation source design it is necessary to re-evaluate the mercury database including making new measurements. During the presentation the currently available data will be presented and experiments proposed which can lead to design quality cross sections.

  4. A model for astrophysical spallation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, W. F.; Ayres, C. L.; Merker, M.; Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    A Monte-Carlo model (RENO) for spallation reactions is described which can treat both the spallations induced by a free nucleon and those induced by a complex nucleus. It differs from other such models in that it employs a discrete-nucleon representation of the nucleus and allows clusters of nucleons to form and to participate in the reaction. The RENO model is particularly suited for spallations involving the relatively light nuclei of astrophysical and cosmic-ray interest.

  5. Neutronic moderator design for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, L.A.; Barnes, J.M.; Johnson, J.O.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1998-11-01

    Neutronics analyses are now in progress to support the initial selection of moderator design parameters for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The results of the initial optimization studies involving moderator poison plate location, moderator position, and premoderator performance for the target system are presented in this paper. Also presented is an initial study of the use of a composite moderator to produce a liquid methane like spectrum.

  6. Spallation and fracture resulting from reflected and intersecting stress waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinslow, R.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the effects of stress waves produced in solid by explosions or high-velocity impacts. These waves rebound from free surfaces in the form of tensile waves that are capable of causing internal fractures or spallation of the material. The high-speed framing camera is shown to be an important tool for observing the stress waves and fracture in transparent targets, and its photographs provide valuable information on the mechanics of fracture.

  7. Fission of 232Th in a spallation neutron field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurevich, V. I.; Nikolaev, V. A.; Yakovlev, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    The spatial distributions of thorium fission reaction rate in a spallation neutron field of thick lead target bombarded by protons or deuterons with energy between 1.0 and 3.7 GeV were measured. Approximately a linear dependence of the thorium fission rate on the beam energy is observed. The mean fission cross section of 232Th <σ f > ≈ 123 mb and it does not depend on energy and type of the beam particles.

  8. Influence of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser-irradiated metallic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Ziyu; Li Jianfeng; Yu Yong; Li Xiaoya; Peng Qixian; Zhu Wenjun; Wang Jiaxiang

    2012-11-15

    The influences of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser interaction with metallic targets have been investigated. Particle-in-cell simulations at high laser intensities show that the yield of hot electrons tends to increase with lateral target size, because the larger surface area reduces the electrostatic field on the target, owing to its expansion along the target surface. At lower laser intensities and longer time scales, experimental data characterizing electromagnetic pulse emission as a function of lateral target size also show target-size effects. Charge separation and a larger target tending to have a lower target potential have both been observed. The increase in radiation strength and downshift in radiation frequency with increasing lateral target size can be interpreted using a simple model of the electrical capacity of the target.

  9. Process for the fabrication of aluminum metallized pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Ramsey, Philip B.; Juntz, Robert S.

    1995-01-01

    An improved method for fabricating pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets with superior heat transfer ability, longer life, and maximum energy transmission. Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite is contoured and/or segmented to match the erosion profile of the sputter target and then oriented such that the graphite's high thermal conductivity planes are in maximum contact with a thermally conductive metal backing. The graphite contact surface is metallized, using high rate physical vapor deposition (HRPVD), with an aluminum coating and the thermally conductive metal backing is joined to the metallized graphite target by one of four low-temperature bonding methods; liquid-metal casting, powder metallurgy compaction, eutectic brazing, and laser welding.

  10. Industrial recovered-materials-utilization targets for the metals and metal-products industry

    SciTech Connect

    1980-03-01

    The National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978 directs DOE to set targets for increased utilization of energy-saving recovered materials for certain industries. These targets are to be established at levels representing the maximum feasible increase in utilization of recovered materials that can be achieved progressively by January 1, 1987 and is consistent with technical and economic factors. A benefit to be derived from the increased use of recoverable materials is in energy savings, as state in the Act. Therefore, emhasis on different industries in the metals sector has been related to their energy consumption. The ferrous industry (iron and steel, ferrour foundries and ferralloys), as defined here, accounts for approximately 3%, and all others for the remaining 3%. Energy consumed in the lead and zinc segments is less than 1% each. Emphasis is placed on the ferrous scrap users, followed by the aluminum and copper industries. A bibliography with 209 citations is included.

  11. Spallation performance of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation tubing.

    PubMed

    Peek, G J; Thompson, A; Killer, H M; Firmin, R K

    2000-09-01

    During the prolonged roller pump use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), tubing wear generates spallation. The spallation performance of Tygon S-65-HL was measured and compared with a potential new ECMO tubing, LVA (Portex 800-500-575). Spallation was measured by on-line laser diode particle counting (HIAC) during simulated ECMO. The effects of differing levels of occlusion and pump speed were examined, as was the effect of spallation over time. The spallation produced by Tygon S-65-HL was less than that seen with LVA during 24 h of simulated ECMO (p < 0.001), and after 72 h had fallen almost to zero. Spallation with Tygon tubing increases with increasing pump speed and decreases over time. There appears to be only a weak correlation with occlusion, which is surprising. The spallation performance of Tygon S-65-HL was variable and under some conditions exceeded that of LVA. Overall, however, Tygon S-65-HL produced less spallation than LVA. Therefore, LVA cannot be recommended for clinical ECMO use. PMID:11001170

  12. Cryogenics at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisend, J. G., II; Arnold, P.; Hees, J. Fydrych. W.; Jurns, J. M.; Wang, X. L.

    Cryogenics plays an important role at the European Spallation Source, a world class neutron science center, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. Three principal applications of cryogenics are found at ESS. The SRF cryomodules of the ESS proton linac require cooling at 2 K, 4.5 K and 40 K; the hydrogenmoderator surrounding the target that produces neutrons, requires cooling via 16.5 K helium and LHe is required for many of the scientific instruments. These needs will be met by a set of three cryogenic refrigeration/liquefaction plants and an extensive cryogenic distribution system. Significant progress has been made on the ESS cryogenic system in preparation for the expected first beam on target in 2019. This work includes: funding of industry studies for the accelerator cryoplant, preliminary design of the cryogenic distribution system, investigation of possible in kind contributors and release of the invitation to tender for the accelerator cryoplant.This paper describes the requirements, design solutions and current status of the ESS cryogenic system. The planned recovery of waste heat from the cryogenic plants, a unique aspect of ESS, is described. The procurement of the cryogenic system, expected to be done via a combination of purchase via competitive bids and in kind contributions is also discussed.

  13. Mercury Cavitation Phenomenon in Pulsed Spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Naoe, Takashi; Kawai, Masayoshi

    2008-06-24

    Innovative researches will be performed at Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility in J-PARC, in which a mercury target system will be installed as MW-class pulse spallation neutron sources. Proton beams will be injected into mercury target to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the intense proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. Localized impacts by micro-jets and/or shock waves which are caused by cavitation bubble collapse impose pitting damage on the vessel wall. The pitting damage which degrades the structural integrity of target vessels is a crucial issue for high power mercury targets. Micro-gas-bubbles injection into mercury may be useful to mitigate the pressure wave and the pitting damage. The visualization of cavitation-bubble and gas-bubble collapse behaviors was carried out by using a high-speed video camera. The differences between them are recognized.

  14. Investigation of metallic and metallic glass hollow spheres for fusion target application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Kendall, J. M.; Wang, T. G.; Johnson, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    The first successful formation of submillimeter and millimeter spherical shells of tin and of a gold-lead-antimony alloy by means of the hollow-jet instability technique developed by Kendall is reported. Examination of tin specimens by SEM reveals that surface quality varies from poor to excellent. Whereas the metal is employed only as a convenient and inexpensive material, the gold alloy is important in that it is hard, has a high atomic number, and may be solidified into the amorphous state through the provision of a modest cooling rate. AuPbSb spherules up to 1.5 mm in diameter are produced using LN2 or chilled methanol as a coolant. It is found that these amorphous samples possess a superb surface smoothness compatible with fusion target requirements. It is noted that hollow spheres currently made of this alloy have an average outside diameter of 2000 microns.

  15. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    ScienceCinema

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2010-01-08

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  16. Dose measurements around spallation neutron sources.

    PubMed

    Fragopoulou, M; Stoulos, S; Manolopoulou, M; Krivopustov, M; Zamani, M

    2008-01-01

    Neutron dose measurements and calculations around spallation sources appear to be of great importance in shielding research. Two spallation sources were irradiated by high-energy proton beams delivered by the Nuclotron accelerator (JINR), Dubna. Neutrons produced by the spallation sources were measured by using solid-state nuclear track detectors. In addition, neutron dose was calculated after polyethylene and concrete, using a phenomenological model based on empirical relations applied in high-energy physics. The study provides an analytical and experimental neutron benchmark analysis using the transmission factor and a comparison between the experimental results and calculations. PMID:18957519

  17. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2009-09-30

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  18. New head picked for European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The UK physicist John Womersley is to become the next director-general of the €1.8bn European Spallation Source (ESS), which is currently being built in Lund, Sweden, by a 17-member consortium of European countries.

  19. Neutronic Design Studies for the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, LA

    2001-08-01

    Neutronics analyses are now in progress to support initial selection of target system design features, materials, geometry, and component sizes for the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Calculations have been performed to determine the neutron, proton, heavy ion, and gamma-ray flux spectra as a function of time, energy, and space for the major components of the target station (target, moderators, reflectors, etc.). These analyses were also performed to establish an initial set of performance characteristics for the neutron source. The methodology, reference performance characteristics, and results of initial optimization studies involving moderator poison plate location, target material performance, reflector performance, moderator position and premoderator performance for the target system are presented in this paper.

  20. Synchrotron based spallation neutron source concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.

    1998-07-01

    During the past 20 years, rapid-cycling synchrotrons (RCS) have been used very productively to generate short-pulse thermal neutron beams for neutron scattering research by materials science communities in Japan (KENS), the UK (ISIS) and the US (IPNS). The most powerful source in existence, ISIS in the UK, delivers a 160-kW proton beam to a neutron-generating target. Several recently proposed facilities require proton beams in the MW range to produce intense short-pulse neutron beams. In some proposals, a linear accelerator provides the beam power and an accumulator ring compresses the pulse length to the required {approx} 1 {micro}s. In others, RCS technology provides the bulk of the beam power and compresses the pulse length. Some synchrotron-based proposals achieve the desired beam power by combining two or more synchrotrons of the same energy, and others propose a combination of lower and higher energy synchrotrons. This paper presents the rationale for using RCS technology, and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of synchrotron-based spallation sources.

  1. European Spallation Source and Neutron Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeck, James

    2014-03-01

    International collaborations in large-scale scientific projects can link Sciences and Society. Following this goal, the European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries. Scandinavia is providing 50 percent of the construction cost whilst the other member states are providing financial support mainly via in-kind contribution from institutes, laboratories or industries of the given countries. Scientists and engineers from 35 different countries are members of the workforce in Lund who participate in its design and construction. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics by producing very high flux neutrons to study condensed matter physics, chemistry, biology, nuclear physics and materials science. The ESS will be up to 30 times brighter than today's leading facilities and neutron sources. A tungsten target and a 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator, composed mainly of superconducting Radio-Frequency components, are used to achieve these goals.

  2. The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S.; Abraham, W.; Aleksandrov, A.; Allen, C.; Alonso, J.; Anderson, D.; Arenius, D.; Arthur, T.; Assadi, S.; Ayers, J.; Bach, P.; Badea, V.; Battle, R.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Bergmann, B.; Bernardin, J.; Bhatia, T.; Billen, J.; Birke, T.; Bjorklund, E.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Blind, B.; Blokland, W.; Bookwalter, V.; Borovina, D.; Bowling, S.; Bradley, J.; Brantley, C.; Brennan, J.; Brodowski, J.; Brown, S.; Brown, R.; Bruce, D.; Bultman, N.; Cameron, P.; Campisi, I.; Casagrande, F.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Champion, M.; Champion, M.; Chen, Z.; Cheng, D.; Cho, Y.; Christensen, K.; Chu, C.; Cleaves, J.; Connolly, R.; Cote, T.; Cousineau, S.; Crandall, K.; Creel, J.; Crofford, M.; Cull, P.; Cutler, R.; Dabney, R.; Dalesio, L.; Daly, E.; Damm, R.; Danilov, V.; Davino, D.; Davis, K.; Dawson, C.; Day, L.; Deibele, C.; Delayen, J.; DeLong, J.; Demello, A.; DeVan, W.; Digennaro, R.; Dixon, K.; Dodson, G.; Doleans, M.; Doolittle, L.; Doss, J.; Drury, M.; Elliot, T.; Ellis, S.; Error, J.; Fazekas, J.; Fedotov, A.; Feng, P.; Fischer, J.; Fox, W.; Fuja, R.; Funk, W.; Galambos, J.; Ganni, V.; Garnett, R.; Geng, X.; Gentzlinger, R.; Giannella, M.; Gibson, P.; Gillis, R.; Gioia, J.; Gordon, J.; Gough, R.; Greer, J.; Gregory, W.; Gribble, R.; Grice, W.; Gurd, D.; Gurd, P.; Guthrie, A.; Hahn, H.; Hardek, T.; Hardekopf, R.; Harrison, J.; Hatfield, D.; He, P.; Hechler, M.; Heistermann, F.; Helus, S.; Hiatt, T.; Hicks, S.; Hill, J.; Hill, J.; Hoff, L.; Hoff, M.; Hogan, J.; Holding, M.; Holik, P.; Holmes, J.; Holtkamp, N.; Hovater, C.; Howell, M.; Hseuh, H.; Huhn, A.; Hunter, T.; Ilg, T.; Jackson, J.; Jain, A.; Jason, A.; Jeon, D.; Johnson, G.; Jones, A.; Joseph, S.; Justice, A.; Kang, Y.; Kasemir, K.; Keller, R.; Kersevan, R.; Kerstiens, D.; Kesselman, M.; Kim, S.; Kneisel, P.; Kravchuk, L.; Kuneli, T.; Kurennoy, S.; Kustom, R.; Kwon, S.; Ladd, P.; Lambiase, R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Lewis, S.; Liaw, C.; Lionberger, C.; Lo, C. C.; Long, C.; Ludewig, H.; Ludvig, J.; Luft, P.; Lynch, M.; Ma, H.; MacGill, R.; Macha, K.; Madre, B.; Mahler, G.; Mahoney, K.; Maines, J.; Mammosser, J.; Mann, T.; Marneris, I.; Marroquin, P.; Martineau, R.; Matsumoto, K.; McCarthy, M.; McChesney, C.; McGahern, W.; McGehee, P.; Meng, W.; Merz, B.; Meyer, R.; Meyer, R.; Miller, B.; Mitchell, R.; Mize, J.; Monroy, M.; Munro, J.; Murdoch, G.; Musson, J.; Nath, S.; Nelson, R.; Nelson, R.; O`Hara, J.; Olsen, D.; Oren, W.; Oshatz, D.; Owens, T.; Pai, C.; Papaphilippou, I.; Patterson, N.; Patterson, J.; Pearson, C.; Pelaia, T.; Pieck, M.; Piller, C.; Plawski, T.; Plum, M.; Pogge, J.; Power, J.; Powers, T.; Preble, J.; Prokop, M.; Pruyn, J.; Purcell, D.; Rank, J.; Raparia, D.; Ratti, A.; Reass, W.; Reece, K.; Rees, D.; Regan, A.; Regis, M.; Reijonen, J.; Rej, D.; Richards, D.; Richied, D.; Rode, C.; Rodriguez, W.; Rodriguez, M.; Rohlev, A.; Rose, C.; Roseberry, T.; Rowton, L.; Roybal, W.; Rust, K.; Salazer, G.; Sandberg, J.; Saunders, J.; Schenkel, T.; Schneider, W.; Schrage, D.; Schubert, J.; Severino, F.; Shafer, R.; Shea, T.; Shishlo, A.; Shoaee, H.; Sibley, C.; Sims, J.; Smee, S.; Smith, J.; Smith, K.; Spitz, R.; Staples, J.; Stein, P.; Stettler, M.; Stirbet, M.; Stockli, M.; Stone, W.; Stout, D.; Stovall, J.; Strelo, W.; Strong, H.; Sundelin, R.; Syversrud, D.; Szajbler, M.; Takeda, H.; Tallerico, P.; Tang, J.; Tanke, E.; Tepikian, S.; Thomae, R.; Thompson, D.; Thomson, D.; Thuot, M.; Treml, C.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Tuzel, W.; Vassioutchenko, A.; Virostek, S.; Wallig, J.; Wanderer, P.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. G.; Wangler, T.; Warren, D.; Wei, J.; Weiss, D.; Welton, R.; Weng, J.; Weng, W.-T.; Wezensky, M.; White, M.; Whitlatch, T.; Williams, D.; Williams, E.; Wilson, K.; Wiseman, M.; Wood, R.; Wright, P.; Wu, A.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Young, K.; Young, L.; Yourd, R.; Zachoszcz, A.; Zaltsman, A.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhukov, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) was designed and constructed by a collaboration of six U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories. The SNS accelerator system consists of a 1 GeV linear accelerator and an accumulator ring providing 1.4 MW of proton beam power in microsecond-long beam pulses to a liquid mercury target for neutron production. The accelerator complex consists of a front-end negative hydrogen-ion injector system, an 87 MeV drift tube linear accelerator, a 186 MeV side-coupled linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, a 248-m circumference accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines. The accelerator complex is supported by ~100 high-power RF power systems, a 2 K cryogenic plant, ~400 DC and pulsed power supply systems, ~400 beam diagnostic devices and a distributed control system handling ~100,000 I/O signals. The beam dynamics design of the SNS accelerator is presented, as is the engineering design of the major accelerator subsystems.

  3. CNO destruction by spallation and type I X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tillett, Jason C.; Macdonald, James

    1992-01-01

    Recent work on the surface boundary conditions of accreting neutron stars indicates that appreciable amounts of CNO elements can be destroyed by spallation. Previous authors assume an accretion of near-solar-abundance material which is not altered by boundary effects. Steady state models of accreting neutron stars are constructed assuming all but traces of metals are destroyed due to spallation in the surface layers. Models with solar accretion for comparison are also constructed. The models are compared with Exosat observations of 4U/MXB 1636 - 53. It is found that the simplifications introduced by assuming CNO destruction does not bring theory closer to describing what is observed.

  4. KNN classification of metallic targets using the magnetic polarizability tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makkonen, J.; Marsh, L. A.; Vihonen, J.; Järvi, A.; Armitage, D. W.; Visa, A.; Peyton, A. J.

    2014-05-01

    Walk-through metal detectors are used at check points for preventing personnel and passengers from carrying threatening metallic objects, such as knives and guns, into a secure area. These systems are capable of detecting small metallic items, such as handcuff keys and blades, but are unable to distinguish accurately between threatening objects and innocuous items. This paper studies the extent to which a K-nearest-neighbour classifier can distinguish various kinds of metallic objects, such as knives, shoe shanks, belts and containers. The classifier uses features extracted from the magnetic polarizability tensor, which represents the electromagnetic properties of the object. The tests include distinguishing threatening objects from innocuous ones, classifying a set of objects into 13 classes, and distinguishing between several similar objects within an object class. A walk-through metal detection system is used as source for the test data, which consist of 835 scans and 67 objects. The results presented show a typical success rate of over 95% for recognizing threats, and over 85% for correct classification. In addition, we have shown that the system is capable of distinguishing between similar objects reliably. Overall, the method shows promise for the field of security screening and suggests the need for further research.

  5. Process for the fabrication of aluminum metallized pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Ramsey, P.B.; Juntz, R.S.

    1995-07-04

    An improved method is disclosed for fabricating pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets with superior heat transfer ability, longer life, and maximum energy transmission. Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite is contoured and/or segmented to match the erosion profile of the sputter target and then oriented such that the graphite`s high thermal conductivity planes are in maximum contact with a thermally conductive metal backing. The graphite contact surface is metallized, using high rate physical vapor deposition (HRPVD), with an aluminum coating and the thermally conductive metal backing is joined to the metallized graphite target by one of four low-temperature bonding methods; liquid-metal casting, powder metallurgy compaction, eutectic brazing, and laser welding. 11 figs.

  6. Study of accelerator neutrino detection at a spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Yang

    2016-06-01

    We study the detection of accelerator neutrinos produced at the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS). Using the code FLUKA, we have simulated the production of neutrinos in a proton beam on a tungsten target and obtained the yield efficiency, numerical flux, and average energy of different flavors of neutrinos. Furthermore, detection of these accelerator neutrinos is investigated in two reaction channels: neutrino-electron reactions and neutrino-carbon reactions. The expected numbers of different flavors of neutrinos have also been calculated. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205185, 11175020)

  7. Finite element simulation of the film spallation process induced by the pulsed laser peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M.; Zeng, D. Y.; Kan, J. P.; Zhang, Y. K.; Cai, L.; Shen, Z. H.; Zhang, X. R.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2003-09-01

    The laser spallation technique for measuring the interface strength between a coating and a substrate is similar to laser shock peening, in which the stress wave induced by laser shock cause debond on the interface between a hard coating with micron thickness and a metal substrate. According to the modified experiment setup of the laser spallation technique, finite element analysis simulated the process of the film spallation by taking the laser loading as a direct input. We presented a numerical model of finite element that the laser spallation process includes two related, but uncoupled procedures. One was transient heat transfer in a two-layer medium. The other was the related transient elastic wave propagation in the same two-layer media, which was the result of the thermal misfit by transient heating. Based on the threshold of film spallation, we analyzed the process of laser shocking to study the propagation of stress wave and evaluate the spall resistance of sputtered films. The analysis result showed the dynamic adhesive strength of the interface between the TiN coating and the 304 stainless steel substrate was 193.0 MPa.

  8. Hollow metal target magnetron sputter type radio frequency ion source.

    PubMed

    Yamada, N; Kasuya, T; Tsubouchi, N; Wada, M

    2014-02-01

    A 70 mm diameter 70 mm long compact ion source equipped with a hollow sputtering target has been designed and tested. The hollow sputtering target serves as the radio frequency (RF) plasma excitation electrode at 13.56 MHz. A stable beam of Cu(+) has been extracted when Ar was used as the discharge support gas. In the extracted beam, Cu(+) had occupied more than 85% of the total ion current. Further increase in Cu(+) ions in the beam is anticipated by increasing the RF power and Ar pressure. PMID:24593636

  9. Hollow metal target magnetron sputter type radio frequency ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, N. Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.; Tsubouchi, N.

    2014-02-15

    A 70 mm diameter 70 mm long compact ion source equipped with a hollow sputtering target has been designed and tested. The hollow sputtering target serves as the radio frequency (RF) plasma excitation electrode at 13.56 MHz. A stable beam of Cu{sup +} has been extracted when Ar was used as the discharge support gas. In the extracted beam, Cu{sup +} had occupied more than 85% of the total ion current. Further increase in Cu{sup +} ions in the beam is anticipated by increasing the RF power and Ar pressure.

  10. Metallic alloy targets for high Tc superconducting film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manini, P.; Nigro, A.; Romano, P.; Vaglio, R.

    1989-02-01

    Many experiments are nowadays conducting worldwide on superconducting films based on the recently developed high Tc superconductor materials (YBCO, BISCO, etc). There are different ways to produce these films, among which sputtering and evaporation are most popular. Normally, use is made of oxides, pure metals or compounds as material sources. In the present paper we describe the fabrication process and the physico-chemical characteristics of various metallic alloy components for both sputtering and evaporation processes which show various advantages in terms of stability, easiness of use, purity, flexibility in composition and shape and allow good process control. Deposition techniques and experimental results obtained on thin films of the new superconductors realized starting from these alloys are also reported.

  11. High power neutron production targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wender, S.

    1996-06-01

    The author describes issues of concern in the design of targets and associated systems for high power neutron production facilities. The facilities include uses for neutron scattering, accelerator driven transmutation, accelerator production of tritium, short pulse spallation sources, and long pulse spallation sources. Each of these applications requires a source with different design needs and consequently different implementation in practise.

  12. Spallation of the Galileo probe heat shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundell, J. H.

    1982-06-01

    The Galileo probe heat shield will encounter severe radiative and convective heating during entry into Jupiter's atmosphere. The shield is made of two different carbon phenolic composites; one is chopped-molded, and the other is tape-wrapped, both of which tend to spall under intense heating conditions. To characterize this phenomenon, an experimental program, using a gasdynamic laser, was initiated. Tests were performed at a variety of radiation intensities, and both the total and spallation mass-loss rates were measured and correlated with intensity. These correlations were then applied to calculated flight heating conditions for two model atmospheres. Entry of a 310-kg probe into the nominal atmosphere would result in a spallation mass loss of 6.3 kg, or 7.4% of the expected thermochemical mass loss. Similarly, entry of that probe into the cool-dense atmosphere would result in 11.9 kg of spallation, or about 10% of the expected thermochemical mass loss.

  13. Spallation of the Galileo probe heat shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundell, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    The Galileo probe heat shield will encounter severe radiative and convective heating during entry into Jupiter's atmosphere. The shield is made of two different carbon phenolic composites; one is chopped-molded, and the other is tape-wrapped, both of which tend to spall under intense heating conditions. To characterize this phenomenon, an experimental program, using a gasdynamic laser, was initiated. Tests were performed at a variety of radiation intensities, and both the total and spallation mass-loss rates were measured and correlated with intensity. These correlations were then applied to calculated flight heating conditions for two model atmospheres. Entry of a 310-kg probe into the nominal atmosphere would result in a spallation mass loss of 6.3 kg, or 7.4% of the expected thermochemical mass loss. Similarly, entry of that probe into the cool-dense atmosphere would result in 11.9 kg of spallation, or about 10% of the expected thermochemical mass loss.

  14. Moisture-Induced Spallation and Interfacial Hydrogen Embrittlement of Alumina Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal expansion mismatch stresses and interfacial sulfur activity are the major factors producing primary Al2O3 scale spallation on high temperature alloys. However, moisture-induced delayed spallation appears as a secondary, but often dramatic, illustration of an additional mechanistic detail. A historical review of delayed failure of alumina scales and TBC s on superalloys is presented herein. Similarities with metallic phenomena suggest that hydrogen embrittlement from ambient humidity, resulting from the reaction Al+3H2O=Al(OH)3+3H(+)+3e(-), is the operative mechanism. This proposal was tested by standard cathodic hydrogen charging in 1N H2SO4, applied to Rene N5 pre-oxidized at 1150 C for 1000 1-hr cycles, and monitored by weight change, induced current, and microstructure. Here cathodic polarization at -2.0 V abruptly stripped mature Al2O3 scales at the oxide-metal interface. Anodic polarization at +2.0 V, however, produced alloy dissolution. Finally, with no applied voltage, the electrolyte alone produced neither scale spallation nor alloy dissolution. These experiments thus highlight the detrimental effects of hydrogen charging on alumina scale adhesion. It is proposed that interfacial hydrogen embrittlement is produced by moist air and is the root cause of both moisture-induced, delayed scale spallation and desktop TBC failures.

  15. Enhancement of heat removal using concave liquid metal targets for high-power accelerators.

    SciTech Connect

    Konkashbaev, I.; Fischer, P.; Hassanein, A.; Mokhov, N. V.; Mathematics and Computer Science; FNAL

    2007-01-01

    The need is increasing for development of high-power targets and beam dump areas for the production of intense beams of secondary particles. The severe constraints arising from a megawatt beam deposited on targets and absorbers call for nontrivial procedures to dilute the beam. This study describes the development of targets and absorbers and the advantages of using flowing liquid metal in concave channels first proposed by IFMIF to raise the liquid metal boiling point by increasing the pressure in liquid supported by a centrifugal force. Such flow with a back-wall is subject to Taylor-Couette instability. The instability can play a positive role of increasing the heat transfer from the hottest region in the target/absorber to the back-wall cooled by water. Results of theoretical analysis and numerical modeling of both targets and dump areas for the IFMIF, ILC, and RIA facilities are presented.

  16. Simulation of a beam rotation system for a spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Tibor; Reggiani, Davide; Seidel, Mike; Talanov, Vadim; Wohlmuther, Michael

    2015-04-01

    With a nominal beam power of nearly 1 MW on target, the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source (SINQ), ranks among the world's most powerful spallation neutron sources. The proton beam transport to the SINQ target is carried out exclusively by means of linear magnetic elements. In the transport line to SINQ the beam is scattered in two meson production targets and as a consequence, at the SINQ target entrance the beam shape can be described by Gaussian distributions in transverse x and y directions with tails cut short by collimators. This leads to a highly nonuniform power distribution inside the SINQ target, giving rise to thermal and mechanical stresses. In view of a future proton beam intensity upgrade, the possibility of homogenizing the beam distribution by means of a fast beam rotation system is currently under investigation. Important aspects which need to be studied are the impact of a rotating proton beam on the resulting neutron spectra, spatial flux distributions and additional—previously not present—proton losses causing unwanted activation of accelerator components. Hence a new source description method was developed for the radiation transport code MCNPX. This new feature makes direct use of the results from the proton beam optics code TURTLE. Its advantage to existing MCNPX source options is that all phase space information and correlations of each primary beam particle computed with TURTLE are preserved and transferred to MCNPX. Simulations of the different beam distributions together with their consequences in terms of neutron production are presented in this publication. Additionally, a detailed description of the coupling method between TURTLE and MCNPX is provided.

  17. Targeted Removal of Bioavailable Metal as a Detoxification Strategy for Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyuan; Guo, Lin; Morris, Daniel; Kane, Agnes B.; Hurt, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    There is substantial evidence for toxicity and/or carcinogenicity upon inhalation of pure transition metals in fine particulate form. Carbon nanotube catalyst residues may trigger similar metal-mediated toxicity, but only if the metal is bioavailable and not fully encapsulated within fluid-protective carbon shells. Recent studies have documented the presence of bioavailable iron and nickel in a variety of commercial as-produced and vendor “purified” nanotubes, and the present article examines techniques to avoid or remove this bioavailable metal. First, data are presented on the mechanisms potentially responsible for free metal in “purified” samples, including kinetic limitations during metal dissolution, the re-deposition or adsorption of metal on nanotube outer surfaces, and carbon shell damage during last-step oxidation or one-pot purification. Optimized acid treatment protocols are presented for targeting the free metal, considering the effects of acid strength, composition, time, and conditions for post-treatment water washing. Finally, after optimized acid treatment, it is shown that the remaining, non-bioavailable (encapsulated) metal persists in a stable and biologically unavailable form up to two months in an in vitro biopersistence assay, suggesting that simple removal of bioavailable (free) metal is a promising strategy for reducing nanotube health risks. PMID:19255622

  18. Radiological Hazard of Spallation Products in Accelerator-Driven System

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, M.; Stankovskii, A.; Artisyuk, V.; Korovin, Yu.; Shmelev, A.; Titarenko, Yu.

    2002-09-15

    The central issue underlying this paper is related to elucidating the hazard of radioactive spallation products that might be an important factor affecting the design option of accelerator-driven systems (ADSs). Hazard analysis based on the concept of Annual Limit on Intake identifies alpha-emitting isotopes of rare earths (REs) (dysprosium, gadolinium, and samarium) as the dominant contributors to the overall toxicity of traditional (W, Pb, Pb-Bi) targets. The matter is addressed from several points of view: code validation to simulate their yields, choice of material for the neutron producing targets, and challenging the beam type. The paper quantitatively determines the domain in which the toxicity of REs exceeds that of polonium activation products broadly discussed now in connection with advertising lead-bismuth technology for the needs of ADSs.

  19. Harmonic generation in the extended plasmas produced on the non-metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeev, R. A.

    2016-04-01

    The review of the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) studies in the extended plasma plumes produced on the surfaces of non-metal targets (elemental semiconductors, oxygen- and fluorine-contained crystals) is presented. The objective of those studies was to reveal the attractive properties of non-metal plasmas. We discuss the results of HHG optimization in the above plasma plumes using different methods. These studies demonstrate the usefulness of the plasma harmonic approach for the analysis of the nonlinear optical and spectroscopic properties of the extended laser-produced plasmas formed on the non-metal surfaces.

  20. Generic guide concepts for the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendler, C.; Martin Rodriguez, D.; Bentley, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The construction of the European Spallation Source (ESS) faces many challenges from the neutron beam transport point of view: the spallation source is specified as being driven by a 5 MW beam of protons, each with 2 GeV energy, and yet the requirements in instrument background suppression relative to measured signal vary between 10-6 and 10-8. The energetic particles, particularly above 20 MeV, which are expected to be produced in abundance in the target, have to be filtered in order to make the beamlines safe, operational and provide good quality measurements with low background. We present generic neutron guides of short and medium length instruments which are optimised for good performance at minimal cost. Direct line of sight to the source is avoided twice, with either the first point out of line of sight or both being inside the bunker (20 m) to minimise shielding costs. These guide geometries are regarded as a baseline to define standards for instruments to be constructed at ESS. They are used to find commonalities and develop principles and solutions for common problems. Lastly, we report the impact of employing the over-illumination concept to mitigate losses from random misalignment passively, and that over-illumination should be used sparingly in key locations to be effective. For more widespread alignment issues, a more direct, active approach is likely to be needed.

  1. Plasma Processing of Functional Thin Films by Sputtering Deposition Using Metal-Based Powder Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Hiroharu; Ohshima, Tamiko; Ihara, Takeshi; Arafune, Kento; Taniyama, Daichi; Yagyu, Yoshihito; Suda, Yoshiaki

    2013-11-01

    Titanium-based functional thin films were prepared by a sputtering deposition method using a metal powder target, and the electron density and temperature of the processing plasma were investigated. The electron density of the plasma, measured by a probe method, when using a powder target was higher than that when using a bulk target. The deposition rate when using a powder target was also higher than that in the case of a bulk target. These results may be due to the net-cathode area of the powder target being larger than that of the bulk target. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction measurements, and atomic force microscopy images of the films prepared using the Ti powder target indicated nearly the same properties as those of films prepared using a Ti bulk target, and the prepared films are oxide. These results suggest that TiO2 thin films can be prepared using a Ti powder target and that the quality is almost the same as those of films prepared using a Ti bulk target.

  2. Generation of negative pressures and spallation phenomena in diamond exposed to a picosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Abrosimov, S A; Bazhulin, A P; Bol'shakov, A P; Konov, V I; Krasyuk, I K; Pashinin, P P; Ral'chenko, V G; Semenov, A Yu; Sovyk, D N; Stuchebryukhov, I A; Khomich, A A; Fortov, V E; Khishchenko, K V

    2014-06-30

    The spallation phenomena in poly- and single-crystal synthetic diamonds have been experimentally investigated. A shockwave impact on a target was implemented using a 70-ps laser pulse in the Kamerton-T facility. The ablation pressure of 0.66 TPa on the front target surface was formed by pulsed radiation of a neodymium phosphate glass laser (second harmonic λ = 0.527 mm, pulse energy 2.5 J) with an intensity as high as 2 × 10{sup 13} W cm{sup -2}. The maximum diamond spall strength σ* ≈ 16.5 GPa is found to be 24% of the theoretical ultimate strength. Raman scattering data indicate that a small amount of crystalline diamond in the spallation region on the rear side of the target is graphitised. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  3. Formation of periodic structures upon laser ablation of metal targets in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakevich, Pavel V; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2005-09-30

    Experimental data on the formation of ordered microstructures produced upon ablation of metal targets in liquids irradiated by a copper vapour laser or a pulsed Nd:YAG laser are presented. The structures were obtained on brass, bronze, copper, and tungsten substrates immersed in distilled water or ethanol. As a result of multiple-pulse laser ablation by a scanning beam, ordered microcones with pointed vertexes are formed on the target surface. The structures are separated by deep narrow channels. The structure period was experimentally shown to increase linearly with diameter of the laser spot on the target surface. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  4. MOVING SOLID METALLIC TARGETS FOR PION PRODUCTION IN THE MUON COLLIDER/NEUTRINO FACTORY PROJECT.

    SciTech Connect

    THIEBERGER,P.KIRK,H.G.WEGGEL,R.J.MCDONALD,K.

    2004-03-03

    The production of large fluxes of pions and muons using high-energy, high-intensity proton pulses impinging on solid or liquid targets presents unique problems which have not yet been entirely solved. We investigate the possibilities of using solid targets by choosing a metal of either extremely low thermal expansion coefficient 1 or exceptionally high mechanical strength. Candidates are respectively Super-Invar and Vascomax 350 or Inconel 718. Moving targets in the form of chains or cables would be required for cooling purposes. These materials seem easily capable of surviving the beam pulses required for the largest beam power contemplated. Questions regarding radiation damage effects are being investigated.

  5. Increase of the deposition rate in reactive sputtering of metal oxides using a ceramic nitride target

    SciTech Connect

    Severin, D.; Wuttig, M.; Kappertz, O.; Nyberg, T.; Berg, S.; Pflug, A.

    2009-05-01

    We present a method to eliminate hysteresis effects and to increase the deposition rate for the reactive sputtering of metal oxides. This is achieved by using a ceramic nitride target in an argon-oxygen atmosphere. Although the use of a ceramic nitride target leads to pronounced changes of the processing characteristics, incorporation of nitrogen into the growing film is very small. These observations can be theoretically predicted using an extension of Berg's model [S. Berg and T. Nyberg, Thin Solid Films 476, 215 (2005)] to two different reactive gases and a compound target.

  6. 3D laser scanning microscopy of hypervelocity impact features in metal and aerogel targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, J. K.; Postberg, F.; Price, M. C.; Trieloff, M.; Li, Y. W.; Srama, R.

    2012-09-01

    We present the results of a study into the mapping of hypervelocity impact features using a Keyence VK-X200 3D laser scanning microscope. The impact features observed are impact craters in a variety of different metal targets (Al, Au and Cu) and impact tracks in aerogel targets, similar to those used in the Stardust mission. Differences in crater morphology between different target materials and impact velocities, as well as differences in track depth and diameter in aerogel, for particles of known constant dimensions, are discussed.

  7. A multitask neutron beam line for spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietropaolo, A.; Festa, G.; Grazzi, F.; Barzagli, E.; Scherillo, A.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Civita, F.

    2011-08-01

    Here we present a new concept for a time-of-flight neutron scattering instrument allowing for simultaneous application of three different techniques: time-of-flight neutron diffraction, neutron resonance capture analysis and Bragg edge transmission analysis. The instrument can provide average resolution neutron radiography too. The potential of the proposed concept was explored by implementing the necessary equipment on INES (Italian Neutron Experimental Station) at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). The results obtained show the effectiveness of the proposed instrument to acquire relevant quantitative information in a non-invasive way on a historical metallurgical sample, namely a Japanese hand guard (tsuba). The aforementioned neutron techniques simultaneously exploited the extended neutron energy range available from 10 meV to 1 keV. This allowed a fully satisfactory characterization of the sample in terms of metal components and their combination in different phases, and forging and assembling methods.

  8. Peptide-Metal Organic Framework Swimmers that Direct the Motion toward Chemical Targets.

    PubMed

    Ikezoe, Yasuhiro; Fang, Justin; Wasik, Tomasz L; Shi, Menglu; Uemura, Takashi; Kitagawa, Susumu; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2015-06-10

    Highly efficient and robust chemical motors are expected for the application in microbots that can selectively swim toward targets and accomplish their tasks in sensing, labeling, and delivering. However, one of major issues for such development is that current artificial swimmers have difficulty controlling their directional motion toward targets like bacterial chemotaxis. To program synthetic motors with sensing capability for the target-directed motion, we need to develop swimmers whose motions are sensitive to chemical gradients in environments. Here we create a new intelligent biochemical swimmer by integrating metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and peptides that can sense toxic heavy metals in solution and swim toward the targets. With the aid of Pb-binding enzymes, the peptide-MOF motor can directionally swim toward PbSe quantum dots (QD) by sensing pH gradient and eventually complete the motion as the swimmer reaches the highest gradient point at the target position in solution. This type of technology could be evolved to miniaturize chemical robotic systems that sense target chemicals and swim toward target locations. PMID:26010172

  9. Modification of base-side {sup 99}MO production processes for LEU metal-foil targets.

    SciTech Connect

    Vandegrift, G. F.; Leonard, R. A.; Aase, S.; Sedlet, J.; Koma, Y.; Conner, C.; Clark, C. R.; Meyer, M. K.

    1999-09-30

    Argonne National Laboratory is cooperating with the National Atomic Energy Commission of the Argentine Republic (CNEA) to convert their {sup 99}Mo production process, which uses high enriched uranium (HEU), to low-enriched uranium (LEU), The program is multifaceted; however, discussed in this paper are (1) results of laboratory experiments to develop means for substituting LEU metal-foil targets into the current process and (2) preparation of uranium-alloy or uranium-metal/aluminum-dispersion targets. Although {sup 99}Mo production is a multi-step process, the first two steps (target dissolution and primary molybdenum recovery) are by far the most important in the conversion. Commonly, once molybdenum is separated from the bulk of the uranium, the remainder of the process need not be modified. Our results show that up to this point in our study, conversion of the CNEA process to LEU appears viable.

  10. Cavitation in a Mercury Target

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    2000-09-01

    Recent theoretical work on the formation of bubble nucleation centers by energetic particles leads to some reasonably credible calculations of the maximum negative pressure that might be sustained without bubble formation in the mercury target of the Spallation Neutron Source.

  11. "Cavitation in a Mercury Target"

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    2000-09-06

    Recent theoretical work on the formation of bubble nucleation centers by energetic particles leads to some reasonably credible calculations of the maximum negative pressure that might be sustained without bubble formation in the mercury target of the Spallation Neutron Source.

  12. The spin-echo spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohl, M.; Monkenbusch, M.; Arend, N.; Kozielewski, T.; Vehres, G.; Tiemann, C.; Butzek, M.; Soltner, H.; Giesen, U.; Achten, R.; Stelzer, H.; Lindenau, B.; Budwig, A.; Kleines, H.; Drochner, M.; Kaemmerling, P.; Wagener, M.; Möller, R.; Iverson, E. B.; Sharp, M.; Richter, D.

    2012-12-01

    A novel neutron spin-echo spectrometer with superconducting main coils enabling enclosure by a double walled μ-metal magnetic shielding chamber has been built and set into operation at the spallation neutron source in Oak Ridge. The layout of the spectrometer is described. Performance with emphasis on the superconducting main solenoids and the time-of-flight operation is described. Data on resolution, stability and first experiments are shown.

  13. Promises and Challenges of Two-Step Targets for Production of Neutron-rich RIBs

    SciTech Connect

    Talbert, W.L.; Drake, D.M.; Hsu, H.-H.; Wilson, M.T.

    2003-08-26

    Development of a prototype two-step target to produce neutron-rich RIBs is presented, with particular emphasis on thermal analysis under high-power operation. The two-step target is an attractive concept for production of fission-product activities without interference by high-energy spallation reactions which occur in direct production targets. In this concept, a high-energy production beam interacts with a primary target of refractory metal, depositing beam energy in the primary target and producing low-energy neutrons that cause fissions in a surrounding secondary target of mixed UC2 and excess C. Thermal analysis of the composite target presents challenges in cooling the primary target while maintaining the secondary target at temperatures suitable for release of the fission products. The effects of fission energy deposition in the secondary target are discussed, along with the complexities resulting from the thermally insulating character of the secondary target material.

  14. Isotopic production cross sections and recoil velocities of spallation-fission fragments in the reaction {sup 238}U(1A GeV)+d

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, J.; Benlliure, J.; Casarejos, E.; Armbruster, P.; Enqvist, T.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Bernas, M.; Mustapha, B.; Rejmund, F.; Stephan, C.; Taieeb, J.; Tassan-Got, L.; Boudard, A.; Legrain, R.; Leray, S.; Volant, C.; Wlazlo, W.

    2007-01-15

    Fission fragments of 1A GeV{sup 238}U nuclei interacting with a deuterium target have been investigated with the Fragment Separator (FRS) at Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) by measuring their isotopic production cross sections and velocities. Results, along with those obtained recently for spallation-evaporation fragments, provide a comprehensive analysis of the spallation nuclear productions in this reaction. Details about the experimental performance, data reduction and results are presented.

  15. Targeted cleavage of HIV RRE RNA by Rev-coupled transition metal chelates.

    PubMed

    Joyner, Jeff C; Cowan, J A

    2011-06-29

    A series of compounds that target reactive metal chelates to the HIV-1 Rev response element (RRE) mRNA have been synthesized. Dissociation constants and chemical reactivity toward HIV RRE RNA have been determined and evaluated in terms of reduction potential, coordination unsaturation, and overall charge associated with the metal-chelate-Rev complex. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) were linked to a lysine side chain of a Rev-derived peptide by either EDC/NHS or isothiocyanate coupling. The resulting chelate-Rev (EDTA-Rev, DTPA-Rev, NTA-Rev, and DOTA-Rev) conjugates were used to form coordination complexes with Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Cu(2+) such that the arginine-rich Rev peptide could mediate localization of the metal chelates to the Rev peptide's high-affinity mRNA binding partner, RRE stem loop IIB. Metal complexes of the extended peptides GGH-Rev and KGHK-Rev, which also contain N-terminal peptidic chelators (ATCUN motifs), were studied for comparison. A fluorescence titration assay revealed high-affinity RRE RNA binding by all 22 metal-chelate-Rev species, with K(D) values ranging from ~0.2 to 16 nM, indicating little to no loss of RNA affinity due to the coupling of the metal chelates to the Rev peptide. Dissociation constants for binding at a previously unobserved low-affinity site are also reported. Rates of RNA modification by each metal-chelate-Rev species were determined and varied from ~0.28 to 4.9 nM/min but were optimal for Cu(2+)-NTA-Rev. Metal-chelate reduction potentials were determined and varied from -228 to +1111 mV vs NHE under similar solution conditions, allowing direct comparison of reactivity with redox thermodynamics. Optimal activity was observed when the reduction potential for the metal center was poised between those of the two principal co-reagents for metal-promoted formation of

  16. The Spallation Neutron Source Beam Commissioning and Initial Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Stuart; Aleksandrov, Alexander V.; Allen, Christopher K.; Assadi, Saeed; Bartoski, Dirk; Blokland, Willem; Casagrande, F.; Campisi, I.; Chu, C.; Cousineau, Sarah M.; Crofford, Mark T.; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Deibele, Craig E.; Dodson, George W.; Feshenko, A.; Galambos, John D.; Han, Baoxi; Hardek, T.; Holmes, Jeffrey A.; Holtkamp, N.; Howell, Matthew P.; Jeon, D.; Kang, Yoon W.; Kasemir, Kay; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kravchuk, L.; Long, Cary D.; McManamy, T.; Pelaia, II, Tom; Piller, Chip; Plum, Michael A.; Pogge, James R.; Purcell, John David; Shea, T.; Shishlo, Andrei P; Sibley, C.; Stockli, Martin P.; Stout, D.; Tanke, E.; Welton, Robert F; Zhang, Y.; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2015-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator delivers a one mega-Watt beam to a mercury target to produce neutrons used for neutron scattering materials research. It delivers ~ 1 GeV protons in short (< 1 us) pulses at 60 Hz. At an average power of ~ one mega-Watt, it is the highest-powered pulsed proton accelerator. The accelerator includes the first use of superconducting RF acceleration for a pulsed protons at this energy. The storage ring used to create the short time structure has record peak particle per pulse intensity. Beam commissioning took place in a staged manner during the construction phase of SNS. After the construction, neutron production operations began within a few months, and one mega-Watt operation was achieved within three years. The methods used to commission the beam and the experiences during initial operation are discussed.

  17. BEAM INSTRUMENTATION FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WITKOVER,R.L.; CAMERON,P.R.; SHEA,T.J.; CONNOLLY,R.C.; KESSELMAN,M.

    1999-03-29

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be constructed by a multi-laboratory collaboration with BNL responsible for the transfer lines and ring. [1] The 1 MW beam power necessitates careful monitoring to minimize un-controlled loss. This high beam power will influence the design of the monitors in the high energy beam transport line (HEBT) from linac to ring, in the ring, and in the ring-to-target transfer line (RTBT). The ring instrumentation must cover a 3-decade range of beam intensity during accumulation. Beam loss monitoring will be especially critical since un-controlled beam loss must be kept below 10{sup -4}. A Beam-In-Gap (BIG) monitor is being designed to assure out-of-bucket beam will not be lost in the ring.

  18. Progress for the European spallation source in Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettier, Christian; Carlile, Colin J.; Carlsson, Patrik

    2009-02-01

    The proposal for the European Spallation Source (ESS) is still awaiting a decision to start construction. Nevertheless, there appears to be renewed interest and consensus in Europe to build a next-generation neutron source. The current understanding is that the ESS project will be based on a 5 MW linear proton beam accelerator and a long-pulse target station, feeding 22 neutron instruments. Several sites in Europe have submitted expressions of interest to host ESS and are preparing their final bids. Furthermore, the site selection process and discussions on potential partnerships within Europe have started. Key factors for site selection include the potential for scientific environment and proximity to other European large-scale research facilities. The Swedish proposal to construct ESS in Lund in the region Skåne will make ESS a vibrant scientific site.

  19. COMMISSIONING OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE ACCELERATOR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator complex consists of a 2.5 MeV H- front-end injector system, a 186 MeV normal-conducting linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, an accumulator ring, and associated beam transport lines. The linac was commissioned in five discrete runs, starting in 2002 and completed in 2005. The accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines were commissioned in two runs from January to April 2006. With the completed commissioning of the SNS accelerator, the facility has begun initial low-power operations. In the course of beam commissioning, most beam performance parameters and beam intensity goals have been achieved at low duty factor. A number of beam dynamics measurements have been performed, including emittance evolution, transverse coupling in the ring, beam instability thresholds, and beam distributions on the target. The commissioning results, achieved beam performance and initial operating experience of the SNS will be discussed

  20. INJECTION CHOICE FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRODOWSKI,J.; FEDOTOV,A.; GARDNER,C.; LEE,Y.Y.; RAPARIA,D.; DANILOV,V.; HOLMES,J.; PRIOR,C.; REES,G.; MACHIDA,S.

    2001-06-18

    Injection is key in the low-loss design of high-intensity proton facilities like the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). During the design of both the accumulator and the rapid-cycling-synchrotron version of the SNS, extensive comparison has been made to select injection scenarios that satisfy SNS's low-loss design criteria. This paper presents issues and considerations pertaining to the final choice of the SNS injection systems.

  1. COHERENT at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raybern, Justin; Scholberg, Kate

    2015-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense isotropic flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure which is beneficial for background rejection. This talk will describe how the SNS source can be used for a measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS), the physics reach of such a measurement, and the status of COHERENT, the planned experimental program.

  2. COHERENT at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholberg, Kate; Coherent Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense isotropic flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure which is beneficial for background rejection. This talk will describe aspects of COHERENT, the experimental program underway to measure CEvNS (Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering) using low-energy nuclear recoil detectors.

  3. Rate-dependent spallation properties of tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.N.; Hixson, R.S.; Tonks, D.L.; Zurek, A.K.

    1995-09-01

    Spallation experiments are conducted on high-purity tantalum using VISAR instrumentation for impact stresses of 9.5 GPa and 6.0 GPa. The high-amplitude experiment exhibits very rapid initial spall separation, while the low-amplitude shot is only slightly above the threshold for void growth and thus exhibits distinct rate-dependent spallation behavior. These experiments are analyzed in terms of simple tensile fracture criteria, a standard rate-dependent void-growth model, and a rate-dependent void growth model in which the expected plastic volume strain makes no contribution to the relaxation of the mean stress. Recovery tests and VISAR measurements suggest an additional resistance to spallation that follows the rapid coalescence of voids; this effect is termed the secondary spall resistance and is due to the convoluted nature of the spall plane and the resulting interlocking fracture pattern that is developed and for which the stress remains unrelieved until the spall planes have separated several hundred microns.

  4. Reactor target from metal chromium for "pure" high-intensive artificial neutrino source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrin, V. N.; Kozlova, Yu. P.; Veretenkin, E. P.; Logachev, A. V.; Logacheva, A. I.; Lednev, I. S.; Okunkova, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents the first results of development of manufacturing technology of metallic chromium targets from highly enriched isotope 50Cr for irradiation in a high flux nuclear reactor to obtain a compact high intensity neutrino source with low content of radionuclide impurities and minimum losses of enriched isotope. The main technological stages are the hydrolysis of chromyl fluoride, the electrochemical reduction of metallic chromium, the hot isostatic pressing of chromium powder and the electrical discharge machining of chromium bars. The technological stages of hot isostatic pressing of chromium powder and of electrical discharge machining of Cr rods have been tested.

  5. A ROTATING METAL BAND TARGET FOR PION PRODUCTION AT MUON COLLIDERS.

    SciTech Connect

    KING,B.J.; SIMOS,N.; WEGGEL,R.V.; MOKHOV,N.V.

    2002-01-18

    A conceptual design is presented for a high power pion production target for muon colliders that is based on a rotating metal band. Three candidate materials are considered for the target band: inconel alloy 718, titanium alloy 6Al-4V grade 5 and nickel. A pulsed proton beam tangentially intercepts a chord of the target band that is inside a 20 Tesla tapered solenoidal magnetic pion capture channel similar to designs previously considered for muon colliders and neutrino factories. The target band has a radius of 2.5 meters and is continuously rotated at approximately 1 m/s to carry heat away from the production region and through a water cooling tank. The mechanical layout and cooling setup of the target are described, including the procedure for the routine replacement of the target band. A rectangular band cross section is assumed, optionally with I-beam struts to enhance stiffness and minimize mechanical vibrations. Results are presented from realistic MARS Monte Carlo computer simulations of the pion yield and energy deposition in the target and from ANSYS finite element calculations for the corresponding shock heating stresses. The target scenario is found to perform satisfactorily and with conservative safety margins for multi-MW pulsed proton beams.

  6. Estimating Magnetic Polarizability Tensor of Buried Metallic Targets for Land Mine Clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekdouk, B.; Marsh, L. A.; Armitage, D. W.; Peyton, A. J.

    This chapter addresses the problem of identifying metallic objects in buried land mines and discriminating them from clutter using low-frequency electromagnetic induction (EMI) techniques. From dipolar fields, the magnetic polarizability tensor extracted from the target response can be used as a basis for identification. Here, a deterministic nonlinear optimization method is presented to estimate target polarizability matrix and location by fitting a dipole model to EMI data collected above target in a least squares sense. Using finite element simulated data with added synthetic low-frequency noise (10 dB SNR), results show initial guess misestimating target position with few centimeters in the transversal (x, y) plane can be corrected very close to the true location. The method is also able to estimate the polarizability tensor to within 12 % error of the true tensor.

  7. Target designs for Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) utilizing lithium-aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Todosow, M.; Van Tuyle, G.J.

    1996-03-01

    A number of accelerator-driven spallation neutron-source target/blanket systems have been developed for production of tritium under the APT Program. The two systems described in this paper employ a proton linear accelerator, and a target which contains a heavy-metal(s) for the production of neutrons via spallation, and solid lithium-aluminum for the production of tritium via neutron capture. lie lithium-aluminum technology is based on that employed at Savannah River for tritium production since the 1950`s. In the APT concept tritium is produced without the presence of fissionable materials; therefore, no high-level waste is produced, and the ES&H concerns are significantly reduced compared to reactor systems.

  8. Automatic beam position control at Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF)

    SciTech Connect

    Oothoudt, M.; Pillai, C.; Zumbro, M.

    1997-08-01

    Historically the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has used manual methods to control the position of the 800 kW, 800 MeV proton beam on targets. New experiments, however, require more stringent position control more frequently than can be done manually for long periods of time. Data from an existing harp is used to automatically adjust steering magnets to maintain beam position to required tolerances.

  9. Recent improvement of spallation cross section calculations, applicable to cosmic ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silberberg, R.; Tsao, C. H.; Letaw, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    About half of the cosmic ray nuclei heavier than helium have suffered nuclear transformations while colliding with the interstellar gas. The semiempirical calculations developed for calculating the still unmeasured cross sections had errors of about 25-50 per cent, depending on the target mass interval. Recent precise measurements have permitted significant improvements in the calculation of cross sections. Several such improvements are discussed. A status report on work-in-progress is presented on a general modification of the spallation equation parameters.

  10. Morphology of meteoroid and space debris craters on LDEF metal targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, S. G.; Brownlee, D. E.; King, N. L.; Hoerz, F.

    1994-01-01

    We measured the depths, average diameters, and circularity indices of over 600 micrometeoroid and space debris craters on various metal surfaces exposed to space on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite, as a test of some of the formalisms used to convert the diameters of craters on space-exposed surfaces into penetration depths for the purpose of calculating impactor sizes or masses. The topics covered include the following: targe materials orientation; crater measurements and sample populations; effects of oblique impacts; effects of projectile velocity; effects of crater size; effects of target hardness; effects of target density; and effects of projectile properties.

  11. Spallation recoil II: Xenon evidence for young SiC grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, U.; Altmaier, M.; Herpers, U.; Kuhnhenn, J.; Merchel, S.; Michel, R.; Mohapatra, R. K.

    2005-11-01

    We have determined the recoil range of spallation xenon produced by irradiation of Ba glass targets with ˜1190 and ˜268 MeV protons, using a catcher technique, where spallation products are measured in target and catcher foils. The inferred range for 126Xe produced in silicon carbide is ˜0.19 μm, which implies retention of ˜70% for 126Xe produced in "typical" presolar silicon carbide grains of 1 μm size. Recoil loss of spallation xenon poses a significantly smaller problem than loss of the spallation neon from SiC grains. Ranges differ for the various Xe isotopes and scale approximately linearly as function of the mass difference between the target element, Ba, and the product. As a consequence, SiC grains of various sizes will have differences in spallation Xe composition. In an additional experiment at ˜66 MeV, where the recoil ranges of 22Na and 127Xe produced on Ba glass were determined using γ-spectrometry, we found no evidence for recoil ranges being systematically different at this lower energy. We have used the new data to put constraints on the possible presolar age of the SiC grains analyzed for Xe by Lewis et al. (1994). Uncertainties in the composition of the approximately normal Xe component in SiC (Xe-N) constitute the most serious problem in determining an age, surpassing remaining uncertainties in Xe retention and production rate. A possible interpretation is that spallation contributions are negligible and that trapped 124Xe/126Xe is ˜5% lower in Xe-N than in Q-Xe. But also for other reasonable assumptions for the 124Xe/126Xe ratio in Xe-N (e.g., as in Q-Xe), inferred exposure ages are considerably shorter than theoretically expected lifetimes for interstellar grains. A short presolar age is in line with observations by others (appearance, grain size distribution) that indicate little processing in the interstellar medium (ISM) of surviving (crystalline) SiC. This may be due to amorphization of SiC in the ISM on a much shorter time scale

  12. Changes in the emission properties of metallic targets upon exposure to repetitively pulsed laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konov, V. I.; Pimenov, S. M.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Chapliev, N. I.

    1988-02-01

    A scanning electron microscope and a repetitively pulsed CO2 laser are used to reveal the relationships which govern the correlation of the transforming metal surface microrelief with the emission of charged particles and the surface luminescence upon exposure to multipulse laser focusing. It is shown that the effect of sorption and laser-stimulated desorption on the emission signals can manifest itself in different ways depending on the current oscillation mode in the target-vacuum chamber circuit.

  13. Spallation reaction study for fission products in nuclear waste: Cross section measurements for 137Cs and 90Sr on proton and deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Otsu, H.; Sakurai, H.; Ahn, D. S.; Aikawa, M.; Doornenbal, P.; Fukuda, N.; Isobe, T.; Kawakami, S.; Koyama, S.; Kubo, T.; Kubono, S.; Lorusso, G.; Maeda, Y.; Makinaga, A.; Momiyama, S.; Nakano, K.; Niikura, M.; Shiga, Y.; Söderström, P.-A.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Takeuchi, S.; Taniuchi, R.; Watanabe, Ya.; Watanabe, Yu.; Yamasaki, H.; Yoshida, K.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied spallation reactions for the fission products 137Cs and 90Sr for the purpose of nuclear waste transmutation. The spallation cross sections on the proton and deuteron were obtained in inverse kinematics for the first time using secondary beams of 137Cs and 90Sr at 185 MeV/nucleon at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory. The target dependence has been investigated systematically, and the cross-section differences between the proton and deuteron are found to be larger for lighter spallation products. The experimental data are compared with the PHITS calculation, which includes cascade and evaporation processes. Our results suggest that both proton- and deuteron-induced spallation reactions are promising mechanisms for the transmutation of radioactive fission products.

  14. Materials considerations in accelerator targets

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, H.B. Jr.; Iyer, N.C.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    Future nuclear materials production and/or the burn-up of long lived radioisotopes may be accomplished through the capture of spallation produced neutrons in accelerators. Aluminum clad-lead and/or lead alloys has been proposed as a spallation target. Aluminum was the cladding choice because of the low neutron absorption cross section, fast radioactivity decay, high thermal conductivity, and excellent fabricability. Metallic lead and lead oxide powders were considered for the target core with the fabrication options being casting or powder metallurgy (PM). Scoping tests to evaluate gravity casting, squeeze casting, and casting and swaging processes showed that, based on fabricability and heat transfer considerations, squeeze casting was the preferred option for manufacture of targets with initial core cladding contact. Thousands of aluminum clad aluminum-lithium alloy core targets and control rods for tritium production have been fabricated by coextrusion processes and successfully irradiated in the SRS reactors. Tritium retention in, and release from the coextruded product was modeled from experimental and operational data. Newly produced tritium atoms were trapped by lithium atoms to form a lithium tritide. The effective tritium pressure required for trap or tritide stability was the equilibrium decomposition pressure of tritium over a lithium tritide-aluminum mixture. The temperature dependence of tritium release was determined by the permeability of the cladding to tritium and the local equilibrium at the trap sites. The model can be used to calculate tritium release from aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloy targets during postulated accelerator operational and accident conditions. This paper describes the manufacturing technologies evaluated and presents the model for tritium retention in aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloy tritium production targets.

  15. Moisture-induced delayed spallation and interfacial hydrogen embrittlement of alumina scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2006-01-01

    While interfacial sulfuris the primary chemical factor affecting Al2O3 scale adhesion, moisture-induced delayed spallation appears as a secondary, but impressive, mechanistic detail. Similarities with bulk metallic phenomena suggest that hydrogen embrittlement from ambient humidity, resulting from the reaction Alalloy+3(H2O)air=Al(OH)- 3+3H+ may be the operative mechanism. This proposal was tested on pre-oxidized René N5 by standard cathodic hydrogen charging in 1N H2SO4, as monitored by weight change, induced current, and microstructure. Cathodic polarization at -2.0 V abruptly stripped mature Al2O3 scales at the oxide-metal interface. Anodic polarization at +2.0V, however, produced alloy dissolution. Finally, with no applied voltage, the acid electrolyte produced neither scale spallation nor alloy dissolution. Thus, hydrogen charging was detrimental to alumina scale adhesion. Moisture-induced interfacial hydrogen embrittlement is concluded to be the cause of delayed scale spallation and desktop thermal barrier coating failures.

  16. Moisture-Induced Delayed Spallation and Interfacial Hydrogen Embrittlement of Alumina Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2008-01-01

    While interfacial sulfur is the primary chemical factor affecting Al2O3 scale adhesion, moisture-induced delayed spallation appears as a secondary, but impressive, mechanistic detail. Similarities with bulk metallic phenomena suggest that hydrogen embrittlement from ambient humidity, resulting from the reaction Al(sub alloy)+3(H2O)(sub air) = Al(OH)(-) (sub 3) +3H(+) may be the operative mechanism. This proposal was tested on pre-oxidized Rene N5 by standard cathodic hydrogen charging in 1N H2SO4, as monitored by weight change, induced current, and microstructure. Cathodic polarization at -2.0 V abruptly stripped mature Al2O3 scales at the oxide-metal interface. Anodic polarization at +2.0 V, however, produced alloy dissolution. Finally, with no applied voltage, the acid electrolyte produced neither scale spallation nor alloy dissolution. Thus, hydrogen charging was detrimental to alumina scale adhesion. Moisture-induced interfacial hydrogen embrittlement is concluded to be the cause of delayed scale spallation and desktop thermal barrier coating failures.

  17. Materials Compatibility Studies for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Pawel, S.J.

    1998-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high power facility for producing neutrons that utilizes flowing liquid mercury inside an austenitic stainless steel container as the target for a 1.0 GeV proton beam. The energy deposited in the target is transported by two separate mercury flow streams: one to transport heat in the interior target region and one to cool the stainless steel container. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations have been performed to predict temperature, velocity, and pressure distributions in the target. Results have generally shown that the power deposited in the bulk mercury can be effectively transported with reasonable flow rates and the bulk mercury temperature should not exceed 160{deg}C. Assuming good thermal contact, the maximum stainless steel wall temperature should be 130 {deg}C. Type 316 SS has been selected as the container material for the mercury and consequences of exposure of 316 SS to radiation, thermal shock, thermal stress, cavitation and hot, flowing mercury are all being addressed by R&D programs. In addition, corrosion studies include evaluation of Inconel 718 because it has been successfully used in previous water cooled spallation neutron systems as a window material. With type 316 SS selected to contain the mercury target of the SNS, two types of compatibility issues have been examined: LME and temperature gradient mass transfer. Studies have shown that mercury does not easily wet type 316 SS below 275{deg}C. In the LME experiments, attempts were made to promote wetting of the steel by mercury either by adding gallium to the mercury or coating the specimen with a tin-silver solder that the mercury easily wets. The latter proved more reliable in establishing wetting, but there was no evidence of LME in any of the constant extension rate tensile tests either at 23 or 100 {deg}C. Inconel 718 also showed no change in room temperature properties when tested in mercwy or mercury-gallium. However, there

  18. A ROTATING METAL BAND TARGET FOR PION PRODUCTION AT NEUTRINO FACTORIES AND MUON COLLIDERS.

    SciTech Connect

    KING, B.J.; SIMOS, N.; WEGGEL, R.V.; MOKHOV, N.V.

    2001-06-18

    A conceptual design is presented for a high power pion production target for neutrino factories and muon colliders that is based on a rotating metal band of either inconel alloy 718, titanium alloy 6AL4V grade 5 or nickel. The band is 5 meters in diameter and is tangentially intercepted by a pulsed proton beam inside a 20 Tesla tapered solenoidal magnetic pion capture channel. The mechanical layout and cooling setup of the target are summarized and results are presented from realistic MARS and ANSYS computer simulations of pion yields, energy depositions and shock heating stresses. The target scenario is predicted to perform satisfactorily and with conservative safety margins for multi-megawatt pulsed proton beams.

  19. Demonstration of {sup 99}MO production using LEU metal-foil targets in the cintichem process.

    SciTech Connect

    Vandegrift, G. F.; Conner, C.; Hofman, G. L.; Snelgrove, J. L.; Mutalib, A.; Purwadi, B.; Adang, H. G.; Hotman, L.; Kadarisman, Sukmana, A.; Dicky, T. J.; Sriyono, Suripto, A.; Lutfi, D.; Amin; Basiran, A.; Gogo, A.; Sarwani; Taryo, T.

    1999-09-30

    In March and September 1999, demonstrations of the irradiation, disassembly, and processing of LEU metal foil targets were performed in the Indonesian BATAN PUSPIPTEK Facilities. These demonstrations showed that (1) irradiation and disassembly can be performed so that the uranium foil can be easily removed from the target body, and (2) with only minor changes to the current process, the LEU foil can produce yield and purity of the {sup 99}Mo product at least as great as that obtained with the HEU target. Further, because of these modifications, two hours are cut from the processing time, and the liquid waste volume is reduced. Results of these demonstrations will be presented along with conclusions and plans for future work.

  20. Preparation of mixed metal thin films by a PVD method using several kinds of powder targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiaki; Kawasaki, Hiroharu; Ohshima, Tamiko; Yagyu, Yoshihito; Ihara, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Makiko; Plasma process; application Team

    2015-09-01

    Bismuth iron garnet (Bi3Fe5O12) and aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films were prepared by a physical vapor deposition method using mixed metal powder targets. The X-ray powder diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results suggest that crystalline thin films can be prepared using powder targets with quality similar to that of the films prepared using bulk targets. Bi3Fe5O12 films prepared using the pulsed laser deposition method were Bi rich, which may be due to the lower melting temperature of Bi (544 K) compared with that of Fe (1811 K). The mean transparency and resistivity of the AZO films prepared by the sputtering method were approximately 79%-84% and 0.5 - 1.4 ohm/cm, respectively.

  1. Asymmetric partitioning of metals among cluster anions and cations generated via laser ablation of mixed aluminum/Group 6 transition metal targets.

    PubMed

    Waller, Sarah E; Mann, Jennifer E; Jarrold, Caroline Chick

    2013-02-28

    While high-power laser ablation of metal alloys indiscriminately produces gas-phase atomic ions in proportion to the abundance of the various metals in the alloy, gas-phase ions produced by moderate-power laser ablation sources coupled with molecular beams are formed by more complicated mechanisms. A mass spectrometric study that directly compares the mass distributions of cluster anions and cations generated from laser ablation of pure aluminum, an aluminum/molybdenum mixed target, and an aluminum/tungsten mixed target is detailed. Mass spectra of anionic species generated from the mixed targets showed that both tungsten and molybdenum were in higher abundance in the negatively charged species than in the target material. Mass spectra of the cationic species showed primarily Al(+) and aluminum oxide and hydroxide cluster cations. No molybdenum- or tungsten-containing cluster cations were definitively assigned. The asymmetric distribution of aluminum and Group 6 transition metals in cation and anion cluster composition is attributed to the low ionization energy of atomic aluminum and aluminum suboxide clusters. In addition, the propensity of both molybdenum and tungsten to form metal oxide cluster anions under the same conditions that favor metallic aluminum cluster anions is attributed to differences in the optical properties of the surface oxide that is present in the metal powders used to prepare the ablation targets. Mechanisms of mixed metal oxide clusters are considered. PMID:23413829

  2. Basic physics with spallation-neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Michaudon, A.F.

    1994-05-01

    The neutron has unique intrinsic properties widely used in basic and applied sciences. The neutron plays a well-known role in applied sciences and technology and is a unique probe well suited for the exploration of condensed-matter properties. But the neutron is also used for many other basic-physics studies, including nuclear physics, particle physics, fundamental physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. These last studies are briefly reviewed in this paper. Spallation-neutron sources today have unmatched neutron-beam properties for such studies and have great potential in future technological developments whereby these studies could be carried out under much improved conditions.

  3. Surface modification to prevent oxide scale spallation

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, Elizabeth V; Sun, Xin; Liu, Wenning; Stevenson, Jeffry W; Surdoval, Wayne; Khaleel, Mohammad A

    2013-07-16

    A surface modification to prevent oxide scale spallation is disclosed. The surface modification includes a ferritic stainless steel substrate having a modified surface. A cross-section of the modified surface exhibits a periodic morphology. The periodic morphology does not exceed a critical buckling length, which is equivalent to the length of a wave attribute observed in the cross section periodic morphology. The modified surface can be created using at least one of the following processes: shot peening, surface blasting and surface grinding. A coating can be applied to the modified surface.

  4. Calculation of astrophysical spallation reactions using the RENO model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, C. L.; Schmitt, W. F.; Merker, M.; Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    The RENO model for the Monte-Carlo treatment of astrophysical spallation reactions has been used to generate preliminary cross-sections for the purpose of illustrating the discrete-nucleon approach to spallation modeling and to exhibit differences between two versions of RENO. Comparisons with experimental, theoretical, and semiempirical data demonstrate the practicability of the discrete-nucleon approach.-

  5. Characterization of high-current electron beam interaction with metal targets

    SciTech Connect

    An, W.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Fetzer, R.; Bazylev, B.; Mueller, G.; Weisenburger, A.; Bernshtam, V.

    2011-11-01

    The process of electron beam interaction with metal targets was characterized using electrical and optical diagnostics. Electron beams with current density of 5-10 A/cm{sup 2}, electron energy up to 120 keV, pulse duration up to 200 {mu}s, and cross-sectional area of 8-30 cm{sup 2} at the target surface were generated by GESA I and GESA II facilities. Streak imaging of the target surface specular reflectivity was used to determine the onset of melting and re-solidification of the target surface. Using time- and space-resolved schlieren imaging, the evolution of surface irregularities was studied. Experimental and numerical investigations of the neutral flow evaporated from the target surface showed a neutral density of {approx}10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} in the vicinity of the target and neutral velocities up to 2 x 10{sup 5} cm/s. Framing and streak images of visible light emission were used to study the temporal evolution of the target surface plasma and vapors. Time- and space-resolved spectroscopy was applied to determine the surface plasma density and temperature, which were found to be {approx}10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} and {<=}1 eV, respectively. Because of this small plasma density, electric fields in the plasma sheath are not sufficient to cause electrohydrodynamic instability of the liquid target surface. However, hydrodynamic instabilities due to the intense neutral flow observed in experimental and numerical studies are likely to be responsible for the growth of wavelike irregularities.

  6. Systematic neutron guide misalignment for an accelerator-driven spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendler, C.; Bentley, P. M.

    2016-08-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a long pulse spallation neutron source that is currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. A considerable fraction of the 22 planned instruments extend as far as 75-150 m from the source. In such long beam lines, misalignment between neutron guide segments can decrease the neutron transmission significantly. In addition to a random misalignment from installation tolerances, the ground on which ESS is built can be expected to sink with time, and thus shift the neutron guide segments further away from the ideal alignment axis in a systematic way. These systematic errors are correlated to the ground structure, position of buildings and shielding installation. Since the largest deformation is expected close to the target, even short instruments might be noticeably affected. In this study, the effect of this systematic misalignment on short and long ESS beam lines is analyzed, and a possible mitigation by overillumination of subsequent guide sections investigated.

  7. Challenges and design solutions of the liquid hydrogen circuit at the European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gallimore, S.; Nilsson, P.; Sabbagh, P.; Takibayev, A.; Weisend II, J. G.; Beßler, Y.; Klaus, M.

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS), Lund, Sweden will be a 5MW long-pulse neutron spallation research facility and will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. Neutrons are produced by accelerating a high-energy proton beam into a rotating helium-cooled tungsten target. These neutrons pass through moderators to reduce their energy to an appropriate range (< 5 meV for cold neutrons); two of which will use liquid hydrogen at 17 K as the moderating and cooling medium. There are several technical challenges to overcome in the design of a robust system that will operate under such conditions, not least the 20 kW of deposited heat. These challenges and the associated design solutions will be detailed in this paper.

  8. Spallative production of Li, Be and B in superbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parizot, Etienne

    We investigate the spallative production of the light elements (Li, Be and B) associated with the evolution of a superbubble (SB) blown by repeated supernova explosions in an OB association. It is shown that if about ten percent of the SN energy can power the acceleration of particles from the material inside the SB, the observed abundances of LiBeB in halo stars, as a function of O, can be explained in a fully consistent way over several decades of metallicity. We investigate two different energy spectra for the EPs: the standard cosmic ray source spectrum and a specific `SB spectrum' as results from Bykov's SB acceleration mechanism. We find that the latter spectrum is more efficient in producing LiBeB, and that the SNR spectrum can be reconciled with the observational data if an imperfect mixing of the SN ejecta with the rest of the SB material and/or a selective acceleration is invoked (enhancing the C and O abundance amongst the EPs by a factor of ˜ 6). One consequence of the model is that the observed linear growth of Be and B abundances as a function of the metallicity expresses a dilution line rather than a continuous, monotonic increase throughout the Galaxy. We also find that the recent 6 Li observations in halo stars fit equally well in the framework of the SB model (see Parizot & Drury, 1999c, for more details).

  9. Improving Targeting of Metal-Phenolic Capsules by the Presence of Protein Coronas.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yi; Dai, Qiong; Cui, Jiwei; Dai, Yunlu; Suma, Tomoya; Richardson, Joseph J; Caruso, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Particles adsorb proteins when they enter a physiological environment; this results in a surface coating termed a "protein corona". A protein corona can affect both the properties and functionalities of engineered particles. Here, we prepared hyaluronic acid (HA)-based capsules through the assembly of metal-phenolic networks (MPNs) and engineered their targeting ability in the absence and presence of protein coronas by varying the HA molecular weight. The targeting ability of the capsules was HA molecular weight dependent, and a high HA molecular weight (>50 kDa) was required for efficient targeting. The specific interactions between high molecular weight HA capsules and receptor-expressing cancer cells were negligibly affected by the presence of protein coronas, whereas nonspecific capsule-cell interactions were significantly reduced in the presence of a protein corona derived from human serum. Consequently, the targeting specificity of HA-based MPN capsules was enhanced due to the formation of a protein corona. This study highlights the significant and complex roles of a protein corona in biointeractions and demonstrates how protein coronas can be used to improve the targeting specificity of engineered particles. PMID:27560314

  10. Spallation studies on shock loaded uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D.L.; Hixson, R.; Gustavsen, R.L.; Vorthman, J.E.; Kelly, A.; Zurek, A.K.; Thissel, W.R.

    1997-12-31

    Uranium samples at two different purity levels were used for spall strength measurements at three different stress levels. A 50 mm single-stage gas-gun was used to produce planar impact conditions using Z-cut quartz impactors. Samples of depleted uranium were taken from very high purity material and from material that had 300 ppm of carbon added. A pair of shots was done for each impact strength, one member of the pair with VISAR diagnostics and the second with soft recovery for metallographical examination. A series of increasing final stress states were chosen to effectively freeze the microstructural damage at three places in the development to full spall separation. This allowed determination of the dependence of spall mechanisms on stress level and sample purity. This report will discuss both the results of the metallurgical examination of soft recovered samples and the modeling of the free surface VISAR data. The micrographs taken from the recovered samples show brittle cracking as the spallation failure mechanism. Deformation induced twins are plentiful and obviously play a role in the spallation process. The twins are produced in the initial shock loading and, so, are present already before the fracture process begins. The 1 d characteristics code CHARADE has been used to model the free surface VISAR data.

  11. Using spallation neutron sources for defense research

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Sterbenz, S.M.; Weinacht, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    Advanced characterization techniques and accelerated simulation are the cornerstones of the Energy Department`s science-based program to maintain confidence in the safety, reliability, and performance of the US nuclear deterrent in an era of no nuclear testing. Neutrons and protons provided by an accelerator-based facility have an important role to play in this program, impacting several of the key stockpile stewardship and management issues identified by the Department of Defense. Many of the techniques used for defense research at a spallation source have been used for many years for the basic research community, and to a lesser extent by industrial scientists. By providing access to a broad spectrum of researchers with different backgrounds, a spallation source such as the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is able to promote synergistic interaction between defense, basic and industrial researchers. This broadens the scientific basis of the stockpile stewardship program in the short term and will provide spin-off to industrial and basic research in the longer term.

  12. Metal-containing plasma-polymerized coatings for laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Letts, S.A.; Jordan, C.W.

    1981-09-14

    Addition of metal to plastic layers in some direct drive laser fusion targets is needed to reduce electron induced fuel preheat. A plasma polymerization coating system was constructed to produce a metal seeded polymer by adding an organometallic gas to the usual trans-2-butene and hydrogen feedstocks. Since organometallic gases are highly reactive and toxic, safety is a major concern in the design of a coating system. Our coating apparatus was designed with three levels of containment to assure protection of the operator. The gas handling system has redundant valves and was designed to fail safe. Several sensor controlled interlocks assure safe operating conditions. Waste materials are collected on a specially designed cold trap. Waste disposal is accomplished by heating the traps and purging volatile products through a reactor vessel. The design, operating procedure, and safety interlocks of this novel coating system are described.

  13. Characteristics of flows of energetic atoms reflected from metal targets during ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmichev, A.; Perevertaylo, V.; Tsybulsky, L.; Volpian, O.

    2016-07-01

    Particle number and energy reflection coefficients for energetic neutralized gas ions (Ar and O atoms) backscattered from metal targets during ion bombardment have been calculated using TRIM code. The energy distributions of reflected atoms are computed, too, and their dependence on the primary ion energy and the angle of ion incidence is determined. The obtained data confirm the possibility of employing energetic atoms reflection for generation of high energy neutral beams and point out to take this phenomenon into account under analysis of the ion technology for coating deposition.

  14. Moisture-Induced Delayed Alumina Scale Spallation on a Ni(Pt)Al Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2009-01-01

    Delayed interfacial scale failure takes place after cooling for samples of a Ni(Pt)Al-coated CMSX4 single crystal superalloy, cycled at 1150 C for up to 2000 hr. One sample exhibited premature coating grain boundary wrinkling, alumina scale spallation to bare metal, and a final weight loss of 3.3 mg/cm2 . Spallation under ambient conditions was monitored with time after cooldown and was found to continue for 24 hr. This produced up to 0.05 mg/cm2 additional loss for each hold, accumulating 0.7 mg/cm 2 (20 percent of the total) over the course of the test. After test termination, water immersion produced an additional 0.15 mg/cm2 loss. (A duplicate sample produced much less wrinkling and time dependent spalling, maintaining a net weight gain.) The results are consistent with the general phenomena of moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) of mature, distressed alumina scales formed on oxidation resistant M-Al alloys. Relative ambient humidity is discussed as the factor controlling adsorbed moisture, reaction with the substrate, and hydrogen effects on interface strength.

  15. Cylindrical-Wave Approach for electromagnetic scattering by subsurface metallic targets in a lossy medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frezza, F.; Pajewski, L.; Ponti, C.; Schettini, G.; Tedeschi, N.

    2013-10-01

    An analytical solution is developed to the two-dimensional scattering problem of a plane-wave propagating in air, impinging on the interface with a dissipative soil, and interacting with a finite set of subsurface metallic targets. The Cylindrical Wave Approach is applied, the electromagnetic field scattered by the targets is expanded into cylindrical waves and use is made of the plane-wave spectrum to take into account the interaction of such waves with the planar interface between air and soil. The theoretical solution is implemented in a Fortran code. The numerical evaluation of the spectral integral relevant to reflected and transmitted cylindrical wave functions in the presence of lossy media is performed by means of Gaussian adaptive quadrature formulas. The method may return the field values in each point of the space, both in the near and far zones; moreover it may be applied for any polarization, and for arbitrary values of the cylinder sizes and positions.

  16. Spallation Neutron Source Operating Experience and Outlook for Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Stuart

    2010-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a MW-class accelerator-driven pulsed neutron source. The SNS began formal operations in October 2006. Since then, the beam power has been increased to 1 MW, the number of operating hours per year has increased to nearly 5000, the availability has increased to 85%, and the number of operating neutron scattering instruments has increased to 13. Plans are in place to increase the beam power and availability to their design values of 1.4 MW and 90% over the next two years, and to continue the build-out of instruments to 16 by 2012. Two upgrade projects are in the planning stages. In the first, the beam power of the SNS is increased to at least 2 MW by raising the beam energy from 1.0 to 1.3 GeV and the beam current by 60%. In the second, a Second Target Station is constructed, and is powered by sharing beam pulses with the first target station. The operating experience will be described, as will the challenges that have been met along the path toward 1 MW beam power. The strategy for upgrades will also be presented.

  17. Spallation Neutron Source Accident Terms for Environmental Impact Statement Input

    SciTech Connect

    Devore, J.R.; Harrington, R.M.

    1998-08-01

    This report is about accidents with the potential to release radioactive materials into the environment surrounding the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). As shown in Chap. 2, the inventories of radioactivity at the SNS are dominated by the target facility. Source terms for a wide range of target facility accidents, from anticipated events to worst-case beyond-design-basis events, are provided in Chaps. 3 and 4. The most important criterion applied to these accident source terms is that they should not underestimate potential release. Therefore, conservative methodology was employed for the release estimates. Although the source terms are very conservative, excessive conservatism has been avoided by basing the releases on physical principles. Since it is envisioned that the SNS facility may eventually (after about 10 years) be expanded and modified to support a 4-MW proton beam operational capability, the source terms estimated in this report are applicable to a 4-MW operating proton beam power unless otherwise specified. This is bounding with regard to the 1-MW facility that will be built and operated initially. See further discussion below in Sect. 1.2.

  18. Metal complexes of curcumin for cellular imaging, targeting, and photoinduced anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samya; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2015-07-21

    damaging the cancer cells on photoactivation in visible light while being minimally toxic in darkness. In this Account, we have made an attempt to review the current status of the chemistry of metal curcumin complexes and present results from our recent studies on curcumin complexes showing remarkable in vitro photocytotoxicity. The undesirable dark toxicity of the complexes can be reduced with suitable choice of the metal and the ancillary ligands in a ternary structure. The complexes can be directed to specific subcellular organelles. Selectivity by targeting cancer cells over normal cells can be achieved with suitable ligand design. We expect that this methodology is likely to provide an impetus toward developing curcumin-based photochemotherapeutics for anticancer treatment and cure. PMID:26158541

  19. Design of antibody-functionalized carbon nanotubes filled with radioactivable metals towards a targeted anticancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinato, Cinzia; Perez Ruiz de Garibay, Aritz; Kierkowicz, Magdalena; Pach, Elzbieta; Martincic, Markus; Klippstein, Rebecca; Bourgognon, Maxime; Wang, Julie Tzu-Wen; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T.; Ballesteros, Belén; Tobias, Gerard; Bianco, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    In the present work we have devised the synthesis of a novel promising carbon nanotube carrier for the targeted delivery of radioactivity, through a combination of endohedral and exohedral functionalization. Steam-purified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been initially filled with radioactive analogues (i.e. metal halides) and sealed by high temperature treatment, affording closed-ended CNTs with the filling material confined in the inner cavity. The external functionalization of these filled CNTs was then achieved by nitrene cycloaddition and followed by the derivatization with a monoclonal antibody (Cetuximab) targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), overexpressed by several cancer cells. The targeting efficiency of the so-obtained conjugate was evaluated by immunostaining with a secondary antibody and by incubation of the CNTs with EGFR positive cells (U87-EGFR+), followed by flow cytometry, confocal microscopy or elemental analyses. We demonstrated that our filled and functionalized CNTs can internalize more efficiently in EGFR positive cancer cells.In the present work we have devised the synthesis of a novel promising carbon nanotube carrier for the targeted delivery of radioactivity, through a combination of endohedral and exohedral functionalization. Steam-purified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been initially filled with radioactive analogues (i.e. metal halides) and sealed by high temperature treatment, affording closed-ended CNTs with the filling material confined in the inner cavity. The external functionalization of these filled CNTs was then achieved by nitrene cycloaddition and followed by the derivatization with a monoclonal antibody (Cetuximab) targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), overexpressed by several cancer cells. The targeting efficiency of the so-obtained conjugate was evaluated by immunostaining with a secondary antibody and by incubation of the CNTs with EGFR positive cells (U87

  20. Optimizing Moderator Dimensions for Neutron Scattering at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jinkui; Robertson, Lee; Herwig, Kenneth W; Gallmeier, Franz X; Riemer, Bernie

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source. In a recent study of the planned second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility [1,2], we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter for a smaller viewing area [4]. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories, those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. We found that the cross-sections of the sample and the neutron guide, respectively, are the deciding factors for choosing the moderator. Beam divergence plays no role as long as it is within the reach of practical constraints. Namely, the required divergence is not too large for the guide or sample to be located close enough to the moderator on an actual spallation source.

  1. Calculations of helium production in materials irradiated at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Corzine, R.K.; Dudziak, D.J.; Wechsler, M.S.; Barnett, M.H.; Mansur, L.K.

    1998-09-01

    Experience with materials irradiated in fission reactor neutron environments has shown that radiation-produced helium can exacerbate the degradation of properties caused by radiation-produced defects and defect clusters. Whereas fission-reactor neutron energies extend up to {approximately}10 MeV, the neutrons and protons at spallation neutron sources reach up to 1,000 to 2,000 MeV, and He production is much greater. For example, calculations have shown for the innermost shell of the containment vessel of the spallation neutron source, under collaborative design by several national laboratories led by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, that full-power displacement and He production rates are {approximately}20 displacements per atom (dpa)/yr and 1,000 atomic parts per million (appm) He/yr, which corresponds to 50 appm He/dpa. By contrast, materials in fission reactor cores usually experience <1 appm He/dpa. In this paper, the authors summarize methods and results for the calculation of He production cross sections appropriate to the neutron and proton energies to which target and containment materials are exposed at spallation neutron sources. The principal calculational tool is LAHET or, more broadly, the LAHET code system (LCS).

  2. Engineered Metal-Phenolic Capsules Show Tunable Targeted Delivery to Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yi; Cui, Jiwei; Sun, Huanli; Müllner, Markus; Dai, Yunlu; Guo, Junling; Bertleff-Zieschang, Nadja; Suma, Tomoya; Richardson, Joseph J; Caruso, Frank

    2016-06-13

    We engineered metal-phenolic capsules with both high targeting and low nonspecific cell binding properties. The capsules were prepared by coating phenolic-functionalized hyaluronic acid (HA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) on calcium carbonate templates, followed by cross-linking the phenolic groups with metal ions and removing the templates. The incorporation of HA significantly enhanced binding and association with a CD44 overexpressing (CD44+) cancer cell line, while the incorporation of PEG reduced nonspecific interactions with a CD44 minimal-expressing (CD44-) cell line. Moreover, high specific targeting to CD44+ cells can be balanced with low nonspecific binding to CD44- cells simply by using an optimized feed-ratio of HA and PEG to vary the content of HA and PEG incorporated into the capsules. Loading an anticancer drug (i.e., doxorubicin) into the obtained capsules resulted in significantly higher cytotoxicity to CD44+ cells but lower cytotoxicity to CD44- cells. PMID:27249228

  3. Fighting Cancer with Transition Metal Complexes: From Naked DNA to Protein and Chromatin Targeting Strategies.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Giulia; Magistrato, Alessandra; Riedel, Tina; von Erlach, Thibaud; Davey, Curt A; Dyson, Paul J; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2016-06-20

    Many transition metal complexes have unique physicochemical properties that can be efficiently exploited in medicinal chemistry for cancer treatment. Traditionally, double-stranded DNA has been assumed to be the main binding target; however, recent studies have shown that nucleosomal DNA as well as proteins can act as dominant molecular binding partners. This has raised new questions about the molecular determinants that govern DNA versus protein binding selectivity, and has offered new ways to rationalize their biological activity and possible side effects. To address these questions, molecular simulations at an atomistic level of detail have been used to complement, support, and rationalize experimental data. Herein we review some relevant studies-focused on platinum and ruthenium compounds-to illustrate the power of state-of-the-art molecular simulation techniques and to demonstrate how the interplay between molecular simulations and experiments can make important contributions to elucidating the target preferences of some promising transition metal anticancer agents. This contribution aims at providing relevant information that may help in the rational design of novel drug-discovery strategies. PMID:26634638

  4. Metal ion mediated synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymers targeting tetracyclines in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Qu, Guorun; Zheng, Sulian; Liu, Yumin; Xie, Wei; Wu, Aibo; Zhang, Dabing

    2009-10-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) prepared in water-containing systems are more appropriate as adsorption materials in analyte extraction from biological samples. However, water as a polar solvent involved in the synthesis of MIPs frequently disrupts non-covalent interactions, and causes non-specific binding. In this study Fe(2+) was used as mediator to prepare MIPs, targeting tetracyclines (TCs) of tetracycline (TC), oxytetracycline (OTC) and chlortetracycline (CTC), with TC as template molecule and methacrylic acid (MAA) as functional monomer. The subsequent binding assay indicated that Fe(2+) was responsible for substantially improved specific binding in recognition of TCs by decreasing the non-specific binding. Spectrophotometric analysis suggested the existence of the strong interactions among TC, metal ions and MAA in the mixture of methanol and water. Moreover, mass spectrometric measurements verified that Fe(2+) could bridge between TC and MAA to form a ternary complex of one TC, one Fe(2+) and four MAAs with a mass of 844.857. Furthermore, combined with molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) for sample pretreatment, HPLC-UV analysis data revealed good performance of the obtained MIPs as adsorbents. The recoveries of TC, OTC and CTC in urine samples were 80.1-91.6%, 78.4-89.3% and 78.2-86.2%, respectively. This research strategy provides an example for preparation of desirable water-compatible MIPs extracting target drugs from aqueous samples by introducing metal ion as mediator into conventional polymerization system. PMID:19726243

  5. SPALLATION STUDIES ON SHOCK LOADED U-6 WT PCT NB.

    SciTech Connect

    D. TONKS; ET AL

    2001-01-10

    Several spallation experiments have been performed on the 6 wt pct alloy of uranium using gas gun driven normal plate impacts with VISAR instrumentation and soft recovery. The nominal shock pressures achieved were 28, 34, 42, 50, 55, and 82 kbar. This paper will focus on spallation modeling, e.g. using the 1 D characteristics code CHARADE to simulate the free surface particle velocity. The spallation model involves the ductile growth and coalescence of voids. Metallographical examination of recovered samples and details of the experimental apparatus are discussed in a separate paper.

  6. Convection in molten pool created by a concentrated energy flux on a solid metal target

    SciTech Connect

    Dikshit, B.; Zende, G. R.; Bhatia, M. S.; Suri, B. M.

    2009-08-15

    During surface evaporation of metals by use of a concentrated energy flux such as electron beam or lasers, a liquid metal pool having a very high temperature gradient is formed around the hot zone created by the beam. Due to temperature dependence of surface tension, density, and depression of the evaporating surface caused by back pressure of the emitted vapor in this molten pool, a strong convective current sets in the molten pool. A proposition is made that this convection may pass through three different stages during increase in the electron beam power depending upon dominance of the various driving forces. To confirm this, convective heat transfer is quantified in terms of dimensionless Nusselt number and its evolution with power is studied in an experiment using aluminum, copper, and zirconium as targets. These experimentally determined values are also compared to the theoretical values predicted by earlier researchers to test the validity of their assumptions and to know about the type of flow in the melt pool. Thus, conclusion about the physical characteristics of flow in the molten pool of metals could be drawn by considering the roles of surface tension and curvature of the evaporating surface on the evolution of convective heat transfer.

  7. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM CURRENT MONITOR ELECTRONICS.

    SciTech Connect

    KESSELMAN,M.; DAWSON,W.C.

    2002-05-06

    This paper will discuss the present electronics design for the beam current monitor system to be used throughout the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The beam is composed of a micro-pulse structure due to the 402.5MHz RF, and is chopped into mini-pulses of 645ns duration with a 300ns gap, providing a macro-pulse of 1060 mini-pulses repeating at a 60Hz rate. Ring beam current will vary from about 15ma peak during studies, to about 50Amps peak (design to 100 amps). A digital approach to droop compensation has been implemented and initial test results presented.

  8. BNL feasibility studies of spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Ruggiero, A.G.; Van Steenbergen, A.; Weng, W.T.

    1995-12-01

    This paper is the summary of conceptual design studies of a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS) conducted by an interdepartmental study group at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The study was made of two periods. First, a scenario based on the use of a 600 MeV Linac followed by two fast-cycling 3.6 GeV Synchrotrons was investigated. Then, in a subsequent period, the attention of the study was directed toward an Accumulator scenario with two options: (1) a 1.25 GeV normal conducting Linac followed by two Accumulator Rings, and (2) a 2.4 GeV superconducting Linac followed by a single Accumulator Ring. The study did not make any reference to a specific site.

  9. Spallation UCN Production for nEDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Yasuhiro; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Jeong, Sun-Chan; Kawasaki, Shinsuke; Matsumiya, Ryohei; Matsuta, Kensaku; Mihara, Mototsugu; Watanabe, Yutaka

    A new superthermal UCN production in He-II, which is placed in a spallation neutron source, is discussed. In the new UCN source, the production rate is expected to be 200 UCN/cm3/s at a proton beam power of 500 MeV×40 μA and the UCN maximum energy of Ec = 210 neV. The γ heating in the He-II can be removed by means of 3He pumping according to calculations. For an EDM measurement, UCN are extracted from a He-II bottle through an aluminum window by using a superconducting magnet. The possibility of a 129Xe magnetometer for the EDM measurement is also discussed.

  10. Laser-Induced Spallation of Microsphere Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Hiraiwa, Morgan; Stossel, Melicent; Khanolkar, Amey; Wang, Junlan; Boechler, Nicholas

    2016-08-01

    The detachment of a semiordered monolayer of polystyrene microspheres adhered to an aluminum-coated glass substrate is studied using a laser-induced spallation technique. The microsphere-substrate adhesion force is estimated from substrate surface displacement measurements obtained using optical interferometry, and a rigid-body model that accounts for the inertia of the microspheres. The estimated adhesion force is compared with estimates obtained using an adhesive contact model together with interferometric measurements of the out-of-plane microsphere contact resonance, and with estimated work of adhesion values for the polystyrene-aluminum interface. Scanning electron microscope images of detached monolayer regions reveal a unique morphology, namely, partially detached monolayer flakes composed of single hexagonal close packed crystalline domains. This work contributes to the fields of microsphere adhesion and contact dynamics, and demonstrates a unique monolayer delamination morphology. PMID:27409715

  11. Benchmarking shielding simulations for an accelerator-driven spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkashyna, Nataliia; DiJulio, Douglas D.; Panzner, Tobias; Rantsiou, Emmanouela; Filges, Uwe; Ehlers, Georg; Bentley, Phillip M.

    2015-08-01

    The shielding at an accelerator-driven spallation neutron facility plays a critical role in the performance of the neutron scattering instruments, the overall safety, and the total cost of the facility. Accurate simulation of shielding components is thus key for the design of upcoming facilities, such as the European Spallation Source (ESS), currently in construction in Lund, Sweden. In this paper, we present a comparative study between the measured and the simulated neutron background at the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source (SINQ), at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Villigen, Switzerland. The measurements were carried out at several positions along the SINQ monolith wall with the neutron dosimeter WENDI-2, which has a well-characterized response up to 5 GeV. The simulations were performed using the Monte-Carlo radiation transport code geant4, and include a complete transport from the proton beam to the measurement locations in a single calculation. An agreement between measurements and simulations is about a factor of 2 for the points where the measured radiation dose is above the background level, which is a satisfactory result for such simulations spanning many energy regimes, different physics processes and transport through several meters of shielding materials. The neutrons contributing to the radiation field emanating from the monolith were confirmed to originate from neutrons with energies above 1 MeV in the target region. The current work validates geant4 as being well suited for deep-shielding calculations at accelerator-based spallation sources. We also extrapolate what the simulated flux levels might imply for short (several tens of meters) instruments at ESS.

  12. A Hybrid Reflective/Refractive/Diffractive Achromatic Fiber-Coupled Radiation Resistant Imaging System for Use in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Maxey, L Curt; Ally, Tanya R; Brunson, Aly; Garcia, Frances; Goetz, Kathleen C; Hasse, Katelyn E; McManamy, Thomas J; Shea, Thomas J; Simpson, Marc Livingstone

    2011-01-01

    A fiber-coupled imaging system for monitoring the proton beam profile on the target of the Spallation Neutron Source was developed using reflective, refractive and diffractive optics to focus an image onto a fiber optic imaging bundle. The imaging system monitors the light output from a chromium-doped aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}:Cr) scintillator on the nose of the target. Metal optics are used to relay the image to the lenses that focus the image onto the fiber. The material choices for the lenses and fiber were limited to high-purity fused silica, due to the anticipated radiation dose of 10{sup 8} R. In the first generation system (which had no diffractive elements), radiation damage to the scintillator on the nose of the target significantly broadened the normally monochromatic (694 nm) spectrum. This created the need for an achromatic design in the second generation system. This was achieved through the addition of a diffractive optic for chromatic correction. An overview of the target imaging system and its performance, with particular emphasis on the design and testing of a hybrid refractive/diffractive high-purity fused silica imaging triplet, is presented.

  13. Strain rate effects for spallation of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häussler-Combe, Ulrich; Panteki, Evmorfia; Kühn, Tino

    2015-09-01

    Appropriate triaxial constitutive laws are the key for a realistic simulation of high speed dynamics of concrete. The strain rate effect is still an open issue within this context. In particular the question whether it is a material property - which can be covered by rate dependent stress strain relations - or mainly an effect of inertia is still under discussion. Experimental and theoretical investigations of spallation of concrete specimen in a Hopkinson Bar setup may bring some evidence into this question. For this purpose the paper describes the VERD model, a newly developed constitutive law for concrete based on a damage approach with included strain rate effects [1]. In contrast to other approaches the dynamic strength increase is not directly coupled to strain rate values but related to physical mechanisms like the retarded movement of water in capillary systems and delayed microcracking. The constitutive law is fully triaxial and implemented into explicit finite element codes for the investigation of a wide range of concrete structures exposed to impact and explosions. The current setup models spallation experiments with concrete specimen [2]. The results of such experiments are mainly related to the dynamic tensile strength and the crack energy of concrete which may be derived from, e.g., the velocity of spalled concrete fragments. The experimental results are compared to the VERD model and two further constitutive laws implemented in LS-Dyna. The results indicate that both viscosity and retarded damage are required for a realistic description of the material behaviour of concrete exposed to high strain effects [3].

  14. Spallation nucleosynthesis by accelerated charged-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.

    2008-05-12

    Recent observations have suggested the presence of radioactive elements, such as Pm and 84{<=}Z{<=}99 elements) at the surface of the magnetic star HD101065, also known as Przybylski's star. This star is know to be a chemically peculiar star and its anomalous 38spallation processes resulting from the interaction of the stellar material with stellar energetic particle can by themselves only explain the abundances determined by observation at the surface of HD101065. We show that specific parametric simulations can explain many different observational aspects, and in particular that a significant production of Z>30 heavy elements can be achieved. In this nucleosynthesis process, the secondary-neutron captures play a crucial role. The most attractive feature of the spallation process is the systematic production of Pm and Tc and the possible synthesis of actinides and sub-actinides.Based on such a parametric model, it is also shown that intense fluences of accelerated charged-particles interacting with surrounding material can efficiently produce elements heavier than iron. Different regimes are investigated and shown to be at the origin of p- and s-nuclei in the case of high-fluence low-flux events and r-nuclei for high-fluence high-flux irradiations. The possible existence of such irradiation events need to be confirmed by hydrodynamics simulations, but most of all by spectroscopic observations through the detection of short-lived radio-elements.

  15. PREFACE: Neutrino physics at spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avignone, F. T.; Chatterjee, L.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Strayer, M.

    2003-11-01

    Unique because of their super-light masses and tiny interaction cross sections, neutrinos combine fundamental physics on the scale of the miniscule with macroscopic physics on the scale of the cosmos. Starting from the ignition of the primal p-p chain of stellar and solar fusion reactions that signal star-birth, these elementary leptons (neutrinos) are also critical players in the life-cycles and explosive deaths of massive stars and the production and disbursement of heavy elements. Stepping beyond their importance in solar, stellar and supernova astrophysics, neutrino interactions and properties influence the evolution, dynamics and symmetries of the cosmos as a whole. Further, they serve as valuable probes of its material content at various levels of structure from atoms and nuclei to valence and sea quarks. In the light of the multitude of physics phenomena that neutrinos influence, it is imperative to enhance our understanding of neutrino interactions and properties to the maximum. This is accentuated by the recent evidence of finite neutrino mass and flavour mixing between generations that reverberates on the plethora of physics that neutrinos influence. Laboratory experiments using intense neutrino fluxes would allow precision measurements and determination of important neutrino reaction rates. These can then complement atmospheric, solar and reactor experiments that have enriched so valuably our understanding of the neutrino and its repertoire of physics applications. In particular, intermediate energy neutrino experiments can provide critical information on stellar and solar astrophysical processes, along with advancing our knowledge of nuclear structure, sub-nuclear physics and fundamental symmetries. So where should we look for such intense neutrino sources? Spallation neutron facilities by their design are sources of intense neutrino pulses that are produced as a by-product of neutron spallation. These neutrino sources could serve as unique laboratories

  16. Effects of mercury on fatigue behavior of Type 316 LN stainless steel: application in the spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, H.; Liaw, P. K.; Strizak, J. P.; Mansur, L. K.

    2003-05-01

    The high-cycle fatigue behavior of Type 316 stainless steel (SS), the prime candidate target-container material for the spallation neutron source (SNS), was investigated in air and mercury at frequencies of 0.2 and 10 Hz with a R ratio of -1, and at 10 and 700 Hz with a R ratio of 0.1. Here R equals the ratio of the applied minimum to maximum loads during fatigue experiments. A decrease in the fatigue life in mercury was observed, relative to that in air, at 0.2 Hz. Correspondingly, intergranular fracture was found on the fracture surfaces of specimens tested in mercury at 0.2 Hz, which is a typical fracture mode caused by liquid metal embrittlement (LME). Heating by mechanical working was observed during fatigue tests at 10 Hz and a R of -1, and at 700 Hz and a R of 0.1, which resulted in great increases in specimen temperatures and shorter fatigue lives for large stress amplitudes (⩾210 MPa), relative to those in mercury. However, in the fatigue tests at 10 and 700 Hz, the fatigue lives in air with cooling and those in mercury seemed to be comparable, indicating little influence of the mercury. Thus, both specimen self-heating and LME need to be considered in understanding fatigue behavior of Type 316 SS in air and mercury.

  17. Summary of the results from post-irradiation examination of spent targets at the FZ-Juelich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Bauer, G. S.; Broome, T.; Carsughi, F.; Dai, Y.; Maloy, S. A.; Roedig, M.; Sommer, W. F.; Ullmaier, H.

    2003-05-01

    The lifetime of structural components of spallation targets (beam window, liquid metal container, return hull) is determined by the irradiation-induced changes of the mechanical properties of their materials. An extensive test program was initiated using specimens obtained from spent target components from operating spallation facilities (Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, LANSCE and the Spallation Neutron Source at Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, ISIS). The investigated materials include a nickel-based alloy (IN 718), an austenitic stainless steel (AISI 304L), a martensitic stainless steel (DIN 1.4926) and a refractory metal (tantalum). The materials experienced 800 MeV proton irradiation to maximum fluences of >10 25 p/m 2. The mechanical property changes were investigated by microhardness measurements, three-point bending tests and tensile tests at temperatures ranging from room temperature (RT) to 250 °C. Subsequent scanning electron microscopy was employed to investigate the fracture surfaces. Generally, irradiation hardening and a decrease in ductility with increasing proton fluence was observed. Nevertheless, all materials except IN 718 tested at RT, retained some ductility up to the maximum doses explored. The transmission electron microscopy investigation showed that a high density of 'black dots' and dislocation loops appeared in all materials. No effect of long-range radiation-induced segregation at grain boundaries was detected by energy dispersive X-ray investigation on AISI 304L and IN718 which failed by intergranular fracture.

  18. Design of antibody-functionalized carbon nanotubes filled with radioactivable metals towards a targeted anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Spinato, Cinzia; Perez Ruiz de Garibay, Aritz; Kierkowicz, Magdalena; Pach, Elzbieta; Martincic, Markus; Klippstein, Rebecca; Bourgognon, Maxime; Wang, Julie Tzu-Wen; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T; Ballesteros, Belén; Tobias, Gerard; Bianco, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    In the present work we have devised the synthesis of a novel promising carbon nanotube carrier for the targeted delivery of radioactivity, through a combination of endohedral and exohedral functionalization. Steam-purified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been initially filled with radioactive analogues (i.e. metal halides) and sealed by high temperature treatment, affording closed-ended CNTs with the filling material confined in the inner cavity. The external functionalization of these filled CNTs was then achieved by nitrene cycloaddition and followed by the derivatization with a monoclonal antibody (Cetuximab) targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), overexpressed by several cancer cells. The targeting efficiency of the so-obtained conjugate was evaluated by immunostaining with a secondary antibody and by incubation of the CNTs with EGFR positive cells (U87-EGFR+), followed by flow cytometry, confocal microscopy or elemental analyses. We demonstrated that our filled and functionalized CNTs can internalize more efficiently in EGFR positive cancer cells. PMID:26733445

  19. Time-domain response of a metal detector to a target buried in soil with frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Y.

    2006-05-01

    The work reported in this paper is a part of on-going studies to clarify how and to what extent soil electromagnetic properties affect the performance of induction metal detectors widely used in humanitarian demining. This paper studies the specific case of the time-domain response of a small metallic sphere buried in a non-conducting soil half-space with frequency-dependent complex magnetic susceptibility. The sphere is chosen as a simple prototype for the small metal parts in low-metal landmines, while soil with dispersive magnetic susceptibility is a good model for some soils that are known to adversely affect the performance of metal detectors. The included analysis and computations extend previous work which has been done mostly in the frequency domain. Approximate theoretical expressions for weakly magnetic soils are found to fit the experimental data very well, which allowed the estimation of soil model parameters, albeit in an ad hoc manner. Soil signal is found to exceed target signal (due to an aluminum sphere of radius 0.0127 m) in many cases, even for the weakly magnetic Cambodian laterite used in the experiments. How deep a buried target is detected depends on many other factors in addition to the relative strength of soil and target signals. A general statement cannot thus be made regarding detectability of a target in soil based on the presented results. However, computational results complemented with experimental data extend the understanding of the effect that soil has on metal detectors.

  20. Neutron diffractometers for structural biology at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenborn, B.P.; Pitcher, E.

    1994-12-31

    Spallation neutron sources are ideal for diffraction studies of proteins and oriented molecular complexes. With spoliation neutrons and their time dependent wavelength structure, it is easy to electronically select data with an optimal wavelength bandwidth and cover the whole Laue spectrum as time (wavelength) resolved snapshots. This optimized data quality with best peak-to-background ratios and provides adequate spatial and energy resolution to eliminate peak overlaps. The application of this concept will use choppers to select the desired Laue wavelength spectrum and employ focusing optics and large cylindrical {sup 3}He detectors to optimize data collection rates. Such a diffractometer will cover a Laue wavelength range from 1 to 5{Angstrom} with a flight path length of 10m and an energy resolution of 0.25{Angstrom}. Moderator concepts for maximal flux distribution within this energy range will be discussed using calculated flux profiles. Since the energy resolution required for such timed data collection in this super Laue techniques is not very high, the use of a linac only (LAMPF) spoliation target is an exciting possibility with an order of magnitude increase in flux.

  1. The cryomodule test stand at the European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hees, W.; Weisend II, J. G.; Wang, X. L.; Köttig, T.

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is an intergovernmental project building a multidisciplinary research laboratory based upon the world's most powerful neutron source to be built in Lund, Sweden. The ESS will use a linear accelerator which will deliver protons with 5 MW of power to the target at 2.5 GeV with a nominal current of 50 mA. The superconducting part of the linac consists of over 150 niobium cavities cooled with superfluid helium at 2 K. A dedicated cryoplant will supply the cryomodules with single phase helium through an external cryogenic transfer line. The elliptical cavity cryomodules will undergo their site acceptance tests at the ESS cryomodule test stand in Lund. This test stand will use a 4.5 K cryoplant and warm sub-atmospheric compression to supply the 2 K helium. We will show the requirements for the test stand, a layout proposal and discuss the factors determining the required cryogenic capacity, test sequence and schedule.

  2. The effects of shockwave profile shape and shock obliquity on spallation in Cu and Ta: kinetic and stress-state effects on damage evolution(u)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, George T

    2010-12-14

    Widespread research over the past five decades has provided a wealth of experimental data and insight concerning shock hardening and the spallation response of materials subjected to square-topped shock-wave loading profiles. Less quantitative data have been gathered on the effect of direct, in-contact, high explosive (HE)-driven Taylor wave (or triangular-wave) loading profile shock loading on the shock hardening, damage evolution, or spallation response of materials. Explosive loading induces an impulse dubbed a 'Taylor Wave'. This is a significantly different loading history than that achieved by a square-topped impulse in terms of both the pulse duration at a fixed peak pressure, and a different unloading strain rate from the peak Hugoniot state achieved. The goal of this research is to quantify the influence of shockwave obliquity on the spallation response of copper and tantalum by subjecting plates of each material to HE-driven sweeping detonation-wave loading and quantify both the wave propagation and the post-mortem damage evolution. This talk will summarize our current understanding of damage evolution during sweeping detonation-wave spallation loading in Cu and Ta and show comparisons to modeling simulations. The spallation responses of Cu and Ta are both shown to be critically dependent on the shockwave profile and the stress-state of the shock. Based on variations in the specifics of the shock drive (pulse shape, peak stress, shock obliquity) and sample geometry in Cu and Ta, 'spall strength' varies by over a factor of two and the details of the mechanisms of the damage evolution is seen to vary. Simplistic models of spallation, such as P{sub min} based on 1-D square-top shock data lack the physics to capture the influence of kinetics on damage evolution such as that operative during sweeping detonation loading. Such considerations are important for the development of predictive models of damage evolution and spallation in metals and alloys.

  3. A multifunctional metal-organic framework based tumor targeting drug delivery system for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Dong, Zhi-Yue; Cheng, Hong; Wan, Shuang-Shuang; Chen, Wei-Hai; Zou, Mei-Zhen; Huo, Jia-Wei; Deng, He-Xiang; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects.Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  4. Facile graphene transfer directly to target substrates with a reusable metal catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mafra, D. L.; Ming, T.; Kong, J.

    2015-09-01

    High-throughput, roll-to-roll growth and transferring of high-quality, large-area chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene directly onto a target substrate with a reusable metal catalyst is an enabling technology for flexible optoelectronics. We explore the direct transfer via hot lamination of CVD graphene onto a flexible substrate, followed by electrochemical delamination (bubble transfer) of the graphene. The transfer method investigated here does not require any intermediate transfer layer and allows the copper to be reused, which will reduce the production cost and avoid the generation of chemical waste. Such integration is one necessary step forward toward the economical and industrial scale production of graphene. Our method bares promise in various applications. As an example, we fabricated flexible solution-gated graphene field-effect-transistors, which exhibited transconductance as high as 200 μS.High-throughput, roll-to-roll growth and transferring of high-quality, large-area chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene directly onto a target substrate with a reusable metal catalyst is an enabling technology for flexible optoelectronics. We explore the direct transfer via hot lamination of CVD graphene onto a flexible substrate, followed by electrochemical delamination (bubble transfer) of the graphene. The transfer method investigated here does not require any intermediate transfer layer and allows the copper to be reused, which will reduce the production cost and avoid the generation of chemical waste. Such integration is one necessary step forward toward the economical and industrial scale production of graphene. Our method bares promise in various applications. As an example, we fabricated flexible solution-gated graphene field-effect-transistors, which exhibited transconductance as high as 200 μS. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03892h

  5. Micro-hardness measurement and micro-structure characterization of T91 weld metal irradiated in SINQ Target-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, X.; Dai, Y.

    2005-08-01

    This work is concerned with the micro-structure and mechanical behavior of T91 weld metal before and after an irradiation in SINQ Target-3. Optical and TEM observations and micro-hardness tests were performed to identify the irradiation effects. Before irradiation, the micro-structure of the T91 weld metals consisted of mainly tempered martensite and retained ferrite area. Precipitates in the weld metal are predominately M 7C 3 carbides, and few M 23C 6 particles are observed along the martensitic lath and primary austenite grain boundaries. The dislocation density in the weld metal is much higher than that in the base metal. The main feature of the irradiated micro-structure of the weld metal are small defects (black dots) and faulted Frank interstitial loops at lower irradiation temperature and a high density of helium bubbles appear at higher irradiation dose and temperature. The results are comparable with those of the T91 base metal irradiated under the same condition in the previous work. The weld metal and heat affected zone (HAZ) show much higher hardness than the base metal before irradiation, showing that no post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) has been applied to the weld metal. Irradiation hardening increases with irradiation dose below 10 dpa, but decreases at higher dose, which might be related to the transformation of M 7C 3 precipitates to M 23C 6 at higher irradiation temperatures.

  6. The effect of metallic overcoats on imprint and perturbation growth in ICF targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Lee; Aglitskiy, Y.

    2005-10-01

    A series of 2d simulations using NRL's FAST radiation hydrodynamics code (J.H. Gardner et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1935 (1998)) were performed on CH foils accelerated by laser ablation. Without a strategy to counteract the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, the growth of either applied small perturbations or nonuniformities arising from the laser irradiation are amplified and eventually destroy the target. We show that the application of a thin metallic overcoat on the front of the foil can be effective in reducing the perturbation growth rate dramatically, in agreement with experiments conducted at the NRL NIKE laser facility. Also in agreement with these experiments, we show that the growth of perturbations is enhanced if the overcoat is below a critical thickness. Comparison with fluid theory demonstrates that the principal stabilizing mechanism is the increase in ablation velocity resulting from conversion of laser energy to x-rays by the high-Z overcoat. It is found that the degree of stabilization in the simulations is fairly sensitive to initial conditions, and in order to predict the strong stabilization seen in experiment, a realistic initial density profile is required. These results on planar foils are applied to the design of high-gain direct-drive ICF targets.

  7. Spectral analysis of ground penetrating radar signals in concrete, metallic and plastic targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Vinicius Rafael N. dos; Al-Nuaimy, Waleed; Porsani, Jorge Luís; Hirata, Nina S. Tomita; Alzubi, Hamzah S.

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy of detecting buried targets using ground penetrating radar (GPR) depends mainly on features that are extracted from the data. The objective of this study is to test three spectral features and evaluate the quality to provide a good discrimination among three types of materials (concrete, metallic and plastic) using the 200 MHz GPR system. The spectral features which were selected to check the interaction of the electromagnetic wave with the type of material are: the power spectral density (PSD), short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and the Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD). The analyses were performed with simulated data varying the sizes of the targets and the electrical properties (relative dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity) of the soil. To check if the simulated data are in accordance with the real data, the same approach was applied on the data obtained in the IAG/USP test site. A noticeable difference was found in the amplitude of the studies' features in the frequency domain and these results show the strength of the signal processing to try to differentiate buried materials using GPR, and so can be used in urban planning and geotechnical studies.

  8. Deexcitation Modes in Spallation Nuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, F. G.; Guzmán, F.; Rodriguez, O.; Tumbarell, O.; Souza, D. A.; Samana, A. R.; Andrade-II, E.; Bernal Castillo, J. L.; Deppman, A.

    2016-08-01

    Spallation nuclear reactions in the range of 0.2 to 1.2 GeV are studied using the CRISP code. A new approach for the deexcitation stage of the compound nucleus was introduced. For the calculations of the level densities, this approach is based on the Back-shifted Fermi gas model (BSFG), which takes into account pairing effects and shell corrections, whereas the calculation of the fission barriers were performed by means of the Extended Thomas-Fermi plus Strutinsky Integral (ETFSI) method, which is a high-speed approximation to the Hartree-Fock method with pairing correlations treated as in the usual BCS plus blocking approach. This procedure is more appropriate to calculate level densities for exotic nuclei. Satisfactory results were obtained and compared with experimental data obtained in the GSI experiments. As another important result, we highlight some directions for the development of a qualitatively superior version of the CRISP code with the implementation of more realistic and suitable physical models to be applied in stable and exotic nuclei that participate in the process. This new version of the code includes several substantial changes in the decay of the hot compound nucleus which allow satisfactory agreement with the experimental data and a reduction of the adjustment parameters.

  9. Computational Benchmark Calculations Relevant to the Neutronic Design of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, F.X.; Glasgow, D.C.; Jerde, E.A.; Johnson, J.O.; Yugo, J.J.

    1999-11-14

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will provide an intense source of low-energy neutrons for experimental use. The low-energy neutrons are produced by the interaction of a high-energy (1.0 GeV) proton beam on a mercury (Hg) target and slowed down in liquid hydrogen or light water moderators. Computer codes and computational techniques are being benchmarked against relevant experimental data to validate and verify the tools being used to predict the performance of the SNS. The LAHET Code System (LCS), which includes LAHET, HTAPE ad HMCNP (a modified version of MCNP version 3b), have been applied to the analysis of experiments that were conducted in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In the AGS experiments, foils of various materials were placed around a mercury-filled stainless steel cylinder, which was bombarded with protons at 1.6 GeV. Neutrons created in the mercury target, activated the foils. Activities of the relevant isotopes were accurately measured and compared with calculated predictions. Measurements at BNL were provided in part by collaborating scientists from JAERI as part of the AGS Spallation Target Experiment (ASTE) collaboration. To date, calculations have shown good agreement with measurements.

  10. Photoactive metal carbonyl complexes as potential agents for targeted CO delivery.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Margarita A; Mascharak, Pradip K

    2014-04-01

    The surprising discovery of carbon monoxide (CO) as a signaling molecule in mammalian physiology has recently raised interest in this toxic gas among researchers in biochemical and pharmaceutical community. CO is endogenously produced mainly from catabolism of heme by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO) and participates in a myriad of anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, and vasoregulatory pathways. In animal models, low doses of CO have exhibited beneficial effects in suppression of organ graft rejection and safeguarding the heart during reperfusion after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. The salutary effects of CO have naturally drawn attention of the pharmaceutical industry for its use as a cytoprotective agent. Safety-related concerns of the use of this noxious gas have prompted research in the area of syntheses of CO-releasing molecules (CORMs) and to date, several metal carbonyls (metal complexes of CO) have been employed as CORMs in promoting prolonged (and safe) delivery of low doses of CO to cellular targets. Because many carbonyl complexes release CO upon illumination, investigators have recently began to explore the possibility of "controlled CO delivery" through the use of light. During the past few years, a number of photoactive CORMs or "photoCORMs" have been synthesized that release CO upon illumination with UV or visible light. The utility of these photoCORMs in CO delivery has also been confirmed. Novel design principles for isolation of photoCORMs have started to appear in recent reports. Scrutiny of the literature reveals the emergence of a new exciting area of drug development in such efforts. The potential of photoCORMs as CO-donating pharmaceuticals along with a brief overview of the physiological roles of CO is presented in this review. PMID:24287103

  11. Tagging spallation backgrounds with showers in water Cherenkov detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shirley Weishi; Beacom, John F.

    2015-11-01

    Cosmic-ray muons and especially their secondaries break apart nuclei ("spallation") and produce fast neutrons and beta-decay isotopes, which are backgrounds for low-energy experiments. In Super-Kamiokande, these beta decays are the dominant background in 6-18 MeV, relevant for solar neutrinos and the diffuse supernova neutrino background. In a previous paper, we showed that these spallation isotopes are produced primarily in showers, instead of in isolation. This explains an empirical spatial correlation between a peak in the muon Cherenkov light profile and the spallation decay, which Super-Kamiokande used to develop a new spallation cut. However, the muon light profiles that Super-Kamiokande measured are grossly inconsistent with shower physics. We show how to resolve this discrepancy and how to reconstruct accurate profiles of muons and their showers from their Cherenkov light. We propose a new spallation cut based on these improved profiles and quantify its effects. Our results can significantly benefit low-energy studies in Super-Kamiokande, and will be especially important for detectors at shallower depths, like the proposed Hyper-Kamiokande.

  12. Reconstruction of Colloidal Spheres by Targeted Etching: A Generalized Self-Template Route to Porous Amphoteric Metal Oxide Hollow Spheres.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jia Hong; Bai, Yuqing; Wang, Qing

    2015-04-21

    Despite the significant progress in developing various synthetic strategies for metal oxide hollow spheres (h-MO), the so-far explored materials are mostly chemically inert metal oxides. Very few attempts have been made for amphoteric metal oxides such as Al2O3 and ZnO due to the difficulties in the control of the dissolution and recrystallization process. Herein, a facile self-template route to the synthesis of amphoteric h-MO with tunable size and shell thickness is developed by targeted etching via an acid-base reaction. With the protection of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on the surface, the interior of metal oxide solid colloidal spheres (c-MOs) that possess radially divergent structures could be selectively etched with acid/alkali as an etchant, forming h-MO of Al2O3 and ZnO. Our results also show that a wide variety of metal oxide colloidal spheres can be potential self-templates for targeted etching, which paves the way for developing a generalized strategy for the synthesis of various metal oxide hollow spheres. PMID:25835084

  13. Influence of electronic stopping on sputtering induced by cluster impact on metallic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2009-04-01

    Using molecular-dynamics simulation, we model the sputtering of a Au (111) crystallite induced by the impact of Au{sub 13} projectiles with total energies up to 500 keV. Due to the uncertainty of the electronic stopping of Au moving in particular at small velocities, we performed several simulations, in which the electronic stopping parameters are systematically changed. Our results demonstrate the dominating influence of the cut-off energy E{sub c}, below which the high-velocity electronic stopping of atoms is switched off in the simulation. If E{sub c} is smaller than roughly one half the cohesive energy of the target, sputtering ceases after a few ps; the spike contribution to sputtering (also called phase explosion or gas-flow contribution) is entirely quenched and the sputtering yield is up to an order of magnitude smaller than when electronic stopping is taken into account only at higher atom energies. Our results demonstrate the importance of a careful modeling of electronic stopping in simulations of spike sputtering from metals.

  14. GRAIN-SCALE FAILURE IN THERMAL SPALLATION DRILLING

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, S C; Lomov, I; Roberts, J J

    2012-01-19

    Geothermal power promises clean, renewable, reliable and potentially widely-available energy, but is limited by high initial capital costs. New drilling technologies are required to make geothermal power financially competitive with other energy sources. One potential solution is offered by Thermal Spallation Drilling (TSD) - a novel drilling technique in which small particles (spalls) are released from the rock surface by rapid heating. While TSD has the potential to improve drilling rates of brittle granitic rocks, the coupled thermomechanical processes involved in TSD are poorly described, making system control and optimization difficult for this drilling technology. In this paper, we discuss results from a new modeling effort investigating thermal spallation drilling. In particular, we describe an explicit model that simulates the grain-scale mechanics of thermal spallation and use this model to examine existing theories concerning spalling mechanisms. We will report how borehole conditions influence spall production, and discuss implications for macro-scale models of drilling systems.

  15. GEANT4 simulations of the n_TOF spallation source and their benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Meo, S.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Massimi, C.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Barbagallo, M.; Colonna, N.; Guerrero, C.; Mancusi, D.; Mingrone, F.; Quesada, J. M.; Sabate-Gilarte, M.; Vannini, G.; Vlachoudis, V.

    2015-12-01

    Neutron production and transport in the spallation target of the n_TOF facility at CERN has been simulated with GEANT4. The results obtained with different models of high-energy nucleon-nucleus interaction have been compared with the measured characteristics of the neutron beam, in particular the flux and its dependence on neutron energy, measured in the first experimental area. The best agreement at present, within 20% for the absolute value of the flux, and within few percent for the energy dependence in the whole energy range from thermal to 1 GeV, is obtained with the INCL++ model coupled with the GEANT4 native de-excitation model. All other available models overestimate by a larger factor, of up to 70%, the n_TOF neutron flux. The simulations are also able to accurately reproduce the neutron beam energy resolution function, which is essentially determined by the moderation time inside the target/moderator assembly. The results here reported provide confidence on the use of GEANT4 for simulations of spallation neutron sources.

  16. 5 MW pulsed spallation neutron source, Preconceptual design study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report describes a self-consistent base line design for a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS). It is intended to establish feasibility of design and as a basis for further expanded and detailed studies. It may also serve as a basis for establishing project cost (30% accuracy) in order to intercompare competing designs for a PSNS not only on the basis of technical feasibility and technical merit but also on the basis of projected total cost. The accelerator design considered here is based on the objective of a pulsed neutron source obtained by means of a pulsed proton beam with average beam power of 5 MW, in {approx} 1 {mu}sec pulses, operating at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. Two target stations are incorporated in the basic facility: one for operation at 10 Hz for long-wavelength instruments, and one operating at 50 Hz for instruments utilizing thermal neutrons. The design approach for the proton accelerator is to use a low energy linear accelerator (at 0.6 GeV), operating at 60 Hz, in tandem with two fast cycling booster synchrotrons (at 3.6 GeV), operating at 30 Hz. It is assumed here that considerations of cost and overall system reliability may favor the present design approach over the alternative approach pursued elsewhere, whereby use is made of a high energy linear accelerator in conjunction with a dc accumulation ring. With the knowledge that this alternative design is under active development, it was deliberately decided to favor here the low energy linac-fast cycling booster approach. Clearly, the present design, as developed here, must be carried to the full conceptual design stage in order to facilitate a meaningful technology and cost comparison with alternative designs.

  17. H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, Robert F; Pennisi, Terry R; Roseberry, Ron T; Stockli, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent {approx}38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of {approx}90%. H{sup -} beam pulses ({approx}1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, {approx}60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of {approx}0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of {approx}99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of {approx}75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to {approx}100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  18. H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Dudnikov, V. G.; Gawne, K. R.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Roseberry, R. T.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Turvey, M. W.

    2012-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent ˜38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of ˜90%. H- beam pulses (˜1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, ˜60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of ˜0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of ˜99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of ˜75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to ˜100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  19. Cyclotron production of ⁹⁹mTc: recycling of enriched ¹⁰⁰Mo metal targets.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, K; Wilson, J S; Holt, C M B; Abrams, D N; McEwan, A J B; Mitlin, D; McQuarrie, S A

    2012-08-01

    There is growing interest in the large scale cyclotron production of (99m)Tc via the (100)Mo(p,2n)(99m)Tc reaction. While the use and recycling of cyclotron-irradiated enriched molybdenum targets has been reported previously in the context of (94m)Tc production, to the best of our knowledge, previous recycling studies have been limited to the use of oxide targets. To facilitate reuse of high-power enriched (100)Mo targets, this work presents and evaluates a strategy for recycling of enriched metallic molybdenum. For the irradiated (100)Mo targets in this study, an overall metal to metal recovery of 87% is reported. Evaluation of "new" and "recycled" (100)Mo revealed no changes in the molybdenum isotopic composition (as measured via ICP-MS). For similar irradiation conditions of "new" and "recycled" (100)Mo, (i.e. target thicknesses, irradiation time, and energy), comparable levels of (94g)Tc, (95g)Tc, and (96g)Tc contaminants were observed. Comparable QC specifications (i.e. aluminum ion concentration, pH, and radiochemical purity) were also reported. We finally note that [(99m)Tc]-MDP images obtained by comparing MDP labelled with generator-based (99m)Tc vs. (99m)Tc obtained following the irradiation of recycled (100)Mo demonstrated comparable biodistribution. With the goal of producing large quantities of (99m)Tc, the proposed methodology demonstrates that efficient recycling of enriched metallic (100)Mo targets is feasible and effective. PMID:22750197

  20. Neutron scattering instrumentation for biology at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1994-12-31

    Conventional wisdom holds that since biological entities are large, they must be studied with cold neutrons, a domain in which reactor sources of neutrons are often supposed to be pre-eminent. In fact, the current generation of pulsed spallation neutron sources, such as LANSCE at Los Alamos and ISIS in the United Kingdom, has demonstrated a capability for small angle scattering (SANS) - a typical cold- neutron application - that was not anticipated five years ago. Although no one has yet built a Laue diffractometer at a pulsed spallation source, calculations show that such an instrument would provide an exceptional capability for protein crystallography at one of the existing high-power spoliation sources. Even more exciting is the prospect of installing such spectrometers either at a next-generation, short-pulse spallation source or at a long-pulse spallation source. A recent Los Alamos study has shown that a one-megawatt, short-pulse source, which is an order of magnitude more powerful than LANSCE, could be built with today`s technology. In Europe, a preconceptual design study for a five-megawatt source is under way. Although such short-pulse sources are likely to be the wave of the future, they may not be necessary for some applications - such as Laue diffraction - which can be performed very well at a long-pulse spoliation source. Recently, it has been argued by Mezei that a facility that combines a short-pulse spallation source similar to LANSCE, with a one-megawatt, long-pulse spallation source would provide a cost-effective solution to the global shortage of neutrons for research. The basis for this assertion as well as the performance of some existing neutron spectrometers at short-pulse sources will be examined in this presentation.

  1. VITESS 3 - Virtual Instrumentation Tool for the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendler, C.; Lieutenant, K.; Nekrassov, D.; Fromme, M.

    2014-07-01

    VITESS is a software widely used for simulation of neutron scattering experiments. Although originally motivated by instrument design for the European Spallation Source, all major neutron sources are available. Existing as well as future instruments on reactor or spallation sources can be designed and optimized, or simulated in a virtual experiment to prepare a measurement, including basic data evaluation. This note gives an overview of the VITESS software concept and usage. New developments are presented, including a 3D visualization of instruments and neutron trajectories, a numerical optimization routine and a parallelization tool allowing to split VITESS simulations on a computer cluster.

  2. A National Spallation Neutron Source for neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Appleton, B.R.

    1996-10-01

    The National Spallation Neutron Source is a collaborative project or perform the conceptual design for a next generation neutron source for the Department of Energy. This paper reviews the need and justification for a new neutron source, the origins and structure of the collaboration formed to address this need, and the community input leading up to the current design approach. A reference design is presented for an accelerator based spallation neutron source that would begin operation at about 1 megawatt of power but designed so that it could be upgraded to significantly higher powers in the future. The technology approach, status, and progress on the conceptual design to date are presented.

  3. Detection of supernova neutrinos at spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Yang; Guo, Xin-Heng; Young, Bing-Lin

    2016-07-01

    After considering supernova shock effects, Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects, neutrino collective effects, and Earth matter effects, the detection of supernova neutrinos at the China Spallation Neutron Source is studied and the expected numbers of different flavor supernova neutrinos observed through various reaction channels are calculated with the neutrino energy spectra described by the Fermi-Dirac distribution and the “beta fit” distribution respectively. Furthermore, the numerical calculation method of supernova neutrino detection on Earth is applied to some other spallation neutron sources, and the total expected numbers of supernova neutrinos observed through different reactions channels are given. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205185, 11175020, 11275025, 11575023)

  4. Bacterial Spores in Granite Survive Hypervelocity Launch by Spallation: Implications for Lithopanspermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Langenhorst, Falko; Melosh, H. Jay; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial spores are considered good candidates for endolithic life-forms that could survive interplanetary transport by natural impact processes, i. e., lithopanspermia. Organisms within rock can only embark on an interplanetary journey if they survive ejection from the surface of the donor planet and the associated extremes of compressional shock, heating, and acceleration. Previous simulation experiments have measured each of these three stresses more or less in isolation of one another, and results to date indicate that spores of the model organism Bacillus subtilis can survive each stress applied singly. Few simulations, however, have combined all three stresses simultaneously. Because considerable experimental and theoretical evidence supports a spallation mechanism for launch, we devised an experimental simulation of launch by spallation using the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR). B. subtilis spores were applied to the surface of a granite target that was impacted from above by an aluminum projectile fired at 5.4 km/s. Granite spall fragments were captured in a foam recovery fixture and then recovered and assayed for shock damage by transmission electron microscopy and for spore survival by viability assays. Peak shock pressure at the impact site was calculated to be 57.1 Pa, though recovered spall fragments were only very lightly shocked at pressures of 5-7 GPa. Spore survival was calculated to be on the order of 10-5, which is in agreement with results of previous static compressional shock experiments. These results demonstrate that endolithic spores can survive launch by spallation from a hypervelocity impact, which lends further evidence in favor of lithopanspermia theory.

  5. Bacterial spores in granite survive hypervelocity launch by spallation: implications for lithopanspermia.

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Langenhorst, Falko; Melosh, H Jay; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial spores are considered good candidates for endolithic life-forms that could survive interplanetary transport by natural impact processes, i.e., lithopanspermia. Organisms within rock can only embark on an interplanetary journey if they survive ejection from the surface of the donor planet and the associated extremes of compressional shock, heating, and acceleration. Previous simulation experiments have measured each of these three stresses more or less in isolation of one another, and results to date indicate that spores of the model organism Bacillus subtilis can survive each stress applied singly. Few simulations, however, have combined all three stresses simultaneously. Because considerable experimental and theoretical evidence supports a spallation mechanism for launch, we devised an experimental simulation of launch by spallation using the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR). B. subtilis spores were applied to the surface of a granite target that was impacted from above by an aluminum projectile fired at 5.4 km/s. Granite spall fragments were captured in a foam recovery fixture and then recovered and assayed for shock damage by transmission electron microscopy and for spore survival by viability assays. Peak shock pressure at the impact site was calculated to be 57.1 GPa, though recovered spall fragments were only very lightly shocked at pressures of 5-7 GPa. Spore survival was calculated to be on the order of 10(-5), which is in agreement with results of previous static compressional shock experiments. These results demonstrate that endolithic spores can survive launch by spallation from a hypervelocity impact, which lends further evidence in favor of lithopanspermia theory. PMID:19778276

  6. Targeting triple negative breast cancer cells by N3-substituted 9,10-Phenanthrenequinone thiosemicarbazones and their metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrasiabi, Zahra; Stovall, Preston; Finley, Kristen; Choudhury, Amitava; Barnes, Charles; Ahmad, Aamir; Sarkar, Fazlul; Vyas, Alok; Padhye, Subhash

    2013-10-01

    Novel N3-substituted 9,10-Phenanthrenequinone thiosemicarbazones and their copper, nickel and palladium complexes are structurally characterized and reported along with the single crystal X-ray structures of three ligands and one nickel complex. All compounds were evaluated for their antiproliferative potential against Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) cells which have poor prognosis and no effective drugs to treat with. All compounds exhibited antiproliferative activity against these cells. Among the metal complexes evaluated, redox active copper complexes were found to be more potent. The possible mechanism for such enhanced activity can be attributed to the generation of oxidative stress, which was amenable for targeting through metal complexation.

  7. Experimental research on the penetration of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material bullet into steel target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. W.; Chen, G.

    2012-08-01

    In the present paper, the penetration experiments of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material bullets into 45# steel targets are conducted by employing H25 artillery. In which, an experimental technique of sub-caliber penetration is constructed. The quasi static and dynamic behaviours of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material are also experimental investigated. The self-sharpening phenomenon of composite material is observed. Integrated with metallographic analysis, the failure modes of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material are identified systemically and compared with the quasi-static and dynamic material tests. It includes four failure modes, i.e., shear fracture of tungsten fiber, brittle fracture of tungsten fiber and shear fracture of metallic glass matrix as well as melting of tungsten fiber and metallic glass matrix. Comparatively, three failure mechanisms of tungsten fiber in the bullet nose are also identified, i.e., shear fracture, splitting fracture and bending or/and buckling. Finally, the mechanism of self-sharpening behaviour of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material is discussed.

  8. Opportunities for Neutrino Physics at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Efremenko, Yuri; Hix, William Raphael

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss opportunities for a neutrino program at the Spallation Neutrons Source (SNS) being commissioning at ORNL. Possible investigations can include study of neutrino-nuclear cross sections in the energy rage important for supernova dynamics and neutrino nucleosynthesis, search for neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering, and various tests of the standard model of electro-weak interactions.

  9. The Spallation Neutron Source and the Neutrino Physics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Stancu, Ion

    2008-02-21

    In this paper we describe the recently-completed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), along with a proposed long-term neutrino physics program to study neutrino-nucleus cross-sections and neutrino oscillations.

  10. Neutrino Cross-Section Measurements at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stancu, Ion

    2008-02-21

    In this paper we discuss the proposal to build a neutrino facility at the recently-completed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This facility can host an extensive, long-term program to study neutrino-nucleus cross-sections in the range of interest for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear theory.

  11. Neutron science opportunities at pulsed spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    Using the IPNS Upgrade plan developed at Argonne National Laboratory as a worked example of the design of a pulsed spallation neutron source, this paper explores some of the scientific applications of an advanced facility for materials science studies and the instrumentation for those purposes.

  12. Neutrino Cross-Section Measurements at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancu, Ion

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the proposal to build a neutrino facility at the recently-completed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This facility can host an extensive, long-term program to study neutrino-nucleus cross-sections in the range of interest for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear theory.

  13. Gamma ray line production from cosmic ray spallation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silberberg, R.; Tsao, C. H.; Letaw, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The gamma ray line intensities due to cosmic ray spallation reactions in clouds, the galactic disk and accreting binary pulsars are calculated. With the most favorable plausible assumptions, only a few lines may be detectable to the level of 0.0000001 per sq. cm per sec. The intensities are compared with those generated in nuclear excitation reactions.

  14. Shear punch testing of candidate reactor materials after irradiation in fast reactors and spallation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, S. A.; Romero, T. J.; Hosemann, P.; Toloczko, M. B.; Dai, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels and nickel-base superalloys are potential materials for use in spallation targets and fusion and fast reactors. To investigate the effects of irradiation on these materials, tests were performed after irradiation in the high energy proton beam at the Paul Scherrer Institute (SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP), 570 MeV), as well on specimens obtained from a driver duct irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Dose accumulations were up to 18 dpa for STIP irradiations (at 147-406 °C) and up to 155 dpa in FFTF (at 383-505 °C). The helium/dpa ratios ranged from 0.2 to 80 appm/dpa. Mechanical testing was performed at 25 °C. Increases in shear yield and shear maximum stress with increasing dose mirrored the results observed from companion tensile tests.

  15. THE COMMISSIONING PLAN FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING AND TRANSPORT LINES.

    SciTech Connect

    RAPARIA,D.BLASKIEWICZ,M.LEE,Y.Y.WEI,J.ET AL.

    2004-03-10

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator systems will provide a 1 GeV, 1.44 MW proton beam to a liquid mercury target for neutron production. In order to satisfy the accelerator systems' portion of the Critical Decision 4 (CD-4) commissioning goal (which marks the completion of the construction phase of the project), a beam pulse with intensity greater than 1 x 10{sup 13} protons must be accumulated in the ring, extracted in a single turn and delivered to the target. A commissioning plan has been formulated for bringing into operation and establishing nominal operating conditions for the various ring and transport line subsystems as well as for establishing beam conditions and parameters which meet the commissioning goal.

  16. Precompound emission of energetic light fragments in spallation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerby, Leslie Marie

    Emission of light fragments (LF) from nuclear reactions is an open question. Different reaction mechanisms contribute to their production; the relative roles of each, and how they change with incident energy, mass number of the target, and the type and emission energy of the fragments is not completely understood. None of the available models are able to accurately predict emission of LF from arbitrary reactions. However, the ability to describe production of LF (especially at energies ~ 30 MeV) from many reactions is important for different applications, such as cosmic-ray-induced Single Event Upsets (SEUs), radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and heavy-ion beams, to name just a few. The Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) version 03.03 and the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM) version 03.03 event generators in Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code version 6 (MCNP6) describe quite well the spectra of fragments with sizes up to 4He across a broad range of target masses and incident energies (up to ~ 5 GeV for CEM and up to ~1 TeV/A for LAQGSM). However, they do not predict the high-energy tails of LF spectra heavier than 4He well. Most LF with energies above several tens of MeV are emitted during the precompound stage of a reaction. The current versions of the CEM and LAQGSM event generators do not account for precompound emission of LF larger than 4He. The aim of our work is to extend the precompound model in them to include such processes, leading to an increase of predictive power of LF-production in MCNP6. This entails upgrading the Modified Exciton Model currently used at the preequilibrium stage in CEM and LAQGSM. It also includes expansion and examination of the coalescence and Fermi break-up models used in the precompound stages of spallation reactions within CEM and LAQGSM. Extending our models to include emission of fragments heavier than 4He at the precompound stage has indeed provided results that have much better

  17. Dissertation: Precompound Emission of Energetic Light Fragments in Spallation Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kerby, Leslie Marie

    2015-08-04

    Emission of light fragments (LF) from nuclear reactions is an open question. Different reaction mechanisms contribute to their production; the relative roles of each, and how they change with incident energy, mass number of the target, and the type and emission energy of the fragments is not completely understood. None of the available models are able to accurately predict emission of LF from arbitrary reactions. However, the ability to describe production of LF (especially at energies ≳ 30 MeV) from many reactions is important for different applications, such as cosmic-ray-induced Single Event Upsets (SEUs), radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and heavy-ion beams, to name just a few. The Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) version 03.03 and the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM) version 03.03 event generators in Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code version 6 (MCNP6) describe quite well the spectra of fragments with sizes up to ⁴He across a broad range of target masses and incident energies (up to ~ 5 GeV for CEM and up to ~ 1 TeV/A for LAQGSM). However, they do not predict the high energy tails of LF spectra heavier than ⁴He well. Most LF with energies above several tens of MeV are emitted during the precompound stage of a reaction. The current versions of the CEM and LAQGSM event generators do not account for precompound emission of LF larger than ⁴He. The aim of our work is to extend the precompound model in them to include such processes, leading to an increase of predictive power of LF-production in MCNP6. This entails upgrading the Modified Exciton Model currently used at the preequilibrium stage in CEM and LAQGSM. It also includes expansion and examination of the coalescence and Fermi break-up models used in the precompound stages of spallation reactions within CEM and LAQGSM. Extending our models to include emission of fragments heavier than ⁴He at the precompound stage has indeed provided results that have much

  18. Spallation radiation damage and dosimetry for accelerator transmutation of waste applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, M.S.; Lin, C.; Ferguson, P.D.; Sommer, W.F.

    1993-10-01

    Proposals are currently being made for systems to treat radioactive waste based on the use of accelerator-driven neutron sources. A linear proton accelerator with energies as high as 1600 MeV and currents up to 250 ma are anticipated for the driver. The neutron fluxes may reach up to 10{sup 20} neutrons/m{sup 2}s as generated by the spallation reactions that occur when the protons strike target materials. Calculations are described to determine radiation fluxes and flux spectra inherent in such systems and to estimate likely radiation effects on system components. The calculations use LAHET, a Monte Carlo high-energy transport code, and MCNP, a generalized-geometry, coupled neutron-photon Monte Carlo transport code. Cross sections for displacement and helium production are presented for spallation neutrons of energies from 21 MeV to 1600 MeV for Inconel 718 (Ni plus 18.5, 18.5, 5.1, and 3 wt % of Cr, Fe, Nb, and Mo, respectively), an alloy that is used for the proton beam entry window in several accelerators. In addition, results for this alloy are presented for the primary knocked-on atom (PKA) spectrum and the transmutation yield for 1600 MeV incident neutrons.

  19. Waste heat recovery from the European Spallation Source cryogenic helium plants - implications for system design

    SciTech Connect

    Jurns, John M.; Bäck, Harald; Gierow, Martin

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) neutron spallation project currently being designed will be built outside of Lund, Sweden. The ESS design includes three helium cryoplants, providing cryogenic cooling for the proton accelerator superconducting cavities, the target neutron source, and for the ESS instrument suite. In total, the cryoplants consume approximately 7 MW of electrical power, and will produce approximately 36 kW of refrigeration at temperatures ranging from 2-16 K. Most of the power consumed by the cryoplants ends up as waste heat, which must be rejected. One hallmark of the ESS design is the goal to recycle waste heat from ESS to the city of Lund district heating system. The design of the cooling system must optimize the delivery of waste heat from ESS to the district heating system and also assure the efficient operation of ESS systems. This report outlines the cooling scheme for the ESS cryoplants, and examines the effect of the cooling system design on cryoplant design, availability and operation.

  20. Waste heat recovery from the European Spallation Source cryogenic helium plants - implications for system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurns, John M.; Bäck, Harald; Gierow, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) neutron spallation project currently being designed will be built outside of Lund, Sweden. The ESS design includes three helium cryoplants, providing cryogenic cooling for the proton accelerator superconducting cavities, the target neutron source, and for the ESS instrument suite. In total, the cryoplants consume approximately 7 MW of electrical power, and will produce approximately 36 kW of refrigeration at temperatures ranging from 2-16 K. Most of the power consumed by the cryoplants ends up as waste heat, which must be rejected. One hallmark of the ESS design is the goal to recycle waste heat from ESS to the city of Lund district heating system. The design of the cooling system must optimize the delivery of waste heat from ESS to the district heating system and also assure the efficient operation of ESS systems. This report outlines the cooling scheme for the ESS cryoplants, and examines the effect of the cooling system design on cryoplant design, availability and operation.

  1. Plans for a Collaboratively Developed Distributed Control System for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    DeVan, W.R.; Gurd, D.P.; Hammonds, J.; Lewis, S.A.; Smith, J.D.

    1999-03-29

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based pulsed neutron source to be built in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The facility has five major sections - a ''front end'' consisting of a 65 keV H{sup -} ion source followed by a 2.5 MeV RFQ; a 1 GeV linac; a storage ring; a 1MW spallation neutron target (upgradeable to 2 MW); the conventional facilities to support these machines and a suite of neutron scattering instruments to exploit them. These components will be designed and implemented by five collaborating institutions: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Front End), Los Alamos National Laboratory (Linac); Brookhaven National Laboratory (Storage Ring); Argonne National Laboratory (Instruments); and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Neutron Source and Conventional Facilities). It is proposed to implement a fully integrated control system for all aspects of this complex. The system will be developed collaboratively, with some degree of local autonomy for distributed systems, but centralized accountability. Technical integration will be based upon the widely-used EPICS control system toolkit, and a complete set of hardware and software standards. The scope of the integrated control system includes site-wide timing and synchronization, networking and machine protection. This paper discusses the technical and organizational issues of planning a large control system to be developed collaboratively at five different institutions, the approaches being taken to address those issues, as well as some of the particular technical challenges for the SNS control system.

  2. Preparation and Testing of Corrosion and Spallation-Resistant Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, John

    2015-11-01

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project is designed to determine if plating APMT®, a specific highly oxidation-resistant oxide dispersion-strengthened FeCrAl alloy made by Kanthal, onto nickel-based superalloy turbine parts is a viable method for substantially improving the lifetimes and maximum use temperatures of the parts. The method for joining the APMT plate to the superalloys is called evaporative metal bonding and involves placing a thin foil of zinc between the plate and the superalloy, clamping them together, and heating in an atmosphere-controlled furnace. Upon heating, the zinc melts and dissolves the oxide skins of the alloys at the bond line, allowing the two alloys to diffuse into each other. The zinc then diffuses through the alloys and evaporates from their surfaces. During this annual reporting period, the finite element model was completed and used to design clamping jigs to hold the APMT plate to the larger blocks of superalloys during the bonding process. The clamping system was machined from titanium–zirconium–molybdenum and used to bond the APMT plate to the superalloy blocks. The bond between the APMT plate was weak for one of each of the superalloy blocks. We believe that this occurred because enough oxidation had occurred on the surface of the parts as a result of a 1-month time period between sandblasting to prepare the parts and the actual bonding process. The other blocks were, therefore, bonded within 1 day of preparing the parts for bonding, and their joints appear strong. Scanning electron microscopy analyses of representative joints showed that no zinc remained in the alloys after bonding. Also, phases rich in hafnium and tantalum had precipitated near the bond line in the APMT. Iron from the APMT had diffused into the superalloys during bonding, more extensively in the CM247LC than in the Rene 80. Nickel from the superalloys had diffused into the APMT, again more extensively in the joint with the CM247LC than

  3. Methods of studying the composition of the low-energy ion beams and the surface of deuterated-metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S. I.; Dudkin, G. N.; Nechaev, B. A.; Bystritsky, I. D.

    2016-06-01

    To study the reactions between the light nuclei (dd, pd, d3He, d4He) with ultralow collision energies, there is a need to obtain the high-precision experimental results on the purity of the target surface saturated with the hydrogen isotopes (protium, deuterium) and on the number and composition of the accelerated particles falling on the target. To solve this problem, a method has been developed and tested for operational testing the quality of the vacuum system and the cleaning of the metal target surface saturated with deuterium. The paper also presents the measurement results for the true flow of the accelerated ions and neutrals of hydrogen (deuterium), using a multigrid electrostatic energy analyzer. The values of the ion and neutral components of the accelerated particle flow were received for the Hall ion source. The values of the secondary electron emission coefficients were determined for a number of the metal targets (Cu, Ti, Ta, Zr) in the range of the accelerated ion energies of 3-12 keV.

  4. Microjet formation and hard x-ray production from a liquid metal target irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lar'kin, A.; Uryupina, D.; Ivanov, K.; Savel'ev, A.; Bonnet, T.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Spohr, K.; Breil, J.; Chimier, B.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Leguay, P.-M.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2014-09-01

    By using a liquid metal as a target one may significantly enhance the yield of hard x-rays with a sequence of two intense femtosecond laser pulses. The influence of the time delay between the two pulses is studied experimentally and interpreted with numerical simulations. It was suggested that the first arbitrary weak pulse produces microjets from the target surface, while the second intense pulse provides an efficient electron heating and acceleration along the jet surface. These energetic electrons are the source of x-ray emission while striking the target surface. The microjet formation is explained based on the results given by both optical diagnostics and hydrodynamic modeling by a collision of shocks originated from two distinct zones of laser energy deposition.

  5. Microjet formation and hard x-ray production from a liquid metal target irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Lar'kin, A. Uryupina, D.; Ivanov, K.; Savel'ev, A.; Bonnet, T.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Spohr, K.; Breil, J.; Chimier, B.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Leguay, P.-M.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2014-09-15

    By using a liquid metal as a target one may significantly enhance the yield of hard x-rays with a sequence of two intense femtosecond laser pulses. The influence of the time delay between the two pulses is studied experimentally and interpreted with numerical simulations. It was suggested that the first arbitrary weak pulse produces microjets from the target surface, while the second intense pulse provides an efficient electron heating and acceleration along the jet surface. These energetic electrons are the source of x-ray emission while striking the target surface. The microjet formation is explained based on the results given by both optical diagnostics and hydrodynamic modeling by a collision of shocks originated from two distinct zones of laser energy deposition.

  6. Computer simulations for rf design of a Spallation Neutron Source external antenna H ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Woo; Goulding, Richard Howell; Kang, Yoon W; Shin, Ki; Welton, Robert F

    2010-01-01

    Electromagnetic modeling of the multicusp external antenna H ion source for the Spallation Neutron Source SNS has been performed in order to optimize high-power performance. During development of the SNS external antenna ion source, antenna failures due to high voltage and multicusp magnet holder rf heating concerns under stressful operating conditions led to rf characteristics analysis. In rf simulations, the plasma was modeled as an equivalent lossy metal by defining conductivity as . Insulation designs along with material selections such as ferrite and Teflon could be included in the computer simulations to compare antenna gap potentials, surface power dissipations, and input impedance at the operating frequencies, 2 and 13.56 MHz. Further modeling and design improvements are outlined in the conclusion.

  7. Simulation of neutron production in heavy metal targets using Geant4 software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldin, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Kudashkin, I. V.; Mogildea, G.; Mogildea, M.; Paraipan, M.; Tyutyunnikov, S. I.

    2016-03-01

    Inelastic hadronic interactions in heavy targets have been simulated using Geant4 and compared with experimental data for thin and thick lead and uranium targets. Special attention is paid to neutron and fission fragment production. Good agreement in the description of proton-beam interaction with thick targets is demonstrated, which is important for the simulation of experiments aimed at the development of subcritical reactors.

  8. Spallative nucleosynthesis in supernova remnants. II. Time-dependent numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parizot, Etienne; Drury, Luke

    1999-06-01

    We calculate the spallative production of light elements associated with the explosion of an isolated supernova in the interstellar medium, using a time-dependent model taking into account the dilution of the ejected enriched material and the adiabatic energy losses. We first derive the injection function of energetic particles (EPs) accelerated at both the forward and the reverse shock, as a function of time. Then we calculate the Be yields obtained in both cases and compare them to the value implied by the observational data for metal-poor stars in the halo of our Galaxy, using both O and Fe data. We find that none of the processes investigated here can account for the amount of Be found in these stars, which confirms the analytical results of Parizot & Drury (1999). We finally analyze the consequences of these results for Galactic chemical evolution, and suggest that a model involving superbubbles might alleviate the energetics problem in a quite natural way.

  9. The effect of delta T /oxidizing temperature minus cooling temperature/ on oxide spallation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    Several alloys (one iron base and five nickel base) were cyclically oxidized in a series of tests in which the higher temperature (1100 or 1200 C) of the cycle was fixed at a level to allow ample oxidation in reasonable time and the lower temperature was variable to allow cycle temperature differences of up to 1400 C. For all nickel alloys, as delta T increased the extent of spallation increased. This effect was attributed to thermal expansion mismatches between the oxide and the nickel substrate. The FeCrAl alloy was not sensitive to delta T and resisted spalling at delta T levels to 1400 C. FeCrAl, and the Al2O3 scale which forms on it, have thermal expansion coefficients which are substantially more alike than any of the other oxide-metal combinations tested.

  10. Overcoming Thermal Shock Problems in Liquid Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Kim, S.H.

    2000-06-01

    Short pulse accelerator-driven neutron sources such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) employ high-energy proton beam energy deposition in heavy metal (such as mercury) over microsecond time frames. The interaction of the energetic proton beam with the mercury target leads to very high heating rates in the target. Although the resulting temperature rise is relatively small (a few {degree}C ), the rate of temperature rise is enormous ({approximately}10{sup 7} C/s) during the very brief beam pulse ({approximately}0.58 {micro}s). The resulting thermal-shock induced compression of the mercury leads to the production of large amplitude pressure waves in the mercury that interact with the walls of the mercury target and the bulk flow field. Safety-related operational concerns exist in two main areas, viz., (1) possible target enclosure failure from impact of thermal shocks on the wall due to its direct heating from the proton beam and the loads transferred from the mercury compression waves, and (2) impact of the compression-cum-rarefaction wave-induced effects such as cavitation bubble emanation and fluid surging. Preliminary stress evaluations indicate stress levels approaching yielding conditions and beyond in select regions of the target. Also, the induction of cavitation (which could assist in attenuation) can also release gases that may accumulate at undesirable locations and impair heat transfer.

  11. A Long-Pulse Spallation Source at Los Alamos: Facility description and preliminary neutronic performance for cold neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; Weinacht, D.J.; Pitcher, E.J.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1998-03-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has discussed installing a new 1-MW spallation neutron target station in an existing building at the end of its 800-MeV proton linear accelerator. Because the accelerator provides pulses of protons each about 1 msec in duration, the new source would be a Long Pulse Spallation Source (LPSS). The facility would employ vertical extraction of moderators and reflectors, and horizontal extraction of the spallation target. An LPSS uses coupled moderators rather than decoupled ones. There are potential gains of about a factor of 6 to 7 in the time-averaged neutron brightness for cold-neutron production from a coupled liquid H{sub 2} moderator compared to a decoupled one. However, these gains come at the expense of putting ``tails`` on the neutron pulses. The particulars of the neutron pulses from a moderator (e.g., energy-dependent rise times, peak intensities, pulse widths, and decay constant(s) of the tails) are crucial parameters for designing instruments and estimating their performance at an LPSS. Tungsten is the reference target material. Inconel 718 is the reference target canister and proton beam window material, with Al-6061 being the choice for the liquid H{sub 2} moderator canister and vacuum container. A 1-MW LPSS would have world-class neutronic performance. The authors describe the proposed Los Alamos LPSS facility, and show that, for cold neutrons, the calculated time-averaged neutronic performance of a liquid H{sub 2} moderator at the 1-MW LPSS is equivalent to about 1/4th the calculated neutronic performance of the best liquid D{sub 2} moderator at the Institute Laue-Langevin reactor. They show that the time-averaged moderator neutronic brightness increases as the size of the moderator gets smaller.

  12. High-Power Linac for the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, D. J.

    2002-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be the world’s most intense source of neutrons for fundamental science and industrial applications. Design and construction of this facility, located at Oak Ridge, is a joint venture between six DOE laboratories. Construction began in 1999 and is currently ahead of the scheduled 2006 completion date. Injecting a high-power, pulsed proton beam into a mercury target produces neutrons. In this talk, we review the physics requirements, design, and status of the construction of the 1-GeV, 1.4-MW average power RF linac for SNS. The accelerator consists of a drift tube linac (DTL), a coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and a superconducting rf (SRF) linac. The phase and quadrupole settings are set to avoid structure and parametric resonances, with coherent resonances posing minimal risk for emittance growth. The DTL is 37 m long and accelerates the ions to 87 MeV. The CCL is 55 m long and accelerates the ions to 186 MeV. The rf structure design and stability for both the DTL and CCL have been validated with scale models. The SRF linac has a modular design to accelerate ions to 1000 MeV, with a straightforward upgrade to 1.3 GeV at a later date. 3D particle-in-cell simulations of beam dynamics are performed to validate performance. The accelerator utilizes 93 MW of pulsed power operating continuously at 60-Hz with an 8factor. Approximately one hundred 402.5 or 805-MHz klystrons, with outputs between 0.55 and 5 MW, are used. The klystrons are powered by a novel converter-modulator that takes advantage of recent advances in IGBT switch plate assemblies and low-loss material cores for boost transformer. Beam diagnostics include position, phase, profile, and current monitors. They are designed to enable accurate beam steering and matching, and to minimize beam loss that would lead to activation and prevent hands-on maintenance.

  13. Proceedings of Soil Decon `93: Technology targeting radionuclides and heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The principal objective for convening this workshop was to exchange ideas and discuss with scientists and engineers methods for removing radionuclides and/or toxic metals from soils. Over the years there have been numerous symposia, conferences, and workshops directed at soil remediation. However, this may be the first where the scope was narrowed to the removal of radionuclides and toxic metals from soils. The intent was to focus on the separation processes controlling the removal of the radionuclide and/or metal from soil. Its purpose was not intended to be a soil washing/leaching workshop, but rather to identify a variety or combination of processes (chemical, physical, and biological) that can be used in concert with the applicable engineering approaches to decontaminate soils of radionuclides and toxic metals. Abstracts and visual aids used by the speakers of the workshop are presented in this document.

  14. On the highly directional expansion of laser-produced plasmas. [metallic targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Feldman, U.; Burkhalter, P. G.; Finn, T.; Feibelman, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    The expansion of plasmas produced by focusing a CO2 laser pulse onto solid planar targets is discussed. The plasmas are studied using an extreme-ultraviolet spectroheliograph. With titanium and iron targets the plasma blow-off observed in transitions within highly ionized species (e.g., Fe XVI) occurs parallel to the target normal. The plasma is tightly confined to narrow cylindrical structures about 0.7 mm in diameter and is observed as far as 1 cm from the target surface. The electron density is about 2.8 by 10 to the 18th power per cu cm at a distance of 0.7 mm from the target surface and decreases to approximately 6.5 by 10 to the 17th power per cu cm at a distance of 2.9 mm from the surface.

  15. Polymer-based metal nano-coated disposable target for matrix-assisted and matrix-free laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bugovsky, Stefan; Winkler, Wolfgang; Balika, Werner; Koranda, Manfred; Allmaier, Günter

    2016-07-15

    The ideal MALDI/LDI mass spectrometry sample target for an axial TOF instrument possesses a variety of properties. Primarily, it should be chemically inert to the sample, i.e. analyte, matrix and solvents, highly planar across the whole target, without any previous chemical contact and provide a uniform surface to facilitate reproducible measurements without artifacts from previous sample or matrix compounds. This can be hard to achieve with a metal target, which has to be extensively cleaned every time after use. Any cleaning step may leave residues behind, may change the surface properties due to the type of cleaning method used or even cause microscopic scratches over time hence altering matrix crystallization behavior. Alternatively, use of disposable targets avoids these problems. As each possesses the same surface they therefore have the potential to replace the conventional full metal targets so commonly employed. Furthermore, low cost single-use targets with high planarity promise an easier compliance with GLP guidelines as they alleviate the problem of low reproducibility due to inconsistent sample/matrix crystallization and changes to the target surface properties. In our tests, polymeric metal nano-coated targets were compared to a stainless steel reference. The polymeric metal nano-coated targets exhibited all the performance characteristics for a MALDI MS sample support, and even surpassed the - in our lab commonly used - reference in some aspects like limit of detection. The target exhibits all necessary features such as electrical conductivity, vacuum, laser and solvent compatibility. PMID:27038744

  16. Investigation of Coulombic bremsstrahlung spectra of metallic targets for the photon energy region of 1-100keV.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A S

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, the formation of bremsstrahlung spectra by ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) and polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) in metallic targets by (35)S beta particles has been investigated in the photon energy region of 1-100keV. From the experimental measurements and the theoretical results obtained from Elwert corrected (non-relativistic) Bethe Heitler (EBH) theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) (FmodBH) theories for OB and Avdonina and Pratt (FmodBH+PB) theory for total bremsstrahlung (BS) having the contribution of PB into OB, it has been found that the contribution of PB into BS in a target is limited to a low energy region only and also varies with the atomic number of target material. The FmodBH+PB theory is in agreement with the experimental results in low energy regions of the target, whereas at high energy region FmodBH is found to give better agreement. Further, the present experimental results indicate that the screening effects in the Coulombic bremsstrahlung process cannot be neglected in the high energy region, and the multiple scattering and secondary electron emissions effects in thick target are required to be taken into account in describing the bremsstrahlung process. PMID:27400163

  17. Magnetic nanoscale metal organic frameworks for potential targeted anticancer drug delivery, imaging and as an MRI contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Ray Chowdhuri, Angshuman; Bhattacharya, Dipsikha; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2016-02-21

    The development of a novel multifunctional porous nanoplatform for targeted anticancer drug delivery with cell imaging and magnetic resonance imaging has been realised in the current work. Here we have developed a magnetic nanoscale metal organic frameworks (NMOF) for potential targeted drug delivery. These magnetic NMOFs were fabricated by incorporation of Fe3O4 nanoparticles into porous isoreticular metal organic frameworks (IRMOF-3). To achieve targeted drug delivery towards cancer cells specifically, folic acid was conjugated to the NMOF surface. Then, the fluorescent molecule rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RITC) was conjugated to the NMOFs for biological imaging applications. The synthesized magnetic NMOFs were fully characterised by FTIR, powder XRD, XPS, SQUID, TGA, TEM, FESEM, and DLS. The synthesized magnetic NMOFs were observed to be smaller than 100 nm and were found to be nontoxic towards human cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa) and murine fibroblast (NIH3T3) cells according to cell viability assays. The cancer chemotherapy drug paclitaxel was conjugated to the magnetic NMOFs through hydrophobic interactions with a relatively high loading capacity. Moreover, these folic acid-conjugated magnetic NMOFs showed stronger T2-weighted MRI contrast towards the cancer cells, justifying their possible significance in imaging. PMID:26754449

  18. Actinide chelation: biodistribution and in vivo complex stability of the targeted metal ions.

    PubMed

    Kullgren, Birgitta; Jarvis, Erin E; An, Dahlia D; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2013-01-01

    Because of the continuing use of nuclear fuel sources and heightened threats of nuclear weapon use, the amount of produced and released radionuclides is increasing daily, as is the risk of larger human exposure to fission product actinides. A rodent model was used to follow the in vivo distribution of representative actinides, administered as free metal ions or complexed with chelating agents including diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and the hydroxypyridinonate ligands 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) and 5-LIO(Me-3,2-HOPO). Different metabolic pathways for the different metal ions were evidenced, resulting in intricate ligand- and metal-dependent decorporation mechanisms. While the three studied chelators are known for their unrivaled actinide decorporation efficiency, the corresponding metal complexes may undergo in vivo decomposition and release metal ions in various biological pools. This study sets the basis to further explore the metabolism and in vivo coordination properties of internalized actinides for the future development of viable therapeutic chelating agents. PMID:22957518

  19. Spallation processes and nuclear interaction products of cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silberberg, R.; Tsao, C. H.

    1990-01-01

    Most cosmic-ray nuclei heavier than helium have suffered nuclear collisions in the interstellar gas, with transformation of nuclear composition. The isotopic and elemental composition at the sources has to be inferred from the observed composition near the Earth. The source composition permits tests of current ideas on sites of origin, nucleosynthesis in stars, evolution of stars, the mixing and composition of the interstellar medium and injection processes prior to acceleration. The effects of nuclear spallation, production of radioactive nuclides and the time dependence of their decay provide valuable information on the acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays, their nuclear transformations, and their confinement time in the Galaxy. The formation of spallation products that only decay by electron capture and are relatively long-lived permits an investigation of the nature and density fluctuations (like clouds) of the interstellar medium. Since nuclear collisions yield positrons, antiprotons, gamma rays and neutrinos, we shall discuss these topics briefly.

  20. Energy-Deposition and Damage Calculations in Core-Vessel Inserts at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B.D.

    2002-06-25

    Heat-deposition and damage calculations are described for core-vessel inserts in the target area of the Spallation Neutron Source. Two separate designs for these inserts (or neutron beam tubes) were studied; a single-unit insert and a multi-unit insert. The single unit contains a neutron guide; the multi unit does not. Both units are constructed of stainless steel. For the single unit, separate studies were carried out with the guide composed of stainless steel, glass, and aluminum. Results are also reported for an aluminum window on the front of the insert, a layer of nickel on the guide, a cadmium shield surrounding the guide, and a stainless steel plug in the beam-tube opening. The locations of both inserts were the most forward positions to be occupied by each design respectively thus ensuring that the calculations are conservative.

  1. Moisture-Induced Alumina Scale Spallation: The Hydrogen Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2010-01-01

    For some time the oxidation community has been concerned with interfacial spallation of protective alumina scales, not just upon immediate cool down, but as a time-delayed phenomenon. Moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) and desktop spallation (DTS) of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) refer to this process. It is most apparent for relatively adherent alumina scales that have survived initial cool down in a dry environment, have built up considerable thickness and strain energy, and have been somewhat damaged, such as by cyclic oxidation cracking. Indeed, a "sensitive zone" can be described that maximizes the observed effect as a function of all the relevant factors. Moisture has been postulated to serve as a source of interfacial hydrogen embrittlement. Hydrogen is derived from reaction with aluminum in the alloy at an exposed interface. The purpose of this monograph is to trace the close analogy of this phenomenon to other hydrogen-induced effects, such as embrittlement of aluminides and blistering of alloys and anodic alumina films. A formalized, top-down, logic-tree structure is presented as a guide to this discussion. A theoretical basis for interfacial weakening by hydrogen is first cited, as are demonstrations of hydrogen detection as a reaction product or interfacial species. Further support is provided by critical experiments that recreate the moisture effect, but by isolating hydrogen from other potential causative factors. These experiments include tests in H 2-containing atmospheres or cathodic hydrogen charging. Accordingly, they strongly indicate that interfacial hydrogen, derived from moisture, is the key chemical species accounting for delayed alumina scale spallation.

  2. Spallation neutron source and other high intensity froton sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2003-02-06

    This lecture is an introduction to the design of a spallation neutron source and other high intensity proton sources. It discusses two different approaches: linac-based and synchrotron-based. The requirements and design concepts of each approach are presented. The advantages and disadvantages are compared. A brief review of existing machines and those under construction and proposed is also given. An R&D program is included in an appendix.

  3. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE AT 1 MW

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, John D

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been operating at the MW level for about one year. Experience in beam loss control and machine activation at this power level is presented. Also experience with machine protection systems is reviewed, which is critical at this power level. One of the most challenging operational aspects of high power operation has been attaining high availability, which is also discussed

  4. Design and fabrication of specific ceramic?metallic fuels and targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, A.; Konings, R. J. M.; Somers, J.

    2003-06-01

    The fabrication of ceramic-metallic (cermet) composite fuel, containing (Y,An,Zr)O 2- x spheres, by dust free processes has been studied. The influence of several process parameters, such as, ceramic volume fraction, compaction pressure and sintering temperature, on the microstructure of the final composite have been investigated and optimised using cerium as a stand for americium and two metal matrices namely molybdenum and stainless steel. In addition, a cermet fuel with (near) spherical (Y,Pu,Zr)O 2- x particles, dispersed in stainless steel matrix, has been successfully fabricated and characterized.

  5. Interaction Of CO2 Laser Nanosecond Pulse Train With The Metallic Targets In Optical Breakdown Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonov, V. V.; Firsov, K. N.; Konov, V. I.; Nikitin, P. I.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Silenok, A. S.; Sorochenko, V. R.

    1986-11-01

    In the present paper the electric field and currents in the air-breakdown plasma, produced by the train of nanosecond pulses of TEA-002 - regenerative amplifier near the un-charged targets are studied. The breakdown thresholds and the efficiency of plasma-target heat transmission are also measured. The results of numerical calculations made for increasing of the pulse train contrast with respect to the background in a regenerative amplifier are advanced.

  6. Moisture-Induced Alumina Scale Spallation: The Hydrogen Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2009-01-01

    For some time our community has been concerned with interfacial spallation of protective alumina scales, not just upon immediate cooldown, but as a time-delayed phenomenon. Moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) and desktop spallation (DTS) of TBC's refer to this process. It is most apparent for relatively adherent alumina scales that have survived cool down in a dry environment, built up considerable thickness and strain energy, and have been somewhat damaged, such as by cyclic oxidation cracking. Indeed, a "sweet zone" can be defined that maximizes the observed effect as a function of all the relevant factors. Moisture has been postulated to serve as a source of interfacial hydrogen embrittlement derived from reaction with aluminum in the alloy at an exposed interface. The purpose of this monograph is to trace the close analogy of this phenomenon to other hydrogen effects, such as embrittlement of aluminides and blistering of alloys and anodic alumina films. A formalized, top-down, logic tree structure is presented as a guide to this discussion. A theoretical basis for interfacial weakening by hydrogen is first cited, as are demonstrations of hydrogen as a reaction product or detected interfacial species. Further support is provided by critical experiments that produce the same moisture effect, but by isolating hydrogen from other potential causative factors. These experiments include tests in H2-containing atmospheres or cathodic hydrogen charging.

  7. A multi-element screening method to identify metal targets for blood biomonitoring in green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas).

    PubMed

    Villa, C A; Finlayson, S; Limpus, C; Gaus, C

    2015-04-15

    Biomonitoring of blood is commonly used to identify and quantify occupational or environmental exposure to chemical contaminants. Increasingly, this technique has been applied to wildlife contaminant monitoring, including for green turtles, allowing for the non-lethal evaluation of chemical exposure in their nearshore environment. The sources, composition, bioavailability and toxicity of metals in the marine environment are, however, often unknown and influenced by numerous biotic and abiotic factors. These factors can vary considerably across time and space making the selection of the most informative elements for biomonitoring challenging. This study aimed to validate an ICP-MS multi-element screening method for green turtle blood in order to identify and facilitate prioritisation of target metals for subsequent fully quantitative analysis. Multi-element screening provided semiquantitative results for 70 elements, 28 of which were also determined through fully quantitative analysis. Of the 28 comparable elements, 23 of the semiquantitative results had an accuracy between 67% and 112% relative to the fully quantified values. In lieu of any available turtle certified reference materials (CRMs), we evaluated the use of human blood CRMs as a matrix surrogate for quality control, and compared two commonly used sample preparation methods for matrix related effects. The results demonstrate that human blood provides an appropriate matrix for use as a quality control material in the fully quantitative analysis of metals in turtle blood. An example for the application of this screening method is provided by comparing screening results from blood of green turtles foraging in an urban and rural region in Queensland, Australia. Potential targets for future metal biomonitoring in these regions were identified by this approach. PMID:25655987

  8. A feasibility study for a one-megawatt pulsed spallation source at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1994-07-01

    Over the past two decades, high-intensity proton accelerators have been designed and developed to support nuclear physics research and defense applications. This technology has now matured to the point where it can support simultaneous and cost-effective exploitation of a number of important areas of both basic and applied science. Examples include neutron scattering, the production of radioisotopes, tests of technologies to transmute nuclear waste, radiation damage studies, nuclear physics, and muon spin research. As part of a larger program involving these and other areas, a team at Los Alamos National Laboratory has undertaken a feasibility study for a 1-MW pulsed spallation neutron source (PSS) based on the use of an 800-MeV proton linac and an accumulator ring. In January 1994, the feasibility study was reviewed by a large, international group of experts in the design of accelerators and neutron spallation targets. This group confirmed the viability of the proposed neutron source. In this paper, I describe the approach Los Alamos has taken to the feasibility study, which has involved a synergistic application of the Laboratory`s expertise in nuclear science and technology, computation, and particle-beam technologies. Several examples of problems resolved by the study are described, including chopping of low-energy proton beam, interactions between H{sup {minus}} particles and the stripper foil used to produce protons for injection into an accumulator ring, and the inclusion of engineering realities into the design of a neutron production target. These examples are chosen to illustrate the breadth of the expertise that has been brought to bear on the feasibility study and to demonstrate that there are real R&D issues that need to be resolved before a next-generation spoliation source can be built.

  9. Department of Energy review of the National Spallation Neutron Source Project

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    A Department of Energy (DOE) review of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) was conducted. The NSNS will be a new high-power spallation neutron source; initially, it will operate at 1 megawatt (MW), but is designed to be upgradeable to significantly higher power, at lower cost, when accelerator and target technologies are developed for higher power. The 53-member Review Committee examined the projected cost, schedule, technical scope, and management structure described in the CDR. For each of the major components of the NSNS, the Committee determined that the project team had produced credible designs that can be expected to work well. What remains to be done is to integrate the design of these components. With the exception of the liquid mercury target, the NSNS Project will rely heavily on proven technologies and, thus, will face a relatively low risk to successful project completion. The Total Project Cost (TPC) presented to the Committee in the CDR was $1.266 billion in as-spent dollars. In general, the Committee felt that the laboratory consortium had presented a credible estimate for each of the major components but that value engineering might produce some savings. The construction schedule presented to the Committee covered six years beginning in FY 1999. The Committee questioned whether all parts of the project could be completed according to this schedule. In particular, the linac and the conventional facilities appeared to have overly optimistic schedules. The NSNS project team was encouraged to reexamine these activities and to consider a more conservative seven-year schedule. Another concern of the Committee was the management structure. In summary, the Committee felt that this Conceptual Design Report was a very credible proposal, and that there is a high probability for successful completion of this major project within the proposed budget, although the six-year proposed schedule may be optimistic.

  10. Pre-conceptual design and preliminary neutronic analysis of the proposed National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.; Barnes, J.M.; Charlton, L.A.

    1997-03-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a pre-conceptual design study for the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) and given preliminary approval for the proposed facility to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The pre-conceptual design of the NSNS initially consists of an accelerator system capable of delivering a 1 to 2 GeV proton beam with 1 MW of beam power in an approximate 0.5 {micro}s pulse at a 60 Hz frequency onto a single target station. The NSNS will be upgradable to a significantly higher power level with two target stations (a 60 Hz station and a 10 Hz station). There are many possible layouts and designs for the NSNS target stations. This paper gives a brief overview of the proposed NSNS with respect to the target station, as well as the general philosophy adopted for the neutronic design of the NSNS target stations. A reference design is presented, and some preliminary neutronic results for the NSNS are briefly discussed.

  11. Multi-charged heavy ion acceleration from the ultra-intense short pulse laser system interacting with the metal target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Sakaki, H.; Maeda, S.; Sagisaka, A.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Pikuz, T.; Faenov, A.; Ogura, K.; Kanasaki, M.; Matsukawa, K.; Kusumoto, T.; Tao, A.; Fukami, T.; Esirkepov, T.; Koga, J.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Shimomura, T.; Tanoue, M.; Nakai, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Sakai, S.; Tamura, J.; Nishio, K.; Sako, H.; Kando, M.; Yamauchi, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.

    2014-02-01

    Experimental demonstration of multi-charged heavy ion acceleration from the interaction between the ultra-intense short pulse laser system and the metal target is presented. Al ions are accelerated up to 12 MeV/u (324 MeV total energy). To our knowledge, this is far the highest energy ever reported for the case of acceleration of the heavy ions produced by the <10 J laser energy of 200 TW class Ti:sapphire laser system. Adding to that, thanks to the extraordinary high intensity laser field of ˜1021 W cm-2, the accelerated ions are almost fully stripped, having high charge to mass ratio (Q/M).

  12. Laser self-mixing sensor to monitor in situ the penetration depth during short pulse laser drilling of metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzapesa, Francesco P.; Ancona, Antonio; Sibillano, Teresa; De Lucia, Francesco; Dabbicco, Maurizio; Lugarà, Pietro Mario; Scamarcio, Gaetano

    2011-05-01

    Direct real-time measurements of the penetration depth during laser micromachining has been demonstrated by developing a novel ablation sensor based on laser diode feedback interferometry. Percussion drilling experiments have been performed by focusing a 120-ps pulsed fiber laser onto metallic targets with different thermal conductivity. In-situ monitoring of the material removal rate was achieved by coaxially aligning the beam probe with the ablating laser. The displacement of the ablation front was revealed with sub-micrometric resolution by analyzing the sawtooth-like induced modulation of the interferometric signal out of the detector system.

  13. Hypoxia inducible factor prolyl hydroxylases as targets for neuroprotection by “antioxidant” metal chelators: from ferroptosis to stroke

    PubMed Central

    Speer, Rachel E.; Karuppagounder, Saravanan S.; Basso, Manuela; Sleiman, Sama; Kumar, Amit; Brand, David; Smirnova, Natalya; Gazaryan, Irina; Khim, Soah J.; Ratan, Rajiv R.

    2015-01-01

    Neurologic conditions including stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease are leading causes of death and long-term disability in the United States, and efforts to develop novel therapeutics for these conditions have historically had poor success in translating from bench to bedside. Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) mediates a broad, evolutionarily conserved, endogenous adaptive program to hypoxia, and manipulation of components of the HIF pathway are neuroprotective in a number of human neurological diseases and experimental models. In this review, we discuss molecular components of one aspect of hypoxic adpatation in detail, and provide perspective on which targets within this pathway appear to be ripest for preventing and repairing neurodegeneration. Further, we highlight the role of HIF prolyl hydroxylases as emerging targets for the salutary effects of metal chelators on ferroptosis in vitro as well in animal models of neurological diseases. PMID:23376032

  14. Inside HOLMES experiment: 163Ho metallic target production for the micro-calorimeter absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzigoni, G.; Alpert, B.; Balata, M.; Bennett, D.; Biasotti, M.; Boragno, C.; Brofferio, C.; De Gerone, M.; Dressler, R.; Faverazani, M.; Ferri, E.; Folwer, J.; Gatti, F.; Giachero, A.; Heinitz, S.; Hilton, G.; Köster, U.; Lusignoli, M.; Maino, M.; Mates, J.; Nisi, S.; Nizzolo, R.; Nucciotti, A.; Pessina, G.; Puiu, A.; Ragazzi, S.; Reintsema, C.; Ribeiro Gomes, M.; Shmidt, D.; Schumann, D.; Sisti, M.; Swetz, D.; Terranova, F.; Ullom, J.; Day, P. K.

    2016-07-01

    The main goal in the HOLMES experiment is the neutrino mass measurement using an array of 1000 micro-calorimeters with standard metallic absorber. A good isotope for such measurement is the 163Ho, those isotopes embedded in the metallic absorber will be 1011-1013. Since 163Ho is not available in nature, a dedicated process must be set up to produce the amount needed for this neutrino mass experiment. The process with the highest born-up cross-section is the neutron irradiation of Er2O3 enriched in 162Er: 162Er(n,γ)163Er →163Ho+νe, where the decay is an EC with half-life of about 75 min and the (n,γ) is about 20 barns for thermal neutron. After the neutron irradiation in the oxide powder there are several radioactive isotopes which are potentially disturbing because of the background that they cause below 5 keV. The chemical separation of holmium from the irradiation enriched Er2O3 powder is therefore mandatory and will be performed by means of ion exchange chromatography. On the end of those processes the oxide powder enriched in 162Er will have the 163Ho isotope number required. The holmium chemical state influences the end point of the EC spectrum, in order to avoid such effect it is necessary to embed in the absorber only the metallic isotope. Reduction and distillation technique allowed us to obtain a pure metallic holmium, starting from natural oxide holmium. This technique will be applied on the irradiated oxide powder to obtain the metallic 163Ho, ready to be embedded in the micro-calorimeter absorber.

  15. The terminal effects of chisel-shape projectile penetrating into metallic target plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xu; Yao, Xiaohu; Ma, Wei

    2015-09-01

    This work performs the analysis and simulation investigations of penetration behaviors of chisel-shape projectile. In analysis, the projectile is assumed to be a rigid body and the target plate is elastic-plastic material. By introducing the velocity potential function, the velocity field in target is first obtained. Then, the momentum equation is solved for determining the pressure and stress fields in the elastic and plastic regions in target. The variation of the resultant force subjected by the projectiles with the penetration depth is studied. The approximate expressions of penetration depth and the residual velocity with the initial impacting velocity are obtained for the exploration of the penetration mechanisms of the chisel-shape projectile. In numerical simulation, the main attention focuses on the dissipation mechanisms of the kinetic energy of the chisel-shape projectile in penetration process.

  16. Liquid nanodroplet formation through phase explosion mechanism in laser-irradiated metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzi, Alberto; Gorrini, Federico; Miotello, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Some quantitative aspects of laser-irradiated pure metals, while approaching phase explosion, are still not completely understood. Here, we develop a model that describes the main quantities regulating the liquid-vapor explosive phase transition and the expulsion of liquid nanodroplets that, by solidifying, give rise to nanoparticle formation. The model combines both a thermodynamics description of the explosive phase change and a Monte Carlo simulation of the randomly generated critical vapor bubbles. The calculation is performed on a set of seven metals (Al, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ag, and Au) which are frequently used in pulsed laser ablation experiments. Our final predictions about the size distribution of the liquid nanodroplets and the number ratio of liquid/vapor ejected atoms are compared, whenever possible, with available molecular dynamics simulations and experimental data.

  17. Interaction of carbon monoxide with transition metals: evolutionary insights into drug target discovery.

    PubMed

    Foresti, Roberta; Motterlini, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    The perception that carbon monoxide (CO) is poisonous and life-threatening for mammalian organisms stems from its intrinsic propensity to bind iron in hemoglobin, a reaction that ultimately leads to impaired oxygen delivery to tissues. From evolutionary and chemical perspectives, however, CO is one of the most essential molecules in the formation of biological components and its interaction with transition metals is at the origin of primordial cell signaling. Not surprisingly, mammals have gradually evolved systems to finely control the synthesis and the sensing of this gaseous molecule. Cells are indeed continuously exposed to small quantities of CO produced endogenously during the degradation of heme by constitutive and inducible heme oxygenase enzymes. We have gradually learnt that heme oxygenase-derived carbon monoxide (CO) serves as a ubiquitous signaling mediator which could be exploited for therapeutic purposes. The development of transition metal carbonyls as prototypic carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CO-RMs) represents a novel stratagem for a safer delivery of CO-based pharmaceuticals in the treatment of various pathological disorders. This review will look back at evolution to analyze and argue that a dynamic interaction of CO with specific intracellular metal centers is the common denominator for the diversified beneficial effects mediated by this gaseous molecule. PMID:20704543

  18. Measurements of neutron emission induced by muons stopped in metal deuteride targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Steadman, S. G.; Gaudreau, M. P. J.; Luckhardt, S. C.; Parker, R. R.; Albagli, D.; Cammarata, V.; Schloh, M.; Wrighton, M. S.; Kwok, K.; Thieme, C.; Lowenstein, D. I.; Debbe, R.; Reilly, J. J.

    1990-06-01

    An 80-MeV/c negative muon beam from the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory was used to investigate the stopping of muons inside Pd, Ti, and Y targets saturated with deuterium. Neutron emission from the targets was measured with an array of3He detectors, and in some runs, the temperature of the target was monitored as a function of time, with and without a flux of muons on the target. The neutron rates were also measured for Pd cathodes in an active electrochemical cell similar in design to those used in so-called “cold fusion” experiments, and the electrolyte solution was analyzed for excess tritium. No evidence was found for muon-catalyzed fusion at rates consistent with those claimed in “cold fusion” experiments. Neutron production from catalyzed fusion due to the presence of deuterium in palladium deuteride, PdD0.7, exposed to muons was determined to be 0.0±0.03 (stat.) ±0.25 (syst.) neutrons per stopped muon.

  19. Structural-hydraulic test of the liquid metal EURISOL target mock-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milenković, Rade Ž.; Dementjevs, Sergejs; Samec, Karel; Platacis, Ernests; Zik, Anatolij; Flerov, Aleksej; Manfrin, Enzo; Thomsen, Knud

    2009-08-01

    Structural-hydraulic tests of the European Isotope Separation On-Line (EURISOL) neutron converter target mock-up, named MErcury Target EXperiment 1 (METEX 1), have been conducted by Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI, Switzerland) in cooperation with Institute of Physics of the University of Latvia (IPUL, Latvia). PSI proceeded with extensive thermal-hydraulic and structural computational studies, followed by the target mock-up tests carried out on the mercury loop at IPUL. One of the main goals of the METEX 1 test is to investigate the hydraulic and structural behaviour of the EURISOL target mock-up for various inlet flow conditions (i.e. mass flow rates) and, in particular, for nominal operating flow rate and pressure in the system. The experimental results were analysed by advanced time-frequency methods such as Short-Time Fourier Transform in order to check the vibration characteristics of the mock-up and the resonance risk. The experimental results (obtained in METEX 1), which include inlet flow rate, pressure of the cover gas, total pressure loss, structural acceleration, sound and strain data, were jointly analysed together with numerical data obtained from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD).

  20. Measurements of neutron emission induced by muons stopped in metal deuteride targets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.; Steadman, S.G.; Gaudreau, M.P.J.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Parker, R.R.; Albagli, D.; Cammarata, V.; Schloh, M.; Wrighton, M.S.; Kwok, K.; Thieme, C.; Lowenstein, D.I.; Debbe, R.; Reilly, J.J.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY )

    1989-01-01

    An 80 MeV/c negative muon beam from the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory was used to investigate the stopping of muons inside Pd, Ti and Y targets saturated with deuterium. Neutron emission from the targets was measured with an array of {sup 3}He detectors, and in some runs, the temperature of the target was monitored as a function of time, with and without a flux of muons on the target. The neutron rates were also measured for Pd cathodes in an active electrochemical cell similar in design to those used in so-called cold-fusion'' experiments, and the electrolyte solution was analyzed for excess tritium at rates consistent with these claimed in cold fusion'' experiments. Neutron production catalyzed fusion due to the presence of deuterium in palladium deuteride, PdD{sub 0.7}, exposed to muons was determined in palladium 0.0 {plus minus} 0.03 (stat.) {plus minus} 0.25 (syst.) neutrons per stored muon. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Targeting high value metals in lithium-ion battery recycling via shredding and size-based separation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Gaustad, Gabrielle; Babbitt, Callie W

    2016-05-01

    Development of lithium-ion battery recycling systems is a current focus of much research; however, significant research remains to optimize the process. One key area not studied is the utilization of mechanical pre-recycling steps to improve overall yield. This work proposes a pre-recycling process, including mechanical shredding and size-based sorting steps, with the goal of potential future scale-up to the industrial level. This pre-recycling process aims to achieve material segregation with a focus on the metallic portion and provide clear targets for subsequent recycling processes. The results show that contained metallic materials can be segregated into different size fractions at different levels. For example, for lithium cobalt oxide batteries, cobalt content has been improved from 35% by weight in the metallic portion before this pre-recycling process to 82% in the ultrafine (<0.5mm) fraction and to 68% in the fine (0.5-1mm) fraction, and been excluded in the larger pieces (>6mm). However, size fractions across multiple battery chemistries showed significant variability in material concentration. This finding indicates that sorting by cathode before pre-treatment could reduce the uncertainty of input materials and therefore improve the purity of output streams. Thus, battery labeling systems may be an important step towards implementation of any pre-recycling process. PMID:26577459

  2. Cytoplasmic membrane is the target organelle for transition metal mediated damage induced by paraquat in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Kohen, R.; Chevion, M.

    1988-04-05

    Bacterial survival indicates that copper or iron is an essential mediator in paraquat toxicity in Escherichia coli. In this study the authors have identified the cytoplasmic membrane as a target organelle in metal-mediated paraquat toxicity and have demonstrated the complete correlation of the membrane damage with the levels of adventitious copper (or iron). The extent of membrane damage was related by use of four parameters: (a) the level of cellular ATP, (b) the level of cellular potassium, (c) the cellular capacity to accumulate and retain radiolabeled leucine, and (d) the cellular integrity as reflected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Exposure of bacterial cells to a combination of paraquat and copper caused a marked decline in parameters a, b, and c. This decline was found to occur in parallel with, or even to precede, the sharp loss of survival of E. coli under the same conditions. Likewise, TEM micrographs clearly indicated alternations in cellular structure that possibly reflect sites of detachment of the cytoplasmic membrane from the bacterial capsule. In contradistinction, copper alone or paraquat alone could not bring about similar changes in cellular structure. These findings are in accord with the suggested site-specific metal-mediated Haber-Weiss mechanism for paraquat toxicity and support our notion that specific chelators of transition metals could reduce or prevent the biological deleterious effects of this herbicide.

  3. Target organs of the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum for studying metal accumulation and biomarkers in pollution monitoring: laboratory and in-situ transplantation experiments.

    PubMed

    Won, Eun-Ji; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Eun-Soo; Ra, Kongtae

    2016-08-01

    To characterize the target organs of the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum for use in environmental study, the accumulation of trace metals and three biomarkers was measured in different organs. Exposure with Cu and Pb carried out under laboratory conditions revealed a linear uptake of metals throughout the experimental period in each tissue. In particular, significant increase was observed in gills and mantle. The increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species showed the great potential of gills as a target tissue for both Cu and Pb exposure. The highest activity of glutathione S-transferase and their relative increase in activity were also observed in gills. Metallothionein-like protein levels, however, increased greatly in the digestive gland and mantle during Cu and Pb exposure, respectively, although all tissues, except the foot, showed significant changes after 24 h of metal exposure. In the field study, the highest concentration of metals was recorded in the gills and mantle, accounting for over 50 % of the total accumulated metal in all sites. Additionally, Cu and Pb increased significantly in these two organs, respectively. However, the order of accumulation rate in laboratory exposure was not concomitant with those of the lab-based study, suggesting that different routes of metal uptake and exposure duration induce distinct partitioning of metals and regulating system in R. philippinarum. These series of exposure studies demonstrated that gills, mantle, and digestive gland in R. philippinarum are potential target tissues in environmental monitoring study using metal concentrations and biomarkers. PMID:27450372

  4. Effects study on the thermal stresses in a LEU metal foil annular target.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Srisharan G; Solbrekken, Gary L

    2015-09-01

    The effects of fission gas pressure, uranium swelling and thermal contact conductance on the thermal-mechanical behavior of an annular target containing a low-enriched uranium foil (LEU) encapsulated in a nickel foil have been presented in this paper. The draw-plug assembly method is simulated to obtain the residual stresses, which are applied to the irradiation model as initial inputs, and the integrated assembly-irradiation process is simulated as an axisymmetric problem using the commercial finite element code Abaqus FEA. Parametric studies were performed on the LEU heat generation rate and the results indicate satisfactory irradiation performance of the annular target. The temperature and stress margins have been provided along with a discussion of the results. PMID:26036440

  5. Design of an Aluminum Proton Beam Window for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, Jim G; McClintock, David A

    2012-01-01

    An aluminum proton beam window design is being considered at the Spallation Neutron Source primarily to increase the lifetime of the window, with secondary advantages of higher beam transport efficiency and lower activation. The window separates the core vessel, the location of the mercury target, from the vacuum of the accelerator, while withstanding the pass through of a proton beam of up to 2 MW with 1.0 GeV proton energy. The current aluminum alloy being investigated for the window material is 6061-T651 due to its combination of high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good resistance to aqueous corrosion, as well as demonstrated dependability in previous high-radiation environments. The window design will feature a thin plate with closely spaced cross drilled cooling holes. An analytical approach was used to optimize the dimensions of the window before finite element analysis was used to simulate temperature profiles and stress fields resulting from thermal and static pressure loading. The resulting maximum temperature of 60 C and Von Mises stress of 71 MPa are very low compared to allowables for Al 6061-T651. A significant challenge in designing an aluminum proton beam window for SNS is integrating the window with the current 316L SS shield blocks. Explosion bonding was chosen as a joining technique because of the large bonding area required. A test program has commenced to prove explosion bonding can produce a robust vacuum joint. Pending successful explosion bond testing, the aluminum proton beam window design will be proven acceptable for service in the Spallation Neutron Source.

  6. Highly conductive indium zinc oxide prepared by reactive magnetron cosputtering technique using indium and zinc metallic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, T. K.; Chen, H. C.; Lee, J. H.; Huang, Y. Y.; Fang, J. S.

    2010-05-15

    Zn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} film is frequently deposited from an oxide target; but the use of metallic target is increasingly expected as preparing the film with comparable properties. This work aimed to prepare a highly conductive and transparent Zn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film on Corning Eagle{sup 2000} glass substrate by magnetron cosputtering method using indium and zinc targets. Structural characterization was performed using x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The film had an amorphous structure when the film was prepared on an unheated substrate, but had an In{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystalline structure when the film was deposited on 150 and 300 deg. C substrates. The electrical properties of the film were greatly affected by annealing; the Zn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} film had a low resistivity of 6.1x10{sup -4} {Omega} cm and an average transmittance of 81.7% when the film was deposited without substrate heating and followed a 600 deg. C annealing.

  7. Chemical isolation of .sup.82 Sr from proton-irradiated Mo targets

    DOEpatents

    Grant, Patrick M.; Kahn, Milton; O'Brien, Jr., Harold A.

    1976-01-01

    Spallation reactions are induced in Mo targets with 200-800 MeV protons to produce microcurie to millicurie amounts of a variety of radionuclides. A six-step radiochemical procedure, incorporating precipitation, solvent extractions, and ion exchange techniques, has been developed for the separation and purification of Sr radioactivities from other spallation products and the bulk target material. Radiostrontium can be quantitatively recovered in a sufficiently decontaminated state for use in biomedical generator development.

  8. Moisture-Induced TBC Spallation on Turbine Blade Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Delayed failure of TBCs is a widely observed laboratory phenomenon, although many of the early observations went unreported. "The weekend effect" or "DeskTop Spallation" (DTS) is characterized by initial survival of a TBC after accelerated laboratory thermal cycling, then failure by exposure to ambient humidity or water. Once initiated, failure can occur quite dramatically in less than a second. To this end, the water drop test and digital video recordings have become useful techniques in studies at NASA (Smialek, Zhu, Cuy), DECHMA (Rudolphi, Renusch, Schuetze), and CNRS Toulouse/SNECMA (Deneux, Cadoret, Hervier, Monceau). In the present study the results for a commercial turbine blade, with a standard EB-PVD 7YSZ TBC top coat and Pt-aluminide diffusion bond monitored by weight change and visual appearance. Failures were distributed widely over a 5-100 hr time range, depending on temperature. At some opportune times, failure was captured by video recording, documenting the appearance and speed of the moisture-induced spallation process. Failure interfaces exhibited alumina scale grains, decorated with Ta-rich oxide particles, and alumina inclusions as islands and streamers. The phenomenon is thus rooted in moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) of the alumina scale formed on the bond coat. In that regard, many studies show the susceptibility of alumina scales to moisture, as long as high strain energy and a partially exposed interface exist. The latter conditions result from severe cyclic oxidation conditions, which produce a highly stressed and partially damaged scale. In one model, it has been proposed that moisture reacts with aluminum in the bond coat to release hydrogen atoms that 'embrittle' the interface. A negative synergistic effect with interfacial sulfur is also invoked.

  9. Moisture-Induced TBC Spallation on Turbine Blade Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James

    2011-01-01

    Delayed failure of TBCs is a widely observed laboratory phenomenon, although many of the early observations went unreported. The weekend effect or DeskTop Spallation (DTS) is characterized by initial survival of a TBC after accelerated laboratory thermal cycling, then failure by exposure to ambient humidity or water. Once initiated, failure can occur quite dramatically in less than a second. To this end, the water drop test and digital video recordings have become useful techniques in studies at NASA (Smialek, Zhu, Cuy), DECHMA (Rudolphi, Renusch, Schuetze), and CNRS Toulouse/SNECMA (Deneux, Cadoret, Hervier, Monceau). In the present study the results for a commercial turbine blade, with a standard EB-PVD 7YSZ TBC top coat and Pt-aluminide diffusion bond coat are reported. Cut sections were intermittently oxidized at 1100, 1150, and 1200 C and monitored by weight change and visual appearance. Failures were distributed widely over a 5-100 hr time range, depending on temperature. At some opportune times, failure was captured by video recording, documenting the appearance and speed of the moisture-induced spallation process. Failure interfaces exhibited alumina scale grains, decorated with Ta-rich oxide particles, and alumina inclusions as islands and streamers. The phenomenon is thus rooted in moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) of the alumina scale formed on the bond coat. In that regard, many studies show the susceptibility of alumina scales to moisture, as long as high strain energy and a partially exposed interface exist. The latter conditions result from severe cyclic oxidation conditions, which produce a highly stressed and partially damaged scale. In one model, it has been proposed that moisture reacts with aluminum in the bond coat to release hydrogen atoms that embrittle the interface. A negative synergistic effect with interfacial sulfur is also invoked.

  10. Towards detectors for next generation spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebauer, B.

    2004-12-01

    Neutron scattering and diffraction methods are of utmost importance for probing the structure and dynamics of condensed matter at an atomic, molecular and mesoscopic level. However, today's experiments, using either wavelength-selected cw beams from steady-state reactor or spallation sources or, on the other hand, comparatively weak pulsed spallation source beams (with the exception of the pulsed IBR-2 reactor in Dubna), suffer from relatively low source strengths, e.g. compared to synchrotron-radiation investigations. Therefore, neutron scattering methods can greatly benefit from next generation pulsed spallation neutron sources with 1-10 MW average proton beam power, which will allow analyzing wavelengths by time-of-flight (TOF) and thus utilizing in an experiment simultaneously a large fraction of the full wavelength band. However, the improved instantaneous flux will pose great challenges on the detection systems, since for instance for ESS, the strongest of the projected sources, the peak thermal neutron flux will be higher by nearly two orders of magnitude than at the presently strongest sources. Owing to current improvements in neutron optics and spectrometer design, the fluxes impinging on the samples will be further enhanced by another factor 5-10; however, this will be compensated for by the tendency to investigate smaller samples becoming accessible due to smaller foci and higher beam fluxes. Hence, thermal neutron detectors with up to two orders of magnitude higher peak count rate capacity in conjunction with microsecond TOF and for some applications sub-millimeter position resolutions are required, in addition to other characteristics like e.g. high long-term stability and low sensitivity to photon background. In this review article an overview will be given on the current state-of-the-art and on currently investigated novel solutions for thermal neutron detectors for very high rate and resolution time-resolved experiments, comprising silicon

  11. Features of the synthesis of nanocolloid oxides by laser ablation of bulk metal targets in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapin, Ivan N.; Svetlichnyi, Valery A.

    2015-12-01

    Laser ablation of bulk targets in a fluid -- a promising new method for the synthesis of "pure" nanocolloids. Nanocrystalline materials produced by laser ablation are widely used in biology, medicine, and catalysis. High local temperature during ablation and large surface area of the particles promote chemical reactions and the formation of a complex composition of nanoparticles. In this paper the characteristics of the process of ablation and the obtaining of nanoparticles in a liquid by laser ablation of active materials (Zn, Ce, Ti, Si) were studied. Ways of increasing the productivity of laser ablation were discussed. Characterization of nanocolloids and nanocrystalline powders were performed.

  12. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING-DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.

    2005-05-16

    After six years, the delivery of components for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring (AR) and the transport lines was completed in Spring 2005. Designed to deliver 1.5 MW beam power (1.5 x 10{sup 14} protons of 1 GeV kinetic energy at a repetition rate of 60 Hz), stringent measures were implemented in the fabrication, test, and assembly to ensure the quality of the accelerator systems. This paper summarizes the design, R&D, and construction of the ring and transport systems.

  13. Emittance characterization of the spallation neutron source H- injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, B. X.; Stockli, M. P.; Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N., Jr.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.

    2013-02-01

    The H- injector for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory consists of a RF H- ion source and a compact electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) section. Up to 5 ion sources and up to 4 LEBT assemblies are alternated for the SNS beam operations. The beam current and emittance of the H- beam exiting the LEBT were characterized on the test-stand for different sources and LEBT assemblies in order to understand and minimize their performance variations.

  14. Beginnings of remote handling at the RAL Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Liska, D.J.; Hirst, J.

    1985-01-01

    Expenditure of funds and resources for remote maintenance systems traditionally are delayed until late in an accelerator's development. However, simple remote-surveillance equipment can be included early in facility planning to set the stage for future remote-handling needs and to identify appropriate personnel. Some basic equipment developed in the UK at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) that serves this function and that has been used to monitor beam loss during commissioning is described. A photograph of this equipment, positioned over the extractor septum magnet, is shown. This method can serve as a pattern approach to the problem of initiating remote-handling activities in other facilities.

  15. VESPA: The vibrational spectrometer for the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedrigo, Anna; Colognesi, Daniele; Bertelsen, Mads; Hartl, Monika; Lefmann, Kim; Deen, Pascale P.; Strobl, Markus; Grazzi, Francesco; Zoppi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    VESPA, Vibrational Excitation Spectrometer with Pyrolytic-graphite Analysers, aims to probe molecular excitations via inelastic neutron scattering. It is a thermal high resolution inverted geometry time-of-flight instrument designed to maximise the use of the long pulse of the European Spallation Source. The wavelength frame multiplication technique was applied to provide simultaneously a broad dynamic range (about 0-500 meV) while a system of optical blind choppers allows to trade flux for energy resolution. Thanks to its high flux, VESPA will allow the investigation of dynamical and in situ experiments in physical chemistry. Here we describe the design parameters and the corresponding McStas simulations.

  16. Multiple-Scale Geomechanical Models for Thermal Spallation Drilling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, I.; Walsh, S. D.; Roberts, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    Widespread adoption of geothermal energy will require access to deeply buried geothermal sources in granitic basement rocks at high temperatures and pressures. Exploiting these resources necessitates novel methods for drilling, stimulation, and maintenance, under operating conditions difficult or impossible to test in laboratory settings. Physically rigorous numerical modeling tools are vital to highlight potential risks, guide process optimization and reduce the uncertainties involved in these developing technologies. In this presentation, we discuss a numerical modeling effort investigating the multiscale mechanics of thermal spallation drilling (TSD) - a technique in which rock is fragmented into small flakes by a high temperature fluid jet. This process encompasses interconnected phenomena on several length and time scales: from system-scale fluid dynamics to grain-scale thermomechanics of spallation. Here we describe how these disperate scales are simulated using GEODYN, a parallel Eulerian compressible solid and fluid dynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capabilities. GEODYN is able to simulate materials under extremely large deformations, resolve details of wave propagation within grains, and uses a continuum damage mechanics approach to represent fracture. We will present results from both system- and grain-scale simulations describing the transfer of heat from the high temperature jet to the rock face, and the effect of grain-scale properties such as incipient flaw distribution, grain size and grain size distribution, heat flux, applied temperature and material heterogeneity on the onset of spallation. Detailed computer modeling helps to address several of the uncertainties surrounding TSD: 1) What rock compositions are drillable with TSD? 2) How do grain size and grain size distribution affect TSD and drilling rates? 3) What combination of macroscopic (Poisson ratio, heat capacity and thermal conductivity) and microscopic (flaw distribution

  17. Optical model methods of predicting nuclide production from spallation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, C. R.; Townsend, L. W.; Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Quantum mechanical optical model methods for calculating isotope production cross sections from the spallation of heavy nuclei by high-energy protons are developed from a modified abrasion-ablation collision formalism. The abrasion step is treated quantum-mechanically as a knockout process which leaves the residual prefragment nucleus in an excited state. In ablation the prefragment deexcites to produce the final fragment. The excitation energies of the prefragments are estimated from a combination of liquid drop and frictional-spectator interaction considerations. Estimates of elemental and isotopic production cross sections are in good agreement with recently published cross section measurements.

  18. POWER SUPPLY CONTROL FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    LAMBIASE, R.F.; OERTER, B.; SMITH, J.

    2000-06-30

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is currently constructing an accumulator ring as part of a six laboratory collaboration to build the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) that will be located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Control of the power supplies will be implemented using a simple integrated system that provides all functions (setpoint, readback, control and status) with a single board at the power converter. Communication between the power supply interface and the VME control card is through a pair of fibers that also provides electrical isolation. This paper describes the power supply control system and it's impact on the SNS.

  19. AN ALTERNATIVE LATTICE FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE ACCUMULATOR RING.

    SciTech Connect

    GARDNER,C.J.; LEE,Y.Y.; TSOUPAS,N.; WEI,J.

    1999-03-29

    As a key component of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project, the Accumulator Ring will collect the proton beam from the SNS LINAC at an intensity of 2 x 10{sup 14} per pulse at 60 Hz for a total power of 2 MW, exceeding present performance value of existing facilities. Requirements of minimum beam loss for hands-on maintenance and flexibility for future upgrade are essential for the lattice design. In this paper, we study an alternative lattice emphasizing various injection schemes and flexibility for future upgrade. Working points, sextupole families for chromaticity control, and alternate extraction schemes are also considered.

  20. High brightness EUV sources based on laser plasma at using droplet liquid metal target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokhodov, A. Yu; Krivokorytov, M. S.; Sidelnikov, Yu V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Medvedev, V. V.; Koshelev, K. N.

    2016-05-01

    We present the study of a source of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation based on laser plasma generated due to the interaction of radiation from a nanosecond Nd : YAG laser with a liquidmetal droplet target consisting of a low-temperature eutectic indium–tin alloy. The generator of droplets is constructed using a commercial nozzle and operates on the principle of forced capillary jet decomposition. Long-term spatial stability of the centre-of-mass position of the droplet with the root-mean-square deviation of ~0.5 μm is demonstrated. The use of a low-temperature working substance instead of pure tin increases the reliability and lifetime of the droplet generator. For the time- and space-averaged power density of laser radiation on the droplet target 4 × 1011 W cm-2 and the diameter of radiating plasma ~80 μm, the mean efficiency of conversion of laser energy into the energy of EUV radiation at 13.5 +/- 0.135 nm equal to 2.3% (2π sr)-1 is achieved. Using the doublepulse method, we have modelled the repetitively pulsed regime of the source operation and demonstrated the possibility of its stable functioning with the repetition rate up to 8 kHz for the droplet generation repetition rate of more than 32 kHz, which will allow the source brightness to be as large as ~0.96 kW (mm2 sr)-1.

  1. High brightness EUV sources based on laser plasma at using droplet liquid metal target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokhodov, A. Yu; Krivokorytov, M. S.; Sidelnikov, Yu V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Medvedev, V. V.; Koshelev, K. N.

    2016-05-01

    We present the study of a source of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation based on laser plasma generated due to the interaction of radiation from a nanosecond Nd : YAG laser with a liquidmetal droplet target consisting of a low-temperature eutectic indium–tin alloy. The generator of droplets is constructed using a commercial nozzle and operates on the principle of forced capillary jet decomposition. Long-term spatial stability of the centre-of-mass position of the droplet with the root-mean-square deviation of ~0.5 μm is demonstrated. The use of a low-temperature working substance instead of pure tin increases the reliability and lifetime of the droplet generator. For the time- and space-averaged power density of laser radiation on the droplet target 4 × 1011 W cm-2 and the diameter of radiating plasma ~80 μm, the mean efficiency of conversion of laser energy into the energy of EUV radiation at 13.5 ± 0.135 nm equal to 2.3% (2π sr)-1 is achieved. Using the doublepulse method, we have modelled the repetitively pulsed regime of the source operation and demonstrated the possibility of its stable functioning with the repetition rate up to 8 kHz for the droplet generation repetition rate of more than 32 kHz, which will allow the source brightness to be as large as ~0.96 kW (mm2 sr)-1.

  2. Inorganic metal hydroxide nanoparticles for targeted cellular uptake through clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jae-Min; Choi, Soo-Jin; Lee, Go-Eun; Kim, Jung-Eun; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2009-01-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) are biocompatible materials which can be used as drug-delivery nanovehicles. In order to define the optimum size of LDH nanoparticles for efficient cellular uptake and drug-delivery pathway, we prepared different sized LDH nanoparticles with narrow size distribution by modulating the crystal growth rate, and labelled each LDH particle with a fluorophore using a silane coupling reaction. The cellular uptake rate of LDHs was found to be highly dependent on particle size (50 > 200 > or = 100 > 350 nm), whose range of 50 to 200 nm was selectively internalized into cells through clathrin-mediated endocytosis with enhanced permeability and retention. Our study clearly shows that not only the particle size plays an important role in the endocytic pathway and processing, but also the size control of LDH nanoparticles results in their targeted uptake to site-specific clathrin-mediated endocytosis. This result provides a new perspective for the design of LDH nanoparticles with maximum ability towards targeted drug delivery. PMID:18988236

  3. Pressure waves in liquid mercury target from pulsed heat loads and the possible way controlling their effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, L.; Skala, K.

    1996-06-01

    In ESS project liquid metals are selected as the main target for the pulsed spallation neutron source. Since the very high instantaneous energy is deposited on the heavy molten target in a very short period time, pressure waves are generated. They travel through the liquid and cause high stress in the container. Also, additional stress should be considered in the wall which is the result of direct heating of the target window. These dynamic processes were simulated with computational codes with the static response being analized first. The total resulting dynamic wall stress has been found to have exceeded the design stress for the selected container material. Adding a small amount of gas bubbles in the liquid could be a possible way to reduce the pressure waves.

  4. Multi-charged heavy ion acceleration from the ultra-intense short pulse laser system interacting with the metal target.

    PubMed

    Nishiuchi, M; Sakaki, H; Maeda, S; Sagisaka, A; Pirozhkov, A S; Pikuz, T; Faenov, A; Ogura, K; Kanasaki, M; Matsukawa, K; Kusumoto, T; Tao, A; Fukami, T; Esirkepov, T; Koga, J; Kiriyama, H; Okada, H; Shimomura, T; Tanoue, M; Nakai, Y; Fukuda, Y; Sakai, S; Tamura, J; Nishio, K; Sako, H; Kando, M; Yamauchi, T; Watanabe, Y; Bulanov, S V; Kondo, K

    2014-02-01

    Experimental demonstration of multi-charged heavy ion acceleration from the interaction between the ultra-intense short pulse laser system and the metal target is presented. Al ions are accelerated up to 12 MeV/u (324 MeV total energy). To our knowledge, this is far the highest energy ever reported for the case of acceleration of the heavy ions produced by the <10 J laser energy of 200 TW class Ti:sapphire laser system. Adding to that, thanks to the extraordinary high intensity laser field of ∼10(21) W cm(-2), the accelerated ions are almost fully stripped, having high charge to mass ratio (Q/M). PMID:24593609

  5. Production of CeO2 Nanoparticles by Method of Laser Ablation of Bulk Metallic Cerium Targets in Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetlichnyi, V. A.; Lapin, I. N.

    2016-03-01

    The method of pulsed laser ablation in liquid was used to synthesize dispersions of cerium oxide nanoparticles when subjecting a metallic cerium target in water and alcohol to basic frequency radiation of the nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 7 ns, 20 Hz). Researchers have studied the effect of laser radiation parameters, duration of impact, and optical scheme of experiment on the ablation process. The average rate of nanoparticle production was 50 mg/h in water and 25 mg/h in alcohol. Researchers have studied the size characteristics and crystalline structure of the nanoparticles produced. The particles have bimodal size distribution with 6 nm and 25 nm maximums. The average crystallite size is 17-19 nm. The crystalline structure of nanoparticles, namely cubic cerium oxide (fluorite structure), space group Fm-3m, is confirmed by the X-ray diffraction data, as well as optical absorption spectra and Raman spectroscopy.

  6. Separation of spallation and terrestrial C-14 in chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cresswell, R. G.; Beukens, R. P.; Rucklidge, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Weathering products and contamination severely hamper our ability to accurately measure the C-14 spallation component in meteorites, but can give insights into a sample's terrestrial history. A procedure was developed to measure the C-14 in these components using CO and CO2 separations from temperature extractions from 200-500 mg of material. The Bruderheim (L6) chondrite was chosen as a standard following the practice of previous researchers, crosschecked against Peace River (L6), Abee (EH4), and Juvinas (EUC). Low temperature fractions (less than 900 C) give C-14 signatures consistent with a modern terrestrial C-14 source; melt fractions show elevated levels attesting to a spallogenic origin. Higher yields of CO in the melt fraction are less affected by the low levels of experimental contamination than the CO2. This fraction gave a mean CO:CO2 ratio in Bruderheim of 81.6 +/- 7.7; the ratio of the spallation component is 79.8 +/- 8.1. These values suggest equilibrium release of gases on the olivine-silica-pyroxene-iron buffer. This is corroborated by approximately equal release of the two components at 900 C. The chondrites gave an average saturation level of 54.3 +/- 2.9 dpm/kg; the achondrite gave 49.6 +/- 2.0 dpm/kg. No clear correlation with oxygen content is apparent, though shielding effects have yet to be evaluated. A further evaluation of this subject matter is given.

  7. THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS: LUMINOSITY CLASS, PLANET OCCURRENCE, AND PLANET-METALLICITY RELATION OF THE COOLEST KEPLER TARGET STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Andrew W.; Hilton, Eric J.; Gaidos, Eric; Lepine, Sebastien

    2012-07-01

    We estimate the stellar parameters of late K- and early M-type Kepler target stars. We obtain medium-resolution visible spectra of 382 stars with K{sub P} - J > 2 ({approx_equal}K5 and later spectral type). We determine luminosity class by comparing the strength of gravity-sensitive indices (CaH, K I, Ca II, and Na I) to their strength in a sample of stars of known luminosity class. We find that giants constitute 96% {+-} 1% of the bright (K{sub P} < 14) Kepler target stars, and 7% {+-} 3% of dim (K{sub P} > 14) stars, significantly higher than fractions based on the stellar parameters quoted in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). The KIC effective temperatures are systematically (110{sup +15}{sub -35} K) higher than temperatures we determine from fitting our spectra to PHOENIX stellar models. Through Monte Carlo simulations of the Kepler exoplanet candidate population, we find a planet occurrence of 0.36 {+-} 0.08 when giant stars are properly removed, somewhat higher than when a KIC log g > 4 criterion is used (0.27 {+-} 0.05). Last, we show that there is no significant difference in g - r color (a probe of metallicity) between late-type Kepler stars with transiting Earth-to-Neptune-size exoplanet candidates and dwarf stars with no detected transits. We show that a previous claimed offset between these two populations is most likely an artifact of including a large number of misidentified giants.

  8. Structure of the I-SceI nuclease complexed with its dsDNA target and three catalytic metal ions.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Jesús; Redondo, Pilar; Merino, Nekane; Villate, Maider; Montoya, Guillermo; Blanco, Francisco J; Molina, Rafael

    2016-06-01

    Homing endonucleases are highly specific DNA-cleaving enzymes that recognize and cleave long stretches of DNA. The engineering of these enzymes provides instruments for genome modification in a wide range of fields, including gene targeting. The homing endonuclease I-SceI from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been purified after overexpression in Escherichia coli and its crystal structure has been determined in complex with its target DNA. In order to evaluate the number of ions that are involved in the cleavage process, thus determining the catalytic mechanism, crystallization experiments were performed in the presence of Mn(2+), yielding crystals that were suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 80.11, b = 80.57, c = 130.87 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The self-rotation function and the Matthews coefficient suggested the presence of two protein-DNA complexes in the asymmetric unit. The crystals diffracted to a resolution limit of 2.9 Å using synchrotron radiation. From the anomalous data, it was determined that three cations are involved in catalysis and it was confirmed that I-SceI follows a two-metal-ion DNA-strand cleavage mechanism. PMID:27303901

  9. Thermochromism of metal-doped VO{sub 2} films deposited by dual-target sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, P.; Tazawa, M.; Yoshimura, K.; Miki, T.; Igarashi, K.; Tanemura, S.

    1994-12-31

    There are several kinds of chromogenic materials such as photochromic material, electrochromic material and thermochromic material, of which the thermochromic one is known for its optical properties (transmittance and reflectance) being able to change reversibly upon temperature. Among the chromogenic materials feasible to smart window coatings, thermochromic (TC) one has recently received increasing attention, since a window with TC coating enables automatic control of the energy throughputs of the solar radiation as well as the environmental radiation in response to the ambient temperature. Here, thermochromic VO{sub 2} films were prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering under various conditions of substrate temperature, total sputter pressure and oxygen flow ratio and characterized by XRD, RBS, AFM and spectrophotometry. Films with VO{sub 2} single phase were formed from a fairly low substrate temperature of 300 C by precisely controlling the oxygen flow ratio. The use of vanadium nucleated substrates significantly improved the crystallinity of VO{sub 2}. Tungsten doped V{sub 1{minus}x}W{sub x}O{sub 2} films with x = 0--0.26 were formed by dual-target sputtering and the thermochromism of films was evaluated. The tungsten doping linearly decreased {tau}{sub c} by 24 C/at.%W with a reduction in the hysteresis loop width.

  10. Comparison of dissociation mechanism between collisionally activated dissociation and charge inversion using alkali metal targets for chlorophenol isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Shigeo; Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2005-11-01

    Chlorinated aromatic compounds are well-known environmental pollutants whose toxicities depend dramatically on the chlorine substitution pattern, making differentiation of chlorophenol isomers important for environmental analysis. Collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) spectra and charge inversion spectra of ortho-, meta-, and para-chlorophenols (ClC6H4OH) and their partially deuterated forms (ClC6H4OD) were measured using alkali metal targets. The peaks associated with C6H4O+ and C5H5Cl+ ions observed in the CAD spectra result from the loss of HCl and CO fragments, respectively, after the re-arrangement of the hydroxyl hydrogen atom. The peaks associated with C6H4OH- and ClC6H4O- ions observed in the charge inversion spectra result from Cl loss and from hydroxyl bond dissociation, respectively. Isomeric differentiation is possible based on the clear differences observed in the relative intensities of these pairs of peaks. Although the intensities of the peaks associated with C6H4O+ relative to those of C5H5Cl+ in the CAD spectra are independent of the target species, the intensities of the peaks associated with C6H4OH- relative to those of ClC6H4O- in the charge inversion spectra are target dependent. The isomeric dependence of the positive ion distribution patterns in the CAD spectra is proposed to be due to the differences in the rate of the hydrogen atom re-arrangement process. In contrast, the isomeric dependence of the negative ion distribution patterns in the charge inversion spectra is attributed to differences in the bond strength involved in the direct dissociation process in the neutral intermediate species.

  11. Signal enhancement in electrospray laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry by using a black oxide-coated metal target and a relatively low laser fluence.

    PubMed

    Kononikhin, Alexey; Huang, Min-Zong; Popov, Igor; Kostyukevich, Yury; Kukaev, Evgeny; Boldyrev, Alexey; Spasskiy, Alexander; Leypunskiy, Ilya; Shiea, Jentaie; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    The electrospray Laser desorption/ionization (ELDI) method is actively used for direct sample analysis and ambient mass spectrometry imaging. The optimizing of Laser desorption conditions is essential for this technology. In this work, we propose using a metal target with a black oxide (Fe3O4) coating to increase the signal in ELDI-MS for peptides and small proteins. The experiments were performed on an LTQ-FT mass spectrometer equipped with a home-made ELDI ion source. A cutter blade with black oxide coating was used as a target. A nitrogen laser was used with the following parameters: 337 nm, pulse duration 4ns, repetition rate 10 Hz, fluence to approximately 700 Jm(-2). More than a five times signal increase was observed for a substance P peptide when a coated and a non-coated metal target were compared. No ion signal was observed for proteins if the same fluence and the standard stainless steel target were used. With the assistance of the Fe3O4 coated metal target and a relatively low laser fluence < or =700 Jm(-2)), proteins such as insulin, ubiquitin and myoglobin were successfully ionized. It was demonstrated that the Fe3O4-coated metal target can be used efficiently to assist laser desorption and thus significantly increase the analyte signal in ELDI-MS. A relatively low laser fluence (< or = 700 Jm(-2)) was enough to desorb peptides and proteins (up to 17 kDal with the assistance of the Fe3O4-coated metal target under ambient conditions. PMID:24575623

  12. Long-Lifetime Low-Scatter Neutron Polarization Target

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Jonathan M. Richardson

    2004-07-09

    Polarized neutrons scattering is an important technology for characterizing magnetic and other materials. Polarized helium three (P-3He) is a novel technology for creating polarized beams and, perhaps more importantly, for the analysis of polarization in highly divergent scattered beams. Analysis of scattered beams requires specialized targets with complex geometries to ensure accurate results. Special materials and handling procedures are required to give the targets a long useful lifetime. In most cases, the targets must be shielded from stray magnetic fields from nearby equipment. SRL has developed and demonstrated hybrid targets made from glass and aluminum. We have also developed and calibrated a low-field NMR system for measuring polarization lifetimes. We have demonstrated that our low-field system is able to measure NMR signals in the presence of conducting (metallic) cell elements. We have also demonstrated a non-magnetic valve that can be used to seal the cells. We feel that these accomplishments in Phase I are sufficient to ensure a successful Phase II program. The commercial market for this technology is solid. There are over nine neutron scattering centers in the US and Canada and over 22 abroad. Currently, the US plans to build a new $1.4B scattering facility called the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The technology developed in this project will allow SRL to supply targets to both existing and future facilities. SRL is also involved with the application of P-3He to medical imaging.

  13. The Evolution of the Cryogenic System of the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hees, W.; Arnold, Ph; Fydrych, J.; Jurns, J.; Wang, X. L.; Weisend, J. G., II

    2015-12-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is an intergovernmental project building a multidisciplinary research laboratory based upon the world's most powerful neutron source to be built in Lund, Sweden. The ESS will use a superconducting linear accelerator which will deliver protons with 5 MW of power to the target at 2.0 GeV with a nominal current of 62.5 mA. A cryomodule test stand will be supplied with helium for the site acceptance tests. The target will have two moderators using supercritical hydrogen to cool down the neutrons. The neutron instruments and the experiments’ sample environment will use liquid helium and liquid nitrogen to cool detectors and samples. The ESS cryogenic system is designed to deliver cryogenic cooling capacity to all three client system. A first concept of the ESS cryogenic system was developed in 2010 and 2011 with a limited amount of input from the clients as well as from site infrastructure (i.e. buildings and utilities). The design had to be flexible enough to accommodate future changes in scope, schedule and available infrastructure. Over the following years the design has evolved together with these parameters to achieve a maturity today which allowed us to order the accelerator cryoplant and to start procurement of many of the other parts of the ESS cryogenic system. This paper presents the evolution of the design throughout the years and the factors influencing certain design choices.

  14. Iron-Targeting Antitumor Activity of Gallium Compounds and Novel Insights Into Triapine®-Metal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Antholine, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Despite advances made in the treatment of cancer, a significant number of patients succumb to this disease every year. Hence, there is a great need to develop new anticancer agents. Recent Advances: Emerging data show that malignant cells have a greater requirement for iron than normal cells do and that proteins involved in iron import, export, and storage may be altered in cancer cells. Therefore, strategies to perturb these iron-dependent steps in malignant cells hold promise for the treatment of cancer. Recent studies show that gallium compounds and metal-thiosemicarbazone complexes inhibit tumor cell growth by targeting iron homeostasis, including iron-dependent ribonucleotide reductase. Chemical similarities of gallium(III) with iron(III) enable the former to mimic the latter and interpose itself in critical iron-dependent steps in cellular proliferation. Newer gallium compounds have emerged with additional mechanisms of action. In clinical trials, the first-generation-compound gallium nitrate has exhibited activity against bladder cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, while the thiosemicarbazone Triapine® has demonstrated activity against other tumors. Critical Issues: Novel gallium compounds with greater cytotoxicity and a broader spectrum of antineoplastic activity than gallium nitrate should continue to be developed. Future Directions: The antineoplastic activity and toxicity of the existing novel gallium compounds and thiosemicarbazone-metal complexes should be tested in animal tumor models and advanced to Phase I and II clinical trials. Future research should identify biologic markers that predict tumor sensitivity to gallium compounds. This will help direct gallium-based therapy to cancer patients who are most likely to benefit from it. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000–000. PMID:22900955

  15. Three-Dimensional Characterization of Buried Metallic Targets via a Tomographic Algorithm Applied to GPR Synthetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comite, Davide; Galli, Alessandro; Catapano, Ilaria; Soldovieri, Francesco; Pettinelli, Elena

    2013-04-01

    This work is focused on the three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of buried metallic targets achievable by processing GPR (ground penetrating radar) simulation data via a tomographic inversion algorithm. The direct scattering problem has been analysed by means of a recently-developed numerical setup based on an electromagnetic time-domain CAD tool (CST Microwave Studio), which enables us to efficiently explore different GPR scenarios of interest [1]. The investigated 3D domain considers here two media, representing, e.g., an air/soil environment in which variously-shaped metallic (PEC) scatterers can be buried. The GPR system is simulated with Tx/Rx antennas placed in a bistatic configuration at the soil interface. In the implementation, the characteristics of the antennas may suitably be chosen in terms of topology, offset, radiative features, frequency ranges, etc. Arbitrary time-domain waveforms can be used as the input GPR signal (e.g., a Gaussian-like pulse having the frequency spectrum in the microwave range). The gathered signal at the output port includes the backscattered wave from the objects to be reconstructed, and the relevant data may be displayed in canonical radargram forms [1]. The GPR system sweeps along one main rectilinear direction, and the scanning process is here repeated along different close parallel lines to acquire data for a full 3-D analysis. Starting from the processing of the synthetic GPR data, a microwave tomographic approach is used to tackle the imaging, which is based on the Kirchhoff approximation to linearize the inverse scattering problem [2]. The target reconstruction is given in terms of the amplitude of the 'object function' (normalized with respect to its maximum inside the 3-D investigation domain). The data of the scattered field are collected considering a multi-frequency step process inside the fixed range of the signal spectrum, under a multi-bistatic configuration where the Tx and Rx antennas are separated by an offset

  16. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE HIGH-POWER PROTECTION MODULE TEST STAND

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Woo; Ball, Jeffrey Allen; Crofford, Mark T; Davidson Jr, Taylor L; Jones, Stacey L; Hardek, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) High-Power Protection Module (HPM) provides interlocks and fast shutdown for the radio frequency (RF) system to protect the accelerating structures and high power RF (HPRF) Distribution System. The HPM has required some functional upgrades since the start of beam operations and an upgrade to the HPM test stand was required to support these added features. The HPM test stand currently verifies functionality, RF channel calibration, and measurement of the speed of shutdown to ensure the specifications are met. The upgraded test stand was implemented in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) to allow for future growth and flexibility. Work is currently progressing on automation of the test stand to better perform the required module calibration schedule.

  17. THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE CRYOMODULE TEST STAND RF SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Crofford, Mark T; Ball, Jeffrey Allen; Davidson Jr, Taylor L; Hardek, Thomas W; Heidenreich, Dale A; Kasemir, Kay; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kang, Yoon

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has recently commissioned a cryomodule test facility for the repair and testing of the super-conducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. This facility utilizes the original 402.5/805 MHz Radio Frequency (RF) Klystron Test Stand as its power source along with dual Low Level RF (LLRF) control systems. One control system is based on the standard SNS Linac LLRF controls with a second system for open-loop only control. The system is designed to allow simultaneous testing of devices in the test cave and other devices which can be tested outside of the enclosure. Initial tests have shown good results; some improvements are yet to be implemented.

  18. STATUS OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE SUPERCONDUCTING RF FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, Daniel S; Assadi, Saeed; Campisi, Isidoro E; Casagrande, Fabio; Crofford, Mark T; DeVan, Bill; Hardek, Thomas W; Henderson, Stuart D; Howell, Matthew P; Kang, Yoon W; Geng, Xiaosong; Stone Jr, William C; Strong, William Herb; Williams, Derrick C; Wright, Paul Alan

    2007-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project was completed with only limited superconducting RF (SRF) facilities installed as part of the project. A concerted effort has been initiated to install the infrastructure and equipment necessary to maintain and repair the superconducting Linac, and to support power upgrade research and development (R&D). Installation of a Class10/100/10,000 cleanroom and outfitting of the test cave with RF, vacuum, controls, personnel protection and cryogenics systems is underway. A horizontal cryostat, which can house a helium vessel/cavity and fundamental power coupler for full power, pulsed testing, is being procured. Equipment for cryomodule assembly and disassembly is being procured. This effort, while derived from the experience of the SRF community, will provide a unique high power test capability as well as long term maintenance capabilities. This paper presents the current status and the future plans for the SNS SRF facilities.

  19. CONSTRUCTION STATUS AND ISSUES OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.

    2004-07-05

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ring is designed to accumulate beam pulses of 1.5 x 10{sup 14} protons of 1 GeV kinetic energy at a repetition rate of 60 Hz [1]. At such beam intensity and power, key design challenges include control of beam loss and radio-activation, construction of high-quality large-aperture magnets and power supplies, design of robust injection and extraction systems, minimization of beam-coupling impedances, and mitigation of electron-cloud effects. This paper discusses the status of the ring systems with emphasis on technical challenges and issues, and presents future perspectives towards a next-generation high-intensity facility.

  20. Electron-cloud mitigation in the spallation neutron source ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brodowski, J.; Cameron, P.; Davino, D.; Fedotov, A.; He, P.; Hseuh, H.; Lee, Y.Y.; Meng, W.; Raparia, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, S.Y.; Danilov, V.; Henderson, S.; Furman, M.; Pivi, M.; Macek, R.

    2003-05-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring is designed to accumulate, via H- injection, protons of 2 MW beam power at 1 GeV kinetic energy at a repetition rate of 60 Hz [1]. At such beam intensity, electron cloud is expected to be one of the intensity-limiting mechanisms that complicate ring operations. This paper summarizes mitigation strategy adopted in the design, both in suppressing electron-cloud formation and in enhancing Landau damping, including tapered magnetic field and monitoring system for the collection of stripped electrons at injection, TiN coated beam chamber for suppression of the secondary yield, clearing electrodes dedicated for the injection region and parasitic on BPMs around the ring, solenoid windings in the collimation region, and planning of vacuum systems for beam scrubbing upon operation.

  1. Impedance measurements of the Spallation Neutron Source extraction kicker system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, H.

    2004-10-01

    Transverse coupling impedance measurements of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam extraction system were performed and the results are here reported. The SNS beam extraction system is composed from 14 subsystems, each of which consists of a vertical kicker magnet plus a pulse forming network (PFN). Impedance bench measurements were performed on one large and one small aperture magnet, stand-alone as well as assembled with the first-article production PFN. The impedance measuring methods to cover the interesting frequency range from below 1 to 100MHz are described in considerable detail. The upper frequency range is properly covered by the conventional twin-wire method but it had to be supplemented at the low-frequency end by a direct input impedance measurement at the magnet busbar. Required modifications of the PFN to maintain the impedance budget are discussed. The total impedance estimate was finally obtained by quadratic scaling with vertical aperture from the two tested kicker subsystems.

  2. Preliminary Numerical and Experimental Analysis of the Spallation Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Alexandre; Bailey, Sean C. C.; Panerai, Francesco; Davuluri, Raghava S. C.; Vazsonyi, Alexander R.; Zhang, Huaibao; Lippay, Zachary S.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Bathel, Brett F.; Splinter, Scott C.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The spallation phenomenon was studied through numerical analysis using a coupled Lagrangian particle tracking code and a hypersonic aerothermodynamics computational fluid dynamics solver. The results show that carbon emission from spalled particles results in a significant modification of the gas composition of the post shock layer. Preliminary results from a test-campaign at the NASA Langley HYMETS facility are presented. Using an automated image processing of high-speed images, two-dimensional velocity vectors of the spalled particles were calculated. In a 30 second test at 100 W/cm2 of cold-wall heat-flux, more than 1300 particles were detected, with an average velocity of 102 m/s, and most frequent observed velocity of 60 m/s.

  3. Sulfur and Moisture Effects on Alumina Scale and TBC Spallation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2007-01-01

    It has been well established that a few ppmw sulfur impurity may segregate to the interface of thermally grown alumina scales and the underlying substrate, resulting in bond degradation and premature spallation. This has been shown for NiAl and NiCrAl-based alloys, bare single crystal superalloys, or coated superalloys. The role of reactive elements (especially Y) has been to getter the sulfur in the bulk and preclude interfacial segregation. Pt additions are also very beneficial, however a similar thermodynamic explanation does not apply. The purpose of the present discussion is to highlight some observations of these effects on Rene'142, Rene'N5, PWA1480, and PWA1484. For PWA1480, we have mapped cyclic oxidation and spallation in terms of potential sulfur interfacial layers and found that a cumulative amount of about one monolayer is sufficient to degrade long term adhesion. Depending on substrate thickness, optimum performance occurs if sulfur is reduced below about 0.2-0.5 ppmw. This is accomplished in the laboratory by hydrogen annealing or commercially by melt-fluxing. Excellent 1150 C cyclic oxidation is thus demonstrated for desulfurized Rene'142, Rene'N5, and PWA1484. Alternatively, a series of N5 alloys provided by GE-AE have shown that as little as 15 ppmw of Y dopant was effective in providing remarkable scale adhesion. In support of a Y-S gettering mechanism, hydrogen annealing was unable to desulfurize these alloys from their initial level of 5 ppmw S. This impurity and critical doping level corresponds closely to YS or Y2S3 stoichiometry. In many cases, Y-doped alloys or alloys with marginal sulfur levels exhibit an oxidative sensitivity to the ambient humidity called Moisture-Induced Delayed Spallation (MIDS). After substantial scale growth, coupled with damage from repeated cycling, cold samples may spall after a period of time, breathing on them, or immersing them in water. While stress corrosion arguments may apply, we propose that the underlying

  4. The Spallation Neutron Source: A powerful tool for materials research

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Thom; Anderson, Ian S; Ankner, John Francis; Egami, Takeshi; Ekkebus, Allen E; Herwig, Kenneth W; Hodges, Jason P; Horak, Charlie M; Horton, Linda L; Klose, Frank Richard; Mesecar, Andrew D.; Myles, Dean A A; Ohl, M.; Zhao, Jinkui

    2006-01-01

    When completed in 2006, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will use an accelerator to produce the most intense beams of pulsed neutrons in the world. This unique facility is being built by a collaboration of six US Department of Energy laboratories and will serve a diverse community of users drawn from academia, industry, and government labs. The project continues on schedule and within budget, with commissioning and installation of all systems going well. Installation of 14 state-of-the-art instruments is under way, and design work is being completed for several others. These new instruments will enable inelastic and elastic-scattering measurements across a broad range of science such as condensed-matter physics, chemistry, engineering materials, biology, and beyond. Neutron Science at SNS will be complemented by research opportunities at several other facilities under way at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  5. Electron Cloud Mitigation in the Spallation Neutron Source Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brodowski, J.; Cameron, P.; Davino, Daniele; Fedotov, A.; He, P.; Hseuh, H.; Lee, Y.Y.; Ludewig, H.; Meng, W.; Raparia, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, S.Y.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Macek, R.J.; Furman, Miguel A.; Aleksandrov, A.; Cousineau, S.; Danilov, V.; Henderson, S.; /Brookhaven /CERN /LANL, Ctr. for Nonlinear Studies /LBL, Berkeley /Oak Ridge /SLAC

    2008-03-17

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring is designed to accumulate, via H{sup -} injection, protons of 2 MW beam power at 1 GeV kinetic energy at a repetition rate of 60 Hz [1]. At such beam intensity, electron-cloud is expected to be one of the intensity-limiting mechanisms that complicate ring operations. This paper summarizes mitigation strategy adopted in the design, both in suppressing electron-cloud formation and in enhancing Landau damping, including tapered magnetic field and monitoring system for the collection of stripped electrons at injection, TiN coated beam chamber for suppression of the secondary yield, clearing electrodes dedicated for the injection region and parasitic on BPMs around the ring, solenoid windings in the collimation region, and planning of vacuum systems for beam scrubbing upon operation.

  6. Spallation neutron source cryomodule heat loads and thermal design

    SciTech Connect

    E. F. Daly; V. Ganni; C. H. Rode; W. J. Schneider; K. M. Wilson; M. A. Wiseman

    2002-05-10

    When complete, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will provide a 1 GeV, 2 MW beam for experiments. One portion of the machine's linac consists of over 80 Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) 805 MHz cavities housed in a minimum of 23 cryomodules operating at a saturation temperature of 2.1 K. Minimization of the total heat load is critical to machine performance and for efficient operation of the system. The total heat load of the cryomodules consists of the fixed static load and the dynamic load, which is proportional to the cavity performance. The helium refrigerator supports mainly the cryomodule loads and to a lesser extent the distribution system loads. The estimated heat loads and calculated thermal performance are discussed along with two unique features of this design: the helium heat exchanger housed in the cryomodule return end can and the helium gas cooled fundamental power coupler.

  7. The Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Geoffrey; Cianciolo, Vince; Koehler, Paul; Allen, Richard; Snow, William Michael; Huffman, Paul; Gould, Chris; Bowman, David; Cooper, Martin; Doyle, John

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), currently under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with an anticipated start-up in early 2006, will provide the most intense pulsed beams of cold neutrons in the world. At a projected power of 1.4 MW, the time averaged fluxes and fluences of the SNS will approach those of high flux reactors. One of the flight paths on the cold, coupled moderator will be devoted to fundamental neutron physics. The fundamental neutron physics beamline is anticipated to include two beam-lines; a broad band cold beam, and a monochromatic beam of 0.89 nm neutrons for ultracold neutron (UCN) experiments. The fundamental neutron physics beamline will be operated as a user facility with experiment selection based on a peer reviewed proposal process. An initial program of five experiments in neutron decay, hadronic weak interaction and time reversal symmetry violation have been proposed. PMID:27308112

  8. VESPA: The vibrational spectrometer for the European Spallation Source.

    PubMed

    Fedrigo, Anna; Colognesi, Daniele; Bertelsen, Mads; Hartl, Monika; Lefmann, Kim; Deen, Pascale P; Strobl, Markus; Grazzi, Francesco; Zoppi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    VESPA, Vibrational Excitation Spectrometer with Pyrolytic-graphite Analysers, aims to probe molecular excitations via inelastic neutron scattering. It is a thermal high resolution inverted geometry time-of-flight instrument designed to maximise the use of the long pulse of the European Spallation Source. The wavelength frame multiplication technique was applied to provide simultaneously a broad dynamic range (about 0-500 meV) while a system of optical blind choppers allows to trade flux for energy resolution. Thanks to its high flux, VESPA will allow the investigation of dynamical and in situ experiments in physical chemistry. Here we describe the design parameters and the corresponding McStas simulations. PMID:27370491

  9. Core Vessel Insert Handling Robot for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Van B; Dayton, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source provides the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams for scientific research and industrial development. Its eighteen neutron beam lines will eventually support up to twenty-four simultaneous experiments. Each beam line consists of various optical components which guide the neutrons to a particular instrument. The optical components nearest the neutron moderators are the core vessel inserts. Located approximately 9 m below the high bay floor, these inserts are bolted to the core vessel chamber and are part of the vacuum boundary. They are in a highly radioactive environment and must periodically be replaced. During initial SNS construction, four of the beam lines received Core Vessel Insert plugs rather than functional inserts. Remote replacement of the first Core Vessel Insert plug was recently completed using several pieces of custom-designed tooling, including a highly complicated Core Vessel Insert Robot. The design of this tool are discussed.

  10. Large-scale massively parallel atomistic simulations of short pulse laser interaction with metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chengping; Zhigilei, Leonid; Computational Materials Group Team

    2014-03-01

    Taking advantage of petascale supercomputing architectures, large-scale massively parallel atomistic simulations (108-109 atoms) are performed to study the microscopic mechanisms of short pulse laser interaction with metals. The results of the simulations reveal a complex picture of highly non-equilibrium processes responsible for material modification and/or ejection. At low laser fluences below the ablation threshold, fast melting and resolidification occur under conditions of extreme heating and cooling rates resulting in surface microstructure modification. At higher laser fluences in the spallation regime, the material is ejected by the relaxation of laser-induced stresses and proceeds through the nucleation, growth and percolation of multiple voids in the sub-surface region of the irradiated target. At a fluence of ~ 2.5 times the spallation threshold, the top part of the target reaches the conditions for an explosive decomposition into vapor and small droplets, marking the transition to the phase explosion regime of laser ablation. The dynamics of plume formation and the characteristics of the ablation plume are obtained from the simulations and compared with the results of time-resolved plume imaging experiments. Financial support for this work was provided by NSF (DMR-0907247 and CMMI-1301298) and AFOSR (FA9550-10-1-0541). Computational support was provided by the OLCF (MAT048) and XSEDE (TG-DMR110090).

  11. Helium Bubble Injection Solution To The Cavitation Damage At The Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, M. W.; Ruggles, A. E.

    2009-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is one of the largest science projects in the United States, with total cost near 1.4 Billion Dollars. The limiting factor of the facility had always been assumed to be the lifetime of the target window due to radiation damage. After further investigation, the lifetime of the target was determined not to be limited by radiation damage but by cavitation damage. The cavitation damage derives from pressure waves caused by the beam energy deposition. Vapor bubbles form when low to negative pressures occur in the mercury near the stainless steel target window due to wave interaction with the structure. Collapse of these bubbles can focus wave energy in small liquid jets that erode the window surface. Compressibility of the mercury can be enhanced to reduce the amplitude of the pressure wave caused by the beam energy deposition. To enhance compressibility, small (10 to 30 micron diameter) gas bubbles could be injected into the bulk of the mercury. Solubility and diffusivity parameters of inert gas in mercury are required for a complete mechanical simulation and engineering of these strategies. Using current theoretical models, one obtains a theoretical Henry coefficient of helium in mercury on the order of 3.9E15 Pa-molHg/molHe at 300 K. This low solubility was confirmed by a direct, offline experimental method. Mercury was charged with helium and any pressure change was recorded. Any pressure change was attributed to gas going into solution. Therefore, with the sensitivity of the experiment, a lower limit of 9E12 Pa-molHg/molHe was placed on the mercury-helium system. These values guarantee a stable bubble lifetime needed within the SNS mercury target to mitigate cavitation issues.

  12. Helium Bubble Injection Solution To The Cavitation Damage At The Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, M. W.; Ruggles, A. E.

    2009-03-10

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is one of the largest science projects in the United States, with total cost near 1.4 Billion Dollars. The limiting factor of the facility had always been assumed to be the lifetime of the target window due to radiation damage. After further investigation, the lifetime of the target was determined not to be limited by radiation damage but by cavitation damage. The cavitation damage derives from pressure waves caused by the beam energy deposition. Vapor bubbles form when low to negative pressures occur in the mercury near the stainless steel target window due to wave interaction with the structure. Collapse of these bubbles can focus wave energy in small liquid jets that erode the window surface. Compressibility of the mercury can be enhanced to reduce the amplitude of the pressure wave caused by the beam energy deposition. To enhance compressibility, small (10 to 30 micron diameter) gas bubbles could be injected into the bulk of the mercury. Solubility and diffusivity parameters of inert gas in mercury are required for a complete mechanical simulation and engineering of these strategies. Using current theoretical models, one obtains a theoretical Henry coefficient of helium in mercury on the order of 3.9E15 Pa-molHg/molHe at 300 K. This low solubility was confirmed by a direct, offline experimental method. Mercury was charged with helium and any pressure change was recorded. Any pressure change was attributed to gas going into solution. Therefore, with the sensitivity of the experiment, a lower limit of 9E12 Pa-molHg/molHe was placed on the mercury-helium system. These values guarantee a stable bubble lifetime needed within the SNS mercury target to mitigate cavitation issues.

  13. Spallation recoil and age of presolar grains in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, U.; Begemann, F.

    2000-01-01

    We have determined the recoil losses from silicon carbide grain size fractions of spallation neon produced by irradiation with 1.6 GeV protons. During the irradiation the SiC grains were dispersed in paraffin wax in order to avoid re-implantation into neighboring grains. Analysis for spallogenic 21Ne of grain size separates in the size range 0.3 μm to 6 μm and comparison with the 22Na activity of the SiC+paraffin mixture indicates an effective recoil range of 2-3 μm with no apparent effect from acid treatments such as routinely used in the isolation of meteoritic SiC grains. Our results indicate that the majority of presolar SiC grains in primitive meteorites, which are ~μm-sized, will have lost essentially all spallogenic Ne produced by cosmic ray interaction in the interstellar medium. This argues against the validity of previously published presolar ages of Murchison SiC (~10 to ~130 Ma; increasing with grain size; Lewis et al., 1994), where recoil losses had been based on calculated recoil energies. It is argued that the observed variations in meteoritic SiC grain size fractions of 21Ne/22Ne ratios are more likely due to the effects of nucleosynthesis in the He burning shell of the parent AGB stars which imposes new boundary conditions on nuclear parameters and stellar models. It is suggested that spallation-Xe produced on the abundant Ba and REE in presolar SiC, rather than spallogenic Ne, may be a promising approach to the presolar age problem. There is a hint in the currently available Xe data (Lewis et al., 1994) that the large (>1 μm) grains may be younger than the smaller (<1 μm) ones.

  14. Study of material changes of SINQ target rods after long-term exposure by neutron radiography methods.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, E E; Vontobel, P; Estermann, M

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes the results of non-destructive investigations by indirect neutron radiography methods obtained at the facility NEUTRA [Nondestruct. Testing Eval. 16 (2000b) 203], spallation neutron source SINQ [Operating experience and development projects at SINQ, PSI Report 98-04, ISSN 1019-0643]. Target rods from the second SINQ metal target were removed after 6 Ah of proton beam exposure and studied under well-shielded conditions. No real damage was found at one of the 11 observed rods and one tube. However, hydrogen accumulation could be identified inside the zircaloy rods and the steel rods as well. Whereas the hydrogen has a homogenous distribution in Zr (with the peak value near the centre of the applied beam), the steel samples show clusters of hydrogen near the edge of the Zr cladding. Lead (in steel cladding) was found modified by accumulations of spallation products, mainly mercury. In the radiography images, a depression of the neutron field was observed due to the absorption by mercury. The applied method with Dy and In as neutron converters and imaging plates [Nucl. Instrum. Methods 377 (1996) 119] as secondary detectors seems to be optimal for such kind of investigations, especially when quantitative considerations have to be made. PMID:15246406

  15. Efficient fast electron generation in an interaction of Intense, ultrashort laser with metal nanoparticle coated dielectric target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Deep; Tata, Sheroy; Shaikh, Moniruzzaman; Lad, Amit D.; Adak, Amitava; Sarkar, Subhrangsu; Ayyub, Pushan; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2016-05-01

    Hot electron generation in intense laser-matter interaction studies is a topic of great interest due in significant part to its applications in fast ignitor scheme in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). We measure the hot electron energy spectrum from Ag nanoparticle coated fused silica target (100 μm thick) interacting with an intense (I∼1018W/cm2), short pulse (τ∼ 30× 10-15s) laser and compare the results with those of an uncoated fused silica. Enhancement in hot electron energy and hard x-ray yield is measured as a function of thickness of Ag nano-coating, varied from tens of nm to hundreds of nm. The hot electron temperatures and integrated x-ray yield are observed to be greater for subwavelength film thicknesses for the case of a p-polarized laser. Such results indicate that metal nanoparticle layers have an important role to play in the enhancement of laser-plasma coupling efficiency for short scale-length plasmas created in femtosecond laser interactions.

  16. Computer simulations for rf design of a Spallation Neutron Source external antenna H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. W.; Kang, Y. W.; Shin, K.; Welton, R. F.; Goulding, R. H.

    2010-02-15

    Electromagnetic modeling of the multicusp external antenna H{sup -} ion source for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been performed in order to optimize high-power performance. During development of the SNS external antenna ion source, antenna failures due to high voltage and multicusp magnet holder rf heating concerns under stressful operating conditions led to rf characteristics analysis. In rf simulations, the plasma was modeled as an equivalent lossy metal by defining conductivity as {sigma}. Insulation designs along with material selections such as ferrite and Teflon could be included in the computer simulations to compare antenna gap potentials, surface power dissipations, and input impedance at the operating frequencies, 2 and 13.56 MHz. Further modeling and design improvements are outlined in the conclusion.

  17. Technology and science at a high-power spallation source: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    These proceedings cover many aspects of the usefulness of spallation neutrons. Nine different areas are considered: surfaces and interfaces, engineering, materials science, polymers and complex fluids, chemistry, structural biology, nuclear engineering and radiation effects, condensed matter physics and fundamental physics.

  18. A proposal for a long-pulse spallation source at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Weinacht, D.

    1995-12-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is proposing a new spallation neutron source that will provide the US with an internationally competitive facility for neutron science and technology that can be built in approximately three years for less than $100 million. The establishment of a 1-MW, long-pulse spallation source (LPSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) will meet many of the present needs of scientists in the neutron scattering community and provide a significant boost to neutron research in the US. The new facility will support the development of a future, more intense spallation neutron source, that is planned by DOE`s Office of Energy Research. Together with the existing short pulse spallation source (SPSS) at the Manual Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC) at Los Alamos, the new LPSS will provide US scientists with a complementary pair of high-performance neutron sources to rival the world`s leading facilities in Europe.

  19. Different effects of a laser prepulse on the proton generation between plastic and metal targets irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Cha, Y.-H.; Lee, Y. W.; Park, S. H.; Jeong, Y. U.; Lee, J. Y.

    2009-01-15

    The effect of a laser prepulse on the generation of proton beams is compared between plastic and metal targets by irradiating a 30 fs, 2.4x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} Ti:sapphire laser pulse. Proton energies generated from both target materials increase as the pulse duration of the laser prepulse decreases. However, it was found that there are distinct differences with respect to target materials. In the case of aluminum targets, as target thickness decreases, proton energy gets higher, which is well described by an isothermal expansion model. However, in the case of Mylar targets, no such dependence on target thickness could be observed, and the highest maximum proton energies are higher by factors of 1.5 to 3 than those from aluminum targets or those predicted by the isothermal expansion model. Such characteristics of the proton beams from Mylar targets can be accounted for by a bulk acceleration model, or acceleration by a resistively induced electric field.

  20. Quantitative analysis of damage clustering and void linking for spallation modeling in tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D.L.; Zurek, A.K.; Thissell, W.R.; Hixson, R.

    1997-05-01

    In a companion paper in this volume by Zurek et al, micrographs of incipient spallation damage in rolled tantalum were numerically analyzed using image analysis techniques. Void sizes, locations, and overall porosity were measured and tabulated. In this paper, we extend this analysis to include void clusters and examine the correlation between cluster size and the ranges of local instabilities between voids visible in the micrographs. The implications for spallation modeling will be given.

  1. Optimizing moderator dimensions for neutron scattering at the spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. K.; Robertson, J. L.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Riemer, Bernard W.

    2013-12-15

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). In a recent study of the planned second target station at the SNS facility, we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter over a smaller viewing area. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories: those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. For instruments using natural collimation, the optimal moderator selection depends on the size of the moderator, the sample, and the moderator brightness. The desired beam divergence only plays a role in determining the distance between sample and moderator. For instruments using neutron optical systems, the smallest moderator available that is larger than the entrance dimension of the closest optical element will perform the best (assuming, as is the case here that smaller moderators are brighter)

  2. Optimizing moderator dimensions for neutron scattering at the spallation neutron source.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J K; Robertson, J L; Herwig, Kenneth W; Gallmeier, Franz X; Riemer, Bernard W

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). In a recent study of the planned second target station at the SNS facility, we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter over a smaller viewing area. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories: those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. For instruments using natural collimation, the optimal moderator selection depends on the size of the moderator, the sample, and the moderator brightness. The desired beam divergence only plays a role in determining the distance between sample and moderator. For instruments using neutron optical systems, the smallest moderator available that is larger than the entrance dimension of the closest optical element will perform the best (assuming, as is the case here that smaller moderators are brighter). PMID:24387465

  3. A 1- to 5-MW, RCS-based, short-pulse spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y. Chae, Y.C.; Crosbie, E.

    1997-06-01

    Two accelerator configurations, the linac/compressor ring scheme and the linac/RCS scheme, are commonly used to provide the proton beam power for a short-pulse spallation neutron source. In one configuration, a full-power linac provides the beam power and a compressor ring shortens the pulse length from 1-ms down to 1 {micro}s. In the other, rapid cycling synchrotrons (RCSs) provide the beam power and also shorten the pulse length. A feasibility study of a staged approach to a 5-MW proton source utilizing RCS technology, allowing intermediate operation at 1 MW, was performed at ANL and is presented in this paper. This study is complementary to a study in progress at ORNL based on a linac and an accumulator ring. The 1-MW facility consists of a 400-MeV injector linac that delivers 0.5-mA time-averaged current, a synchrotron that accelerates the beam to 2 GeV at a 30-Hz rate, and two neutron-generating target stations. In the second phase, the 2-GeV beam is accelerated to 10 GeV by a larger RCS, increasing the facility beam power to 5 MW.

  4. Characterization of irradiated AISI 316L stainless steel disks removed from the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Vevera, Bradley J; Hyres, James W; McClintock, David A; Riemer, Bernie

    2014-01-01

    Irradiated AISI 316L stainless steel disks were removed from the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) for post-irradiation examination (PIE) to assess mechanical property changes due to radiation damage and erosion of the target vessel. Topics reviewed include high-resolution photography of the disk specimens, cleaning to remove mercury (Hg) residue and surface oxides, profile mapping of cavitation pits using high frequency ultrasonic testing (UT), high-resolution surface replication, and machining of test specimens using wire electrical discharge machining (EDM), tensile testing, Rockwell Superficial hardness testing, Vickers microhardness testing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The effectiveness of the cleaning procedure was evident in the pre- and post-cleaning photography and permitted accurate placement of the test specimens on the disks. Due to the limited amount of material available and the unique geometry of the disks, machine fixturing and test specimen design were critical aspects of this work. Multiple designs were considered and refined during mock-up test runs on unirradiated disks. The techniques used to successfully machine and test the various specimens will be presented along with a summary of important findings from the laboratory examinations.

  5. Stripper foil failure modes and cures at the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plum, M. A.; Cousineau, S. M.; Galambos, J.; Kim, S. H.; Ladd, P.; Luck, C. F.; Peters, C. C.; Polsky, Y.; Shaw, R. W.; Macek, R. J.; Raparia, D.

    2011-03-01

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source comprises a 1 GeV, 1.5 MW linear accelerator followed by an accumulator ring and a liquid mercury target. To manage the beam loss caused by the H0 excited states created during the H- charge-exchange injection into the accumulator ring, the stripper foil is located inside one of the chicane dipoles. This has some interesting consequences that were not fully appreciated until the beam power reached about 840 kW. One consequence was sudden failure of the stripper foil system due to convoy electrons stripped from the incoming H- beam, which circled around to strike the foil bracket and cause bracket failure. Another consequence is that convoy electrons can reflect back up from the electron catcher and strike the foil and bracket. An additional contributor to foil system failure is vacuum breakdown due to the charge developed on the foil by secondary electron emission. In this paper we detail these and other interesting failure mechanisms and describe the improvements we have made to mitigate them.

  6. Stripper foil failure modes and cures at the Oak Rdige Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.A.; Raparia, D.; Cousineau, S.M.; Galambos, J.; Kim, S.H.; Ladd, P.; Luck, C.F.; Peters, C.C.; Polsky, Y.; Shaw, R.W.; Macek, R.J.

    2011-03-28

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source comprises a 1 GeV, 1.5 MW linear accelerator followed by an accumulator ring and a liquid mercury target. To manage the beam loss caused by the H{sup 0} excited states created during the H{sup -} charge-exchange injection into the accumulator ring, the stripper foil is located inside one of the chicane dipoles. This has some interesting consequences that were not fully appreciated until the beam power reached about 840 kW. One consequence was sudden failure of the stripper foil system due to convoy electrons stripped from the incoming H{sup -} beam, which circled around to strike the foil bracket and cause bracket failure. Another consequence is that convoy electrons can reflect back up from the electron catcher and strike the foil and bracket. An additional contributor to foil system failure is vacuum breakdown due to the charge developed on the foil by secondary electron emission. In this paper we detail these and other interesting failure mechanisms and describe the improvements we have made to mitigate them.

  7. Stripper foil failure modes and cures at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Cousineau, Sarah M; Galambos, John D; Kim, Sang-Ho; Ladd, Peter; Luck, Chris; Peters, Charles C; Polsky, Yarom; Shaw, Robert W; Raparia, Deepak; Macek, Robert James; Plum, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source comprises a 1 GeV, 1.4 MW linear accelerator followed by an accumulator ring and a liquid mercury target. To manage the beam loss caused by the $H^0$ excited states created during the $H^-$ charge exchange injection into the accumulator ring, the stripper foil is located inside one of the chicane dipoles. This has some interesting consequences that were not fully appreciated until the beam power reached about 840 kW. One consequence was sudden failure of the stripper foil system due to convoy electrons stripped from the incoming $H^-$ beam, which circled around to strike the foil bracket and cause bracket failure. Another consequence is that convoy electrons can reflect back up from the electron catcher and strike the foil and bracket. An additional contributor to foil system failure is vacuum breakdown due to the charge developed on the foil by secondary electron emission. In this paper we detail these and other interesting failure mechanisms and describe the improvements we have made to mitigate them.

  8. High-power linac for a US spallation-neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Billen, J.; Jason, A. Krawczyk, F.; Nath, S.; Shafer, R.; Staples, J.; Takeda, H.; Tallerico, P.

    1996-09-01

    We present status of high-power linac design studies for a proposed National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS), based on a linac/accumulator-ring accelerator system. Overall project is a collaboration involving 5 national laboratories. ORNL will be responsible for the target, facilities, and conceptual design; BNL will be responsible for the ring; LBNL will be responsible for the injector, including the RFQ and a low-energy chopper in front of the RFQ; LANL will be responsible for the main linac; and ANL will be responsible for the instrumentation. The facility will be built at Oak Ridge. In the first phase, the dual-frequency linac with 402.5 and 805 MHz frequencies must deliver to the accumulator ring an H{sup -} beam near 1 GeV, with about 1 ms pulse length, a repetition rate 60 Hz, and average beam power {ge} 1 MW. The linac can be upgraded by a factor of 4 in beam power by increasing the dc injector current, and by funneling the beams from two 402.5 MHz low-energy linacs into the 805-MHz high-energy linac. Requirements for low beam loss in both linac and ring have important implications for linac design, including the requirement to provide efficient beam chopping to provide low-loss extraction for the ring. Linac design options and initial parameters are presented together with initial beam-dynamics simulation results.

  9. A Large Neutrino Detector Facility at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Efremenko, Y.V.

    1999-02-14

    The ORLaND (Oak Ridge Large Neutrino Detector) collaboration proposes to construct a large neutrino detector in an underground experimental hall adjacent to the first target station of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The main mission of a large (2000 ton) Scintillation-Cherenkov detector is to measure {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {r_arrow} {bar {nu}}{sub e} neutrino oscillation parameters more accurately than they can be determined in other experiments, or significantly extending the covered parameter space below (sin'20 {le} 10{sup {minus}4}). In addition to the neutrino oscillation measurements, ORLaND would be capable of making precise measurements of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}, search for the magnetic moment of the muon neutrino, and investigate the anomaly in the KARMEN time spectrum, which has been attributed to a new neutral particle. With the same facility an extensive program of measurements of neutrino nucleus cross sections is also planned to support nuclear astrophysics.

  10. Light nuclides produced in the proton-induced spallation of {sup 238}U at 1 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ricciardi, M.V.; Armbruster, P.; Enqvist, T.; Kelic, A.; Rejmund, F.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Yordanov, O.; Benlliure, J.; Pereira, J.; Bernas, M.; Mustapha, B.; Stephan, C.; Tassan-Got, L.

    2006-01-15

    The production of light and intermediate-mass nuclides formed in the reaction {sup 1}H+{sup 238}U at 1 GeV was measured at the Fragment Separator at GSI, Darmstadt. The experiment was performed in inverse kinematics, by shooting a 1 A GeV {sup 238}U beam on a thin liquid-hydrogen target. A total of 254 isotopes of all elements in the range 7{<=}Z{<=}37 were unambiguously identified, and the velocity distributions of the produced nuclides were determined with high precision. The results show that the nuclides are produced in a very asymmetric binary decay of heavy nuclei originating from the spallation of uranium. All the features of the produced nuclides merge with the characteristics of the fission products as their mass increases.

  11. RADIATION-RESISTANT FIBER OPTIC STRAIN SENSORS FOR SNS TARGET INSTRUMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Blokland, Willem; Bryan, Jeff; Riemer, Bernie; Sangrey, Robert L; Wendel, Mark W; Liu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of stresses and strains in the mercury tar-get vessel of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is important to understand the structural dynamics of the target. This work reports the development of radiation-resistant fiber optic strain sensors for the SNS target in-strumentation.

  12. Production of Actinium-225 via High Energy Proton Induced Spallation of Thorium-232

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, James T.; Nolen, Jerry; Vandergrift, George; Gomes, Itacil; Kroc, Tom; Horwitz, Phil; McAlister, Dan; Bowers, Del; Sullivan, Vivian; Greene, John

    2011-12-30

    The science of cancer research is currently expanding its use of alpha particle emitting radioisotopes. Coupled with the discovery and proliferation of molecular species that seek out and attach to tumors, new therapy and diagnostics are being developed to enhance the treatment of cancer and other diseases. This latest technology is commonly referred to as Alpha Immunotherapy (AIT). Actinium-225/Bismuth-213 is a parent/daughter alpha-emitting radioisotope pair that is highly sought after because of the potential for treating numerous diseases and its ability to be chemically compatible with many known and widely used carrier molecules (such as monoclonal antibodies and proteins/peptides). Unfortunately, the worldwide supply of actinium-225 is limited to about 1,000mCi annually and most of that is currently spoken for, thus limiting the ability of this radioisotope pair to enter into research and subsequently clinical trials. The route proposed herein utilizes high energy protons to produce actinium-225 via spallation of a thorium-232 target. As part of previous R and D efforts carried out at Argonne National Laboratory recently in support of the proposed US FRIB facility, it was shown that a very effective production mechanism for actinium-225 is spallation of thorium-232 by high energy proton beams. The base-line simulation for the production rate of actinium-225 by this reaction mechanism is 8E12 atoms per second at 200 MeV proton beam energy with 50 g/cm2 thorium target and 100 kW beam power. An irradiation of one actinium-225 half-life (10 days) produces {approx}100 Ci of actinium-225. For a given beam current the reaction cross section increases slightly with energy to about 400 MeV and then decreases slightly for beam energies in the several GeV regime. The object of this effort is to refine the simulations at proton beam energies of 400 MeV and above up to about 8 GeV. Once completed, the simulations will be experimentally verified using 400 MeV and 8 Ge

  13. Vacuum seals design and testing for a linear accelerator of the National Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Z. Chen; C. Gautier; F. Hemez; N. K. Bultman

    2000-02-01

    Vacuum seals are very important to ensure that the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Linac has an optimum vacuum system. The vacuum joints between flanges must have reliable seals to minimize the leak rate and meet vacuum and electrical requirements. In addition, it is desirable to simplify the installation and thereby also simplify the maintenance required. This report summarizes an investigation of the metal vacuum seals that include the metal C-seal, Energized Spring seal, Helcoflex Copper Delta seal, Aluminum Delta seal, delta seal with limiting ring, and the prototype of the copper diamond seals. The report also contains the material certifications, design, finite element analysis, and testing for all of these seals. It is a valuable reference for any vacuum system design. To evaluate the suitability of several types of metal seals for use in the SNS Linac and to determine the torque applied on the bolts, a series of vacuum leak rate tests on the metal seals have been completed at Los Alamos Laboratory. A copper plated flange, using the same type of delta seal that was used for testing with the stainless steel flange, has also been studied and tested. A vacuum seal is desired that requires significantly less loading than a standard ConFlat flange with a copper gasket for the coupling cavity assembly. To save the intersegment space the authors use thinner flanges in the design. The leak rate of the thin ConFlat flange with a copper gasket is a baseline for the vacuum test on all seals and thin flanges. A finite element analysis of a long coupling cavity flange with a copper delta seal has been performed in order to confirm the design of the long coupling cavity flange and the welded area of a cavity body with the flange. This analysis is also necessary to predict a potential deformation of the cavity under the combined force of atmospheric pressure and the seating load of the seal. Modeling of this assembly has been achieved using both HKS/Abaqus and COSMOS

  14. rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H- ion sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Y. W.; Fuja, R.; Goulding, R. H.; Hardek, T.; Lee, S.-W.; McCarthy, M. P.; Piller, M. C.; Shin, K.; Stockli, M. P.; Welton, R. F.

    2010-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering ˜38 mA H- beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier.

  15. rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H-ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoon W; Fuja, Raymond E; Goulding, Richard Howell; Hardek, Thomas W; Lee, Sung-Woo; McCarthy, Mike; Piller, Chip; Shin, Ki; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering 38 mA H beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride AlN plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier. 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Mechanical Engineering of the Linac for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Bultman, N.K.; Chen, Z.; Collier, M.; Erickson, J.L.; Guthrie, A.; Hunter, W.T.; Ilg, T.; Meyer, R.K.; Snodgrass, N.L.

    1999-03-29

    The linac for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project will accelerate an average current of 1 mA of H{sup {minus}} ions from 20 MeV to 1GeV for injection into an accumulator ring. The linac will be an intense source of H{sup {minus}} ions and as such requires advanced design techniques to meet project technical goals as well as to minimize costs. The DTL, CCDTL and CCL are 466m long and operate at 805 MHz with a maximum H{sup {minus}} input current of 28 mA and 7% rf duty factor. The Drift Tube Linac is a copper-plated steel structure using permanent magnetic quadrupoles. The Coupled-Cavity portions are brazed copper structures and use electromagnetic quads. RF losses in the copper are 80 MW, with total rf power supplied by 52 klystrons. Additionally, the linac is to be upgraded to the 2- and 4-MW beam power levels with no increase in duty factor. The authors give an overview of the linac mechanical engineering effort and discuss the special challenges and status of the effort.

  17. Superconducting Prototype Cavities for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Kneisel; John Brawley; Richard Bundy; Gianluigi Ciovati; Kurt Macha; Danny Machie; John Mammosser; Ron Sundelin; Larry Turlington; Katherine Wilson; J. Sekutowicz; D. Barni; C. Pagani; R. Parodi; P. Pierini; D. Schrage; M. Doleans; S.H. Kim; D. Mangra; P. Ylae-Oijala

    2001-06-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source project includes a superconducting linac section in the energy range from 192 MeV to 1000 MeV. For this energy range two types of cavities are needed with geometrical beta - values of beta = 0.61 and beta = 0.81. An aggressive cavity prototyping program is being pursued at Jlab, which calls for fabricating and testing of four beta = 0.61 cavities and two beta = 0.81 cavities. Both types consist of six cells made from high purity niobium and feature one HOM coupler of the TESLA type on each beam pipe and a port for a high power coaxial input coupler. Three of the four beta = 0.61 cavities will be used for a cryomodule test at the end of the year 2001. At this time two cavities of each type have been fabricated and the first tests on the beta = 0.61 cavity exceeded the design values for gradient and Q - value: Eacc = 10.3 MV/m and Q = 6.5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1K. This paper will describe the cavity design with respect to electrical and mechanical features, the fabrication efforts and the results obtained with the different cavities existing at the time of the conference.

  18. rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H- ion source.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y W; Fuja, R; Goulding, R H; Hardek, T; Lee, S-W; McCarthy, M P; Piller, M C; Shin, K; Stockli, M P; Welton, R F

    2010-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering approximately 38 mA H(-) beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier. PMID:20192394

  19. Assessment of radiation exposure for materials in the LANSCE Spallation Irradiation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    James, M. R.; Maloy, S. A.; Sommer, W. F. , Jr.; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Dry, D. E.; Ferguson, P. D.; Corzine, R. K.; Mueller, G. E.

    2001-01-01

    Materials samples were irradiated in the Los Alamos Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to provide data for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project on the changes in mechanical and physical properties of materials in a spallation target environment. The targets were configured to expose samples to a variety of radiation environments including high-energy protons, mixed protons and neutrons, and predominantly neutrons. The irradiation was driven by an 800 MeV 1 mA proton beam with a circular Gaussian shape of approximately 2{sigma} = 3.5 cm. Two irradiation campaigns were conducted in which samples were exposed for approximately six months and two months, respectively. At the end of this period, the samples were extracted and tested. Activation foils that had been placed in proximity to the materials samples were used to quantify the fluences in various locations. The STAYSL2 code was used to estimate the fluences by combining the activation foil data with calculated data from the LAHET Code System (LCS) and MCNPX. The exposure for each sample was determined from the estimated fluences using interpolation based on a mathematical fitting to the fluence results. The final results included displacement damage (dpa) and gas (H, He) production for each sample from the irradiation. Based on the activation foil analysis, samples from several locations in both irradiation campaigns were characterized. The radiation damage to each sample was highly dependent upon location and varied from 0.023 to 13 dpa and was accompanied by high levels of H and He production.

  20. Impact spallation processes on the Moon: A case study from the size and shape analysis of ejecta boulders and secondary craters of Censorinus crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, N.; Kumar, P. Senthil

    2016-01-01

    have subdued ejecta (rayless craters), while some possess bright-rayed ejecta (bright-rayed craters). The CSFD of rayless craters show a steep power-law slope with a b-value of -4.0, similar to the secondary craters produced by the impact of ejecta from primary craters. We therefore interpret the rayless craters as the secondary craters of Censorinus. On the other hand, the CSFD of bright-rayed craters have smaller power-law slope (b value -2.7) which is a characteristic of primary craters, and thus provide 3 Ma age for Censorinus crater. When the characteristics of Censorinus boulders are compared with the theoretical spallation models that are sensitive to the petrophysical properties of the target (lunar highland), the models generally agree with the Censorinus boulders. However, the observed shape and size characteristics of the Censorinus boulders are found to be more complex than the theoretical spallation models. The ejecta boulders suffered more complex fragmentation and asymmetric distribution in response to the oblique impact. The spallation models accounting oblique impacts have not yet been developed. Therefore, our Censorinus boulder observations can be used to develop and validate the new theoretical spallation models for the effects of oblique impacts.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of the influence of pressure and target-substrate distance on the sputtering process for metal and semiconductor layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouazza, Abdelkader; Settaouti, Abderrahmane

    2016-07-01

    The energy and the number of particles arriving at the substrate during physical vapor deposition (PVD) are in close relation with divers parameters. In this work, we present the influence of the distance between the target and substrate and the gas pressure in the sputtering process of deposited layers of metals (Cu, Al and Ag) and semiconductors (Ge, Te and Si) for substrate diameter of 40 cm and target diameter of 5 cm. The nascent sputter flux, the flux of the atoms and their energy arriving at the substrate have been simulated by Monte Carlo codes. A good agreement between previous works of other groups and our simulations for sputter pressures (0.3-1 Pa) and target-substrate distances (8-20 cm) is obtained.

  2. Design, status and first operations of the spallation neutron source polyphase resonant converter modulator system

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, W. A.; Apgar, S. E.; Baca, D. M.; Doss, James D.; Gonzales, J.; Gribble, R. F.; Hardek, T. W.; Lynch, M. T.; Rees, D. E.; Tallerico, P. J.; Trujillo, P. B.; Anderson, D. E.; Heidenreich, D. A.; Hicks, J. D.; Leontiev, V. N.

    2003-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a new 1.4 MW average power beam, 1 GeV accelerator being built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The accelerator requires 15 converter-modulator stations each providing between 9 and 11 MW pulses with up to a 1 .I MW average power. The converter-modulator can be described as a resonant 20 kHz polyphase boost inverter. Each converter modulator derives its buss voltage from a standard substation cast-core transformer. Each substation is followed by an SCR pre-regulator to accommodate voltage changes from no load to full load, in addition to providing a soft-start function. Energy storage is provided by self-clearing metallized hazy polypropylene traction capacitors. These capacitors do not fail short, but clear any internal anomaly. Three 'H-Bridge' IGBT transistor networks are used to generate the polyphase 20 kHz transformer primary drive waveforms. The 20 kHz drive waveforms are time-gated to generate the desired klystron pulse width. Pulse width modulation of the individual 20 lcHz pulses is utilized to provide regulated output waveforms with DSP based adaptive feedforward and feedback techniques. The boost transformer design utilizes nanocrystalline alloy that provides low core loss at design flux levels and switching frequencies. Capacitors are used on the transformer secondary networks to resonate the leakage inductance. The transformers are wound for a specific leakage inductance, not turns ratio. This design technique generates multiple secondary volts per turn as compared to the primary. With the appropriate tuning conditions, switching losses are minimized. The resonant topology has the added benefit of being deQed in a klystron fault condition, with little energy deposited in the arc. This obviates the need of crowbars or other related networks. A review of these design parameters, operational performance, production status, and OWL installation and performance to date will be presented.

  3. Radiation induced cavitation: A possible phenomenon in liquid targets?

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1998-07-01

    The proposed design of a new, short-pulse spallation neutron source includes a liquid mercury target irradiated with a 1 GeV proton beam. This paper explores the possibility that cavitation bubbles may be formed in the mercury and briefly discusses some design features that could avoid harmful effects should cavitation take place.

  4. The COHERENT Experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Steven Ray

    2015-09-30

    The COHERENT collaboration's primary objective is to measure coherent elastic neutrino- nucleus scattering (CEvNS) using the unique, high-quality source of tens-of-MeV neutrinos provided by the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In spite of its large cross section, the CEvNS process has never been observed, due to tiny energies of the resulting nuclear recoils which are out of reach for standard neutrino detectors. The measurement of CEvNS has now become feasible, thanks to the development of ultra-sensitive technology for rare decay and weakly-interacting massive particle (dark matter) searches. The CEvNS cross section is cleanly predicted in the standard model; hence its measurement provides a standard model test. It is relevant for supernova physics and supernova-neutrino detection, and enables validation of dark-matter detector background and detector-response models. In the long term, precision measurement of CEvNS will address questions of nuclear structure. COHERENT will deploy multiple detector technologies in a phased approach: a 14-kg CsI[Na] scintillating crystal, 15 kg of p-type point-contact germanium detectors, and 100 kg of liquid xenon in a two-phase time projection chamber. Following an extensive background measurement campaign, a location in the SNS basement has proven to be neutron-quiet and suitable for deployment of the COHERENT detector suite. The simultaneous deployment of the three COHERENT detector subsystems will test the N=2 dependence of the cross section and ensure an unambiguous discovery of CEvNS. This document describes concisely the COHERENT physics motivations, sensitivity and plans for measurements at the SNS to be accomplished on a four-year timescale.

  5. Superconducting Prototype Cavities for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2001-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source project includes a superconducting linac section in the energy range from 186 MeV to 1000 MeV. For this energy range two types of cavities are needed with geometrical {beta} values of {beta} = 0.61 and {beta} = 0.81. An aggressive cavity prototyping program is being pursued at Jefferson Lab, which calls for fabricating and testing four {beta} = 0.61 cavities and two {beta} = 0.81 cavities. Both types consist of six cells made from high purity niobium and feature one HOM coupler on each beam pipe and a port for a high power coaxial input coupler. Three of the four {beta} = 0.61 cavities will be used for a cryomodule test in early 2002. At this time four medium beta cavities and one high beta cavity have been completed at JLab. The first tests on the {beta} = 0.61 and {beta} = 0.81 exceeded the design values for gradient and Q value: E{sub acc} = 10.1 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1K for the {beta} = 0.61 and E{sub acc} = 12.3 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1 K for the {beta} = 0.81. One of the medium beta cavities has been equipped with an integrated helium vessel and measurements of the static Lorentz force detuning have been done and compared to the ''bare'' cavities. In addition two single cell cavities have been fabricated, equipped with welded-on HOM couplers. They are being used to evaluate the HOM couplers with respect to multipacting, fundamental mode rejection and HOM damping as far as possible in a single cell. This paper describes the cavity design with respect to electromagnetic and mechanical features, the fabrication efforts and the results obtained with the different cavities existing at the time of this workshop.

  6. Metal bioaccumulation in edible target tissues of mullet (Mugil liza) from a tropical bay in Southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hauser-Davis, Rachel Ann; Bordon, Isabella C A C; Oliveira, Terezinha F; Ziolli, Roberta Lourenço

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to investigate metal bioaccumulation in mullet (M. liza) from a tropical bay located in Southeastern Brazil, comparing a previously considered reference site to a known contaminated area of the bay, as well as to conduct human health risk assessments with regard to the consumption of this species. The metal concentrations were compared to the maximum residue level (MRL) in foods established by the different national and international regulatory agencies, and the Provisional Tolerable Daily Intake (PTDI) was determined and compared to reference values. Chromium (Cr), Zinc (Zn), Copper (Cu), Manganese (Mn), Nickel (Ni), Cadmium (Cd) and Lead (Pb) concentrations were determined in the gills, muscle and liver of 28 mullet by ICP-MS after acid digestion. Certain metals exceeded MRL guidelines established by different regulatory agencies, indicating human health risks associated to these metals. PTDI values, however, did not exceed corresponding metal values proposed by the World Health Organization. The metal concentrations found in the mullet samples indicate that the previously considered reference site is now showing signs of anthropogenic contamination. PMID:27259350

  7. Oxidative Recession, Sulfur Release, and Al203 Spallation for Y-Doped Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2001-01-01

    Second-order spallation phenomena have been noted for Y-doped Rene'N5 after long term oxidation at 1150 degrees C. The reason for this behavior has not been conclusively identified. A mass equivalence analysis has shown that the surface recession resulting from oxidation has the potential of releasing about 0.15 monolayer of sulfur for every 1 mg/sq cm of oxygen reacted for an alloy containing 5 ppmw of sulfur. This amount is significant in comparison to levels that have been shown to result in first-order spallation behavior for undoped alloys. Oxidative recession is therefore speculated to be a contributing source of sulfur and second-order spallation for Y-doped alloys.

  8. H{sup -} radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, R. F.; Gawne, K. R.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Roseberry, R. T.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Dudnikov, V. G.; Turvey, M. W.

    2012-02-15

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent {approx}38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of {approx}90%. H{sup -} beam pulses ({approx}1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, {approx}60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of {approx}0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of {approx}99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of {approx}75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to {approx}100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  9. Operational performance characteristics of the WISH detector array on the ISIS spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, D.; Khalyavin, D.; Manuel, P.; Raspino, D.; Rhodes, N.; Schooneveld, E.; Spill, E.

    2014-12-01

    The performance of the position sensitive neutron detector array of the WISH diffractometer is discussed. WISH (Wide angle In a Single Histogram) is one of the seven instruments currently available for users on the second target station (TS2) of the ISIS spallation neutron source, and is used mainly for magnetic studies of materials. WISH is instrumented with an array of 10 detector panels, covering an angular range of 320o, orientated in two semi-cylindrical annuli around a central sample position at a radius of 2.2m. In total the 10 detector panels are composed of 1520 3He based position sensitive detector tubes. Each tube has an active length of one metre, a diameter of 8mm and is filled with 3He at 15 bar. The specification for the WISH detectors included a neutron detection efficiency of 50% at a neutron wavelength of 1Å with good gamma rejection. A position resolution better than 8 mm FWHM along the length of the tubes was also required which has been met experimentally. Results obtained from the detector arrays showing pulse height and positional information both prior to and post installation are shown. The first 5 of the 10 detector panels have been operational since 2009, and comparable diffraction data from powder and single crystal samples taken from the remaining 5 panels (installation completed in 2013) shows that we have a detector array with a highly stable performance which is easily assembled and maintained. Finally some real user data is shown, highlighting the excellent quality of data attainable with this instrument.

  10. NON-DESTRUCTIVE TBC SPALLATION DETECTION BY A MICRO-INDENTATION METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Tannenbaum; B.S.-J. Kang; M.A. Alvin

    2010-06-18

    In this research, a load-based depth-sensing micro-indentation method for spallation detection and damage assessment of thermal barrier coating (TBC) materials is presented. A non-destructive multiple loading/partial unloading testing methodology was developed where in stiffness responses of TBC coupons subjected to various thermal cyclic loading conditions were analyzed to predict the spallation site and assess TBC degradation state. The measured stiffness responses at various thermal loading cycles were used to generate time-series color maps for correlation with accumulation of TBC residual stress states. The regions with higher stiffness responses can be linked to a rise in out-of-plane residual stress located near or at the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/thermally grown oxide (TGO) interface, which is ultimately responsible for initiating TBC spallation failure. A TBC thermal exposure testing plan was carried out where time-series cross-sectional microstructural analyses of damage accumulation and spallation failure associated with the evolution of bond coat/TGO/top coat composite (e.g. thickness, ratcheting, localized oxidations, etc.) of air plasma sprayed (APS) TBCs were evaluated and correlated to the measured stiffness responses at various thermal cycles. The results show that the load-based micro-indentation test methodology is capable of identifying the spallation site(s) before actual occurrence. This micro-indentation technique can be viewed as a viable non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique for determining as-manufactured and process-exposed TBCs. This technique also shows promise for the development of a portable instrument for on-line, in-situ spallation detection/prediction of industrial-size TBC turbine components.

  11. Isospin effects in a covariant transport approach to spallation reactions: Analysis of p+Fe and p+Pb reactions at 0.8,1.2, and 1.6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Waged, Khaled; Felemban, Nuha; Gaitanos, Theodoros; Ferini, Graziella; Toro, Massimo Di

    2010-01-15

    We have investigated the influence of different nonlinear relativistic mean-field models (NL, NL{rho}, and NL{rho}{delta}) on spallation neutrons for p+Fe and p+Pb reactions at 0.8,1.2, and 1.6 GeV by means of a relativistic Boltzmann Uehling Uhlenbeck (RBUU) approach plus a statistical multifragmentation (SM) decay model. We find that the 'evaporation shoulder', that is, the neutron energy spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV, almost for any emission angle is quite sensitive to the isospin part of the mean field. For the more neutron-rich Pb target the evaporation component can be directly related to the low-density behavior on the symmetry energy in the thermal expansion phase of the excited compound system. It turns out that the spallation data for the reactions under study are shown to be more consistent with RBUU+SM employing the NLrho effective Lagrangian.

  12. A time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source, BASIS

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, E.; Herwig, K. W.

    2011-08-15

    We describe the design and current performance of the backscattering silicon spectrometer (BASIS), a time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer built at the spallation neutron source (SNS) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). BASIS is the first silicon-based backscattering spectrometer installed at a spallation neutron source. In addition to high intensity, it offers a high-energy resolution of about 3.5 {mu}eV and a large and variable energy transfer range. These ensure an excellent overlap with the dynamic ranges accessible at other inelastic spectrometers at the SNS.

  13. Triple ion-beam studies of radiation damage effects in a 316LN austenitic alloy for a high power spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.H.; Rao, G.R.; Hunn, J.D.; Rice, P.M.; Lewis, M.B.; Cook, S.W.; Farrell, K.; Mansur, L.K.

    1997-09-01

    Austenitic 316LN alloy was ion-irradiated using the unique Triple Ion Beam Facility (TIF) at ORNL to investigate radiation damage effects relevant to spallation neutron sources. The TIF was used to simulate significant features of GeV proton irradiation effects in spallation neutron source target materials by producing displacement damage while simultaneously injecting helium and hydrogen at appropriately high gas/dpa ratios. Irradiations were carried out at 80, 200, and 350 C using 3.5 MeV Fe{sup ++}, 360 keV He{sup +}, and 180 keV H{sup +} to accumulate 50 dpa by Fe, 10,000 appm of He, and 50,000 appm of H. Irradiations were also carried out at 200 C in single and dual ion beam modes. The specific ion energies were chosen to maximize the damage and the gas accumulation at a depth of {approximately} 1 {micro}m. Variations in microstructure and hardness of irradiated specimens were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a nanoindentation technique, respectively. TEM investigation yielded varying damage defect microstructures, comprising black dots, faulted and unfaulted loops, and a high number density of fine bubbles (typically less than 1 nm in diameter). With increasing temperature, faulted loops had a tendency to unfault, and bubble microstructure changed from a bimodal size distribution to a unimodal distribution. Triple ion irradiations at the three temperatures resulted in similar increases in hardness of approximately a factor of two. Individually, Fe and He ions resulted in a similar magnitude of hardness increase, whereas H ions showed only a very small effect. The present study has yielded microstructural information relevant to spallation neutron source conditions and indicates that the most important concern may be radiation induced hardening and associated ductility loss.

  14. Superconducting Prototype Cavities for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati; P. Kneisel; K. Davis; K. Macha; J. Mammosser

    2002-06-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source project includes a superconducting linac section in the energy range from 186 MeV to 1000 MeV operating at a frequency of 805 MHz at 2.1 K. For this energy range two types of cavities are needed with geometrical Beta-values of Beta=0.61 and Beta=0.81. An aggressive cavity prototyping program is being pursued at JLab, which calls for fabricating and testing of four Beta=0.61 cavities and two Beta=0.81 cavities. Both types consist of six cells made from high purity niobium and feature one HOM coupler of the TESLA type on each beam pipe and a port for a high power coaxial input coupler. Three of the four Beta=0.61 cavities will be used for a cryomodule test in early 2002. At this time, four medium beta cavities and one high beta cavity have been completed and tested at JLab. In addition, the three medium beta cavities for the prototype cryomodule have been equipped with the integrated Ti-Helium vessel, successfully retested and will be assembled into a cavity string. Results from the cryo-module test should be available by the time of the conference. The tests on the Beta=0.61 cavity and the Beta=0.81 cavity exceeded the design values for gradient and Q - value: E{sub acc} =10.1 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1K for Beta=0.61 and E{sub acc} = 12.3 MV/m and Q=5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1K for Beta = 0.81. The medium beta cavities reached gradients between E{sub acc} = 15 MV/m and 21 MV/m. This paper will describe the test results obtained with the various cavities, some aspects of the HOM damping at cryogenic temperatures, results from microphonics and Lorentz force detuning tests and the cavity string assembly at the time of this workshop.

  15. Superconducting Prototype Cavities for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati, P. Kneisel , J. Brawley, R. Bundy, I. Campisi, K. Davis; K. Macha; D. Machie; J. Mammosser; S. Morgan; R. Sundelin; L. Turlington; K. Wilson; M. Doleans; S.H. Kim; D. Barni; C. Pagani; P. Pierini; K. Matsumoto; R. Mitchell; D. Schrage; R. Parodi; J. Sekutowicz; P. Ylae-Oijala

    2001-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source project includes a superconducting linac section in the energy range from 192 MeV to 1000 MeV, operating at a frequency of 805 MHz at 2.1 K. For this energy range two types of cavities are needed with geometrical beta - values of beta= 0.61 and beta= 0.81. An aggressive cavity prototyping program is being pursued at Jlab, which calls for fabricating and testing of four beta= 0.61 cavities and two beta= 0.81 cavities. Both types consist of six cells made from high purity niobium and feature one HOM coupler on each beam pipe and a port for a high power coaxial input coupler. Three of the four beta= 0.61 cavities will be used for a cryomodule test in early 2002. At this time four medium beta cavities and one high beta cavity have been completed at JLab. The first tests on the beta=0.61 cavity and the beta= 0.81 exceeded the design values for gradient and Q - value: E{sub acc} = 1 0.3 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1K for beta= 0.61 and E{sub acc} = 12.3 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1K for beta= 0.81. One of the medium beta cavities has been equipped with an integrated helium vessel and measurements of the static and dynamic Lorentz force detuning will be done and compared to the ''bare'' cavities. In addition two single cell cavities have been fabricated, equipped with welded-on HOM couplers. They are being used to evaluate the HOM couplers with respect to multipacting, fundamental mode rejection and HOM damping as far as possible in a single cell. This paper will describe the cavity design with respect to electrical and mechanical features, the fabrication efforts and the results obtained with the different cavities existing at the time of this workshop.

  16. Helium behavior in ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in spallation target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krsjak, Vladimir; Kuriplach, Jan; Shen, Tielong; Sabelova, Veronika; Sato, Koichi; Dai, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Two positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) techniques have been used for the investigation of helium behavior in STIP samples. Positron lifetime measurements and coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy have been employed together in a complex PAS characterization of RAFM steel irradiated in a mixed neutron-proton spectrum up to 20 dpa and 1800 appm He. Both techniques show an increase of the He-to-dpa ratio up to ∼10 dpa. At higher irradiation loads, the ratio is decreasing, which was attributed to the formation and growth of helium bubbles.

  17. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER AND OTHER LASER APPLICATIONS: Changes in the emission properties of metal targets during pulse-periodic laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konov, Vitalii I.; Pimenov, S. M.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Chapliev, N. I.

    1988-02-01

    A scanning electron microscope was used with a pulse-periodic CO2 laser to discover the laws governing the correlation of the modified microrelief of metal surfaces, subjected to the action of multiple laser pulses, with the emission of charged particles and the luminescence of the irradiated zone. It was established that the influence of sorption and laser-induced desorption on the emission signals may be manifested differently depending on the regime of current generation in the "target-vacuum chamber" circuit.

  18. Au25 cluster functionalized metal-organic nanostructures for magnetically targeted photodynamic/photothermal therapy triggered by single wavelength 808 nm near-infrared light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dan; Yang, Guixin; Gai, Shili; He, Fei; An, Guanghui; Dai, Yunlu; Lv, Ruichan; Yang, Piaoping

    2015-11-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) light-induced cancer therapy has gained considerable interest, but pure inorganic anti-cancer platforms usually suffer from degradation issues. Here, we designed metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) of Fe3O4/ZIF-8-Au25 (IZA) nanospheres through a green and economic procedure. The encapsulated Fe3O4 nanocrystals not only produce hyperthemal effects upon NIR light irradiation to effectively kill tumor cells, but also present targeting and MRI imaging capability. More importantly, the attached ultrasmall Au25(SR)18- clusters (about 2.5 nm) produce highly reactive singlet oxygen (1O2) to cause photodynamic effects through direct sensitization under NIR light irradiation. Furthermore, the Au25(SR)18- clusters also give a hand to the hyperthemal effect as photothermal fortifiers. This nanoplatform exhibits high biocompatibility and an enhanced synergistic therapeutic effect superior to any single therapy, as verified by in vitro and in vivo assay. This image-guided therapy based on a metal-organic framework may stimulate interest in developing other kinds of metal-organic materials with multifunctionality for tumor diagnosis and therapy.Near-infrared (NIR) light-induced cancer therapy has gained considerable interest, but pure inorganic anti-cancer platforms usually suffer from degradation issues. Here, we designed metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) of Fe3O4/ZIF-8-Au25 (IZA) nanospheres through a green and economic procedure. The encapsulated Fe3O4 nanocrystals not only produce hyperthemal effects upon NIR light irradiation to effectively kill tumor cells, but also present targeting and MRI imaging capability. More importantly, the attached ultrasmall Au25(SR)18- clusters (about 2.5 nm) produce highly reactive singlet oxygen (1O2) to cause photodynamic effects through direct sensitization under NIR light irradiation. Furthermore, the Au25(SR)18- clusters also give a hand to the hyperthemal effect as photothermal fortifiers. This nanoplatform exhibits high

  19. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, R.J.

    1984-10-10

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density (achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms) is described.

  20. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Roy J.

    1986-01-01

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms.

  1. Carbon Dots Embedded Magnetic Nanoparticles @Chitosan @Metal Organic Framework as a Nanoprobe for pH Sensitive Targeted Anticancer Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Chowdhuri, Angshuman Ray; Singh, Tanya; Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Recently, nanoscale metal organic frameworks (NMOFs) have been demonstrated as a promising carrier for drug delivery, as they possess many advantages like large surface area, high porosity, and tunable functionality. However, there are no reports about the functionalization of NMOFs, which combines cancer-targeted drug delivery/imaging, magnetic property, high drug loading content, and pH-sensitive drug release into one system. Existing formulations for integrating target molecules into NMOF are based on multistep synthetic processes. However, in this study, we report an approach that combines NMOF (IRMOF-3) synthesis and target molecule (Folic acid) encapsulation on the surface of chitosan modified magnetic nanoparticles in a single step. A noticeable feature of chitosan is control and pH responsive drug release for several days. More importantly, doxorubicin (DOX) was incorporated into magnetic NMOF formulation and showed high drug loading (1.63 g DOX g(-1) magnetic NMOFs). To demonstrate the optical imaging, carbon dots (CDs) are encapsulated into the synthesized magnetic NMOF, thereby endowing fluorescence features to the nanoparticles. These folate targeted magnetic NMOF possess more specific cellular internalization toward folate-overexpressed cancer (HeLa) cells in comparison to normal (L929) cells. PMID:27305490

  2. Target studies for surface muon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, F.; Desorgher, L.; Fuchs, A.; Hajdas, W.; Hodge, Z.; Kettle, P.-R.; Knecht, A.; Lüscher, R.; Papa, A.; Rutar, G.; Wohlmuther, M.

    2016-02-01

    Meson factories are powerful drivers of diverse physics programs. With beam powers already in the MW-regime attention has to be turned to target and beam line design to further significantly increase surface muon rates available for experiments. For this reason we have explored the possibility of using a neutron spallation target as a source of surface muons by performing detailed Geant4 simulations with pion production cross sections based on a parametrization of existing data. While the spallation target outperforms standard targets in the backward direction by more than a factor 7 it is not more efficient than standard targets viewed under 90°. Not surprisingly, the geometry of the target plays a large role in the generation of surface muons. Through careful optimization, a gain in surface muon rate of between 30% and 60% over the standard "box-like" target used at the Paul Scherrer Institute could be achieved by employing a rotated slab target. An additional 10% gain could also be possible by utilizing novel target materials such as, e.g., boron carbide.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of ablation and spallation of gold irradiated by femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaske, Brian; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; Inogamov, Nail; Oleynik, Ivan

    2010-03-01

    The dynamics of material response to irradiation of thin gold foils by a femtosecond laser pulse is examined by molecular dynamics simulations. The major physical phenomena include ablation - the removal of material from irradiated surface and spallation - the ejection of a thin layer of material from the rear of the film. In order to reproduce the physical processes that occur under experimental conditions, we simulated 1 μm thick foils containing up to 170,000,000 atoms. Such thick foils are also needed to prevent the ablation and spallation zones from overlapping. In this presentation, we discuss the major physics of laser ablation and spallation observed in MD simulations: heating of a narrow region beneath the surface of the foil, its transformation to a metastable stress-confined state, and the rapid decomposition of this state into a strong rarefaction and compression wave. At some critical absorbed laser fluence, the rarefaction wave results in nucleation and growth of voids leading to ablation of the frontal surface. At higher absorbed fluences, the compression wave causes rear-side spallation of crystalline gold. Quantitative data such as the absorbed fluence thresholds, crater depths, and cavitation strength of gold are obtained from simulation and compared to experimental data.

  4. Multimaterial lamination as a means of retarding penetration and spallation failures in plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibattista, J. D.; Humes, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental data are presented which show that hypervelocity impact spallation and penetration failures of a single solid aluminum plate and of a solid aluminum plate spaced a distance behind a Whipple meteor bumper may be retarded by replacing the solid aluminum plate with a laminated plate. Four sets of experiments were conducted. The first set of experiments was conducted with projectile mass and velocity held constant and with polycarbonate cylinders impacted into single plates of different construction. The second set of experiments was done with single plates of various construction and aluminum spherical projectiles of similar mass but different velocities. These two experiments showed that a laminated plate of aluminum and polycarbonate or aluminum and methyl methacrylate could prevent spallation and penetration failures with a lower areal density than either an all-aluminum laminated plate or a solid aluminum plate. The aluminum laminated plate was in turn superior to the solid aluminum plate in resisting spallation and penetration failures. In addition, through an example of 6061-T6 aluminum and methyl methacrylate, it is shown that a laminated structure ballistically superior to its parent materials may be built. The last two sets of experiments were conducted using bumper-protected main walls of solid aluminum and of laminated aluminum and polycarbonate. Again, under hypervelocity impact conditions, the laminated main walls were superior to the solid aluminum main walls in retarding spallation and penetration failures.

  5. BEAM-LOSS DRIVEN DESIGN OPTIMIZATION FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; CAMERON,P.; DANBY,G.; GARDNER,C.J.; JACKSON,J.; LEE,Y.Y.; LUDEWIG,H.; MALITSKY,N.; RAPARIA,D.; TSOUPAS,N.; WENG,W.T.; ZHANG,S.Y.

    1999-03-29

    This paper summarizes three-stage design optimization for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ring: linear machine design (lattice, aperture, injection, magnet field errors and misalignment), beam core manipulation (painting, space charge, instabilities, RF requirements), and beam halo consideration (collimation, envelope variation, e-p issues etc.).

  6. A facility for neutrino-nucleus cross-section measurements at the spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremenko, Yu.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the possibility of building a neutrino facility at the Spallation Neutron Source presently under construction at ORNL. At such a facility an extensive long-term program can be established to study neutrino nucleus cross-sections in the range of interest for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear theory.

  7. Effect of Substrate Thickness on Oxide Scale Spallation for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, the effect of the ferritic substrate's thickness on the delamination/spallation of the oxide scale was investigated experimentally and numerically. At the high-temperature oxidation environment of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), a combination of growth stress with thermal stresses may lead to scale delamination/buckling and eventual spallation during SOFC stack cooling, even leading to serious degradation of cell performance. The growth stress is induced by the growth of the oxide scale on the scale/substrate interface, and thermal stress is induced by a mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion between the oxide scale and the substrate. The numerical results show that the interfacial shear stresses, which are the driving force of scale delamination between the oxide scale and the ferritic substrate, increase with the growth of the oxide scale and also with the thickness of the ferritic substrate; i.e., the thick ferritic substrate can easily lead to scale delamination and spallation. Experimental observation confirmed the predicted results of the delamination and spallation of the oxide scale on the ferritic substrate.

  8. INFLUENCE OF MICROSTRUCTURAL ANISOTROPY ON THE SPALLATION OF 1080 EUTECTOID STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    G.T. GRAY; M.F. LOPEZ; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    While the influence of crystallographic texture on elastic and plastic constitutive response has seen extensive investigation in recent years, the influence of texture on the dynamic fracture of engineering materials remains less extensively explored. In particular, the influence of anisotropy, both textural and morphological, on the spallation behavior of materials remains poorly quantified. In this study, the spallation response of 1080-steel has been studied as a function of microstructural morphological anisotropy. In this study the influence of elongated MnS stringers, resident within a crystallographically isotropic eutectoid steel, on the spallation response of 1080 steel was investigated. That of a fully-pearlitic 1080 steel loaded to 5 GPa was found to be dominated by the heterogeneous nucleation of damage normal and orthogonal to the MnS stringers. Delamination between the matrix pearlitic microstructure and the MnS stringers was seen to correlate to a significantly lower pull-back signal during transverse loading than to that parallel to the stringer axis. The ''pull-back'' signals and post-spallation metallographic observations are discussed with reference to the influence of microstructural anisotropy on void nucleation and growth.

  9. Influence of microstructural anisotropy on the spallation of 1080 eutectoid steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, N. K.; Millett, J. C. F.; Lopez, M. F.; Vecchio, K. S.; Gray, G. T. , III

    2001-01-01

    While the influence of crystallographic texture on elastic and plastic constitutive response has seen extensive investigation in recent years, the influence of texture on the dynamic fracture of engineering materials remains less extensively explored. In particular, the influence of anisotropy, both textural and morphological, on the spallation behavior of materials remains poorly quantified. In this study, the spallation response of 1080-steel has been studied as a function of microstructural morphological anisotropy. In this study the influence of elongated MnS stringers, resident within a crystallographically isotropic eutectoid steel, on the spallation response of 1080 steel was investigated. That of a fully-pearlitic 1080 steel loaded to 5 GPa was found to be dominated by the heterogeneous nucleation of damage normal and orthogonal to the MnS stringers. Delamination between the matrix pearlitic microstructure and the MnS stringers was seen to correlate to a significantly lower pull-back signal during transverse loading than to that parallel to the stringer axis. The 'pull-back' signals and post-spallation metallographic observations are discussed with reference to the influence of microstructural anisotropy on void nucleation and growth.

  10. Characteristics of high-energy neutrons estimated using the radioactive spallation products of Au at the 500-MeV neutron irradiation facility of KENS.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hiroshi; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi; Nakao, Noriaki; Wang, Qingbin; Toyoda, Akihiro; Kawai, Masayoshi; Aze, Takahiro; Fujimura, Masatsugu

    2005-01-01

    We carried out a shielding experiment of high-energy neutrons, generated from a tungsten target bombarded with primary 500-MeV protons at KENS, which penetrated through a concrete shield in the zero-degree direction. We propose a new method to evaluate the spectra of high-energy neutrons ranging from 8 to 500 MeV. Au foils were set in a concrete shield, and the reaction rates for 13 radionuclides produced by the spallation reactions on the Au targets were measured by radiochemical techniques. The experimental results were compared with those obtained by the MARS14 Monte-Carlo code. A good agreement (between them) was found for energies beyond 100 MeV. The profile of the neutron spectrum, ranging from 8 to 500 MeV, does not depend on the thickness of the concrete shield. PMID:16604584

  11. Utilization of Monte Carlo Calculations in Radiation Transport Analyses to Support the Design of the U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.

    2000-10-23

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has given the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project approval to begin Title I design of the proposed facility to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and construction is scheduled to commence in FY01 . The SNS initially will consist of an accelerator system capable of delivering an {approximately}0.5 microsecond pulse of 1 GeV protons, at a 60 Hz frequency, with 1 MW of beam power, into a single target station. The SNS will eventually be upgraded to a 2 MW facility with two target stations (a 60 Hz station and a 10 Hz station). The radiation transport analysis, which includes the neutronic, shielding, activation, and safety analyses, is critical to the design of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed SNS, and the Monte Carlo method is the cornerstone of the radiation transport analyses.

  12. Optimizing EMI transmitter and receiver configurations to enhance detection and identification of small and deep metallic targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Juan Pablo; Barrowes, Benjamin; Bijamov, Alex; O'Neill, Kevin; Shamatava, Irma; Steinhurst, Daniel A.; Shubitidze, Fridon

    2012-06-01

    Current electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensors of the kind used to discriminate buried unexploded orndance (UXO) can detect targets down to a depth limited by the geometric size of the transmitter (Tx) coils, the amplitudes of the transmitting currents, and the noise floor of the receivers (Rx). The last two factors are not independent: for example, one cannot detect a deeply buried target simply by increasing the amplitude of the Tx current, since this also increases the noise and thus does not improve the SNR. The problem could in principle be overcome by increasing the size of the Tx coils and thus their moment. Current multi-transmitter instruments such as the TEMTADS sensor array can be electronically tweaked to provide a big Tx moment: they can be modified to transmit signals from two, three or more Tx coils simultaneously. We investigate the possibility of enhancing the deep-target detection capability of TEMTADS by exploring different combinations of Tx coils. We model different multi-Tx combinations within TEMTADS using a full-3D EMI solver based on the method of auxiliary sources (MAS).We determine the feasibility of honing these combinations for enhanced detection and discrimination of deep targets. We investigate how to improve the spatial resolution and focusing properties of the primary magnetic field by electronically adjusting the currents of the transmitters. We apply our findings to data taken at different UXO live sites.

  13. Computational study of the generation of crystal defects in a bcc metal target irradiated by short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhibin; Johnson, Robert A.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2008-06-01

    The generation of crystal defects in a Cr target irradiated by a short, 200 fs, laser pulse is investigated in computer simulations performed with a computational model that combines the classical molecular dynamics method with a continuum description of the laser excitation of conduction band electrons, electron-phonon coupling, and electron heat conduction. Interatomic interactions are described by the embedded atom method (EAM) potential with a parametrization designed for Cr. The potential is tested by comparing the properties of the EAM Cr material with experimental data and predictions of density functional theory calculations. The simulations are performed at laser fluences close to the threshold for surface melting. Fast temperature variation and strong thermoelastic stresses produced by the laser pulse are causing surface melting and epitaxial resolidification, transient appearance of a high density of stacking faults along the {110} planes, and generation of a large number of point defects (vacancies and self-interstitials). The stacking faults appear as a result of internal shifts in the crystal undergoing a rapid uniaxial expansion in the direction normal to the irradiated surface. The stacking faults are unstable and disappear shortly after the laser-induced tensile stress wave leaves the surface region of the target. Thermally activated generation of vacancy-interstitial pairs during the initial temperature spike and quick escape of highly mobile self-interstitials to the melting front or the free surface of the target, along with the formation of vacancies at the solid-liquid interface during the fast resolidification process, result in a high density of vacancies, on the order of 10-3 per lattice site, created in the surface region of the target. The strong supersaturation of vacancies can be related to the incubation effect in multipulse laser ablation/damage and should play an important role in mixing/alloying of multicomponent or composite

  14. A technical and economic evaluation of thermal spallation drilling technology

    SciTech Connect

    1984-07-10

    Thermal spallation of rock may be defined as a type of progressive rock failure caused by the creation of thermal stresses induced by a sudden application of heat from a high temperature source. This technology is applicable to only certain types of hard rock, such as dolomite, taconite, and granite. In 1981 and 1982, the deepest holes ever drilled by this process were drilled in granite to depths of 1086 feet and 425 feet respectively. Penetration rates at the bottom of the deeper hole reached a maximum of 100 ft/hr. Because of these high rates, considerable interest was generated concerning the use of this technology for the drilling of deep holes. Based on this interest, this study was undertaken to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of the technology in general. This methodology has been used for blasthole drilling, the cutting of chambers at the bottom of drilled holes, and the cutting of narrow grooves in rock. However, because of the very high temperatures generated by the flame jet and the application of the technology to only certain types of rock, other areas of use have been very limited. In this report, evaluation of the technology was performed by conceptually designing and costing a theoretical flame jet drilling rig. The design process reviews a number of different concepts of the various components needed, and then chooses those pieces of equipment that best suit the needs of the system and have the best chance of being properly developed. The final concept consists of a flexible umbilical hose containing several internal hoses for carrying the various required fluids. An evaluation of this system was then made to determine its operational characteristics. The drilling capabilities and the economics of this rig were then compared to a conventional rotary drilling rig by theoretically drilling two holes of approximately 15,000 feet in depth. This comparison was done by use of a spread sheet type computer program. The results of this study

  15. Accelerator-based production of the (99m)Tc-(186)Re diagnostic-therapeutic pair using metal disulfide targets (MoS2, WS2, OsS2).

    PubMed

    Gott, Matthew D; Hayes, Connor R; Wycoff, Donald E; Balkin, Ethan R; Smith, Bennett E; Pauzauskie, Peter J; Fassbender, Michael E; Cutler, Cathy S; Ketring, Alan R; Wilbur, D Scott; Jurisson, Silvia S

    2016-08-01

    Novel, natural abundance metal disulfide targets were irradiated for 1h with a 10µA proton beam in a small, medical cyclotron. Osmium disulfide was synthesized by simple distillation and precipitation methods while MoS2 and WS2 were commercially available. The targets dissolved under mild conditions and were analyzed by γ-spectroscopy. Production rates and potential applications are discussed, including target recovery and recycling schemes for OsS2 and WS2. PMID:27236832

  16. Metal-enhanced fluorescence-based core-shell Ag@SiO₂ nanoflares for affinity biosensing via target-induced structure switching of aptamer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Qian, Yunxia; Wang, Lihui; Ma, Keke; Zhang, Yaodong

    2014-02-12

    One of the great challenges in metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) technology is the achievement of distance modulation with nanometer accuracy between the fluorophore and metal surface to obtain maximum enhancement. We propose an MEF-based core-shell Ag@SiO2 nanoflare for distance control via the thickness of silica shell with cooperation of DNA hybridization. The nanoflare contains a 50 nm spherical silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) core, a 8 nm silica shell, and cyanine (Cy5)-labeled aptamer hybridized with a complementary DNA (cDNA) immobilized onto the shell surface. The formation of the Cy5-labeled aptamer/cDNA duplex on the Ag@SiO2 NP surface results in the confinement of Cy5 to the shell surface and an increase in the fluorescence of Cy5 with a 32-fold enhancement factor in bulk solution (signal-on). In the presence of affinity-binding targets, the Cy5-labeled aptamers confined onto the Ag@SiO2 NP surface dissociate from their cDNA into the solution because of structure switching. The target-induced release of aptamer leads to a reduction in the enhanced fluorescence signal of the labeled Cy5 moiety (signal-off). Thus, the nanoflare can be used as a sensor for target recognition. Using adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) aptamer, detection of ATP has a linear response from 0 to 0.5 mM and a detection limit of 8 μM. With various types of DNA probes immobilized onto the core-shell Ag@SiO2 NPs, the MEF-based nanoflare has provided an effective platform for the detection and quantification of a broad range of analytes, such as mRNA regulation and detection, cell sorting, and gene profiling. PMID:24480015

  17. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; et al

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. But, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elasticmore » and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. Furthermore, to demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample ( 100 mg).« less

  18. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A. I.; Egami, T.; Kelton, K. F.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. But, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. Furthermore, to demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample ( 100 mg).

  19. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A. I.; Egami, T.; Kelton, K. F.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (˜100 mg).

  20. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source.

    PubMed

    Mauro, N A; Vogt, A J; Derendorf, K S; Johnson, M L; Rustan, G E; Quirinale, D G; Kreyssig, A; Lokshin, K A; Neuefeind, J C; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A I; Egami, T; Kelton, K F

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (∼100 mg). PMID:26827330

  1. In-situ structural integrity evaluation for high-power pulsed spallation neutron source - Effects of cavitation damage on structural vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Tao; Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    A double-wall structure mercury target will be installed at the high-power pulsed spallation neutron source in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Cavitation damage on the inner wall is an important factor governing the lifetime of the target-vessel. To monitor the structural integrity of the target vessel, displacement velocity at a point on the outer surface of the target vessel is measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The measured signals can be used for evaluating the damage inside the target vessel because of cyclic loading and cavitation bubble collapse caused by pulsed-beam induced pressure waves. The wavelet differential analysis (WDA) was applied to reveal the effects of the damage on vibrational cycling. To reduce the effects of noise superimposed on the vibration signals on the WDA results, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), statistical methods were applied. Results from laboratory experiments, numerical simulation results with random noise added, and target vessel field data were analyzed by the WDA and the statistical methods. The analyses demonstrated that the established in-situ diagnostic technique can be used to effectively evaluate the structural response of the target vessel.

  2. LIQUID TARGET

    DOEpatents

    Martin, M.D.; Salsig, W.W. Jr.

    1959-01-13

    A liquid handling apparatus is presented for a liquid material which is to be irradiated. The apparatus consists essentially of a reservoir for the liquid, a target element, a drain tank and a drain lock chamber. The target is in the form of a looped tube, the upper end of which is adapted to be disposed in a beam of atomic particles. The lower end of the target tube is in communication with the liquid in the reservoir and a means is provided to continuously circulate the liquid material to be irradiated through the target tube. Means to heat the reservoir tank is provided in the event that a metal is to be used as the target material. The apparatus is provided with suitable valves and shielding to provide maximum safety in operation.

  3. High-pressure beamline (PLANET) at the spallation neutron source, J-PARC (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagi, H.; Hattori, T.; Arima, H.; Utsumi, W. S.; Komatsu, K.; Nagai, T.; Yagi, T.

    2009-12-01

    Material and Life Science experimental Facility (MLF) of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) will be one of the most powerful spallation neutron facilities in the world. The pulsed neutron source with a liquid Hg target is designed to be running at 25 Hz with a power of 1 MW. We have started the construction of the powder diffractometer dedicated to high-pressure experiments (PLANET) on BL-11. PLANET aims to study structures of hydrogen-bearing materials including dense hydrous minerals of the Earth’s deep interior, magmas and light element liquids. The instrument will realize diffraction and radiography experiments for powder and liquid/glass samples at high pressures up to 20 GPa and 2000 K using a large sized multi-anvil hydraulic press that can apply forces of ˜1500 ton. The instrument views a decoupled liquid H2 moderator with a cross section of 100 × 100 mm2. The primary and secondary fight paths are 25 m and 1.5 m, respectively. The 11.5-m-long supermirror guide with elliptical shape starts at a distance of 11.5 m from the moderator. Design of elliptical geometry is optimized by means of incorporating several different grade mirrors and linear approximation with planar guide in order to save cost for production without degradation of the intensity performance. The guide has a rectangular cross-section and consists of four walls coated with supermirror material. Sample is placed at 2 m from the guide exit. The 90° detectors will be installed at 1.5 m from the sample position. For the powder diffraction measurements using a multi-anvil press, an incident neutron beam passes through the vertical anvil gaps and irradiates the sample in the pressure medium. Diffracted neutrons go through the other anvil gaps at 90° direction. Half inch 3He linear position sensitive detectors with 600 mm length will be arranged horizontally and form these detector banks, which cover the scattering angle of 79° ≤ 2θ ≤ 101° and -35° ≤ Φ ≤ +35°. The

  4. Overcoming thermal shock problems in liquid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Kim, S.H.

    2000-07-01

    Short-pulse accelerator-driven neutron sources such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) employ high-energy proton beam energy deposition in heavy metal (such as mercury) over microsecond time frames. The interaction of the energetic proton beam with the mercury target leads to very high heating rates in the target. Although the resulting temperature rise is relatively small (a few degrees centigrade), the rate of temperature rise is enormous ({approximately}10{sup 7} C/s) during the very brief beam pulse ({approximately}0.58 {micro}s). The resulting thermal shock-induced compression of the mercury leads to the production of large-amplitude pressure waves in the mercury that interact with the walls of the mercury target and the bulk flow field. Safety-related operational concerns exist in two main areas: (a) possible target enclosure failure from impact of thermal shocks on the wall due to its direct heating from the proton beam and the loads transferred from the mercury compression waves and (b) impact of the compression-cum-rarefaction wave-induced effects such as cavitation bubble emanation and fluid surging. Preliminary stress evaluations indicate stress levels approaching yielding conditions and beyond in select regions of the target. Also, the induction of cavitation (which could assist in attenuation) can also release gases that may accumulate at undesirable locations and impair heat transfer. Fortunately, powerful approaches also exist that if properly applied can conclusively mitigate thermal shock issues. The general philosophy being proposed for addressing thermal shock-related issues for SNS is intelligently designing their way out. To succeed in such a philosophy requires knowledge of one or more key phenomena or mechanisms that provide conclusive and compelling benefits that if properly harnessed into the design will automatically address several issues. The general approach is based on use of wave energy attenuation via use of appropriately

  5. Impact ejection, spallation, and the origin of meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    A model for the ejection of material from an impact crater which links ejection velocity, fragment size, and shock pressure through a simplified stress-wave propagation and reflection scheme is presented. It is shown that a small amount of material (0.01 to 0.05 projectile mass) may be ejected at high velocity without suffering petrologically detectable shock pressures. The largest fragments ejected at any velocity are spalls that originate from the target planet's surface. The spall size is proportional to the radius of the primary impactor and the target tensile strength and inversely proportional to ejection velocity. The shock level in the spalls is low, typically half of the dynamic crushing strength of the rock. The model also predicts the aspect ratio of the spalled fragments, the angle of ejection, and the sizes and shock level of other fragments originating deeper in the target. Comparison with observational and experimental data shows generally good agreement.

  6. Impact spallation experiments - Fracture patterns and spall velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanskey, Carol A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    The spall velocities produced by nine experimental impacts of 1 to 6.5 km/sec into San Marcos gabbro targets, using projectiles of Fe, Al, Pb, and basalt of various sizes, have been measured in conjunction with fragment-velocity high-speed filmings of the events. A detailed comparison is made between measured spall velocities and those predicted by the model of Melosh (1984), with a view to the compatibility of small-scale results and large planetary impacts. Attention is also given to the patterns of internal fracture generated by impact within the targets.

  7. Impact spallation experiments - Fracture patterns and spall velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Polanskey, C.A.; Ahrens, T.J. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena )

    1990-09-01

    The spall velocities produced by nine experimental impacts of 1 to 6.5 km/sec into San Marcos gabbro targets, using projectiles of Fe, Al, Pb, and basalt of various sizes, have been measured in conjunction with fragment-velocity high-speed filmings of the events. A detailed comparison is made between measured spall velocities and those predicted by the model of Melosh (1984), with a view to the compatibility of small-scale results and large planetary impacts. Attention is also given to the patterns of internal fracture generated by impact within the targets. 29 refs.

  8. Behaviour of metals at ultra-high strain rate by using femtosecond laser shockwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuq-Lelandais, J.-P.; Boustie, M.; Berthe, L.; De Rességuier, T.

    2012-08-01

    The mechanical behavior of materials under extreme conditions can be investigated by using laser driven shocks. Actually, femtosecond (fs) technologies allow to reach strong pressures over a very fast duration. This work is dedicated to characterize metals behavior in this ultra-short mode, (aluminum, tantalum), leading to an extreme dynamic solicitation in the target (>107s-1). The study includes the validation of experimental results obtained on the LULI 100TW facility by comparison with numerical model. Three modeling steps are considered. First, we characterize the pressure loading resulting from the fs laser-matter interaction, different from what happens in the classical nanosecond regime. Then, the shock wave propagation is observed through the target and particularly its pressure decay, strong in this regime. The elastic-plastic influence on the shock attenuation is discussed, particularly for tantalum which has a high elastic limit. Dynamic damage appears with spallation. Experimentally, spallation is characterized by VISAR measurements and post-test observations. Shots with different thicknesses have been carried out to determine the damage properties in function of strain rate. We show in this work that a simple instantaneous rupture criterion is not sufficient to reproduce the damage induced in the sample. Only the Kanel model, which includes damage kinetics, is able to reproduce experimental data (VISAR measurements, spall thickness). A generalization of this model to any strain rate can be performed by confronting these results to other shock generators data (ns laser driven shocks, plate impacts). One remarkable result is that every Kanel parameters follows a power law with strain rate in dynamic regime (105 to 108s-1) for both aluminum and tantalum.

  9. A long-wavelength target station for the SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, J. M.

    2006-11-01

    A long-wavelength target station (LWTS) [J. M. Carpenter, T. E. Mason, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 545 (2001) 1; Technical concepts for a long-wavelength target station for the spallation neutron source, Argonne National Laboratory report ORNL/SNS-TM-2001/163, November, 2002; < http://www.pns.anl.gov/related/>] will complement the high-power target station (HPTS) facility of the spallation neutron source. The LWTS will at least double the overall scientific capability of the SNS and provide up to an order of magnitude performance gain over the initial HPTS. The fully equipped SNS has the prospect to offer capabilities for neutron-scattering studies that are unparalleled in the world. We describe the principal features of the LWTS concept and illustrate some neutron-scattering instruments suited to exploit the unique features of the LWTS.

  10. Nitrogen in chondritic metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, K. J.; Marti, K.; Kim, Y.

    2005-02-01

    We report new nitrogen isotopic data in metals of H-, L- and one LL -chondrites, with N abundances in the range of ˜0.3 to 3.3 ppm and half of these <1 ppm. Nitrogen isotopic signatures in metals with low indigenous N concentrations are modified by cosmic ray spallation components; corrections are required to determine the indigenous N signatures. The metals of type 4 and 5 show uniform indigenous nitrogen (δ 15N = -6.8 ± 0.5 ‰) and confirm a reported possible genetic association of chondritic metal with metal in IIE and IVA iron meteorites. Distinct isotopic signatures are observed in two metal samples of the Portales Valley (H6) meteorite which both are inconsistent with signatures in H4 and H5 chondrites, but possibly reveal a record of impact-induced melting and metamorphism on the parent asteroid. Anomalous nitrogen signatures in metals of type 3 chondrites, on the other hand, may reflect residues of surviving presolar isotopic signatures.

  11. Meditating metal coenhanced fluorescence and SERS around gold nanoaggregates in nanosphere as bifunctional biosensor for multiple DNA targets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Wu, Peiyi

    2013-06-26

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are very attractive candidate nanoparticles in biological assay because of their high chemical stabilities, high homogeneities, good biocompatibilities, and low toxicities. However, molecular beacon assays via encapsulating the combined fluorescence or surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals of reporters and Au NPs in nanobarcodes particles usually suffer from fluorescence quenching or weak Raman enhancement when Au NPs are employed (especially with size smaller than 15 nm). Herein, we present a new design of simultaneously realizing metal-enhanced fluorescence and coenhanced surface-enhanced Raman scattering by facilely embedding Ag nanoparticle into the shell of two kinds of Au nanoaggregate (5 and 10 nm), meanwhile, fluorophore is located between the silver core and gold nanoparticle layers and the distance among them is adjusted by SiO2 spacer (Ag@first SiO2 spacer@FiTC+SiO2@second SiO2 spacer@Au nanoaggregate). In this architecture, Ag nanoparticle not only is utilized as an efficient fluorescence enhancer to overcome the common fluorescence quenching around Au nanoaggregates but also behaves like a mirror. Thus, incident light that passes through the SERS-active Au nanoaggregate and the intervening dielectric layer of SiO2 could be reflected multiply from the surface of Ag nanoparticle and coupled with the light at the nanogap between the Au nanoaggregates to further amplify Raman intensity. This results in enhancement factors for fluorescence and SERS ~1.6-fold and more than 300-fold higher than the control samples without silver core under identical experimental conditions, respectively. Moreover, fluorophore and SERS reporters are assembled onto different layers of the concentric hybrid microsphere, resulting in a feasible fabrication protocol when a large number of agents need to be involved into the dual-mode nanobarcodes. A proof-of-concept chip-based DNA sandwich hybridization assay using genetically modified

  12. Some technical methods to study the roughness of some surfaces generated into metallic targets by laser micro piercing in determined conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokor, Corina; Rau, Ileana B.; Isarie, Ilie V.; Isarie, Claudiu; Kappel, Wilhelm; Mortoiu, Doina; Ticusan, Stelian; Itu, Sorin

    2012-09-01

    Dimensional machining realized by laser beam and/or another concentrated energy sources in metallic targets, is based on melting, vaporisation and expulsion of some quantities of metal as a function of radiation parameters and material nature. In some cases as: drawing plates used for the synthetic wires, fine fuel filters or fuel injectors, for the internal surface of the hole, is prefered more roughness in comparison of the holes, realized by classic piercing. For instance, to realize some textures of simple synthetic fibres or in combination with natural fibres we want to have not a smooth surface, but a rough one because in this way, the texture will be more resistant in the places exposed at different efforts. Concerning the fuel injectors we prefere the same: a rough surface, in order to ensure a better pulverized jet of the fuel. In the same time, when the hole is machined with a concentrated energy: L.B.M., E.B.M. a.s.o. the injector has a longer life. It is not very easy to study the roughness resulted by L.B.M. in a less than 0.2 mm diameter hole. To avoid errors of investigation, authors have experienced on pieces of carbide and alloyed steel which were bored on separate adjacent plans, and in this way, the bored surfaces were not affected by a cutting operation after boring, for such small diameters.

  13. Heavy metal and trace element bioaccumulation in target tissues of four edible fish species from the Danube River (Serbia).

    PubMed

    Subotić, Srđan; Spasić, Slađana; Višnjić-Jeftić, Zeljka; Hegediš, Aleksandar; Krpo-Ćetković, Jasmina; Mićković, Branislav; Skorić, Stefan; Lenhardt, Mirjana

    2013-12-01

    Pikeperch (Sander lucioperca), European catfish (Silurus glanis), burbot (Lota lota), and common carp (Cyprinus carpio) were collected from the Danube River (Belgrade section, Serbia), and samples of liver, muscle, and gills were analyzed for Al, As, B, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, and Zn using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) to highlight the importance of species and tissue selection in monitoring research, contaminant studies, and human health research. The Kruskal-Wallis test revealed significant differences between fish species in regard to metal levels in liver, muscle, and gills. The principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that the studied fish species could be grouped on the basis of the level of analyzed elements in liver and gills. The Mann-Whitney test showed two subsets (one comprising two piscivorous species, pikeperch and catfish, and the other, two polyphagous species, burbot and carp) in regard to Cr and Hg levels in liver (higher levels in piscivorous species), as well as B, Fe, and Hg in gills (B and Fe with higher levels in polyphagous and Hg in piscivorous species), and As in muscle (higher levels in polyphagous species). Carp had distinctly higher levels of Cd, Cu, and Zn in liver in comparison to other three species. None of the elements exceeded the maximum acceptable concentrations (MAC). However, since Hg levels are close to the prescribed MAC levels, the consumption of these fishes can be potentially hazardous for humans. PMID:24054751

  14. Potential human health risks from toxic metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and organochlorine pesticides via canned fish consumption: estimation of target hazard quotients.

    PubMed

    El Morsy, Fadia A M; El-Sadaawy, Manal M; Ahdy, Hoda H H; Abdel-Fattah, Laila M; El-Sikaily, Amany M; Khaled, Azza; Tayel, Fathi M T

    2013-01-01

    Canned fish (tuna and sardine) of different geographical regions were collected randomly from supermarkets and were analyzed for heavy metal contents (Hg, Cd and Pb) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and pesticides. Canned fish samples (two brands of sardines, six brands of tuna) that were purchased from Egyptian cities between 2009 and 2010, represent four countries (Morocco, Republic of Yemen, Indonesia and Thailand). Health risks on humans via dietary intake of seafood were assessed by the target hazard quotients (THQs), potential non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic effects. The contents of trace metals in canned tuna and canned sardines were found as: 0.149-0.218 μg/g for Cd; 0.312-0.937 μg/g for Pb and 0.053-0.022 μg/g for Hg. Canned sardines fluctuated between 0.55 and 1.82, 1.08 and 1.64, 11.91 and 26.24 ng/g for total HCHs, Total cyclodienes and DDTs respectively while the corresponding concentrations in canned tuna were 0.24-1.85, 0.24-1‥85 and 6.56-49.73 ng/g, respectively. Total PCBs fluctuated between 21.75 and 55.10 for canned sardines and 8.56-208.11 ng/g for canned tuna. On the other hand the total PAHs fluctuated between 0.006-9.775 and 1.556-2.686 ng/g for tuna and sardines. From the human health point of view, there is no adverse health effect for both PAHs and heavy metals content on consumers. PMID:23802155

  15. Recent developments in zinc oxide target chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, R.C.; Taylor, W.A.; Phillips, D.R.; Jamriska, D.J. Sr.; Garcia, J.B.

    1994-04-01

    Zinc oxide targets irradiated with high energy protons at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) contain a number of radioactive spallation products in quantities large enough to warrant recovery. This paper describes methods for recovering {sup 7}Be, {sup 46}Sc, and {sup 48}V from such targets and offers suggestions on possible ways to recover additional isotopes. The proposed methods are based on traditional precipitation and ion exchange techniques, are readily adaptable to hot cell use, and produce no hazardous waste components. The products are obtained in moderate to high yields and have excellent radiopurity.

  16. Crater morphology in sandstone targets: The MEMIN impact parameter study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufresne, Anja; Poelchau, Michael H.; Kenkmann, Thomas; Deutsch, Alex; Hoerth, Tobias; SchńFer, Frank; Thoma, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Hypervelocity (2.5-7.8 km s-1) impact experiments into sandstone were carried out to investigate the influence of projectile velocity and mass, target pore space saturation, target-projectile density contrast, and target layer orientation on crater size and shape. Crater size increases with increasing projectile velocity and mass as well as with increasing target pore space saturation. Craters in water-saturated porous targets are generally shallower and larger in volume and in diameter than craters from equivalent impacts into dry porous sandstone. Morphometric analyses of the resultant craters, 5-40 cm in diameter, reveal features that are characteristic of all of our experimental craters regardless of impact conditions (I) a large central depression within a fragile, light-colored central part, and (II) an outer spallation zone with areas of incipient spallation. Two different mechanical processes, grain fragmentation and intergranular tensile fracturing, are recorded within these crater morphologies. Zone (I) approximates the shape of the transient crater formed by material compression, displacement, comminution, and excavation flow, whereas (II) is the result of intergranular tensile fracturing and spallation. The transient crater dimensions are reconstructed by fitting quadric parabolas to crater profiles from digital elevation models. The dimensions of this transient and of the final crater show the same trends: both increase in volume with increasing impact energy, and with increasing water saturation of the target pore space. The relative size of the transient crater (in percent of the final crater volume) decreases with increasing projectile mass and velocity, signifying a greater contribution of spallation on the final crater size when projectile mass and velocity are increased.

  17. Negative pressures and spallation in water drops subjected to nanosecond shock waves

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stan, Claudiu A.; Willmott, Philip R.; Stone, Howard A.; Koglin, Jason E.; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Gumerlock, Karl L.; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G.; et al

    2016-05-16

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below –100 MPamore » were reached in the drops. As a result, we model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures.« less

  18. Spallation Model for the Titanium-Rich Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Ouyed, Amir; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2011-10-07

    Titanium-rich subluminous supernovae are rare and challenge current SN nucleosynthesis models. We present a model in which ejecta from a standard supernova is impacted by a second explosion of the neutron star (a quark nova), resulting in spallation reactions that lead to {sup 56}Ni destruction and {sup 44}Ti creation under the right conditions. Basic calculations of the spallation products shows that a delay between the two explosions of {approx}5 days reproduces the observed abundance of {sup 44}Ti in Cas A and explains its low luminosity as a result of the destruction of {sup 56}Ni. Our results could have important implications for light curves of subluminous as well as superluminous supernovae.

  19. A neutron resonance capture analysis experimental station at the ISIS spallation source.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, Antonino; Gorini, Giuseppe; Festa, Giulia; Reali, Enzo; Grazzi, Francesco; Schooneveld, Erik M

    2010-09-01

    Neutron resonance capture analysis (NRCA) is a nuclear technique that is used to determine the elemental composition of materials and artifacts (e.g., bronze objects) of archaeological interest. NRCA experiments are mostly performed at the GELINA facility in Belgium, a pulsed neutron source operating with an electron linear accelerator. Very intense fluxes of epithermal neutrons are also provided by spallation neutron sources, such as the ISIS spallation neutron source in the United Kingdom. In the present study, the suitability of the Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) beam line for NRCA measurements is assessed using a compact (n, γ) resonance detector made of a Yttrium-Aluminum-Perovskite (YAP) scintillation crystal coupled with a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readout. The measurements provided a qualitative recognition of the composition of the standard sample, a lower limit for the sensitivity for NRCA for almost-in-traces elements, and an estimation of the relative isotopic concentration in the sample. PMID:20828445

  20. Spallation model for the titanium-rich supernova remnant cassiopeia A.

    PubMed

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Ouyed, Amir; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2011-10-01

    Titanium-rich subluminous supernovae are rare and challenge current SN nucleosynthesis models. We present a model in which ejecta from a standard supernova is impacted by a second explosion of the neutron star (a quark nova), resulting in spallation reactions that lead to (56)Ni destruction and (44)Ti creation under the right conditions. Basic calculations of the spallation products shows that a delay between the two explosions of ∼5  days reproduces the observed abundance of (44)Ti in Cas A and explains its low luminosity as a result of the destruction of (56)Ni. Our results could have important implications for light curves of subluminous as well as superluminous supernovae. PMID:22107282

  1. Negative Pressures and Spallation in Water Drops Subjected to Nanosecond Shock Waves.

    PubMed

    Stan, Claudiu A; Willmott, Philip R; Stone, Howard A; Koglin, Jason E; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L; Robinson, Joseph S; Gumerlock, Karl L; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G; Boutet, Sébastien; Guillet, Serge A H; Curtis, Robin H; Vetter, Sharon L; Loos, Henrik; Turner, James L; Decker, Franz-Josef

    2016-06-01

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below -100 MPa were reached in the drops. We model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures. PMID:27182751

  2. The possible use of a spallation neutron source for neutron capture therapy with epithermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Grusell, E.; Conde, H.; Larsson, B.; Roennqvist, T.; Sornsuntisook, O.; Crawford, J.; Reist, H.; Dahl, B.; Sjoestrand, N.G.; Russel, G. . Dept. of Radiation Sciences; Paul Scherrer Inst. , Villigen; Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Goeteborg . Dept. of Reactor Physics; Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1989-01-01

    Spallation is induced in a heavy material by 72 MeV protons. The hereby produced neutrons with essentially an evaporation spectrum with a peak energy of less than 2 MeV are moderated in two steps, first in iron, and then in carbon. Results from neutron fluence measurements in a perspex phantom placed close to the moderator are presented. Monte Carlo calculations of neutron fluence in a water phantom are also presented under some chosen configurations of spallation source and moderator. The calculations and measurements show a good agreement and also show that useful thermal neutron fluences are attainable in the depth of the brain, at proton currents of less than 0.5 mA. 3 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Measurement of Recoil Losses and Ranges for Spallation Products Produced in Proton Interactions with Al, Si, Mg at 200 and 500 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    Cosmic rays interact with extraterrestrial materials to produce a variety of spallation products. If these cosmogenic nuclides are produced within an inclusion in such material, then an important consideration is the loss of the product nuclei, which recoil out of the inclusion. Of course, at the same time, some atoms of the product nuclei under study may be knocked into the inclusion from the surrounding material, which is likely to have a different composition to that of the inclusion [1]. For example, Ne-21 would be produced in presolar grains, such as SiC, when irradiated in interstellar space. However, to calculate a presolar age, one needs to know how much 21Ne is retained in the grain. For small grains, the recoil losses might be large [2, 3] To study this effect under laboratory conditions, recoil measurements were made using protons with energies from 66 - 1600 MeV on Si, Al and Ba targets [3, 4, 5].

  4. Fundamental neutron physics beamline at the spallation neutron source at ORNL

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fomin, N.; Greene, G. L.; Allen, R. R.; Cianciolo, V.; Crawford, C.; Tito, T. M.; Huffman, P. R.; Iverson, E. B.; Mahurin, R.; Snow, W. M.

    2014-11-04

    In this paper, we describe the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline (FnPB) facility located at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The FnPB was designed for the conduct of experiments that investigate scientific issues in nuclear physics, particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology using a pulsed slow neutron beam. Finally, we present a detailed description of the design philosophy, beamline components, and measured fluxes of the polychromatic and monochromatic beams.

  5. Spallation backgrounds in Super-Kamiokande are made in muon-induced showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shirley Weishi; Beacom, John F.

    2015-05-01

    Crucial questions about solar and supernova neutrinos remain unanswered. Super-Kamiokande has the exposure needed for progress, but detector backgrounds are a limiting factor. A leading component is the beta decays of isotopes produced by cosmic-ray muons and their secondaries, which initiate nuclear spallation reactions. Cuts of events after and surrounding muon tracks reduce this spallation decay background by ≃ 90 % (at a cost of ≃ 20 % deadtime), but its rate at 6-18 MeV is still dominant. A better way to cut this background was suggested in a Super-Kamiokande paper by Bays et al. [Phys. Rev. D 85, 052007 (2012)] on a search for the diffuse supernova neutrino background. They found that spallation decays above 16 MeV were preceded near the same location by a peak in the apparent Cherenkov light profile from the muon; a more aggressive cut was applied to a limited section of the muon track, leading to decreased background without increased deadtime. We put their empirical discovery on a firm theoretical foundation. We show that almost all spallation decay isotopes are produced by muon-induced showers and that these showers are rare enough and energetic enough to be identifiable. This is the first such demonstration for any detector. We detail how the physics of showers explains the peak in the muon Cherenkov light profile and other Super-K observations. Our results provide a physical basis for practical improvements in background rejection that will benefit multiple studies. For solar neutrinos, in particular, it should be possible to dramatically reduce backgrounds at energies as low as 6 MeV.

  6. Coherent Scattering Investigations at the Spallation Neutron Source: a Snowmass White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Akimov, D.; Bernstein, A.; BarbeauP.,; Barton, P. J.; Bolozdynya, A.; Cabrera-Palmer, B.; Cavanna, F.; Cianciolo, Vince; Collar, J.; Cooper, R. J.; Dean, D. J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Etenko, A.; Fields, N.; Foxe, M.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fomin, N.; Gallmeier, F.; Garishvili, I.; Gerling, M.; Green, M.; Greene, Geoffrey; Hatzikoutelis, A.; Henning, Reyco; Hix, R.; Hogan, D.; Hornback, D.; Jovanovic, I.; Hossbach, T.; Iverson, Erik B; Klein, S. R.; Khromov, A.; Link, J.; Louis, W.; Lu, W.; Mauger, C.; Marleau, P.; Markoff, D.; Martin, R. D.; Mueller, Paul Edward; Newby, J.; Orrell, John L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Penttila, Seppo; Patton, K.; Poon, A. W.; Radford, David C; Reyna, D.; Ray, H.; Scholberg, K.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Tayloe, R.; Vetter, K.; Virtue, C.; Wilkerson, J.; Yoo, J.; Yu, Chang-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure that is beneficial for background rejection. In this white paper, we describe how the SNS source can be used for a measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS), and the physics reach of different phases of such an experimental program (CSI: Coherent Scattering Investigations at the SNS).

  7. RESULTS OF BACKGROUND SUBTRACTION TECHNIQUES ON THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM LOSS MONITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Pogge, James R; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2010-01-01

    Recent improvements to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam loss monitor (BLM) designs have been made with the goal of significantly reducing background noise. This paper outlines this effort and analyzes the results. The significance of this noise reduction is the ability to use the BLM sensors [1], [2], [3] distributed throughout the SNS accelerator as a method to monitor activation of components as well as monitor beam losses.

  8. The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer MaNDi at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, Leighton; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Frost, Matthew J.; He, Junhong; Weiss, Kevin L.; McFeeters, Hana; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Langan, Paul; Iverson, Erik B.

    2015-07-18

    The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer (MaNDi) is located on beamline 11B of the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Moreover, the instrument is a neutron time-of-flight wavelength-resolved Laue diffractometer optimized to collect diffraction data from single crystals. Finally, the instrument has been designed to provide flexibility in several instrumental parameters, such as beam divergence and wavelength bandwidth, to allow data collection from a range of macromolecular systems.

  9. The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer MaNDi at the Spallation Neutron Source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Coates, Leighton; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Frost, Matthew J.; He, Junhong; Weiss, Kevin L.; McFeeters, Hana; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Langan, Paul; Iverson, Erik B.

    2015-07-18

    The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer (MaNDi) is located on beamline 11B of the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Moreover, the instrument is a neutron time-of-flight wavelength-resolved Laue diffractometer optimized to collect diffraction data from single crystals. Finally, the instrument has been designed to provide flexibility in several instrumental parameters, such as beam divergence and wavelength bandwidth, to allow data collection from a range of macromolecular systems.

  10. A bifunctional poly(ethylene glycol) silane immobilized on metallic oxide-based nanoparticles for conjugation with cell targeting agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, Nathan J.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Zhang, Miqin

    2004-06-16

    A trifluoroethylester-terminal poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) silane was synthesized and self-assembled on iron oxide nanoparticles. The nanoparticle system thus prepared has the flexibility to conjugate with cell targeting agents having either carboxylic and amine terminal groups for a number of biomedical applications, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and controlled drug delivery. The trifluoroethylester silane was synthesized by modifying a PEG diacid to form the corresponding bistrifluoroethylester (TFEE), followed by a reaction with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS). The APS coupled with PEG chains confers the stability of PEG self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and increases the PEG packing density on nanoparticles by establishing hydrogen bonding between the carbonyl and amine groups present within the monolayer structure. The success of the synthesis of the PEG TEFE silane was confirmed with 1H NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The conjugating flexibility of the PEG TEFE was demonstrated with folic acid having carboxylic acid groups and amine terminal groups respectively and confirmed by FTIR. TEM analysis showed the dispersion of nanoparticles before and after they were coated with PEG and folic acid.

  11. Ring energy and current considerations for spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, L.N.

    1994-04-01

    The most desirable energy E{sub o} of protons from the synchrotron and thus beam current {bar I} to produced a given beam power P{sub B} involves a balanced consideration of neutron production capability, accelerator beam stability, user requirements, and cost considerations. The present solution consists of two 3.6-GeV rings with a 600-MeV Linac injector, a compromise between conflicting factors of cost and technical concern. The authors believe that the design is a conservative one. They could increase the beam energy and/or the repetition rate and thereby decrease the requirement for the number of protons N{sub o} in the ring which in the present design is an extrapolation of about a factor of 7 from existing ring intensities. However, the specified ring acceptance appears quite adequate to contain the required 1.45 10{sup 14} protons/ring and the resulting loss in the target window and target are reasonable. The beam power and current are indeed modest in terms of window and target integrity compared to the 200 MW, 200mA 1-GeV design for the APT. The two-ring approach also offers several practical advantages -- the project is stageable in the sense that only one ring may be required initially to achieve P{sub B} = 2.5 MW power on the target with subsequent expansion to 5 MW with addition of the second ring. Two rings also provide additional reliability in the sense that the user program need not be interrupted by failure of one ring.

  12. Delayed Alumina Scale Spallation on Rene'n5+y: Moisture Effects and Acoustic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    2001-01-01

    The single crystal superalloy Rene'N5 (with or without Y-doping and hydrogen annealing) was cyclically oxidized at 1150 C for 1000 hours. After considerable scale growth (>= 500 hours), even the adherent alumina scales formed on Y-doped samples exhibited delayed interfacial spallation during subsequent water immersion tests, performed up to one year after oxidation. Spallation was characterized by weight loss, the amount of spalled area, and acoustic emission response. Hydrogen annealing (prior to oxidation) reduced spallation both before and after immersion, but without measurably reducing the bulk sulfur content of the Y-doped alloys. The duration and frequency of sequential, co-located acoustic emission events implied an interfacial crack growth rate at least 10(exp -3) m/s, but possibly higher than 10(exp 2) m/s. This is much greater than classic moisture-assisted slow crack growth rates in bulk alumina (10(exp -6) to 10(exp -3) m/s), which may still have occurred undetected by acoustic emission. An alternative failure sequence is proposed: an incubation process for preferential moisture ingress leads to a local decrease in interfacial toughness, thus allowing fast fracture driven by stored strain energy.

  13. SPACS: A semi-empirical parameterization for isotopic spallation cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Kelić-Heil, A.

    2014-12-01

    A new semi-empirical parameterization for residue cross sections in spallation reactions is presented. The prescription named SPACS, for spallation cross sections, permits calculating the fragment production in proton- and neutron-induced collisions with light up to heavy non-fissile partners from the Fermi regime to ultra-relativistic energies. The model is fully analytical, based on a new parameterization of the mass yields, accounting for the dependence on bombarding energy. The formalism for the isobaric distribution consists of a commonly used functional form, borrowed from the empirical parameterization of fragmentation cross sections EPAX, with the observed suited adjustments for spallation, and extended to the charge-pickup channel. Structural and even-odd staggering related to the last stage of the primary-residue deexcitation process is additionally explicitly introduced with a new prescription. Calculations are benchmarked with recent data collected at GSI, Darmstadt as well as with previous measurements employing various techniques. The dependences observed experimentally on collision energy, reaction-partner mass, and proton-neutron asymmetry are well described. A fast analytical parameterization, such as SPACS, can be relevant to be implemented in complex simulations as used for practical issues at nuclear facilities and plants. Its predictive power also makes it useful for cross-section estimates in astrophysics and biophysics.

  14. NON-DESTRUCTIVE THERMAL BARRIER COATING SPALLATION PREDICTION BY A LOADBASED MICRO-INDENTATION TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Tannenbaum; K. Lee; B. S.-J. Kang; M.A. Alvin

    2010-11-18

    Currently, the durability and life cycle of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) applied to gas turbine blades and combustor components are limiting the maximum temperature and subsequent efficiency at which gas turbine engines operate. The development of new materials, coating technologies and evaluation techniques is required if enhanced efficiency is to be achieved. Of the current ceramic coating materials used in gas turbine engines, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is most prevalent, its low thermal conductivity, high thermal expansion coefficient and outstanding mechanical strength make it ideal for use in TBC systems. However, residual stresses caused by coefficients of thermal expansion mismatches within the TBC system and unstable thermally grown oxides are considered the primary causes for its premature and erratic spallation failure. Through finite element simulations, it is shown that the residual stresses generated within the thermally grown oxide (TGO), bond coat (BC), YSZ and their interfaces create slight variations in indentation unloading surface stiffness response prior to spallation failure. In this research, seven air plasma sprayed and one electron beam physical vapor deposition yttria partially stabilized zirconia TBCs were subjected to isothermal and cyclic loadings at 1100°C. The associated coating degradation was evaluated using a non-destructive multiple partial unloading micro-indentation procedure. The results show that the proposed non-destructive micro-indentation evaluation technique can be an effective and specimenindependent TBC failure prediction tool capable of determining the location of initial spallation failure prior to its actual occurrence.

  15. Dislocation-kinetic analysis of FCC and BCC crystal spallation under shock-wave loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malygin, G. A.; Ogarkov, S. L.; Andriyash, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    Within the dislocation-kinetic model of the formation and propagation of shock waves in crystals under their intense shock-wave loading, the crystal spallation mechanism at micro- and macrolevels has been discussed taking into account published empirical data. It has been shown that the spallation time t f for Cu, Ni, α-Fe, and Ta crystals in the time interval of 10-6-10-9 s at the macroscopic level changes with variations in the wave pressure σ as , where = is the plastic strain rate according to the Swegle-Grady relation; K f , K σ, and ɛ f = K f K σ ≈ 3-5% are the pressure-independent spallation coefficients and strain, respectively; and E is the Young's modulus. At the microlevel, the dislocation-kinetic calculation of plastic zones around pore nuclei as stress concentrators and plastic strain localization regions at the shock wave front has been performed. It has been shown that the pore coalescence and spall fracture formation result from the superposition of shear stresses and plastic deformations in interpore spacings when the latter decrease to a size of the order of two pore sizes.

  16. An investigation into spallation of titanium alloy using plate impact experiments and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, P.; Cullis, I.; Bardilas, A.; Cogar, J.; Proud, W. G.; Hammond, R. I.

    2003-09-01

    Spallation studies have proved invaluable in determining the spall strengths of these materials, which are then used for various assessment and design purposes. However, there are still many uncertainties regarding the spallation process, particlllarly in alloys, due to the difficulty in developing predictive constitutive and failure models for these materials. One difficulty is that the simulation results depend as much on the constitutive and fracture behaviour as the numerical treatment, particularly post failure. The purpose of this paper is to isolate these effects by using very well controlled data for Ti6Al4Vn alloy under a range of impact scenarios using VISAR. These experiments have been simulated using the Lagrangian hydrocode DYNA and the Eulerian hydrocode CTH. The study renforces the view that the simulation of uniaxial spall signais, represents a significant challenge for the constitutive and fracture models, as well as the post failure numerical treatment within the hydrocode. The results of the simulations are discussed in the wider context of validation of constitutive and fracture models and the lack of real understanding concerning the spallation processes in these alloys.

  17. Preparation and testing of corrosion and spallation-resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, John

    2012-09-30

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project is designed to determine if plating APMT, a specific highly oxidation-resistant oxide dispersion-strengthened FeCrAl alloy made by Kanthal, onto nickel-based superalloy turbine parts is a viable method for substantially improving the lifetimes and maximum use temperatures of the parts. The method for joining the APMT plate to the superalloys is called evaporative metal bonding. It involves placing a thin foil of zinc (Zn) between the plate and the superalloy, clamping them together, and heating in an atmosphere-controlled furnace. Upon heating, the Zn melts and dissolves the oxide skins of the alloys at the bond line, allowing the two alloys to diffuse into each other. The Zn then diffuses through the alloys and evaporates from their surfaces. Laboratory testing has shown that the diffusion rate of Zn through the FeCrAl alloy is much faster than through the nickel superalloys. This means that the FeCrAl will serve as a sink for the Zn bonding alloy during the evaporative metal bonding process. Also, the testing has shown that the Zn diffusion mechanism is bulk diffusion, and not intergranular. This is a surprise. However, it means that quantification of the Zn diffusivities in these samples will be significantly simpler than would have been the case if grain boundary diffusion dominated. In addition to the laboratory testing, gas impinger and particulate samples are being collected from a combustor firing syngas and natural gas to determine what types of microcontaminants may reach a turbine firing syngas. The syngas is created in one of two different pilot-scale pressurized coal gasifiers. The initial analysis of the impinger solutions was for standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 29 determination of hazardous metals and did not include major element analysis. When syngas is fired, the amount of Mn in the combustor gas increases substantially. Halogens (Br2 and Cl2) and hydrogen

  18. Remotely Operated Equipment for Post Irradiation Examination of the SNS Target Vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Adam J; Graves, Van B; Dayton, Michael J; Riemer, Bernie

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source produces neutrons by accelerating protons into flowing mercury contained inside a stainless steel target vessel. During facility operation the target vessel is degraded by a combination of high-energy neutrons, the proton beam, and cavitation-induced corrosion. The degradation is primarily concentrated at the nose of the target vessel, where the proton beam passes through. Currently, the Spallation Neutron Source has replaced three target vessels and is operating the fourth. To minimize the operational costs of manufacturing and disposing of target vessels, efforts are underway to increase the operational lifetimes of the target vessels by conducting post irradiation examinations of spent vessels. This examination involves remotely removing multiple coupons from the nose of the target vessel using a single piece of equipment, called the Nose Sampling Cutter, installed inside the Spallation Neutron Source s hot cell. The Cutter produces circular coupons approximately 2 inches in diameter using a carbide-tipped hole saw. The nose of the target vessel consists of four layers of material, and the Nose Sampling Cutter is capable of cutting through the layers in a single stroke. This remote operation has been successfully completed twice. In addition to the Nose Sampling Cutter, a large reciprocation saw capable of removing a sizable section of the nose of the target vessel has been constructed and tested, but never implemented. To support this large reciprocation saw other equipment has also been designed. The details of the Nose Sampling Cutter, reciprocation saw, and associated equipment are discussed.

  19. Comparative study of the matrix effect in Cl analysis with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in a pellet or in a dried solution layer on a metallic target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lijuan; Niu, Sheng; Khan, Abdul Qayyum; Yuan, Shuai; Yu, Jin; Zeng, Heping

    2016-04-01

    Chlorine content brought by salt in a composite powder was determined when the sample was prepared in pellet or first dissolved into solution and then dropped on the surface of a pure metallic target. The purpose is to address the matrix effect when the mixture powders of different kinds of mineral salt are used, and to compare the influence of the matrix effect for two kinds of sample preparation. Three types of powder mixture, NaCl + KBr, NaCl + MgSO4, and NaCl + Na2CO3, were then first prepared with well controlled proportion of salt (NaCl) and mineral salt powder. On one hand, pellets were prepared for laser ablation. On the other hand, mixture powder was dissolved in deionized water for analysis with surface-assisted laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of solution by dropping it on the surface of a pure aluminum target. Calibration curves were established for the pellets and the solutions, respectively. The slopes of these curves provided an assessment of the matrix effect related to the different mineral salt matrix and different forms of the sample preparation. The similar responses from chlorine for the solution samples showed absence of matrix effect for analysis with the surface-assisted solution analysis configuration. This result was further confirmed by the consistence of the measured temperatures and the electron densities of the produced plasmas. In contrast, the slopes of the chlorine calibration curves exhibited significant variation for different pellet samples corresponding to different powder mixtures, which is an indication of matrix effect in the LIBS analysis of the pellet samples.

  20. Final Report on MEGAPIE Target Irradiation and Post-Irradiation Examination

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, Dai

    2015-06-30

    Megawatt pilot experiment (MEGAPIE) was successfully performed in 2006. One of the important goals of MEGAPIE is to understand the behaviour of structural materials of the target components exposed to high fluxes of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons in flowing LBE (liquid lead-bismuth eutectic) environment by conducting post-irradiation examination (PIE). The PIE includes four major parts: non-destructive test, radiochemical analysis of production and distribution of radionuclides produced by spallation reaction in LBE, analysis of LBE corrosion effects on structural materials, T91 and SS 316L steels, and mechanical testing of the T91 and SS 316L steels irradiated in the lower part of the target. The non-destructive test (NDT) including visual inspection and ultrasonic measurement was performed in the proton beam window area of the T91 calotte of the LBE container, the most intensively irradiated part of the MEGAPIE target. The visual inspection showed no visible failure and the ultrasonic measurement demonstrated no detectable change in thickness in the beam window area. Gamma mapping was also performed in the proton beam window area of the AlMg3 safety-container. The gamma mapping results were used to evaluate the accumulated proton fluence distribution profile, the input data for determining irradiation parameters. Radiochemical analysis of radionuclides produced by spallation reaction in LBE is to improve the understanding of the production and distribution of radionuclides in the target. The results demonstrate that the radionuclides of noble metals, 207Bi, 194Hg/Au are rather homogeneously distributed within the target, while radionuclides of electropositive elements are found to be deposited on the steel-LBE interface. The corrosion effect of LBE on the structural components under intensive irradiation was investigated by metallography. The results show that no evident corrosion damages. However, unexpected deep