Science.gov

Sample records for metal sulphate hydrates

  1. Magnetic Properties of Sediments from IODP Expedition 311 - Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrates: Records of Fossil Sulphate Methane Interface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enkin, R. J.; Baker, J.; Esteban, L.; Mullin, A. J.; Paterson, B.; Hamilton, T. S.; Michael, R.

    2006-12-01

    interpret type-B samples to hold iron sulphides produced diagenetically from iron oxides within the sediments at the sulphate-methane interface. We hypothesize that the two magnetic behaviors record a stratigraphic and geochemical interplay between the sedimentation rate and changes in methane flux, sulphate reduction and the gas hydrate stability field with time.

  2. Anaerobic sulphate-reducing microbial process using UASB reactor for heavy metals decontamination.

    PubMed

    de Lima, A C; Gonçalves, M M; Granato, M; Leite, S G

    2001-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the possibility of using sewage as an organic substrate for the growth of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) and to acclimatise anaerobic sludge to produce sulphide from sulphate reduction, with a view to metal precipitation. The experiments were carried out in a continuous bench-scale bioreactor (13 1 UASB reactor) operated with hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 11 and 19 hours. The feed solution used was composed of the liquid part of the sewage (organic matter) supplemented with nickel sulphate and sodium sulphate. The results showed that it was possible to acclimatise anaerobic sludge for production of sulphide by sulphate reduction. A relation between the available COD and the concentration of sulphate reduced by SRB was observed. High nickel removal efficiency (96%) was obtained during the whole operation (320 days). However, the process required very strict control of the organic load available (sewage) in the solution and, if necessary, the addition of a complementary organic carbon source, in order to maintain a constant level of metal removal. The SRB were not affected by the HRT values studied and were installed and maintained in the system; however, granular sludge was not observed. The micrographs confirmed the presence of iron and nickel sulphides and also a mixed bacterial culture in the anaerobic sludge. The EDS spectrum of the sludge showed that nickel was retained in the sludge predominantly as a nickel sulphide. PMID:11346283

  3. Metal halogen battery system with multiple outlet nozzle for hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkman, Jr., Harry K.

    1983-06-21

    A metal halogen battery system, including at least one cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode contacted by aqueous electrolyte containing the material of said metal and halogen, store means whereby halogen hydrate is formed and stored as part of an aqueous material, means for circulating electrolyte through the cell and to the store means, and conduit means for transmitting halogen gas formed in the cell to a hydrate former whereby the hydrate is formed in association with the store means, said store means being constructed in the form of a container which includes a filter means, said filter means being inoperative to separate the hydrate formed from the electrolyte, said system having, a hydrate former pump means associated with the store means and being operative to intermix halogen gas with aqueous electrolyte to form halogen hydrate, said hydrate former means including, multiple outlet nozzle means connected with the outlet side of said pump means and being operative to minimize plugging, said nozzle means being comprised of at least one divider means which is generally perpendicular to the rotational axes of gears within the pump means, said divider means acting to divide the flow from the pump means into multiple outlet flow paths.

  4. Metal precipitation in an ethanol-fed, fixed-bed sulphate-reducing bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kousi, Pavlina; Remoundaki, Emmanouela; Hatzikioseyian, Artin; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne; Joulian, Catherine; Kousteni, Vassiliki; Tsezos, Marios

    2011-05-30

    A batch upflow fixed-bed sulphate-reducing bioreactor has been set up and monitored for the treatment of synthetic solutions containing divalent iron (100mg/L and 200mg/L), zinc (100mg/L and 200mg/L), copper (100mg/L and 200mg/L), nickel (100mg/L and 200mg/L) and sulphate (1700 mg/L and 2130 mg/L) at initial pH 3-3.5, using ethanol as the sole electron donor. The reactor has been operated at the theoretical stoichiometric ethanol/sulphate ratio. Complete oxidation of ethanol has been achieved through complete oxidation of the intermediately, microbially produced acetate. This is mainly attributed to the presence of Desulfobacter postgatei species which dominated the sulphate-reducing community in the reactor. The reduction of sulphate was limited to about 85%. Quantitative precipitation of the soluble metal ions has been achieved. XRD and SEM-EDS analyses performed on samples of the produced sludge showed poorly crystalline phases of marcasite, covellite and wurtzite as well as several mixed metal sulphides. PMID:21316850

  5. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  8. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  10. Hydrate-based heavy metal separation from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongchen; Dong, Hongsheng; Yang, Lei; Yang, Mingjun; Li, Yanghui; Ling, Zheng; Zhao, Jiafei

    2016-02-01

    A novel hydrate-based method is proposed for separating heavy metal ions from aqueous solution. We report the first batch of experiments and removal characteristics in this paper, the effectiveness and feasibility of which are verified by Raman spectroscopy analysis and cross-experiment. 88.01-90.82% of removal efficiencies for Cr3+, Cu2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+ were obtained. Further study showed that higher R141b-effluent volume ratio contributed to higher enrichment factor and yield of dissociated water, while lower R141b-effluent volume ratio resulted in higher removal efficiency. This study provides insights into low-energy, intensive treatment of wastewater.

  11. Hydrate-based heavy metal separation from aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yongchen; Dong, Hongsheng; Yang, Lei; Yang, Mingjun; Li, Yanghui; Ling, Zheng; Zhao, Jiafei

    2016-01-01

    A novel hydrate-based method is proposed for separating heavy metal ions from aqueous solution. We report the first batch of experiments and removal characteristics in this paper, the effectiveness and feasibility of which are verified by Raman spectroscopy analysis and cross-experiment. 88.01–90.82% of removal efficiencies for Cr3+, Cu2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+ were obtained. Further study showed that higher R141b–effluent volume ratio contributed to higher enrichment factor and yield of dissociated water, while lower R141b–effluent volume ratio resulted in higher removal efficiency. This study provides insights into low-energy, intensive treatment of wastewater. PMID:26887357

  12. Metal pollution of estuarine sediments caused by leaching of acid sulphate soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordmyr, Linda; Åström, Mats; Peltola, Pasi

    2008-01-01

    This study tracks changes in metal distribution in estuarine sediments as a result of leakage from acid sulphate (AS) soil landscapes in the Boreal Zone (Finland). The main objective was to identify the impact of these nasty soils on sediment geochemistry in a biologically sensitive and shallow brackish-water estuary. In order to do this four sediment cores were sampled in a profile extending seawards from the mouth of the Vörå River, which is one of the most heavily AS soil-impacted rivers in Finland and Europe. Two of the cores were rather deep (2.5 m and 4.0 m) and the others were shallow (0.4 m and 0.8 m). The results showed that an appreciable amount of aluminium (Al), cobalt (Co), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) were elevated in the surface and sub-surface of the sampled bottom sediments compared to the deeper sediment background levels. These metals are all known to be abundantly leached from the AS soils. At the site approximately 4 km away from the river mouth, the concentrations of Cd, Co, Mn, Ni and Zn were elevated 5-100 times as compared to the background levels and showed an intriguing cyclic pattern, most likely reflecting seasonal leaching dynamics in the AS soil landscapes. In contrast, metals that are not abundantly leached from AS soils, i.e. chromium (Cr), iron (Fe) and vanadium (V) had consistently low concentrations throughout all sediment cores. The elevated metal concentrations in the top layers of the sediments in the estuary are alarming. The continuous land uplift of the region combined with the episodic rapid declines in pH may result in short and long term extensive release of metals. This, in turn, may have significant effects on the trace-metal contents in the Gulf of Bothnia and the entire Baltic Sea.

  13. Hydrated lime for metals immobilization and explosives transformation: Treatability study.

    PubMed

    Martin, W Andy; Larson, S L; Nestler, C C; Fabian, G; O'Connor, G; Felt, D R

    2012-05-15

    Fragmentation grenades contain Composition B (RDX and TNT) within a steel shell casing. There is the potential for off-site migration of high explosives and metals from hand grenade training ranges by transport in surface water and subsurface transport in leachate. This treatability study used bench-scale columns and mesocosm-scale laboratory lysimeters to investigate the potential of hydrated lime as a soil amendment for in situ remediation of explosives and metals stabilization in hand grenade range soils. Compared to the unamended soil there was a 26-92% reduction of RDX in the leachate and runoff water from the lime treated soils and a 66-83% reduction of zinc in the leachate and runoff water samples; where the hand grenade range metals of concern were zinc, iron, and manganese. The amended soil was maintained at the target pH of greater than 10.5 for optimum explosives decomposition. The treatability study indicated a high potential of success for scale-up to an in situ field study. PMID:22445717

  14. Crystal Structures of Three Framework Alkali Metal Uranyl Phosphate Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locock, Andrew J.; Burns, Peter C.

    2002-08-01

    Three homeotypic hydrated alkali metal uranyl phosphates, A2(UO 2)[(UO 2)(PO 4)] 4(H 2O) 2, A=Cs ( CsUP), Rb ( RbUP), K ( KUP), were synthesized by hydrothermal methods. Intensity data were collected at room temperature using Mo Kα radiation and a CCD-based area detector. Their crystal structures were solved by Patterson ( CsUP) and direct ( RbUP, KUP) methods and refined by full-matrix least-squares techniques to agreement indices ( CsUP, RbUP, KUP) w R2=0.048, 0.230, 0.072 for all data, and R1=0.023, 0.078, 0.038 calculated for 5338, 4738, 4514 unique observed reflections (∣ Fo∣≥4 σF), respectively. The compound CsUP is orthorhombic, space group Cmc2 1, Z=4, a=14.854(1), b=13.879(1), c=12.987(1) Å, V=2677.5(3) Å 3. Both RbUP and KUP are monoclinic, space group Cm, but are presented in the unconventional pseudo-orthorhombic space group Fm11 to facilitate comparison with CsUP and to allow a model for RbUP that includes the effects of pseudo-merohedral twinning. RbUP is monoclinic, space group Fm11, Z=4, a=15.72(2), b=13.84(1), c=13.05(1) Å, α=90.39°(2), V=2839(5) Å 3; KUP is monoclinic, space group Fm11, Z=4, a=15.257(1), b=13.831(1), c=13.007(1) Å, α=91.760°(1), V=2743.4(3) Å 3. The structures consist of sheets of phosphate tetrahedra and uranyl pentagonal bipyramids, with composition [(UO 2)(PO 4)] -, that are topologically identical to the uranyl silicate sheets in uranophane-beta. These sheets are connected by a uranyl pentagonal bipyramid in the interlayer that shares corners with two phosphate tetrahedra on each of two adjacent sheets and whose fifth equatorial vertex is an H 2O group, resulting in an open framework with alkali metal cations in the larger cavities of the structures. Where CsUP and RbUP have two alkali metal positions and a H 2O group in these cavities, KUP has four K atoms and two H 2O groups, all of which are partially occupied, in the interstitial sites.

  15. Frictional Dissipation Pathways Mediated by Hydrated Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Ma, Liran; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2016-05-17

    Frictional energy dissipation between sliding solid surfaces in aqueous media may proceed by different pathways. Using a surface force balance (SFB), we have examined systematically how such dissipation is mediated by the series of hydrated cations M(+) = Li(+), Na(+), and K(+) that are trapped between two atomically smooth, negatively charged, mica surfaces sliding across the ionic solutions over many orders of magnitude loading. By working at local contact pressures up to ca. 30 MPa (∼300 atm), up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than earlier studies, we could show that the frictional dissipation at constant sliding velocity, represented by the coefficient of sliding friction μM+, decreased as μLi+ > μNa+ ≳ μK+. This result contrasts with the expectation (in conceptual analogy with the Hofmeister series) that the lubrication would improve with the extent of ionic hydration, since that would have led to the opposite μM+ sequence. It suggests, rather, that frictional forces, even in such simple systems, can be dominated by rate-activated pathways where the size of the hydration shell becomes a dissipative liability, rather than by the hydration-shell dissipation expected via the hydration lubrication mechanism. PMID:27089022

  16. Stratification of Metal and Sulphate Loads in Acid Mine Drainage Receiving Water Dams - Variables Regionalization by Cluster Analysis.

    PubMed

    Grande, J A; de la Torre, M L; Valente, T; Fernández, J P; Borrego, J; Santisteban, M; Cerón, J C; Sánchez-Rodas, D

    2015-07-01

    The Sancho Reservoir (Iberian Pyrite Belt, SW Spain) is nourished by the waters of the river Meca, which is affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) processes from the abandoned Tharsis mine. The aim of the present work is to study the hydrochemical variations in this reservoir, in order to define potential stratification processes in metal load and sulphates. A stratified sampling from the surface, with one meter deep intervals to the bottom of the dam, was performed. The results show a clear stratification of temperature, pH, electric conductivity, dissolved oxygen, metal and sulphate loads associated with depth. There is an increase of metal loads at the bottom of the reservoir, though previous studies only detect iron. The proximity between pH and aluminium suggests that water chemistry is strongly influenced by aluminium precipitation processes. This indicates the buffer effect that aluminium exercises, which precipitates as amorphous or low crystalline phases, introducing hydrogen ions to the system, while alkalinity input tends to raise pH. PMID:26163498

  17. Characterization and activity studies of highly heavy metal resistant sulphate-reducing bacteria to be used in acid mine drainage decontamination.

    PubMed

    Martins, Mónica; Faleiro, M Leonor; Barros, Raúl J; Veríssimo, A Raquel; Barreiros, M Alexandra; Costa, M Clara

    2009-07-30

    Biological treatment with sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) has been considered as the most promising alternative for acid mine drainage (AMD) decontamination. Normally, these wastewaters contain high concentrations of sulphate and heavy metals, so the search for SRB highly resistant to metals is extremely important for the development of a bioremediation technology. A SRB consortium resistant to high concentrations of heavy metals (Fe, Cu and Zn), similar to those typically present in AMD, was obtained among several environmental samples, from a wastewater treatment plant. The phylogenetic analysis of the dsr gene sequence revealed that this consortium contains species of SRB affiliated to Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and Desulfobulbus rhabdoformis. The results show that the presence of usually lethal concentrations of Fe (400mg/L), Zn (150 mg/L) and Cu (80 mg/L) is not toxic for the sulphate-reducing bacteria present in this sample. As a consequence, a very good efficiency in terms of sulphate reduction and metals removal was obtained. Both ethanol and lactate can be used by this inoculum as carbon source. With the other samples tested sulphate reduction was inhibited by the presence of copper and zinc. This highly metal resistant consortium will be used to inoculate a bioreactor to carry out AMD decontamination. PMID:19135795

  18. Evaluation of the thermodynamic properties of hydrated metal oxide nanoparticles by INS techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Elinor; Ross, Dr. Nancy; Parker, Stewart F.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we will present a detailed methodology for the elucidation of the following aspects of the thermodynamic properties of hydrated metal oxide nanoparticles from high-resolution, low-temperature inelastic neutron scattering (INS) data: (i) the isochoric heat capacity and entropy of the hydration layers both chemi- and physisorbed to the particle surface; (ii) the magnetic contribution to the heat capacity of the nanoparticles. This will include the calculation of the vibrational density of states (VDOS) from the raw INS spectra, and the subsequent extraction of the thermodynamic data from the VDOS. This technique will be described in terms of a worked example namely, cobalt oxide (Co3O4 and CoO). To complement this evaluation of the physical properties of metal oxide nanoparticle systems, we will emphasise the importance of high-resolution, high-energy INS for the determination of the structure and dynamics of the water species, namely molecular (H2O) and dissociated water (OH, hydroxyl), confined to the oxide surfaces. For this component of the chapter we will focus on INS investigations of hydrated isostructural rutile (a-TiO2) and cassiterite (SnO2) nanoparticles. We will complete this discussion of nanoparticle analysis by including an appraisal of the INS instrumentation employed in such studies with particular focus on TOSCA [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), U.K.] and the newly developed spectrometer SEQUOIA [SNS, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), U.S.A].

  19. Metal-Free Markovnikov-Type Alkyne Hydration under Mild Conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenbo; Wang, Haining; Li, Chao-Jun

    2016-05-01

    A Markovnikov-type alkyne hydration protocol is presented using 20% CF3SO3H (TfOH) as the catalyst under unprecedented mild conditions applicable to various alkynes, including terminal arylalkynes, terminal nonfunctionalized aliphatic alkynes, and internal alkynes with excellent regioselectivity in good to excellent yields (average yields >85%). The reaction procedure operates under mild conditions (25-70 °C), with broad functional group compatibility, and uses only slightly more than a stoichiometric amount of water in the absence of any transition metal. The success of this protocol hinges upon the utilization of trifluoroethanol as the solvent. PMID:27082159

  20. Calcium sulphate in ammonium sulphate solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, E.C.

    1905-01-01

    Calcium sulphate, at 25?? C., is two-thirds as soluble in dilute (o.i mol per liter) and twice as soluble in concentrated (3 mois per liter) ammonium sulphate solution as in water. The specific electric conductivity of concentrated ammonium sulphate solutions is lessened by saturating with calcium sulphate. Assuming that dissociation of ammonium sulphate takes place into 2NH4?? and SO4" and of calcium sulphate into Ca and SO4" only, and that the conductivity is a measure of such dissociation, the solubility of calcium sulphate in dilute ammonium sulphate solutions is greater than required by the mass-law. The conductivity of the dilute mixtures may be accurately calculated by means of Arrhenius' principle of isohydric solutions. In the data obtained in these calculations, the concentration of non-dissociated calcium sulphate decreases with increasing ammonium sulphate. The work as a whole is additional evidence of the fact that we are not yet in possession of all the factors necessary for reconciling the mass-law to the behavior of electrolytes. The measurements above described were made in the chemical laboratory of the University of Michigan.

  1. Simulation of substrate erosion and sulphate assimilation by Martian low-viscosity lava flows: implications for the genesis of precious metal-rich sulphide mineralisation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Raphael; Baratoux, David; Gaillard, Fabrice; Fiorentini, Marco

    2016-04-01

    On Earth, high temperature mafic to ultramafic lava flows, such as komatiites and ferropicrites of the Archean and Proterozic eons, can be hosts to Ni-Cu-PGE sulphide mineralisation. Mechanical/thermo-mechanical erosion and assimilation of sulphur-rich crustal rocks is ascribed as the principal mechanism that leads to sulphide supersaturation, batch segregation and subsequent accumulation of metal-enriched magmatic sulphides (e.g., Bekker et al., Science, 2009). In order to investigate the likelihood of the occurrence of similar sulphide mineralisation in extraterrestrial magmatic systems, we numerically modelled erosion and assimilation during the turbulent emplacement of Martian lavas, some of which display chemical and rheological analogies with terrestrial komatiites and ferropicrites, on a variety of consolidated sedimentary sulphate-rich substrates. The modelling approach relies on the integration of i) mathematical lava erosion models for turbulent flows (Williams et al., J. Geophys. Res., 1998), ii) thermodynamic volatile degassing models (Gaillard et al., Space Sci. Rev., 2013), and iii) formulations on the stability of sulphides (Fortin et al., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2015). A series of scenarios are examined in which various Martian mafic to ultramafic mantle-derived melts emplace over, and assimilate consolidated sulphate-rich substrates, such as the sedimentary lithologies (i.e., conglomerates, sandstones and mudstones) recently discovered at the Gale Crater landing site. Our modellings show that lavas emplacing over consolidated sedimentary substrate rather than stiff basaltic crust, are governed by relatively high cooling and substrate erosion rates. The rapid assimilation of sulphate, which serves as a strongly oxidising agent, could result in dramatic sulphur loss due to increased volatile degassing rates at fO2 ≳QFM-1. This effect is further enhanced with increased temperature. Nevertheless, sulphide supersaturation in the way of sulphate

  2. Linking interfacial chemistry of CO2 to surface structures of hydrated metal oxide nanoparticles: hematite.

    PubMed

    Chernyshova, Irina V; Ponnurangam, Sathish; Somasundaran, Ponisseril

    2013-05-14

    A better understanding of interaction with dissolved CO2 is required to rationally design and model the (photo)catalytic and sorption processes on metal (hydr)oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous media. Using in situ FTIR spectroscopy, we address this problem for rhombohedral 38 nm hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanoparticles as a model. We not only resolve the structures of the adsorbed carbonate species, but also specify their adsorption sites and their location on the nanoparticle surface. The spectral relationships obtained present a basis for a new method of characterizing the microscopic structural and acid-base properties (related to individual adsorption sites) of hydrated metal (hydr)oxide NPs using atmospherically derived CO2 as a probe. Specifically, we distinguish two carbonate species suggesting two principally different adsorption mechanisms. One species, which is more weakly adsorbed, has an inner-sphere mononuclear monodentate structure which is formed by a conventional ligand-exchange mechanism. At natural levels of dissolved carbonate and pH from 3 to 11, this species is attached to the most acidic/reactive surface cations (surface states) associated with ferrihydrite-like surface defects. The second species, which is more strongly adsorbed, presents a mixed C and O coordination of bent CO2. This species uniquely recognizes the stoichiometric rhombohedral {104} facets in the NP texture. Like in gas phase, it is formed through the surface coordination of molecular CO2. We address how the adsorption sites hosting these two carbonate species are affected by the annealing and acid etching of the NPs. These results support the nanosize-induced phase transformation of hematite towards ferrihydrite under hydrous conditions, and additionally show that the process starts from the roughened areas of the facet intersections. PMID:23552484

  3. Sulphate in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Paul A; Elliott, Aoife; Bowling, Francis G

    2015-03-01

    Sulphate is an obligate nutrient for healthy growth and development. Sulphate conjugation (sulphonation) of proteoglycans maintains the structure and function of tissues. Sulphonation also regulates the bioactivity of steroids, thyroid hormone, bile acids, catecholamines and cholecystokinin, and detoxifies certain xenobiotics and pharmacological drugs. In adults and children, sulphate is obtained from the diet and from the intracellular metabolism of sulphur-containing amino acids. Dietary sulphate intake can vary greatly and is dependent on the type of food consumed and source of drinking water. Once ingested, sulphate is absorbed into circulation where its level is maintained at approximately 300 μmol/L, making sulphate the fourth most abundant anion in plasma. In pregnant women, circulating sulphate concentrations increase by twofold with levels peaking in late gestation. This increased sulphataemia, which is mediated by up-regulation of sulphate reabsorption in the maternal kidneys, provides a reservoir of sulphate to meet the gestational needs of the developing foetus. The foetus has negligible capacity to generate sulphate and thereby, is completely reliant on sulphate supply from the maternal circulation. Maternal hyposulphataemia leads to foetal sulphate deficiency and late gestational foetal death in mice. In humans, reduced sulphonation capacity has been linked to skeletal dysplasias, ranging from the mildest form, multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, to achondrogenesis Type IB, which results in severe skeletal underdevelopment and death in utero or shortly after birth. Despite being essential for numerous cellular and metabolic functions, the nutrient sulphate is largely unappreciated in clinical settings. This article will review the physiological roles and regulation of sulphate during pregnancy, with a particular focus on animal models of disturbed sulphate homeostasis and links to human pathophysiology. PMID:25746011

  4. Sulphate in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Elliott, Aoife; Bowling, Francis G.

    2015-01-01

    Sulphate is an obligate nutrient for healthy growth and development. Sulphate conjugation (sulphonation) of proteoglycans maintains the structure and function of tissues. Sulphonation also regulates the bioactivity of steroids, thyroid hormone, bile acids, catecholamines and cholecystokinin, and detoxifies certain xenobiotics and pharmacological drugs. In adults and children, sulphate is obtained from the diet and from the intracellular metabolism of sulphur-containing amino acids. Dietary sulphate intake can vary greatly and is dependent on the type of food consumed and source of drinking water. Once ingested, sulphate is absorbed into circulation where its level is maintained at approximately 300 μmol/L, making sulphate the fourth most abundant anion in plasma. In pregnant women, circulating sulphate concentrations increase by twofold with levels peaking in late gestation. This increased sulphataemia, which is mediated by up-regulation of sulphate reabsorption in the maternal kidneys, provides a reservoir of sulphate to meet the gestational needs of the developing foetus. The foetus has negligible capacity to generate sulphate and thereby, is completely reliant on sulphate supply from the maternal circulation. Maternal hyposulphataemia leads to foetal sulphate deficiency and late gestational foetal death in mice. In humans, reduced sulphonation capacity has been linked to skeletal dysplasias, ranging from the mildest form, multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, to achondrogenesis Type IB, which results in severe skeletal underdevelopment and death in utero or shortly after birth. Despite being essential for numerous cellular and metabolic functions, the nutrient sulphate is largely unappreciated in clinical settings. This article will review the physiological roles and regulation of sulphate during pregnancy, with a particular focus on animal models of disturbed sulphate homeostasis and links to human pathophysiology. PMID:25746011

  5. Metal halogen battery construction with improved technique for producing halogen hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Fong, Walter L.; Catherino, Henry A.; Kotch, Richard J.

    1983-01-01

    An improved electrical energy storage system comprising, at least one cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by aqueous electrolyte, a store means wherein halogen hydrate is formed and stored as part of an aqueous material having a liquid level near the upper part of the store, means for circulating electrolyte through the cell, conduit means for transmitting halogen gas formed in the cell to a hydrate forming apparatus associated with the store, said hydrate forming apparatus including, a pump to which there is introduced quantities of the halogen gas and chilled water, said pump being located in the store and an outlet conduit leading from the pump and being substantially straight and generally vertically disposed and having an exit discharge into the gas space above the liquid level in the store, and wherein said hydrate forming apparatus is highly efficient and very resistant to plugging or jamming. The disclosure also relates to an improved method for producing chlorine hydrate in zinc chlorine batteries.

  6. Monitoring of sulphate attack on hardened cement paste studied by synchrotron XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroh, J.; Meng, B.; Emmerling, F.

    2015-10-01

    The complex matter of external sulphate attack on cement-based construction materials is still not completely understood. The concentration of sulphate is a crucial factor for the formation of secondary phases and phase transitions of cement hydrates due to sulphate ingress into the microstructure. The sulphate attack on building materials for high and low sulphate concentrations was monitored by laboratory experiments. Hardened cement paste consisting of ordinary Portland cement (CEM I) were exposed to aqueous solutions of sodium sulphate for 18 months. Three sample compositions were used for this research, including different supplementary cementitious materials (SCM). The phase composition was determined for different time spans by high resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Cross sections of exposed cement prisms were investigated as a representation of the microstructural profile. Based on the data, a temporal and spatial determination of the stages of the sulphate attack and the deterioration course was possible. Cement matrices blended with slag showed the highest resistance against sulphate attack.

  7. Hydrate detection

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, W.P.; Ahlbrandt, T.S.

    1992-01-01

    Project objectives were: (1) to create methods of analyzing gas hydrates in natural sea-floor sediments, using available data, (2) to make estimates of the amount of gas hydrates in marine sediments, (3) to map the distribution of hydrates, (4) to relate concentrations of gas hydrates to natural processes and infer the factors that control hydrate concentration or that result in loss of hydrate from the sea floor. (VC)

  8. Hydrate detection

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, W.P.; Ahlbrandt, T.S.

    1992-06-01

    Project objectives were: (1) to create methods of analyzing gas hydrates in natural sea-floor sediments, using available data, (2) to make estimates of the amount of gas hydrates in marine sediments, (3) to map the distribution of hydrates, (4) to relate concentrations of gas hydrates to natural processes and infer the factors that control hydrate concentration or that result in loss of hydrate from the sea floor. (VC)

  9. An examination of the solution phase and nucleation properties of sodium, potassium and rubidium dodecyl sulphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. A.; Roberts, K. J.; Machin, D.; McLeod, G.

    2001-06-01

    The nucleation of sodium, rubidium and potassium dodecyl sulphates are examined using temperature programmed milli-scale batch crystallisation experiments using optical turbidometry detection. As sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) crystallises as a hydrated system from aqueous solution, studies have also been carried out in the presence of sodium citrate, which causes the anhydrous phase to crystallise. The meta-stable zone widths (MSZW) and solution properties (the enthalpies and entropies of dissolution) as well as the nucleation reaction orders, are measured. The temperature of dissolution decreases with the decrease in cooling/heating rate whilst the temperature of crystallisation increases for all the systems, resulting in a decrease in the meta-stable zone width with decreasing temperature change rate. The enthalpies and entropies of dissolution of sodium, potassium and rubidium dodecyl sulphate increased with increasing alkali metal ionic radii. Very large values of MSZW for sodium citrate containing solutions occur. Extremely high reaction orders occur with SDS, at high concentrations when pure and at low concentrations when with sodium citrate.

  10. Highly efficient removal of heavy metals by polymer-supported nanosized hydrated Fe(III) oxides: behavior and XPS study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bingjun; Qiu, Hui; Pan, Bingcai; Nie, Guangze; Xiao, Lili; Lv, Lu; Zhang, Weiming; Zhang, Quanxing; Zheng, Shourong

    2010-02-01

    The present study developed a polymer-based hybrid sorbent (HFO-001) for highly efficient removal of heavy metals [e.g., Pb(II), Cd(II), and Cu(II)] by irreversibly impregnating hydrated Fe(III) oxide (HFO) nanoparticles within a cation-exchange resin D-001 (R-SO(3)Na), and revealed the underlying mechanism based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study. HFO-001 combines the excellent handling, flow characteristics, and attrition resistance of conventional cation-exchange resins with the specific affinity of HFOs toward heavy metal cations. As compared to D-001, sorption selectivity of HFO-001 toward Pb(II), Cu(II), and Cd(II) was greatly improved from the Ca(II) competition at greater concentration. Column sorption results indicated that the working capacity of HFO-001 was about 4-6 times more than D-001 with respect to removal of three heavy metals from simulated electroplating water (pH approximately 4.0). Also, HFO-001 is particularly effective in removing trace Pb(II) and Cd(II) from simulated natural waters to meet the drinking water standard, with treatment volume orders of magnitude higher than D-001. The superior performance of HFO-001 was attributed to the Donnan membrane effect exerted by the host D-001 as well as to the impregnated HFO nanoparticles of specific interaction toward heavy metal cations, as further confirmed by XPS study on lead sorption. More attractively, the exhausted HFO-001 beads can be effectively regenerated by HCl-NaCl solution (pH 3) for repeated use without any significant capacity loss. PMID:19906397

  11. Sub-Chronic Oral Exposure to Iridium (III) Chloride Hydrate in Female Wistar Rats: Distribution and Excretion of the Metal

    PubMed Central

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Fontana, Luca; Bergamaschi, Antonio; Conti, Marcelo Enrique; Pino, Anna; Mattei, Daniela; Bocca, Beatrice; Alimonti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Iridium tissue distribution and excretion in female Wistar rats following oral exposure to iridium (III) chloride hydrate in drinking water (from 1 to 1000 ng/ml) in a sub-chronic oral study were determined. Samples of urine, feces, blood and organs (kidneys, liver, lung, spleen and brain) were collected at the end of exposure. The most prominent fractions of iridium were retained in kidney and spleen; smaller amounts were found in lungs, liver and brain. Iridium brain levels were lower than those observed in other tissues but this finding can support the hypothesis of iridium capability to cross the blood brain barrier. The iridium kidney levels rose significantly with the administered dose. At the highest dose, important amounts of the metal were found in serum, urine and feces. Iridium was predominantly excreted via feces with a significant linear correlation with the ingested dose, which is likely due to low intestinal absorption of the metal. However, at the higher doses iridium was also eliminated through urine. These findings may be useful to help in the understanding of the adverse health effects, particularly on the immune system, of iridium dispersed in the environment as well as in identifying appropriate biological indices of iridium exposure. PMID:22942873

  12. Identifying alkali metal inhibitors of crystal growth: a selection criterion based on ion pair hydration energy.

    PubMed

    Farmanesh, Sahar; Alamani, Bryan G; Rimer, Jeffrey D

    2015-09-21

    We show that alkali metals function as effective modifiers of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystallization wherein alkali-oxalate ion parings reduce the rate of crystal growth by as much as 60%. Our findings reveal a distinct trend in alkali metal efficacy that cannot be explained by colloidal theories or simple descriptors, such as ion size, but is consistent with a theoretical model that accounts for the ion pair's affinity for water. PMID:26242310

  13. Heavily-hydrated lithic clasts in CH chondrites and the related, metal-rich chondrites Queen Alexandra Range 94411 and Hammadah al Hamra 237

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greshake, A.; Krot, A. N.; Meibom, A.; Weisberg, M. K.; Zolensky, M. E.; Keil, K.

    2002-02-01

    Fine-grained, heavily-hydrated lithic clasts in the metal-rich (CB) chondrites Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 94411 and Hammadah al Hamra 237 and CH chondrites, such as Patuxent Range (PAT) 91546 and Allan Hills (ALH) 85085, are mineralogically similar suggesting genetic relationship between these meteorites. These clasts contain no anhydrous silicates and consist of framboidal and platelet magnetite, prismatic sulfides (pentlandite and pyrrhotite), and Fe-Mn-Mg-bearing Ca-carbonates set in a phyllosilicate-rich matrix. Two types of phyllosilicates were identified: serpentine, with basal spacing of ?0.73 nm, and saponite, with basal spacings of about 1.1-1.2 nm. Chondrules and FeNi-metal grains in CB and CH chondrites are believed to have formed at high temperature (>1300 K) by condensation in a solar nebula region that experienced complete vaporization. The absence of aqueous alteration of chondrules and metal grains in CB and CH chondrites indicates that the clasts experienced hydration in an asteroidal setting prior to incorporation into the CH and CB parent bodies. The hydrated clasts were either incorporated during regolith gardening or accreted together with chondrules and FeNi-metal grains after these high-temperature components had been transported from their hot formation region to a much colder region of the solar nebula.

  14. Reactions of Hexa-aquo Transition Metal Ions with the Hydrated Electron up to 300 °C.

    PubMed

    Kanjana, Kotchaphan; Courtin, Bruce; MacConnell, Ashley; Bartels, David M

    2015-11-12

    Reactions of the hydrated electron with divalent aqueous transition-metal ions, Cd(2+), Zn(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Co(2+), Fe(2+), and Mn(2+), were studied using a pulse radiolysis technique. The kinetics study was carried out at a constant pressure of 120 bar with temperatures up to 300 °C. The rate constants at room temperature agree with those reported in the literature. The reaction of Cd(2+) is approximately diffusion-limited, but none of the first-row transition-metal ion reactions are diffusion-controlled at any temperature studied. The activation energies obtained from the Arrhenius plots are in the range 14.5-40.6 kJ/mol. Pre-exponential factors are quite large, between 1 × 10(13) and 7 × 10(15) M(-1) s(-1). There appears to be a large degree of entropy-enthalpy compensation in the activation of Zn(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+), and Cu(2+), as the larger pre-exponential factors strongly correlate with higher activation energy. Saturation of the ionic strength effect suggests that these reactions could be long-range nonadiabatic electron "jumps", but Marcus theory is incompatible with direct formation of ground state (M(+))aq ions. A self-consistent explanation is that electron transfer occurs to excited states derived from the metal 4s orbitals. The ionic strength effect in the Mn(2+) and Fe(2+) reactions suggests that these proceed by short-range adiabatic electron attachment involving breakdown of the water coordination shell. PMID:26530531

  15. Chloral Hydrate

    MedlinePlus

    Chloral hydrate, a sedative, is used in the short-term treatment of insomnia (to help you fall asleep and ... Chloral hydrate comes as a capsule and liquid to take by mouth and as a suppository to insert rectally. ...

  16. Sulphate transport in Candida utilis.

    PubMed

    Benítez, J A; Alonso, A; Delgado, J; Kotyk, A

    1983-01-01

    Sulphate uptake by Candida utilis follows Michaelis-Menten type kinetics characterized by a Km of 1.43 mM for sulphate. The process is unidirectional, pH, temperature and energy dependent. Molybdate, selenate, thiosulphate, chromate and sulphite are competitive inhibitors. Dithionite is a mixed-type inhibitor of sulphate uptake. If cells are pre-incubated with sulphate, sulphite, thiosulphate, dithionite or sulphide, sulphate uptake is severely blocked. Inhibition by endogenous sulphate, sulphite and thiosulphate was specific for sulphate uptake. Thus, incorporation of extracellular sulphate seems to be under the control of a heterogeneous pool of sulphur compounds. These results are discussed in connection with the regulation of sulphur amino acid biosynthesis in C. utilis. PMID:6682074

  17. A QUANTUM MECHANICAL STUDY OF THE PROTONATION AND COVALENT HYDRATION OF QUINAZOLINE IN THE PRESENCE OF METAL CATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have investigated the protonation and reversible covalent hydration of quinazoline in the presence of Li+, Na+, and Ca2+ ions using ab initio quantum mechanical calculations at the MP2/6-31G**//HF/6-31G*level of theory. Proton affinities, enthalpies of hydration at 298.15K (DH...

  18. Study on third order nonlinear optical properties of a metal organic complex-Monothiourea-cadmium Sulphate Dihydrate single crystals grown in silica gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivanandan, T.; Kalainathan, S.

    2015-04-01

    The third order nonlinear optical properties of Monothiourea-cadmium Sulphate Dihydrate crystal were measured using a He-Ne laser (λ=632.8 nm) by a Z-scan technique. The magnitude of nonlinear refractive index (n2) and nonlinear absorption coefficient was found to be 4.4769×10-11 m2/W and 1.233×10-2 m/W respectively. The third order non-linear optical susceptibility χ(3) was found to be in the order of 3.6533×10-2 esu. The negative sign of non-linear refractive index shows the self-defocusing nature of the gel grown crystal. The second-order molecular hyperpolarizability γ of the grown crystal is 1.2822×10-33 esu. Laser damage threshold was measured by using an Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm). Photoconductivity studies of the gel grown crystal revealed that the crystal possesses positive photoconducting nature. The results obtained from Z-scan, laser damage threshold and photoconducting studies reveal that the crystal can be a possible candidate material for photonics device, optical switches, and optical power limiting application.

  19. Corrosion Performance of Inconel 625 in High Sulphate Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Azzura

    2016-05-01

    Inconel 625 (UNS N06625) is a type of nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy with excellent corrosion resistance in a wide range of corrosive media, being especially resistant to pitting and crevice corrosion. However, in aggressive environment, Inconel 625 will suffer corrosion attack like other metals. This research compared the corrosion performance of Inconel 625 when exposed to higher sulphate content compared to real seawater. The results reveal that Inconel 625 is excellent in resist the corrosion attack in seawater. However, at increasing temperature, the corrosion resistance of this metal decrease. The performance is same in seawater with high sulphate content at increasing temperature. It can be concluded that sulphate promote perforation on Inconel 625 and become aggressive agents that accelerate the corrosion attack.

  20. Deterioration of hardened cement paste under combined sulphate-chloride attack investigated by synchrotron XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroh, J.; Meng, B.; Emmerling, F.

    2016-06-01

    The exact mechanisms of the phase transitions caused by a combined sulphate-chloride attack are discussed controversially. The main points concern the mutual influences of sulphate and chloride ions during the secondary binding processes of these anions within cement hydrate phases. We simulated combined sulphate-chloride attack under laboratory conditions using solutions containing NaCl and Na2SO4 in different concentrations. Three sample compositions were used for the preparation of the specimens. In two of them, 30% of Portland cement was replaced by supplementary cementitious materials (fly ash, slag). The phase distribution in the samples was determined using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The analysis with high spatial resolution allows the localisation of the secondary phase formation in the microstructural profile of the sample. A mechanism of the phase developments under combined sulphate-chloride attack is derived.

  1. Chloral hydrate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chloral hydrate ; CASRN 302 - 17 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  2. Chondroitin sulphate and keratan sulphate are almost isosteric.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, J E

    1991-01-01

    Keratan sulphate and chondroitin sulphate (KS and CS) in the 2-fold helical configurations that are prevalent in solution are of very similar tacticity. The chiral centres, anionic sites and hydrophobic patches are in identical conformations. Only the position of the acetamido group varies from CS to KS, but part of its intramolecular H-bonding potential in CS is retained in KS. The formation of tertiary aggregates, observed in vitro and in tissues, is explicable on these bases. The proposal that KS may be a functional substitute for CS [Scott & Haigh (1988) J. Anat. 158, 95-108] under low-O2 conditions is relevant. PMID:1902086

  3. The ecology and biotechnology of sulphate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Muyzer, Gerard; Stams, Alfons J M

    2008-06-01

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are anaerobic microorganisms that use sulphate as a terminal electron acceptor in, for example, the degradation of organic compounds. They are ubiquitous in anoxic habitats, where they have an important role in both the sulphur and carbon cycles. SRB can cause a serious problem for industries, such as the offshore oil industry, because of the production of sulphide, which is highly reactive, corrosive and toxic. However, these organisms can also be beneficial by removing sulphate and heavy metals from waste streams. Although SRB have been studied for more than a century, it is only with the recent emergence of new molecular biological and genomic techniques that we have begun to obtain detailed information on their way of life. PMID:18461075

  4. Reduction on the anaerobic biological activity inhibition caused by heavy metals and sulphates in effluents through chemical precipitation with soda and lime.

    PubMed

    Alves, L de Carvalho; Cammarota, M C; De França, F P

    2006-12-01

    The School of Chemistry Environmental Technology Laboratory generates 43.4 1 of effluent with low pH (0.7) and high contents of COD (1908 mgO2 l(-1)), phenol (132.1 mg l(-1)), sulfate (36700 mg l(-1)) and heavy metals (28.2 mg Hg l(-1); 82.1 mg Cr(total) l(-1); 30.8 mg Cu l(-1); 57.4 mg Fe(total) l(-1); 16.2 mg Al l(-1)) weekly. These data show that this effluent presents high toxicity for biological treatment, with a physical-chemical step being necessary before a biological step. Preliminary studies showed that the most toxic constituents of the effluent were sulfate, phenol and total chromium. In this work, a chemical precipitation step with sodium hydroxide or lime was evaluated for the toxicity reduction on anaerobic microbial consortium. These experiments were carried out with increasing concentrations of alkalis in the effluent in order to obtain pH initial values of 8-12. Similar results were obtained for COD (15-28%), turbidity (95-98%), phenol (13-24%) and total chromium (99.8-99.9%) removals in each condition studied with soda or lime. Sulfate was only removed by precipitation with lime, obtaining reductions from 84 to 88%. The toxicity on the anaerobic sludge was studied employing specific methanogenic activity (SMA) analysis of raw and treated effluent (after chemical precipitation step). The SMA experiments showed that chemical precipitation at pH 8 reduces the toxic effect of the effluent on anaerobic microbial consortium three times (with soda) and thirteen times (with lime). These results indicate that precipitation with lime is more efficient at toxicity removal, however the produced sludge volume is around two times higher than that produced with soda. PMID:17285944

  5. Reactivity of hydrated monovalent first row transition metal ions M(+)(H2O)n, M = V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, toward molecular oxygen, nitrous oxide, and carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    van der Linde, Christian; Hemmann, Sonja; Höckendorf, Robert F; Balaj, O Petru; Beyer, Martin K

    2013-02-14

    The reactions of hydrated monovalent transition metal ions M(+)(H(2)O)(n), M = V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, toward molecular oxygen, nitrous oxide, and carbon dioxide were studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. Clusters containing monovalent chromium, cobalt, nickel, or zinc were reactive toward O(2), while only hydrated cobalt was reactive toward N(2)O. A strongly size dependent reactivity was observed. Chromium and cobalt react very slowly with carbon dioxide. Nanocalorimetric analysis, (18)O(2) exchange, and collision induced dissociation (CID) experiments were done to learn more about the structure of the O(2) products. The thermochemistry for cobalt, nickel, and zinc is comparable to the formation of O(2)(-) from hydrated electrons. These results suggest that cobalt, nickel, and zinc are forming M(2+)/O(2)(-) ion pairs in the cluster, while chromium rather forms a covalently bound dioxygen complex in large clusters, followed by an exothermic dioxide formation in clusters with n ≤ 5. The results show that hydrated singly charged transition metal ions exhibit highly specific reactivities toward O(2), N(2)O, and CO(2). PMID:22506540

  6. Structures of Hydrated Alkali Metal Cations, M+(H2O)nAr (m = Li, Na, K, rb and Cs, n = 3-5), Using Infrared Photodissociation Spectroscopy and Thermodynamic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Haochen; van der Linde, Christian; Lisy, James M.

    2014-06-01

    Alkali metal cations play vital roles in chemical and biochemical systems. Lithium is widely used in psychiatric treatment of manic states and bipolar disorder; Sodium and potassium are essential elements, having major biological roles as electrolytes, balancing osmotic pressure on body cells and assisting the electroneurographic signal transmission; Rubidium has seen increasing usage as a supplementation for manic depression and depression treatment; Cesium doped compounds are used as essential catalysts in chemical production and organic synthesis. Since hydrated alkali metal cations are ubiquitous and the basic form of the alkali metal cations in chemical and biochemical systems, their structural and thermodynamic properties serve as the foundation for modeling more complex chemical and biochemical processes, such as ion transport and ion size-selectivity of ionophores and protein channels. By combining mass spectrometry and infrared photodissociation spectroscopy, we have characterized the structures and thermodynamic properties of the hydrated alkali metal cations, i.e. M+(H2O)nAr, (M = Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs, n = 3-5). Ab initio calculations and RRKM-EE (evaporative ensemble) calculations were used to assist in the spectral assignments and thermodynamic analysis. Results showed that the structures of hydrated alkali metal cations were determined predominantly by the competition between non-covalent interactions, i.e. the water---water hydrogen bonding interactions and the water---cation electrostatic interactions. This balance, however, is very delicate and small changes, i.e. different cations, different levels of hydration and different effective temperatures clearly impact the balance.

  7. Prolonged release terbutaline sulphate microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Manekar, N C; Puranik, P K; Joshi, S B

    1991-01-01

    Terbutaline sulphate microcapsules were prepared by coacervation-phase separation induced by solvent evaporation technique. The cellulose acetate phthalate was employed as coating material alone and in combination with ethyl cellulose. The prepared microcapsules were evaluated for their drug content, particle size distribution (microscopic method), flow properties, bulk density and in vitro dissolution. PMID:1798022

  8. Hydrate habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Whoever said there is nothing new under the sun did not delve deeply enough to the bottom of the ocean. There in the Gulf of Mexico, about 150 miles south of New Orleans, scientists have just discovered what could be a new species of centipede—like worms living on or within gas hydrates— mounds of methane ice— rising from the ocean floor.Scientists have previously recognized an association between some bacteria and these hydrates. However, this is the first discovery of a higher life form there.

  9. Multiple stage multiple filter hydrate store

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkman, H.K. Jr.

    1983-05-31

    An improved hydrate store for a metal halogen battery system is disclosed which employs a multiple stage, multiple filter means for separating the halogen hydrate from the liquid used in forming the hydrate. The filter means is constructed in the form of three separate sections which combine to substantially cover the interior surface of the store container. Exit conduit means is provided in association with the filter means for transmitting liquid passing through the filter means to a hydrate former subsystem. The hydrate former subsystem combines the halogen gas generated during the charging of the battery system with the liquid to form the hydrate in association with the store. Relief valve means is interposed in the exit conduit means for controlling the operation of the separate sections of the filter means, such that the liquid flow through the exit conduit means from each of the separate sections is controlled in a predetermined sequence. The three separate sections of the filter means operate in three discrete stages to provide a substantially uniform liquid flow to the hydrate former subsystem during the charging of the battery system. The separation of the liquid from the hydrate causes an increase in the density of the hydrate by concentrating the hydrate along the filter means. 7 figs.

  10. Multiple stage multiple filter hydrate store

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkman, Jr., Harry K.

    1983-05-31

    An improved hydrate store for a metal halogen battery system is disclosed which employs a multiple stage, multiple filter means or separating the halogen hydrate from the liquid used in forming the hydrate. The filter means is constructed in the form of three separate sections which combine to substantially cover the interior surface of the store container. Exit conduit means is provided in association with the filter means for transmitting liquid passing through the filter means to a hydrate former subsystem. The hydrate former subsystem combines the halogen gas generated during the charging of the battery system with the liquid to form the hydrate in association with the store. Relief valve means is interposed in the exit conduit means for controlling the operation of the separate sections of the filter means, such that the liquid flow through the exit conduit means from each of the separate sections is controlled in a predetermined sequence. The three separate sections of the filter means operate in three discrete stages to provide a substantially uniform liquid flow to the hydrate former subsystem during the charging of the battery system. The separation of the liquid from the hydrate causes an increase in the density of the hydrate by concentrating the hydrate along the filter means.

  11. THE CONTROL OF SULPHATE ACTIVATION IN BACTERIA.

    PubMed

    WHELDRAKE, J F; PASTERNAK, C A

    1965-07-01

    1. ATP-sulphate adenylyltransferase (EC 2.7.7.4) and ATP-adenylyl sulphate 3'-phosphotransferase (EC 2.7.1.25) of Escherichia coli 9723, E. coli K(12) and Bacillus subtilis 1379 are each repressed by growth in the presence of cystine. Repression of the two enzymes in E. coli 9723 may be co-ordinate. 2. ATP-sulphate adenylyltransferase of Desulphovibrio desulphuricans, in which sulphate reduction is linked to the energy supply of the organism, is not repressed by growth in the presence of inorganic sulphite or cysteine. 3. Leuconostoc mesenteroides lacks all the enzymes between sulphate and cysteine whether grown on cysteine or glutathione. PMID:14343144

  12. The influence of hydrogen bonding on the dielectric constant and the piezoelectric energy harvesting performance of hydrated metal salt mediated PVDF films.

    PubMed

    Jana, Santanu; Garain, Samiran; Sen, Shrabanee; Mandal, Dipankar

    2015-07-14

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) films are filled with various mass fractions (wt%) of hydrated metal salt (MgCl2·6H2O) (Mg-salt) to fabricate high performance piezoelectric energy harvesters (PEHs). They deliver up to 4 V of open circuit voltage by simply repeated human finger imparting (under a pressure of ∼4.45 kPa) and also generate sufficient power to turn on at least ten commercial blue light emitting diodes (LEDs) instantly. The enhanced piezo-response is attributed to the combined effect of the change in the inherent dipole moment of the electroactive phase containing PVDF itself and H-bonding arising between the Mg-salt filler and PVDF via electrostatic interactions. Furthermore, it also successfully charged the capacitors, signifying practical applicability as a piezoelectric based energy harvester power source. UV-visible optical absorption spectral analysis revealed the possibility to estimate a change in the optical band gap value at different concentrations of Mg-salt filler added PVDF films that possess a useful methodology where the Mg-salt can be used as an optical probe. In addition dielectric properties have been studied to understand the role of molecular kinetic and interfacial polarization occurs in H-bond PVDF films at different applied frequencies at room temperature. PMID:26077827

  13. Influence of the hydration by the environmental humidity on the metallic speciation and the photocatalytic activity of Cr/MCM-41

    SciTech Connect

    Elías, Verónica R.; Sabre, Ema V.; Winkler, Elin L.; Andrini, Leandro; Requejo, Félix G.; Casuscelli, Sandra G.; Eimer, Griselda A.

    2014-05-01

    The influence of the environmental humidity on the Cr species deposited on inorganic supports like MCM-41 silicates was analyzed by UV–vis Diffuse Reflectance (UV–vis RD), Electronic Spin Resonance (ESR) and X-ray near-edge (XANES) spectroscopy. Metal speciation could be inferred, finding that prolonged exposure periods under environmental humidity provoked the reduction of the active Cr{sup 6+} species and thus, the decrease of the Cr/MCM-41 photoactivity. After the Ti loading over the Cr modified samples, Cr species and the photoactivity were not notably influenced by the humidity exposure. Thus, it could be concluded that the presence of Ti is important because the TiO{sub 2} cover protects the oxidized Cr species, stabilizing them. - Graphical abstract: The load of Ti on the Cr modified MCM-41 produces a TiO{sub 2} cover that protects the active Cr species from their reduction by the environmental humidity. - Highlights: • Spectroscopic analysis shows presence of Cr{sup 6+}/Cr{sup 5+} in calcined/re-calcined samples. • Cr{sup 3+} species increase for hydrated samples causing their photoactivity decrease. • Samples with high Cr loadings are more sensitive to environmental humidity presence. • TiO{sub 2} cover protects oxidized Cr species from their reduction by the water. • Ti is important to allow a synergistic effect and to stabilize active Cr{sup 6+}/Cr{sup 5+}.

  14. Sulphate, more than a nutrient, protects the microalga Chlamydomonas moewusii from cadmium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mera, Roi; Torres, Enrique; Abalde, Julio

    2014-03-01

    Sulphur is an essential macroelement that plays important roles in living organisms. The thiol rich sulphur compounds, such as cysteine, γ-Glu-Cys, glutathione and phytochelatins participate in the tolerance mechanisms against cadmium toxicity. Plants, algae, yeasts and most prokaryotes cover their demand for reduced sulphur by reduction of inorganic sulphate. The aim of this study was to investigate, using a bifactorial experimental design, the effect of different sulphate concentrations in the nutrient solution on cadmium toxicity in the freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas moewusii. Cell growth, kinetic parameters of sulphate utilization and intracellular concentrations of low-molecular mass thiol compounds were determined. A mathematical model to describe the growth of this microalga based on the effects of sulphate and cadmium was obtained. An ANOVA revealed an interaction between them, 16% of the effect sizes was explained by this interaction. A higher amount of sulphate in the culture medium allowed a higher cadmium tolerance due to an increase in the thiol compound biosynthesis. The amount of low-molecular mass thiol compounds, mainly phytochelatins, synthesized by this microalga was significantly dependent on the sulphate and cadmium concentrations; the higher phytochelatin content was obtained in cultures with 4 mg Cd/L and 1mM sulphate. The maximum EC50 value (based on nominal cadmium concentration) reached for this microalga was 4.46 ± 0.42 mg Cd/L when the sulphate concentration added to the culture medium was also 1mM. An increase in the sulphate concentration, in deficient environments, could alleviate the toxic effect of this metal; however, a relative excess is also negative. The results obtained showed a substrate inhibition for this nutrient. An uncompetitive model for sulphate was chosen to establish the mathematical model that links both factors. PMID:24463493

  15. Keratan sulphate--a 'reserve' polysaccharide?

    PubMed

    Scott, J E

    1994-04-01

    The early history of keratan sulphate and its proteoglycans is briefly described. Studies were overlooked that could have had a profound influence on later work. Early methods of writing the structures of keratan and chondroitin sulphates obscured the fundamental relationships between them. Both are now seen to be based on the same polymer backbone poly(Gal beta 1:4 Glc beta 1-3). Confusion over the complicated sulphation patterns in keratan sulphate was clarified by the domain structure idea by the group of Helmut Greiling. Keratan sulphate is characteristic of avascular tissues (cartilages, intervertebral discs, corneal stromas) that get their oxygen supplies by diffusion. Stockwell's early idea that the distribution of keratan sulphate in cartilages was a response to the poor supply of oxygen has been generalised, to the hypothesis that keratan sulphate is a functional substitute for chondroitin sulphate under conditions of oxygen lack. The keratan:chondroitin sulphate ratios in discs, corneas of different species, and changes therein with age can be explained on this basis. The biochemical controlling step is probably the NAD:NADH ratio. Keratan sulphate may thus be a 'reserve' polysaccharide, able to do the job of chondroitin sulphate in adverse conditions of oxygen supply. Keratan and chondroitin/dermatan sulphates have similar functions in corneal stroma, and probably in the other connective tissues in which they are found. They swell the collagenous matrix, keeping the fibrils apart. Even more importantly, they probably act as tissue organisers, orienting the fibrils vis-a-vis each other via specific interactions of their proteoglycan protein cores with the fibrils.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8038262

  16. 7 CFR 160.10 - Sulphate wood turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sulphate wood turpentine. 160.10 Section 160.10... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.10 Sulphate wood turpentine. The designation “sulphate wood... in the sulphate process of cooking wood pulp, and commonly known as sulphate turpentine or...

  17. 7 CFR 160.10 - Sulphate wood turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sulphate wood turpentine. 160.10 Section 160.10... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.10 Sulphate wood turpentine. The designation “sulphate wood... in the sulphate process of cooking wood pulp, and commonly known as sulphate turpentine or...

  18. 7 CFR 160.10 - Sulphate wood turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sulphate wood turpentine. 160.10 Section 160.10... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.10 Sulphate wood turpentine. The designation “sulphate wood... in the sulphate process of cooking wood pulp, and commonly known as sulphate turpentine or...

  19. 7 CFR 160.10 - Sulphate wood turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sulphate wood turpentine. 160.10 Section 160.10... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.10 Sulphate wood turpentine. The designation “sulphate wood... in the sulphate process of cooking wood pulp, and commonly known as sulphate turpentine or...

  20. 7 CFR 160.10 - Sulphate wood turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sulphate wood turpentine. 160.10 Section 160.10... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.10 Sulphate wood turpentine. The designation “sulphate wood... in the sulphate process of cooking wood pulp, and commonly known as sulphate turpentine or...

  1. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Foropoulos, Jr., Jerry; Avens, Larry R.; Trujillo, Eddie A.

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride is provided.

  2. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Foropoulos, J. Jr.; Avens, L.R.; Trujillo, E.A.

    1992-03-24

    A process is described for preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride.

  3. The control of sulphate activation in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wheldrake, J. F.; Pasternak, C. A.

    1965-01-01

    1. ATP–sulphate adenylyltransferase (EC 2.7.7.4) and ATP–adenylyl sulphate 3′-phosphotransferase (EC 2.7.1.25) of Escherichia coli 9723, E. coli K12 and Bacillus subtilis 1379 are each repressed by growth in the presence of cystine. Repression of the two enzymes in E. coli 9723 may be co-ordinate. 2. ATP–sulphate adenylyltransferase of Desulphovibrio desulphuricans, in which sulphate reduction is linked to the energy supply of the organism, is not repressed by growth in the presence of inorganic sulphite or cysteine. 3. Leuconostoc mesenteroides lacks all the enzymes between sulphate and cysteine whether grown on cysteine or glutathione. PMID:14343144

  4. Vibrational spectroscopic study of sulphated silk proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, P.; Freddi, G.; Arosio, C.; Tsukada, M.; Arai, T.; Taddei, P.

    2007-05-01

    Degummed Bombyx mori ( B. m.) silk fibroin fabric and mutant naked pupa cocoons (Nd-s) consisting of almost pure silk sericin were treated with chlorosulphonic acid in pyridine and investigated by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopies. Untreated silk fibroin and sericin displayed typical spectral features due to characteristic amino acid composition and molecular conformation (prevailing β-sheet with a less ordered structure in sericin). Upon sulphation, the degree of molecular disorder increased in both proteins and new bands appeared. The IR bands at 1049 and 1014 cm -1 were attributed to vibrations of sulphate salts and that at 1385 cm -1 to the νasSO 2 mode of organic covalent sulphates. In the 1300-1180 cm -1 range various contributions of alkyl and aryl sulphate salts, sulphonamides, sulphoamines and organic covalent sulphates, fell. Fibroin covalently bound sulphate groups through the hydroxyl groups of tyrosine and serine, while sericin through the hydroxyl groups of serine, since the δOH vibrations at 1399 cm -1 in IR and at 1408 cm -1 in Raman disappeared almost completely. Finally, the increase of the I850/ I830 intensity ratio of Raman tyrosine doublet in fibroin suggested a change towards a more exposed state of tyrosine residues, in good agreement with the more disordered conformation taken upon sulphation.

  5. Gas hydrate and humans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    2000-01-01

    The potential effects of naturally occurring gas hydrate on humans are not understood with certainty, but enough information has been acquired over the past 30 years to make preliminary assessments possible. Three major issues are gas hydrate as (1) a potential energy resource, (2) a factor in global climate change, and (3) a submarine geohazard. The methane content is estimated to be between 1015 to 1017 m3 at STP and the worldwide distribution in outer continental margins of oceans and in polar regions are significant features of gas hydrate. However, its immediate development as an energy resource is not likely because there are various geological constraints and difficult technological problems that must be solved before economic recovery of methane from hydrate can be achieved. The role of gas hydrate in global climate change is uncertain. For hydrate methane to be an effective greenhouse gas, it must reach the atmosphere. Yet there are many obstacles to the transfer of methane from hydrate to the atmosphere. Rates of gas hydrate dissociation and the integrated rates of release and destruction of the methane in the geo/hydro/atmosphere are not adequately understood. Gas hydrate as a submarine geohazard, however, is of immediate and increasing importance to humans as our industrial society moves to exploit seabed resources at ever-greater depths in the waters of our coastal oceans. Human activities and installations in regions of gas-hydrate occurrence must take into account the presence of gas hydrate and deal with the consequences of its presence.

  6. Vibrational spectroscopy of the sulphate mineral sturmanite from Kuruman manganese deposits, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Scholz, Ricardo; López, Andrés; Xi, Yunfei; Lana, Cristiano

    2014-12-10

    The mineral sturmanite is a hydrated calcium iron aluminium manganese sulphate tetrahydroxoborate hydroxide of formula Ca6(Fe, Al, Mn)2(SO4)2(B(OH)4)(OH)12·26H2O. We have studied the mineral sturmanite using a number of techniques, including SEM with EPMA and vibrational spectroscopy. Chemical analysis shows a homogeneous phase, composed by Ca, Fe, Mn, S, Al and Si. B is not determined in this EPMA technique. An intense Raman band at 990cm(-1) is assigned to the SO4(2-) symmetric stretching mode. Raman spectroscopy identifies multiple sulphate symmetric stretching modes in line with the three sulphate crystallographically different sites. Raman spectroscopy also identifies a band at 1069cm(-1) which may be attributed to a carbonate symmetric stretching mode, indicating the presence of thaumasite. Infrared spectra display two bands at 1080 and 1107cm(-1) assigned to the SO4(2-) antisymmetric stretching modes. The observation of multiple bands in this ν4 spectral region offers evidence for the reduction in symmetry of the sulphate anion from Td to C2v or even lower symmetry. The Raman band at 3622cm(-1) is assigned to the OH unit stretching vibration and the broad feature at around 3479cm(-1) to water stretching bands. Infrared spectroscopy shows a set of broad overlapping bands in the OH stretching region. Vibrational spectroscopy enables an assessment of the molecular structure of sturmanite to be made. PMID:24929311

  7. Vibrational spectroscopy of the sulphate mineral sturmanite from Kuruman manganese deposits, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Scholz, Ricardo; López, Andrés; Xi, Yunfei; Lana, Cristiano

    2014-12-01

    The mineral sturmanite is a hydrated calcium iron aluminium manganese sulphate tetrahydroxoborate hydroxide of formula Ca6(Fe, Al, Mn)2(SO4)2(B(OH)4)(OH)12·26H2O. We have studied the mineral sturmanite using a number of techniques, including SEM with EPMA and vibrational spectroscopy. Chemical analysis shows a homogeneous phase, composed by Ca, Fe, Mn, S, Al and Si. B is not determined in this EPMA technique. An intense Raman band at 990 cm-1 is assigned to the SO42- symmetric stretching mode. Raman spectroscopy identifies multiple sulphate symmetric stretching modes in line with the three sulphate crystallographically different sites. Raman spectroscopy also identifies a band at 1069 cm-1 which may be attributed to a carbonate symmetric stretching mode, indicating the presence of thaumasite. Infrared spectra display two bands at 1080 and 1107 cm-1 assigned to the SO42- antisymmetric stretching modes. The observation of multiple bands in this ν4 spectral region offers evidence for the reduction in symmetry of the sulphate anion from Td to C2v or even lower symmetry. The Raman band at 3622 cm-1 is assigned to the OH unit stretching vibration and the broad feature at around 3479 cm-1 to water stretching bands. Infrared spectroscopy shows a set of broad overlapping bands in the OH stretching region. Vibrational spectroscopy enables an assessment of the molecular structure of sturmanite to be made.

  8. The optical constants of gypsum particles as analog of Martian sulphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzo, G.; Blanco, A.; Colangeli, L.; Esposito, F.; Fonti, S.; Marra, A.; Orofino, V.; Palomba, E.

    Various indications suggest that in the past the Martian climate allowed the presence of liquid water on the surface of the planet. It is therefore reasonable to think that bodies of standing water were once present in basins such as craters or depressions and that evaporite deposits of sulphates could have formed in these basins. The identification of such deposits, which might have survived in some regions of the planet, could confirm the present hypothesis about the ancient climate on Mars. Recent analyses of Mars spectra, obtained by the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) as well as by instruments in Martian orbit, show bands consistent with sulphate features. If such data have to be interpreted with the aid of synthetic spectra, the knowledge of the complex refractive index of some sulphate is necessary. In this work we present the optical constants of submicron particles of gypsum (a typical hydrate-sulphate very common on Earth), derived by means of the dispersion theory from transmission spectra. These data are compared with optical constants obtained by other groups from reflectance measurements of particulate samples. At the same time we plan to extend the calculation of the optical constants in the far infrared, also in view of the wide spectral range covered by the Planetary Fourier Spectrometer (PFS) to be launched in 2003 on board of the ESA space mission Mars Express.

  9. Understanding gas hydrate dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, Laura; Chanton, Jeffrey; MacDonald, Ian; Martens, Christopher

    2010-05-01

    In order to understand the role gas hydrates play in climate change or their potential as an energy source, we must first understand their basic behaviors. One such behavior not well understood is their dissolution and the factors that control it. Theoretically, hydrates are stable in areas of high pressure, low temperature, moderate salt concentrations, and saturated methane. Yet in nature, we observe hydrate to outcrop seafloor sediments into overlying water that is under-saturated with respect to methane. How do these hydrates not dissolve away? To address this question, we combine both field and laboratory experiments. In the field, we have collected pore-waters directly surrounding gas hydrate outcrops and measured for in situ methane concentrations. This gives us an understanding of the concentration gradients, and thus methane flux, directly from the hydrate to the surrounding environment. From these samples, we found that methane concentrations decreased further from hydrate yet are always under-saturated with respect to methane hydrate. The resulting low methane gradients were then used to calculate low dissolution rates. This result suggests that hydrates are meta-stable in the environment. What controls their apparent meta-stability? We hypothesize that surrounding oils or microbial slimes help protect the hydrate and slow down their dissolution. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a series of laboratory experiments where hydrate was formed at in situ pressure and temperature and the source gas removed; first with no oils, then with oils. Dissolved methane concentrations were then measured in surrounding fluids over time and dissolution rates calculated. To date, both methane and mixed gas hydrate (methane, ethane, and propane) have similar dissolution rates of 0.12 mM/hr. Future experiments will add oils to determine how different hydrate dissolves with such contaminants. This study will further our understanding of factors that control hydrate

  10. Severe hyperkalaemia peripartum with magnesium sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Adam

    2012-01-01

    A case of severe hyperkalaemia peripartum in the setting of magnesium sulphate infusion is presented. Health professionals involved in the care of high-risk pregnancies should be aware of this rare association.

  11. Origins of hydration lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  12. Methane Hydrate Field Program

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-31

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report. • Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report • Methane Hydrate Workshop Report • Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan • Final Scientific/Technical Report

  13. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication. PMID:25585501

  14. Concept of Methane Hydrate System in the eastern Nankai Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagakubo, S.; Fujii, T.; Noguchi, S.; Kawasaki, T.

    2008-12-01

    By the study of the Phase 1 (FY2001-2008) of the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium), MH21 Research Consortium showed that methane hydrates pore-filled in sandy sediments had a potential to develop in the future. It is important to clarify the accumulation mechanism and processes of methane hydrates pore-filled in sandy sediment because it would contribute to explore new methane hydrate field to develop other than the eastern Nankai Trough in the future. Therefore Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (JOGMEC), as a member of MH21 Research Consortium, has been constructing a concept of Methane Hydrate System (methane generation and migration, MH formation and dissociation) with methane hydrates pore-filled in sandy sediment. We extracted critical elements and executed processes to summarize Methane Hydrate System in the eastern Nankai Trough by reviewing past geochemical analysis, well logs and core analyses, seismic interpretations, and laboratory studies for the eastern Nankai Trough. We also conducted case studies using 1D and 2D numerical simulators developed for the clarification of methane hydrate accumulation mechanism. It was determined that there are still many unsolved issues as listed below though we try to construct a concept of Methane Hydrate System in the eastern Nankai Trough. 1.Methane source and migration -methane-dominant generation depth -methane generation rate. -driving forces of methane migration 2.Occurrences and distribution -occurrences and distribution of methane hydrates other than methane hydrates pore-filled in sandy sediment. -methane-bearing fluid condition (properties, distribution) below methane hydrate bearing zones. 3.Relation between seafloor phenomena and methane hydrate occurences. 4.Impact of geohistory and sea level (water depth) change to methane hydrate accumulation. New investigation surveys (drilling and geological/geochemical surveys on seafloor) are required to

  15. Method for the photocatalytic conversion of gas hydrates

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.; Bockrath, Bradley C.

    2001-01-01

    A method for converting methane hydrates to methanol, as well as hydrogen, through exposure to light. The process includes conversion of methane hydrates by light where a radical initiator has been added, and may be modified to include the conversion of methane hydrates with light where a photocatalyst doped by a suitable metal and an electron transfer agent to produce methanol and hydrogen. The present invention operates at temperatures below 0.degree. C., and allows for the direct conversion of methane contained within the hydrate in situ.

  16. Experimental study of the replacement of calcite by calcium sulphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Agudo, E.; Putnis, C. V.; Hövelmann, J.; Álvarez-Lloret, P.; Ibáñez-Velasco, A.; Putnis, A.

    2015-05-01

    Among the most relevant mineral replacement reactions are those involving sulphates and carbonates, which have important geological and technological implications. Here it is shown experimentally that during the interaction of calcite (CaCO3) cleavage surfaces with sulphate-bearing acidic solutions, calcite is ultimately replaced by gypsum (CaSO4 2H2O) and anhydrite (CaSO4), depending on the reaction temperature. Observations suggest that this occurs most likely via an interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation reaction, in which the substrate is replaced pseudomorphically by the product. At 120 and 200 °C gypsum and/or bassanite (CaSO4·0.5H2O) form as precursor phases for the thermodynamically stable anhydrite. Salinity promotes the formation of less hydrated precursor phases during the replacement of calcite by anhydrite. The reaction stops before equilibrium with respect to calcite is reached and during the course of the reaction most of the bulk solutions are undersaturated with respect to the precipitating phase(s). A mechanism consisting of the dissolution of small amounts of solid in a thin layer of fluid at the mineral-fluid interface and the subsequent precipitation of the product phase from this layer is in agreement with these observations. PHREEQC simulations performed in the framework of this mechanism highlight the relevance of transport and surface reaction kinetics on the volume change associated with the CaCO3-CaSO4 replacement. Under our experimental conditions, this reaction occurs with a positive volume change, which ultimately results in passivation of the unreacted substrate before calcite attains equilibrium with respect to the bulk solution.

  17. Sulphate-activated growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes over copper catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jarrn-Horng; Chen, Ching-Shiun; Zeng, Zhi-Yan; Chang, Chia-Wei; Chen, Hsiu-Wei

    2012-07-01

    A sulphate-activated mechanism is proposed to describe the growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) over copper catalysts using chemical vapour deposition with helium-diluted ethylene. Sulphate-assisted copper catalysts afford a high-yield growth of bamboo-like CNTs at a mild temperature, 800 °C however, non-sulphate-assisted copper catalysts, e.g., copper acetate and copper nitrate prepared catalysts, were inert to CNT growth and only gave amorphous carbons (a-C) surrounding copper nanoparticles under the same conditions. Nevertheless, the addition of sulphate ions in the preparation step for the two inert catalysts can activate their abilities for CNT growth with remarkable yields. Furthermore, Raman spectra analysis demonstrates a linear dependence between the concentration of sulphate ions in copper catalysts and the ratio of CNT-a-C in the as-grown carbon soot. The sulphate-activated effect on CNT growth over copper catalysts could be related to a three-way interaction of sulphate ions, copper nanoparticles and support. In situ TEM images of an as-grown CNT irradiated by electron beams without the inlet of carbon sources reveal a new pathway of carbon diffusion through the bulk of copper nanoparticles and an enlarged inner-wall thickness of the on-site CNT. This carbon diffusion model over copper catalysts can provide new insights into the CNT growth mechanism over non-magnetic metal catalysts.A sulphate-activated mechanism is proposed to describe the growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) over copper catalysts using chemical vapour deposition with helium-diluted ethylene. Sulphate-assisted copper catalysts afford a high-yield growth of bamboo-like CNTs at a mild temperature, 800 °C however, non-sulphate-assisted copper catalysts, e.g., copper acetate and copper nitrate prepared catalysts, were inert to CNT growth and only gave amorphous carbons (a-C) surrounding copper nanoparticles under the same conditions. Nevertheless, the addition of

  18. Biological treatment of acidic coal refuse using sulphate-reducing bacteria with chicken manure as carbon source.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Haixia

    2014-01-01

    The performance of using chicken manure as carbon source to promote sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) activity within acidic coal refuse to prevent the generation of acidic leachate was investigated in batch and column bioreactors. The bioreactors showed satisfactory performance in biological sulphate reduction, evidenced by the increase in effluent pH, high removal efficiencies of sulphate and metals, and the presence of large numbers of SRB. Scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analysis of the formed precipitate indicated the formation of metal sulphides. Chicken manure was observed to play an important role in this treatment, which could not only provide carbon source but also reduce the adverse effect of strong acidity and metal toxicity on SRB activity. Metal removal could be mainly attributed to sulphides precipitation and sorption to chicken manure. This study indicated that SRB with chicken manure could be a novel alternative used for the prevention of acidic leachate from coal refuse. PMID:25189842

  19. Zinc sulphate and vitamin E alleviate reproductive toxicity caused by aluminium sulphate in male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Rawi, Sayed M; Seif Al Nassr, Fatma M

    2015-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the reproductive toxicity of aluminium sulphate and the therapeutic effects of administration of zinc sulphate and vitamin E individually or in combination against the toxic effect caused by aluminium (Al) in male albino rats. The animals were divided into five groups: group 1 received distilled water and served as control; group 2 received only aluminium sulphate (50 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)); group 3 received aluminium sulphate (50 mg/kg b.w.) plus zinc sulphate (50 mg/kg b.w.); group 4 received aluminium sulphate (50 mg/kg b.w.) and vitamin E (15 mg/kg b.w.); group 5 received aluminium sulphate plus a combination of zinc sulphate and vitamin E in similar doses as above. Doses were administered orally once daily for 45 consecutive days. The results revealed that aluminium sulphate induced significant decrease in body weight gain and testis weight and significant increase in Al level in both serum and testes of male rats. Biochemical analysis showed significant decrease in serum total protein and phospholipids levels, while serum total lipid was significantly elevated post Al treatment. In addition, significant decrease in total protein, phospholipids and cholesterol levels in the testes of Al-treated rats was recorded. The data also showed significant decrease in the levels of serum testosterone, leutinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone and significant increase in the level of serum prolactin in Al-intoxicated rats. Moreover, histological examination showed that aluminium sulphate caused apparent alterations in the testicular structure of the treated animals. Treatment with zinc sulphate and vitamin E individually or in combination ameliorated the harmful effects of Al, which was proved histopathologically by the noticeable improvement in the testicular tissues. We can conclude that the tested dose of aluminium sulphate induced toxic effect on the reproductive system of male albino rats and the treatment with

  20. TOUGH-Fx/Hydrate

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-02-01

    TOUGH-Fx/HYORATL can model the non-isothermal gas release. phase behavior and flow of fluids and heat in complex geologic media. The code can simulate production from natural gas hydrate deposits in the subsurtace (i.e., in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments), as well as laboratory experiments of hydrate dissociation/formation in porous/fractured media. T006H-Fx/HYDRATE vi .0 includes both an equilibrium and a kinetic model of hydrate Ibmiation and dissociation. The model accounts for heat and upmore » to four mass components-- i.e., water, CH4, hydrate, and water-soluble inhibitors such as salts or alcohols. These are partitioned among four possible phases (gas phase, liquid phase, ice phase and hydrate phase). Hydrate dIssociation or formation, phase changes, and the corresponding thermal effects are fully described, as are the effects of inhibitors. The model can describe all possible hydrate dissociation mechanisms, i.e., depressurization, thermal stimulation, salting-out effects, and inhibItor-Induced effects.« less

  1. Hydration processes on metal surfaces studied by IR and STM: a model for the potential drop across the electric double layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Masashi; Shingaya, Yoshitaka; Ito, Masatoki

    2002-04-01

    Four different hydration water molecules, a flat monomer, a tilted monomer, a tetramer cluster and an upright monomer, were observed on Ru(0 0 1). In situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of M(1 1 1)-√3×√7-(HSO -4+H 5O 2+) (M=Pt, Ir, Au, Ru(0 0 1)) in H 2SO 4 solution produced a zig-zag chain of hydration water molecules, revealing a large stabilization energy due to the formation of a hydrogen bonding network. Also 2×2-2CO + H 2O structure was observed on both Ru(0 0 1) electrode and Ru(0 0 1) ultra-high vacuum surfaces by STM and low energy electron diffraction. These model double layers including over-layer water molecules form a preferentially ordered structure in terms of hydrogen bonding at a negative electrode potential while also forming a disordered structure with a relatively random orientation in the over layer at a positive electrode potential. The preferential orientation of the large water dipole yields a strong electric field on the surface and lowers the frequencies of the adsorbed bisulfate S-O stretching or the CO stretching absorption band.

  2. Metal complexation and ion hydration in low density hydrothermal fluids: Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of Cu(I) and Au(I) in chloride solutions (25-1000 °C, 1-5000 bar)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Yuan; Liu, Weihua; Sherman, David M.; Brugger, Joël

    2014-04-01

    Low-density supercritical fluids are suspected of being able to transport metals, but it is unclear what the speciation/complexation would be in such conditions. In this work, we used ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the complexation, ion association and hydration of Cu+ and Au+ in NaCl brines as a function of solution density, from ambient to supercritical conditions (to 1000 °C, 5000 bar). Cu(I) and Au(I) form distorted linear complexes with two chloride ligands (i.e., CuCl2- and AuCl2-) in subcritical chloride brines. We have discovered that these charged complexes remain in high density supercritical fluids even at high temperature; however, with decreasing density, these complexes become progressively neutralized by ion association with Na+ to form low-charge (NanCuCl2)n-1 and (NanAuCl2)n-1 complexes. In these species, the Na+ ion is very weakly bonded in the outer coordination sphere, resulting in highly disordered structures and fast (few picoseconds) exchange among coordinated and solvent Na+ ions. Thermodynamic models to predict the solubility of metals in low-density magmatic or metamorphic fluids must account for these species. In addition, we found that the number of water molecules (i.e., the hydration number) surrounding the Cu+, Au+, Na+ and Cl- ions decreases linearly when fluid density decreases; this supports empirical thermodynamic models that correlate the stability constants of complexation reactions with solvent density. The traditional Born-model description explains the ion association as resulting from the decreased dielectric constant of the solvent. However at a molecular level, the increased ion association results from the increase in translational entropy associated with ion dehydration.

  3. Influence of respiratory substrate in carbon steel corrosion by a Sulphate Reducing Prokaryote model organism.

    PubMed

    Dall'agnol, Leonardo T; Cordas, Cristina M; Moura, José J G

    2014-06-01

    Sulphate Reducing Prokaryotes (SRP) are an important group of microorganisms involved in biocorrosion processes. Sulphide production is recognized as a fundamental cause of corrosion and nitrate is often used as treatment. The present work analyses the influence of respiratory substrates in the metal, from off-shore installations, SRP influenced corrosion, using Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATTC 27774 as model organism, since this can switch from sulphate to nitrate. Open Circuit Potential over 6days in different conditions was measured, showing an increase around 200 and 90mV for the different media. Tafel plots were constructed allowing Ecorr and jcorr calculations. For SRP in sulphate and nitrate media Ecorr values of -824 and -728mV, and jcorr values of 2.5 and 3.7μAcm(-2), respectively, were attained indicating that in nitrate, the resultant corrosion rate is larger than in sulphate. Also, it is shown that the equilibrium of sulphide in the solution/gas phases is a key factor to the evolution of corrosion Nitrate prevents pitting but promotes general corrosion and increases the corrosion potential and iron dissolution 40 times when compared to sulphate. Our results demonstrate that nitrate injection strategy in oil fields has to be considered carefully as option to reduce souring and localized corrosion. PMID:24238897

  4. Biopharmaceutical characterisation of ciprofloxacin-metallic ion interactions: comparative study into the effect of aluminium, calcium, zinc and iron on drug solubility and dissolution.

    PubMed

    Stojković, Aleksandra; Tajber, Lidia; Paluch, Krzysztof J; Djurić, Zorica; Parojčić, Jelena; Corrigan, Owen I

    2014-03-01

    Ciprofloxacin bioavailability may be reduced when ciprofloxacin is co-administered with metallic ion containing preparations. In our previous study, physicochemical interaction between ciprofloxacin and ferrous sulphate was successfully simulated in vitro. In the present work, comparative in vitro ciprofloxacin solubility and dissolution studies were performed in the reactive media containing aluminium hydroxide, calcium carbonate or zinc sulphate. Solid phases collected from the dissolution vessel with aluminium hydroxide, calcium carbonate and zinc sulphate were investigated for their properties. The results obtained indicate that different types of adducts may form and retard ciprofloxacin solubility and dissolution. In the case of aluminium, no phase changes were observed. The solid phase generated in the presence of calcium carbonate was identified as hydrated ciprofloxacin base. Similarly to iron, a new complex consistent with Zn(SO4)2(Cl)2(ciprofloxacin)2 × nH2O stoichiometry was generated in the presence of relatively high concentrations of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride and zinc sulphate, indicating that small volume dissolution experiments can be useful for biorelevant dissolution tests. PMID:24670353

  5. Asymmetric Membrane Osmotic Capsules for Terbutaline Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Gobade, N. G.; Koland, Marina; Harish, K. H.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to design an asymmetric membrane capsule, an osmotic pump-based drug delivery system of ethyl cellulose for controlled release of terbutaline sulphate. asymmetric membrane capsules contains pore-forming water soluble additive, sorbitol in different concentrations in the capsule shell membrane, which after coming in contact with water, dissolves, resulting in an in situ formation of a microporous structure. The terbutaline sulphate is a β-adrenoreceptor agonist widely used in the treatment of asthma. The oral dosage regimen of terbutaline sulphate is 5 mg twice or thrice daily, the plasma half-life is approximate 3-4 h and it produces GI irritation with extensive first pass metabolism. Hence, terbutaline sulphate was chosen as a model drug with an aim to develop controlled release system. Different formulations of ethyl cellulose were prepared by phase inversion technique using different concentrations of sorbitol as pore forming agent. It was found that the thickness of the prepared asymmetric membrane capsules was increased with increase in concentration of ethyl cellulose and pore forming agent, i.e. sorbitol. The dye release study in water and 10% sodium chloride solution indicates that, the asymmetric membrane capsules follow osmotic principle to release content. The pores formed due to sorbitol were confirmed by microscopic observation of transverse section of capsule membrane. Data of in vitro release study of terbutaline sulphate from asymmetric membrane capsules indicated that, the capsules prepared with 10% and 12.5% of ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol released as much as 97.44% and 76.27% in 12 h, respectively with zero order release rate. Hence asymmetric membrane capsule of 10% ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol is considered as optimum for controlled oral delivery of terbutaline sulphate. PMID:23204625

  6. Asymmetric membrane osmotic capsules for terbutaline sulphate.

    PubMed

    Gobade, N G; Koland, Marina; Harish, K H

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to design an asymmetric membrane capsule, an osmotic pump-based drug delivery system of ethyl cellulose for controlled release of terbutaline sulphate. asymmetric membrane capsules contains pore-forming water soluble additive, sorbitol in different concentrations in the capsule shell membrane, which after coming in contact with water, dissolves, resulting in an in situ formation of a microporous structure. The terbutaline sulphate is a β-adrenoreceptor agonist widely used in the treatment of asthma. The oral dosage regimen of terbutaline sulphate is 5 mg twice or thrice daily, the plasma half-life is approximate 3-4 h and it produces GI irritation with extensive first pass metabolism. Hence, terbutaline sulphate was chosen as a model drug with an aim to develop controlled release system. Different formulations of ethyl cellulose were prepared by phase inversion technique using different concentrations of sorbitol as pore forming agent. It was found that the thickness of the prepared asymmetric membrane capsules was increased with increase in concentration of ethyl cellulose and pore forming agent, i.e. sorbitol. The dye release study in water and 10% sodium chloride solution indicates that, the asymmetric membrane capsules follow osmotic principle to release content. The pores formed due to sorbitol were confirmed by microscopic observation of transverse section of capsule membrane. Data of in vitro release study of terbutaline sulphate from asymmetric membrane capsules indicated that, the capsules prepared with 10% and 12.5% of ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol released as much as 97.44% and 76.27% in 12 h, respectively with zero order release rate. Hence asymmetric membrane capsule of 10% ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol is considered as optimum for controlled oral delivery of terbutaline sulphate. PMID:23204625

  7. Differential expression of specific sulphate transporters underlies seasonal and spatial patterns of sulphate allocation in trees.

    PubMed

    Malcheska, F; Honsel, A; Wildhagen, H; Dürr, J; Larisch, C; Rennenberg, H; Herschbach, C

    2013-07-01

    Sulphate uptake and its distribution within plants depend on the activity of different sulphate transporters (SULTR). In long-living deciduous plants such as trees, seasonal changes of spatial patterns add another layer of complexity to the question of how the interplay of different transporters adjusts S distribution within the plant to environmental changes. Poplar is an excellent model to address this question because its S metabolism is already well characterized. In the present study, the importance of SULTRs for seasonal sulphate storage and mobilization was examined in the wood of poplar (Populus tremula × P. alba) by analysing their gene expression in relation to sulphate contents in wood and xylem sap. According to these results, possible functions of the respective SULTRs for seasonal sulphate storage and mobilization in the wood are suggested. Together, the present results complement the previously published model for seasonal sulphate circulation between leaves and bark and provide information for future mechanistic modelling of whole tree sulphate fluxes. PMID:23278135

  8. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years. PMID:17782901

  9. The impact of sulphate and magnesium on chloride binding in Portland cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    De Weerdt, K.; Orsáková, D.; Geiker, M.R.

    2014-11-15

    The effect of magnesium and sulphate present in sea water on chloride binding in Portland cement paste was investigated. Ground well hydrated cement paste was exposed to MgCl{sub 2}, NaCl, NaCl + MgCl{sub 2}, MgSO{sub 4} + MgCl{sub 2} and artificial sea water solutions with a range of concentrations at 20 °C. Chloride binding isotherms are determined and pH of the solutions were measured. A selection of samples was examined by SEM-EDS to identify phase changes upon exposure. The experimental data were compared with calculations of a thermodynamic model. Chloride binding from sea water was similar to chloride binding for NaCl solutions. The magnesium content in the sea water lead to a slight decrease in pH, but this did not result in a notable increase in chloride binding. The sulphate present in sea water reduces both chloride binding in C–S–H and AFm phases, as the C–S–H incorporates more sulphates instead of chlorides, and part of the AFm phases converts to ettringite.

  10. Combustion of Methane Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshandell, Melika

    A significant methane storehouse is in the form of methane hydrates on the sea floor and in the arctic permafrost. Methane hydrates are ice-like structures composed of water cages housing a guest methane molecule. This caged methane represents a resource of energy and a potential source of strong greenhouse gas. Most research related to methane hydrates has been focused on their formation and dissociation because they can form solid plugs that complicate transport of oil and gas in pipelines. This dissertation explores the direct burning of these methane hydrates where heat from the combustion process dissociates the hydrate into water and methane, and the released methane fuels the methane/air diffusion flame heat source. In contrast to the pipeline applications, very little research has been done on the combustion and burning characteristics of methane hydrates. This is the first dissertation on this subject. In this study, energy release and combustion characteristics of methane hydrates were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The experimental study involved collaboration with another research group, particularly in the creation of methane hydrate samples. The experiments were difficult because hydrates form at high pressure within a narrow temperature range. The process can be slow and the resulting hydrate can have somewhat variable properties (e.g., extent of clathration, shape, compactness). The experimental study examined broad characteristics of hydrate combustion, including flame appearance, burning time, conditions leading to flame extinguishment, the amount of hydrate water melted versus evaporated, and flame temperature. These properties were observed for samples of different physical size. Hydrate formation is a very slow process with pure water and methane. The addition of small amounts of surfactant increased substantially the hydrate formation rate. The effects of surfactant on burning characteristics were also studied. One finding

  11. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  12. Withdrawing Nutrition, Hydration

    Cancer.gov

    Module eleven of the EPEC-O Self-Study Original Version discusses the general aspects of withholding or withdrawing of life-sustaining therapies, and presents a specific application to artificial nutrition and hydration.

  13. Transformations in methane hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Chou, I-Ming; Sharma, Anurag; Burruss, Robert C.; Shu, Jinfu; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Stern, Laura A.; Kirby, Stephen H.

    2000-01-01

    Detailed study of pure methane hydrate in a diamond cell with in situ optical, Raman, and x-ray microprobe techniques reveals two previously unknown structures, structure II and structure H, at high pressures. The structure II methane hydrate at 250 MPa has a cubic unit cell of a = 17.158(2) Å and volume V = 5051.3(13) Å3; structure H at 600 MPa has a hexagonal unit cell of a = 11.980(2) Å, c = 9.992(3) Å, and V = 1241.9(5) Å3. The compositions of these two investigated phases are still not known. With the effects of pressure and the presence of other gases in the structure, the structure II phase is likely to dominate over the known structure I methane hydrate within deep hydrate-bearing sediments underlying continental margins. PMID:11087836

  14. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  15. Correlation analysis between sulphate content and leaching of sulphates in recycled aggregates from construction and demolition wastes.

    PubMed

    Barbudo, Auxi; Galvín, Adela P; Agrela, Francisco; Ayuso, Jesús; Jiménez, Jose Ramón

    2012-06-01

    In some recycled aggregates applications, such as component of new concrete or roads, the total content of soluble sulphates should be measured and controlled. Restrictions are usually motivated by the resistance or stability of the new structure, and in most cases, structural concerns can be remedied by the use of techniques such as sulphur-resistant cements. However, environmental risk assessment from recycling and reuse construction products is often forgotten. The purpose of this study is to analyse the content of soluble sulphate on eleven recycled aggregates and six samples prepared in laboratory by the addition of different gypsum percentages. As points of reference, two natural aggregates were tested. An analysis of the content of the leachable amount of heavy metals regulated by European regulation was included. As a result, the correlation between solubility and leachability data allow suggest a limiting gypsum amount of 4.4% on recycled aggregates. This limit satisfies EU Landfill Directive criteria, which is currently used as reference by public Spanish Government for recycled aggregates in construction works. PMID:22410435

  16. Uncovering the Relationship between Sulphation Patterns and Conformation of Iduronic Acid in Heparan Sulphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Po-Hung; Thieker, David F.; Guerrini, Marco; Woods, Robert J.; Liu, Jian

    2016-07-01

    The L-iduronic acid (IdoA) residue is a critically important structural component in heparan sulphate polysaccharide for the biological functions. The pyranose ring of IdoA is present in 1C4-chair, 2SO-skew boat, and less frequently, in 4C1-chair conformations. Here, we analyzed the conformation of IdoA residue in eight hexasaccharides by NMR. The data demonstrate a correlation between the conformation of IdoA and sulphations in the surrounding saccharide residues. For the 2-O-sulpho IdoA residue, a high degree of sulphation on neighboring residues drives ring dynamics towards the 2SO-skew boat conformer. In contrast, the nonsulphated IdoA residue is pushed towards the 1C4-chair conformer when the neighboring residues are highly sulphated. Our data suggest that the conformation of IdoA is regulated by the sulphation pattern of nearby saccharides that is genetically controlled by the heparan sulphate biosynthetic pathway.

  17. Uncovering the Relationship between Sulphation Patterns and Conformation of Iduronic Acid in Heparan Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Po-Hung; Thieker, David F.; Guerrini, Marco; Woods, Robert J.; Liu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The L-iduronic acid (IdoA) residue is a critically important structural component in heparan sulphate polysaccharide for the biological functions. The pyranose ring of IdoA is present in 1C4-chair, 2SO-skew boat, and less frequently, in 4C1-chair conformations. Here, we analyzed the conformation of IdoA residue in eight hexasaccharides by NMR. The data demonstrate a correlation between the conformation of IdoA and sulphations in the surrounding saccharide residues. For the 2-O-sulpho IdoA residue, a high degree of sulphation on neighboring residues drives ring dynamics towards the 2SO-skew boat conformer. In contrast, the nonsulphated IdoA residue is pushed towards the 1C4-chair conformer when the neighboring residues are highly sulphated. Our data suggest that the conformation of IdoA is regulated by the sulphation pattern of nearby saccharides that is genetically controlled by the heparan sulphate biosynthetic pathway. PMID:27412370

  18. Cryopegs as destabilization factor of intra-permafrost gas hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvilin, Evgeny; Bukhanov, Boris; Istomin, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A characteristic feature of permafrost soils in the Arctic is widespread intra-permafrost unfrozen brine lenses - cryopegs. They are often found in permafrost horizons in the north part of Western Siberia, in particular, on the Yamal Peninsula. Cryopegs depths in permafrost zone can be tens and hundreds of meters from the top of frozen strata. The chemical composition of natural cryopegs is close to sea waters, but is characterized by high mineralization. They have a sodium-chloride primary composition with a minor amount of sulphate. Mineralization of cryopegs brine is often hundreds of grams per liter, and the temperature is around -6…-8 °C. The formation of cryopegs in permafrost is associated with processes of long-term freezing of sediments and cryogenic concentration of salts and salt solutions in local areas. The cryopegs' formation can take place in the course of permafrost evolution at the sea transgressions and regressions during freezing of saline sea sediments. Very important feature of cryopegs in permafrost is their transformation in the process of changing temperature and pressure conditions. As a result, the salinity and chemical composition are changed and in addition the cryopegs' location can be changed during their migration. The cryopegs migration violates the thermodynamic conditions of existence intra-permafrost gas hydrate formations, especially the relic gas hydrates deposits, which are situated in the shallow permafrost up to 100 meters depth in a metastable state [1]. The interaction cryopegs with gas hydrates accumulations can cause decomposition of intra-permafrost hydrates. Moreover, the increasing of salt and unfrozen water content in sedimentary rocks sharply reduce the efficiency of gas hydrates self-preservation in frozen soils. It is confirmed by experimental investigations of interaction of frozen gas hydrate bearing sediments with salt solutions [2]. So, horizons with elevated pressure can appear, as a result of gas hydrate

  19. Formation of sulphate ion during the dehydration of sulphited vegetables.

    PubMed

    Wedzicha, B L; Herrera-Viloria, J C

    1991-01-01

    A reverse isotope dilution procedure was used to measure the formation of sulphate ion during the air dehydration of sulphited cabbage, carrot and potato at 80 degrees C. The conversion of sulphite to sulphate was found to be of first order with respect to sulphite. The formation of sulphate in the vegetables during dehydration accounts for only part of the sulphate in the dehydrated products; the remainder comes from the scald liquor. The technique for sulphate determination is critically evaluated and the observed yields discussed. PMID:1812014

  20. Methane Hydrates inventory for a warm Paleogene Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahana, R.; Ridgwell, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    -state hydrate stability model (Davie and Buffett, 2003) which simulates the vertical profile of methane (hydrates and free gas) in the sediment at a given location. We estimate the Paleogene methane inventory by running the 1D hydrate model on each of GENIE’s Paleogene ocean grid cells. Results with modern methanogenesis rates and Paleogene seafloor temperatures show extremely low volumes of methane hydrates anywhere in the ocean apart from the Arctic, which is not resolved adequately in GENIE. The hydrate model predicts that the warm Paleogene hydrates reservoir size was about an order of magnitude smaller than the modern and therefore not sufficient to cause the negative carbon excursion observed in the geological record. We will also show the sensitivity of the methane volume to a range of temperatures, organic Carbon levels and methanogenesis rates. References: D. Archer, B.A. Buffett and V. Brovkin, (2009) Ocean methane hydrates as a slow tipping point in the global carbon cycle, PNAS 106(49). M.K. Davie, B.A. Buffett, (2003) A steady state model for marine hydrate formation: constraints on methane supply from pore water sulphate profiles, J. Geophys. Res. 108.

  1. Stereoselective sulphate conjugation of racemic terbutaline by human liver cytosol.

    PubMed

    Walle, T; Walle, U K

    1990-07-01

    1. The enantioselectivity of the sulphation of racemic terbutaline by phenolsulphotransferases was examined in vitro using cytosol from human livers (n = 3) and [35S]-3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulphate (PAP35S) as the sulphate donor. 2. The radioactive sulphate conjugate formed was isolated by h.p.l.c. and its enantiomers were separated intact by h.p.l.c. after chiral derivatization. 3. Sulphation of racemic terbutaline occurred with the same apparent Km value for both enantiomers (270 microM). The extent of sulphation of the (+)-enantiomer was double that of the (-)-enantiomer, solely due to a difference in their apparent Vmax values. 4. Sulphation of racemic prenalterol, a structural analogue of terbutaline, also showed a two-fold preference for the (+)-enantiomer. 5. These findings suggest that enantioselective sulphate conjugation of chiral phenolic sympathomimetic amine drugs may lead to enantioselective pharmacokinetics that should be considered in the clinical use of these drugs. PMID:2390423

  2. Detailed analysis of methane hydrate concentrated zone of lobe type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Saeki, T.; Inamori, T.; Fujii, T.; Shimoda, N.

    2007-12-01

    Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (hereinafter called JOGMEC), as a member of MH21 Research Consortium, takes charge of a study of the Research for Resources Assessment, and is pursuing a possibility that methane hydrate, which is presumed to be distributed around ocean area of Japan, will be energy resources. JOGMEC is currently conducting analysis of seismic data which was acquired by 3D seismic survey conducted from Tokai-Oki to Kumano-nada in the eastern Nankai Trough by METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry) in 2002 under the national program of assessment for methane hydrates as energy resources. It was understood that methane hydrate was correlated to high resistivity and high velocity based on the results of drilling surveys and velocity analysis, and that methane hydrate concentrated zones can be roughly classified into the channels and lobes in seismic geomorphology because they were characterized with reserves consisting turbidite sand bodies. In this study, the detailed analysis of the inner structure of the methane hydrate concentrated zone of lobe type was conducted to understand the occurrence configurations of methane hydrates. The reflected waves that construct the methane hydrate concentrated zones in the seismic data were extracted and those reflected waves were classified into some groups every one reflector. As the result, some reflectors that construct the methane hydrate concentrated zones were revealed. Those reflectors show the layers including methane hydrates, and the detailed distribution of the methane hydrates in those layers was revealed by the intensity distribution of the amplitude. This time, we introduce the example of the detailed analysis of the methane hydrate concentrated zone in the lobe of submarine fan.

  3. Sulphation by cultured cells. Cysteine, cysteinesulphinic acid and sulphite as sources for proteoglycan sulphate.

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, D E; Silbert, C K; Silbert, J E

    1988-01-01

    Bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells, bovine aortic endothelial cells, and IMR-90 human embryonic lung fibroblasts were tested to determine their ability to use cysteine or cysteine metabolites as a source of sulphate (SO4). Cells were incubated in SO4-depleted medium containing [3H]glucosamine plus 0.2 mM-cystine, 0.3 mM-cysteinesulphinic acid or 0.3 mM-sulphite (SO3). The [3H]chondroitin sulphate produced by the different cells was found to vary considerably in degree of sulphation under these conditions. One line of smooth-muscle cells utilized cysteine effectively as a SO4 source and thus produced chondroitin sulphate which was highly sulphated. IMR-90 fibroblasts produced partly sulphated chondroitin sulphate under these conditions, while another smooth-muscle cell line could not utilize cysteine, but could utilize cysteinesulphinic acid as a partial SO4 source. In contrast with the above cells, endothelial cells could not use cysteine or cysteinesulphinic acid as a source of SO4 and produced chondroitin with almost no SO4. All of the cells were able to utilize SO3. Incubation of the cells in the SO4-depleted medium containing [35S]cysteine confirmed that only the first line of smooth-muscle cells could convert significant amounts of [35S]cysteine to 35SO4. Furthermore, the addition of 0.4 mM inorganic SO4 did not inhibit the production of SO4 from cysteine by these cells. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3138971

  4. Sulphation by cultured cells. Cysteine, cysteinesulphinic acid and sulphite as sources for proteoglycan sulphate.

    PubMed

    Humphries, D E; Silbert, C K; Silbert, J E

    1988-05-15

    Bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells, bovine aortic endothelial cells, and IMR-90 human embryonic lung fibroblasts were tested to determine their ability to use cysteine or cysteine metabolites as a source of sulphate (SO4). Cells were incubated in SO4-depleted medium containing [3H]glucosamine plus 0.2 mM-cystine, 0.3 mM-cysteinesulphinic acid or 0.3 mM-sulphite (SO3). The [3H]chondroitin sulphate produced by the different cells was found to vary considerably in degree of sulphation under these conditions. One line of smooth-muscle cells utilized cysteine effectively as a SO4 source and thus produced chondroitin sulphate which was highly sulphated. IMR-90 fibroblasts produced partly sulphated chondroitin sulphate under these conditions, while another smooth-muscle cell line could not utilize cysteine, but could utilize cysteinesulphinic acid as a partial SO4 source. In contrast with the above cells, endothelial cells could not use cysteine or cysteinesulphinic acid as a source of SO4 and produced chondroitin with almost no SO4. All of the cells were able to utilize SO3. Incubation of the cells in the SO4-depleted medium containing [35S]cysteine confirmed that only the first line of smooth-muscle cells could convert significant amounts of [35S]cysteine to 35SO4. Furthermore, the addition of 0.4 mM inorganic SO4 did not inhibit the production of SO4 from cysteine by these cells. PMID:3138971

  5. Nature of sulphated macromolecules in mouse Reichert's membrane. Evidence for tyrosine O-sulphate in basement-membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Paulsson, M; Dziadek, M; Suchanek, C; Huttner, W B; Timpl, R

    1985-01-01

    Seven different sulphated macromolecules were detected in 6 M-guanidinium chloride extracts of metabolically [35S]sulphate-labelled mouse Reichert's membrane and were partially separated. Polypeptide bands of apparent Mr 50 000, 150 000 (tentatively identified as entactin) and 170 000 contained essentially tyrosine O-sulphate as the labelled component. Most of the radioactive sulphate was incorporated into three different proteoglycans, which could be separated by chromatography and density-gradient centrifugation before and after enzymic degradation. Enzymic analysis of glycosaminoglycans and of protein cores by immunoassays identified these components as low-density and high-density forms of heparan sulphate proteoglycan and a high-density form of chondroitin sulphate or dermatan sulphate proteoglycan. Images Fig. 2. PMID:4074325

  6. Human liver steroid sulphotransferase sulphates bile acids.

    PubMed Central

    Radominska, A; Comer, K A; Zimniak, P; Falany, J; Iscan, M; Falany, C N

    1990-01-01

    The sulphation of bile acids is an important pathway for the detoxification and elimination of bile acids during cholestatic liver disease. A dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) sulphotransferase has been purified from male and female human liver cytosol using DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B and adenosine 3',5'-diphosphate-agarose affinity chromatography [Falany, Vazquez & Kalb (1989) Biochem. J. 260, 641-646]. Results in the present paper show that the DHEA sulphotransferase, purified to homogeneity, is also reactive towards bile acids, including lithocholic acid and 6-hydroxylated bile acids, as well as 3-hydroxylated short-chain bile acids. The highest activity towards bile acids was observed with lithocholic acid (54.3 +/- 3.6 nmol/min per mg of protein); of the substrates tested, the lowest activity was detected with hyodeoxycholic acid (4.2 +/- 0.01 nmol/min per mg of protein). The apparent Km values for the enzyme are 1.5 +/- 0.31 microM for lithocholic acid and 4.2 +/- 0.73 microM for taurolithocholic acid. Lithocholic acid also competitively inhibits DHEA sulphation by the purified sulphotransferase (Ki 1.4 microM). No evidence was found for the formation of bile acid sulphates by sulphotransferases different from the DHEA sulphotransferase during purification work. The above results suggest that a single steroid sulphotransferase with broad specificity encompassing neutral steroids and bile acids exists in human liver. PMID:2268288

  7. Bovine aortic chondroitin sulphate- and dermatan sulphate-containing proteoglycans. Isolation, fractionation and chemical characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, R; Phelps, C F; Cöster, L; Fransson, L A

    1981-01-01

    1. Guanidinium chloride (4M) in the presence of proteinase inhibitors extracted 90% of bovine aorta galactosaminoglycans as proteoglycans that were subsequently purified by ion-exchange and gel chromatography. 2. Fractionation of the calcium salts of the purified proteoglycans with increasing concentration of ethanol yielded fractions PG-25 (28%), PG-35 (45%) and PG-50 (37%). 3. Fraction PG-50 contained proteochondroitin 6-sulphate, whereas fractions PG-25 and PG-35 were proteodermatan sulphates of greatly different carbohydrate composition; the molar proportions of L-iduronate-N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulphate, D-glucuronate-N-acetyl-galactosamine 4-sulphate and D-glucuronate-N-acetylgalactosamine 6-sulphate were 75: 18 :7 in fraction PG-25 and 14 :46 :40 in fraction PG-35. 4. The presence of alternating or mixed sequences with L-iduronate- and D-glucuronate-containing repeating disaccharides was indicated by the formation of tetrasaccharides after chondroitinase AC digestion (single L-iduronate residues) and by the release of fragments containing four or five consecutive D-glucuronate-N-acetylgalactosamine repeats after periodate oxidation and alkaline elimination. 5. The amino acid compositions of fractions PG-25 and PG-35 were similar and markedly different from that of fraction PG-50, which also contained more side chains. PMID:6798960

  8. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large

  9. Influence of sulphate on the reduction of cadmium toxicity in the microalga Chlamydomonas moewusii.

    PubMed

    Mera, Roi; Torres, Enrique; Abalde, Julio

    2016-06-01

    Cadmium is considered as one of the most hazardous metals for living organism and ecosystems. Environmental factors play an important role since they alter the toxicity of metals by varying the bioavailability of these elements for the organisms. The aim of the present study was to investigate, using the freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas moewusii, the existence of an interaction between cadmium and sulphate as a factor that varied the toxicity of this metal. Different cell parameters such as cell growth, content of chlorophylls and biosynthesis of phytochelatins (PCs) were determined. A two-way ANOVA showed that the interaction had a significant effect size of 21% (p<0.001) for the growth of this microalga and around of a 6% on the content of chlorophylls/cell. The effect of this inhibition was that when the concentration of sulphate increased, a lower toxic effect of cadmium on the growth and on the content of chlorophylls was observed. In addition, the increase of sulphate concentration allowed the biosynthesis of a higher amount of PCs and/or PCs with higher chain length. This higher biosynthesis was responsible for the reduction of the toxic effect of cadmium and explained the interaction. PMID:26963118

  10. Dynamics of protein hydration water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, M.; Emmert, S.; Gulich, R.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Loidl, A.

    2015-09-01

    We present the frequency- and temperature-dependent dielectric properties of lysozyme solutions in a broad concentration regime, measured at subzero temperatures, and compare the results with measurements above the freezing point of water and on hydrated lysozyme powder. Our experiments allow examining the dynamics of unfreezable hydration water in a broad temperature range. The obtained results prove the bimodality of the hydration shell dynamics. In addition, we find indications of a fragile-to-strong transition of hydration water.

  11. Dynamics of protein hydration water.

    PubMed

    Wolf, M; Emmert, S; Gulich, R; Lunkenheimer, P; Loidl, A

    2015-09-01

    We present the frequency- and temperature-dependent dielectric properties of lysozyme solutions in a broad concentration regime, measured at subzero temperatures, and compare the results with measurements above the freezing point of water and on hydrated lysozyme powder. Our experiments allow examining the dynamics of unfreezable hydration water in a broad temperature range. The obtained results prove the bimodality of the hydration shell dynamics. In addition, we find indications of a fragile-to-strong transition of hydration water. PMID:26465518

  12. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  13. Influence of the hydration by the environmental humidity on the metallic speciation and the photocatalytic activity of Cr/MCM-41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elías, Verónica R.; Sabre, Ema V.; Winkler, Elin L.; Andrini, Leandro; Requejo, Félix G.; Casuscelli, Sandra G.; Eimer, Griselda A.

    2014-05-01

    The influence of the environmental humidity on the Cr species deposited on inorganic supports like MCM-41 silicates was analyzed by UV-vis Diffuse Reflectance (UV-vis RD), Electronic Spin Resonance (ESR) and X-ray near-edge (XANES) spectroscopy. Metal speciation could be inferred, finding that prolonged exposure periods under environmental humidity provoked the reduction of the active Cr6+ species and thus, the decrease of the Cr/MCM-41 photoactivity. After the Ti loading over the Cr modified samples, Cr species and the photoactivity were not notably influenced by the humidity exposure. Thus, it could be concluded that the presence of Ti is important because the TiO2 cover protects the oxidized Cr species, stabilizing them.

  14. Many-body exchange-repulsion in polarizable molecular mechanics. I. Orbital-based approximations and applications to hydrated metal cation complexes.

    PubMed

    Chaudret, Robin; Gresh, Nohad; Parisel, Olivier; Piquemal, Jean-Philip

    2011-11-15

    We have quantified the extent of the nonadditivity of the short-range exchange-repulsion energy, E(exch-rep), in several polycoordinated complexes of alkali, alkaline-earth, transition, and metal cations. This was done by performing ab initio energy decomposition analyses of interaction energies in these complexes. The magnitude of E(exch-rep(n-body, n > 2)) was found to be strongly cation-dependent, ranging from close to zero for some alkali metal complexes to about 6 kcal/mol for the hexahydrated Zn(2+) complex. In all cases, the cation-water molecules, E(exch-rep(three-body)), has been found to be the dominant contribution to many-body exchange-repulsion effects, higher order terms being negligible. As the physical basis of this effect is discussed, a three-center exponential term was introduced in the SIBFA (Sum of Interactions Between Fragments Ab initio computed) polarizable molecular mechanics procedure to model such effects. The three-body correction is added to the two-center (two-body) overlap-like formulation of the short-range repulsion contribution, E(rep), which is grounded on simplified integrals obtained from localized molecular orbital theory. The present term is computed on using mostly precomputed two-body terms and, therefore, does not increase significantly the computational cost of the method. It was shown to match closely E(three-body) in a series of test cases bearing on the complexes of Ca(2+), Zn(2+), and Hg(2+). For example, its introduction enabled to restore the correct tetrahedral versus square planar preference found from quantum chemistry calculations on the tetrahydrate of Hg(2+) and [Hg(H(2)O)(4)](2+). PMID:21793002

  15. Dermatan sulphate proteoglycans of human articular cartilage. The properties of dermatan sulphate proteoglycans I and II.

    PubMed Central

    Roughley, P J; White, R J

    1989-01-01

    Dermatan sulphate proteoglycans were purified from juvenile human articular cartilage, with a yield of about 2 mg/g wet wt. of cartilage. Both dermatan sulphate proteoglycan I (DS-PGI) and dermatan sulphate proteoglycan II (DS-PGII) were identified and the former was present in greater abundance. The two proteoglycans could not be resolved by agarose/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, but could be resolved by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, which indicated average Mr values of 200,000 and 98,000 for DS-PGI and DS-PGII respectively. After digestion with chondroitin ABC lyase the Mr values of the core proteins were 44,000 for DS-PGI and 43,000 and 47,000 for DS-PGII, with the smaller core protein being predominant in DS-PGII. Sequence analysis of the N-terminal 20 amino acid residues reveals the presence of a single site for the potential substitution of dermatan sulphate at residue 4 of DS-PGII and two such sites at residues 5 and 10 for DS-PGI. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2590169

  16. Diet-induced hypercholesterolemia imparts structure-function changes to erythrocyte chondroitin sulphate/dermatan sulphate.

    PubMed

    Kiran, G; Srikanth, C B; Salimath, P V; Nandini, C D

    2015-09-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is one of the factors contributing to cardiovascular problems. Erythrocytes are known to contribute its cholesterol to atherosclerotic plaque. Our earlier study showed that erythrocytes overexpress chondroitin sulphate/dermatan sulphate (CS/DS), a linear co-polymer, during diabetes which resulted in increased cytoadherence to extracellular matrix (ECM) components. This study was carried out to determine whether diet-induced hypercholesterolemia had any effect on erythrocyte CS/DS and impacted cytoadherence to ECM components. Unlike in diabetes, diet-induced hypercholesterolemia did not show quantitative changes in erythrocyte CS/DS but showed difference in proportion of un-sulphated and 4-O-sulphated disaccharides. Erythrocytes from hypercholesterolemic rats showed increased adhesion to ECM components which was abrogated to various extents when subjected to chondroitinase ABC digestion. However, isolated CS/DS chains showed a different pattern of binding to ECM components indicating that orientation of CS/DS chains could be playing a role in binding. PMID:25862809

  17. Rare earth element geochemistry in cold-seep pore waters of Hydrate Ridge, northeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himmler, Tobias; Haley, Brian A.; Torres, Marta E.; Klinkhammer, Gary P.; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Peckmann, Jörn

    2013-07-01

    The concentrations of rare earth elements (REEs), sulphate, hydrogen sulphide, total alkalinity, calcium, magnesium and phosphate were measured in shallow (<12 cm below seafloor) pore waters from cold-seep sediments on the northern and southern summits of Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon. Downward-decreasing sulphate and coevally increasing sulphide concentrations reveal sulphate reduction as dominant early diagenetic process from ~2 cm depth downwards. A strong increase of total dissolved REE (∑REE) concentrations is evident immediately below the sediment-water interface, which can be related to early diagenetic release of REEs into pore water resulting from the re-mineralization of particulate organic matter. The highest pore water ∑REE concentrations were measured close to the sediment-water interface at ~2 cm depth. Distinct shale-normalized REE patterns point to particulate organic matter and iron oxides as main REE sources in the upper ~2-cm depth interval. In general, the pore waters have shale-normalized patterns reflecting heavy REE (HREE) enrichment, which suggests preferential complexation of HREEs with carbonate ions. Below ~2 cm depth, a downward decrease in ∑REE correlates with a decrease in pore water calcium concentrations. At this depth, the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulphate reduction increases carbonate alkalinity through the production of bicarbonate, which results in the precipitation of carbonate minerals. It seems therefore likely that the REEs and calcium are consumed during vast AOM-induced precipitation of carbonate in shallow Hydrate Ridge sediments. The analysis of pore waters from Hydrate Ridge shed new light on early diagenetic processes at cold seeps, corroborating the great potential of REEs to identify geochemical processes and to constrain environmental conditions.

  18. Tinospora cordifolia consumption ameliorates changes in kidney chondroitin sulphate/dermatan sulphate in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Joladarashi, Darukeshwara; Chilkunda, Nandini D; Salimath, Paramahans V

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is known to alter kidney extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Chondroitin sulphate (CS)/dermatan sulphate (DS), an ECM component, which plays an essential role in kidney is altered during diabetes. The focus of this study has been to examine the effect of Tinospora cordifolia (TC) consumption, a potent plant widely used to treat diabetes, on kidney CS/DS. Experimentally induced diabetic rats were fed with diet containing TC at 2·5 and 5 % levels and the effect of it on kidney CS/DS was examined. The CS/DS content and CS:heparan sulphate ratio which was decreased during diabetic condition were ameliorated in TC-fed groups. Disaccharide composition analysis of CS/DS by HPLC showed that decreases in 'E' units and degree of sulphation were modulated in 5 % TC-fed groups. Apparent molecular weight of purified CS/DS from the control rat kidney was found to be 38 kDa which was decreased to 29 kDa in diabetic rat kidney. Rats in 5 % TC-fed groups showed chain length of 38 kDa akin to control rats. Expression of chondroitin 4-O-sulfotransferase-1, dermatan 4-O-sulfotransferase-1 and N-acetylgalactosamine 4 sulphate 6-O-sulfotransferase, enzymes involved in the synthesis of 'E' units which was reduced during diabetic condition, was significantly contained in the 5 % TC-fed group. Purified CS/DS from 5 % TC-fed group was able to bind higher amounts of ECM components, namely type IV collagen and laminin, when compared with untreated diabetic rats. The present results demonstrate that consumption of a diet containing TC at the 5 % level modulates changes in kidney CS/DS which were due to diabetes. PMID:25191554

  19. Tinospora cordifolia consumption ameliorates changes in kidney chondroitin sulphate/dermatan sulphate in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Joladarashi, Darukeshwara; Chilkunda, Nandini D.; Salimath, Paramahans V.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is known to alter kidney extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Chondroitin sulphate (CS)/dermatan sulphate (DS), an ECM component, which plays an essential role in kidney is altered during diabetes. The focus of this study has been to examine the effect of Tinospora cordifolia (TC) consumption, a potent plant widely used to treat diabetes, on kidney CS/DS. Experimentally induced diabetic rats were fed with diet containing TC at 2·5 and 5 % levels and the effect of it on kidney CS/DS was examined. The CS/DS content and CS:heparan sulphate ratio which was decreased during diabetic condition were ameliorated in TC-fed groups. Disaccharide composition analysis of CS/DS by HPLC showed that decreases in ‘E’ units and degree of sulphation were modulated in 5 % TC-fed groups. Apparent molecular weight of purified CS/DS from the control rat kidney was found to be 38 kDa which was decreased to 29 kDa in diabetic rat kidney. Rats in 5 % TC-fed groups showed chain length of 38 kDa akin to control rats. Expression of chondroitin 4-O-sulfotransferase-1, dermatan 4-O-sulfotransferase-1 and N-acetylgalactosamine 4 sulphate 6-O-sulfotransferase, enzymes involved in the synthesis of ‘E’ units which was reduced during diabetic condition, was significantly contained in the 5 % TC-fed group. Purified CS/DS from 5 % TC-fed group was able to bind higher amounts of ECM components, namely type IV collagen and laminin, when compared with untreated diabetic rats. The present results demonstrate that consumption of a diet containing TC at the 5 % level modulates changes in kidney CS/DS which were due to diabetes. PMID:25191554

  20. Improved lead recovery and sulphate removal from used lead acid battery through electrokinetic technique.

    PubMed

    Soundarrajan, C; Sivasankar, A; Maruthamuthu, S; Veluchamy, A

    2012-05-30

    This paper presents improvement in lead (Pb) recovery and sulphate removal from used Pb acid battery (ULAB) through Electrokinetic technique, a process aimed to eliminate environmental pollution that arises due to emission of gases and metal particles from the existing high temperature pyrometallurgical process. Two different cell configurations, (1) one with Nafion membrane placed between anode and middle compartments and Agar membrane between cathode and middle compartments and (2) another with only Agar membrane placed between both sides of the middle compartments were designed for the Pb and sulphate separation from ULAB. This paper concludes that the cell with only Agar membranes performed better than the cell with Nafion and Agar membranes in combinations and also explains the mechanism underlying the chemical and electrochemical processes in the cell. PMID:22483596

  1. Methane Clathrate Hydrate Prospecting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N.; Romanovsky, V.

    2003-01-01

    A method of prospecting for methane has been devised. The impetus for this method lies in the abundance of CH4 and the growing shortages of other fuels. The method is intended especially to enable identification of subpermafrost locations where significant amounts of methane are trapped in the form of methane gas hydrate (CH4(raised dot)6H2O). It has been estimated by the U.S. Geological Survey that the total CH4 resource in CH4(raised dot) 6H2O exceeds the energy content of all other fossil fuels (oil, coal, and natural gas from non-hydrate sources). Also, CH4(raised dot)6H2O is among the cleanest-burning fuels, and CH4 is the most efficient fuel because the carbon in CH4 is in its most reduced state. The method involves looking for a proxy for methane gas hydrate, by means of the combination of a thermal-analysis submethod and a field submethod that does not involve drilling. The absence of drilling makes this method easier and less expensive, in comparison with prior methods of prospecting for oil and natural gas. The proposed method would include thermoprospecting in combination with one more of the other non-drilling measurement techniques, which could include magneto-telluric sounding and/or a subsurface-electrical-resistivity technique. The method would exploit the fact that the electrical conductivity in the underlying thawed region is greater than that in the overlying permafrost.

  2. 21 CFR 520.62 - Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets. 520.62 Section 520.62 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets. (a) Chemical name. 4-(Dimethylamino)-2,2-diphenylvaleramide...

  3. 21 CFR 520.62 - Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets. 520.62 Section 520.62 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets. (a) Chemical name. 4-(Dimethylamino)-2,2-diphenylvaleramide...

  4. 21 CFR 520.62 - Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets. 520.62 Section 520.62 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets. (a) Chemical name. 4-(Dimethylamino)-2,2-diphenylvaleramide...

  5. 21 CFR 520.62 - Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets. 520.62 Section 520.62 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets. (a) Chemical name. 4-(Dimethylamino)-2,2-diphenylvaleramide...

  6. Sulphate Adsorption in Soils of North and Northeast Iran.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O) is used in agriculture both as a source of calcium (Ca) and sulphate (SO4) and as an amendment to improve soil structure. The effect of gypsum on the adsorption of SO4 in irrigated and nonirrigated soils was examined. Almost all of the indigenous sulphate (SO4) in a range of Gole...

  7. 21 CFR 520.62 - Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets. 520.62 Section 520.62 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets. (a) Chemical name. 4-(Dimethylamino)-2,2-diphenylvaleramide...

  8. Hydration-dependent dynamic crossover phenomenon in protein hydration water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Fratini, Emiliano; Li, Mingda; Le, Peisi; Mamontov, Eugene; Baglioni, Piero; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2014-10-01

    The characteristic relaxation time τ of protein hydration water exhibits a strong hydration level h dependence. The dynamic crossover is observed when h is higher than the monolayer hydration level hc=0.2-0.25 and becomes more visible as h increases. When h is lower than hc, τ only exhibits Arrhenius behavior in the measured temperature range. The activation energy of the Arrhenius behavior is insensitive to h, indicating a local-like motion. Moreover, the h dependence of the crossover temperature shows that the protein dynamic transition is not directly or solely induced by the dynamic crossover in the hydration water.

  9. Gas hydrate measurements at Hydrate Ridge using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, K. C.; Dunk, R. M.; White, S. N.; Brewer, P. G.; Peltzer, E. T.; Sloan, E. D.

    2007-06-01

    Oceanic gas hydrates have been measured near the seafloor for the first time using a seagoing Raman spectrometer at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon, where extensive layers of hydrates have been found to occur near the seafloor. All of the hydrates analyzed were liberated from the upper meter of the sediment column near active gas venting sites in water depths of 770-780 m. Hydrate properties, such as structure and composition, were measured with significantly less disturbance to the sample than would be realized with core recovery. The natural hydrates measured were sI, with methane as the predominant guest component, and minor/trace amounts of hydrogen sulfide present in three of the twelve samples measured. Methane large-to-small cage occupancy ratios of the hydrates varied from 1.01 to 1.30, in good agreement with measurements of laboratory synthesized and recovered natural hydrates. Although the samples visually appeared to be solid, varying quantities of free methane gas were detected, indicating the possible presence of occluded gas in a hydrate bubble fabric.

  10. Modification of chromate toxicity by sulphate in duckweeds (Lemnaceae).

    PubMed

    Appenroth, Klaus-J; Luther, Alexandra; Jetschke, Gottfried; Gabrys, Halina

    2008-09-17

    Two duckweed species, Spirodela polyrhiza and Lemna minor, were used to measure the toxicity of chromate (100 microM) at three levels of sulphate (13 microM, low sulphate=LS; 410 microM, normal sulphate=NS; 10,000 microM, high sulphate=HS). Growth rates calculated on the basis of dry weight, chlorophyll and carotenoid content were all reduced by chromate. This inhibition was the strongest under LS conditions and the weakest under HS conditions. Thus, sulphate decreases chromate toxicity-which conforms with its influence on chromate uptake reported previously (Kaszycki, P., Gabrys, H., Appenroth, K.-J., Jaglarz, A., Sedziwy, S., Walczak, T., Koloczek, H., 2005. Exogenously applied sulphate as a tool to investigate transport and reduction of chromate in the duckweed Spirodela polyrhiza. Plant Cell Environ. 28, 260-269). The three levels of sulphate were also applied during pre-cultivation of both species for 2 weeks and the consequences for chromate toxicity were tested thereafter. When S. polyrhiza was pre-cultivated in NS medium, the growth inhibition by chromate was approximately 80% of the control (no chromate) in the subsequently applied LS medium, and approximately 50% in HS. L. minor showed similar relationships but a lower overall chromate sensitivity. In comparison to the plants pre-treated in NS medium, those pre-treated in LS were more sensitive whereas those pre-treated in HS were less sensitive toward chromate. The present data demonstrate that chromate is taken up into cells of the two duckweed species by sulphate transporter(s). The rather weak influence of sulphate on chromate toxicity indicates that chromate binds to the transporters much stronger than sulphate. Moreover, the relative effects of sulphate on the chromate toxicity remain very similar regardless of pre-treatment. This confirms the conclusion from uptake experiments that pre-treatment with different levels of sulphate changes the number of sulphate transporters but their affinity remains

  11. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  12. Clathrate hydrates for ozone preservation.

    PubMed

    Muromachi, Sanehiro; Ohmura, Ryo; Takeya, Satoshi; Mori, Yasuhiko H

    2010-09-01

    We report the experimental evidence for the preservation of ozone (O(3)) encaged in a clathrate hydrate. Although ozone is an unstable substance and is apt to decay to oxygen (O(2)), it may be preserved for a prolonged time if it is encaged in hydrate cavities in the form of isolated molecules. This possibility was assessed using a hydrate formed from an ozone + oxygen gas mixture coexisting with carbon tetrachloride or xenon. Each hydrate sample was stored in an air-filled container at atmospheric pressure and a constant temperature in the range between -20 and 2 degrees C and was continually subjected to iodometric measurements of its fractional ozone content. Such chronological measurements and structure analysis using powder X-ray diffraction have revealed that ozone can be preserved in a hydrate-lattice structure for more than 20 days at a concentration on the order of 0.1% (hydrate-mass basis). PMID:20707330

  13. Sulphate release from building rubble of WWII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekiffer, Beate; Wessolek, Gerd; Vogeler, Iris; Brettholle, Mareike

    2010-05-01

    Sulphate concentration in the upper aquifer of Berlin, Germany is increasing continuously since 40 years. In downtown Berlin they particular exceed the precaution values of drinking water ordinance. We assume that the main source of sulphate in the groundwater is technogenic material, which is part of building rubble from WW II bombing. Nearly 115 Mio t of this material have been deposited in Berlin. Our aim is, ­ to identify rubble components which contain S and to quantify the S-pool of this material ­ to identify factors, influencing the release of SO4 and ­ to predict sulphate release from building rubble of WW II We analyzed total and water soluble S of various components and the fine earth fraction of the soils containing the rubble. We investigated the influence of physical and chemical parameters on the release of SO4 using unsaturated column experiments (With an automatic percolation system). Thereby, the particle size, the flow rate and the pH of the solution has been varied. Among the components, slag shows the highest total S-contents of up to 0,7% . Lignite Coal-ashes from Lusatia, Germany are also rich in SO4. The total S of brick varies between 0,01% and 0,3%. Mortar shows S-Values between 0,08 and 0,12%. In 75% of all samples show total S of less than 0,14%. There was no significant correlation between total S-amount and water-soluble SO4, which is caused by different chemical compounds in the samples. In the percolation experiments technogenic components with grain size <2mm cause a higher density, resulting in a lower percolation velocity. The concentration of ions in the according leachate is higher than in the leachate of coarse fraction (2 - 20mm). Gypsum-rich material (10%) released constant SO4 -concentration over the whole experiment. Slag-rich material released high initial SO4-concentrations which then fastly decreased. We concluded, that the kind of technogenic component and its grain size strongly influences the release of SO4 to the

  14. Sulphate release from construction and demolition material in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Stefan; Wessolek, Gerd

    2013-04-01

    In Berlin and many other cities soils are heavily influenced by anthropogenic activities and deposited substrates. A widespread technical substrate in technosols is construction and demolition material from residential and industrial buildings. Existing rubble landfills without sealing facilities pose threats to ground water quality. In the central city of Berlin rising sulphate concentrations of groundwaters (up to 1200 mg/L) are measured since more than two decades. Previous studies point out that the high sulphate concentrations are mainly attributed to World War II rubble. The major part of debris was deposited in form of landfills and contains approximately 0.3 wt% gypsum. The scope of our research is to determine mechanisms of sulphate release from debris material, interactions between sulphate release, soil hydraulic properties and potential sinks of sulphur. To estimate equilibrium concentration and kinetics of sulphate release of various debris components batch and column experiments are conducted. The same method is applied to determine potential adsorptive character of common debris components. To analyse the impacts of soil hydraulic properties on sulphate leaching we carry out soil column experiments with defined upper and lower boundary conditions, varying water flow velocity and induced preferential flow. Simultaneously we monitor sulphate concentration of soil leachate in a 2 m³ lysimeter. First results of the batch experiments show that gypsum from broken stucco is the main source of sulphate in the observed technosols. Other components as mortar and slag show a quite low sulphate release. Similar results are found within the column experiments. For brigs medium and strongly time dependent sulphate release is determined. Concentrations up to 1500 mg/L are measured in the soil leachate from the lysimeter.

  15. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  16. Tandem repeated application of organic solvents and sodium lauryl sulphate enhances cumulative skin irritation.

    PubMed

    Schliemann, Sibylle; Schmidt, Christina; Elsner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate the tandem irritation potential of two organic solvents with concurrent exposure to the hydrophilic detergent irritant sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS). A tandem repeated irritation test was performed with two undiluted organic solvents, cumene (C) and octane (O), with either alternating application with SLS 0.5% or twice daily application of each irritant alone in 27 volunteers on the skin of the back. The cumulative irritation induced over 4 days was quantified using visual scoring and non-invasive bioengineering measurements (skin colour reflectance, skin hydration and transepidermal water loss). Repeated application of C/SLS and O/SLS induced more decline of stratum corneum hydration and higher degrees of clinical irritation and erythema compared to each irritant alone. Our results demonstrate a further example of additive harmful skin effects induced by particular skin irritants and indicate that exposure to organic solvents together with detergents may increase the risk of acquiring occupational contact dermatitis. PMID:24457469

  17. Steroid hormone sulphation in lead workers.

    PubMed Central

    Apostoli, P; Romeo, L; Peroni, E; Ferioli, A; Ferrari, S; Pasini, F; Aprili, F

    1989-01-01

    The metabolism of steroid hormones has been investigated in 10 workers exposed to lead and in 10 non-exposed subjects to determine whether lead interferes with the first or second phase reactions of steroid hormone biotransformation, or both. In the exposed workers blood lead concentrations (PbB) ranged from 45 to 69 micrograms/100 ml; in the controls PbB was less than 25 micrograms/100 ml. No statistical differences were found for the total amount of the urinary hormone metabolites, but a drop of about 50% was observed for the sulphated portion. It is suggested that lead interferes with the mechanisms of sulphoconjugation through an effect on the cytosol enzymes sulphotransferase and sulphokinase. PMID:2930732

  18. Heparan sulphate proteoglycans in glia and in the normal and injured CNS: expression of sulphotransferases and changes in sulphation.

    PubMed

    Properzi, Francesca; Lin, Rachel; Kwok, Jessica; Naidu, Murali; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Ten Dam, Gerdy B; Camargo, Luiz M; Raha-Chowdhury, Ruma; Furukawa, Yoko; Mikami, Tadahisa; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Fawcett, James W

    2008-02-01

    Heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs) have multiple functions relevant to the control of the CNS injury response, particularly in modulating the effects of growth factors and localizing molecules that affect axon growth. We examined the pattern of expression and glycanation of HSPGs in the normal and damaged CNS, and in astrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursors because of their participation in the injury reaction. The composition of HS glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains was analysed by biochemical analysis and by the binding of antibodies that recognize sulphated epitopes. We also measured levels of HS sulphotransferases and syndecans. Compared with oligodendrocytes, oligodendrocyte precursors have more 2-O-sulphation in their HS GAG. This is accompanied by higher expression of the enzyme responsible for 2-O-sulphation, HS 2-O-sulphotransferase (HS2ST) and a fall in syndecan-1. Astrocytes treated with tumour growth factor (TGF)alpha or TGFbeta to mimic the injury response showed upregulation of syndecan-1 and HS2ST correlating with an increase in 2-O-sulphate residues in their HS GAGs. This also correlated with increased staining with AO4B08 anti-GAG antibody that recognizes high sulphation, and reduced staining with RB4EA12 recognizing low sulphation. After injury to the adult rat brain there was an overall increase in the quantity of HSPG around the injury site, mRNA for HS2ST was increased, and the changes in staining with sulphation-specific antibodies were consistent with an increase in 2-O-sulphated HS. Syndecan-1 was upregulated in astrocytes. The major injury-related change, seen in injured brain and cultured glia, was an increase in 2-O-sulphated HS and increased syndecan-1, suggesting novel approaches to modulating scar formation. PMID:18279312

  19. Investigation of shallow gas hydrate occurrence and gas seep activity on the Sakhalin continental slope, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Young Keun; Baranov, Boris; Obzhirov, Anatoly; Salomatin, Alexander; Derkachev, Alexander; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Minami, Hrotsugu; Kuk Hong, Jong

    2016-04-01

    The Sakhalin continental slope has been a well-known gas hydrate area since the first finding of gas hydrate in 1980's. This area belongs to the southernmost glacial sea in the northern hemisphere where most of the area sea is covered by sea ice the winter season. Very high organic carbon content in the sediment, cold sea environment, and active tectonic regime in the Sakhalin slope provide a very favorable condition for occurring shallow gas hydrate accumulation and gas emission phenomena. Research expeditions under the framework of a Korean-Russian-Japanese long-term international collaboration projects (CHAOS, SSGH-I, SSGH-II projects) have been conducted to investigate gas hydrate occurrence and gas seepage activities on the Sakhalin continental slope, Russia from 2003 to 2015. During the expeditions, near-surface gas hydrate samples at more than 30 sites have been retrieved and hundreds of active gas seepage structures on the seafloor were newly registered by multidisciplinary surveys. The gas hydrates occurrence at the various water depths from about 300 m to 1000 m in the study area were accompanied by active gas seepage-related phenomena in the sub-bottom, on the seafloor, and in the water column: well-defined upward gas migration structures (gas chimney) imaged by high-resolution seismic, hydroacoustic anomalies of gas emissions (gas flares) detected by echosounders, seafloor high backscatter intensities (seepage structures) imaged by side-scan sonar and bathymetric structures (pockmarks and mounds) mapped by single/multi-beam surveys, and very shallow SMTZ (sulphate-methane transition zone) depths, strong microbial activities and high methane concentrations measured in sediment/seawater samples. The highlights of the expeditions are shallow gas hydrate occurrences around 300 m in the water depth which is nearly closed to the upper boundary of gas hydrate stability zone in the area and a 2,000 m-high gas flare emitted from the deep seafloor.

  20. Hydration force between mica surfaces in aqueous KCl electrolyte solution.

    PubMed

    Leng, Yongsheng

    2012-03-27

    Liquid-vapor molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the interaction forces between two mica surfaces in an aqueous KCl electrolyte solution. Strong repulsive hydration force is obtained within a distance of ~2 nm between the two mica surfaces, which cannot be explained by the continuum theory of double-layer repulsion. We find that this short-range repulsive hydration force is much stronger than the double-layer force between mica surfaces. Whereas the simulation system is much smaller than the surface force measurement system, fundamental mechanisms of repulsive hydration force are revealed. In particular, important features of the step-like force oscillatory behavior during normal compression and force hysteresis during retraction are observed. Detailed analysis of the ionic density distributions shows that the "forced adsorption" of diffusive K(+) ions onto mica surfaces during compression and the subsequent "slow desorption" of the absorbed K(+) ions from mica surfaces upon retraction are responsible for the hysteresis phenomenon. From a mechanics point of view, we attribute the load bearing capacity of the dense electrolyte to the very hard hydration shells of K(+) metal ions under confinement. We find that the hydrated K(+) ions and Cl(-) co-ions remain very diffusive in the aqueous film. Water molecules in the hydration layer are also very fluidic, in the sense that the diffusion constant of water molecules is less than its bulk value by at most 3 orders of magnitude under the extreme confinement. PMID:22369483

  1. Interactions of Organic Additives with Ionic Crystal Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füredi-Milhofer, H.; Sikirić, M.; Tunik, L.; Filipović-Vinceković, N.; Garti, N.

    The interactions of two groups of hydrated model crystals, calcium hydrogenphosphate dihydrate (DCPD) vs. octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) vs. calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) with different organic additives are considered. DCPD precipitates as platelet-like crystals with the dominant faces shielded by hydrated layers and charged lateral faces. In the second system COM has charged surfaces, while all faces of COD are covered with layers containing water molecules. The organic molecules tested include negatively charged, flexible and rigid small and macromolecules (glutamic and aspartic acid, citrate, hexaammonium polyphosphate, phytate and polyaspartate) and anionic surfactants (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS, sodium diisooctyl sulfosuccinate, AOT, sodium cholate NaC and disodium oleoamido PEG-2 sulfosuccinate, PEG). Two types of effects have been demonstrated: (1) Effect on crystal growth morphology: Flexible organic molecules with high charge density and anionic surfactants affected the growth morphology of DCPD and COM by selectively interacting with the charged lateral faces while rigid molecules (phytate, polyaspartate) specifically recognized the dominant (010) face of DCPD due to structural and stereochemical compatibility. (2) Effect on phase composition: Anionic surfactants at concentrations above the cmc promoted growth of OCP and COD respectively by selectively adsorbing at, and inhibiting growth oif nuclei of DCPD and/or COM, which were dominant in the respective control systems. The effect was especially pronounced in the calcium oxalate precipitation system, where in some cases complete reversal of the phase composition occurred. The important role of the hydrated layer, as part of the structure of the investigated crystal hydrates, in the above crystal additive interactions is discussed.

  2. Concrete under sulphate attack: an isotope study on sulphur sources.

    PubMed

    Mittermayr, Florian; Bauer, Christoph; Klammer, Dietmar; Böttcher, Michael E; Leis, Albrecht; Escher, Peter; Dietzel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The formation of secondary sulphate minerals such as thaumasite, ettringite and gypsum is a process causing severe damage to concrete constructions. A major key to understand the complex reactions, involving concrete deterioration is to decipher the cause of its appearance, including the sources of the involved elements. In the present study, sulphate attack on the concrete of two Austrian tunnels is investigated. The distribution of stable sulphur isotopes is successfully applied to decipher the source(s) of sulphur in the deteriorating sulphate-bearing minerals. Interestingly, δ(34)S values of sulphate in local groundwater and in the deteriorating minerals are mostly in the range from+14 to+27 ‰. These δ(34)S values match the isotope patterns of regional Permian and Triassic marine evaporites. Soot relicts from steam- and diesel-driven trains found in one of the tunnels show δ(34)S values from-3 to+5 ‰, and are therefore assumed to be of minor importance for sulphate attack on the concretes. In areas of pyrite-containing sedimentary rocks, the δ(34)S values of sulphate from damaged concrete range between-1 and+11 ‰. The latter range reflects the impact of sulphide oxidation on local groundwater sulphate. PMID:22321257

  3. Keratan sulphate in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Spector, T D; Woodward, L; Hall, G M; Hammond, A; Williams, A; Butler, M G; James, I T; Hart, D J; Thompson, P W; Scott, D L

    1992-01-01

    Serum concentrations of antigenic keratan sulphate determined by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a monoclonal antibody were studied in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, other inflammatory diseases, and a large control group of women without arthritis. Mean keratan sulphate concentrations were low in 117 women with RA compared with 227 female control subjects matched for age drawn from a community survey. There were significant correlations between serum keratan sulphate concentrations in patients with RA and serum C reactive protein and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Serum keratan sulphate concentrations were also low in 29 men and women with ankylosing spondylitis and 29 patients with arthritis and high concentrations of C reactive protein. In 98 women undergoing an operation for benign breast disease there were decreases in serum keratan sulphate concentrations after the operation which correlated with doses in serum C reactive protein. No differences were found in keratan sulphate concentrations in 137 women with osteoarthritis compared with controls. Within the group with osteoarthritis there were no differences for the various joint groups and there was no obvious correlation with radiographic severity or progression. These findings suggest serum keratan sulphate is unlikely to be useful as a diagnostic marker in osteoarthritis or RA but indicate a role for inflammation in the regulation of cartilage loss. PMID:1444626

  4. Effects of glycerol on human skin damaged by acute sodium lauryl sulphate treatment.

    PubMed

    Atrux-Tallau, Nicolas; Romagny, Céline; Padois, Karine; Denis, Alain; Haftek, Marek; Falson, Françoise; Pirot, Fabrice; Maibach, Howard I

    2010-08-01

    Glycerol, widely used as humectant, is known to protect against irritants and to accelerate recovery of irritated skin. However, most studies were done with topical formulations (i.e. emulsions) containing glycerol in relatively high amounts, preventing drawing conclusions from direct effects. In this study, acute chemical irritations were performed on the forearm with application of a 10% sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) aqueous solution under occlusion for 3 h. Then, glycerol aqueous solutions from 1 to 10% were applied under occlusion for 3 h. After elimination of moist excess consecutive to occlusive condition, in ambient air for 15 and 30 min, skin barrier function was investigated by dual measurement of skin hydration and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Treatments with SLS solution under occlusion significantly increased TEWL and decreased skin hydration as assessed by capacitance measurements. The SLS irritant property was raised by the occlusion and the water barrier function as well as water content appeared impaired. Recovery with glycerol at low doses was remarkable through a mechanism that implies its hygroscopic properties and which is saturable. This precocious effect acts through skin rehydration by enhancing water-holding capacity of stratum corneum that would facilitate the late physiological repair of impaired skin barrier. Thus, glycerol appears to substitute for natural moisturizing factors that have been washed out by the detergent action of SLS, enhancing skin hydration but without restoring skin barrier function as depicted by TEWL values that remained high. Thus, irritant contact dermatitis treated with glycerol application compensate for skin dehydration, favouring physiological process to restore water barrier function of the impaired skin. Empirical use of glycerol added topical formulations onto detergent altered skin was substantiated in the present physicochemical approach. PMID:20043170

  5. Fast X-Ray Fluorescence Microtomography of Hydrated Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lombi, Enzo; de Jonge, Martin D.; Donner, Erica; Kopittke, Peter M.; Howard, Daryl L.; Kirkham, Robin; Ryan, Chris G.; Paterson, David

    2011-01-01

    Metals and metalloids play a key role in plant and other biological systems as some of them are essential to living organisms and all can be toxic at high concentrations. It is therefore important to understand how they are accumulated, complexed and transported within plants. In situ imaging of metal distribution at physiological relevant concentrations in highly hydrated biological systems is technically challenging. In the case of roots, this is mainly due to the possibility of artifacts arising during sample preparation such as cross sectioning. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microtomography has been used to obtain virtual cross sections of elemental distributions. However, traditionally this technique requires long data acquisition times. This has prohibited its application to highly hydrated biological samples which suffer both radiation damage and dehydration during extended analysis. However, recent advances in fast detectors coupled with powerful data acquisition approaches and suitable sample preparation methods can circumvent this problem. We demonstrate the heightened potential of this technique by imaging the distribution of nickel and zinc in hydrated plant roots. Although 3D tomography was still impeded by radiation damage, we successfully collected 2D tomograms of hydrated plant roots exposed to environmentally relevant metal concentrations for short periods of time. To our knowledge, this is the first published example of the possibilities offered by a new generation of fast fluorescence detectors to investigate metal and metalloid distribution in radiation-sensitive, biological samples. PMID:21674049

  6. Purification and characterization of heparan sulphate proteoglycan from bovine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Park, Y; Yu, G; Gunay, N S; Linhardt, R J

    1999-01-01

    A heparan sulphate proteoglycan was purified from adult bovine brain tissues and its structure was characterized. The major heparan sulphate proteoglycan from whole bovine brain had a molecular mass of >200 kDa on denaturing SDS/PAGE and a core protein size of 66 kDa following the removal of glycosaminoglycan chains. Fractionation on DEAE-Sephacel showed that this proteoglycan consisted of three major forms having high, intermediate and low overall charge. All core proteins were identical in size and reacted with heparan sulphate proteoglycan-stub antibody and an antibody made to a synthetic peptide based on rat glypican. The three forms of proteoglycans had identical peptide maps and their amino acid compositional analysis did not match any of the known glypicans. The internal sequence of a major peptide showed only 37.5% sequence similarity with human glypican 5. The glycosaminoglycan chain sizes of the three forms of this proteoglycan, determined after beta-elimination by PAGE, were identical. The disaccharide compositional analysis on the heparan sulphate chains from the three forms of the proteoglycan, determined by treatment with a mixture of heparin lyases followed by high-resolution capillary electrophoresis, showed that they differed primarily by degree of sulphation. The most highly sulphated proteoglycan isolated had a disaccharide composition similar to heparan sulphate glycosaminoglycans found in brain tissue. Based on their sensitivity to low pH nitrous acid treatment, the N-sulphate groups in these proteoglycans were found to be primarily in the smaller glycosaminoglycan chains. The heparan sulphate proteoglycans were also heavily glycosylated with O-linked glycans and no glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor could be detected. PMID:10585858

  7. Effect of temperature on the durability of class C fly ash belite cement in simulated radioactive liquid waste: synergy of chloride and sulphate ions.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, A; Goñi, S; Allegro, V R

    2009-06-15

    The durability of class C fly ash belite cement (FABC-2-W) in simulated radioactive liquid waste (SRLW) rich in a mixed sodium chloride and sulphate solution is presented here. The effect of the temperature and potential synergic effect of chloride and sulfate ions are discussed. This study has been carried out according to the Koch-Steinegger test, at the temperature of 20 degrees C and 40 degrees C during a period of 180 days. The durability has been evaluated by the changes of the flexural strength of mortar, fabricated with this cement, immersed in a simulated radioactive liquid waste rich in sulfate (0.5M), chloride (0.5M) and sodium (1.5M) ions--catalogued like severely aggressive for the traditional Portland cement--and demineralised water, which was used as reference. The reaction mechanism of sulphate, chloride and sodium ions with the mortar was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), porosity and pore-size distribution, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the chloride binding and formation of Friedel's salt was inhibited by the presence of sulphate. Sulphate ion reacts preferentially with the calcium aluminate hydrates forming non-expansive ettringite which precipitated inside the pores; the microstructure was refined and the mechanical properties enhanced. This process was faster and more marked at 40 degrees C. PMID:19056176

  8. Bubble migration during hydrate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagapov, V. Sh.; Chiglintseva, A. S.; Rusinov, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    A model of the process of migration of methane bubbles in water under thermobaric conditions of hydrate formation is proposed. The peculiarities of the temperature field evolution, migration rate, and changes in the radius and volume fraction of gas hydrate bubbles are studied. It is shown that, with a constant mass flow of gas from the reservoir bottom, for all parameters of the surfacing gas hydrate disperse system, there is a quasistationary pattern in the form of a "step"-like wave. Depending on the relationship of the initial gas bubble density with the average gas density in the hydrate composition determined by the depth from which bubbles rise to the surface, the final radius of hydrate particles may be larger or smaller than the initial gas bubble radii. It is established that the speed at which gas hydrate inclusions rise to the surface decreases by several times due to an increase in their weight during hydrate formation. The influence of the depth of the water reservoir whose bottom is a gas flow source on the dynamics of hydrate formation is studied.

  9. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  10. Effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement blended with siliceous fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Deschner, Florian; Lothenbach, Barbara; Winnefeld, Frank; Neubauer, Jürgen

    2013-10-15

    The effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement pastes blended with 50 wt.% of siliceous fly ash is investigated within a temperature range of 7 to 80 °C. The elevation of temperature accelerates both the hydration of OPC and fly ash. Due to the enhanced pozzolanic reaction of the fly ash, the change of the composition of the C–S–H and the pore solution towards lower Ca and higher Al and Si concentrations is shifted towards earlier hydration times. Above 50 °C, the reaction of fly ash also contributes to the formation of siliceous hydrogarnet. At 80 °C, ettringite and AFm are destabilised and the released sulphate is partially incorporated into the C–S–H. The observed changes of the phase assemblage in dependence of the temperature are confirmed by thermodynamic modelling. The increasingly heterogeneous microstructure at elevated temperatures shows an increased density of the C–S–H and a higher coarse porosity. -- Highlights: •The reaction of quartz powder at 80 °C strongly enhances the compressive strength. •Almost no strength increase of fly ash blended OPC at 80 °C was found after 2 days. •Siliceous hydrogarnet is formed upon the reaction of fly ash at high temperatures. •Temperature dependent change of the system was simulated by thermodynamic modelling. •Destabilisation of ettringite above 50 °C correlates with sulphate content of C–S–H.

  11. Some thermodynamical aspects of protein hydration water

    SciTech Connect

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Stanley, H. Eugene; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-06-07

    We study by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the self-diffusion of protein hydration water at different hydration levels across a large temperature range that includes the deeply supercooled regime. Starting with a single hydration shell (h = 0.3), we consider different hydrations up to h = 0.65. Our experimental evidence indicates that two phenomena play a significant role in the dynamics of protein hydration water: (i) the measured fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover temperature is unaffected by the hydration level and (ii) the first hydration shell remains liquid at all hydrations, even at the lowest temperature.

  12. There are two major types of skeletal keratan sulphates.

    PubMed Central

    Nieduszynski, I A; Huckerby, T N; Dickenson, J M; Brown, G M; Tai, G H; Morris, H G; Eady, S

    1990-01-01

    High-field 1H-n.m.r.-spectroscopic studies supported by chemical carbohydrate analyses show that skeletal keratan sulphates (KS-II) of bovine origin may be sub-classified into two groups. Keratan sulphate chains from articular and intervertebral-disc cartilage (KS-II-A) contain two structural features, namely alpha(1----3)-fucose and alpha(2----6)-linked N-acetyl-neuraminic acid residues, that are absent from keratan sulphates from tracheal or nasal-septum cartilage (KS-II-B). PMID:2222415

  13. ADR salt pill design and crystal growth process for hydrated magnetic salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor); DiPirro, Michael J. (Inventor); Canavan, Edgar R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A process is provided for producing a salt pill for use in very low temperature adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADRs). The method can include providing a thermal bus in a housing. The thermal bus can include an array of thermally conductive metal conductors. A hydrated salt can be grown on the array of thermally conductive metal conductors. Thermal conductance can be provided to the hydrated salt.

  14. Gas Hydrate Petroleum System Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, T. S.

    2012-12-01

    In a gas hydrate petroleum system, the individual factors that contribute to the formation of gas hydrate accumulations, such as (1) gas hydrate pressure-temperature stability conditions, (2) gas source, (3) gas migration, and (4) the growth of the gas hydrate in suitable host sediment can identified and quantified. The study of know and inferred gas hydrate accumulations reveal the occurrence of concentrated gas hydrate is mostly controlled by the presence of fractures and/or coarser grained sediments. Field studies have concluded that hydrate grows preferentially in coarse-grained sediments because lower capillary pressures in these sediments permit the migration of gas and nucleation of hydrate. Due to the relatively distal nature of the deep marine geologic settings, the overall abundance of sand within the shallow geologic section is usually low. However, drilling projects in the offshore of Japan, Korea, and in the Gulf of Mexico has revealed the occurrence of significant hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs. The 1999/2000 Japan Nankai Trough drilling confirmed occurrence of hydrate-bearing sand-rich intervals (interpreted as turbidite fan deposits). Gas hydrate was determined to fill the pore spaces in these deposits, reaching saturations up to 80% in some layers. A multi-well drilling program titled "METI Toaki-oki to Kumano-nada" also identified sand-rich reservoirs with pore-filling hydrate. The recovered hydrate-bearing sand layers were described as very-fine- to fine-grained turbidite sand layers measuring from several centimeters up to a meter thick. However, the gross thickness of the hydrate-bearing sand layers were up to 50 m. In 2010, the Republic of Korea conducted the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate (UBGH2) Drilling Expedition. Seismic data clearly showed the development of a thick, potential basin wide, sedimentary sections characterized by mostly debris flows. The downhole LWD logs and core data from Site UBGH2-5 reveal that each debris flows is

  15. Sulphate removal from sodium sulphate-rich brine and recovery of barium as a barium salt mixture.

    PubMed

    Vadapalli, Viswanath R K; Zvimba, John N; Mulopo, Jean; Motaung, Solly

    2013-01-01

    Sulphate removal from sodium sulphate-rich brine using barium hydroxide and recovery of the barium salts has been investigated. The sodium sulphate-rich brine treated with different dosages of barium hydroxide to precipitate barium sulphate showed sulphate removal from 13.5 g/L to less than 400 mg/L over 60 min using a barium to sulphate molar ratio of 1.1. The thermal conversion of precipitated barium sulphate to barium sulphide achieved a conversion yield of 85% using coal as both a reducing agent and an energy source. The recovery of a pure mixture of barium salts from barium sulphide, which involved dissolution of barium sulphide and reaction with ammonium hydroxide resulted in recovery of a mixture of barium carbonate (62%) and barium hydroxide (38%), which is a critical input raw material for barium salts based acid mine drainage (AMD) desalination technologies. Under alkaline conditions of this barium salt mixture recovery process, ammonia gas is given off, while hydrogen sulfide is retained in solution as bisulfide species, and this provides basis for ammonium hydroxide separation and recovery for reuse, with hydrogen sulfide also recoverable for further industrial applications such as sulfur production by subsequent stripping. PMID:23485244

  16. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    PubMed Central

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  17. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates.

    PubMed

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P; Andreev, Andrey S; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F; Flatt, Robert J; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of (29)Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  18. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured.

  19. Age-related changes in the sulphation of the chondroitin sulphate linkage region from human articular cartilage aggrecan.

    PubMed Central

    Lauder, R M; Huckerby, T N; Brown, G M; Bayliss, M T; Nieduszynski, I A

    2001-01-01

    The chondroitin sulphate (CS) linkage regions have been isolated from human articular cartilage aggrecan (from 10- to 72-year-olds) by chondroitin ABC endolyase digestion and size-exclusion chromatography. Linkage region hexasaccharides have been characterized and their abundance estimated by high-pH anion-exchange chromatography. The basic structure for the CS linkage region oligosaccharides identified from human aggrecan is as follows: DeltaUA(beta1-3)GalNAc[0S/4S/6S](beta1-4)GlcA(beta1-3)Gal[0S/6S](beta1-3)Gal(beta1-4)Xyl, where DeltaUA represents 4,5-unsaturated hexuronic acid, 4S and 6S represent an O-ester sulphate group on C-4 and C-6 respectively, and 0S represents zero sulphation. There are significant age-related changes in the abundance of the various N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) sulphation forms identified, occurring up to approx. 20 years old. During the period from 10 to 20 years old the level of GalNAc 6-sulphation at the linkage region increases from approx. 43% to approx. 75%, while there is a corresponding reduction in unsulphated (approx. 30% to approx. 20%) and 4-sulphated (approx. 25% to approx. 6%) GalNAc residues. There is also an increase in the incidence of linkage region galactose 6-sulphation (approx. 2% to approx. 10%) which was only observed in linkage regions with GalNAc 6-sulphation. Beyond 20 years old there are few changes in the relative abundance of these GalNAc sulphation variants; however, there is a slight increase in the abundance of 6-sulphation between approx. 20 years old and approx. 40 years old and a slight decrease in its abundance beyond approx. 40 years old. Our data show that in the majority of chains from tissues of all ages the GalNAc residue closest to the linkage region is 6-sulphated, but the level of GalNAc 6-sulphation within the linkage region is lower than the average level observed within the repeat region. PMID:11513754

  20. Fucose content of keratan sulphates from bovine articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Tai, G H; Brown, G M; Morris, H G; Huckerby, T N; Nieduszynski, I A

    1991-01-01

    Alkaline-borohydride-reduced keratan sulphate chains were isolated from bovine articular cartilage (6-8-year-old animals). Nine keratan sulphate fractions of increasing molecular weight were prepared by gel-permeation chromatography on a calibrated column of TSK 30 XL. The samples were analysed for fucose and galactose contents (% by wt. of keratan sulphate) and fucose/galactose ratio. The fucose content increased with molecular size, but the galactose content remained constant. It was concluded that the alpha(1----3)-linked fucose [Thornton, Morris, Cockin, Huckerby, Nieduszynski, Carlstedt, Hardingham & Ratcliffe (1989) Biochem. J. 260, 277-282] was located within the poly-N-acetyl-lactosamine repeat sequence of articular-cartilage keratan sulphate. PMID:1991030

  1. Water, Hydration and Health

    PubMed Central

    Popkin, Barry M.; D’Anci, Kristen E.; Rosenberg, Irwin H.

    2010-01-01

    This review attempts to provide some sense of our current knowledge of water including overall patterns of intake and some factors linked with intake, the complex mechanisms behind water homeostasis, the effects of variation in water intake on health and energy intake, weight, and human performance and functioning. Water represents a critical nutrient whose absence will be lethal within days. Water’s importance for prevention of nutrition-related noncommunicable diseases has emerged more recently because of the shift toward large proportions of fluids coming from caloric beverages. Nevertheless, there are major gaps in knowledge related to measurement of total fluid intake, hydration status at the population level, and few longer-term systematic interventions and no published random-controlled longer-term trials. We suggest some ways to examine water requirements as a means to encouraging more dialogue on this important topic. PMID:20646222

  2. Hydrated hydride anion clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han Myoung; Kim, Dongwook; Singh, N. Jiten; Kołaski, Maciej; Kim, Kwang S.

    2007-10-01

    On the basis of density functional theory (DFT) and high level ab initio theory, we report the structures, binding energies, thermodynamic quantities, IR spectra, and electronic properties of the hydride anion hydrated by up to six water molecules. Ground state DFT molecular dynamics simulations (based on the Born-Oppenheimer potential surface) show that as the temperature increases, the surface-bound hydride anion changes to the internally bound structure. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations are also carried out for the spectral analysis of the monohydrated hydride. Excited-state ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that the photoinduced charge-transfer-to-solvent phenomena are accompanied by the formation of the excess electron-water clusters and the detachment of the H radical from the clusters. The dynamics of the detachment process of a hydrogen radical upon the excitation is discussed.

  3. Vaporization study of sodium sulphate — potassium sulphate binary system by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armatys, K.; Miller, M.; Matraszek, A.; Wolter, A.

    2011-06-01

    The vaporization of samples of different chemical and phase compositions in the Na2SO4-K2SO4 system was investigated over the temperature range 1100 K-1400 K by the use of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry. The gaseous species Na(g), Na2SO4(g), K(g), K2SO4(g), SO2(g), O2(g) and NaKSO4(g) were identified in the vapour over the samples investigated. The thermodynamic activities of sulphates in the examined system at 1350 K were obtained, which allowed calculating the chemical composition of the vapours present in the high temperature zone of cement kilns.

  4. Enhancement of indirect sulphation of limestone by steam addition.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael C; Manovic, Vasilije; Anthony, Edward J; Macchi, Arturo

    2010-11-15

    The effect of water (H₂O(g)) on in situ SO₂ capture using limestone injection under (FBC) conditions was studied using a thermobalance and tube furnace. The indirect sulphation reaction was found to be greatly enhanced in the presence of H₂O(g). Stoichiometric conversion of samples occurred when sulphated with a synthetic flue gas containing 15% H₂O(g) in under 10 h, which is equivalent to a 45% increase in conversion as compared to sulphation without H₂O(g). Using gas pycnometry and nitrogen adsorption methods, it was shown that limestone samples sulphated in the presence of H₂O(g) undergo increased particle densification without any significant changes to pore area or volume. The microstructural changes and observed increase in conversion were attributed to enhanced solid-state diffusion in CaO/CaSO₄ in the presence of H₂O(g). Given steam has been shown to have such a strong influence on sulphation, whereas it had been previously regarded as inert, may prompt a revisiting of the classically accepted sulphation models and phenomena. These findings also suggest that steam injection may be used to enhance sulfur capture performance in fluidized beds firing low-moisture fuels such as petroleum coke. PMID:20958025

  5. 75 FR 9886 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. Federal... Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of methane hydrate...

  6. Standard enthalpies of formation of francium hydroxide hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Burylev, B.P.

    1995-03-01

    Available experimental data on standard enthalpies of formation of alkali metal hydroxide hydrates have been summarized. Using equations derived, the authors have calculated previously unknown enthalpies of formation of some lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium hydroxide hydrates. Taking into account the contribution of water to the enthalpies of formation of monohydrates, the authors have estimated the enthalpies of formation of francium hydroxide hydrates FrOH{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, FrOH{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, and FrOH{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O (-745.8, -1085.8, and -1515.8 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively).

  7. Reservoir controls on the occurrence and production of gas hydrates in nature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy Scott

    2014-01-01

    modeling has shown that concentrated gas hydrate occurrences in sand reservoirs are conducive to existing well-based production technologies. The resource potential of gas hydrate accumulations in sand-dominated reservoirs have been assessed for several polar terrestrial basins. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assigned an in-place resource of 16.7 trillion cubic meters of gas for hydrates in sand-dominated reservoirs on the Alaska North Slope. In a more recent assessment, the USGS indicated that there are about 2.42 trillion cubic meters of technically recoverable gas resources within concentrated, sand-dominated, gas hydrate accumulations in northern Alaska. Estimates of the amount of in-place gas in the sand dominated gas hydrate accumulations of the Mackenzie Delta Beaufort Sea region of the Canadian arctic range from 1.0 to 10 trillion cubic meters of gas. Another prospective gas hydrate resources are those of moderate-to-high concentrations within sandstone reservoirs in marine environments. In 2008, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management estimated that the Gulf of Mexico contains about 190 trillion cubic meters of gas in highly concentrated hydrate accumulations within sand reservoirs. In 2008, the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation reported on a resource assessment of gas hydrates in which they estimated that the volume of gas within the hydrates of the eastern Nankai Trough at about 1.1 trillion cubic meters, with about half concentrated in sand reservoirs. Because conventional production technologies favor sand-dominated gas hydrate reservoirs, sand reservoirs are considered to be the most viable economic target for gas hydrate production and will be the prime focus of most future gas hydrate exploration and development projects.

  8. Geochemical, metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into trace metal utilization by methane-oxidizing microbial consortia in sulphidic marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, DR. Jennifer; Yu, DR. Hang; Steele, Joshua; Dawson, Katherine; Sun, S; Chourey, Karuna; Pan, Chongle; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Orphan, V

    2013-01-01

    Microbes have obligate requirements for trace metals in metalloenzymes that catalyse important biogeochemical reactions. In anoxic methane- and sulphiderich environments, microbes may have unique adaptations for metal acquisition and utilization because of decreased bioavailability as a result of metal sulphide precipitation. However, micronutrient cycling is largely unexplored in cold ( 10 C) and sulphidic (> 1 mM H2S) deep-sea methane seep ecosystems. We investigated trace metal geochemistry and microbial metal utilization in methane seeps offshore Oregon and California, USA, and report dissolved concentrations of nickel (0.5 270 nM), cobalt (0.5 6 nM), molybdenum (10 5600 nM) and tungsten (0.3 8 nM) in Hydrate Ridge sediment porewaters. Despite low levels of cobalt and tungsten, metagenomic and metaproteomic data suggest that microbial consortia catalysing anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) utilize both scarce micronutrients in addition to nickel and molybdenum. Genetic machinery for cobalt-containing vitamin B12 biosynthesis was present in both anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulphate-reducing bacteria. Proteins affiliated with the tungsten-containing form of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase were expressed in ANME from two seep ecosystems, the first evidence for expression of a tungstoenzyme in psychrophilic microorganisms. Overall, our data suggest that AOM consortia use specialized biochemical strategies to overcome the challenges of metal availability in sulphidic environments.

  9. Geochemical, metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into trace metal utilization by methane-oxidizing microbial consortia in sulphidic marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Glass, Jennifer B; Yu, Hang; Steele, Joshua A; Dawson, Katherine S; Sun, Shulei; Chourey, Karuna; Pan, Chongle; Hettich, Robert L; Orphan, Victoria J

    2014-06-01

    Microbes have obligate requirements for trace metals in metalloenzymes that catalyse important biogeochemical reactions. In anoxic methane- and sulphide-rich environments, microbes may have unique adaptations for metal acquisition and utilization because of decreased bioavailability as a result of metal sulphide precipitation. However, micronutrient cycling is largely unexplored in cold (≤ 10°C) and sulphidic (> 1 mM ΣH(2)S) deep-sea methane seep ecosystems. We investigated trace metal geochemistry and microbial metal utilization in methane seeps offshore Oregon and California, USA, and report dissolved concentrations of nickel (0.5-270 nM), cobalt (0.5-6 nM), molybdenum (10-5600 nM) and tungsten (0.3-8 nM) in Hydrate Ridge sediment porewaters. Despite low levels of cobalt and tungsten, metagenomic and metaproteomic data suggest that microbial consortia catalysing anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) utilize both scarce micronutrients in addition to nickel and molybdenum. Genetic machinery for cobalt-containing vitamin B12 biosynthesis was present in both anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulphate-reducing bacteria. Proteins affiliated with the tungsten-containing form of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase were expressed in ANME from two seep ecosystems, the first evidence for expression of a tungstoenzyme in psychrophilic microorganisms. Overall, our data suggest that AOM consortia use specialized biochemical strategies to overcome the challenges of metal availability in sulphidic environments. PMID:24148160

  10. Obsidian Hydration: A New Paleothermometer

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Riciputi, Lee R; Cole, David R; Fayek, Mostafa; Elam, J. Michael

    2006-01-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  11. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow. PMID:17806883

  12. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Pierce, K.L.; Obradovich, J.D.; Long, W.D.

    1973-01-01

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming . The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  13. The effect of oral inorganic sulphate on the metabolism of 4-hydroxyphenethylamine (tyramine) in man: tyramine O-sulphate measurement in human urine (Short Communication)

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ivor; Mitchell, Paul D.

    1974-01-01

    1. Urinary excretion of tyramine O-sulphate in six normal human subjects after an oral dose of 125mg of tyramine hydrochloride alone, and with a supplement of Na2SO4, was determined by using chromatographic and electrophoretic separations followed by spectrophotofluorimetry. 2. In every case the excretion of tyramine O-sulphate was increased significantly after sulphate supplementation. PMID:4441371

  14. Crowding induced collective hydration of biological macromolecules over extended distances

    PubMed Central

    King, John T.; Arthur, Evan J.; Brooks, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy reveals picosecond protein and hydration dynamics of crowded hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) labeled with a metal-carbonyl vibrational probe covalently attached to a solvent accessible His residue. HEWL is systematically crowded alternatively with polyethylene glycol (PEG) or excess lysozyme in order to distinguish the chemically inert polymer from the complex electrostatic profile of the protein crowder. The results are threefold: (1) A sharp dynamical jamming-like transition is observed in the picosecond protein and hydration dynamics that is attributed to an independent-to-collective hydration transition induced by macromolecular crowding that slows the hydration dynamics up to an order of magnitude relative to bulk water; (2) The interprotein distance at which the transition occurs suggests collective hydration of proteins over distances of 30-40 Å; and (3) Comparing the crowding effects of PEG400 to our previously reported experiments using glycerol exposes fundamental differences between small and macromolecular crowding agents. PMID:24341684

  15. Hydrate control in deepwater drilling

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Gas-hydrate formation during deepwater offshore drilling and production is a well-recognized operational hazard. In water depths greater than 1,000 ft, seabed conditions of pressure and temperature become conducive to gas-hydrate formation. In a well-control situation, although the kick fluid leaves the formation at a high temperature, it can cool to seabed temperature with an extended shut-in period. With high enough hydrostatic pressure at the mudline, hydrates could form in the blowout-preventer (BOP) stack and choke and kill lines, as has been observed in field operations. The current practice in deepwater drilling is to suppress the hydrate-formation temperature by use of highly saline drilling fluids formulated from NaCl or other salts. This solution is applicable for the Gulf of Mexico but insufficient for the conditions encountered in Norwegian deep waters. At extreme water depths or extremely low mudline temperatures, this thermodynamic inhibition alone may not be sufficient to prevent hydrate formation. Instead, the use of kinetic inhibitors or crystal modifiers, in conjunction with thermodynamic inhibitors, may allow successful operations in such an environment. The definition of kinetic inhibitors (to distinguish them from the classic thermodynamic inhibitors, such as polar compounds and electrolytes) comes from the effect of the chemicals on the nucleation and growth of natural gas hydrates, both of which are time-dependent, stochastic processes. The paper describes deepwater drilling fluids, polar and surface-active additives, kinetic inhibition and crystal modifiers, laboratory measurements, and test results.

  16. Preparation and characterization of titanium dioxide nanotube array supported hydrated ruthenium oxide catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giang, Thi Phuong Ly; Tran, Thi Nhu Mai; Le, Xuan Tuan

    2012-03-01

    This work aimed at preparing and characterizing TiO2 nanotube supported hydrated ruthenium oxide catalysts. First of all, we succeeded in preparing TiO2 nanotube arrays by electrochemical anodization of titanium metal at 20 V for 8 h in a 1M H3PO4+0.5 wt% HF solution as evidenced from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results. The hydrated ruthenium oxide was then deposited onto TiO2 nanotubes by consecutive exchange of protons by Ru3+ ions, followed by formation of hydrated oxide during the alkali treatment. Further XPS measurements showed that the modified samples contain not only hydrated ruthenium oxide but also hydrated ruthenium species Ru(III)-OH.

  17. Two linkage-region fragments isolated from skeletal keratan sulphate contain a sulphated N-acetylglucosamine residue.

    PubMed Central

    Dickenson, J M; Huckerby, T N; Nieduszynski, I A

    1990-01-01

    Peptido-keratan sulphate fragments were isolated from the nucleus pulposus of bovine intervertebral discs (6-year-old animals) after chondroitin ABC lyase digestion followed by digestion of A1D1 proteoglycans by diphenylcarbamoyl chloride-treated trypsin and gel-permeation chromatography on Sepharose CL-6B. Treatment of these peptido-keratan sulphate fragments with alkaline NaB3H4 yielded keratan sulphate chains with [3H]galactosaminitol end-labels, and these chains were further purified by gel-permeation chromatography on Sephadex G-50 and ion-exchange chromatography on a Pharmacia Mono-Q column in order to exclude any contamination with O-linked oligosaccharides. The chains were then treated with keratanase, and the digest was chromatographed on a Bio-Gel P-4 column followed by anion-exchange chromatography on a Nucleosil 5 SB column. Two oligosaccharides, each representing 18% of the recovered radiolabel, were examined by 500 MHz 1H-n.m.r. spectroscopy, and shown to have the following structures: [formula: see text] The structure of oligosaccharide (I) confirms the N-acetylneuraminylgalactose substitution at position 3 of N-acetylgalactosamine in the keratan sulphate-protein linkage region found by Hopwood & Robinson [(1974) Biochem. J. 141, 57-69] but additionally shows the presence of a 6-sulphated N-acetylglucosamine. Electron micro-probe analysis specifically confirmed the presence of sulphur in this sample. This sulphate ester group differentiates the keratan sulphate linkage region from similar structures derived from O-linked oligosaccharides [Lohmander, De Luca, Nilsson, Hascall, Caputo, Kimura & Heinegård (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 6084-6091]. PMID:2142881

  18. Bioavailability of sulphate and dihydrochloride salts of quinine.

    PubMed

    Sowunmi, A; Salako, L A; Ogunbona, F A

    1994-09-01

    A comparative bioavailability of three formulations of quinine was performed in 6 healthy male adult Africans after intravenous infusion of 600mg quinine hydrochloride in 0.9% saline over 4 hours and after single oral doses of 600mg quinine sulphate capsule, 600mg quinine dihydrochloride plain tablet and 600mg quinine sulphate sugar coated tablet. The drugs were given according to a randomised cross-over design. The quinine sulphate coated tablet was found to contain no quinine. There was no statistical significant difference (P > 0.05) in the plasma Cmax, tmax, AUC and Ka values between the quinine sulphate capsule and quinine dihydrochloride plain tablet, although a considerable degree of inter- and intra-individual variability in the pharmacokinetic parameters was observed. The absolute bioavailability was 64.5 and 64.3% for the quinine sulphate capsule and the quinine dihydrochloride plain tablet respectively. The non-detection of quinine in the sugar coated tablet (obtained from Nigeria) confirms the presence of fake circulating antimalarial drugs in the country. PMID:7604754

  19. Impacts of Hydrate Pore Habit on Physical Properties of Hydrate Bearing Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, Y.; Dai, S.; Choi, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate bearing sediments, to a large extent, are governed by the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. For sediments containing the same amount of hydrates, their overall physical properties may vary several orders of magnitude depending on hydrate pore habit. We investigate the interplay among hydrate formation methods, hydrate pore habits, and fundamental physical properties of hydrate bearing sediments. We have developed a new method to synthesize noncementing hydrate in sands, a multi-properties characterization chamber to test the hydrate bearing sediments, and pore network models to simulate fluid flow processes in hydrate bearing sediments. We have found that (1) the growth pattern of hydrate crystal in the pore spaces of water saturated sediments is dominated by the relative magnitude of the capillary force (between hydrate crystal and pore fluid) and the skeleton force, which will result in pore-filling or grain-displacing type of hydrate pore character; (2) the existing capillary tube models of water permeability in hydrate bearing sediments are sensitive to pore geometry and hydrate pore habit; and (3) preliminary CT results suggest that hydrate nucleation in partially water saturated sands tends to agglomerate in patches, rather than in an uniformly-distributed contact-cementing morphology. Additional CT results with a small amount of fines (5wt%) and visualization via micro-CT of hydrate pore habits in sediments using different hydrate formation methods will be discussed.

  20. Energy resource potential of natural gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of large gas hydrate accumulations in terrestrial permafrost regions of the Arctic and beneath the sea along the outer continental margins of the world's oceans has heightened interest in gas hydrates as a possible energy resource. However, significant to potentially insurmountable technical issues must be resolved before gas hydrates can be considered a viable option for affordable supplies of natural gas. The combined information from Arctic gas hydrate studies shows that, in permafrost regions, gas hydrates may exist at subsurface depths ranging from about 130 to 2000 m. The presence of gas hydrates in offshore continental margins has been inferred mainly from anomalous seismic reflectors, known as bottom-simulating reflectors, that have been mapped at depths below the sea floor ranging from about 100 to 1100 m. Current estimates of the amount of gas in the world's marine and permafrost gas hydrate accumulations are in rough accord at about 20,000 trillion m3. Disagreements over fundamental issues such as the volume of gas stored within delineated gas hydrate accumulations and the concentration of gas hydrates within hydrate-bearing strata have demonstrated that we know little about gas hydrates. Recently, however, several countries, including Japan, India, and the United States, have launched ambitious national projects to further examine the resource potential of gas hydrates. These projects may help answer key questions dealing with the properties of gas hydrate reservoirs, the design of production systems, and, most important, the costs and economics of gas hydrate production.

  1. NATURAL GAS HYDRATES STORAGE PROJECT PHASE II. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ECONOMIC STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    R.E. Rogers

    1999-09-27

    DOE Contract DE-AC26-97FT33203 studied feasibility of utilizing the natural-gas storage property of gas hydrates, so abundantly demonstrated in nature, as an economical industrial process to allow expanded use of the clean-burning fuel in power plants. The laboratory work achieved breakthroughs: (1) Gas hydrates were found to form orders of magnitude faster in an unstirred system with surfactant-water micellar solutions. (2) Hydrate particles were found to self-pack by adsorption on cold metal surfaces from the micellar solutions. (3) Interstitial micellar-water of the packed particles were found to continue forming hydrates. (4) Aluminum surfaces were found to most actively collect the hydrate particles. These laboratory developments were the bases of a conceptual design for a large-scale process where simplification enhances economy. In the design, hydrates form, store, and decompose in the same tank in which gas is pressurized to 550 psi above unstirred micellar solution, chilled by a brine circulating through a bank of aluminum tubing in the tank employing gas-fired refrigeration. Hydrates form on aluminum plates suspended in the chilled micellar solution. A low-grade heat source, such as 110 F water of a power plant, circulates through the tubing bank to release stored gas. The design allows a formation/storage/decomposition cycle in a 24-hour period of 2,254,000 scf of natural gas; the capability of multiple cycles is an advantage of the process. The development costs and the user costs of storing natural gas in a scaled hydrate process were estimated to be competitive with conventional storage means if multiple cycles of hydrate storage were used. If more than 54 cycles/year were used, hydrate development costs per Mscf would be better than development costs of depleted reservoir storage; above 125 cycles/year, hydrate user costs would be lower than user costs of depleted reservoir storage.

  2. Immunohistochemical identification of heparan sulphate proteoglycan in secondary systemic amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Norling, B; Westermark, G T; Westermark, P

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of proteoglycans in kidneys from patients with secondary (AA) systemic amyloidosis was investigated. Antisera reacting with the protein cores of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSPG), dermatan sulphate proteoglycan (DSPG) and heparan sulphate proteoglycan (HSPG) were used in conjunction with the peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) method. HSPG was the only proteoglycan found to be specifically localized to the amyloid deposits. The staining was most intense on the endothelial side of the deposits in both the glomeruli and in the vessel walls. No staining was observed after absorption of the HSPG antiserum with a fraction of the amyloid preparations, corresponding in size to that reported for glomerular HSPG. The possible role of HSPG and endothelial cells in the pathogenesis of the amyloid deposits is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3052949

  3. The alkali-labile linkage between keratan sulphate and protein

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, John J.; Robinson, H. Clem

    1974-01-01

    Keratan sulphate was isolated from adult intervertebral disc in 90% yield by sequential digestion of the whole tissue with papain, Pronase and Proteus vulgaris chondroitin sulphate lyase. Treatment of this preparation with alkali cleaved a glycosidic bond between N-acetylgalactosamine and threonine and produced, by an alkali-catalysed `peeling' reaction, an unsaturated derivative of N-acetylgalactosamine which reacted as a chromogen in the Morgan–Elson reaction, but remained covalently bonded to the keratan sulphate chain. This derivative was reduced and labelled by alkaline NaB3H4. The substituent at position 3 of N-acetylgalactosamine in the keratan sulphate–protein linkage was identified as a disaccharide, N-acetylneuraminylgalactose, which was isolated from the reaction mixture after alkali treatment. PMID:4281652

  4. Magnesium sulphate for fetal neuroprotection: a cost-effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of administering magnesium sulphate to patients in whom preterm birth at < 32+0 weeks gestation is either imminent or threatened for the purpose of fetal neuroprotection. Methods Multiple decision tree models and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were used to compare the administration of magnesium sulphate with the alternative of no treatment. Two separate cost perspectives were utilized in this series of analyses: a health system and a societal perspective. In addition, two separate measures of effectiveness were utilized: cases of cerebral palsy (CP) averted and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Results From a health system and a societal perspective, respectively, a savings of $2,242 and $112,602 is obtained for each QALY gained and a savings of $30,942 and $1,554,198 is obtained for each case of CP averted when magnesium sulphate is administered to patients in whom preterm birth is imminent. From a health system perspective and a societal perspective, respectively, a cost of $2,083 is incurred and a savings of $108,277 is obtained for each QALY gained and a cost of $28,755 is incurred and a savings of $1,494,500 is obtained for each case of CP averted when magnesium sulphate is administered to patients in whom preterm birth is threatened. Conclusions Administration of magnesium sulphate to patients in whom preterm birth is imminent is a dominant (i.e. cost-effective) strategy, no matter what cost perspective or measure of effectiveness is used. Administration of magnesium sulphate to patients in whom preterm birth is threatened is a dominant strategy from a societal perspective and is very likely to be cost-effective from a health system perspective. PMID:24350635

  5. Microwave assisted synthesis of nano sized sulphate doped hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Alshemary, Ammar Z.; Goh, Yi-Fan; Akram, Muhammad; Razali, Ili Rabihah; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq; Hussain, Rafaqat

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ► Phase pure nano-sized sulphur doped hydroxyapatite has been synthesized. ► TEM analysis confirmed formation of needle shaped structure. ► Lattice parameters and cell volume increased with increase in sulphate doping. ► Crystallite size decreased as sulphate content inside the structure increased. ► Degree of crystallinity decreased with increase in sulphate substitution. - Abstract: Inorganic sulphate is required by all mammalian cells to function properly, it is the fourth most abundant anion in the human plasma. Sulphate ions are the major source of sulphur which is considered an important element for sustenance of life as it is present in the essential amino and is required by cells to function properly. In this study we have successfully substituted sulphate ions (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}) into hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6−x}(SO{sub 4}){sub x}(OH){sub 2−x}) lattice via ion exchange process with phosphate group. Concentration of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ions was varied between X = 0.05–0.5, using (Ca (NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O), ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4}) and (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) as starting materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform IR spectroscopy (FTIR), showed that the substitution of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ions into the lattice resulted in peak broadening and reduced peak height due to the amorphous nature and reduced crystallinity of the resulting HA powder. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission electron microscopy (FESEM) analysis confirmed the formation of needle shaped particles of 41 nm size with homogenous and uniform distribution of element within the HA structure.

  6. Hydration water in dynamics of a hydrated beta-lactoglobulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.; Longeville, S.

    2007-02-01

    Incoherent spin-echo signals of a hydrated β-lactoglobulin protein were investigated, at 275 and 293 K. The intermediate scattering functions I(Q,t) were divided in two contributions from surface water and protein, respectively. On one hand, the dynamics of the surface water follows a KWW stretched exponential function (the exponent is ~0.5), on the other hand, that of the protein follows a single exponential. The present results are consistent with our previous results of hydrated C-phycocyanin combining elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering and by molecular dynamics simulation.

  7. Methane production and emission from peat. the influence of anions (sulphate, nitrate) from acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Andrea; Nedwell, David B.

    The influence of sulphate concentrations on the production and emission of methane in two contrasting peat sites was determined. Seasonal changes in sulphate concentrations appeared to influence the amount of organic carbon oxidised to carbon dioxide by sulphate reduction at both peat sites. For the majority of the year at both sites the amount of carbon mineralised through sulphate reduction exceeded that being transformed to methane by methanogenic bacteria, except when sulphate reduction became sulphate limited. In order to sustain the high sulphate reduction rates measured in the peat sulphide formed from dissimilatory sulphate reduction must be reoxidised rapidly to sulphate within the peat. Laboratory experiments showed that addition of 500 μM sulphate and 100 μM nitrate to peat samples significantly inhibited methanogenesis. Sulphate appeared to be the more important inhibitor of methanogenesis since inhibition of methane formation occurred with additions of sulphate reflecting in situ concentrations. Supplements of either acetate and/or hydrogen in combination with molybdate to peat samples revealed that methanogenesis was hydrogen limited and that the majority of active methanogens were hydrogen-utilising methanogens. Methanogenesis in peat samples appeared to be dependant on sulphate reducing bacteria for provision of substrates. Great Dun Fell, receiving the largest sulphate loading, had the lower rates of microbial activity (methane formation and sulphate reduction rates) than Ellergower, which received less than half the annual sulphate deposition of Great Dun Fell. This implied that some other factor—possibly organic matter lability, was limiting microbial rates of methane formation and sulphate reduction at Great Dun Fell.

  8. A Sea Floor Methane Hydrate Displacement Experiment Using N2 Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, P. G.; Peltzer, E. T.; Walz, P. M.; Zhang, X.; Hester, K.

    2009-12-01

    The production of free methane gas from solid methane hydrate accumulations presents a considerable challenge. The presently preferred procedure is pressure reduction whereby the relief of pressure to a condition outside the hydrate phase boundary creates a gas phase. The reaction is endothermic and thus a problematic water ice phase can form if the extraction of gas is too rapid, limiting the applicability of this procedure. Additionally, the removal of the formation water in contact with the hydrate phase is required before meaningful pressure reduction can be attained -- and this can take time. An alternate approach that has been suggested is the injection of liquid CO2 into the formation, thereby displacing the formation water. Formation of a solid CO2 hydrate is thermodynamically favored under these conditions. Competition between CH4 and CO2 for the hydrate host water molecules can occur displacing CH4 from the solid to the gas phase with formation of a solid CO2 hydrate. We have investigated another alternate approach with displacement of the surrounding bulk water phase by N2 gas, resulting in rapid release of CH4 gas and complete loss of the solid hydrate phase. Our experiment was carried out at the Southern Summit of Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon, at 780m depth. There we harvested hydrate fragments from surficial sediments using the robotic arm of the ROV Doc Ricketts. Specimens of the hydrate were collected about 1m above the sediment surface in an inverted funnel with a mesh covered neck as they floated upwards. The accumulated hydrate was transferred to an inverted glass cylinder, and N2 gas was carefully injected into this container. Displacement of the water phase occurred and when the floating hydrate material approached the lower rim the gas injection was stopped and the cylinder placed upon a flat metal plate effectively sealing the system. We returned to this site after 7 days to measure progress, and observed complete loss of the hydrate phase

  9. Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

  10. Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence? Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

  11. Complex gas hydrate from the Cascadia margin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hailong; Seo, Yu-taek; Lee, Jong-won; Moudrakovski, Igor; Ripmeester, John A; Chapman, N Ross; Coffin, Richard B; Gardner, Graeme; Pohlman, John

    2007-01-18

    Natural gas hydrates are a potential source of energy and may play a role in climate change and geological hazards. Most natural gas hydrate appears to be in the form of 'structure I', with methane as the trapped guest molecule, although 'structure II' hydrate has also been identified, with guest molecules such as isobutane and propane, as well as lighter hydrocarbons. A third hydrate structure, 'structure H', which is capable of trapping larger guest molecules, has been produced in the laboratory, but it has not been confirmed that it occurs in the natural environment. Here we characterize the structure, gas content and composition, and distribution of guest molecules in a complex natural hydrate sample recovered from Barkley canyon, on the northern Cascadia margin. We show that the sample contains structure H hydrate, and thus provides direct evidence for the natural occurrence of this hydrate structure. The structure H hydrate is intimately associated with structure II hydrate, and the two structures contain more than 13 different hydrocarbon guest molecules. We also demonstrate that the stability field of the complex gas hydrate lies between those of structure II and structure H hydrates, indicating that this form of hydrate is more stable than structure I and may thus potentially be found in a wider pressure-temperature regime than can methane hydrate deposits. PMID:17230188

  12. Microbial colonization in impact-generated hydrothermal sulphate deposits, Haughton impact structure, and implications for sulphates on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell, J.; Lee, P.; Cockell, C. S.; Osinski, G. R.

    2004-07-01

    Hydrothermal gypsum deposits in the Haughton impact structure, Devon Island, Canada, contain microbial communities in an endolithic habitat within individual gypsum crystals. Cyanobacterial colonies occur as masses along cleavage planes, up to 5 cm from crystal margins. The crystals are transparent, so allow transmission of light for photosynthesis, while affording protection from dehydration and wind. The colonies appear to have modified their mineral host to provide additional space as they expanded. The colonies are black due to UV-screening pigments. The relative ease with which microbial colonization may be detected and identified in impact-generated sulphate deposits at Haughton suggests that analogous settings on other planets might merit future searches for biosignatures. The proven occurrence of sulphates on the Martian surface suggests that sulphate minerals should be a priority target in the search for life on Mars.

  13. Gas Hydrate and Pore Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinivella, Umberta; Giustiniani, Michela

    2014-05-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to quantify excess pore pressures related to gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments below the BSR using several approaches. Dissociation of gas hydrates in proximity of the BSR, in response to a change in the physical environment (i.e., temperature and/or pressure regime), can liberate excess gas incrising the local pore fluid pressure in the sediment, so decreasing the effective normal stress. So, gas hydrate dissociation may lead to excess pore pressure resulting in sediment deformation or failure, such as submarine landslides, sediment slumping, pockmarks and mud volcanoes, soft-sediment deformation and giant hummocks. Moreover, excess pore pressure may be the result of gas hydrate dissociation due to continuous sedimentation, tectonic uplift, sea level fall, heating or inhibitor injection. In order to detect the presence of the overpressure below the BSR, we propose two approachs. The fist approach models the BSR depth versus pore pressure; in fact, if the free gas below the BSR is in overpressure condition, the base of the gas hydrate stability is deeper with respect to the hydrostatic case. This effect causes a discrepancy between seismic and theoretical BSR depths. The second approach models the velocities versus gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and pore pressure, considering the approximation of the Biot theory in case of low frequency, i.e. seismic frequency. Knowing the P and S seismic velocity from seismic data analysis, it is possibile to jointly estimate the gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and the pore pressure regime. Alternatively, if the S-wave velocity is not availbale (due to lack of OBS/OBC data), an AVO analysis can be performed in order to extract information about Poisson ratio. Our modeling suggests that the areas characterized by shallow waters (i.e., areas in which human infrastructures, such as pipelines, are present) are significantly affected by the presence of overpressure condition

  14. Natural Gas Hydrates Update 1998-2000

    EIA Publications

    2001-01-01

    Significant events have transpired on the natural gas hydrate research and development front since "Future Supply Potential of Natural Gas Hydrates" appeared in Natural Gas 1998 Issues and Trends and in the Potential Gas Committee's 1998 biennial report.

  15. Compact apparatus for photogeneration of hydrated electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, E.; Schmidt, K.

    1970-01-01

    Flash-photolysis instrument generates hydrated electrons and studies their reactions. It has a three-dimensional, multiple-reaction cell and the capacity to produce up to .1 micromole hydrated electron in a single 40 microsec light pulse.

  16. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  17. Chronic barium intoxication disrupts sulphated proteoglycan synthesis: a hypothesis for the origins of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Purdey, Mark

    2004-01-01

    High level contamination by natural and industrial sources of the alkali earth metal, barium (Ba) has been identified in the ecosystems/workplaces that are associated with high incidence clustering of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurodegenerative diseases such as the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Analyses of ecosystems supporting the most renowned MS clusters in Saskatchewan, Sardinia, Massachusetts, Colorado, Guam, NE Scotland demonstrated consistently elevated levels of Ba in soils (mean: 1428 ppm) and vegetation (mean: 74 ppm) in relation to mean levels of 345 and 19 ppm recorded in MS-free regions adjoining. The high levels of Ba stemmed from local quarrying for Ba ores and/or use of Ba in paper/foundry/welding/textile/oil and gas well related industries, as well as from the use of Ba as an atmospheric aerosol spray for enhancing/refracting the signalling of radio/radar waves along military jet flight paths, missile test ranges, etc. It is proposed that chronic contamination of the biosystem with the reactive types of Ba salts can initiate the pathogenesis of MS; due to the conjugation of Ba with free sulphate, which subsequently deprives the endogenous sulphated proteoglycan molecules (heparan sulfates) of their sulphate co partner, thereby disrupting synthesis of S-proteoglycans and their crucial role in the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling which induces oligodendrocyte progenitors to maintain the growth and structural integrity of the myelin sheath. Loss of S-proteoglycan activity explains other key facets of MS pathogenesis; such as the aggregation of platelets and the proliferation of superoxide generated oxidative stress. Ba intoxications disturb the sodium-potassium ion pump--another key feature of the MS profile. The co-clustering of various neurodegenerative diseases in these Ba-contaminated ecosystems suggests that the pathogenesis of all of these diseases could pivot upon a

  18. Microencapsulation of terbutaline sulphate by the solvent evaporation technique.

    PubMed

    Manekar, N C; Puranik, P K; Joshi, S B

    1992-01-01

    Terbutaline sulphate microcapsules were prepared by coacervation-phase separation (solvent evaporation) technique using ethyl cellulose as a coating material. Acetone, ethyl alcohol and isopropyl alcohol were employed as solvents for coating material. Microcapsules were evaluated for their drug content, particle size distribution (microscopic method), flow properties, bulk density, in vitro dissolution, drug release kinetics and surface characteristics (scanning electron microscopy). PMID:1403496

  19. Acute tocolysis for fetal distress: terbutaline versus magnesium sulphate.

    PubMed

    Magann, E F; Cleveland, R S; Dockery, J R; Chauhan, S P; Martin, J N; Morrison, J C

    1993-11-01

    Forty-six women in active labour who developed fetal distress requiring abdominal delivery were randomized to receive 0.25 mg of terbutaline (subcutaneously) or magnesium sulphate as a 4-g bolus (intravenously) to decrease uterine activity. The terbutaline-treated group in contrast to the magnesium sulphate-treated group had reduced uterine activity as measured by Montevideo units (p < 0.002). This decrease in uterine activity was noted more rapidly in all 23 patients who received terbutaline, 1.8 +/- 0.74 minutes compared to 7.5 +/- 2.1 minutes in the 16 of 23 patients (magnesium sulphate-treated women) in whom a decrease in uterine activity occurred (p < 0.001). Umbilical cord arterial blood pH at delivery was less than 7.20 in only 2 of the 23 patients treated with terbutaline versus 7 of the 23 in the magnesium sulphate-treated group. We conclude that terbutaline is an effective and more rapid-acting tocolytic agent to arrest uterine activity prior to delivery for fetal distress. PMID:8179541

  20. Stability of Ceftiofur Sodium and Cefquinome Sulphate in Intravenous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Jelińska, Anna; Bębenek, Marcelina

    2014-01-01

    Stability of ceftiofur sodium and cefquinome sulphate in intravenous solutions was studied. Chromatographic separation and quantitative determination were performed by using a high-performance liquid chromatography with UV-DAD detection. During the stability study, poly(vinylchloride) minibags were filled with a solution containing 5 mg of ceftiofur sodium or cefquinome sulphate and diluted to 0.2 mg/mL with suitable intravenous solution depending on the test conditions. The solutions for the study were protected from light and stored at room temperature (22°C), refrigerated (6°C), frozen (−20°C) for 30 days, and then thawed at room temperature. A comparison of results obtained at 22°C and 6°C for the same intravenous solutions showed that temperature as well as components of solutions and their concentration had an influence on the stability of ceftiofur sodium and cefquinome sulphate. It was found that ceftiofur sodium and cefquinome sulphate dissolved in intravenous solutions used in this study may be stored at room temperature and at 6°C for up to 48 h. PMID:25025091

  1. Characterisation of chlorophyll a solubilised in sodium lauryl sulphate micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, T.; Sapre, A. V.; Mittal, Jai P.

    1980-01-01

    Poisson statistics has been applied to the problem of solubilisation of chlorophyll a in sodium lauryl sulphate micelles. Dilution experiments have been carried out to support the finding that each unit of chlorophyll a contributing to the 740 nm band contains just one chlorophyll a molecule.

  2. Impact of tropospheric sulphate aerosols on the terrestrial carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, Alexey V.

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric sulphate aerosols (TSAs) may oxidise the photosynthesising tissues if they are taken up by plants. A parameterisation of this impact of tropospheric sulphate aerosols (TSAs) on the terrestrial gross primary production is suggested. This parameterisation is implemented into the global Earth system model developed at the A.M. Obukhov Institute of the Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS CM). With this coupled model, the simulations are performed which are forced by common anthropogenic and natural climate forcings based on historical reconstructions followed by the RCP 8.5 scenario. The model response to sulphate aerosol loading is subdivided into the climatic (related to the influence of TSA on the radiative transport in the atmosphere) and ecological (related to the toxic influence of sulphate aerosol on terrestrial plants) impacts. We found that the former basically dominates over the latter on a global scale and modifies the responses of the global vegetation and soil carbon stocks to external forcings by 10%. At a regional scale, however, ecological impact may be as much important as the climatic one.

  3. On the polylactose nature of chondroitin and keratan sulphates

    PubMed Central

    Scott, John E.

    1994-01-01

    The recognition that keratan and chondroitin sulphates are based on the same polylactose backbone simplifies the study of heteroduplex formation between them, suggests insights into structure–function relationships in tissues, and permits new definitions of the linkage regions. PMID:8129722

  4. 77 FR 40032 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice... Federal Officer; Welcome by the Chair of the Committee; Committee Business; Update on Prudhoe Bay Testing; FY 2012 Methane Hydrate Program Activities; Update on International Activity; Methane Hydrate...

  5. 76 FR 59667 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. Federal... of the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice...

  6. 78 FR 37536 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. The Federal... of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of...

  7. Development of the Methane Hydrate Burning Experimental Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, S.

    2010-12-01

    There is a need to increase understanding among Japanese citizens about the importance as a potential future energy source of the great quantity of methane hydrate deposits sleeping on the sea bed around Japan. With cooperation from the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (JOGMEC), the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), and the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) we studied the possibility of using presentations where it was possible to handle actual methane hydrate, videos and active presentations such as experiments in order to increase the public interest in and understanding of methane hydrate. Furthermore, for the benefit of those people who would like to visit the exhibition but are unable to do so due to distance or other physical barriers, we looked into making the presentation materials portable and having a moving exhibition. Currently methane hydrate combustion experiments and exhibition performances are being held at the Hidaka Port New Energy Park (The Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc.) in Gobo, Wakayama with approximately 3,000 visitors monthly.

  8. Monitoring structural transformation of hydroxy-sulphate green rust in the presence of sulphate reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmoula, M.; Zegeye, A.; Jorand, F.; Carteret, C.

    2006-01-01

    The activities of bacterial consortia enable organisms to maximize their metabolic capabilities. This article assesses the synergetic relationship between iron reducing bacteria (IRB), Shewanella putrefaciens and sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) Desulfovibrio alaskensis. Thus, the aim of this study was first to form a biogenic hydroxy-sulpahte green rust GR2( {text{SO}}_{{text{4}}} ^{{2 - }} ) through the bioreduction of lepidocrocite by S. putrefaciens and secondly to investigate if sulfate anions intercalated in the biogenic GR2( {text{SO}}_{{text{4}}} ^{{2 - }} ) could serve as final electron acceptor for a sulfate reducing bacterium, D. alaskensis. The results indicate that the IRB lead to the formation of GR2( {text{SO}}_{{text{4}}} ^{{2 - }} ) and this mineral serve as an electron acceptor for SRB. GR2( {text{SO}}_{{text{4}}} ^{{2 - }} ) precipitation and its transformation was demonstrated by using X-ray diffraction (DRX), Mössbauer spectroscopy (TMS) and transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM). These observations point out the possible acceleration of steel corrosion in marine environment in presence of IRB/SRB consortia.

  9. Monitoring structural transformation of hydroxy-sulphate green rust in the presence of sulphate reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmoula, M.; Zegeye, A.; Jorand, F.; Carteret, C.

    The activities of bacterial consortia enable organisms to maximize their metabolic capabilities. This article assesses the synergetic relationship between iron reducing bacteria (IRB), Shewanella putrefaciens and sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) Desulfovibrio alaskensis. Thus, the aim of this study was first to form a biogenic hydroxysulpahte green rust GR2(SO{4/2-}) through the bioreduction of lepidocrocite by S. putrefaciens and secondly to investigate if sulfate anions intercalated in the biogenic GR2(SO{4/2-}) could serve as final electron acceptor for a sulfate reducing bacterium, D. alaskensis. The results indicate that the IRB lead to the formation of GR2(SO{4/2-}) and this mineral serve as an electron acceptor for SRB. GR2(SO{4/2-}) precipitation and its transformation was demonstrated by using X-ray diffraction (DRX), Mössbauer spectroscopy (TMS) and transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM). These observations point out the possible acceleration of steel corrosion in marine environment in presence of IRB/SRB consortia.

  10. Hydration rind dates rhyolite flows.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I

    1968-02-23

    Hydration of obsidian has been used to date rhyolite flows, containing obsidian or porphyritic glass, at Glass Mountain (Medicine Lake Highlands) and Mono Lake, California. The method is simple and rapid and can be used to date flows that erupted between 200 and approximately 200,000 years ago. PMID:17768978

  11. Hydration rind dates rhyolite flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.

    1968-01-01

    Hydration of obsidian has been used to date rhyolite flows, containing obsidian or porphyritic glass, at Glass Mountain (Medicine Lake Highlands) and Mono Lake, California. The method is simple and rapid and can be used to date flows that erupted between 200 and approximately 200,000 years ago.

  12. Attraction between hydrated hydrophilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanduč, Matej; Schneck, Emanuel; Netz, Roland R.

    2014-08-01

    According to common knowledge, hydrophilic surfaces repel via hydration forces while hydrophobic surfaces attract, but mounting experimental evidence suggests that also hydrophilic surfaces can attract. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations at prescribed water chemical potential we study the crossover from hydration repulsion to hydrophobic attraction for planar polar surfaces of varying stiffness and hydrogen-bonding capability. Rescaling the partial charges of the polar surface groups, we cover the complete spectrum from very hydrophobic surfaces (characterized by contact angles θ ≃ 135°) to hydrophilic surfaces exhibiting complete wetting (θ = 0°). Indeed, for a finite range θadh < θ < 90°, we find a regime where hydrophilic surfaces attract at sub-nanometer separation and stably adhere without intervening water. The adhesive contact angle θadh depends on surface type and lies in the range 65° < θadh < 80°, in good agreement with experiments. Analysis of the total number of hydrogen bonds (HBs) formed by water and surface groups rationalizes this crossover between hydration repulsion and hydrophilic attraction in terms of a subtle balance: Highly polar surfaces repel because of strongly bound hydration water, less polar hydrophilic surfaces attract because water-water HBs are preferred over surface-water HBs. Such solvent reorganization forces presumably underlie also other important phenomena, such as selective ion adsorption to interfaces as well as ion pair formation.

  13. Local and systemic tolerability of magnesium sulphate for tocolysis.

    PubMed

    Zygmunt, M; Heilmann, L; Berg, C; Wallwiener, D; Grischke, E; Münstedt, K; Spindler, A; Lang, U

    2003-04-25

    An open-label, randomised, parallel-group, study was conducted in three study centres in women with premature labor and indication for a single agent intravenous tocolysis therapy with magnesium sulphate. The aim of this study was to examine the local and general tolerability and side-effects of magnesium sulphate for tocolysis. Furthermore, we tested the tolerability of a ready-for-use magnesium solution. No measurements of efficacy were performed during this study. Initially, patients received a loading dose of 4.0 g magnesium sulphate administered over 30 min. Thereafter, a continuous intravenous infusion of 1-2 g magnesium sulphate per hour up to 21 days was given. Venous score (Maddox), vital signs, adverse events as well as general tolerability (assessed by investigator and patients) and blood parameters were assessed. We showed good local and systemic tolerability of high dose magnesium sulphate for tocolysis. Only seven patients (15%) were withdrawn from the study prematurely due to minor adverse events. Potential serious complications of MgSO(4) such as respiratory arrest or clinically relevant respiratory depression were not observed. The most frequently reported local adverse events were injection site pain, itching, erythema, swelling, induration and palpable venous cord. The most common systemic adverse events considered to be possibly related to the study drugs involved the nervous system (dizziness) followed by the digestive system (nausea, constipation). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure changed only slightly during the treatment. Respiratory rate and body temperature remained stable also. Toxic magnesium levels (>2.5 mmol/l) were not observed. The assessment of the clinical investigators with regard to tolerability was very good or good in 72.5% of the patients. The introduction of the ready-to-use solution has the advantage of eliminating the need to mix the solution prior to administration. This means a lower risk of overdose and

  14. Physical activity, hydration and health.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Ascensión; Manonelles, Pedro; Palacios, Nieves; Wärnberg, Julia; Casajús, José A; Pérez, Margarita; Aznar, Susana; Benito, Pedro J; Martínez-Gomez, David; Ortega, Francisco B; Ortega, Eduardo; Urrialde, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of mankind, man has sought ways to promote and preserve health as well as to prevent disease. Hydration, physical activity and exercise are key factors for enhancing human health. However, either a little dose of them or an excess can be harmful for health maintenance at any age. Water is an essential nutrient for human body and a major key to survival has been to prevent dehydration. However, there is still a general controversy regarding the necessary amount to drink water or other beverages to properly get an adequate level of hydration. In addition, up to now the tools used to measure hydration are controversial. To this end, there are several important groups of variables to take into account such as water balance, hydration biomarkers and total body water. A combination of methods will be the most preferred tool to find out any risk or situation of dehydration at any age range. On the other hand, physical activity and exercise are being demonstrated to promote health, avoiding or reducing health problems, vascular and inflammatory disea ses and helping weight management. Therefore, physical activity is also being used as a pill within a therapy to promote health and reduce risk diseases, but as in the case of drugs, dose, intensity, frequency, duration and precautions have to be evaluated and taken into account in order to get the maximum effectiveness and success of a treatment. On the other hand, sedentariness is the opposite concept to physical activity that has been recently recognized as an important factor of lifestyle involved in the obesogenic environment and consequently in the risk of the non-communicable diseases. In view of the literature consulted and taking into account the expertise of the authors, in this review a Decalogue of global recommendations is included to achieve an adequate hydration and physical activity status to avoid overweight/obesity consequences. PMID:24972459

  15. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates.

    PubMed

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-02-23

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C-S-H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C-S-H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C-S-H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C-S-H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C-S-H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  16. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J.; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G.; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C–S–H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C–S–H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C–S–H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C–S–H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C–S–H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  17. Proline residues in two tightly coupled helices of the sulphate transporter, SHST1, are important for sulphate transport.

    PubMed Central

    Shelden, M C; Loughlin, P; Tierney, M L; Howitt, S M

    2001-01-01

    The sulphate transporter SHST1, from Stylosanthes hamata, features three tightly coupled transmembrane helices which include proline residues that are conserved in most related transporters. We used site-directed mutagenesis and expression of the mutant transporters in yeast to test whether these proline residues are important for function. Four proline residues were replaced by both alanine and leucine. Only one of these proline residues, Pro-144, was essential for sulphate transport. However, mutation of either Pro-133 or Pro-160 resulted in a severe decrease in sulphate transport activity; this was due more to a decrease in transport activity than to a decrease in the amount of mutant SHST1 in the plasma membrane. These results suggest that all three proline residues are important for transport, and that the conformation of the three tightly coupled helices may play a critical role in sulphate transport. We also show that SHST1 undergoes a post-translational modification that is required for trafficking to the plasma membrane. PMID:11368789

  18. A Post-Genomic View of the Ecophysiology, Catabolism and Biotechnological Relevance of Sulphate-Reducing Prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Rabus, Ralf; Venceslau, Sofia S; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D; Pereira, Inês A C

    2015-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulphate reduction is the unifying and defining trait of sulphate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP). In their predominant habitats, sulphate-rich marine sediments, SRP have long been recognized to be major players in the carbon and sulphur cycles. Other, more recently appreciated, ecophysiological roles include activity in the deep biosphere, symbiotic relations, syntrophic associations, human microbiome/health and long-distance electron transfer. SRP include a high diversity of organisms, with large nutritional versatility and broad metabolic capacities, including anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds and hydrocarbons. Elucidation of novel catabolic capacities as well as progress in the understanding of metabolic and regulatory networks, energy metabolism, evolutionary processes and adaptation to changing environmental conditions has greatly benefited from genomics, functional OMICS approaches and advances in genetic accessibility and biochemical studies. Important biotechnological roles of SRP range from (i) wastewater and off gas treatment, (ii) bioremediation of metals and hydrocarbons and (iii) bioelectrochemistry, to undesired impacts such as (iv) souring in oil reservoirs and other environments, and (v) corrosion of iron and concrete. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of SRPs focusing mainly on works published after 2000. The wealth of publications in this period, covering many diverse areas, is a testimony to the large environmental, biogeochemical and technological relevance of these organisms and how much the field has progressed in these years, although many important questions and applications remain to be explored. PMID:26210106

  19. Isolation of sulphate transport defective mutants of Candida utilis: further evidence for a common transport system for sulphate, sulphite and thiosulphate.

    PubMed

    García, M; Benítez, J; Delgado, J; Kotyk, A

    1983-01-01

    Selenate-resistant mutants of Candida utilis were isolated. They did not take up sulphate while incorporation of an organic sulphur source, such as L-methionine, was similar to the wild-type strain. They grew poorly on sulphate, sulphite and thiosulphate and, as expected, grew well on methionine. Sulphite reductase activities of the mutants were similar to the wild type strain. The properties of these mutants support the view of a common transport system for sulphate, sulphite and thiosulphate. PMID:6682073

  20. Sulphation of proteochondroitin and 4-methylumbelliferyl beta-D-xyloside-chondroitin formed by mouse mastocytoma cells cultured in sulphate-deficient medium.

    PubMed

    Silbert, J E; Sugumaran, G; Cogburn, J N

    1993-11-15

    Mouse mastocytoma cells were cultured in medium containing [3H]GlcN and concentrations of [35S]sulphate varying from 0.01 to 0.5 mM. Intracellular [35S]sulphate incorporation increased severalfold from the lowest concentrations, reaching a maximum at 0.1-0.2 mM, whereas incorporation of [3H]hexosamine remained constant at all sulphate concentrations. Proteo[3H]-chondroitin [35S]sulphate was isolated and incubated with chondroitin ABC lyase, yielding 35S-labelled and/or 3H-labelled delta Di-0S and delta Di-4S disaccharide products. The increasing percentage of delta Di-4S was consistent with the increasing sulphate incorporation at each higher [35S]sulphate concentration. Examination of proteochondroitin [35S]sulphate size by Sepharose CL-6B chromatography indicated a range consistent with various numbers of glycosaminoglycan chains on the protease-resistant serglycin core protein. Alkali-cleaved chondroitin [35S]sulphate products indicated similar size distributions at all sulphate concentrations with no indication of preferential sulphation being related to smaller or larger size. DEAE-cellulose chromatography of [3H]chondroitin [35S]sulphate glycosaminoglycans indicated a random undersulphation as [35S]sulphate concentration was lowered. Addition of 4-methylumbelliferyl beta-D-xyloside to the cultures resulted in a 2-2.5-fold stimulation of [3H]chondroitin [35S]sulphate synthesis with formation of beta-xyloside-[3H]chondroitin [35S]sulphate which was much smaller, as estimated by Sepharose CL-6B chromatography, than the decreased amount of [3H]chondroitin [35S]sulphate derived from proteo[3H]chondroitin [35S]sulphate. Much higher concentrations of sulphate were necessary to produce sulphation of the beta-xyloside-[3H]chondroitin comparable with that of proteo[3H]-chondroitin, as indicated by chondroitin ABC lyase products and DEAE-cellulose chromatography. The specific radioactivities of the [3H]GalN in the proteo[3H]chondroitin [35S]sulphate and beta-xyloside-[3

  1. Handbook of gas hydrate properties and occurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Kuustraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.

    1983-12-01

    This handbook provides data on the resource potential of naturally occurring hydrates, the properties that are needed to evaluate their recovery, and their production potential. The first two chapters give data on the naturally occurring hydrate potential by reviewing published resource estimates and the known and inferred occurrences. The third and fourth chapters review the physical and thermodynamic properties of hydrates, respectively. The thermodynamic properties of hydrates that are discussed include dissociation energies and a simplified method to calculate them; phase diagrams for simple and multi-component gases; the thermal conductivity; and the kinetics of hydrate dissociation. The final chapter evaluates the net energy balance of recovering hydrates and shows that a substantial positive energy balance can theoretically be achieved. The Appendices of the Handbook summarize physical and thermodynamic properties of gases, liquids and solids that can be used in designing and evaluating recovery processes of hydrates. 158 references, 67 figures, 47 tables.

  2. Ferric sulphate catalysed esterification of free fatty acids in waste cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Gan, Suyin; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Ooi, Chun Weng; Motala, Nafisa Osman; Ismail, Mohd Anas Farhan

    2010-10-01

    In this work, the esterification of free fatty acids (FFA) in waste cooking oil catalysed by ferric sulphate was studied as a pre-treatment step for biodiesel production. The effects of reaction time, methanol to oil ratio, catalyst concentration and temperature on the conversion of FFA were investigated on a laboratory scale. The results showed that the conversion of FFA reached equilibrium after an hour, and was positively dependent on the methanol to oil molar ratio and temperature. An optimum catalyst concentration of 2 wt.% gave maximum FFA conversion of 59.2%. For catalyst loadings of 2 wt.% and below, this catalysed esterification was proposed to follow a pseudo-homogeneous pathway akin to mineral acid-catalysed esterification, driven by the H(+) ions produced through the hydrolysis of metal complex [Fe(H(2)O)(6)](3+) (aq). PMID:20435468

  3. How sulphate-reducing microorganisms cope with stress: Lessons from systems biology

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J.; He, Q.; Hemme, C.L.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hillesland, K.; Zhou, A.; He, Z.; Nostrand, J.D. Van; Hazen, T.C.; Stahl, D.A.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.

    2011-04-01

    Sulphate-reducing microorganisms (SRMs) are a phylogenetically diverse group of anaerobes encompassing distinct physiologies with a broad ecological distribution. As SRMs have important roles in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, sulphur and various metals, an understanding of how these organisms respond to environmental stresses is of fundamental and practical importance. In this Review, we highlight recent applications of systems biology tools in studying the stress responses of SRMs, particularly Desulfovibrio spp., at the cell, population, community and ecosystem levels. The syntrophic lifestyle of SRMs is also discussed, with a focus on system-level analyses of adaptive mechanisms. Such information is important for understanding the microbiology of the global sulphur cycle and for developing biotechnological applications of SRMs for environmental remediation, energy production, biocorrosion control, wastewater treatment and mineral recovery.

  4. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cortes, D.D.; Martin, A.I.; Yun, T.S.; Francisca, F.M.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. The effect of hydrate saturation on water retention curves in hydrate-bearing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabadi, Nariman; Zheng, Xianglei; Jang, Jaewon

    2016-05-01

    The experimental measurement of water retention curve in hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behavior of hydrate dissociation and gas production. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is selected as hydrate former. The pore habit of THF hydrates is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel. It is confirmed that THF hydrates are not wetting phase on the quartz surface of the micromodel and occupy either an entire pore or part of pore space resulting in change in pore size distribution. And the measurement of water retention curves in THF hydrate-bearing sediments with hydrate saturation ranging from Sh = 0 to Sh = 0.7 is conducted for excess water condition. The experimental results show that the gas entry pressure and the capillary pressure increase with increasing hydrate saturation. Based on the experimental results, fitting parameters for van Genuchten equation are suggested for different hydrate saturation conditions.

  6. Pockmark formation and evolution in deep water Nigeria: Rapid hydrate growth versus slow hydrate dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, N.; Bohrmann, G.; Ruffine, L.; Pape, T.; Riboulot, V.; Colliat, J.-L.; De Prunelé, A.; Dennielou, B.; Garziglia, S.; Himmler, T.; Marsset, T.; Peters, C. A.; Rabiu, A.; Wei, J.

    2014-04-01

    In previous works, it has been suggested that dissolution of gas hydrate can be responsible for pockmark formation and evolution in deep water Nigeria. It was shown that those pockmarks which are at different stages of maturation are characterized by a common internal architecture associated to gas hydrate dynamics. New results obtained by drilling into gas hydrate-bearing sediments with the MeBo seafloor drill rig in concert with geotechnical in situ measurements and pore water analyses indicate that pockmark formation and evolution in the study area are mainly controlled by rapid hydrate growth opposed to slow hydrate dissolution. On one hand, positive temperature anomalies, free gas trapped in shallow microfractures near the seafloor and coexistence of free gas and gas hydrate indicate rapid hydrate growth. On the other hand, slow hydrate dissolution is evident by low methane concentrations and almost constant sulfate values 2 m above the Gas Hydrate Occurrence Zone.

  7. The effect of magnesium on partial sulphate removal from mine water as gypsum.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Emma-Tuulia; Rämö, Jaakko; Lassi, Ulla

    2015-08-15

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of magnesium on the removal efficiency of sulphate as gypsum from mine water. The precipitation conditions were simulated with MINEQL + software and the simulation results were compared with the results from laboratory jar test experiments. Both the simulation and the laboratory results showed that magnesium in the mine water was maintaining sulphate in a soluble form as magnesium sulphate (MgSO4) at pH 9.6. Thus magnesium was preventing the removal of sulphate as gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O). However, change in the lime precipitation pH from 9.6 to 12.5 resulted in magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2) precipitation and improved sulphate removal. Additionally, magnesium hydroxide could act as seed crystals for gypsum precipitation or co-precipitate sulphate further enhancing the removal of sulphate from mine water. PMID:26067895

  8. Optimization study for Pb(II) and COD sequestration by consortium of sulphate-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Anamika; Bishnoi, Narsi R.; Gupta, Asha

    2016-04-01

    In this study, initial minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Pb(II) ions was analysed to check optimum concentration of Pb(II) ions at which the growth of sulphate-reducing consortium (SRC) was found to be maximum. 80 ppm of Pb(II) ions was investigated as minimum inhibitory concentration for SRC. Influence of electron donors such as lactose, sucrose, glucose and sodium lactate was examined to investigate best carbon source for growth and activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria. Sodium lactate was found to be the prime carbon source for SRC. Later optimization of various parameters was executed using Box-Behnken design model of response surface methodology to explore the effectiveness of three independent operating variables, namely, pH (5.0-9.0), temperature (32-42 °C) and time (5.0-9.0 days), on dependent variables, i.e. protein content, precipitation of Pb(II) ions, and removal of COD by SRC biomass. Maximum removal of COD and Pb(II) was observed to be 91 and 98 %, respectively, at pH 7.0 and temperature 37 °C and incubation time 7 days. According to response surface analysis and analysis of variance, the experimental data were perfectly fitted to the quadratic model, and the interactive influence of pH, temperature and time on Pb(II) and COD removal was highly significant. A high regression coefficient between the variables and response (r 2 = 0.9974) corroborate eminent evaluation of experimental data by second-order polynomial regression model. SEM and Fourier transform infrared analysis was performed to investigate morphology of PbS precipitates, sorption mechanism and involved functional groups in metal-free and metal-loaded biomass of SRC for Pb(II) binding.

  9. Improved Design and Fabrication of Hydrated-Salt Pills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; DiPirro, Michael J.; Canavan, Edgar R.

    2011-01-01

    A high-performance design, and fabrication and growth processes to implement the design, have been devised for encapsulating a hydrated salt in a container that both protects the salt and provides thermal conductance between the salt and the environment surrounding the container. The unitary salt/container structure is known in the art as a salt pill. In the original application of the present design and processes, the salt is, more specifically, a hydrated paramagnetic salt, for use as a refrigerant in a very-low-temperature adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The design and process can also be applied, with modifications, to other hydrated salts. Hydrated paramagnetic salts have long been used in ADRs because they have the desired magnetic properties at low temperatures. They also have some properties, disadvantageous for ADRs, that dictate the kind of enclosures in which they must be housed: Being hydrated, they lose water if exposed to less than 100-percent relative humidity. Because any dehydration compromises their magnetic properties, salts used in ADRs must be sealed in hermetic containers. Because they have relatively poor thermal conductivities in the temperature range of interest (<0.1 K), integral thermal buses are needed as means of efficiently transferring heat to and from the salts during refrigeration cycles. A thermal bus is typically made from a high-thermal-conductivity met al (such as copper or gold), and the salt is configured to make intimate thermal contact with the metal. Commonly in current practice (and in the present design), the thermal bus includes a matrix of wires or rods, and the salt is grown onto this matrix. The density and spacing of the conductors depend on the heat fluxes that must be accommodated during operation.

  10. Hydrated Electrons in a Quaternary Microemulsion System: A Pulse Radiolysis Study

    PubMed

    Adhikari; Joshi; Gopinathan

    1997-07-01

    Using the technique of pulse radiolysis, hydrated electrons have been produced and studied in quaternary microemulsion (sodium lauryl sulfate (NaLS)/water/cyclohexane/1-pentanol) system. Remarkably high lifetimes ( approximately 20 &mgr;s) for hydrated electrons have been obtained. In general, these are two orders of magnitude higher than those reported earlier in reverse micelles. The water droplet sizes and location of the probes have been determined from the decay kinetics of hydrated electrons. The yields and half-lives (t 1/2 ) of the hydrated electrons vary smoothly as the water droplet sizes are changed. We believe that these studies will be useful not only in interpreting electron transfer reactions occurring in small water pockets in biological systems but also in the production of metal nanoclusters by radiation chemical method. PMID:9241228

  11. Substrate specificities of mouse heparan sulphate glucosaminyl 6-O-sulphotransferases.

    PubMed

    Smeds, Emanuel; Habuchi, Hiroko; Do, Anh-Tri; Hjertson, Eva; Grundberg, Helena; Kimata, Koji; Lindahl, Ulf; Kusche-Gullberg, Marion

    2003-06-01

    Glycosaminoglycan heparan sulphate interacts with a variety of proteins, such as growth factors, cytokines, enzymes and inhibitors and, thus, influences cellular functions, including adhesion, motility, differentiation and morphogenesis. The interactions generally involve saccharide domains in heparan sulphate chains, with precisely located O-sulphate groups. The 6-O-sulphate groups on glucosamine units, supposed to be involved in various interactions of functional importance, occur in different structural contexts. Three isoforms of the glucosaminyl 6-O-sulphotransferase (6-OST) have been cloned and characterized [H. Habuchi, M. Tanaka, O. Habuchi, K. Yoshida, H. Suzuki, K. Ban and K. Kimata (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 2859-2868]. We have studied the substrate specificities of the recombinant enzymes using various O-desulphated poly- and oligo-saccharides as substrates, and using adenosine 3'-phosphate 5'-phospho[(35)S]sulphate as sulphate donor. All three enzymes catalyse 6-O-sulphation of both -GlcA-GlcNS- and -IdoA-GlcNS- (where GlcA represents D-glucuronic acid, NS the N-sulphate group and IdoA the L-iduronic acid) sequences, with preference for IdoA-containing targets, with or without 2-O-sulphate substituents. 6-OST1 showed relatively higher activity towards target sequences lacking 2-O-sulphate, e.g. the -GlcA-GlcNS- disaccharide unit. Sulphation of such non-O-sulphated acceptor sequences was generally favoured at low acceptor polysaccharide concentrations. Experiments using partially O-desulphated antithrombin-binding oligosaccharide as the acceptor revealed 6-O-sulphation of N-acetylated as well as 3-O-sulphated glucosamine residues with each of the three 6-OSTs. We conclude that the three 6-OSTs have qualitatively similar substrate specificities, with minor differences in target preference. PMID:12611590

  12. Substrate specificities of mouse heparan sulphate glucosaminyl 6-O-sulphotransferases.

    PubMed Central

    Smeds, Emanuel; Habuchi, Hiroko; Do, Anh-Tri; Hjertson, Eva; Grundberg, Helena; Kimata, Koji; Lindahl, Ulf; Kusche-Gullberg, Marion

    2003-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycan heparan sulphate interacts with a variety of proteins, such as growth factors, cytokines, enzymes and inhibitors and, thus, influences cellular functions, including adhesion, motility, differentiation and morphogenesis. The interactions generally involve saccharide domains in heparan sulphate chains, with precisely located O-sulphate groups. The 6-O-sulphate groups on glucosamine units, supposed to be involved in various interactions of functional importance, occur in different structural contexts. Three isoforms of the glucosaminyl 6-O-sulphotransferase (6-OST) have been cloned and characterized [H. Habuchi, M. Tanaka, O. Habuchi, K. Yoshida, H. Suzuki, K. Ban and K. Kimata (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 2859-2868]. We have studied the substrate specificities of the recombinant enzymes using various O-desulphated poly- and oligo-saccharides as substrates, and using adenosine 3'-phosphate 5'-phospho[(35)S]sulphate as sulphate donor. All three enzymes catalyse 6-O-sulphation of both -GlcA-GlcNS- and -IdoA-GlcNS- (where GlcA represents D-glucuronic acid, NS the N-sulphate group and IdoA the L-iduronic acid) sequences, with preference for IdoA-containing targets, with or without 2-O-sulphate substituents. 6-OST1 showed relatively higher activity towards target sequences lacking 2-O-sulphate, e.g. the -GlcA-GlcNS- disaccharide unit. Sulphation of such non-O-sulphated acceptor sequences was generally favoured at low acceptor polysaccharide concentrations. Experiments using partially O-desulphated antithrombin-binding oligosaccharide as the acceptor revealed 6-O-sulphation of N-acetylated as well as 3-O-sulphated glucosamine residues with each of the three 6-OSTs. We conclude that the three 6-OSTs have qualitatively similar substrate specificities, with minor differences in target preference. PMID:12611590

  13. National workshop on gas hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Michael D.; Dillon, William P.; Malone, Rodney D.; Kvenvolden, Keith A.

    The range of present knowledge on the subject of gas hydrates and related federal research programs was the topic of discussion at the National Workshop on Gas Hydrates, April 23-24. The intention of the meeting was to provide the impetus for an expanded and broader-based national research program in both academia and government. Held at the U.S. Geological Survey National Center, Reston, Va., the workshop was organized by Michael D. Max, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.; William P. Dillon, USGS, Woods Hole, Mass.; and Rodney D. Malone, U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, W.Va. The 33 attendees represented academia (33%), federal agencies (58%), and industry (9%).

  14. Dynamics of hydrated starch saccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bari, M.; Deriu, A.; Albanese, G.; Cavatorta, F.

    2003-08-01

    We report here elastic neutron scattering data on glucose and on two of its polymeric forms: amylose and amylopectin. We have covered the hydration range from the dry state to about 0.6 g water/g dry saccharide. The data indicate, in all the analysed systems, the presence of a dynamic glass-like transition similar to that observed in hydrated proteins. The fact that this feature is observed also in a relatively small molecule like glucose confirms the hypothesis already put forward by other authors, that this transition in biomolecular species is essentially triggered and driven by the interaction of the macromolecule with the network of fluctuating H-bond of the solvent.

  15. Uranyl p-toluenesulphonate and its crystal hydrates. Synthesis and dehydration-hydration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, A. V.; Mityakhina, V. S.; Bogachev, S. V.; Suglobova, I. G.

    2003-01-01

    Lowest hydrates of uranyl p-toluenesulphonate (UPTS) and anhydrous salt were synthesised. The dehydration-hydration processes were studied by thermal gravimetric analysis. It has been established that the hydrate shell of UPTS has a layered structure. The IR spectra of UPTS and its hydrates were recorded. It was found that the IR spectra of UPTS crystal hydrates of the same composition, produced in dehydration-hydration, noticeably differ in the range of water vibrations and are the same in the range corresponding to vibrations of sulphonate groups.

  16. Formation of magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) cement pastes using sodium hexametaphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Tingting; Vandeperre, Luc J.; Cheeseman, Christopher R.

    2014-11-15

    Magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) gel is formed by the reaction of brucite with amorphous silica during sulphate attack in concrete and M-S-H is therefore regarded as having limited cementing properties. The aim of this work was to form M-S-H pastes, characterise the hydration reactions and assess the resulting properties. It is shown that M-S-H pastes can be prepared by reacting magnesium oxide (MgO) and silica fume (SF) at low water to solid ratio using sodium hexametaphosphate (NaHMP) as a dispersant. Characterisation of the hydration reactions by x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis shows that brucite and M-S-H gel are formed and that for samples containing 60 wt.% SF and 40 wt.% MgO all of the brucites react with SF to form M-S-H gel. These M-S-H cement pastes were found to have compressive strengths in excess of 70 MPa.

  17. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  18. Imaging Hydrated Microbial Extracellular Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Buck, Edgar C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-02-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryo-electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in the collapse of hydrated gel-like EPS into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  19. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: comparative analysis by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dohnalkova, Alice C; Marshall, Matthew J; Arey, Bruce W; Williams, Kenneth H; Buck, Edgar C; Fredrickson, James K

    2011-02-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigation of microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations, and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions by conventional electron microscopy approaches with imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding the nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment. PMID:21169451

  20. Chitosan hydrogels for chondroitin sulphate controlled release: an analytical characterization.

    PubMed

    Bianchera, Annalisa; Salomi, Enrico; Pezzanera, Matteo; Ruwet, Elisabeth; Bettini, Ruggero; Elviri, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an analytical characterization of chitosan scaffolds obtained by freeze-gelation toward the uptake and the controlled release of chondroitin sulphate (CS), as cartilage repair agent, under different pH conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), and liquid chromatography-UV spectrophotometry (LC-UV) techniques were exploited to obtain qualitative and quantitative descriptions of polymer and drug behaviour in the biomaterial. As for morphology, SEM analysis allowed the evaluation of scaffold porosity in terms of pore size and distribution both at the surface (Feret diameter 58 ± 19 μm) and on the cross section (Feret diameter 106 ± 51 μm). LC and ATR-FTIR evidenced a pH-dependent CS loading and release behaviour, strongly highlighting the role of electrostatic forces on chitosan/chondroitin sulphate interactions. PMID:25614850

  1. Chitosan Hydrogels for Chondroitin Sulphate Controlled Release: An Analytical Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Bianchera, Annalisa; Salomi, Enrico; Pezzanera, Matteo; Ruwet, Elisabeth; Bettini, Ruggero; Elviri, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an analytical characterization of chitosan scaffolds obtained by freeze-gelation toward the uptake and the controlled release of chondroitin sulphate (CS), as cartilage repair agent, under different pH conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), and liquid chromatography-UV spectrophotometry (LC-UV) techniques were exploited to obtain qualitative and quantitative descriptions of polymer and drug behaviour in the biomaterial. As for morphology, SEM analysis allowed the evaluation of scaffold porosity in terms of pore size and distribution both at the surface (Feret diameter 58 ± 19 μm) and on the cross section (Feret diameter 106 ± 51 μm). LC and ATR-FTIR evidenced a pH-dependent CS loading and release behaviour, strongly highlighting the role of electrostatic forces on chitosan/chondroitin sulphate interactions. PMID:25614850

  2. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ternes, Mark P.; Kedl, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    This invention is a process for formation of a gas hydrate to be used as a cool storage medium using a refrigerant in water. Mixing of the immiscible refrigerant and water is effected by addition of a surfactant and agitation. The difficult problem of subcooling during the process is overcome by using the surfactant and agitation and performance of the process significantly improves and approaches ideal.

  3. The Development Path for Hydrate Natural Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A. H.; Max, M. D.

    2008-12-01

    The question of when gas hydrate will become a commercially viable resource most concerns those nations with the most severe energy deficiencies. With the vast potential attributed to gas hydrate as a new gas play, the interest is understandable. Yet the resource potential of gas hydrate has persistently remained just over the horizon. While technical and economic hurdles have pushed back the timeline for development, considerable progress has been made in the past five years. An important lesson learned is that an analysis of the factors that control the formation of high grade hydrate deposits must be carried out so that both exploration and recovery scenarios can be modeled and engineered. Commercial hydrate development requires high concentrations of hydrate in porous, permeable reservoirs. It is only from such deposits that gas may be recovered in commercial quantities. While it is unrealistic to consider the global potential of gas hydrate to be in the hundreds of thousands of tcfs, there is a strong potential in the hundreds of tcfs or thousands of tcfs. Press releases from several national gas hydrate research programs have reported gas hydrate "discoveries". These are, in fact, hydrate shows that provide proof of the presence of hydrate where it may previously only have been predicted. Except in a few isolated areas, valid resource assessments remain to be accomplished through the identification of suitable hosts for hydrate concentrations such as sandstone reservoirs. A focused exploration effort based on geological and depositional characteristics is needed that addresses hydrate as part of a larger petroleum system. Simply drilling in areas that have identifiable bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) is unlikely to be a viable exploration tool. It is very likely that with drilling on properly identified targets, commercial development could become a reality in less than a decade.

  4. Gas hydrates: Technology status report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    In 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) assumed the responsibility for expanding the knowledge base and for developing methods to recover gas from hydrates. These are ice-like mixtures of gas and water where gas molecules are trapped within a framework of water molecules. This research is part of the Unconventional Gas Recovery (UGR) program, a multidisciplinary effort that focuses on developing the technology to produce natural gas from resources that have been classified as unconventional because of their unique geologies and production mechanisms. Current work on gas hydrates emphasizes geological studies; characterization of the resource; and generic research, including modeling of reservoir conditions, production concepts, and predictive strategies for stimulated wells. Complementing this work is research on in situ detection of hydrates and field tests to verify extraction methods. Thus, current research will provide a comprehensive technology base from which estimates of reserve potential can be made, and from which industry can develop recovery strategies. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Micelle Structure and Hydrophobic Hydration.

    PubMed

    Long, Joshua A; Rankin, Blake M; Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2015-08-26

    Despite the ubiquity and utility of micelles self-assembled from aqueous surfactants, longstanding questions remain regarding their surface structure and interior hydration. Here we combine Raman spectroscopy with multivariate curve resolution (Raman-MCR) to probe the hydrophobic hydration of surfactants with various aliphatic chain lengths, and either anionic (carboxylate) or cationic (trimethylammonium) head groups, both below and above the critical micelle concentration. Our results reveal significant penetration of water into micelle interiors, well beyond the first few carbons adjacent to the headgroup. Moreover, the vibrational C-D frequency shifts of solubilized deuterated n-hexane confirm that it resides in a dry, oil-like environment (while the localization of solubilized benzene is sensitive to headgroup charge). Our findings imply that the hydrophobic core of a micelle is surrounded by a highly corrugated surface containing hydrated non-polar cavities whose depth increases with increasing surfactant chain length, thus bearing a greater resemblance to soluble proteins than previously recognized. PMID:26222042

  6. Energy landscape of clathrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmedt, A.; Bedouret, L.; Pefoute, E.; Pouvreau, M.; Say-Liang-Fat, S.; Alvarez, M.

    2012-11-01

    Clathrate hydrates are nanoporous crystalline materials made of a network of hydrogen-bonded water molecules (forming host cages) that is stabilized by the presence of foreign (generally hydrophobic) guest molecules. The natural existence of large quantities of hydrocarbon hydrates in deep oceans and permafrost is certainly at the origin of numerous applications in the broad areas of energy and environmental sciences and technologies (e.g. gas storage). At a fundamental level, their nanostructuration confers on these materials specific properties (e.g. their "glass-like" thermal conductivity) for which the host-guest interactions play a key role. These interactions occur on broad timescale and thus require the use of multi-technique approach in which neutron scattering brings unvaluable information. This work reviews the dynamical properties of clathrate hydrates, ranging from intramolecular vibrations to Brownian relaxations; it illustrates the contribution of neutron scattering in the understanding of the underlying factors governing chemical-physics properties specific to these nanoporous systems.

  7. The precipitation of potassium aluminium sulphate from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, J. W.; Žáček, S.

    1981-06-01

    A precipitation study has been made with potassium aluminium sulphate (potash alum) produced by mixing aqueous solutions of its constituent salts. Rates of nucleation, as indicated by the induction period, were measured for both agitated and non-agitated solutions over the temperature range 15-35°C. Nucleation rates increase with increases in agitation, temperature and supersaturation, but the latter has the dominant effect, as predicted by classical nucleation theory. The temperature-dependence of the interfacial tension is evaluated.

  8. Sulphate and desertification signals in Middle Eastern temperature trends

    SciTech Connect

    Nasrallah, H.A.; Balling, R.C. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    Analysis of Middle Eastern annual temperature anomalies over the past 40 years reveals statistically significant warming over this time period of 0.07 C per decade. The warming is most pronounced over the spring season and least apparent in the winter season. Spatial analysis reveals a positive relationship between Middle Eastern warming and the degree of human-induced desertification and a negative relationship between local warming and the atmospheric concentration of sulphate.

  9. Physicochemical properties, cytotoxicity, and antimicrobial activity of sulphated zirconia nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mftah, Ae; Alhassan, Fatah H; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna Sadiq; El Zowalaty, Mohamed Ezzat; Webster, Thomas J; Sh-Eldin, Mohammed; Rasedee, Abdullah; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin; Rashid, Shah Samiur

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle sulphated zirconia with Brønsted acidic sites were prepared here by an impregnation reaction followed by calcination at 600°C for 3 hours. The characterization was completed using X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Brunner-Emmett-Teller surface area measurements, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, the anticancer and antimicrobial effects were investigated for the first time. This study showed for the first time that the exposure of cancer cells to sulphated zirconia nanoparticles (3.9-1,000 μg/mL for 24 hours) resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth, as determined by (4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays. Similar promising results were observed for reducing bacteria functions. In this manner, this study demonstrated that sulphated zirconia nanoparticles with Brønsted acidic sites should be further studied for a wide range of anticancer and antibacterial applications. PMID:25632233

  10. Properties of fractionated chondroitin sulphate from ox nasal septa

    PubMed Central

    Wasteson, Åke

    1971-01-01

    1. Chondroitin sulphate was isolated from bovine nasal septa by precipitation with cetylpyridinium chloride after digestion of the tissue with papain. 2. The material was divided into two portions, one of which was partially degraded with testicular hyaluronidase. 3. Untreated and hyaluronidase-digested material were fractionated into a total of eleven subfractions by gel chromatography on Sephadex G-200 and Sephadex G-100 respectively. 4. Chemical analyses indicated that the composition of all the fractions was similar to that of chondroitin sulphate. However, electrophoresis revealed a charge-inhomogeneity in the low-molecular-weight fractions obtained after hyaluronidase digestion. 5. The physicochemical properties of the subfractions were investigated by sedimentation-velocity, diffusion and sedimentation-equilibrium studies, osmometry, viscometry and gel chromatography. The individual fractions were essentially monodisperse and showed molecular weights ranging from 2400 to 36000. 6. The relationship between the intrinsic viscosity and the molecular weight was [η]=5.0×10−6×M1.14, indicating that the chondroitin sulphate molecules assume a shape intermediate between that of a random coil and a stiff rod. 7. The relationship between the sedimentation constant and the molecular weight (>104) was s020,w=2.3×10−2×M0.44. PMID:5123881

  11. Physicochemical properties, cytotoxicity, and antimicrobial activity of sulphated zirconia nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Mftah, Ae; Alhassan, Fatah H; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna Sadiq; El Zowalaty, Mohamed Ezzat; Webster, Thomas J; Sh-eldin, Mohammed; Rasedee, Abdullah; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin; Rashid, Shah Samiur

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle sulphated zirconia with Brønsted acidic sites were prepared here by an impregnation reaction followed by calcination at 600°C for 3 hours. The characterization was completed using X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Brunner-Emmett-Teller surface area measurements, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, the anticancer and antimicrobial effects were investigated for the first time. This study showed for the first time that the exposure of cancer cells to sulphated zirconia nanoparticles (3.9–1,000 μg/mL for 24 hours) resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth, as determined by (4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays. Similar promising results were observed for reducing bacteria functions. In this manner, this study demonstrated that sulphated zirconia nanoparticles with Brønsted acidic sites should be further studied for a wide range of anticancer and antibacterial applications. PMID:25632233

  12. Study of Formation Mechanisms of Gas Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    Gas hydrates, which had been found in subsurface geological environments of deep-sea sediments and permafrost regions, are solid crystalline compounds of gas molecules and water. The estimated energy resources of hydrates are at least twice of that of the conventional fossil fuel in the world. Gas hydrates have a great opportunity to become a dominating future energy. In the past years, many laboratory experiments had been conducted to study chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of gas hydrates in order to investigate the formation and dissociation mechanisms of hydrates. However, it is difficult to observe the formation and dissociation of hydrates in a porous media from a physical experiment directly. The purpose of this study was to model the dynamic formation mechanisms of gas hydrate in porous media by reservoir simulation. Two models were designed for this study: 1) a closed-system static model with separated gas and water zones; this model was a hydrate equilibrium model to investigate the behavior of the formation of hydrates near the initial gas-water contact; and 2) an open-system dynamic model with a continuous bottom-up gas flow; this model simulated the behavior of gas migration and studied the formation of hydrates from flowed gas and static formation water in porous media. A phase behavior module was developed in this study for reservoir simulator to model the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) behavior of hydrates. The thermodynamic equilibriums and chemical reactions were coupled with the phase behavior module to have functions modelling the formation and dissociation of hydrates from/to water and gas. The simulation models used in this study were validated from the code-comparison project proposed by the NETL. According to the modelling results of the closed-system static model, we found that predominated location for the formation of hydrates was below the gas-water contact (or at the top of water zone). The maximum hydrate saturation

  13. Chemical stabilities of isoetharine hydrochloride, metaproterenol sulphate and terbutaline sulphate after mixing with normal saline for respiratory therapy.

    PubMed

    Das Gupta, V; Parasrampuria, J; Gardner, S N

    1988-04-01

    The chemical stabilities of isoetharine hydrochloride inhalation solution, metaproterenol sulphate inhalation solution and terbutaline sulphate injection, after diluting 1 in 10 with sodium chloride 0.9% injection were studied. On storing the solutions in amber-coloured syringes, they were stable for at least 120 days at 5 degrees C. At 25 degrees C they were also stable for 120 days except that isoetharine solution discoloured and lost 7.8% of its potency after 90 days of storage. There was a new peak in the chromatogram from the decomposition product. All other solutions remained clear for 120 days at both temperatures. The initial and final pH values were similar except that after 120 days at both temperatures. The initial and final pH values were similar except that after 120 days at 25 degrees C, the pH value of terbutaline solution had increased from 4.9 to 5.4. PMID:3392129

  14. Chemical sulphate removal for treatment of construction and demolition debris leachate.

    PubMed

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck; Annachhatre, Ajit P; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2014-08-01

    Construction and demolition debris (CDD) is a product of construction, renovation or demolition activities. It has a high gypsum content (52.4% of total gypsum), concentrated in the CDD sand (CDDS) fraction. To comply with the posed limit of the maximum amount of sulphate present in building sand, excess sulphate needs to be removed. In order to enable reuse of CDDS, a novel treatment process is developed based on washing of the CDDS to remove most of the gypsum, and subsequent sulphate removal from the sulphate-rich CDDS leachate. This study aims to assess chemical techniques, i.e. precipitation and adsorption, for sulphate removal from the CDDS leachate. Good sulphate removal efficiencies (up to 99.9%) from the CDDS leachate can be achieved by precipitation with barium chloride (BaCl2) and lead(II) nitrate (Pb(NO3)2). Precipitation with calcium chloride (CaCl2), calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and calcium oxide (CaO) gave less efficient sulphate removal. Adsorption of sulphate to aluminium oxide (Al2O3) yielded a 50% sulphate removal efficiency, whereas iron oxide-coated sand as adsorbent gave only poor (10%) sulphate removal efficiencies. PMID:24956793

  15. Geomechanical Modeling of Gas Hydrate Bearing Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, M. J.; Gai, X., Sr.

    2015-12-01

    This contribution focuses on an advance geomechanical model for methane hydrate-bearing soils based on concepts of elasto-plasticity for strain hardening/softening soils and incorporates bonding and damage effects. The core of the proposed model includes: a hierarchical single surface critical state framework, sub-loading concepts for modeling the plastic strains generally observed inside the yield surface and a hydrate enhancement factor to account for the cementing effects provided by the presence of hydrates in sediments. The proposed framework has been validated against recently published experiments involving both, synthetic and natural hydrate soils, as well as different sediments types (i.e., different hydrate saturations, and different hydrates morphologies) and confinement conditions. The performance of the model in these different case studies was very satisfactory.

  16. Fundamentals and applications of gas hydrates.

    PubMed

    Koh, Carolyn A; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Wu, David T

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of gas hydrate formation and decomposition processes is critical in many energy and environmental areas and has special importance in flow assurance for the oil and gas industry. These areas represent the core of gas hydrate applications, which, albeit widely studied, are still developing as growing fields of research. Discovering the molecular pathways and chemical and physical concepts underlying gas hydrate formation potentially can lead us beyond flowline blockage prevention strategies toward advancing new technological solutions for fuel storage and transportation, safely producing a new energy resource from natural deposits of gas hydrates in oceanic and arctic sediments, and potentially facilitating effective desalination of seawater. The state of the art in gas hydrate research is leading us to new understanding of formation and dissociation phenomena that focuses on measurement and modeling of time-dependent properties of gas hydrates on the basis of their well-established thermodynamic properties. PMID:22432618

  17. Structural characteristics of hydration sites in lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Soda, Kunitsugu; Shimbo, Yudai; Seki, Yasutaka; Taiji, Makoto

    2011-06-01

    A new method is presented for determining the hydration site of proteins, where the effect of structural fluctuations in both protein and hydration water is explicitly considered by using molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). The whole hydration sites (HS) of lysozyme are composed of 195 single HSs and 38 clustered ones (CHS), and divided into 231 external HSs (EHS) and 2 internal ones (IHS). The largest CHSs, 'Hg' and 'Lβ', are the IHSs having 2.54 and 1.35 mean internal hydration waters respectively. The largest EHS, 'Clft', is located in the cleft region. The real hydration structure of a CHS is an ensemble of multiple structures. The transition between two structures occurs through recombinations of some H-bonds. The number of the experimental X-ray crystal waters is nearly the same as that of the estimated MDS hydration waters for 70% of the HSs, but significantly different for the rest of HSs. PMID:21435773

  18. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  19. Gas hydrates of outer continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Kvenvolden, K.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances in which a rigid framework of water molecules traps molecules of gas, mainly methane. Gas-hydrate deposits are common in continental margin sediment in all major oceans at water depths greater than about 300 m. Thirty-three localities with evidence for gas-hydrate occurrence have been described worldwide. The presence of these gas hydrates has been inferred mainly from anomalous lacoustic reflectors seen on marine seismic records. Naturally occurring marine gas hydrates have been sampled and analyzed at about tensites in several regions including continental slope and rise sediment of the eastern Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. Except for some Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate occurrences, the analyzed gas hydrates are composed almost exclusively of microbial methane. Evidence for the microbial origin of methane in gas hydrates includes (1) the inverse relation between methane occurence and sulfate concentration in the sediment, (2) the subparallel depth trends in carbon isotopic compositions of methane and bicarbonate in the interstitial water, and (3) the general range of {sup 13}C depletion ({delta}{sub PDB}{sup 13}C = {minus}90 to {minus}60 {per thousand}) in the methane. Analyses of gas hydrates from the Peruvian outer continental margin in particular illustrate this evidence for microbially generated methane. The total amount of methane in gas hydrates of continental margins is not known, but estimates of about 10{sup 16} m{sup 3} seem reasonable. Although this amount of methane is large, it is not yet clear whether methane hydrates of outer continental margins will ever be a significant energy resource; however, these gas hydrates will probably constitute a drilling hazard when outer continental margins are explored in the future.

  20. Cation-Induced Hydration Effects Cause Lower Critical Solution Temperature Behavior in Protein Solutions.

    PubMed

    Matsarskaia, Olga; Braun, Michal K; Roosen-Runge, Felix; Wolf, Marcell; Zhang, Fajun; Roth, Roland; Schreiber, Frank

    2016-08-11

    The phase behavior of protein solutions is important for numerous phenomena in biology and soft matter. We report a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) phase behavior of aqueous solutions of a globular protein induced by multivalent metal ions around physiological temperatures. The LCST behavior manifests itself via a liquid-liquid phase separation of the protein-salt solution upon heating. Isothermal titration calorimetry and zeta-potential measurements indicate that here cation-protein binding is an endothermic, entropy-driven process. We offer a mechanistic explanation of the LCST. First, cations bind to protein surface groups driven by entropy changes of hydration water. Second, the bound cations bridge to other protein molecules, inducing an entropy-driven attraction causing the LCST. Our findings have general implications for condensation, LCST, and hydration behavior of (bio)polymer solutions as well as the understanding of biological effects of (heavy) metal ions and their hydration. PMID:27414502

  1. Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gabitto, Jorge F.; Tsouris, Costas

    2010-01-01

    Memore » thane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 10 16   m 3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.« less

  2. Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Gabitto, Jorge; Tsouris, Costas

    2010-01-01

    Methane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 1016?m3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.

  3. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2008-01-01

    Advances are reported in several aspects of clathrate hydrate desalination fundamentals necessary to develop an economical means to produce municipal quantities of potable water from seawater or brackish feedstock. These aspects include the following, (1) advances in defining the most promising systems design based on new types of hydrate guest molecules, (2) selection of optimal multi-phase reactors and separation arrangements, and, (3) applicability of an inert heat exchange fluid to moderate hydrate growth, control the morphology of the solid hydrate material formed, and facilitate separation of hydrate solids from concentrated brine. The rate of R141b hydrate formation was determined and found to depend only on the degree of supercooling. The rate of R141b hydrate formation in the presence of a heat exchange fluid depended on the degree of supercooling according to the same rate equation as pure R141b with secondary dependence on salinity. Experiments demonstrated that a perfluorocarbon heat exchange fluid assisted separation of R141b hydrates from brine. Preliminary experiments using the guest species, difluoromethane, showed that hydrate formation rates were substantial at temperatures up to at least 12 C and demonstrated partial separation of water from brine. We present a detailed molecular picture of the structure and dynamics of R141b guest molecules within water cages, obtained from ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and Raman spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations were used to provide an energetic and molecular orbital description of R141b stability in both large and small cages in a structure II hydrate. Additionally, the hydrate of an isomer, 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, does not form at ambient conditions because of extensive overlap of electron density between guest and host. Classical molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory trials support the results for the isomer hydrate. Molecular dynamics simulations

  4. Polycrystalline methane hydrate: Synthesis from superheated ice, and low-temperature mechanical properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    1998-01-01

    We describe a new and efficient technique to grow aggregates of pure methane hydrate in quantities suitable for physical and material properties testing. Test specimens were grown under static conditions by combining cold, pressurized CH4 gas with granulated H2O ice, and then warming the reactants to promote the reaction CH4(g) + 6H2O(s???1) ??? CH4??6H2O (methane hydrate). Hydrate formation evidently occurs at the nascent ice/liquid water interface on ice grain surfaces, and complete reaction was achieved by warming the system above the ice melting point and up to 290 K, at 25-30 MPa, for approximately 8 h. The resulting material is pure, cohesive, polycrystalline methane hydrate with controlled grain size and random orientation. Synthesis conditions placed the H2O ice well above its melting temperature while reaction progressed, yet samples and run records showed no evidence for bulk melting of the unreacted portions of ice grains. Control experiments using Ne, a non-hydrate-forming gas, showed that under otherwise identical conditions, the pressure reduction and latent heat associated with ice melting are easily detectable in our fabrication apparatus. These results suggest that under hydrate-forming conditions, H2O ice can persist metastably to temperatures well above its ordinary melting point while reacting to form hydrate. Direct observations of the hydrate growth process in a small, high-pressure optical cell verified these conclusions and revealed additional details of the hydrate growth process. Methane hydrate samples were then tested in constant-strain-rate deformation experiments at T = 140-200 K, Pc = 50-100 MPa, and ?? = 10-4 10-6 s-1. Measurements in both the brittle and ductile fields showed that methane hydrate has measurably different strength than H2O ice, and work hardens to an unusually high degree compared to other ices as well as to most metals and ceramics at high homologous temperatures. This work hardening may be related to a changing

  5. Waters of Hydration of Cupric Hydrates: A Comparison between Heating and Absorbance Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2011-01-01

    The empirical formulas of four cupric hydrates are determined by measuring the absorbance in aqueous solution. The Beer-Lambert Law is verified by constructing a calibration curve of absorbance versus known Cu[superscript 2+](aq) concentration. A solution of the unknown hydrate is prepared by using 0.2-0.3 g of hydrate, and water is added such…

  6. Observations related to tetrahydrofuran and methane hydrates for laboratory studies of hydrate-bearing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.Y.; Yun, T.S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction among water molecules, guest gas molecules, salts, and mineral particles determines the nucleation and growth behavior of gas hydrates in natural sediments. Hydrate of tetrahydrofuran (THF) has long been used for laboratory studies of gas hydrate-bearing sediments to provide close control on hydrate concentrations and to overcome the long formation history of methane hydrate from aqueous phase methane in sediments. Yet differences in the polarizability of THF (polar molecule) compared to methane (nonpolar molecule) raise questions about the suitability of THF as a proxy for methane in the study of hydrate-bearing sediments. From existing data and simple macroscale experiments, we show that despite its polar nature, THF's large molecular size results in low permittivity, prevents it from dissolving precipitated salts, and hinders the solvation of ions on dry mineral surfaces. In addition, the interfacial tension between water and THF hydrate is similar to that between water and methane hydrate. The processes that researchers choose for forming hydrate in sediments in laboratory settings (e.g., from gas, liquid, or ice) and the pore-scale distribution of the hydrate that is produced by each of these processes likely have a more pronounced effect on the measured macroscale properties of hydrate-bearing sediments than do differences between THF and methane hydrates themselves.

  7. Methane hydrate research at NETL: Research to make methane production from hydrates a reality

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.E.; Link, D.D.; English, N.

    2007-03-01

    Research is underway at NETL to understand the physical properties of methane hydrates. Five key areas of research that need further investigation have been identified. These five areas, i.e. thermal properties of hydrates in sediments, kinetics of natural hydrate dissociation, hysteresis effects, permeability of sediments to gas flow and capillary pressures within sediments, and hydrate distribution at porous scale, are important to the production models that will be used for producing methane from hydrate deposits. NETL is using both laboratory experiments and computational modeling to address these five key areas. The laboratory and computational research reinforce each other by providing feedback. The laboratory results are used in the computational models and the results from the computational modeling is used to help direct future laboratory research. The data generated at NETL will be used to help fulfill The National Methane Hydrate R&D Program of a “long-term supply of natural gas by developing the knowledge and technology base to allow commercial production of methane from domestic hydrate deposits by the year 2015” as outlined on the NETL Website [NETL Website, 2005. http://www.netl.doe.gov/scngo/Natural%20Gas/hydrates/index.html]. Laboratory research is accomplished in one of the numerous high-pressure hydrate cells available ranging in size from 0.15 mL to 15 L in volume. A dedicated high-pressure view cell within the Raman spectrometer allows for monitoring the formation and dissociation of hydrates. Thermal conductivity of hydrates (synthetic and natural) at a certain temperature and pressure is performed in a NETL-designed cell. Computational modeling studies are investigating the kinetics of hydrate formation and dissociation, modeling methane hydrate reservoirs, molecular dynamics simulations of hydrate formation, dissociation, and thermal properties, and Monte Carlo simulations of hydrate formation and dissociation.

  8. A coupled THMC model of a heating and hydration laboratory experiment in unsaturated compacted FEBEX bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.; Fernandez, A.M.

    2010-05-01

    Unsaturated compacted bentonite is foreseen by several countries as a backfill and sealing material in high-level radioactive waste repositories. The strong interplays between thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes during the hydration stage of a repository call for fully coupled THMC models. Validation of such THMC models is prevented by the lack of comprehensive THMC experiments and the difficulties of experimental methods to measure accurately the chemical composition of bentonite porewater. We present here a non-isothermal multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive solute transport model for a deformable medium of a heating and hydration experiment performed on a sample of compacted FEBEX bentonite. Besides standard solute transport and geochemical processes, the model accounts for solute cross diffusion and thermal and chemical osmosis. Bentonite swelling is solved with a state-surface approach. The THM model is calibrated with transient temperature, water content and porosity data measured at the end of the experiment. The reactive transport model is calibrated with porewater chemical data derived from aqueous extract data. Model results confirm that thermal osmosis is relevant for the hydration of FEBEX bentonite while chemical osmosis can be safely neglected. Dilution and evaporation are the main processes controlling the concentration of conservative species. Dissolved cations are mostly affected by calcite dissolution-precipitation and cation exchange reactions. Dissolved sulphate is controlled by gypsum/anhydrite dissolution-precipitation. pH is mostly buffered by protonation/deprotonation via surface complexation. Computed concentrations agree well with inferred aqueous extract data at all sections except near the hydration boundary where cation data are affected by a sampling artifact. The fit of Cl{sup -} data is excellent except for the data near the heater. The largest deviations of the model from inferred aqueous

  9. Interpretation of multiple archaeal lipid biomarkers in deep sediments bearing gas hydrate in the East Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong-Hun, Lee; Jong-Gu, Gal; Ji-Hoon, Kim; Jang-Jun, Bahk; Kyung-Hoon, Shin

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the distributions and stable carbon isotope values of arhaeal lipid biomarkers at seismically chimney and non-chimney sites (UBGH 2-3, UBGH 2-1_1) of gas hydrate bearing deep core sediments during the second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition (UBGH 2). The objective of this study was to identify and compare the metabolic pathway of methane-related archaea between both sites. The increased concentration and δ13C-depleted archaeol and sn-2-hydroxyarcheol at the Sulphate-Methane transition Zone (SMTZ) of UBGH 2-11 could be predominantly methanotrophic activity indicating methane consumption by Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane (AOM). The concentration of methane-related specific biomarkers (PMI, crocetane, archaeol, sn-2-hydroxyarcheol) within deep core sediment bearing gas hydrate of both sites is relatively higher than in other sediment sections, showing lower Cl- concentration. The carbon stable isotopic data (-47.5 o -75.2o to -52.4) for archaeol, sn-2-hydroxyarcheol in the sediment sections (20mbsf, 93 - 100mbsf) at UBGH 2-11 reflect methane production via microbial carbon dioxide reduction in deep core sediment. Archaeal lipid biomarker concentrations are slightly different depending on upward methane diffusion or advection with the seismic characteristics of both sites. Based on the archaeal lipid biomarker ratio (sn-2-hydroxyarchaeol/archaeol) as a tool to demonstrate the different ANME communities, our result suggest that the predominant occurrence of ANMEs is mediated by upward migration of microbial methane. Consequently, geochemical signature of archaeal lipid biomarkers in the East Sea of the western North Paci?c may be a potential indicator reflected by upward transported-methane in methane cycle of deep core sediment. In addition, the distribution of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) is discussed with archaeal lipid biomarkers in the gas hydrate bearing deep sediment.

  10. Hydration Dynamics of Biomolecules from Co-solvents to Crowding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubarych, Kevin

    Biomolecules self-assemble into complex functional structures with high fidelity largely due to interactions between the macromolecules and water. Once folded, the dynamics of water molecules in the vicinity of extended macromolecular interfaces can be altered relative to the bulk, leading to complex, heterogeneous and distance-dependent transport properties near these surfaces. Using a strategy based on transition metal carbonyl vibrational probes covalently conjugated to the protein surface, we have been able to use ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy to probe the dynamics from this most important perspective. In a series of studies, we have found these probes to be primarily sensitive to the orientational dynamics of the hydrating water molecules, and have studied both protein/water and membrane/water interfaces. Several key finding have emerged, including a modest 2-3-fold slowdown of hydration water's reorientational dynamics relative to the bulk, and a dynamical transition that occurs due to collective hydration induced by macromolecular crowding. We will summarize our progress to-date, as well as present our newest results on the effects of ions and the dynamical signatures of preferential solvation.

  11. Balanced-activity improved inverse emulsion to inhibit brittle lutite hydration in oil fields

    SciTech Connect

    Olmedo, E. P.; de J. Hernandez Alvarez, R.; Barrera, C. D.; Ramos, J. D. G.

    1984-10-02

    An improved inverse emulsion for use as a drilling fluid that inhibits brittle lutite hydration. The emulsion includes a heavy oil; brine; a viscosity agent with thermostabilizing properties; an emulsifying agent; a thickening agent; a gelatinizing additive; and an alkaline earth metal hydroxide. The emulsion avoids hole collapsing and improves well gage stability.

  12. The biochemistry of aromatic amines. 2-Formamido-1-naphthyl hydrogen sulphate, a metabolite of 2-naphthylamine

    PubMed Central

    Boyland, E.; Manson, D.

    1966-01-01

    1. 2-Formamido-1-naphthyl hydrogen sulphate is excreted by dogs and rats dosed with 2-naphthylamine or with 2-amino-1-naphthyl hydrogen sulphate and was isolated from dog urine. 2. 2-Formamido-1-naphthol, naphtho[2,1-d]oxazole and N-formyl-2-naphthylhydroxylamine are excreted as (2-formamido-1-naphthyl glucosid)uronic acid. 2-Formamidonaphthalene is converted into conjugates of 2-amino-6-naphthol and 2-amino-8-naphthol, but 2-methylaminonaphthalene is excreted as 2-amino-1-naphthyl hydrogen sulphate and its N-methyl and N-formyl derivatives and (2-amino-1-naphthyl glucosid)uronic acid. 3. 2-Methylamino-1-naphthyl hydrogen sulphate is converted into 2-formamido-1-naphthyl hydrogen sulphate and 2-amino-1-naphthyl hydrogen sulphate on charcoal. 2-Amino-1-naphthyl hydrogen sulphate and formaldehyde react on charcoal to yield 2-methylamino- and 2-formamido-1-naphthyl hydrogen sulphate. 4. 2-Formamido-1-naphthol, 2-formamido-1-naphthyl hydrogen sulphate, N-formyl-2-naphthylhydroxylamine and N-formyl-2-naphthylhydroxylamine-O-sulphonic acid were synthesized. PMID:5965337

  13. The synthesis of dermatan sulphate proteoglycans by fetal and adult human articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Melching, L I; Roughley, P J

    1989-01-01

    Non-aggregating dermatan sulphate proteoglycans can be extracted from both fetal and adult human articular cartilage. The dermatan sulphate proteoglycans appear to be smaller in the adult, this presumably being due to shorter glycosaminoglycan chains, and these chains contain a greater proportion of their uronic acid residues as iduronate. Both the adult and fetal dermatan sulphate proteoglycans contain a greater amount of 4-sulphation than 6-sulphation of the N-acetylgalactosamine residues, in contrast with the aggregating proteoglycans, which always show more 6-sulphation on their chondroitin sulphate chains. In the fetus the major dermatan sulphate proteoglycan to be synthesized is DS-PGI, though DS-PGII is synthesized in reasonable amounts. In the adult, however, DS-PGI synthesis is barely detectable relative to DS-PGII, which is still synthesized in substantial amounts. Purification of the dermatan sulphate proteoglycans from adult cartilage is hampered by the presence of degradation products derived from the large aggregating proteoglycans, which possess similar charge, size and density properties, but which can be distinguished by their ability to interact with hyaluronic acid. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2775229

  14. Isotopic modelling of the significance of bacterial sulphate reduction for phenol attenuation in a contaminated aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Michael J.; Bottrell, Simon H.; Thornton, Steven F.; Lerner, David N.

    2001-12-01

    A Triassic sandstone aquifer polluted with a mixture of phenolic hydrocarbons has been investigated by means of high-resolution groundwater sampling. Samples taken at depth intervals of 1 m have revealed the presence of a diving pollutant plume with a sharply defined upper margin. Concentrations of pollutant phenols exceed 4 g/l in the plume core, rendering it sterile but towards the diluted upper margin evidence for bacterial sulphate reduction (BSR) has been obtained. Groundwaters have been analysed for both δ34S-SO 4 and δ18O-SO 4. Two reservoirs have been identified with distinct sulphate-oxygen isotope ratios. Groundwater sulphate ( δ18O-SO 4=3-5‰) outside the plume shows a simple linear mixing trend with an isotopically uniform pollutant sulphate reservoir ( δ18O-SO 4=10-12‰) across the plume margin. The sulphur isotope ratios do not always obey a simple mixing relation, however, at one multilevel borehole, enrichment in 34SO 4 at the plume margin is inversely correlated with sulphate concentration. This and the presence of 34S-depleted dissolved sulphide indicate that enrichment in 34SO 4 is the result of bacterial sulphate reduction. δ34S analysis of trace hydrogen sulphide within the plume yielded an isotope enrichment factor ( ɛ) of -9.4‰ for present-day bacterial sulphate reduction. This value agrees with a long-term estimate (-9.9‰) obtained from a Rayleigh model of the sulphate reduction process. The model was also used to obtain an estimate of the pre-reduction sulphate concentration profile with depth. The difference between this and the present-day profiles then gave a mass balance for sulphate consumption. The organic carbon mineralisation that would account for this sulphate loss is shown to represent only 0.1‰ of the phenol concentration in this region of the plume. Hence, the contribution of bacterial sulphate reduction to biodegradation has thus far been small. The highest total phenolic concentration (TPC) at which there is

  15. Stable isotopic evidence for anaerobic maintained sulphate discharge in a polythermal glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, A. H.

    2016-03-01

    To understand the sources and sinks of sulphate and associated biogeochemical processes in a High Arctic environment, late winter snowpacks, the summer melt-waters and rock samples were collected and analysed for major ions and stable isotope tracers (δ18O, δ34S). The SO42bar/Clbar ratio reveal that more than 87% of sulphate (frequently > 95%) of total sulphate carried by the subglacial runoff and proglacial streams was derived from non-snowpack sources. The proximity of non-snowpack sulphate δ34S (∼8-19‰) to the δ34S of the major rocks in the vicinity (∼-6 to +18‰) suggest that the non-snowpack sulphate was principally derived from rock weathering. Furthermore, Ca2++Mg2+/SO42ˉ molar shows that sulphate acquisition in the meltwaters was controlled by two major processes: 1) coupled-sulphide carbonate weathering (molar ratio ∼ 2) and, 2) re-dissolution of secondary salts (molar ratio ∼ 1). The δ34S-SO4 = +19.4‰ > δ34S-S of rock, accompanied by increased sulphate concentration also indicates an input from re-dissolution of secondary salts. Overall, δ18O composition of these non-snowpack sulphate (-11.9 to -2.2‰) mostly stayed below the threshold δ18O value (-6.7 to -3.3‰) for minimum O2 condition, suggesting that certain proportion of sulphate was regularly supplied from anaerobic sulphide oxidation.

  16. Synthesis of polycrystalline methane hydrate, and its phase stability and mechanical properties at elevated pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    Test specimens of methane hydrate were grown under static conditions by combining cold, pressurized CH4 gas with H2O ice grains, then warming the system to promote the reaction CH4 (g) + 6H2O (s???l) ??? CH4??6H2O. Hydrate formation evidently occurs at the nascent ice/liquid water interface, and complete reaction was achieved by warming the system above 271.5 K and up to 289 K, at 25-30 MPa, for approximately 8 hours. The resulting material is pure methane hydrate with controlled grain size and random texture. Fabrication conditions placed the H2O ice well above its melting temperature before reaction completed, yet samples and run records showed no evidence for bulk melting of the ice grains. Control experiments using Ne, a non-hydrate-forming gas, verified that under otherwise identical conditions, the pressure reduction and latent heat associated with ice melting is easily detectable in our fabrication apparatus. These results suggest that under hydrate-forming conditions, H2O ice can persist metastably at temperatures well above its melting point. Methane hydrate samples were then tested in constant-strain-rate deformation experiments at T= 140-200 K, Pc= 50-100 MPa, and ????= 10-4-10-6 s-1. Measurements in both the brittle and ductile fields showed that methane hydrate has measurably different strength than H2O ice, and work hardens to a higher degree compared to other ices as well as to most metals and ceramics at high homologous temperatures. This work hardening may be related to a changing stoichiometry under pressure during plastic deformation; x-ray analyses showed that methane hydrate undergoes a process of solid-state disproportionation or exsolution during deformation at conditions well within its conventional stability field.

  17. DNA hydration studied by neutron fiber diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, W.; Forsyth, V.T.; Mahendrasingam, A.; Langan, P.; Pigram, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    The development of neutron high angle fiber diffraction to investigate the location of water around the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-helix is described. The power of the technique is illustrated by its application to the D and A conformations of DNA using the single crystal diffractometer, D19, at the Institute Laue-Langevin, Grenoble and the time of flight diffractometer, SXD, at the Rutherford Appleton ISIS Spallation Neutron Source. These studies show the existence of bound water closely associated with the DNA. The patterns of hydration in these two DNA conformations are quite distinct and are compared to those observed in X-ray single crystal studies of two-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. Information on the location of water around the DNA double-helix from the neutron fiber diffraction studies is combined with that on the location of alkali metal cations from complementary X-ray high angle fiber diffraction studies at the Daresbury Laboratory SRS using synchrotron radiation. These analyses emphasize the importance of viewing DNA, water and ions as a single system with specific interactions between the three components and provide a basis for understanding the effect of changes in the concentration of water and ions in inducing conformations] transitions in the DNA double-helix.

  18. Unintended consequences of atmospheric injection of sulphate aerosols.

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Patrick Vane; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Goldstein, Barry

    2010-10-01

    Most climate scientists believe that climate geoengineering is best considered as a potential complement to the mitigation of CO{sub 2} emissions, rather than as an alternative to it. Strong mitigation could achieve the equivalent of up to -4Wm{sup -2} radiative forcing on the century timescale, relative to a worst case scenario for rising CO{sub 2}. However, to tackle the remaining 3Wm{sup -2}, which are likely even in a best case scenario of strongly mitigated CO{sub 2} releases, a number of geoengineering options show promise. Injecting stratospheric aerosols is one of the least expensive and, potentially, most effective approaches and for that reason an examination of the possible unintended consequences of the implementation of atmospheric injections of sulphate aerosols was made. Chief among these are: reductions in rainfall, slowing of atmospheric ozone rebound, and differential changes in weather patterns. At the same time, there will be an increase in plant productivity. Lastly, because atmospheric sulphate injection would not mitigate ocean acidification, another side effect of fossil fuel burning, it would provide only a partial solution. Future research should aim at ameliorating the possible negative unintended consequences of atmospheric injections of sulphate injection. This might include modeling the optimum rate and particle type and size of aerosol injection, as well as the latitudinal, longitudinal and altitude of injection sites, to balance radiative forcing to decrease negative regional impacts. Similarly, future research might include modeling the optimum rate of decrease and location of injection sites to be closed to reduce or slow rapid warming upon aerosol injection cessation. A fruitful area for future research might be system modeling to enhance the possible positive increases in agricultural productivity. All such modeling must be supported by data collection and laboratory and field testing to enable iterative modeling to increase the

  19. Characterization of metal and trace element contents of particulate matter (PM10) emitted by vehicles running on Brazilian fuels-hydrated ethanol and gasoline with 22% of anhydrous ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ferreira da Silva, Moacir; Vicente de Assunção, João; de Fátima Andrade, Maria; Pesquero, Célia R

    2010-01-01

    Emission of fine particles by mobile sources has been a matter of great concern due to its potential risk both to human health and the environment. Although there is no evidence that one sole component may be responsible for the adverse health outcomes, it is postulated that the metal particle content is one of the most important factors, mainly in relation to oxidative stress. Data concerning the amount and type of metal particles emitted by automotive vehicles using Brazilian fuels are limited. The aim of this study was to identify inhalable particles (PM(10)) and their trace metal content in two light-duty vehicles where one was fueled with ethanol while the other was fueled with gasoline mixed with 22% of anhydrous ethanol (gasohol); these engines were tested on a chassis dynamometer. The elementary composition of the samples was evaluated by the particle-induced x-ray emission technique. The experiment showed that total emission factors ranged from 2.5 to 11.8 mg/km in the gasohol vehicle, and from 1.2 to 3 mg/km in the ethanol vehicle. The majority of particles emitted were in the fine fraction (PM(2.5)), in which Al, Si, Ca, and Fe corresponded to 80% of the total weight. PM(10) emissions from the ethanol vehicle were about threefold lower than those of gasohol. The elevated amount of fine particulate matter is an aggravating factor, considering that these particles, and consequently associated metals, readily penetrate deeply into the respiratory tract, producing damage to lungs and other tissues. PMID:20563923

  20. Vibrational lifetimes of hydrated phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadidi, Tayebeh; Anvari, Mehrnaz; Mashaghi, Alireza; Sahimi, Muhammad; Rahimi Tabar, M. Reza

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations have been carried out to compute, at human-body temperature, the vibrational modes and lifetimes of pure and hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipids. The projected atomic vibrations calculated from the spectral energy density are used to compute the vibrational modes and the lifetimes. All the normal modes of the pure and hydrated DPPC and their frequencies are identified. The computed lifetimes incorporate the full anharmonicity of the atomic interactions. The vibrational modes of the water molecules close to the head group of DPPC are active (possess large projected spectrum amplitudes) in the frequency range 0.5-55 THz, with a peak at 2.80 THz in the energy spectrum. The computed lifetimes for the high-frequency modes agree well with the recent data measured at room temperature where high-order phonon scattering is not negligible. The computed lifetimes of the low-frequency modes can be tested using the current experimental capabilities. Moreover, the approach may be applied to other lipids and biomolecules, in order to predict their vibrational dispersion relations, and to study the dynamics of vibrational energy transfer.

  1. Gas hydrates in the ocean environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, William P.

    2002-01-01

    A GAS HYDRATE, also known as a gas clathrate, is a gas-bearing, icelike material. It occurs in abundance in marine sediments and stores immense amounts of methane, with major implications for future energy resources and global climate change. Furthermore, gas hydrate controls some of the physical properties of sedimentary deposits and thereby influences seafloor stability.

  2. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the revolutionary and new

  3. Natural Gas Hydrates: Occurrence, Distribution, and Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paull, Charles K.; Dillon, William P.

    We publish this volume at a time when there is a growing interest in gas hydrates and major expansion in international research efforts. The first recognition of natural gas hydrate on land in Arctic conditions was in the mid-1960s (by I. Makogon) and in the seabed environment only in the early 1970s, after natural seafloor gas hydrate was drilled on the Blake Ridge during Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 11. Initial scientific investigations were slow to develop because the study of natural gas hydrates is unusually challenging. Gas hydrate exists in nature in conditions of temperature and pressure where human beings cannot survive, and if gas hydrate is transported from its region of stability to normal Earth-surface conditions, it dissociates. Thus, in contrast to most minerals, we cannot depend on drilled samples to provide accurate estimates of the amount of gas hydrate present. Even the heat and changes in chemistry (methane saturation, salinity, etc.) introduced by the drilling process affect the gas hydrate, independent of the changes brought about by moving a sample to the surface. Gas hydrate has been identified in nature generally by inference from indirect evidence in drilling data or by using remotely sensed indications, mostly from seismic data. Obviously, the established techniques ofgeologic analysis, which require direct observation and sampling, do not apply to gas hydrate studies, and controversy has surrounded many interpretations. Pressure/temperature conditions appropriate for the existence of gas hydrate occur over the greater part of the shallow subsurface of the Earth beneath the ocean at water depths exceeding about 500 m (shallower beneath colder Arctic seas) and on land beneath high-latitude permafrost. Gas hydrate actually will be present in such conditions, however, only where methane is present at high concentrations. In the Arctic, these methane concentrations are often associated with petroleum deposits, whereas at continental margins

  4. Hydration forces at solid and fluid biointerfaces.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Buddha Ratna; Banquy, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    The authors review the different molecular mechanisms giving rise to the repulsive hydration force between biologically relevant surfaces such as lipid bilayers and bioceramics. As the authors will show, the hydration force manifests itself in very different and subtle ways depending on the substrates. Soft, mobile surfaces such as lipid bilayers tend to exhibit monotonic, decaying hydration force, originated from the entropic constriction of the lipid head groups. Solid surfaces, on the other hand, tend to exhibit a periodic oscillatory hydration force, originated from the surface induced polarization of water molecules. In this review, the authors will describe both subtle faces of this important interaction by first describing the early experiments performed on solid surfaces and their interpretation by recent simulation studies. Then, the authors will describe the hydration force between fluid interfaces such as bilayers and explain how experimentally researchers have unraveled the dominant role of the lipid head groups' conformation. PMID:26795057

  5. Compound Natural Gas Hydrate: A Natural System for Separation of Hydrate-Forming Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, M. D.; Osegovic, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Natural processes that separate materials from a mixture may exert a major influence on the development of the atmospheres and surfaces of planets, moons, and other planetary bodies. Natural distillation and gravity separation, amongst others, are well known means of differentiating materials through liquid-gas partitioning. One of the least known attributes of clathrate (gas) hydrates is their potential effect on the evolution of planetary system oceans and atmospheres. Gas hydrates separate gases from mixtures of gases by concentrating preferred hydrate-forming materials (HFM) guests within the water-molecule cage structure of crystalline hydrate. Different HFMs have very different fields of stability. When multiple hydrate formers are present, a preference series based on their selective uptake exists. Compound hydrate, which is formed from two or more species of HFM, extract preferred HFM from a mixture in very different proportions to their relative percentages of the original mixture. These compound hydrates can have different formation and dissociation conditions depending on the evolution of the environment. That is, the phase boundary of the compound hydrate that is required for dissociation lies along a lower pressure - higher temperature course. Compound hydrates respond to variations in temperature, pressure, and HFM composition. On Earth, the primary naturally occurring hydrate of interest to global climate modeling is methane hydrate. Oceanic hydrate on Earth is the largest store of carbon in the biosphere that is immediately reactive to environmental change, and is capable of releasing large amounts of methane into the atmosphere over a short geological time span. Hydrate formation is essentially metastable and is very sensitive to environmental change and to gas flux. Where natural variations in temperature and pressure varies so that hydrate will form and dissociate in some cyclical manner, such as in oceans where sea level is capable of rising and

  6. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-07-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  7. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is

  8. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-06-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  9. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  10. Zinc tetrafluoroborate hydrate as a mild catalyst for epoxide ring opening with amines: scope and limitations of metal tetrafluoroborates and applications in the synthesis of antihypertensive drugs (RS)/(R)/(S)-metoprolols.

    PubMed

    Pujala, Brahmam; Rana, Shivani; Chakraborti, Asit K

    2011-11-01

    The scope and limitations of metal tetrafluoroborates have been studied for epoxide ring-opening reaction with amines, and Zn(BF(4))(2)·xH(2)O has been found to be a mild and efficient catalyst affording high yields under solvent-free conditions at rt with excellent chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivities. The catalytic efficiency followed the order Zn(BF(4))(2)·xH(2)O ≫ Cu(BF(4))(2)·xH(2)O > Co(BF(4))(2)·6H(2)O ≫ Fe(BF(4))(2)·6H(2)O > LiBF(4) for reactions with cyclohexene oxide and Zn(BF(4))(2)·xH(2)O ≫ Co(BF(4))(2)·6H(2)O ≫ Fe(BF(4))(2)·6H(2)O > Cu(BF(4))(2)·xH(2)O for stilbene oxide, but AgBF(4) was ineffective. For reaction of styrene oxide with aniline, the metal tetrafluoroborates exhibited comparable regioselectivity (1:99-7:93) with preferential reaction at the benzylic carbon of the epoxide ring. A reversal of regioselectivity (91:1-69:31) in favor of the reaction at the terminal carbon of the epoxide ring was observed for reaction with morpholine. The regioselectivity was dependent on the electronic and steric factors of the epoxide and the pK(a) of the amine and independent of amine nucleophilicity. The role of the metal tetrafluoroborates is envisaged as "electrophile nucleophile dual activation" through cooperativity of coordination, charge-charge interaction, and hydrogen-bond formation that rationalizes the catalytic efficiency, substrate reactivity, and regioselectivity. The methodology was used for synthesis of cardiovascular drug metoprolol as racemic and enriched enantiomeric forms. PMID:21899254

  11. Organic substrates as electron donors in permeable reactive barriers for removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Kijjanapanich, P; Pakdeerattanamint, K; Lens, P N L; Annachhatre, A P

    2012-12-01

    This research was conducted to select suitable natural organic substrates as potential carbon sources for use as electron donors for biological sulphate reduction in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB). A number of organic substrates were assessed through batch and continuous column experiments under anaerobic conditions with acid mine drainage (AMD) obtained from an abandoned lignite coal mine. To keep the heavy metal concentration at a constant level, the AMD was supplemented with heavy metals whenever necessary. Under anaerobic conditions, sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) converted sulphate into sulphide using the organic substrates as electron donors. The sulphide that was generated precipitated heavy metals as metal sulphides. Organic substrates, which yielded the highest sulphate reduction in batch tests, were selected for continuous column experiments which lasted over 200 days. A mixture of pig-farm wastewater treatment sludge, rice husk and coconut husk chips yielded the best heavy metal (Fe, Cu, Zn and Mn) removal efficiencies of over 90%. PMID:23437664

  12. Complex peroxyuranates. Synthesis and structural assessment of alkali-metal and ammonium dioxoperoxy(sulfato)aquouranates(VI), A/sub 2/(UO/sub 2/(O/sub 2/)SO/sub 4/(H/sub 2/O)) (A = NH/sub 4/, Na), and alkali-metal and ammonium dioxoperoxy(oxalato)uranate(VI) hydrates, A/sub 2/(UO/sub 2/(O/sub 2/)C/sub 2/O/sub 4/). H/sub 2/O

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, M.; Chaudhuri, M.K.; Purkayastha, R.N.D.

    1986-07-02

    Yellow microcrystalline alkali-metal and ammonium dioxoperoxy(sulfato)aquouranates(VI), A/sub 2/(UO/sub 2/(O/sub 2/)SO/sub 4/(H/sub 2/O)) (A = NH/sub 4/, Na), and alkali-metal and ammonium dioxoperoxy(oxalato)uranate(VI) hydrates, A/sub 2/(UO/sub 2/(O/sub 2/)C/sub 2/O/sub 4/).H/sub 2/O (A = NH/sub 4/, Na, K), have been synthesized from the reaction of the product obtained by treating an aqueous solution of UO/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/.6H/sub 2/O with alkali-metal or ammonium hydroxide, AOH, with 30% H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and aqueous sulfuric acid and oxalic acid solution, respectively, in the mole ratio UO/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/.6H/sub 2/O:H/sub 2/O/sub 2/:SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ or C/sub 2/O/sub 4//sup 2 -/ of 1:111:5 or 1, at pH 6 maintained by the addition of the corresponding alkali-metal or ammonium hydroxide. Precipitation was completed by the addition of ethanol. IR and laser Raman spectra suggest that the O/sub 2//sup 2 -/ and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ ions in (UO/sub 2/(O/sub 2/)SO/sub 4/(H/sub 2/O))/sup 2 -/ are bonded to the UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/ center in a bridging and in a monodentate manner, respectively, while both the O/sub 2//sup 2 -/ and C/sub 2/O/sub 4//sup 2 -/ ions in (UO/sub 2/(O/sub 2/)C/sub 2/O/sub 4/)/sup 2 -/ bind the uranyl center in bidentate chelated fashion. The complex peroxyuranates are diamagnetic and insoluble. The A/sub 2/(UO/sub 2/(O/sub 2/)SO/sub 4/(H/sub 2/O)) compounds, unlike A/sub 2/(UO/sub 2/(O/sub 2/)C/sub 2/O/sub 4/).H/sub 2/O, are stable up to 110 /sup 0/C. Whereas H/sub 2/O in A/sub 2/(UO/sub 2/(O/sub 2/SO/sub 4/(H/sub 2/O)) is coordinated to the UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/ center, it occurs as a water of crystallization in the corresponding peroxy oxalato compounds. 20 references, 3 tables.

  13. Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

    2011-04-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with

  14. Clathrate hydrate tuning for technological purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Profio, Pietro; Germani, Raimondo; Savelli, Gianfranco

    2010-05-01

    Gas hydrates are being increasingly considered as convenient media for gas storage and transportation as the knowledge of their properties increases, in particular as relates to methane and hydrogen. Clathrate hydrates may also represent a feasible sequestration technology for carbon dioxide, due to a well defined P/T range of stability, and several research programs are addressing this possibility. Though the understanding of the molecular structure and supramolecular interactions which are responsible of most properties of hydrates have been elucitated in recent years, the underlying theoretical physico-chemical framework is still poor, especially as relates to the role of "conditioners" (inhibitors and promoters) from the molecular/supramolecular point of view. In the present communication we show some results from our research approach which is mainly focused on the supramolecular properties of clathrate hydrate systems - and their conditioners - as a way to get access to a controlled modulation of the formation, dissociation and stabilization of gas hydrates. In particular, this communication will deal with: (a) a novel, compact apparatus for studying the main parameters of formation and dissociation of gas hydrates in a one-pot experiment, which can be easily and rapidly carried out on board of a drilling ship;[1] (b) the effects of amphiphile molecules (surfactants) as inhibitors or promoters of gas hydrate formation;[2] (c) a novel nanotechnology for a reliable and quick production of hydrogen hydrates, and its application to fuel cells;[3,4] and (d) the development of a clathrate hydrate tecnology for the sequestration and geological storage of man-made CO2, possibly with concomitant recovery of natural gas from NG hydrate fields. Furthermore, the feasibility of catalyzing the reduction of carbon dioxide to energy-rich species by hydrates is being investigated. [1] Di Profio, P., Germani, R., Savelli, G., International Patent Application PCT/IT2006

  15. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a

  16. Unusual Recognition and Separation of Hydrated Metal Sulfates [M2(μ-SO4)2(H2O)n, M = Zn(II), Cd(II), Co(II), Mn(II)] by a Ditopic Receptor.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Tamal Kanti; Dutta, Ranjan; Ghosh, Pradyut

    2016-04-01

    A ditopic receptor L1, having metal binding bis(2-picolyl) donor and anion binding urea group, is synthesized and explored toward metal sulfate recognition via formation of dinuclear assembly, (L1)2M2(SO4)2. Mass spectrometric analysis, (1)H-DOSY NMR, and crystal structure analysis reveal the existence of a dinuclear assembly of MSO4 with two units of L1. (1)H NMR study reveals significant downfield chemical shift of -NH protons of urea moiety of L1 selectively with metal sulfates (e.g., ZnSO4, CdSO4) due to second-sphere interactions of sulfate with the urea moiety. Variable-temperature (1)H NMR studies suggest the presence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction toward metal sulfate recognition in solution state, whereas intermolecular H-bonding interactions are observed in solid state. In contrast, anions in their tetrabutylammonium salts fail to interact with the urea -NH probably due to poor acidity of the tertiary butyl urea group of L1. Metal sulfate binding selectivity in solution is further supported by isothermal titration calorimetric studies of L1 with different Zn salts in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), where a binding affinity is observed for ZnSO4 (Ka = 1.23 × 10(6)), which is 30- to 50-fold higher than other Zn salts having other counteranions in DMSO. Sulfate salts of Cd(II)/Co(II) also exhibit binding constants in the order of ∼1 × 10(6) as in the case of ZnSO4. Positive role of the urea unit in the selectivity is confirmed by studying a model ligand L2, which is devoid of anion recognition urea unit. Structural characterization of four MSO4 [M = Zn(II), Cd(II), Co(II), Mn(II)] complexes of L1, that is, complex 1, [(L1)2(Zn)2(μ-SO4)2]; complex 2, [(L1)2(H2O)2(Cd)2(μ-SO4)2]; complex 3, [(L1)2(H2O)2(Co)2(μ-SO4)2]; and complex 4, [(L1)2(H2O)2(Mn)2(μ-SO4)2], reveal the formation of sulfate-bridged eight-membered crownlike binuclear complexes, similar to one of the concentration-dependent dimeric forms of MSO4 as observed in solid state

  17. Diffusion of CO2 During Hydrate Formation and Dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin M. Orr, Jr.

    2002-08-20

    Experiments were performed to measure the rate of diffusion of CO2 through hydrate films. Hydrate films were created in a capillary tube, and the growth of the hydrate film was measured. Difficulties were encountered in creating hydrate repeatedly, and some non-uniform growth of the films was observed. Sufficient observations were obtained to demonstrate that hydrate growth occurs preferentially on the hydrate/water side of the interface, rather than at the hydrate/CO2 interface. Diffusion coefficients were estimated from observations of the rate of growth of the hydrate film along with estimates of the solubility of CO2 in water and of the concentration gradient across the hydrate layer. The experimental observations indicate that hydrate formation occurs much more rapidly at the hydrate water interface than at the hydrate/CO2 interface. Any growth of hydrate at the CO2/hydrate interface was too slow to be observed at the time scale of the experiments. That observation is consistent with the idea that CO2 can move more easily through the hydrate, presumably by hopping between hydrate cages, than water can move through the hydrate, presumably by lattice hopping. Estimated diffusion coefficients were in the range 1-3E-06 cm2/sec. Those values are about an order of magnitude lower than the diffusion coefficient for CO2 in liquid water, but four orders of magnitude larger than the value for diffusion of CO2 in a solid. The rate of diffusion through the hydrate controls both the creation of new hydrate at the hydrate/water interface and the rate at which CO2 dissolves in the liquid water and diffuses away from the hydrate layer. Formation of a hydrate layer reduces the rate at which CO2 dissolves in liquid water.

  18. Mass fractionation of noble gases in synthetic methane hydrate: Implications for naturally occurring gas hydrate dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Stern, Laura; Pohlman, John W.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Moscati, Richard J.; Landis, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of contemporary or longer term (since 15 ka) climate warming, gas hydrates in some settings may presently be dissociating and releasing methane and other gases to the ocean-atmosphere system. A key challenge in assessing the impact of dissociating gas hydrates on global atmospheric methane is the lack of a technique able to distinguish between methane recently released from gas hydrates and methane emitted from leaky thermogenic reservoirs, shallow sediments (some newly thawed), coal beds, and other sources. Carbon and deuterium stable isotopic fractionation during methane formation provides a first-order constraint on the processes (microbial or thermogenic) of methane generation. However, because gas hydrate formation and dissociation do not cause significant isotopic fractionation, a stable isotope-based hydrate-source determination is not possible. Here, we investigate patterns of mass-dependent noble gas fractionation within the gas hydrate lattice to fingerprint methane released from gas hydrates. Starting with synthetic gas hydrate formed under laboratory conditions, we document complex noble gas fractionation patterns in the gases liberated during dissociation and explore the effects of aging and storage (e.g., in liquid nitrogen), as well as sampling and preservation procedures. The laboratory results confirm a unique noble gas fractionation pattern for gas hydrates, one that shows promise in evaluating modern natural gas seeps for a signature associated with gas hydrate dissociation.

  19. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand processes

  20. Purification and N-terminal amino acid sequence of a chondroitin sulphate/dermatan sulphate proteoglycan isolated from intima/media preparations of human aorta.

    PubMed

    Stöcker, G; Meyer, H E; Wagener, C; Greiling, H

    1991-03-01

    A proteoglycan (PG) was purified to homogeneity from intima/media preparations of human aorta specimens by the following chromatographic steps: Sepharose Q anion exchange, Sepharose CL-4B size exclusion, hydroxyapatite, MonoQ anion exchange and TSK G 4000 SW size exclusion. The purity of the preparation was established by SDS/PAGE using direct staining by silver or Dimethylmethylene Blue, as well as by Western blots of biotin-labelled samples. The electrophoretic mobility of the native PG was less than that of a 200,000-Mr standard protein. After treatment with chondroitin sulphate lyase ABC, a core protein of Mr 15,000 was revealed. The Mr of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) peptides was less than 24,000, by comparison with a keratan sulphate peptide. The composition of the GAG chains was determined by differential digestion of the PG by chondroitin sulphate lyases AC/ABC or chondroitin sulphate lyase AC alone followed by anion-exchange chromatography of the resulting disaccharides. The GAG chains are composed of approximately one-third of dermatan sulphate and two-thirds chondroitin sulphate disaccharide units. The sequence of the 20 N-terminal amino acids is identical with the sequence previously reported for PG I isolated from human developing bone [Fisher, Termine & Young (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 4571-4576]. The assignment of glycosylation sites to the serine residues in positions 5 and 10 was confirmed. The findings indicate that the chondroitin sulphate/dermatan sulphate PG is a major PG in intima/media preparations of human aorta and represents a biglycan-type PG. PMID:1848758

  1. Surface topography dependence of biomolecular hydrophobic hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuen-Kit; Rossky, Peter J.

    1998-04-01

    Many biomolecules are characterized by surfaces containing extended nonpolar regions, and the aggregation and subsequent removal of such surfaces from water is believed to play a critical role in the biomolecular assembly in cells. A better understanding of the hydrophobic hydration of biomolecules may therefore yield new insights into intracellular assembly. Conventional views hold that the hydration shell of small hydrophobic solutes is clathrate-like, characterized by local cage-like hydrogen-bonding structures and a distinct loss in entropy. The hydration of extended nonpolar planar surfaces, however, appears to involve structures that are orientationally inverted relative to clathrate-like hydration shells,, with unsatisfied hydrogen bonds that are directed towards the hydrophobic surface. Here we present computer simulations of the interaction between the polypeptide melittin and water that demonstrate that the two different hydration structures also exist near a biomolecular surface. We find that the two structures are distinguished by a substantial difference in the water-water interaction enthalpy, and that their relative contributions depend strongly on the surface topography of the melittin molecule: clathrate-like structures dominate near convex surface patches, whereas the hydration shell near flat surfaces fluctuates between clathrate-like and less-ordered or inverted structures. The strong influence of surface topography on the structure and free energy of hydrophobic hydration is likely to hold in general, and will be particularly important for the many biomolecules whose surfaces contain convex patches, deep or shallow concave grooves and roughly planar areas.

  2. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  3. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Du Frane, Wyatt L.; Stern, Laura A.; Weitemeyer, Karen A.; Constable, Steven; Roberts, Jeffery J.

    2011-01-01

    As part of our DOE-funded proposal to characterize gas hydrate in the Gulf of Mexico using marine electromagnetic methods, a collaboration between SIO, LLNL, and USGS with the goal of measuring the electrical properties of lab-created methane (CH4) hydrate and sediment mixtures was formed. We examined samples with known characteristics to better relate electrical properties measured in the field to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns. Here we discuss first-ever electrical conductivity (σ) measurements on unmixed CH4 hydrate (Du Frane et al., 2011): 6 x 10-5 S/m at 5 °C, which is ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater. This difference allows electromagnetic (EM) techniques to distinguish highly resistive gas hydrate deposits from conductive water saturated sediments in EM field surveys. More recently, we performed measurements on CH4 hydrate mixed with sediment and we also discuss those initial findings here. Our results on samples free of liquid water are important for predicting conductivity of sediments with pores highly saturated with gas hydrate, and are an essential starting point for comprehensive mixing models.

  4. Ab Initio Studies of Calcium Carbonate Hydration.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Berganza, Josue A; Diao, Yijue; Pamidighantam, Sudhakar; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M

    2015-11-25

    Ab initio simulations of large hydrated calcium carbonate clusters are challenging due to the existence of multiple local energy minima. Extensive conformational searches around hydrated calcium carbonate clusters (CaCO3·nH2O for n = 1-18) were performed to find low-energy hydration structures using an efficient combination of Monte Carlo searches, density-functional tight binding (DFTB+) method, and density-functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP level, or Møller-Plesset perturbation theory at the MP2 level. This multilevel optimization yields several low-energy structures for hydrated calcium carbonate. Structural and energetics analysis of the hydration of these clusters revealed a first hydration shell composed of 12 water molecules. Bond-length and charge densities were also determined for different cluster sizes. The solvation of calcium carbonate in bulk water was investigated by placing the explicitly solvated CaCO3·nH2O clusters in a polarizable continuum model (PCM). The findings of this study provide new insights into the energetics and structure of hydrated calcium carbonate and contribute to the understanding of mechanisms where calcium carbonate formation or dissolution is of relevance. PMID:26505205

  5. Mechanisms for thermal conduction in hydrogen hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Niall J.; Gorman, Paul D.; MacElroy, J. M. D.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate thermal conduction mechanisms via the Green-Kubo approach for (type II) hydrogen hydrate, at 0.05 kbar and between 30 and 250 K, for both lightly filled H2 hydrates (1s4l) and for more densely filled H2 systems (2s4l), in which four H2 molecules are present in the large cavities, with respective single- and double-occupation of the small cages. The TIP4P water model was used in conjunction with a fully atomistic hydrogen potential along with long-range Ewald electrostatics. It was found that substantially less damping in guest-host energy transfer is present in hydrogen hydrate as is observed in common type I clathrates (e.g., methane hydrate), but more akin in to previous results for type II and H methane hydrate polymorphs. This gives rise to larger thermal conductivities relative to common type I hydrates, and also larger than type II and H methane hydrate polymorphs, and a more crystal-like temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity.

  6. Prospecting for marine gas hydrate resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boswell, Ray; Shipp, Craig; Reichel, Thomas; Shelander, Dianna; Saeki, Tetsuo; Frye, Matthew; Shedd, William; Collett, Timothy S.; McConnell, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    As gas hydrate energy assessment matures worldwide, emphasis has evolved away from confirmation of the mere presence of gas hydrate to the more complex issue of prospecting for those specific accumulations that are viable resource targets. Gas hydrate exploration now integrates the unique pressure and temperature preconditions for gas hydrate occurrence with those concepts and practices that are the basis for conventional oil and gas exploration. We have aimed to assimilate the lessons learned to date in global gas hydrate exploration to outline a generalized prospecting approach as follows: (1) use existing well and geophysical data to delineate the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), (2) identify and evaluate potential direct indications of hydrate occurrence through evaluation of interval of elevated acoustic velocity and/or seismic events of prospective amplitude and polarity, (3) mitigate geologic risk via regional seismic and stratigraphic facies analysis as well as seismic mapping of amplitude distribution along prospective horizons, and (4) mitigate further prospect risk through assessment of the evidence of gas presence and migration into the GHSZ. Although a wide range of occurrence types might ultimately become viable energy supply options, this approach, which has been tested in only a small number of locations worldwide, has directed prospect evaluation toward those sand-hosted, high-saturation occurrences that were presently considered to have the greatest future commercial potential.

  7. Massive Volcanic SO2 Oxidation and Sulphate Aerosol Deposition in Cenozoic North America

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volcanic eruptions release a large amount of sulphur dioxide (SO2) into the atmosphere. SO2 is oxidized to sulphate and can subsequently form sulphate aerosol, which can affect the Earth's radiation balance, biologic productivity and high-altitude ozone co...

  8. Light microscopic histochemical and immunohistochemical localisation of sulphated glycosaminoglycans in the rooster comb and wattle tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, T; Imai, S; Koga, T; Sim, J S

    1996-01-01

    Comb and wattle tissues, which consist of layers of epidermis, dermis and central connective tissue, are known to contain sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) including dermatan sulphate and chondroitin sulphate-dermatan sulphate copolymers. Little is known about distribution of these CAGs in each tissue. The objective of this study was to localise sulphated GAGS in the comb and wattle tissues from mature roosters. Monoclonal antibodies 6D6, CS-56 and AH12 specific to dermatan sulphate proteoglycan (decorin), chondroitin sulphate and keratan sulphate, respectively, were used. In both tissues, 6D6 epitope was found to be more concentrated in the superficial layer of dermis and the central connective tissue than in the intermediate layer of dermis containing fibromucoid tissue. The staining pattern for 6D6 epitope was similar to that for collagen fibres. In contrast, CS-56 epitope was uniformly distributed in most parts of the dermis and the central connective tissue. The stratum germinativum in the epidermis was the major tissue showing positive staining with AH12, haematoxylin and safranin-O. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 PMID:8982840

  9. Production of biodiesel from mixed waste vegetable oil using an aluminium hydrogen sulphate as a heterogeneous acid catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Kasirajan; Sivakumar, Pandian; Suganya, Tamilarasan; Renganathan, Sahadevan

    2011-08-01

    Al(HSO(4))(3) heterogeneous acid catalyst was prepared by the sulfonation of anhydrous AlCl(3). This catalyst was employed to catalyze transesterification reaction to synthesis methyl ester when a mixed waste vegetable oil was used as feedstock. The physical and chemical properties of aluminum hydrogen sulphate catalyst were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements, energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) analysis and titration method. The maximum conversion of triglyceride was achieved as 81 wt.% with 50 min reaction time at 220°C, 16:1 molar ratio of methanol to oil and 0.5 wt.% of catalyst. The high catalytic activity and stability of this catalyst was related to its high acid site density (-OH, Brönsted acid sites), hydrophobicity that prevented the hydration of -OH group, hydrophilic functional groups (-SO(3)H) that gave improved accessibility of methanol to the triglyceride. The fuel properties of methyl ester were analyzed. The fuel properties were found to be observed within the limits of ASTM D6751. PMID:21621409

  10. Sequence analysis of heparan sulphate indicates defined location of N-sulphated glucosamine and iduronate 2-sulphate residues proximal to the protein-linkage region.

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, J E; Gallagher, J T

    1991-01-01

    A strategy that we originally used to identify an N-acetylated domain adjacent to the protein-linkage sequence of heparan sulphate proteoglycan (HSPG) [Lyon, Steward, Hampson & Gallagher (1987) Biochem. J. 242, 493-498] has been adapted for analysis of the location of GlcNSO3-HexA and GlcNSO3(+/- 6S)-IdoA(2S) units most proximal to the core protein. [3H]Glucosamine-labelled HSPG from human skin fibroblasts was depolymerized by using HNO2 or heparinase under conditions that allowed cleavage of all susceptible linkages. The degraded PG was coupled to Sepharose beads through the protein component, enabling specific recovery of protein-linked resistant oligosaccharides. These were released by treatment with alkaline borohydride and analysed by gel filtration and gradient PAGE. This strategy allowed investigation of the sequence of sugar residues along the chain relative to a common reference point (i.e. the reducing end of the chain). HNO2 scission confirmed the presence of a well-defined N-acetylated sequence predominantly 9-12 disaccharide units in length proximal to the core protein. Heparinase scission produced two classes of oligosaccharides (Mr approx. 7000 and 15,000) with the general formula: IdoA(2S)-GlcNSO3-[HexA-GlcNR]n-HexA-GlcNSO3-[Hex A-GlcNAc]9 12-GlcA-Gal-Gal-Xyl in which the average value for n is 1-2 for the 7000-Mr species and approx. 22 for the 15,000-Mr species. The latter oligosaccharides extend to about one-third of the total length of the HS chains (Mr approx. 45,000). HNO2 scission of these oligosaccharides enabled hypothetical models for their sequence to be proposed. The general arrangement of N-sulphated and N-acetylated disaccharides between the proximal GlcNSO3 and terminal IdoA(2S) residues of the 15,000-Mr fragment was similar to that in the original polysaccharide, suggesting the possibility of a tandemly repeating pattern in the sequence of HS. Images Fig. 3. PMID:1859357

  11. Investigation on Intermolecular Interaction in Supersaturation State of Cadmium Sulphate Mixed Zinc tris-THIOUREA Sulphate Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muley, G. G.; Naik, A. B.; Gambhire, A. B.

    2014-06-01

    Zinc tris-thiourea sulphate (ZTS) is a well known nonlinear optical (NLO) crystal widely used for various NLO applications. The NLO, physical and chemical properties can be modified by adding impurities and/or modifying crystal growth conditions. The impurities present in the growth solution and growth conditions can affect the crystal growth parameters at great extent. Thus, the study on the nature of intermolecular interaction with the dopant in the solution during crystal growth process becomes important. In the present investigation, the ultrasonic velocity was measured in the aqueous solutions of pure and cadmium sulphate mixed ZTS in the supersaturation state at 313.15 K. The thermodynamic parameters such as adiabatic compressibility, inter molecular free length, acoustic impedance and relative associations have been calculated from the ultrasonic data and densities of water and solutions at 313.15 K, and the nature of intermolecular interaction has been discussed. FT-IR spectra of all mixtures in the solid form at room temperature were recorded and the shifts in the absorption peaks corresponding to the functional groups of ZTS have been reported.

  12. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2003-12-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the US have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by maurer Technology, noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R and D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. They plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. They also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. They are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. They hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, the goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

  13. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by Maurer Technology, Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. We plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. We also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. We are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. We hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, our goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

  14. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Frane, Wyatt L.; Stern, Laura A.; Constable, Steven; Weitemeyer, Karen A.; Smith, Megan M.; Roberts, Jeffery J.

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of the electrical properties of multicomponent systems with gas hydrate, sediments, and pore water is needed to help relate electromagnetic (EM) measurements to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns in nature. Toward this goal, we built a pressure cell capable of measuring in situ electrical properties of multicomponent systems such that the effects of individual components and mixing relations can be assessed. We first established the temperature-dependent electrical conductivity (σ) of pure, single-phase methane hydrate to be ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater, a substantial contrast that can help differentiate hydrate deposits from significantly more conductive water-saturated sediments in EM field surveys. Here we report σ measurements of two-component systems in which methane hydrate is mixed with variable amounts of quartz sand or glass beads. Sand by itself has low σ but is found to increase the overall σ of mixtures with well-connected methane hydrate. Alternatively, the overall σ decreases when sand concentrations are high enough to cause gas hydrate to be poorly connected, indicating that hydrate grains provide the primary conduction path. Our measurements suggest that impurities from sand induce chemical interactions and/or doping effects that result in higher electrical conductivity with lower temperature dependence. These results can be used in the modeling of massive or two-phase gas-hydrate-bearing systems devoid of conductive pore water. Further experiments that include a free water phase are the necessary next steps toward developing complex models relevant to most natural systems.

  15. The thermodynamic properties of hydrated -Al2O3 nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Elinor; Huang, Baiyu; Parker, Stewart F.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Ross, Dr. Nancy; Woodfield, Brian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we report a combined calorimetric and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) study of hydrated -Al2O3 ( -alumina) nanoparticles. These complementary techniques have enabled a comprehensive evaluation of the thermodynamic properties of this technological and industrially important metal oxide to be achieved. The isobaric heat capacity (Cp) data presented herein provide further critical insights into the much-debated chemical composition of -alumina nanoparticles. Furthermore, the isochoric heat capacity (Cv) of the surface water, which is so essential to the stability of all metal-oxides at the nanoscale, has been extracted from the high-resolution INS data and differs significantly from that of ice Ih due to the dominating influence of strong surface-water interactions. This study also encompassed the analysis of four -alumina samples with differing pore diameters [4.5 (1), 13.8 (2), 17.9 (3), and 27.2 nm (4)], and the results obtained allow us to unambiguously conclude that the water content and pore size have no influence on the thermodynamic behaviour of hydrated -alumina nanoparticles.

  16. Development-dependent modification of the extracellular matrix by a sulphated glycoprotein in Volvox carteri

    PubMed Central

    Wenzl, Stephan; Thym, Detlef; Sumper, Manfred

    1984-01-01

    We report the chemical characterization of the highly sulphated glycoprotein SSG 185 from Volvox carteri. SSG 185 is a hydroxyproline-containing, extracellular glycoprotein. The sulphate residues are clustered within the parent saccharide structure of SSG 185, since on mercaptolysis all the sulphate residues are recovered in a small saccharide fragment containing mannose, arabinose and sulphate (in a molar ratio of 1̇1̇2). SSG 185 is a short-lived molecule, serving as a precursor for a high mol. wt. component of the extracellular matrix. Synthesis of SSG 185 is developmentally controlled. Different SSG 185 variants, with unknown modifications in the sulphated saccharide fragment, are synthesized at different developmental stages or under the influence of the sexual inducer. These modifications remain conserved in the aggregated state of SSG 185, indicating the development-dependent modification of the extracellular matrix. ImagesFig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 6.Fig. 7. PMID:16453512

  17. Isotope composition of sulphate in acid mine drainage as measure of bacterial oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, B.E.; Wheeler, M.C.; Nordstrom, D.K.

    1984-01-01

    The formation of acid waters by oxidation of pyrite-bearing ore deposits, mine tailing piles, and coal measures is a complex biogeochemical process and is a serious environmental problem. We have studied the oxygen and sulphur isotope geochemistry of sulphides, sulphur, sulphate and water in the field and in experiments to identify sources of oxygen and reaction mechanisms of sulphate formation. Here we report that the oxygen isotope composition of sulphate in acid mine drainage shows a large variation due to differing proportions of atmospheric- and water-derived oxygen from both chemical and bacterially-mediated oxidation. 18O-enrichment of sulphate results from pyrite oxidation facilitated by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in aerated environments. Oxygen isotope analysis may therefore be useful in monitoring the effectiveness of abatement programmes designed to inhibit bacterial oxidation. Sulphur isotopes show no significant fractionation between pyrite and sulphate, indicating the quantitative insignificance of intermediate oxidation states of sulphur under acid conditions. ?? 1984 Nature Publishing Group.

  18. Clathrate hydrates in cometary nuclei and porosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoluchowski, R.

    1988-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of formation and decomposition of CO2-clathrate hydrate in cometary nuclei are discussed. As far as it is known, this is the only clathrate hydrate which is unstable at low temperatures. Calculation shows that, in accord with other evidence, neither volume nor grain boundary diffusion in the clathrate lattice can be responsible for the rate of these reactions and that a surface mechanism with the attendant sensitivity to pressure must play a crucial role. Density changes accompanying CO2-clathrate decomposition and formation can lead to microporosity and enhanced brittleness or even to fracture of cometary nuclei at low temperatures. Other clathrate hydrates and mixed clathrates are also discussed.

  19. Carbon dioxide hydrate and floods on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milton, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Ground ice on Mars probably consists largely of carbon dioxide hydrate. This hydrate dissociates upon release of pressure at temperatures between 0 and 10 C. The heat capacity of the ground would be sufficient to produce up to 4% (by volume) of water at a rate equal to that at which it can be drained away. Catastrophic dissociation of carbon dioxide hydrate during some past epoch when the near-surface temperature was in this range would have produced chaotic terrain and flood channels.

  20. Dissociation of Natural and Artificial Methane Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misyura, S. Y.

    2016-02-01

    Present work deals with natural and artificial methane hydrate dissociation. The heating of the powder produced due to the temperature difference between the external air and the powder. The dissociation rate was determined by gravimetric method. The range of the partial self-preservation for the natural hydrate is significantly longer than for the artificial one and moved to higher temperatures. The destruction of the natural sample is slower than the artificial one. The time-averaged dissociation rate for the artificial sample is equal to 1,25 %/s and for the natural hydrate corresponds to 0,59 %/s.

  1. Glass powder blended cement hydration modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Huda

    The use of waste materials in construction is among the most attractive options to consume these materials without affecting the environment. Glass is among these types of potential waste materials. In this research, waste glass in powder form, i.e. glass powder (GP) is examined for potential use in enhancing the characteristics of concrete on the basis that it is a pozzolanic material. The experimental and the theoretical components of the work are carried out primarily to prove that glass powder belongs to the "family" of the pozzolanic materials. The chemical and physical properties of the hydrated activated glass powder and the hydrated glass powder cement on the microstructure level have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The work presented in this thesis consists of two main phases. The first phase contains experimental investigations of the reaction of glass powder with calcium hydroxide (CH) and water. In addition, it includes experiments that are aimed at determining the consumption of water and CH with time. The reactivity, degree of hydration, and nature of the pore solution of the glass powder-blended cement pastes and the effect of adding different ratios of glass powder on cement hydration is also investigated. The experiments proved that glass powder has a pozzolanic effect on cement hydration; hence it enhances the chemical and physical properties of cement paste. Based on the experimental test results, it is recommended to use a glass powder-to-cement ratio (GP/C) of 10% as an optimum ratio to achieve the best hydration and best properties of the paste. Two different chemical formulas for the produced GP C-S-H gel due to the pure GP and GP-CH pozzolanic reaction hydration are proposed. For the pure GP hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a calcium-to-silica ratio (C/S) of 0.164, water-to-silica ratio (H/S) of 1.3 and sodium/silica ratio (N/S) of 0.18. However, for the GP-CH hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a C/S ratio of 1

  2. An overview of geoengineering of climate using stratospheric sulphate aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Rasch, Philip J.; Tilmes, S.; Turco, Richard P.; Robock, Alan; Oman, Luke; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Garcia, Rolando R.

    2010-01-01

    We provide an overview of geoengineering by stratospheric sulphate aerosols. The state of understanding about this topic as of early 2008 is reviewed, summarizing the past 30 years of work in the area, highlighting some very recent studies using climate models, and discussing methods used to deliver sulphur species to the stratosphere. The studies reviewed here suggest that sulphate aerosols can counteract the globally averaged temperature increase associated with increasing greenhouse gases, and reduce changes to some other components of the Earth system. There are likely to be remaining regional climate changes after geoengineering, with some regions experiencing significant changes in temperature or precipitation. The aerosols also serve as surfaces for heterogeneous chemistry resulting in increased ozone depletion. The delivery of sulphur species to the stratosphere in a way that will produce particles of the right size is shown to be a complex and potentially very difficult task. Two simple delivery scenarios are explored, but similar exercises will be needed for other suggested delivery mechanisms. While the introduction of the geoengineering source of sulphate aerosol will perturb the sulphur cycle of the stratosphere signicantly, it is a small perturbation to the total (stratosphere and troposphere) sulphur cycle. The geoengineering source would thus be a small contributor to the total global source of ‘acid rain’ that could be compensated for through improved pollution control of anthropogenic tropospheric sources. Some areas of research remain unexplored. Although ozone may be depleted, with a consequent increase to solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) energy reaching the surface and a potential impact on health and biological populations, the aerosols will also scatter and attenuate this part of the energy spectrum, and this may compensate the UVB enhancement associated with ozone depletion. The aerosol will also change the ratio of diffuse to direct energy

  3. An overview of geoengineering of climate using stratospheric sulphate aerosols.

    PubMed

    Rasch, Philip J; Tilmes, Simone; Turco, Richard P; Robock, Alan; Oman, Luke; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Stenchikov, Georgiy L; Garcia, Rolando R

    2008-11-13

    We provide an overview of geoengineering by stratospheric sulphate aerosols. The state of understanding about this topic as of early 2008 is reviewed, summarizing the past 30 years of work in the area, highlighting some very recent studies using climate models, and discussing methods used to deliver sulphur species to the stratosphere. The studies reviewed here suggest that sulphate aerosols can counteract the globally averaged temperature increase associated with increasing greenhouse gases, and reduce changes to some other components of the Earth system. There are likely to be remaining regional climate changes after geoengineering, with some regions experiencing significant changes in temperature or precipitation. The aerosols also serve as surfaces for heterogeneous chemistry resulting in increased ozone depletion. The delivery of sulphur species to the stratosphere in a way that will produce particles of the right size is shown to be a complex and potentially very difficult task. Two simple delivery scenarios are explored, but similar exercises will be needed for other suggested delivery mechanisms. While the introduction of the geoengineering source of sulphate aerosol will perturb the sulphur cycle of the stratosphere signicantly, it is a small perturbation to the total (stratosphere and troposphere) sulphur cycle. The geoengineering source would thus be a small contributor to the total global source of 'acid rain' that could be compensated for through improved pollution control of anthropogenic tropospheric sources. Some areas of research remain unexplored. Although ozone may be depleted, with a consequent increase to solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) energy reaching the surface and a potential impact on health and biological populations, the aerosols will also scatter and attenuate this part of the energy spectrum, and this may compensate the UVB enhancement associated with ozone depletion. The aerosol will also change the ratio of diffuse to direct energy

  4. Constant and variable domains of different disaccharide structure in corneal keratan sulphate chains.

    PubMed

    Oeben, M; Keller, R; Stuhlsatz, H W; Greiling, H

    1987-11-15

    Four peptidokeratan sulphate fractions of different Mr and degree of sulphation were cut from the pig corneal keratan sulphate distribution spectrum. After exhaustive digestion with keratanase, the fragments were separated on DEAE-Sephacel and Bio-Gel P-10 and analysed for their Mr, degree of sulphation and amino sugar and neutral sugar content. It was found that every glycosaminoglycan chain is constructed of a constant domain of non-sulphated and monosulphated disaccharide units and a variable domain of disulphated disaccharide units. Total neuraminic acid of the four peptidokeratan sulphates was recovered from their isolated linkage-region oligosaccharides. In kinetic studies, the four peptidokeratan sulphates were investigated for Mr distribution after various incubation times with keratanase. There was a continuous shift towards lower Mr and no appearance of a distinct intermediate-sized product at any degradation time. The linkage-region oligosaccharide was already being liberated after a very short incubation period. From the results of these kinetic investigations in connection with the results of neuraminic acid analyses it is suggested that there exists only one disaccharide chain per peptidokeratan sulphate molecule. A model of corneal keratan sulphate is postulated. One of the alpha-mannose residues in the linkage region is bound to an oligosaccharide consisting of a lactosamine and a terminal sialic acid. The other alpha-mannose residue is attached to the disaccharide chain. This chain contains one or two non-sulphated disaccharide units at the reducing end, followed by 10-12 monosulphated disaccharide units. The disulphated disaccharide moiety of variable length is positioned at the non-reducing end of the chain. PMID:2963618

  5. Three-dimensional distribution of gas hydrate beneath southern Hydrate Ridge: Constraints from ODP Leg 204

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trehu, A.M.; Long, P.E.; Torres, M.E.; Bohrmann, G.; Rack, F.R.; Collett, T.S.; Goldberg, D.S.; Milkov, A.V.; Riedel, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Bangs, N.L.; Barr, S.R.; Borowski, W.S.; Claypool, G.E.; Delwiche, M.E.; Dickens, G.R.; Gracia, E.; Guerin, G.; Holland, M.; Johnson, J.E.; Lee, Y.-J.; Liu, C.-S.; Su, X.; Teichert, B.; Tomaru, H.; Vanneste, M.; Watanabe, M. E.; Weinberger, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Large uncertainties about the energy resource potential and role in global climate change of gas hydrates result from uncertainty about how much hydrate is contained in marine sediments. During Leg 204 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) to the accretionary complex of the Cascadia subduction zone, we sampled the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) from the seafloor to its base in contrasting geological settings defined by a 3D seismic survey. By integrating results from different methods, including several new techniques developed for Leg 204, we overcome the problem of spatial under-sampling inherent in robust methods traditionally used for estimating the hydrate content of cores and obtain a high-resolution, quantitative estimate of the total amount and spatial variability of gas hydrate in this structural system. We conclude that high gas hydrate content (30-40% of pore space or 20-26% of total volume) is restricted to the upper tens of meters below the seafloor near the summit of the structure, where vigorous fluid venting occurs. Elsewhere, the average gas hydrate content of the sediments in the gas hydrate stability zone is generally <2% of the pore space, although this estimate may increase by a factor of 2 when patchy zones of locally higher gas hydrate content are included in the calculation. These patchy zones are structurally and stratigraphically controlled, contain up to 20% hydrate in the pore space when averaged over zones ???10 m thick, and may occur in up to ???20% of the region imaged by 3D seismic data. This heterogeneous gas hydrate distribution is an important constraint on models of gas hydrate formation in marine sediments and the response of the sediments to tectonic and environmental change. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Reactivity of Hydrated Electron in Finite Size System: Sodium Pickup on Mixed N2O-Water Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Šmídová, Daniela; Lengyel, Jozef; Pysanenko, Andriy; Med, Jakub; Slavíček, Petr; Fárník, Michal

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the reactivity of hydrated electron generated by alkali metal deposition on small water particles with nitrous oxide dopant by means of mass spectrometry and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The mixed nitrous oxide/water clusters were generated in a molecular beam and doped with Na atoms in a pickup experiment, and investigated by mass spectrometry using two different ionization schemes: an electron ionization (EI), and UV photoionization after the Na doping (NaPI). The NaPI is a soft-ionization nondestructive method, especially for water clusters provided that a hydrated electron es– is formed in the cluster. The missing signal for the doped clusters indicates that the hydrated electron is not present in the N2O containing clusters. The simulations reveal that the hydrated electron is formed, but it immediately reacts with N2O, forming first N2O– radical anion, later O–, and finally an OH• and OH– pair. PMID:26267171

  7. Understanding effect of structure and stability on transformation of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinxiang; Yan, Yujie; Liu, Haiying; Xu, Jiafang; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Gang

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the transformation process of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate is crucial to develop the CH4sbnd CO2 replacement technique for CH4 production and CO2 sequestration. Ab initio calculations show that the transformation will slightly distort the host lattice and decrease the binding strength of guest molecules, but it is a thermodynamically spontaneous process dominated by the entropic contribution. Moreover, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the dynamics of the host lattice is independent on the guest molecules, while CO2 in hydrate exhibits slower translational and rotational motion than CH4 in hydrate.

  8. Bioactivity and Applications of Sulphated Polysaccharides from Marine Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus Raposo, Maria Filomena; de Morais, Rui Manuel Santos Costa; de Morais, Alcina Maria Miranda Bernardo

    2013-01-01

    Marine microalgae have been used for a long time as food for humans, such as Arthrospira (formerly, Spirulina), and for animals in aquaculture. The biomass of these microalgae and the compounds they produce have been shown to possess several biological applications with numerous health benefits. The present review puts up-to-date the research on the biological activities and applications of polysaccharides, active biocompounds synthesized by marine unicellular algae, which are, most of the times, released into the surrounding medium (exo- or extracellular polysaccharides, EPS). It goes through the most studied activities of sulphated polysaccharides (sPS) or their derivatives, but also highlights lesser known applications as hypolipidaemic or hypoglycaemic, or as biolubricant agents and drag-reducers. Therefore, the great potentials of sPS from marine microalgae to be used as nutraceuticals, therapeutic agents, cosmetics, or in other areas, such as engineering, are approached in this review. PMID:23344113

  9. Recent Insights into Cell Surface Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Couchman, John R; Multhaupt, Hinke; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-01

    A small group of cell surface receptors are proteoglycans, possessing a core protein with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan chains. They are virtually ubiquitous and their chains are major sites at which protein ligands of many types interact. These proteoglycans can signal and regulate important cell processes, such as adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Since many protein ligands, such as growth factors, morphogens, and cytokines, are also implicated in tumour progression, it is increasingly apparent that cell surface proteoglycans impact tumour cell behaviour. Here, we review some recent advances, emphasising that many tumour-related functions of proteoglycans are revealed only after their modification in processes subsequent to synthesis and export to the cell surface. These include enzymes that modify heparan sulphate structure, recycling of whole or fragmented proteoglycans into exosomes that can be paracrine effectors or biomarkers, and lateral interactions between some proteoglycans and calcium channels that impact the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27408707

  10. Development of Stability-Indicating Methods for Cefquinome Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Shantier, Shaza W.; Gadkariem, Elrasheed A.; Adam, Mohamed O.; Mohamed, Magdi A.

    2013-01-01

    The degradation behavior of cefquinome sulphate in alkaline medium at different temperatures was investigated using both first derivative spectrophotometric and HPLC methods. The drug degradation was found to be pH and temperature dependant. The pH-rate profile indicated a first order dependence of Kobs on [OH-] at pHs ranging between 9 and 11. Arrhenius plot obtained at pH 10 was linear between 65° and 100°C. The estimated activation energy of the hydrolysis was found to be 21.1 kcal mol-1. Stability-indicating thin-layer chromatographic method for the separation of the drug and its alkaline hydrolysis product has been developed. PMID:24170991

  11. Liposomes of terbutaline sulphate: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Joshi, M R; Misra, A N

    1999-09-01

    In vitro studies were conducted to understand the comparative drug diffusion pattern, across artificial membrane, of the drug and of the prepared liposomes of different liposomal membrane composition. In vivo studies were carried out to determine the extent and time-course of pulmonary tissue uptake of administered liposomes containing terbutaline sulphate(TER) on rat lungs. In vitro studies revealed that the drug released from the prepared liposomes obeys Higuchi's diffusion controlled model. Different loading doses and release patterns of drug from the liposomes can be obtained by altering the PC:CHOL ratio and incorporation of cholesterol was found to reduce permeability of the membrane. Similarly drug absorption in vivo in rat's lung following intratracheal instillation, prolonged over 12 hr by liposomal entrapment of TER. The findings of present investigation indicated that liposomally encapsulated TER can be used for pulmonary delivery for maximizing the therapeutic efficacy and reducing undesirable side effects. PMID:10687283

  12. A transverse electric current in triglycine sulphate ferroelectric crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fugiel, Bogusław; Kikuta, Toshio

    2016-05-01

    The application of a prolonged transverse electric field at a temperature TA < TC leads to unexpected qualitative changes in dielectric and thermal properties of the uniaxial ferroelectric triglycine sulphate (TGS) crystal, where TC is the critical temperature of the paraelectric-ferroelectric phase transition. The new properties can be still observed even after the transverse field has ceased to be applied as long as the temperature of the sample does not exceed TA. However, annealing the sample above TC leads to the restoration of the original state of the crystal. An electric current flowing along the direction perpendicular to the polar axis of the uniaxial TGS ferroelectric crystal was measured below the temperature TA at which the prolonged transverse electric field had been formerly applied to the crystal for a few hours. The experimental data resemble the classic pyroelectric current flowing along the polar axis.

  13. Giant barocaloric effects at low pressure in ferrielectric ammonium sulphate.

    PubMed

    Lloveras, P; Stern-Taulats, E; Barrio, M; Tamarit, J-Ll; Crossley, S; Li, W; Pomjakushin, V; Planes, A; Mañosa, Ll; Mathur, N D; Moya, X

    2015-01-01

    Caloric effects are currently under intense study due to the prospect of environment-friendly cooling applications. Most of the research is centred on large magnetocaloric effects and large electrocaloric effects, but the former require large magnetic fields that are challenging to generate economically and the latter require large electric fields that can only be applied without breakdown in thin samples. Here we use small changes in hydrostatic pressure to drive giant inverse barocaloric effects near the ferrielectric phase transition in ammonium sulphate. We find barocaloric effects and strengths that exceed those previously observed near magnetostructural phase transitions in magnetic materials. Our findings should therefore inspire the discovery of giant barocaloric effects in a wide range of unexplored ferroelectric materials, ultimately leading to barocaloric cooling devices. PMID:26607989

  14. Giant barocaloric effects at low pressure in ferrielectric ammonium sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Lloveras, P.; Stern-Taulats, E.; Barrio, M.; Tamarit, J.-Ll.; Crossley, S.; Li, W.; Pomjakushin, V.; Planes, A.; Mañosa, Ll.; Mathur, N. D.; Moya, X.

    2015-01-01

    Caloric effects are currently under intense study due to the prospect of environment-friendly cooling applications. Most of the research is centred on large magnetocaloric effects and large electrocaloric effects, but the former require large magnetic fields that are challenging to generate economically and the latter require large electric fields that can only be applied without breakdown in thin samples. Here we use small changes in hydrostatic pressure to drive giant inverse barocaloric effects near the ferrielectric phase transition in ammonium sulphate. We find barocaloric effects and strengths that exceed those previously observed near magnetostructural phase transitions in magnetic materials. Our findings should therefore inspire the discovery of giant barocaloric effects in a wide range of unexplored ferroelectric materials, ultimately leading to barocaloric cooling devices. PMID:26607989

  15. Multifunctional chondroitin sulphate for cartilage tissue-biomaterial integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-An; Varghese, Shyni; Sharma, Blanka; Strehin, Iossif; Fermanian, Sara; Gorham, Justin; Fairbrother, D. Howard; Cascio, Brett; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2007-05-01

    A biologically active, high-strength tissue adhesive is needed for numerous medical applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Integration of biomaterials or implants with surrounding native tissue is crucial for both immediate functionality and long-term performance of the tissue. Here, we use the biopolymer chondroitin sulphate (CS), one of the major components of cartilage extracellular matrix, to develop a novel bioadhesive that is readily applied and acts quickly. CS was chemically functionalized with methacrylate and aldehyde groups on the polysaccharide backbone to chemically bridge biomaterials and tissue proteins via a twofold covalent link. Three-dimensional hydrogels (with and without cells) bonded to articular cartilage defects. In in vitro and in vivo functional studies this approach led to mechanical stability of the hydrogel and tissue repair in cartilage defects.

  16. Stability of morphine sulphate and diamorphine hydrochloride in intrasite gel.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, Giovambattista; Joel, Simon P; Ribeiro, Maria D C

    2005-03-01

    Several studies have reported that opioids applied topically to painful ulcers produce an analgesic effect. It is unknown whether these opioids (usually mixed with hydrogels) are stable and, if so, for how long. We investigated the stability of morphine sulphate and diamorphine hydrochloride, each mixed with intrasite gel at a concentration of 1.25 mg/mL. Samples were prepared in the laboratory and then stored in plastic containers in the dark, at room temperature, in conditions of normal day/night at room temperature, and at 4 degrees C. Aliquots were collected from each container over a 28-day period and analysed using HPLC. No known degradation products were measured in the morphine-intrasite gel mixture stored for up to 28 days, irrespective of the temperature and whether or not samples were exposed to light, suggesting that morphine remains stable. Diamorphine, breaks down to morphine and no other degradation products are measurable. PMID:15810752

  17. Sulphate clastic injectites at Sinus Meridiani on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wezel, Forese Carlo; Baioni, Davide

    2014-01-01

    Based on stratigraphic sections, the 1500 m-thick sulphate-based “Sinus Meridiani complex” appears to be composed of a superposition of three lithologically similar stratigraphic units, each ending with a residual mesa caprock associated with planation surfaces. The three exposed plains display polygonal fault networks, nodular anydrite/gypsum dykes located along subvertical polygonal fractures, and presumed pipe-like fluid flow structures. Such vertically intrusive fluidized bodies are interpreted as indicative of subsurface evaporite remobilization and injection, which probably occurred near actively rising evaporite diapirs originating from an autochthonous “mother” layer situated underneath the Meridiani region. Renewal of diapirism is inferred to have caused repeated post-depositional cycles of uplift and erosional exhumation during relatively recent times.

  18. Recent Insights into Cell Surface Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couchman, John R; Multhaupt, Hinke; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2016-01-01

    A small group of cell surface receptors are proteoglycans, possessing a core protein with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan chains. They are virtually ubiquitous and their chains are major sites at which protein ligands of many types interact. These proteoglycans can signal and regulate important cell processes, such as adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Since many protein ligands, such as growth factors, morphogens, and cytokines, are also implicated in tumour progression, it is increasingly apparent that cell surface proteoglycans impact tumour cell behaviour. Here, we review some recent advances, emphasising that many tumour-related functions of proteoglycans are revealed only after their modification in processes subsequent to synthesis and export to the cell surface. These include enzymes that modify heparan sulphate structure, recycling of whole or fragmented proteoglycans into exosomes that can be paracrine effectors or biomarkers, and lateral interactions between some proteoglycans and calcium channels that impact the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27408707

  19. Sulphate Geoengineering in the UT/LS: Some Relevant Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuck, A. F.; Donaldson, D. J.; Hitchman, M. H.; Richard, E. C.; Tervahattu, H.; Vaida, V.; Wilson, J. C.

    2008-12-01

    We consider the potential effects of meteorological dynamics, the physics and chemistry of aerosols and the photodissociation of sulphuric acid upon the posited maintenance of a 'parasol' of geoengineered sulphate aerosol in the lower stratosphere. Specific observational and experimental results include the spread of tungsten-185 from the Hardtack series of nuclear weapon tests in 1958, satellite observations of the spread of volcanic eruptions, tracer and water profiles in the tropical UT/LS, the organic coating of surfactants on aerosols, the observed distributions of aerosols and the overtone driven photodissociation of sulphuric acid in the stratosphere. A few implications for the logistics of any possible future geoengineering injection are considered briefly. The uncertainties arising from the analysis subtract significantly from the predictability of any supposed amelioration of the effects of global warming from continued increases in carbon dioxide from fossil fuel combustion.

  20. Biological effects of inhaled magnesium sulphate whiskers in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Hori, H; Kasai, T; Haratake, J; Ishimatsu, S; Oyabu, T; Yamato, H; Higashi, T; Tanaka, I

    1994-01-01

    Male Wistar rats were exposed to two types of magnesium sulphate whiskers by inhalation for six hours a day, five days a week, for four weeks (sub-chronic study), or for one year (chronic study) to clarify the biological effects of the whiskers. There were few whiskers detected in the rat lungs even at one day after the exposure, suggesting that they are dissolved and eliminated rapidly from the lungs. To measure the clearance rate of the whiskers from the lungs, an intratracheal instillation was performed in golden hamsters. The half life of the whiskers in the lung was determined as 17.6 minutes by temporally measuring the magnesium concentration up to 80 minutes after the instillation. A histopathological examination indicated a frequent occurrence of adenoma and carcinoma in the year after chronic exposure, but it was not significantly different between exposed and control rats. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8044250

  1. Giant barocaloric effects at low pressure in ferrielectric ammonium sulphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloveras, P.; Stern-Taulats, E.; Barrio, M.; Tamarit, J.-Ll.; Crossley, S.; Li, W.; Pomjakushin, V.; Planes, A.; Mañosa, Ll.; Mathur, N. D.; Moya, X.

    2015-11-01

    Caloric effects are currently under intense study due to the prospect of environment-friendly cooling applications. Most of the research is centred on large magnetocaloric effects and large electrocaloric effects, but the former require large magnetic fields that are challenging to generate economically and the latter require large electric fields that can only be applied without breakdown in thin samples. Here we use small changes in hydrostatic pressure to drive giant inverse barocaloric effects near the ferrielectric phase transition in ammonium sulphate. We find barocaloric effects and strengths that exceed those previously observed near magnetostructural phase transitions in magnetic materials. Our findings should therefore inspire the discovery of giant barocaloric effects in a wide range of unexplored ferroelectric materials, ultimately leading to barocaloric cooling devices.

  2. Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Savidge

    2008-10-31

    The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

  3. Polyethylene oxide hydration in grafted layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Zilu

    Hydration of water soluble polymers is one of the key-factors defining their conformation and properties, similar to biopolymers. Polyethylene oxide (PEO) is one of the most important biomedical-applications polymers and is known for its reverse temperature solubility due to hydrogen bonding with water. As in many practical applications PEO chains are grafted to surfaces, e.g. of nanoparticles or planar surfaces, it is important to understand PEO hydration in such grafted layers. Using atomistic molecular dynamic simulations we investigate the details of molecular conformation and hydration of PEO end-grafted to gold surfaces. We analyze polymer and water density distribution as a function of distance from the surface for different grafting densities. Based on a detailed analysis of hydrogen bonding between polymer and water in grafted PEO layers, we will discuss the extent of PEO hydration and its implication for polymer conformation, mobility and layer properties. This research is supported by NSF (DMR-1410928).

  4. Infrared Spectroscopy of Hydrated Nitromethane Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcum, Jesse C.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2009-06-01

    The hydration of molecular anions is still not as thoroughly explored as for atomic anions. We present IR spectra and quantum chemical calculations of hydrated nitromethane anions. In the monohydrate, the nitro group of the ion interacts with the water molecule via two hydrogen bonds, one from each O atom. This motif is partially conserved in the dihydrate. Adding the third water molecule results in a ring-like structure of the water ligands, each of which forms one H bond to one of the O atoms of the nitro group and another to a neighboring water ligand, reminiscent of the hydration motif of the heavier halides. Interestingly, while the methyl group is not directly involved in the interaction with the water ligands, its infrared signature is strongly affected by the changes in the intramolecular charge distribution through hydration.

  5. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Donn McGuire; Thomas Williams; Bjorn Paulsson; Alexander Goertz

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a drilling hazard by the oil and gas industry for years. Drilling engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous problems, including drilling kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates as a potential energy source agree that the resource potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained from physical samples taken from actual hydrate-bearing rocks. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The project team drilled and continuously cored the Hot Ice No. 1 well on Anadarko-leased acreage beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and used for determining physical characteristics of hydrates and surrounding rock. After the well was logged, a 3D vertical seismic profile (VSP) was recorded to calibrate the shallow geologic section with seismic data and to investigate techniques to better resolve lateral subsurface variations of potential hydrate-bearing strata. Paulsson Geophysical Services, Inc. deployed their 80 level 3C clamped borehole seismic receiver array in the wellbore to record samples every 25 ft. Seismic vibrators were successively positioned at 1185 different surface positions in a circular pattern around the wellbore. This technique generated a 3D image of the subsurface. Correlations were

  6. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  7. Overview: Gas hydrate geology and geography

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    Several geological factors which are directly responsible for the presence or absence of gas hydrates have been reviewed and are: tectonic position of the region; sedimentary environments; structural deformation; shale diapirism; hydrocarbon generation and migration; thermal regime in the hydrate formation zone (HFZ); pressure conditions; and hydrocarbon gas supply to the HFZ. Work on gas hydrate formation in the geological environment has made significant advances, but there is still much to be learned. Work is continuing in the deeper offshore areas through the Ocean Drilling Program, Government Agencies, and Industry. The pressure/temperature conditions necessary for formation has been identified for various compositions of natural gas through laboratory investigations and conditions for formation are being advanced through drilling in areas where gas hydrates exist.

  8. ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test

    SciTech Connect

    Schoderbek, David; Farrell, Helen; Howard, James; Raterman, Kevin; Silpngarmlert, Suntichai; Martin, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Klein, Perry

    2013-06-30

    Work began on the ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrates Production Test (DOE award number DE-NT0006553) on October 1, 2008. This final report summarizes the entire project from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013.

  9. A realistic molecular model of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Kushima, Akihiro; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-01-01

    Despite decades of studies of calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H), the structurally complex binder phase of concrete, the interplay between chemical composition and density remains essentially unexplored. Together these characteristics of C-S-H define and modulate the physical and mechanical properties of this “liquid stone” gel phase. With the recent determination of the calcium/silicon (C/S = 1.7) ratio and the density of the C-S-H particle (2.6 g/cm3) by neutron scattering measurements, there is new urgency to the challenge of explaining these essential properties. Here we propose a molecular model of C-S-H based on a bottom-up atomistic simulation approach that considers only the chemical specificity of the system as the overriding constraint. By allowing for short silica chains distributed as monomers, dimers, and pentamers, this C-S-H archetype of a molecular description of interacting CaO, SiO2, and H2O units provides not only realistic values of the C/S ratio and the density computed by grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation of water adsorption at 300 K. The model, with a chemical composition of (CaO)1.65(SiO2)(H2O)1.75, also predicts other essential structural features and fundamental physical properties amenable to experimental validation, which suggest that the C-S-H gel structure includes both glass-like short-range order and crystalline features of the mineral tobermorite. Additionally, we probe the mechanical stiffness, strength, and hydrolytic shear response of our molecular model, as compared to experimentally measured properties of C-S-H. The latter results illustrate the prospect of treating cement on equal footing with metals and ceramics in the current application of mechanism-based models and multiscale simulations to study inelastic deformation and cracking. PMID:19805265

  10. Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.; Riedel, M.; Boswell, R.; Presley, J.; Kumar, P.; Sathe, A.; Sethi, A.; Lall, M.; NGHP Expedition Scientists

    2015-01-01

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 was designed to study the gas-hydrate occurrences off the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. During Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01, dedicated gas-hydrate coring, drilling, and downhole logging operations were conducted from 28 April 2006 to 19 August 2006.

  11. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  12. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2004-11-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in the

  13. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Runyon; Mike Globe; Kent Newsham; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  14. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in the

  15. Spectroscopic methods in gas hydrate research.

    PubMed

    Rauh, Florian; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline structures comprising a guest molecule surrounded by a water cage, and are particularly relevant due to their natural occurrence in the deep sea and in permafrost areas. Low molecular weight molecules such as methane and carbon dioxide can be sequestered into that cage at suitable temperatures and pressures, facilitating the transition to the solid phase. While the composition and structure of gas hydrates appear to be well understood, their formation and dissociation mechanisms, along with the dynamics and kinetics associated with those processes, remain ambiguous. In order to take advantage of gas hydrates as an energy resource (e.g., methane hydrate), as a sequestration matrix in (for example) CO(2) storage, or for chemical energy conservation/storage, a more detailed molecular level understanding of their formation and dissociation processes, as well as the chemical, physical, and biological parameters that affect these processes, is required. Spectroscopic techniques appear to be most suitable for analyzing the structures of gas hydrates (sometimes in situ), thus providing access to such information across the electromagnetic spectrum. A variety of spectroscopic methods are currently used in gas hydrate research to determine the composition, structure, cage occupancy, guest molecule position, and binding/formation/dissociation mechanisms of the hydrate. To date, the most commonly applied techniques are Raman spectroscopy and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Diffraction methods such as neutron and X-ray diffraction are used to determine gas hydrate structures, and to study lattice expansions. Furthermore, UV-vis spectroscopic techniques and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have assisted in structural studies of gas hydrates. Most recently, waveguide-coupled mid-infrared spectroscopy in the 3-20 μm spectral range has demonstrated its value for in situ studies on the formation and dissociation of gas

  16. Exploitation of subsea gas hydrate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates are considered to be a potential energy resource in the future. They occur in permafrost areas as well as in subsea sediments and are stable at high pressure and low temperature conditions. According to estimations the amount of carbon bonded in natural gas hydrates worldwide is two times larger than in all known conventional fossil fuels. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e.g. depressurization and/or injection of carbon dioxide) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR«. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into a numerical model. The physics of the process leads to strong non-linear couplings between hydraulic fluid flow, hydrate dissociation and formation, hydraulic properties of the sediment, partial pressures and seawater solution of components and the thermal budget of the system described by the heat equation. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the recent development regarding the production of natural gas from subsea gas hydrate reservoirs. It aims at giving a broad insight into natural gas hydrates and covering relevant aspects of the exploitation process. It is focused on the thermodynamic principles and technological approaches for the exploitation. The effects occurring during natural gas production within hydrate filled sediment layers are identified and discussed by means of numerical simulation results. The behaviour of relevant process parameters such as pressure, temperature and phase saturations is described and compared for different strategies. The simulations are complemented by calculations for different safety relevant problems.

  17. Experimental Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Through Depressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgfeldt, T.; Flemings, P. B.; Meyer, D.; You, K.

    2015-12-01

    We dissociated methane hydrates by stepwise depressurization. The initial hydrates were formed by injecting gas into a cylindrical sample of brine-saturated, coarse-grained sand at hydrate-stable conditions with the intention of reaching three-phase equilibrium. The sample was initially at 1°C with a pore pressure of 1775 psi and a salinity of 7 wt. % NaBr. The depressurization setup consisted of one pump filled with tap water attached to the confining fluid port and a second pump attached to the inlet port where the methane was injected. Depressurization was conducted over sixteen hours at a constant temperature of 1°C. The pore pressure was stepwise reduced from 1775 psi to atmospheric pressure by pulling known volumes of gas from the sample. After each extraction, we recorded the instantaneous and equilibrium pore pressure. 0.503 moles of methane were removed from the sample. The pore pressure decreased smoothly and nonlinearly with the cumulative gas withdrawn from the sample. We interpret that hydrate began to dissociate immediately with depressurization, and it continued to dissociate when the pressure decreased below the three-phase pressure for 1°C and 0 wt. % salinity. Two breaks in slope in the pressure vs. mass extracted data are bounded by smooth, nonlinear curves with differing slopes on either side. We attribute the breaks to dissociation of three zones of hydrate concentration. We created a box model to simulate the experimental behavior. For a 10% initial gas saturation (estimated from the hydrate formation experiment and based on mass conservation), an initial hydrate saturation of 55% is required to match the total methane extracted from the sample. Future experiments will be conducted over a longer timespan while monitoring hydrate dissociation with CT imaging throughout the process.

  18. Preservation of methane hydrate at 1 atm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    A "pressure-release" method that enables reproducible bulk preservation of pure, porous, methane hydrate at conditions 50 to 75 K above its equilibrium T (193 K) at 1 atm is refined. The amount of hydrate preserved by this method appears to be greatly in excess of that reported in the previous citations, and is likely the result of a mechanism different from ice shielding.

  19. Measurement of clathrate hydrates via Raman spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sum, A.K.; Burruss, R.C.; Sloan, E.D., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Raman spectra of clathrate hydrate guest molecules are presented for three known structures (I (sI), II (sII), and H (sH)) in the following systems: CH4 (sI), CO2 (sI), C3H8 (sII), CH4 + CO2 (sI), CD4 + C3H8 (sII), CH4 + N2 (sI), CH4 + THF-d8 (sII), and CH4 + C7D14 (sH). Relative occupancy of CH4 in the large and small cavities of sI were determined by deconvoluting the ??1 symmetric bands, resulting in hydration numbers of 6.04 ?? 0.03. The frequency of the ??1 bands for CH4 in structures I, II, and H differ statistically, so that Raman spectroscopy is a potential tool to identify hydrate crystal structure. Hydrate guest compositions were also measured for two vapor compositions of the CH4 + CO2 system, and they compared favorably with predictions. The large cavities were measured to be almost fully occupied by CH4 and CO2, whereas only a small fraction of the small cavities are occupied by CH4. No CO2 was found in the small cavities. Hydration numbers from 7.27 to 7.45 were calculated for the mixed hydrate.

  20. Fe-containing phases in hydrated cements

    SciTech Connect

    Dilnesa, B.Z.; Wieland, E.; Lothenbach, B.; Dähn, R.; Scrivener, K.L.

    2014-04-01

    In this study synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been applied, an element specific technique which allows Fe-containing phases to be identified in the complex mineral mixture of hydrated cements. Several Fe species contributed to the overall Fe K-edge spectra recorded on the cement samples. In the early stage of cement hydration ferrite was the dominant Fe-containing mineral. Ferrihydrite was detected during the first hours of the hydration process. After 1 day the formation of Al- and Fe-siliceous hydrogarnet was observed, while the amount of ferrihydrite decreased. The latter finding agrees with thermodynamic modeling, which predicts the formation of Fe-siliceous hydrogarnet in Portland cement systems. The presence of Al- and Fe-containing siliceous hydrogarnet was further substantiated in the residue of hydrated cement by performing a selective dissolution procedure. - Highlights: • Fe bound to ferrihydrite at early age hydration • Fe found to be stable in siliceous hydrogarnet at longer term age hydration • Fe-containing AFt and AFm phases are less stable than siliceous hydrogarnet. • The study demonstrates EXAFS used to identify amorphous or poorly crystalline phases.

  1. Electrical properties of polycrystalline methane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Du Frane, W. L.; Stern, L.A.; Weitemeyer, K.A.; Constable, S.; Pinkston, J.C.; Roberts, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) remote-sensing techniques are demonstrated to be sensitive to gas hydrate concentration and distribution and complement other resource assessment techniques, particularly seismic methods. To fully utilize EM results requires knowledge of the electrical properties of individual phases and mixing relations, yet little is known about the electrical properties of gas hydrates. We developed a pressure cell to synthesize gas hydrate while simultaneously measuring in situ frequency-dependent electrical conductivity (σ). Synthesis of methane (CH4) hydrate was verified by thermal monitoring and by post run cryogenic scanning electron microscope imaging. Impedance spectra (20 Hz to 2 MHz) were collected before and after synthesis of polycrystalline CH4 hydrate from polycrystalline ice and used to calculate σ. We determined the σ of CH4 hydrate to be 5 × 10−5 S/m at 0°C with activation energy (Ea) of 30.6 kJ/mol (−15 to 15°C). After dissociation back into ice, σ measurements of samples increased by a factor of ~4 and Ea increased by ~50%, similar to the starting ice samples.

  2. Clathrate hydrates in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, S. L.

    1985-01-01

    Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds in which an expanded ice lattice forms cages that contain gas molecules. There are two principal hydrate structures. Structure I, with a 12 A cubic unit cell, contains 46 water molecules and 8 cages of two types, giving an ideal formula (for CH4) of CH4.5.75H2O. The actual formula contains somewhat more water as the cages are not completely filled. Other examples that form Structure I hydrates are C2H6, C2H4, C2H2, CO2, SO2, OCS, Xe, H2S. Structure II, with a 17 A cubic unit cell, contains 136 water molecules, and 8 large and 16 small cages. The ideal formula for CHCl3 is CHCL3.17H2O. Other examples of Structure II hydrates include C3H8, C2H5Cl, acetone, and tetrahydrofuran. Small molecules such as Ar, Kr and probably N2 and O2 also form a Structure II hydrate. The small molecules occupy both the large and small cages, giving an ideal formula of Ar.5.67H2O. The conditions of pressure and temperature for hydrate formation are discussed.

  3. [Preoperative oral hydration for pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Okutomi, Toshiyuki; Kato, Rie

    2011-07-01

    Preoperative oral hydration is an important component of "enhanced recovery after surgery" strategies. This was originally developed for patients undergoing colon surgery. The Obstetric Anesthesia Practice Guideline issued by American Society of Anesthesiologists states that intake of minimum amount of clear fluid 2 hours prior to surgery may be safe. However, anesthesiologists have to consider physiological changes that parturients undergo during pregnancy, such as increased risk of aspiration and impaired glucose tolerance. We also have to consider the potential effect of glucose loading on neonates. Mothers are more likely to develop ketosis by glucose loading. It also stimulates insulin release in the fetus, which can result in neonatal hypoglycemia. In addition, sodium overloading may deteriorate intra-vascular dehydration and cause lung edema to mothers. On the other hand, oral hydration can alleviate a sense of thirst and increase maternal satisfaction. Our data showed that maternal urinal ketone body at delivery tended to decrease with oral hydration during labor. Moreover, some articles suggest that oral hydration may improve utero-placental perfusion. Therefore, we have to balance risks and benefits of oral hydration in parturients. Further investigations are needed among this specific subgroup of patients in order to establish the safe application of preoperative oral hydration. PMID:21800658

  4. Hydration during intense exercise training.

    PubMed

    Maughan, R J; Meyer, N L

    2013-01-01

    Hydration status has profound effects on both physical and mental performance, and sports performance is thus critically affected. Both overhydration and underhydration - if sufficiently severe - will impair performance and pose a risk to health. Athletes may begin exercise in a hypohydrated state as a result of incomplete recovery from water loss induced in order to achieve a specific body mass target or due to incomplete recovery from a previous competition or training session. Dehydration will also develop in endurance exercise where fluid intake does not match water loss. The focus has generally been on training rather than on competition, but sweat loss and fluid replacement in training may have important implications. Hypohydration may impair training quality and may also increase stress levels. It is unclear whether this will have negative effects (reduced training quality, impaired immunity) or whether it will promote a greater adaptive response. Hypohydration and the consequent hyperthermia, however, can enhance the effectiveness of a heat acclimation program, resulting in improved endurance performance in warm and temperate environments. Drinking in training may be important in enhancing tolerance of the gut when athletes plan to drink in competition. The distribution of water between body water compartments may also be important in the initiation and promotion of cellular adaptations to the training stimulus. PMID:23899752

  5. Phase Transition of Methane Gas Hydrate and Response of Marine Gas Hydrate Systems to Environmental Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.

    2003-12-01

    Gas hydrates, which contain mostly methane as the gas component in marine sediment, are stable under relatively high pressure and low temperature conditions such as those found along continental margins and permafrost regions. Its stability is mostly controlled by in-situ pressure, temperature and salinity of pore fluid. Environmentally introduced changes in pressure and temperature can affect the stability of gas hydrate in marine sediment. While certain changes may enhance the process of gas hydrate formation, we are much more interested in the resultant dissociation processes, which may contribute to sub-marine slope instability, seafloor sediment failure, formation of mud volcanoes and pock marks, potential vulnerability of engineering structures, and the risk to drilling and production. We have been developing models to quantify phase transition processes of marine gas hydrates and to investigate the response of marine gas hydrate systems to environmental changes. Methane gas hydrate system is considered as a three-component (water, methane, salt) four-phase (liquid, gas, hydrate, halite) system. Pressure, temperature and salinity of pore fluid constrain the stability of gas hydrate and affect phase transition processes via their effects on methane solubility and fluid density and enthalpy. Compared to the great quantity of studies on its stability in the literature, in-depth research on phase transition of gas hydrate is surprisingly much less. A method, which employs pressure, enthalpy, salinity and methane content as independent variables, is developed to calculate phase transition processes of the three-component four-phase system. Temperature, an intensive thermodynamic parameter, is found not sufficient in describing phase transition of gas hydrate. The extensive thermodynamic parameter enthalpy, on the other hand, is found to be sufficient both in calculation of the phase transition processes and in modeling marine gas hydrate systems. Processes

  6. Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans in the central nervous system: changes and synthesis after injury.

    PubMed

    Properzi, F; Asher, R A; Fawcett, J W

    2003-04-01

    Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are up-regulated in the central nervous system after injury, specifically around the lesion site where the glial scar forms. This structure contains astrocytes, oligodendrocyte precursor cells, microglia and meningeal cells, and forms an inhibitory substrate for axon re-growth. CSPGs have been shown to be closely involved in this neuronal growth inhibition, specifically through their sugar chains. These chains are composed of repeats of the same disaccharide unit carrying sulphate groups in different positions. The sulphation pattern directly influences the CSPG binding properties and function; the specific sulphation pattern required for the inhibitory activity of these molecules on axon growth is unknown at present. The expression of the chondroitin sulphotransferases, which sulphate the disaccharide residues of CSPGs and thus are responsible for the structural diversity of the chondroitin sulphate sugar chains, is regulated differently in central nervous system during development and after injury, suggesting the implication of a specific sulphation pattern in the inhibitory activity of CSPGs. PMID:12653631

  7. The observation of scintillation in a hydrated inorganic compound: CeCl3 6H2O

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A; Neal, John S; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Custelcean, Radu

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported the discovery of a new family of rare-earth metal-organic single-crystal scintillators based on Ce3+ as the activator ion. Starting with the CeCl3(CH3OH)4 prototype, this family of scintillators has recently been extended to include complex metal-organic adducts produced by reacting CeCl3 with heavier organics (e.g., isomers of propanol and butanol). Some of these new rare-earth metal-organic materials incorporated waters of hydration in their structures, and the observation of scintillation in these hydrated compounds was an original finding for any solid scintillator. In the present work, we now report what is apparently the initial observation of gamma-ray-excited scintillation in an inorganic hydrated material, namely single-crystal monoclinic CeCl3 6H2O. This observation shows that the mechanisms of the various scintillation energy-transfer processes are not blocked by the presence of waters of hydration in an inorganic material and that the observation of scintillation in other hydrated inorganic compounds is not precluded.

  8. Sulphate reduction and the removal of carbon and ammonia in a laboratory-scale constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Wiessner, A; Kappelmeyer, U; Kuschk, P; Kästner, M

    2005-11-01

    Sulphate is a normal constituent of domestic wastewater and reduced sulphur compounds are known to be potent inhibitors of plant growth and certain microbial activities. However, the knowledge about sulphate reduction and the effect on the removal of C and N in constructed wetlands is still limited. Investigations in laboratory-scale constructed wetland reactors were performed to evaluate the interrelation of carbon and nitrogen removal with the sulphate reduction by use of artificial domestic wastewater. Carbon removal was found to be only slightly affected and remained at high levels of efficiency (75-90%). Only at sulphate reduction intensities above 75 mgl(-1) (50% removal), a decrease of carbon removal of up to 20% was observed. A highly contrary behaviour of ammonia removal was found in general, which decreased exponentially from 75% to 35% related to a linear increase of sulphate reduction up to 75 mgl(-1) (50% removal). Since sulphate removal is considered to be dependant on the load of electron donors, the carbon load of the system was varied. Variation of the load changed the intensities of sulphate reduction immediately, but did not influence the carbon removal effectiveness. Doubling of the carbon concentration of 200 mgl(-1) BOD(5) for domestic wastewater usually led to sulphate reduction of up to 150 mgl(-1) (100% removal). The findings show that, particularly in constructed wetland systems, the sulphur cycle in the rhizosphere is of high importance for performance of the waste water treatment and may initiate a reconsideration of the amount of sulphate present in the tap water systems. PMID:16246395

  9. Hydrate pingoes at Nyegga: some characteristic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovland, M.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrate pingoes were observed on the seafloor during two different remotely operated vehicle (ROV)-dives, conducted by Statoil at complex-pockmark G11, at Nyegga, off Mid-Norway. Confirmation that these structures actually represent hydrate ice-cored sediment mounds (pingoes), was done by other investigators (Ivanov et al., 2006). Because it is expected that hydrate pingoes represent relatively dynamic seafloor topographic structures and that their shape and size most probably will change over relatively short time, it is important to know how to recognise them visually. Hovland and Svensen (2006) highlighted five different characteristic aspects that define hydrate pingoes on the sea floor: 1) They are dome- or disc-shaped features, which may attain any size from ~0.5 m in height and upwards. Inside pockmark G11, they were up to 1 m high. 2) They are circular or oval in plan view and may attain lateral sizes on the seafloor ranging upwards from ~0.5 m. Inside G11 they had lengths of several metres and widths of up to 4 m. 3) They have dense communities of organisms growing on their surfaces. At G11, they were overgrown with small pogonophoran tube-worms. 4) They have patches of white or grey bacterial mats growing on their surface, indicating advection (seepage) of reduced pore-waters. 5) They have small pits and patches of fluidized sediments on their surface, indicating pit corrosion of the sub-surface gas hydrate. Because gas hydrates often form in high-porosity, near-surface sediments, where water is readily available, it is thought that they will build up at locations where gases are actively migrating upwards from depth. However, gas hydrates are not stable in the presence of ambient seawater, as seawater is deficient in guest molecule gases (normally methane). Therefore, they tend to build up below surface above conduits for gas flow from depth. But, the near-surface hydrate ice-lenses will continually be corroded by seawater circulating into the sediments

  10. High capacity nickel battery material doped with alkali metal cations

    DOEpatents

    Jackovitz, John F.; Pantier, Earl A.

    1982-05-18

    A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

  11. The reversibility of dissimilatory sulphate reduction and the cell-internal multi-step reduction of sulphite to sulphide: insights from the oxygen isotope composition of sulphate.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Benjamin; Einsiedl, Florian; Arnold, Gail L; Müller, Inigo; Templer, Stefanie; Bernasconi, Stefano M

    2012-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulphate reduction (DSR) leads to an overprint of the oxygen isotope composition of sulphate by the oxygen isotope composition of water. This overprint is assumed to occur via cell-internally formed sulphuroxy intermediates in the sulphate reduction pathway. Unlike sulphate, the sulphuroxy intermediates can readily exchange oxygen isotopes with water. Subsequent to the oxygen isotope exchange, these intermediates, e.g. sulphite, are re-oxidised by reversible enzymatic reactions to sulphate, thereby incorporating the oxygen used for the re-oxidation of the sulphur intermediates. Consequently, the rate and expression of DSR-mediated oxygen isotope exchange between sulphate and water depend not only on the oxygen isotope exchange between sulphuroxy intermediates and water, but also on cell-internal forward and backward reactions. The latter are the very same processes that control the extent of sulphur isotope fractionation expressed by DSR. Recently, the measurement of multiple sulphur isotope fractionation has successfully been applied to obtain information on the reversibility of individual enzymatically catalysed steps in DSR. Similarly, the oxygen isotope signature of sulphate has the potential to reveal complementary information on the reversibility of DSR. The aim of this work is to assess this potential. We derived a mathematical model that links sulphur and oxygen isotope effects by DSR, assuming that oxygen isotope effects observed in the oxygen isotopic composition of ambient sulphate are controlled by the oxygen isotope exchange between sulphite and water and the successive cell-internal oxidation of sulphite back to sulphate. Our model predicts rapid DSR-mediated oxygen isotope exchange for cases where the sulphur isotope fractionation is large and slow exchange for cases where the sulphur isotope fractionation is small. Our model also demonstrates that different DSR-mediated oxygen isotope equilibrium values are observed, depending on the

  12. Crystal structure and genesis of the hydrated analog of rastsvetaevite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K.; Aksenov, S. M.; Rozenberg, K. A.

    2015-11-01

    The crystal structure of the hydrated analog of the mineral rastsvetaevite (tentatively called "hydrorastsvetaevite"), which was found by A.P. Khomyakov in ultraagpaitic pegmatites at the Rasvumchorr Mountain of the Khibiny alkaline massif (Kola Peninsula), has been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The trigonal unit-cell parameters are as follows: a = 14.2812(2) Å, c = 60.533(5) Å, V = 10691.54(3) Å3, sp. gr. R3 m. The structure was refined to R = 5.9% in the isotropic and anisotropic approximation of atomic displacement parameters based on 2068 ref lections with | F| > 3σ( F). "Hydrorastsvetaevite" is on the whole analogous to other 24-layer representatives of the eudialyte group (called "megaeudialytes"), but is characterized by a high potassium content and is distinguished from other potassium-rich minerals (rastsvetaevite, davinciite, and andrianovite) by low sodium and alkaline-earth metal content, as well as by a high degree of hydration accompanied by the insertion of H3O groups, which partially or completely replace large cations. The idealized formula of "hydrorastsvetaevite" ( Z = 3) is (Na11(H3O)11K6(H2O)1.5Sr)Ca12Fe3Na2MnZr6Si52O144(OH)4.5Cl3.5(H2O)0.5. In alkaline pegmatites, "hydrorastsvetaevite" occurs as a secondary mineral developed from the original rastsvetaevite through decationation and hydration. The characteristic features of the genesis of eudialyte-group minerals containing potassium as a species-forming cation are discussed in terms of the concept of transformational mineral species. an]Mis||Original Russian Text R.K. Rastsvetaeva, S.M. Aksenov, K.A. Rozenberg, 2015, published in Kristallografiya, 2015, Vol. 60, No. 6, pp. 897-905.

  13. Using magnetic resonance imaging to monitor CH4 hydrate formation and spontaneous conversion of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate in porous media.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Bernard A; Stevens, Jim; Howard, James J; Graue, Arne; Kvamme, Bjorn; Aspenes, Erick; Ersland, Geir; Husebø, Jarle; Zornes, David R

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was used to monitor and quantify methane hydrate formation and exchange in porous media. Conversion of methane hydrate to carbon dioxide hydrate, when exposed to liquid carbon dioxide at 8.27 MPa and approximately 4 degrees C, was experimentally demonstrated with MRI data and verified by mass balance calculations of consumed volumes of gases and liquids. No detectable dissociation of the hydrate was measured during the exchange process. PMID:19168304

  14. Hydrate-phobic surfaces: fundamental studies in clathrate hydrate adhesion reduction.

    PubMed

    Smith, J David; Meuler, Adam J; Bralower, Harrison L; Venkatesan, Rama; Subramanian, Sivakumar; Cohen, Robert E; McKinley, Gareth H; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2012-05-01

    Clathrate hydrate formation and subsequent plugging of deep-sea oil and gas pipelines represent a significant bottleneck for deep-sea oil and gas operations. Current methods for hydrate mitigation are expensive and energy intensive, comprising chemical, thermal, or flow management techniques. In this paper, we present an alternate approach of using functionalized coatings to reduce hydrate adhesion to surfaces, ideally to a low enough level that hydrodynamic shear stresses can detach deposits and prevent plug formation. Systematic and quantitative studies of hydrate adhesion on smooth substrates with varying solid surface energies reveal a linear trend between hydrate adhesion strength and the practical work of adhesion (γ(total)[1 + cos θ(rec)]) of a suitable probe liquid, that is, one with similar surface energy properties to those of the hydrate. A reduction in hydrate adhesion strength by more than a factor of four when compared to bare steel is achieved on surfaces characterized by low Lewis acid, Lewis base, and van der Waals contributions to surface free energy such that the practical work of adhesion is minimized. These fundamental studies provide a framework for the development of hydrate-phobic surfaces, and could lead to passive enhancement of flow assurance and prevention of blockages in deep-sea oil and gas operations. PMID:22441203

  15. Aqueous phase hydration and hydrate acidity of perfluoroalkyl and n:2 fluorotelomer aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Rayne, Sierra; Forest, Kaya

    2016-01-01

    The SPARC software program and comparative density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to investigate the aqueous phase hydration equilibrium constants (Khyd) of perfluoroalkyl aldehydes (PFAlds) and n:2 fluorotelomer aldehydes (FTAlds). Both classes are degradation products of known industrial compounds and environmental contaminants such as fluorotelomer alcohols, iodides, acrylates, phosphate esters, and other derivatives, as well as hydrofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons. Prior studies have generally failed to consider the hydration, and subsequent potential hydrate acidity, of these compounds, resulting in incomplete and erroneous predictions as to their environmental behavior. In the current work, DFT calculations suggest that all PFAlds will be dominantly present as the hydrated form in aqueous solution. Both SPARC and DFT calculations suggest that FTAlds will not likely be substantially hydrated in aquatic systems or in vivo. PFAld hydrates are expected to have pKa values in the range of phenols (ca. 9 to 10), whereas n:2 FTAld hydrates are expected to have pKa values ca. 2 to 3 units higher (ca. 12 to 13). In order to avoid spurious modeling predictions and a fundamental misunderstanding of their fate, the molecular and/or dissociated hydrate forms of PFAlds and FTAlds need to be explicitly considered in environmental, toxicological, and waste treatment investigations. The results of the current study will facilitate a more complete examination of the environmental fate of PFAlds and FTAlds. PMID:26980678

  16. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  17. Properties of equilibrium carbon dioxide hydrate in porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, V. P.; Gorodetskii, E. E.; Podnek, V. E.; Grigoriev, B. A.

    2016-09-01

    Specific heat capacity, dissociation heat and hydration number of carbon dioxide hydrate in porous medium are determined by adiabatic calorimetry method. The measurements were carried out in the temperature range 250-290 K and in pressure range 1-5 MPa. The measured specific heat of the hydrate is approximately 2.7 J/(g K), which is significantly larger than the specific heat of methane hydrate. In particular, at heating, larger value of the specific heat of carbon dioxide hydrate is a result of gas emission from the hydrate. The hydration number at the hydrate-gas coexistence changes from 6.2 to 6.9. The dissociation heat of carbon dioxide hydrate varies from the 55 kJ/mol near the upper quadruple point to the 57 kJ/mol near the lower quadruple point.

  18. Depressurization and electrical heating of hydrate sediment for gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we performed a study on electrical heating of the hydrate core combined with depressurization for gas production. In-situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary for commercial recovery of natural gas from natural gas hydrate sediment. Thermal stimulation is an effective dissociation method, along with depressurization.To simulate methane gas production from methane hydrate layer, we investigated electrical heating of methane hydrate sediment. A decrease in core temperature due to the endothermic reaction of methane hydrate dissociation was suppressed and the core temperature increased between 1oC and 4oC above the control temperature with electric heating. A current density of 10A/m2 with depressurization would effectively dissociate hydrate. Therefore, depressurization and additional electrode heating of hydrate sediment saturated with electrolyte solution was confirmed to enable higher gas production from sediment with less electric power.

  19. Process development for elemental recovery from PGM tailings by thermochemical treatment: Preliminary major element extraction studies using ammonium sulphate as extracting agent.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Sameera; van der Merwe, Elizabet M; Altermann, Wladyslaw; Doucet, Frédéric J

    2016-04-01

    Mine tailings can represent untapped secondary resources of non-ferrous, ferrous, precious, rare and trace metals. Continuous research is conducted to identify opportunities for the utilisation of these materials. This preliminary study investigated the possibility of extracting major elements from South African tailings associated with the mining of Platinum Group Metals (PGM) at the Two Rivers mine operations. These PGM tailings typically contain four major elements (11% Al2O3; 12% MgO; 22% Fe2O3; 34% Cr2O3), with lesser amounts of SiO2 (18%) and CaO (2%). Extraction was achieved via thermochemical treatment followed by aqueous dissolution, as an alternative to conventional hydrometallurgical processes. The thermochemical treatment step used ammonium sulphate, a widely available, low-cost, recyclable chemical agent. Quantification of the efficiency of the thermochemical process required the development and optimisation of the dissolution technique. Dissolution in water promoted the formation of secondary iron precipitates, which could be prevented by leaching thermochemically-treated tailings in 0.6M HNO3 solution. The best extraction efficiencies were achieved for aluminium (ca. 60%) and calcium (ca. 80%). 35% iron and 32% silicon were also extracted, alongside chromium (27%) and magnesium (25%). Thermochemical treatment using ammonium sulphate may therefore represent a promising technology for extracting valuable elements from PGM tailings, which could be subsequently converted to value-added products. However, it is not element-selective, and major elements were found to compete with the reagent to form water-soluble sulphate-metal species. Further development of this integrated process, which aims at achieving the full potential of utilisation of PGM tailings, is currently underway. PMID:26923300

  20. Guest Molecule Exchange Kinetics for the 2012 Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Field Trial

    SciTech Connect

    White, Mark D.; Lee, Won Suk

    2014-05-14

    A commercially viable technology for producing methane from natural gas hydrate reservoirs remains elusive. Short-term depressurization field tests have demonstrated the potential for producing natural gas via dissociation of the clathrate structure, but the long-term performance of the depressurization technology ultimately requires a heat source to sustain the dissociation. A decade of laboratory experiments and theoretical studies have demonstrated the exchange of pure CO2 and N2-CO2 mixtures with CH4 in sI gas hydrates, yielding critical information about molecular mechanisms, recoveries, and exchange kinetics. Findings indicated the potential for producing natural gas with little to no production of water and rapid exchange kinetics, generating sufficient interest in the guest-molecule exchange technology for a field test. In 2012 the U.S. DOE/NETL, ConocoPhillips Company, and Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation jointly sponsored the first field trial of injecting a mixture of N2-CO2 into a CH4-hydrate bearing formation beneath the permafrost on the Alaska North Slope. Known as the Ignik Sikumi #1 Gas Hydrate Field Trial, this experiment involved three stages: 1) the injection of a N2-CO2 mixture into a targeted hydrate-bearing layer, 2) a 4-day pressurized soaking period, and 3) a sustained depressurization and fluid production period. Data collected during the three stages of the field trial were made available after an extensive quality check. These data included continuous temperature and pressure logs, injected and recovered fluid compositions and volumes. The Ignik Sikumi #1 data set is extensive, but contains no direct evidence of the guest-molecule exchange process. This investigation is directed at using numerical simulation to provide an interpretation of the collected data. A numerical simulator, STOMP-HYDT-KE, was recently completed that solves conservation equations for energy, water, mobile fluid guest molecules, and hydrate guest

  1. High-Altitude Hydration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott E.; Orndoff, Evelyne; Bue, Grant C.; Schaefbauer, Mark E.; Urban, Kase

    2010-01-01

    Three methods are being developed for keeping water from freezing during high-altitude climbs so that mountaineers can remain hydrated. Three strategies have been developed. At the time of this reporting two needed to be tested in the field and one was conceptual. The first method is Passive Thermal Control Using Aerogels. This involves mounting the fluid reservoir of the climber s canteen to an inner layer of clothing for better heat retention. For the field test, bottles were mounted to the inner fleece layer of clothing, and then aerogel insulation was placed on the outside of the bottle, and circumferentially around the drink straw. When climbers need to drink, they can pull up the insulated straw from underneath the down suit, take a sip, and then put it back into the relative warmth of the suit. For the field test, a data logger assessed the temperatures of the water reservoir, as well as near the tip of the drink straw. The second method is Passive Thermal Control with Copper-Shielded Drink Straw and Aerogels, also mounted to inner layers of clothing for better heat retention. Braided wire emanates from the inside of the fleece jacket layer, and continues up and around the drink straw in order to use body heat to keep the system-critical drink straw warm enough to keep water in the liquid state. For the field test, a data logger will be used to compare this with the above concept. The third, and still conceptual, method is Active Thermal Control with Microcontroller. If the above methods do not work, microcontrollers and tape heaters have been identified that could keep the drink straw warm even under extremely cold conditions. Power requirements are not yet determined because the thermal environment inside the down suit relative to the external environment has not been established. A data logger will be used to track both the external and internal temperatures of the suit on a summit day.

  2. The Hydration Structure at Yttria-Stabilized Cubic Zirconia (110)-Water Interface with Sub-Ångström Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Binyang; Kim, Seunghyun; Kim, Taeho; Kim, Jongjin; Hong, Seungbum; Bahn, Chi Bum; Park, Changyong; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-06-01

    The interfacial hydration structure of yttria-stabilized cubic zirconia (110) surface in contact with water was determined with ~0.5 Å resolution by high-resolution X-ray reflectivity measurement. The terminal layer shows a reduced electron density compared to the following substrate lattice layers, which indicates there are additional defects generated by metal depletion as well as intrinsic oxygen vacancies, both of which are apparently filled by water species. Above this top surface layer, two additional adsorbed layers are observed forming a characteristic interfacial hydration structure. The first adsorbed layer shows abnormally high density as pure water and likely includes metal species, whereas the second layer consists of pure water. The observed interfacial hydration structure seems responsible for local equilibration of the defective surface in water and eventually regulating the long-term degradation processes. The multitude of water interactions with the zirconia surface results in the complex but highly ordered interfacial structure constituting the reaction front.

  3. New Results on Hydration in M-Type Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsman, Zoe A.; Campins, Humberto; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemí; Emery, Joshua P.; Lorenzi, Vania

    2014-11-01

    The M-type asteroids are a taxonomic group considered to be a candidate source of iron meteorites due to spectral and albedo similarities; however, because the spectra of M-type asteroids lack strong diagnostic absorption features in the near-infrared (NIR), their composition is difficult to constrain. High-resolution NIR spectroscopy and radar studies have shown that a metallic interpretation is unlikely to be valid for the majority of M-types. Many show weak absorption features attributed to mafic silicates (Hardersen et al. 2005, 2011; Ockert-Bell et al. 2010; Fornasier et al. 2010). Radar results show evidence for elevated metal content on the surfaces of most M-type asteroids, but few are likely to be entirely metal (Shepard et al. 2010). Surprisingly, spectrophotometric studies in the 3-μm region have indicated that hydrated minerals are relatively common among the M-type population, confounding interpretations of M-types as highly thermally processed (Rivkin et al. 1995, 2000). The shape of the 3-μm band, diagnostic of hydrated and hydroxylated minerals, is relevant to an asteroid’s thermal history (Rivkin et al. 2002, Takir & Emery 2012). To characterize this region, we have conducted a 2 - 4 μm spectroscopic study of six M-type asteroids using SpeX at NASA’s Infrared Telescope Facility. In its LXD mode, SpeX allows us to investigate the 3-μm band at spectral resolutions unavailable during previously published studies. We report the presence of a 3-μm feature on all six asteroids, indicating hydrated minerals on the asteroids’ surfaces. We have also detected rotational variability of the 3-μm feature in asteroid (216) Kleopatra, which, interestingly, had been interpreted as “dry” in previous work (Rivkin et al. 2000). On all of our target asteroids, the 3-μm band depths are < 10%, and there is apparent variation in the shape of the feature among them. We discuss the impact of our results on interpretations of M-type asteroid composition.

  4. Intrinsic Hydration of Uranyl-Hydroxide, -Nitrate and -Acetate Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Winnie Chien; Dorothy Hanna; Victor Anbalagan; Garold Gresham; Gary Groenewold; Michael Van Stipdonk

    2004-06-01

    The intrinsic hydration of three monopositive uranyl-anion complexes (UO2A)+ (where A = acetate, nitrate, or hydroxide) was investigated using ion-trap mass spectrometry (IT-MS). The relative rates for the formation of the monohydrates [(UO2A)(H2O)]+, with respect to the anion, followed the trend: Acetate = nitrate >> hydroxide. This finding was rationalized in terms of the donation of electron density by the strongly basic OH- to the uranyl metal center, thereby reducing the Lewis acidity of U and its propensity to react with incoming nucleophiles, viz., H2O. An alternative explanation is that the more complex acetate and nitrate anions provide increased degrees of freedom that could accommodate excess energy from the hydration reaction. The monohydrates also reacted with water, forming dihydrates and then trihydrates. The rates for formation of the nitrate and acetate dihydrates [(UO2A)(H2O)2]+ were very similar to the rates for formation of the monohydrates; the presence of the first H2O ligand had no influence on the addition of the second. In contrast, formation of the [(UO2OH)(H2O)2]+ was nearly three times faster than the formation of the monohydrate.

  5. Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations of ion hydration free energies

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kevin; Rempe, Susan B.; Lilienfeld, O. Anatole von

    2009-05-28

    We apply ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) methods in conjunction with the thermodynamic integration or '{lambda}-path' technique to compute the intrinsic hydration free energies of Li{sup +}, Cl{sup -}, and Ag{sup +} ions. Using the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional, adapting methods developed for classical force field applications, and with consistent assumptions about surface potential ({phi}) contributions, we obtain absolute AIMD hydration free energies ({Delta}G{sub hyd}) within a few kcal/mol, or better than 4%, of Tissandier et al.'s [J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 7787 (1998)] experimental values augmented with the SPC/E water model {phi} predictions. The sums of Li{sup +}/Cl{sup -} and Ag{sup +}/Cl{sup -} AIMD {Delta}G{sub hyd}, which are not affected by surface potentials, are within 2.6% and 1.2 % of experimental values, respectively. We also report the free energy changes associated with the transition metal ion redox reaction Ag{sup +}+Ni{sup +}{yields}Ag+Ni{sup 2+} in water. The predictions for this reaction suggest that existing estimates of {Delta}G{sub hyd} for unstable radiolysis intermediates such as Ni{sup +} may need to be extensively revised.

  6. Study on propane-butane gas storage by hydrate technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Nurkholis; Wijayanti, Widya; Widhiyanuriyawan, Denny

    2016-03-01

    Different technology has been applied to store and transport gas fuel. In this work the storage of gas mixture of propane-butane by hydrate technology was studied. The investigation was done on the effect of crystallizer rotation speed on the formation of propane-butane hydrate. The hydrates were formed using crystallizer with rotation speed of 100, 200, and 300 rpm. The formation of gas hydrates was done at initial pressure of 3 bar and temperature of 274K. The results indicated that the higher rotation speed was found to increase the formation rate of propane-butane hydrate and improve the hydrates stability.

  7. Complex admixtures of clathrate hydrates in a water desalination method

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Blake A.; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Anderson, David W.

    2009-07-14

    Disclosed is a method that achieves water desalination by utilizing and optimizing clathrate hydrate phenomena. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds of gas and water that desalinate water by excluding salt molecules during crystallization. Contacting a hydrate forming gaseous species with water will spontaneously form hydrates at specific temperatures and pressures through the extraction of water molecules from the bulk phase followed by crystallite nucleation. Subsequent dissociation of pure hydrates yields fresh water and, if operated correctly, allows the hydrate-forming gas to be efficiently recycled into the process stream.

  8. Hydrate problems in pipelines: A study from Norwegian continental waters

    SciTech Connect

    Lysne, D.; Larsen, R.; Lund, A.; Thomsen, A.K.

    1995-12-31

    This study was undertaken by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate and SINTEF to identify hydrate problems occurring in pipelines on the Norwegian continental shelf. A brief review of hydrate dissociation theory is given. Three major techniques for hydrate removal are discussed, as well as hazards related to hydrate plug removal. Questionnaire answers from 15 companies operating in Norwegian waters show three specific occurrences of hydrate plugs in the North Sea. Problems from other geographical areas are also discussed. Hydrate problems are reported for a wide variety of pipe lengths, diameters, profiles, insulations characteristics and fluids. Most problems occur during normal operation.

  9. Gas storage through impermeation of porous media by hydrate formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzikiriakos, S.G.; Englezos, P.

    1994-12-31

    A mathematical model was developed for the simulation of the methane hydrate formation in a homocline. The rate of hydrate growth was computed by calculating the movement of the hydrate-water interface. This movement was found to be very slow (less than 0.01 mm/hr) and strongly dependent on the value of the effective diffusivity of the gas in the hydrate zone. The temperature at the hydrate-water interface was found to remain practically constant. Finally, the simulations indicate that the development of a hydrate barrier in the permeable formation creates favorable gas storage conditions in the homocline.

  10. Nucleation and Growth of Gas Hydrate in Natural Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, S. A.; Osegovic, J. P.; Young, J. C.; Max, M. D.; Ames, A. L.

    2003-12-01

    Large-scale nucleation of gas hydrate takes place when hydrate-forming gas and seawater are brought together under suitable pressure-temperature conditions or where dissolved hydrate-forming gas in saturated or near-saturated seawater is chilled or brought to higher pressures. Profuse formation of hydrate shells on gas bubbles and nucleation of at least five different forms of gas hydrate have been achieved in fresh natural seawater. Growth of masses of solid gas hydrate takes place when hydrate-forming gas reactant dissolved in seawater is brought into the vicinity of the hydrate. The gas concentration of the enriched water in the vicinity of hydrate is higher than the hydrate equilibrium gas concentration. Hydrate growth under these conditions is accelerated due to the chemical potential difference between the enriched water and the hydrate crystals, which induces mass flux of dissolved hydrate forming gas into new hydrate crystals. As long as water enriched in the hydrate-forming gas is circulated into the vicinity of the hydrate, growth proceeds into the water space. Experimental approaches for growth of examples of solid masses of hydrate are presented. Results of these experiments provide an insight into the growth of gas hydrate under natural conditions where interstitial water in marine sediments is captured by burial from open seawater, and where solid gas hydrate forms on the seafloor. By using fresh natural seawater, which is a chemically and materially complex fluid, our experiments in pressurized, refrigerated reactors should closely track the growth history of solid hydrate in the natural environment. In our model for hydrate growth in sediments, nearly complete pore fill by diagenetic hydrate can best be accomplished by nucleation of hydrate at a point source within the pore water or at a particular point on sediment particulate, with growth outward into the water space that is refreshed with ground water having high concentrations of hydrate

  11. Development of hydrate risk quantification in oil and gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Piyush N.

    Subsea flowlines that transport hydrocarbons from wellhead to the processing facility face issues from solid deposits such as hydrates, waxes, asphaltenes, etc. The solid deposits not only affect the production but also pose a safety concern; thus, flow assurance is significantly important in designing and operating subsea oil and gas production. In most subsea oil and gas operations, gas hydrates form at high pressure and low temperature conditions, causing the risk of plugging flowlines, with a undesirable impact on production. Over the years, the oil and gas industry has shifted their perspective from hydrate avoidance to hydrate management given several parameters such as production facility, production chemistry, economic and environmental concerns. Thus, understanding the level of hydrate risk associated with subsea flowlines is an important in developing efficient hydrate management techniques. In the past, hydrate formation models were developed for various flow-systems (e.g., oil dominated, water dominated, and gas dominated) present in the oil and gas production. The objective of this research is to extend the application of the present hydrate prediction models for assessing the hydrate risk associated with subsea flowlines that are prone to hydrate formation. It involves a novel approach for developing quantitative hydrate risk models based on the conceptual models built from the qualitative knowledge obtained from experimental studies. A comprehensive hydrate risk model, that ranks the hydrate risk associated with the subsea production system as a function of time, hydrates, and several other parameters, which account for inertial, viscous, interfacial forces acting on the flow-system, is developed for oil dominated and condensate systems. The hydrate plugging risk for water dominated systems is successfully modeled using The Colorado School of Mines Hydrate Flow Assurance Tool (CSMHyFAST). It is found that CSMHyFAST can be used as a screening tool in

  12. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  13. Gas hydrates: past and future geohazard?

    PubMed

    Maslin, Mark; Owen, Matthew; Betts, Richard; Day, Simon; Dunkley Jones, Tom; Ridgwell, Andrew

    2010-05-28

    Gas hydrates are ice-like deposits containing a mixture of water and gas; the most common gas is methane. Gas hydrates are stable under high pressures and relatively low temperatures and are found underneath the oceans and in permafrost regions. Estimates range from 500 to 10,000 giga tonnes of carbon (best current estimate 1600-2000 GtC) stored in ocean sediments and 400 GtC in Arctic permafrost. Gas hydrates may pose a serious geohazard in the near future owing to the adverse effects of global warming on the stability of gas hydrate deposits both in ocean sediments and in permafrost. It is still unknown whether future ocean warming could lead to significant methane release, as thermal penetration of marine sediments to the clathrate-gas interface could be slow enough to allow a new equilibrium to occur without any gas escaping. Even if methane gas does escape, it is still unclear how much of this could be oxidized in the overlying ocean. Models of the global inventory of hydrates and trapped methane bubbles suggest that a global 3( degrees )C warming could release between 35 and 940 GtC, which could add up to an additional 0.5( degrees )C to global warming. The destabilization of gas hydrate reserves in permafrost areas is more certain as climate models predict that high-latitude regions will be disproportionately affected by global warming with temperature increases of over 12( degrees )C predicted for much of North America and Northern Asia. Our current estimates of gas hydrate storage in the Arctic region are, however, extremely poor and non-existent for Antarctica. The shrinking of both the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets in response to regional warming may also lead to destabilization of gas hydrates. As ice sheets shrink, the weight removed allows the coastal region and adjacent continental slope to rise through isostacy. This removal of hydrostatic pressure could destabilize gas hydrates, leading to massive slope failure, and may increase the risk of

  14. Characterization of Gas-Hydrate Sediment: In Situ Evaluation of Hydrate Saturation in Pores of Pressured Sedimental Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Y.; Konno, Y.; Kida, M.; Nagao, J.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrate saturation of gas-hydrate bearing sediment is a key of gas production from natural gas-hydrate reservoir. Developable natural gas-hydrates by conventional gas/oil production apparatus almost exist in unconsolidated sedimental layer. Generally, hydrate saturations of sedimental samples are directly estimated by volume of gas generated from dissociation of gas hydrates in pore spaces, porosity data and volume of the sediments. Furthermore, hydrate saturation can be also assessed using velocity of P-wave through sedimental samples. Nevertheless, hydrate saturation would be changed by morphological variations (grain-coating, cementing and pore-filling model) of gas hydrates in pore spaces. Jin et al.[1,2] recently observed the O-H stretching bands of H2O molecules of methane hydrate in porous media using an attenuated total reflection IR (ATR-IR) spectra. They observed in situ hydrate formation/dissociation process in sandy samples (Tohoku Keisya number 8, grain size of ca. 110 μm). In this presentation, we present IR spectroscopy approach to in situ evaluation of hydrate saturation of pressured gas-hydrate sediments. This work was supported by funding from the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) planned by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), Japan. [1] Jin, Y.; Konno, Y.; Nagao, J. Energy Fules, 2012, 26, 2242-2247. [2] Jin, Y.; Oyama, H.; Nagao, J. Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 2009, 48, No. 108001.

  15. Interfacial phenomena in gas hydrate systems.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-03-21

    Gas hydrates are crystalline inclusion compounds, where molecular cages of water trap lighter species under specific thermodynamic conditions. Hydrates play an essential role in global energy systems, as both a hinderance when formed in traditional fuel production and a substantial resource when formed by nature. In both traditional and unconventional fuel production, hydrates share interfaces with a tremendous diversity of materials, including hydrocarbons, aqueous solutions, and inorganic solids. This article presents a state-of-the-art understanding of hydrate interfacial thermodynamics and growth kinetics, and the physiochemical controls that may be exerted on both. Specific attention is paid to the molecular structure and interactions of water, guest molecules, and hetero-molecules (e.g., surfactants) near the interface. Gas hydrate nucleation and growth mechanics are also presented, based on studies using a combination of molecular modeling, vibrational spectroscopy, and X-ray and neutron diffraction. The fundamental physical and chemical knowledge and methods presented in this review may be of value in probing parallel systems of crystal growth in solid inclusion compounds, crystal growth modifiers, emulsion stabilization, and reactive particle flow in solid slurries. PMID:26781172

  16. Novel Hydrogen Hydrate Structures under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Guang-Rui; Lyakhov, Andriy O.; Zhu, Qiang; Oganov, Artem R.; Dong, Xiao

    2014-07-01

    Gas hydrates are systems of prime importance. In particular, hydrogen hydrates are potential materials of icy satellites and comets, and may be used for hydrogen storage. We explore the H2O-H2 system at pressures in the range 0-100 GPa with ab initio variable-composition evolutionary simulations. According to our calculation and previous experiments, the H2O-H2 system undergoes a series of transformations with pressure, and adopts the known open-network clathrate structures (sII, C0), dense ``filled ice'' structures (C1, C2) and two novel hydrate phases. One of these is based on the hexagonal ice framework and has the same H2O:H2 ratio (2:1) as the C0 phase at low pressures and similar enthalpy (we name this phase Ih-C0). The other newly predicted hydrate phase has a 1:2 H2O:H2 ratio and structure based on cubic ice. This phase (which we name C3) is predicted to be thermodynamically stable above 38 GPa when including van der Waals interactions and zero-point vibrational energy, and explains previously mysterious experimental X-ray diffraction and Raman measurements. This is the hydrogen-richest hydrate and this phase has a remarkable gravimetric density (18 wt.%) of easily extractable hydrogen.

  17. Dynamical Disorder in the DNA Hydration Shell.

    PubMed

    Duboué-Dijon, Elise; Fogarty, Aoife C; Hynes, James T; Laage, Damien

    2016-06-22

    The reorientation and hydrogen-bond dynamics of water molecules within the hydration shell of a B-DNA dodecamer, which are of interest for many of its biochemical functions, are investigated via molecular dynamics simulations and an analytic jump model, which provide valuable new molecular level insights into these dynamics. Different sources of heterogeneity in the hydration shell dynamics are determined. First, a pronounced spatial heterogeneity is found at the DNA interface and explained via the jump model by the diversity in local DNA interfacial topographies and DNA-water H-bond interactions. While most of the hydration shell is moderately retarded with respect to the bulk, some water molecules confined in the narrow minor groove exhibit very slow dynamics. An additional source of heterogeneity is found to be caused by the DNA conformational fluctuations, which modulate the water dynamics. The groove widening aids the approach of, and the jump to, a new water H-bond partner. This temporal heterogeneity is especially strong in the minor groove, where groove width fluctuations occur on the same time scale as the water H-bond rearrangements, leading to a strong dynamical disorder. The usual simplifying assumption that hydration shell dynamics is much faster than DNA dynamics is thus not valid; our results show that biomolecular conformational fluctuations are essential to facilitate the water motions and accelerate the hydration dynamics in confined groove sites. PMID:27240107

  18. Fragmentation and hydration of tektites and microtektites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glass, B.P.; Muenow, D.W.; Bohor, B.F.; Meeker, G.P.

    1997-01-01

    An examination of data collected over the last 30 years indicates that the percent of glass fragments vs. whole splash forms in the Cenozoic microtektite strewn fields increases towards the source crater (or source region). We propose that this is due to thermal stress produced when tektites and larger microtektites fall into water near the source crater while still relatively hot (>1150 ??C). We also find evidence (low major oxide totals, frothing when melted) for hydration of most of the North American tektite fragments and microtektites found in marine sediments. High-temperature mass spectrometry indicates that these tektite fragments and microtektites contain up to 3.8 wt% H2O. The H2O-release behavior during the high-temperature mass-spectrometric analysis, plus high Cl abundances (???0.05 wt%), indicate that the North. American tektite fragments and microtektites were hydrated in the marine environment (i.e., the H2O was not trapped solely on quenching from a melt). The younger Ivory Coast and Australasian microtektites do not exhibit much evidence of hydration (at least not in excess of 0.5 wt% H2O); this suggests that the degree of hydration increases with age. In addition, we find that some glass spherules (with 65 wt% SiO2 can undergo simple hydration in the marine environment, while impact glasses (with <65 wt% SiO2) can also undergo palagonitization.

  19. Novel hydrogen hydrate structures under pressure.

    PubMed

    Qian, Guang-Rui; Lyakhov, Andriy O; Zhu, Qiang; Oganov, Artem R; Dong, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Gas hydrates are systems of prime importance. In particular, hydrogen hydrates are potential materials of icy satellites and comets, and may be used for hydrogen storage. We explore the H₂O-H₂ system at pressures in the range 0-100 GPa with ab initio variable-composition evolutionary simulations. According to our calculation and previous experiments, the H₂O-H₂ system undergoes a series of transformations with pressure, and adopts the known open-network clathrate structures (sII, C₀), dense "filled ice" structures (C₁, C₂) and two novel hydrate phases. One of these is based on the hexagonal ice framework and has the same H₂O:H₂ ratio (2:1) as the C₀ phase at low pressures and similar enthalpy (we name this phase Ih-C₀). The other newly predicted hydrate phase has a 1:2 H₂O:H₂ ratio and structure based on cubic ice. This phase (which we name C₃) is predicted to be thermodynamically stable above 38 GPa when including van der Waals interactions and zero-point vibrational energy, and explains previously mysterious experimental X-ray diffraction and Raman measurements. This is the hydrogen-richest hydrate and this phase has a remarkable gravimetric density (18 wt.%) of easily extractable hydrogen. PMID:25001502

  20. On the structure selectivity of clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2011-06-30

    We propose a strategic method to search for a new clathrate hydrate by investigating the selectivity of its crystalline structure, which has been expected to depend mostly on the guest species and less on the thermodynamic conditions. Relative stability among various morphologies is examined in terms of the chemical potential of water of clathrate hydrates in equilibrium with guest gases. This evaluation is performed by calculating the free energy of cage occupancy according to the standard statistical mechanical theory with the aid of the Yarmolyuk and Kripyakevich's rule on the Frank-Kasper type alloys to estimate the numbers of cages of various types. Thus, a comprehensive interpretation of the selectivity of crystalline structures is successfully made. We explain why two major structures are stable in most of the thermodynamic conditions and establish a relation between polymorphism of clathrate hydrate and the guest size and other parameters, thereby suggesting a way to find a new clathrate hydrate by appropriate choice of the guest species and/or the thermodynamic properties. It is found that there is a small room in the above parameter space for the other structure than the major two to be the most stable, including a new structure. In addition, simple but thorough elucidation is given for preferential formation of TS-I structure in bromine hydrate. PMID:21619053

  1. Blue LED irradiation to hydration of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Priscila F. C.; Requena, Michelle B.; Lizarelli, Rosane F., Z.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    Blue LED system irradiation shows many important properties on skin as: bacterial decontamination, degradation of endogenous skin chromophores and biostimulation. In this clinical study we prove that the blue light improves the skin hydration. In the literature none authors reports this biological property on skin. Then this study aims to discuss the role of blue light in the skin hydration. Twenty patients were selected to this study with age between 25-35 years old and phototype I, II and III. A defined area from forearm was pre determined (A = 4.0 cm2). The study was randomized in two treatment groups using one blue light device (power of 5.3mW and irradiance of 10.8mW/cm2). The first treatment group was irradiated with 3J/cm2 (277seconds) and the second with 6J/cm2 (555 seconds). The skin hydration evaluations were done using a corneometer. The measurements were collected in 7, 14, 21 and 30 days, during the treatment. Statistical test of ANOVA, Tukey and T-Student were applied considering 5% of significance. In conclusion, both doses were able to improve the skin hydration; however, 6J/cm2 has kept this hydration for 30 days.

  2. Ovarian steroid sulphate functions as priming pheromone in male Barilius bendelisis (Ham.).

    PubMed

    Bhatt, J P; Sajwan, M S

    2001-06-01

    The study reveals that pre-ovulatory females of the fish Barilius bendelisis (Ham.) release sex steroids and their conjugates into the water and that a steroid sulphate of these compounds functions as a potent sex pheromone which stimulates milt production in conspecific males prior to spawning. Since males exposed to the purified subfraction III of the steroid sulphate fraction have increased milt volume and more spermatozoa with greater motility, the function of this priming pheromone appears to be to enhance male spawning success. High turbulence and faster water currents render the hillstream ecosystem extremely challenging for chemical communication. Therefore, ovulatory female fish secrete highly water soluble steroid sulphates for rapid pheromonal action in males. Inhibited milt volume in olfactory tract lesioned (OTL) males exposed to the steroid sulphate fraction and 17alpha,20 beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one supports the concept that the pheromonally induced priming effect in male fish is mediated through olfactory pathways. PMID:11426061

  3. Carbon Monoxide as an Electron Donor for the Biological Reduction of Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Parshina, Sofiya N.; Sipma, Jan; Henstra, Anne Meint; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Several strains of Gram-negative and Gram-positive sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are able to use carbon monoxide (CO) as a carbon source and electron donor for biological sulphate reduction. These strains exhibit variable resistance to CO toxicity. The most resistant SRB can grow and use CO as an electron donor at concentrations up to 100%, whereas others are already severely inhibited at CO concentrations as low as 1-2%. Here, the utilization, inhibition characteristics, and enzymology of CO metabolism as well as the current state of genomics of CO-oxidizing SRB are reviewed. Carboxydotrophic sulphate-reducing bacteria can be applied for biological sulphate reduction with synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) as an electron donor. PMID:20628586

  4. Stability evaluation of hydrate-bearing sediments during thermally-driven hydrate dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, T.; Cho, G.; Santamarina, J.; Kim, H.; Lee, J.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrate-bearing sediments may destabilize spontaneously as part of geological processes, unavoidably during petroleum drilling/production operations, or intentionally as part of gas extraction from the hydrate itself. In all cases, high pore fluid pressure generation is anticipated during hydrate dissociation. This study examined how thermal changes destabilize gas hydrate-bearing sediments. First, an analytical formulation was derived for predicting fluid pressure evolution in hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to thermal stimulation without mass transfer. The formulation captures the self-preservation behavior, calculates the hydrate and free gas quantities during dissociation, considering effective stress-controlled sediment compressibility and gas solubility in aqueous phase. Pore fluid pressure generation is proportional to the initial hydrate fraction and the sediment bulk stiffness; is inversely proportional to the initial gas fraction and gas solubility; and is limited by changes in effective stress that cause the failure of the sediment. Second, the analytical formulation for hydrate dissociation was incorporated as a user-defined function into a verified finite difference code (FLAC2D). The underlying physical processes of hydrate-bearing sediments, including hydrate dissociation, self-preservation, pore pressure evolution, gas dissolution, and sediment volume expansion, were coupled with the thermal conduction, pore fluid flow, and mechanical response of sediments. We conducted the simulations for a duration of 20 years, assuming a constant-temperature wellbore transferred heat to the surrounding hydrate-bearing sediments, resulting in dissociation of methane hydrate in the well vicinity. The model predicted dissociation-induced excess pore fluid pressures which resulted in a large volume expansion and plastic deformation of the sediments. Furthermore, when the critical stress was reached, localized shear failure of the sediment around the borehole was

  5. Particle engineering using sonocrystallization: salbutamol sulphate for pulmonary delivery.

    PubMed

    Dhumal, Ravindra S; Biradar, Shailesh V; Paradkar, Anant R; York, Peter

    2009-02-23

    The aim of present work was to produce fine elongated crystals of salbutamol sulphate (SS) by sonocrystallization for pulmonary delivery and compare with micronized and spray dried SS (SDSS) for in vitro aerosolization behavior. Application of ultrasound during anti-solvent crystallization resulted in fine elongated crystals (sonocrystallized SS; SCSS) compared to aggregates of large irregular crystals obtained without sonication. Higher sonication amplitude, time, concentration and lower processing temperatures favored formation of smaller crystals with narrow particle size distribution (PSD). SCSS was separated from dispersion by spray drying in the form of loose aggregates (SD-SCSS). The fine particle fraction (FPF) of formulations with coarse lactose carrier in cascade impactor increased from 16.66% for micronized SS to 31.12% for SDSS (obtained by spray drying aqueous SS solution) and 44.21% for SD-SCSS, due to reduced cohesive/adhesive forces and aerodynamic size by virtue of elongated shape of crystals. SD-SCSS was stable without any change in crystallinity and aerodynamic behavior for 3 months at 40 degrees C/75% RH, but amorphous SDSS showed recrystallization with poor aerosolization performance on storage. Sonocrystallization, a rapid and simple technique is reported for production of SS crystals suitable for inhalation delivery. PMID:18996462

  6. Influence of polymer content on stabilizing milled amorphous salbutamol sulphate.

    PubMed

    Balani, P N; Wong, S Y; Ng, W K; Widjaja, E; Tan, R B H; Chan, S Y

    2010-05-31

    The study investigates the influence of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) concentration on stabilizing the amorphous form of salbutamol sulphate (SS) before and after storage under ambient and elevated humidity conditions. Different mass ratios of SS and PVP (0-90wt%) were co-milled using a planetary ball mill. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), high sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry (HSDSC), dynamic vapor sorption (DVS), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman microscopy (RM) were used to analyze the stability of the co-milled mixtures against heat and humidity treatments as well as storage at different humidity conditions. Prior storage, DSC and DVS analyses revealed that re-crystallization of amorphous SS was suppressed above PVP content of 33 wt%. Probable hydrogen bond interaction between SS and PVP was found in FT-IR analysis. XRPD diffractograms and SEM analysis showed stability against re-crystallization was achieved in the co-milled mixtures with a minimum PVP content of 80 wt% after storage. Homogeneous distribution of SS and PVP from RM analysis showed fine clustering of SS and PVP, suggesting the formation of an amorphous dispersion at molecular level. The results provide insights on the application of thermal and humidity treatments, accelerated stability testing and investigations on drug-excipient interactions to predict the minimum ratio of an excipient for stabilizing the amorphous state of a milled API. PMID:20211717

  7. Immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of chondroitin sulphate

    PubMed Central

    du Souich, Patrick; García, Antonio G; Vergés, Josep; Montell, Eulàlia

    2009-01-01

    Chondroitin sulphate (CS) is a natural glycosaminoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is formed by the 1–3 linkage of D-glucuronic acid to N-acetylgalactosamine. In chondrocytes, CS diminishes interleukin-1 p (IL-1p)-induced increases in p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) and signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) phosphorylation, and decreases nuclear factor-KB (NF-kB) nuclear translocation and as a consequence, reduces the formation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1 p and TNF-a, and pro-inflammatory enzymes, such as phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2). The mechanism of action of CS explains its beneficial effect on the cartilage, synovial membrane and subchondral bone. On the other hand, in vivo, CS given orally prevents hepatic NF-κB nuclear translocation, suggesting that systemic CS may elicit an anti-inflammatory effect in many tissues besides the articulation. There is preliminary evidence showing that in human beings, CS may be of benefit in other diseases where inflammation is an essential marker, such as psoriasis and atherosclerosis. The review of the literature suggest that CS might also be of interest for the treatment of other diseases with an inflammatory and/or autoimmune character, such as inflammatory bowel disease, degenerative diseases of the central nervous system and stroke, multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:19522843

  8. Chitosan microparticles for sustaining the topical delivery of minoxidil sulphate.

    PubMed

    Gelfuso, Guilherme Martins; Gratieri, Taís; Simão, Patrícia Sper; de Freitas, Luís Alexandre Pedro; Lopez, Renata Fonseca Vianna

    2011-01-01

    Given the hypothesis that microparticles can penetrate the skin barrier along the transfollicular route, this work aimed to obtain and characterise chitosan microparticles loaded with minoxidil sulphate (MXS) and to study their ability to sustain the release of the drug, attempting a further application utilising them in a targeted delivery system for the topical treatment of alopecia. Chitosan microparticles, containing different proportions of MXS/polymer, were prepared by spray drying and were characterised by yield, encapsulation efficiency, size and morphology. Microparticles selected for further studies showed high encapsulation efficiency (∼82%), a mean diameter of 3.0 µm and a spherical morphology without porosities. When suspended in an ethanol/water solution, chitosan microparticles underwent instantaneous swelling, increasing their mean diameter by 90%. Release studies revealed that the chitosan microparticles were able to sustain about three times the release rate of MXS. This feature, combined with suitable size, confers to these microparticles the potential to target and improve topical therapy of alopecia with minoxidil. PMID:21824068

  9. Indoxyl sulphate and kidney disease: Causes, consequences and interventions.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Robert J; Small, David M; Vesey, David A; Johnson, David W; Francis, Ross; Vitetta, Luis; Gobe, Glenda C; Morais, Christudas

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, chronic kidney disease (CKD), defined as reduced renal function (glomerular filtration rate (GFR) < 60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) ) and/or evidence of kidney damage (typically manifested as albuminuria) for at least 3 months, has become one of the fastest-growing public health concerns worldwide. CKD is characterized by reduced clearance and increased serum accumulation of metabolic waste products (uremic retention solutes). At least 152 uremic retention solutes have been reported. This review focuses on indoxyl sulphate (IS), a protein-bound, tryptophan-derived metabolite that is generated by intestinal micro-organisms (microbiota). Animal studies have demonstrated an association between IS accumulation and increased fibrosis, and oxidative stress. This has been mirrored by in vitro studies, many of which report cytotoxic effects in kidney proximal tubular cells following IS exposure. Clinical studies have associated IS accumulation with deleterious effects, such as kidney functional decline and adverse cardiovascular events, although causality has not been conclusively established. The aims of this review are to: (i) establish factors associated with increased serum accumulation of IS; (ii) report effects of IS accumulation in clinical studies; (iii) critique the reported effects of IS in the kidney, when administered both in vivo and in vitro; and (iv) summarize both established and hypothetical therapeutic options for reducing serum IS or antagonizing its reported downstream effects in the kidney. PMID:26239363

  10. Quantifying hydrate solidification front advancing using method of characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Kehua; DiCarlo, David; Flemings, Peter B.

    2015-10-01

    We develop a one-dimensional analytical solution based on the method of characteristics to explore hydrate formation from gas injection into brine-saturated sediments within the hydrate stability zone. Our solution includes fully coupled multiphase and multicomponent flow and the associated advective transport in a homogeneous system. Our solution shows that hydrate saturation is controlled by the initial thermodynamic state of the system and changed by the gas fractional flow. Hydrate saturation in gas-rich systems can be estimated by 1-cl0/cle when Darcy flow dominates, where cl0 is the initial mass fraction of salt in brine, and cle is the mass fraction of salt in brine at three-phase (gas, liquid, and hydrate) equilibrium. Hydrate saturation is constant, gas saturation and gas flux decrease, and liquid saturation and liquid flux increase with the distance from the gas inlet to the hydrate solidification front. The total gas and liquid flux is constant from the gas inlet to the hydrate solidification front and decreases abruptly at the hydrate solidification front due to gas inclusion into the hydrate phase. The advancing velocity of the hydrate solidification front decreases with hydrate saturation at a fixed gas inflow rate. This analytical solution illuminates how hydrate is formed by gas injection (methane, CO2, ethane, propane) at both the laboratory and field scales.

  11. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  12. Curvature Dependence of Hydrophobic Hydration Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, R. Gregor; Heyden, Matthias; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the solute curvature dependence of water dynamics in the vicinity of hydrophobic spherical solutes using molecular dynamics simulations. For both the lateral and perpendicular diffusivity, as well as for H-bond kinetics of water in the first hydration shell, we find a nonmonotonic solute-size dependence, exhibiting extrema close to the well-known structural crossover length scale for hydrophobic hydration. Additionally, we find an apparent anomalous diffusion for water moving parallel to the surface of small solutes, which, however, can be explained by topology effects. Our findings regarding the intimate connection between solute curvature and water dynamics has implications for our understanding of hydration dynamics at heterogeneous biomolecular surfaces.

  13. Method for production of hydrocarbons from hydrates

    DOEpatents

    McGuire, Patrick L.

    1984-01-01

    A method of recovering natural gas entrapped in frozen subsurface gas hydrate formations in arctic regions. A hot supersaturated solution of CaCl.sub.2 or CaBr.sub.2, or a mixture thereof, is pumped under pressure down a wellbore and into a subsurface hydrate formation so as to hydrostatically fracture the formation. The CaCl.sub.2 /CaBr.sub.2 solution dissolves the solid hydrates and thereby releases the gas entrapped therein. Additionally, the solution contains a polymeric viscosifier, which operates to maintain in suspension finely divided crystalline CaCl.sub.2 /CaBr.sub.2 that precipitates from the supersaturated solution as it is cooled during injection into the formation.

  14. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O.; Walsh, Michael M.

    1999-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel in order to mix its respective portion of liquid water with the corresponding portion of the stream. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  15. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O.; Walsh, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  16. Relaxation mechanism of the hydrated electron.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Madeline H; Williams, Holly L; Shreve, Alexander T; Neumark, Daniel M

    2013-12-20

    The relaxation dynamics of the photoexcited hydrated electron have been subject to conflicting interpretations. Here, we report time-resolved photoelectron spectra of hydrated electrons in a liquid microjet with the aim of clarifying ambiguities from previous experiments. A sequence of three ultrashort laser pulses (~100 femtosecond duration) successively created hydrated electrons by charge-transfer-to-solvent excitation of dissolved anions, electronically excited these electrons via the s→p transition, and then ejected them into vacuum. Two distinct transient signals were observed. One was assigned to the initially excited p-state with a lifetime of ~75 femtoseconds, and the other, with a lifetime of ~400 femtoseconds, was attributed to s-state electrons just after internal conversion in a nonequilibrated solvent environment. These assignments support the nonadiabatic relaxation model. PMID:24357314

  17. Apparatus investigates geological aspects of gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Dillon, William P.

    1999-01-01

    The US Geological Survey has developed a laboratory research system which allows the study of the creation and dissociation of gas hydrates under deepwater conditions and with different sediment types and pore fluids. The system called GHASTLI (gas hydrate and sediment test laboratory instrument) comprises a pressure chamber which holds a sediment specimen, and which can simulate water depths to 2,500m and different sediment overburden. Seawater and gas flow through a sediment specimen can be precisely controlled and monitored. It can simulate a wide range of geology and processes and help to improve understanding of gas hydrate processes and aid prediction of geohazards, their control and potential use as an energy source. This article describes GHASTLI and how it is able to simulate natural conditions, focusing on fluid volume, acoustic velocity-compressional and shear wave, electric resistance, temperature, pore pressure, shear strength, and permeability.

  18. Aggregation of Calcium Silicate Hydrate Nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Delhorme, Maxime; Labbez, Christophe; Turesson, Martin; Lesniewska, Eric; Woodward, Cliff E; Jönsson, Bo

    2016-03-01

    We study the aggregation of calcium silicate hydrate nanoplatelets on a surface by means of Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations at thermodynamic equilibrium. Calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is the main component formed in cement and is responsible for the strength of the material. The hydrate is formed in early cement paste and grows to form platelets on the nanoscale, which aggregate either on dissolving cement particles or on auxiliary particles. The general result is that the experimentally observed variations in these dynamic processes generically called growth can be rationalized from interaction free energies, that is, from pure thermodynamic arguments. We further show that the surface charge density of the particles determines the aggregate structures formed by C-S-H and thus their growth modes. PMID:26859614

  19. Characteristics and antioxidant of Ulva intestinalis sulphated polysaccharides extracted with different solvents.

    PubMed

    Peasura, Napassorn; Laohakunjit, Natta; Kerdchoechuen, Orapin; Wanlapa, Sorada

    2015-11-01

    Ulva intestinalis, a tubular green seaweed, is a rich source of nutrient, especially sulphated polysaccharides. Sulphated polysaccharides from U. intestinalis were extracted with distilled water, 0.1N HCl, and 0.1N NaOH at 80°C for 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24h to study the effect of the extraction solvent and time on their chemical composition and antioxidant activity. Different types of solvents and extraction time had a significant influence on the chemical characteristics and antioxidant activity (p<0.05). Monosaccharide composition and FT-IR spectra analyses revealed that sulphated polysaccharides from all solvent extractions have a typical sugar backbone (glucose, rhamnose, and sulphate attached at C-2 or C-3 of rhamnose). Sulphated polysaccharides extracted with acid exhibited greater antioxidant activity than did those extracted with distilled water and alkali. The results indicated that solvent extraction could be an efficacious method for enhancing antioxidant activity by distinct molecular weight and chemical characteristic of sulphated polysaccharides. PMID:26400737

  20. Comparison of physical and inhalation properties of spray-dried and micronized terbutaline sulphate.

    PubMed

    Thi, Thanh Huong Hoang; Danède, Florence; Descamps, Marc; Flament, Marie-Pierre

    2008-09-01

    Terbutaline sulphate particles, for use in dry powder inhaler formulations, were prepared by spray-drying, using a Büchi 190 mini spray dryer. Spray-drying conditions were chosen to allow the production of spray-dried terbutaline sulphate with a size similar to micronized terbutaline sulphate, that is to say about 2.9 microm of volume mean diameter. The physical properties and in vitro inhalation behaviour of micronized and spray-dried terbutaline sulphate were compared. X-ray diffraction, DSC, SEM and laser size analysis were investigated. Spray-dying produced spherically shaped particles with amorphous structure. After blending with different lactoses, adhesion and aerodynamic properties were investigated. Evaluation of adhesion was carried out with a mechanical sieve and an Alpine air-jet sieve. The adhesion of terbutaline sulphate on the lactoses tested was lower in the case of the spray-dried drug. Aerodynamic evaluation of fine particle dose and emitted dose was conducted using a twin stage impactor. The emitted doses and the fine particle doses were higher with the spray-dried terbutaline sulphate. The Alpine air-jet sieve assays showed that there was a correlation between drug separation from a carrier by sieving and that obtained from longer in vitro deposition studies. There was a linear relationship between the adhesion characteristics and the fine particle dose. PMID:18504120

  1. Development of an Inhaled Sustained Release Dry Powder Formulation of Salbutamol Sulphate, an Antiasthmatic Drug.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, C; Sathishkumar, K

    2016-01-01

    The present research was aimed to develop and characterize a sustained release dry powder inhalable formulation of salbutamol sulphate. The salbutamol sulphate microparticles were prepared by solvent evaporation method using biodegradable polymer poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) to produce salbutamol sulphate microparticle mixed with carrier respirable grade lactose for oral inhalation of dry powder. The drug content were estimated to produce 1 mg sustained release salbutamol sulphate per dose. Total four formulations K1, K2, K3 and K4 were prepared with 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:4 ratio of salbutamol sulphate:poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid). The developed formulations were studied for physicochemical properties, in vitro drug relase and Anderson cascade impaction studies. The prepared formulations effectively releases drug for 12 h in diffusion bag studies. Based on dissolution performance the 1:1 ratio of salbutamol sulphate:poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) produces in vitro release 92.57% at 12 h and having particle size of microparticles (D0.5μm) 5.02±0.6 and the pulmonary deposition of dry powder 34.5±3.21 (respiratory fraction in percentage). PMID:27168692

  2. Sulphate production by Paracoccus pantotrophus ATCC 35512 from different sulphur substrates: sodium thiosulphate, sulphite and sulphide.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Daniel Derrossi; Andrino, Felipe Gabriel; Possedente de Lira, Simone; Fornaro, Adalgiza; Corção, Gertrudes; Brandelli, Adriano

    2016-03-01

    One of the problems in waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) is the increase in emissions of hydrogen sulphide (H2S), which can cause damage to the health of human populations and ecosystems. To control emissions of this gas, sulphur-oxidizing bacteria can be used to convert H2S to sulphate. In this work, sulphate detection was performed by spectrophotometry, ion chromatography and atomic absorption spectrometry, using Paracoccus pantotrophus ATCC 35512 as a reference strain growing in an inorganic broth supplemented with sodium thiosulphate (Na2S2O3·5H2O), sodium sulphide (Na2S) or sodium sulphite (Na2SO3), separately. The strain was metabolically competent in sulphate production. However, it was only possible to observe significant differences in sulphate production compared to abiotic control when the inorganic medium was supplemented with sodium thiosulphate. The three methods for sulphate detection showed similar patterns, although the chromatographic method was the most sensitive for this study. This strain can be used as a reference for sulphate production in studies with sulphur-oxidizing bacteria originating from environmental samples of WWTPs. PMID:26269005

  3. Differential inhibition of polymorphonuclear leukocyte recruitment in vivo by dextran sulphate and fucoidan

    PubMed Central

    Rampart, M.; Herman, A. G.

    1996-01-01

    The selectin-mediated rolling of leukocytes along the endothelial cells is a prerequisite step followed by firm adhesion and extravasation into the inflamed tissue. This initial contact can be suppressed by sulphated polysaccharides. We have studied the effect of sulphated polysaccharides on the ultimate polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) recruitment and plasma leakage in rabbit skin in response to intradermal injection of various inflammatory mediators. PMN infiltration evoked by various PMN chemoattractants (FMLP, C5a desArg, LTB4 and IL-8) was significantly inhibited after intravenous injection of dextran sulphate (25 mg/kg), heparin (2 × 90 mg/kg) or fucoidan (1 mg/kg). PMN-dependent plasma leakage was equally well reduced by the different sulphated polymers. Vascular permeability induced by histamine or thrombin acting via a PMN-independent mechanism was not reduced. Fucoidan was the only polysaccharide able to suppress IL-1-induced PMN infiltration for 60–70%. Local administration of dextran sulphate had no effect on PMN-dependent plasma leakage. Differential inhibition of PMN recruitment was determined after injection of dextran sulphate or fucoidan depending on the type of insult. Therefore, these results suggest that different adhesion pathways are utilized during PMN recruitment in vivo in response to chemoattractants and IL-1. PMID:18475729

  4. Application of sugarcane bagasse for passive anaerobic biotreatment of sulphate rich wastewaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Ali; Qazi, Javed Iqbal

    2016-06-01

    Biological treatment of sulphate-rich wastewaters employing dissimilatory sulphate reducing bacteria as remedial agents is an attractive technique and has gained importance in the last few years. Industrial effluents enriched with sulphates are generally deficient in electron donors. And thus cannot be treated biologically without supplementation of carbon through an external source. For scalable operations, however, the carbon source must not be expensive. In this context, present study reports the efficiency of biological sulphate reduction using sugarcane bagasse as a cost-effective carbon source. An average 0.00391 ± 0.001 gL-1 day-1 (3.91 mgL-1 day-1) sulphate reduction was observed reaching maximally to 0.00466 ± 0.001 gL-1 day-1 (4.66 mgL-1 day-1) while employing Desulfovibrio fructosovorans-HAQ2 and Desulfovibrio piger-HAQ6 in a 60-day trial of anaerobic incubation using sugarcane bagasse as growth substrate. These findings will be helpful in developing economical bioremediation processes tending to operate for a longer period of time to reduce sulphate contents of contaminated waters.

  5. Application of sugarcane bagasse for passive anaerobic biotreatment of sulphate rich wastewaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Ali; Qazi, Javed Iqbal

    2014-09-01

    Biological treatment of sulphate-rich wastewaters employing dissimilatory sulphate reducing bacteria as remedial agents is an attractive technique and has gained importance in the last few years. Industrial effluents enriched with sulphates are generally deficient in electron donors. And thus cannot be treated biologically without supplementation of carbon through an external source. For scalable operations, however, the carbon source must not be expensive. In this context, present study reports the efficiency of biological sulphate reduction using sugarcane bagasse as a cost-effective carbon source. An average 0.00391 ± 0.001 gL-1 day-1 (3.91 mgL-1 day-1) sulphate reduction was observed reaching maximally to 0.00466 ± 0.001 gL-1 day-1 (4.66 mgL-1 day-1) while employing Desulfovibrio fructosovorans-HAQ2 and Desulfovibrio piger-HAQ6 in a 60-day trial of anaerobic incubation using sugarcane bagasse as growth substrate. These findings will be helpful in developing economical bioremediation processes tending to operate for a longer period of time to reduce sulphate contents of contaminated waters.

  6. Development of an Inhaled Sustained Release Dry Powder Formulation of Salbutamol Sulphate, an Antiasthmatic Drug

    PubMed Central

    Kumaresan, C.; Sathishkumar, K.

    2016-01-01

    The present research was aimed to develop and characterize a sustained release dry powder inhalable formulation of salbutamol sulphate. The salbutamol sulphate microparticles were prepared by solvent evaporation method using biodegradable polymer poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) to produce salbutamol sulphate microparticle mixed with carrier respirable grade lactose for oral inhalation of dry powder. The drug content were estimated to produce 1 mg sustained release salbutamol sulphate per dose. Total four formulations K1, K2, K3 and K4 were prepared with 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:4 ratio of salbutamol sulphate:poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid). The developed formulations were studied for physicochemical properties, in vitro drug relase and Anderson cascade impaction studies. The prepared formulations effectively releases drug for 12 h in diffusion bag studies. Based on dissolution performance the 1:1 ratio of salbutamol sulphate:poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) produces in vitro release 92.57% at 12 h and having particle size of microparticles (D0.5μm) 5.02±0.6 and the pulmonary deposition of dry powder 34.5±3.21 (respiratory fraction in percentage). PMID:27168692

  7. A Study on Solidification of Abandoned Mine Tailings with Hydrated Lime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K.; Lee, H.

    2008-12-01

    Solidification is one of the stabilization processes for wastes and their components to reduce their toxicity and migration rates to surroundings. Hydrated limes were applied as cementing materials to solidify heavy metal contaminated tailings from the Geumjang mine and the solidified tailing specimens were tested for their appropriateness in accordance with the suggested test methods. In the preliminary tests for the solidified tailing specimens, all the specimens have higher uniaxial compressive strengths than 3.5kgf/cm2, the standard recommended for land reclamation solids by EPA(Environmental Protection Agency). Even in leaching tests for the solidified tailing specimens, concentrations of heavy metals such as As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn were decreased significantly below the environmental warning standards in comparison with those of raw tailing samples. The optimum mixing ratio of tailings, hydrated lime, and water was determined through the preliminary tests. The solidified mixtures of mine tailings and hydrated lime through pozzolanic reaction were tested for their durability against repeated freezing and thawing processes. After repeated freezing and thawing, the uniaxial compressive strengths of all the solidified mixture specimens decreased in comparison with those before test but still higher than 3.5kgf/cm2, and concentrations of heavy metals such as As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn were below the standards. Effluents in the repetitive artificial tests show pH's of 7.4 to 9.1 and concentrations of heavy metals such as As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn of below 0.05ppm. Conclusively this study shows potential applicability of hydrated limes to in-situ stabilization of abandoned mine tailings.

  8. Co-polymeric glycosaminoglycans in transformed cells. Transformation-dependent changes in the co-polymeric structure of heparan sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Fransson, Lars-Ȧke; Havsmark, Birgitta; Chiarugi, Vincenzo P.

    1982-01-01

    1. Heparan sulphates from normal 3T3 fibroblasts are association-prone as indicated by their affinity for agarose gels substituted with cognate heparan sulphate species. Heparan sulphates from SV40-transformed or polyoma-virus-transformed cells have no affinity for the same gels. 2. Heparan sulphates from the medium, the pericellular and intracellular pools of normal, SV40-transformed and polyoma-transformed 3T3 cells were separated into four subfractions (HS1–HS4) by ion-exchange chromatography. In general, HS1–HS3 were found in cell-derived heparan sulphates, whereas HS3–HS4 were present in the medium. The heparan sulphates from transformed cells were more heterogeneous and of lower charge density than those from the normal counterpart. 3. Degradations via periodate oxidation/alkaline elimination yielded the oligomers glucosamine-(hexuronate–glucosamine)n-R with n=1–5 and a large proportion of N-sulphate groups. There was a large contribution of fragments n=4–5 from heparan sulphates of normal cells. These fragments were less common in low-sulphated heparan sulphates of transformed cells. In the case of medium-drived heparan sulphates all species had a low content of fragments n=4–5. 4. The size distribution of (glucuronate–N-acetylglucosamine)n regions was assessed after deaminative cleavage. It was broad and ranged from n=1–10 for all heparan sulphate species. In the case of medium-derived heparan sulphates there were distinct differences between normal and transformed cells. In the latter chains the N-acetyl-rich segments were both shorter and longer than in the normal case. The shape of the disaccharide peak was consistent with a lower content of O-sulphate in the heparan sulphates from transformed cells. 5. It was concluded that heparan sulphates from medium or transformed cells exhibit the greatest structural deviation from the normal case. The finding of lower proportions of extended, iduronate/glucuronate-bearing, N-sulphate

  9. Acute irritant threshold correlates with barrier function, skin hydration and contact hypersensitivity in atopic dermatitis and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Darlenski, Razvigor; Kazandjieva, Jana; Tsankov, Nikolai; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to disclose interactions between epidermal barrier, skin irritation and sensitization in healthy and diseased skin. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and stratum corneum hydration (SCH) were assessed in adult patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), rosacea and healthy controls. A 4-h patch test with seven concentrations of sodium lauryl sulphate was performed to determine the irritant threshold (IT). Contact sensitization pattern was revealed by patch testing with European baseline series. Subjects with a lower IT had higher TEWL values and lower SCH. Subjects with positive allergic reactions had significantly lower IT. In AD, epidermal barrier deterioration was detected on both volar forearm and nasolabial fold, while in rosacea, impeded skin physiology parameters were observed on the facial skin only, suggesting that barrier impediment is restricted to the face in rosacea, in contrast with AD where the abnormal skin physiology is generalized. PMID:24112695

  10. Mapping the hydration dynamics of ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Nucci, Nathaniel V; Pometun, Maxim S; Wand, A Joshua

    2011-08-17

    The nature of water's interaction with biomolecules such as proteins has been difficult to examine in detail at atomic resolution. Solution NMR spectroscopy is potentially a powerful method for characterizing both the structural and temporal aspects of protein hydration but has been plagued by artifacts. Encapsulation of the protein of interest within the aqueous core of a reverse micelle particle results in a general slowing of water dynamics, significant reduction in hydrogen exchange chemistry and elimination of contributions from bulk water thereby enabling the use of nuclear Overhauser effects to quantify interactions between the protein surface and hydration water. Here we extend this approach to allow use of dipolar interactions between hydration water and hydrogens bonded to protein carbon atoms. By manipulating the molecular reorientation time of the reverse micelle particle through use of low viscosity liquid propane, the T(1ρ) relaxation time constants of (1)H bonded to (13)C were sufficiently lengthened to allow high quality rotating frame nuclear Overhauser effects to be obtained. These data supplement previous results obtained from dipolar interactions between the protein and hydrogens bonded to nitrogen and in aggregate cover the majority of the molecular surface of the protein. A wide range of hydration dynamics is observed. Clustering of hydration dynamics on the molecular surface is also seen. Regions of long-lived hydration water correspond with regions of the protein that participate in molecular recognition of binding partners suggesting that the contribution of the solvent entropy to the entropy of binding has been maximized through evolution. PMID:21761828

  11. Component analysis of the protein hydration entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2012-05-01

    We report the development of an atomic decomposition method of the protein solvation entropy in water, which allows us to understand global change in the solvation entropy in terms of local changes in protein conformation as well as in hydration structure. This method can be implemented via a combined approach based on molecular dynamics simulation and integral-equation theory of liquids. An illustrative application is made to 42-residue amyloid-beta protein in water. We demonstrate how this method enables one to elucidate the molecular origin for the hydration entropy change upon conformational transitions of protein.

  12. Experimental Study of Gas Hydrate Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fandino, O.; Ruffine, L.

    2011-12-01

    Important quantities of methane and other gases are trapped below the seafloor and in the permafrost by an ice-like solid, called gas hydrates or clathrate hydrates. The latter is formed when water is mixing with different gases at high pressures and low temperatures. Due to a their possible use as a source of energy [1] or the problematic related to flow assurance failure in pipelines [2] the understanding of their processes of formation/destabilisation of these structures becomes a goal for many laboratories research as well as industries. In this work we present an experimental study on the stochastic behaviour of hydrate formation from a bulk phase. The method used here for the experiments was to repeat several time the same hydrate formation procedure and to notice the different from one experiment to another. A variable-volume type high-pressure apparatus with two sapphire windows was used. This device, already presented by Ruffine et al.[3], allows us to perform both kinetics and phase equilibrium measurements. Three initial pressure conditions were considered here, 5.0 MPa, 7.5 MPa and 10.0 MPa. Hydrates have been formed, then allowed to dissociate by stepwise heating. The memory effect has also been investigated after complete dissociation. It turned out that, although the thermodynamics conditions of formation and/or destabilization were reproducible. An attempt to determine the influence of pressure on the nucleation induction time will be discussed. References 1. Sum, A. K.; Koh, C. A.; Sloan, E. D., Clathrate Hydrates: From Laboratory Science to Engineering Practice. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research 2009, 48, 7457-7465. 2. Sloan, E. D., A changing hydrate paradigm-from apprehension to avoidance to risk management. Fluid Phase Equilibria 2005, 228, 67-74. 3. Ruffine, L.; Donval, J. P.; Charlou, J. L.; Cremière, A.; Zehnder, B. H., Experimental study of gas hydrate formation and destabilisation using a novel high-pressure apparatus. Marine

  13. Simulation of subsea gas hydrate exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2014-05-01

    The recovery of methane from gas hydrate layers that have been detected in several subsea sediments and permafrost regions around the world is a promising perspective to overcome future shortages in natural gas supply. Being aware that conventional natural gas resources are limited, research is going on to develop technologies for the production of natural gas from such new sources. Thus various research programs have started since the early 1990s in Japan, USA, Canada, India, and Germany to investigate hydrate deposits and develop required technologies. In recent years, intensive research has focussed on the capture and storage of CO2 from combustion processes to reduce climate impact. While different natural or man-made reservoirs like deep aquifers, exhausted oil and gas deposits or other geological formations are considered to store gaseous or liquid CO2, the storage of CO2 as hydrate in former methane hydrate fields is another promising alternative. Due to beneficial stability conditions, methane recovery may be well combined with CO2 storage in the form of hydrates. Regarding technological implementation many problems have to be overcome. Especially mixing, heat and mass transfer in the reservoir are limiting factors causing very long process times. Within the scope of the German research project »SUGAR« different technological approaches for the optimized exploitation of gas hydrate deposits are evaluated and compared by means of dynamic system simulations and analysis. Detailed mathematical models for the most relevant chemical and physical processes are developed. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into simulation programs. Simulations based on geological field data have been carried out. The studies focus on the potential of gas production from turbidites and their fitness for CO2 storage. The effects occurring during gas production and CO2 storage within

  14. Natural gas: Formation of hydrates -- Transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskara Rao, B.K.

    1998-07-01

    The significant growth of Natural gas based industries in India and elsewhere obviously forced the industry to hunt for new fields and sources. This has naturally led to the phenomenal growth of gas networks. The transportation of gas over thousands of kilometers through caprious ambient conditions requires a great effort. Many difficulties such as condensation of light liquids (NGLS), choking of lines due to formation of hydrates, improper distribution of gas into branches are experienced during pipe line transportation of Natural gas. The thermodynamic conditions suitable for formation of solid hydrates have been derived depending upon the constituents of natural gas. Further effects of branching in pipe line transportation have been discussed.

  15. Arctic Gas hydrate, Environment and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mienert, Jurgen; Andreassen, Karin; Bünz, Stefan; Carroll, JoLynn; Ferre, Benedicte; Knies, Jochen; Panieri, Giuliana; Rasmussen, Tine; Myhre, Cathrine Lund

    2015-04-01

    Arctic methane hydrate exists on land beneath permafrost regions and offshore in shelf and continental margins sediments. Methane or gas hydrate, an ice-like substrate, consists mainly of light hydrocarbons (mostly methane from biogenic sources but also ethane and propane from thermogenic sources) entrapped by a rigid cage of water molecules. The pressure created by the overlying water and sediments offshore stabilizes the CH4 in continental margins at a temperature range well above freezing point; consequently CH4 exists as methane ice beneath the seabed. Though the accurate volume of Arctic methane hydrate and thus the methane stored in hydrates throughout the Quaternary is still unknown it must be enormous if one considers the vast regions of Arctic continental shelves and margins as well as permafrost areas offshore and on land. Today's subseabed methane hydrate reservoirs are the remnants from the last ice age and remain elusive targets for both unconventional energy and as a natural methane emitter influencing ocean environments and ecosystems. It is still contentious at what rate Arctic warming may govern hydrate melting, and whether the methane ascending from the ocean floor through the hydrosphere reaches the atmosphere. As indicated by Greenland ice core records, the atmospheric methane concentration rose rapidly from ca. 500 ppb to ca. 750 ppb over a short time period of just 150 years at the termination of the younger Dryas period ca. 11600 years ago, but the dissociation of large quantities of methane hydrates on the ocean floor have not been documented yet (Brook et al., 2014 and references within). But with the major projected warming and sea ice melting trend (Knies et al., 2014) one may ask, for how long will CH4 stay trapped in methane hydrates if surface and deep-ocean water masses will warm and permafrost continuous to melt (Portnov et al. 2014). How much of the Arctic methane will be consumed by the micro- and macrofauna, how much will

  16. Morphology of methane hydrate host sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, K.W.; Feng, H.; Tomov, S.; Winters, W.J.; Eaton, M.; Mahajan, D.

    2005-01-01

    The morphological features including porosity and grains of methane hydrate host sediments were investigated using synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) technique. The sediment sample was obtained during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 164 on the Blake Ridge at water depth of 2278.5 m. The CMT experiment was performed at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source facility. The analysis gave ample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity. The method was found to be highly effective for the study of methane hydrate host sediments.

  17. Mechanical instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianyang; Ning, Fulong; Trinh, Thuat T; Kjelstrup, Signe; Vlugt, Thijs J H; He, Jianying; Skallerud, Bjørn H; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    Despite observations of massive methane release and geohazards associated with gas hydrate instability in nature, as well as ductile flow accompanying hydrate dissociation in artificial polycrystalline methane hydrates in the laboratory, the destabilising mechanisms of gas hydrates under deformation and their grain-boundary structures have not yet been elucidated at the molecular level. Here we report direct molecular dynamics simulations of the material instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates under mechanical loading. The results show dislocation-free brittle failure in monocrystalline hydrates and an unexpected crossover from strengthening to weakening in polycrystals. Upon uniaxial depressurisation, strain-induced hydrate dissociation accompanied by grain-boundary decohesion and sliding destabilises the polycrystals. In contrast, upon compression, appreciable solid-state structural transformation dominates the response. These findings provide molecular insight not only into the metastable structures of grain boundaries, but also into unusual ductile flow with hydrate dissociation as observed during macroscopic compression experiments. PMID:26522051

  18. Mechanical instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianyang; Ning, Fulong; Trinh, Thuat T.; Kjelstrup, Signe; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; He, Jianying; Skallerud, Bjørn H.; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2015-11-01

    Despite observations of massive methane release and geohazards associated with gas hydrate instability in nature, as well as ductile flow accompanying hydrate dissociation in artificial polycrystalline methane hydrates in the laboratory, the destabilising mechanisms of gas hydrates under deformation and their grain-boundary structures have not yet been elucidated at the molecular level. Here we report direct molecular dynamics simulations of the material instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates under mechanical loading. The results show dislocation-free brittle failure in monocrystalline hydrates and an unexpected crossover from strengthening to weakening in polycrystals. Upon uniaxial depressurisation, strain-induced hydrate dissociation accompanied by grain-boundary decohesion and sliding destabilises the polycrystals. In contrast, upon compression, appreciable solid-state structural transformation dominates the response. These findings provide molecular insight not only into the metastable structures of grain boundaries, but also into unusual ductile flow with hydrate dissociation as observed during macroscopic compression experiments.

  19. Mechanical instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianyang; Ning, Fulong; Trinh, Thuat T.; Kjelstrup, Signe; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; He, Jianying; Skallerud, Bjørn H.; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    Despite observations of massive methane release and geohazards associated with gas hydrate instability in nature, as well as ductile flow accompanying hydrate dissociation in artificial polycrystalline methane hydrates in the laboratory, the destabilising mechanisms of gas hydrates under deformation and their grain-boundary structures have not yet been elucidated at the molecular level. Here we report direct molecular dynamics simulations of the material instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates under mechanical loading. The results show dislocation-free brittle failure in monocrystalline hydrates and an unexpected crossover from strengthening to weakening in polycrystals. Upon uniaxial depressurisation, strain-induced hydrate dissociation accompanied by grain-boundary decohesion and sliding destabilises the polycrystals. In contrast, upon compression, appreciable solid-state structural transformation dominates the response. These findings provide molecular insight not only into the metastable structures of grain boundaries, but also into unusual ductile flow with hydrate dissociation as observed during macroscopic compression experiments. PMID:26522051

  20. Secondary iron sulphates in AMD: a minerochemical analysis on jarosite supporting the valorization of its geoenvironmental contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Teresa; Figueiredo, Maria-Ondina

    2010-05-01

    Currently, iron sulphates formed in abandoned sulphide-ore mines have a very negative connotation within acid mine drainage (AMD) because in general these secondary hydroxilated and/or hydrated minerals concentrate a large span of toxic elements. However, this apparently penalizing feature may occasionally turn out to be a positive contribution, once sequestering such elements under the form of stable minerals significantly reduces their spread in soils and rivers, as occurs for jarosite in what concerns lead. The application of an exergetic analysis to resources consumption and sustainability assessment [1] provides a means of evaluating the degradation of mineral resources on Earth and a life cycle assessment (LCA) recently performed on some secondary iron sulphates has emphasized their exergetic contribution [2]. With the purpose of further exploring this positive aspect, and focusing on jarosite, a synopsis is presented on the structural features and geochemical tendencies of secondary iron sulphates liable of being exploited to promote their possible role. Jarosites (s.l.) - with general formula AB3(OH)6(SO4)2, where A is mainly K+, Na+, plus minor Ag+, Tl+, NH4+, Pb2+, Bi3+, and B is essentially Fe3+ (jarosite s.s.) or Al3+ (alunite) - have a trigonal crystal structure [3] and display Kagomé-type layers of corner-sharing B octahedra, [Fe/AlO2(OH)4], that give rise to unique magnetic properties [4]; the large cation A stays in pseudo-icosahedral coordination by 6 O-atoms from [SO4] tetrahedra and 6 hydroxyls shared with A octahedra [5]. A synopsis is presented on the crystal-chemistry and geochemical tendencies of jarosite and the geochemistry of sediments in the abandoned mine of S. Domingos (southern Portugal, Iberian Pyrite Belt of polymetallic sulphide ores), is briefly described to illustrate the positive environmental role of jarosite as energy-saver within the particularly aggressive environment of abandoned sulphide-ore mines. [1] B. de Meester et al

  1. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh; Woodward, Jonathan

    2011-06-07

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  2. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Barbara R [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M [Knoxville, TN; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh [Memphis, TN; Woodward, Jonathan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-28

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  3. Aluminium-phosphate-sulphate minerals as markers of sustained acidic conditions during the Permian-Triassic transition in E Iberia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borruel-Abadía, Violeta; Belén Galán-Abellán, Ana; Barrenechea, José F.; De la Horra, Raúl; Luque, Francisco Javier; Alonso-Azcárate, Jacinto; López-Gómez, José

    2016-04-01

    Strontium-rich hydrated Aluminium phosphate-sulphate (APS) minerals are markers of an acidic formation environment due to their precipitation at low pH conditions. However, their small size (0.5-6 μm), low concentrations, and optical properties represent the main problems to quantify these minerals. This study provides quantitative data on APS mineral concentrations for the Late Permian and Early-Middle Triassic in different continental sections of East Iberia. By quantifying APS minerals useful insight can be obtained into the environmental conditions that prevailed during the biotic crisis of the PTB and during the later recovery of life at the end of the Early Triassic. For that, a quantification method based on element mapping of randomly selected areas of thin sections on the electron microprobe is proposed, with relative errors ranging from 5.6% to 11.7%. The results are considered on a detailed petrographic, sedimentological, and palaeontological framework, and compared with other geochemical. Thus, in the first sedimentary record after the Permian-Triassic boundary (Olenekian), it has been possible to correlate relatively high concentration levels of APS minerals with the lack of signs of living organisms. Our findings suggest a long period of sustained acidic conditions followed by an environmental change that permitted the recovery of life, as reflected by lower APS mineral contents detected at the end of the Spathian and the first presence of bioturbation, paleosols, footprints, and plant remains. Early Anisian acidic episodes were much more sporadic than those during the Olenekian deposition, in which APS mineral concentrations were an order of magnitude higher. This fact would indicate punctual acidic conditions still during the beginning of the Anisian. Based on these results, this method is proposed as a tool for addressing environmental changes that took place during the Permian-Triassic transition in continental environments.

  4. Elastic properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2001-01-01

    Downhole-measured compressional- and shear-wave velocities acquired in the Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well, northwestern Canada, reveal that the dominant effect of gas hydrate on the elastic properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments is as a pore-filling constituent. As opposed to high elastic velocities predicted from a cementation theory, whereby a small amount of gas hydrate in the pore space significantly increases the elastic velocities, the velocity increase from gas hydrate saturation in the sediment pore space is small. Both the effective medium theory and a weighted equation predict a slight increase of velocities from gas hydrate concentration, similar to the field-observed velocities; however, the weighted equation more accurately describes the compressional- and shear-wave velocities of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. A decrease of Poisson's ratio with an increase in the gas hydrate concentration is similar to a decrease of Poisson's ratio with a decrease in the sediment porosity. Poisson's ratios greater than 0.33 for gas hydrate-bearing sediments imply the unconsolidated nature of gas hydrate-bearing sediments at this well site. The seismic characteristics of gas hydrate-bearing sediments at this site can be used to compare and evaluate other gas hydrate-bearing sediments in the Arctic.

  5. 21 CFR 582.2729 - Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. 582.2729... Agents § 582.2729 Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  6. 21 CFR 182.2729 - Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. 182.2729... § 182.2729 Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  7. 21 CFR 182.2729 - Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. 182.2729... § 182.2729 Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  8. 21 CFR 582.2729 - Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. 582.2729... Agents § 582.2729 Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  9. 21 CFR 182.2729 - Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. 182.2729... (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2729 Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium...

  10. Videos of Experiments from ORNL Gas Hydrate Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gas hydrate research performed by the Environmental Sciences Division utilizes the ORNL Seafloor Process Simulator, the Parr Vessel, the Sapphire Cell, a fiber optic distributed sensing system, and Raman spectroscopy. The group studies carbon sequestration in the ocean, desalination, gas hydrates in the solar system, and nucleation and dissociation kinetics. The videos available at the gas hydrates website are very short clips from experiments.

  11. The geology of aluminium phosphates and sulphates of the alunite group minerals: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, Harald G.

    2001-03-01

    Aluminium phosphates and sulphates of the alunite supergroup (APS minerals) occur in a wide range of environments of formation covering the metamorphic, igneous and sedimentary realms. Supergene processes, including mineral dressing and dumping when sulphide ores are mined, as well as hypogene alteration are also responsible for the precipitation of APS minerals. In these environments, complex solid solution series (s.s.s.) can form. The general formula of these alunite minerals is AB 3 (XO 4) 2(OH) 6, where A is a large cation (Na, U, K, Ag, NH 4, Pb, Ca, Ba, Sr, REE). B sites are occupied by cations of the elements Al, Fe, Cu and Zn. In nature, the anion (XO 4) x- is dominated by P and S. Mineral dressing and identification of APS minerals often needs a combination of highly sophisticated measures including Atterberg settling methods, XRD, DTA, TGA, TEM-EDX, SEM, EMPA and XRF. In sedimentary rocks APS minerals occur in various rocks and environments of deposition: calcareous, phosphorite-bearing, argillaceous-carbonaceous, arenaceous, coal-bearing environments, in soils and paleosols, in saprolite (bauxites, laterites) and in calcareous-argillaceous sequences hosting Carlin-type SHDG deposits. In igneous rocks, APS minerals may be encountered mainly in acidic through intermediate pyroclastic, volcanic and subvolcanic rocks. They occur in barren volcanic rocks and porphyry-type intrusions that have sparked epithermal Au-Ag-base metal deposits, Au-Sb mineralization, APS-bearing argillite and alunite deposits in their immediate surroundings. Granitic and pegmatitic rocks are rarely host of supergene APS mineralization. During low-grade stage regional metamorphism, peraluminous parent rocks originating from a sedimentary or igneous protolith may also give rise to APS mineralization. Peraluminous parent rocks enriched in S and/or P are a prerequisite for the formation of APS minerals that are stable up to a temperature of 400°C at moderately high fluid pressure of up

  12. Correlations between stream sulphate and regional SO2 emissions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.A.; Alexander, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between atmospheric SO2 emissions and stream and lake acidification has been difficult to quantify, largely because of the limitations of sulphur deposition measurements. Precipitation sulphate (SO4) records are mostly <5 yr in length and do not account for dry sulphur deposition. Moreover, a variable fraction of wet- and dry-deposited sulphur is retained in soils and vegetation and does not contribute to the acidity of aquatic systems. We have compared annual SO2 emissions for the eastern United States from 1976 to 1980 with stream SO4 measurements from fifteen predominantly undeveloped watersheds. We find that the two forms of sulphur are strongly correlated on a regional basis and that streams in the southeastern United States (SE) receive a smaller fraction (on average, 16%, compared with 24%) of regional sulphur emissions than do streams in the northeastern United States (NE). In addition to providing direct empirical evidence of a relationship between sulphur emissions and aquatic chemistry, these results suggest that there are significant regional differences in the fraction of deposited sulphur retained in basin soils and vegetation.The relationship between atmospheric SO//2 emissions and stream and lake acidification has been difficult to quantify, largely because of the limitations of sulphur deposition measurements. The authors have compared annual SO//2 emissions for the eastern United States from 1967 to 1980 with stream SO//4 measurements from fifteen predominantly undeveloped watersheds. They found that both the wet - and dry-deposited forms of sulphur are strongly correlated on a regional basis and that streams in the southeastern United States receive a smaller fraction (on average, 16%, compared with 24%) of regional sulphur emissions than do streams in the northeastern United States. In addition to providing direct empirical evidence of a relationship between sulphur emissions and aquatic chemistry, these results suggest that

  13. Mineral content of urban plants as an indicator of air sulphate pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Ufimtseva, M.D.; Zaickina, L.I.

    1996-08-01

    Phytogeochemical indication constitutes one of the promising methods of urban environment monitoring. Usually the phytogeochemical assessment includes the estimation of heavy metal content in urban plants in reference to the regional background level. The indication, based on the diversity of the biological response reactions to the industrial contamination, allows us to use the other parameters for the characterization of current condition of the urban environment (and particularly the atmospheric contamination) as well. As it is well known, mineral phytolites which may constitute up to 85% of dry weight are formed in plant tissues. The mineral composition of plants does not seem to be studied well enough as yet, and the data on mineral complexes in urban plants are absent completely. The authors` attempt was to study the peculiarities of urban plant mineral content and to reveal the value of the quantitative proportion of different mineral compounds for the air pollution indication. Urban plant mineral composition was tested in the samples of ashes by means of the infrared (IR) spectroscopy method which is usually used for the estimation of mineral compounds in rock. The IR absorption spectra were taken for the samples of bark or leaf ashes, taken from the tree, shrub, and herbaceous species that were most common and widely distributed both throughout the industrial areas and in the areas without noticeable pollution. These spectra look like curves with a lot of peales with different range which evidently correspond not to clear substances but to the mixtures of different minerals. The variation of absorbtion intensities in the observed lands makes it possible to estimate the quantitative contribution of different minerals (carbonates, sulphates, phosphates, quartz, feldspar, etc.) to the general IR spectrum.

  14. When proteins are completely hydrated in crystals.

    PubMed

    Carugo, Oliviero

    2016-08-01

    In the crystalline state, protein surface patches that do not form crystal packing contacts are exposed to the solvent and one or more layers of hydration water molecules can be observed. It is well known that these water molecules cannot be observed at very low resolution, when the scarcity of experimental information precludes the observation of several parts of the protein molecule, like for example side-chains at the protein surface. On the contrary, more details are observable at high resolution. Here it is shown that it is necessary to reach a resolution of about 1.5-1.6Å to observe a continuous hydration layer at the protein surface. This contrasts previous estimations, which were more tolerant and according to which a resolution of 2.5Å was sufficient to describe at the atomic level the structure of the hydration layer. These results should prove useful in guiding a more rigorous selection of structural data to study protein hydration and in interpreting new crystal structures. PMID:27112977

  15. Obsidian Hydration Dating in the Undergraduate Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manche, Emanuel P.; Lakatos, Stephen

    1986-01-01

    Provides an overview of obsidian hydration dating for the instructor by presenting: (1) principles of the method; (2) procedures; (3) applications; and (4) limitations. The theory of the method and one or more laboratory exercises can be easily introduced into the undergraduate geology curriculum. (JN)

  16. Hydrated Minerals on Asteroids: The Astronomical Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkin, A. S.; Howell, E. S.; Vilas, F.; Lebofsky, L. A.

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge of the hydrated mineral inventory on the asteroids is important for deducing the origin of Earth's water, interpreting the meteorite record, and unraveling the processes occurring during the earliest times in solar system history. Reflectance spectroscopy shows absorption features in both the 0.6-0.8 and 2.5-3.5 micrometers regions, which are diagnostic of or associated with hydrated minerals. Observations in those regions show that hydrated minerals are common in the mid-asteroid belt, and can be found in unexpected spectral groupings, as well. Asteroid groups formerly associated with mineralogies assumed to have high temperature formation, such as M- and E-class asteroids, have been observed to have hydration features in their reflectance spectra. Some asteroids have apparently been heated to several hundred degrees Celsius, enough to destroy some fraction of their phyllosilicates. Others have rotational variation suggesting that heating was uneven. We summarize this work, and present the astronomical evidence for water- and hydroxyl-bearing minerals on asteroids.

  17. Hydration of Acetylene: A 125th Anniversary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponomarev, Dmitry A.; Shevchenko, Sergey M.

    2007-01-01

    The year 2006 is the 125th anniversary of a chemical reaction, the discovery of which by Mikhail Kucherov had a profound effect on the development of industrial chemistry in the 19-20th centuries. This was the hydration of alkynes catalyzed by mercury ions that made possible industrial production of acetaldehyde from acetylene. Historical…

  18. Dynamics of Kr in dense clathrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, D. D.; Tse, J. S.; Zhao, J. Y.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Tulk, C. A.

    2011-05-01

    The dynamics of Kr atoms as guests in dense clathrate hydrate structures are investigated using site specific Kr83 nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. The dense structure H hydrate and filled-ice structures are studied at high pressures in a diamond anvil high-pressure cell. The dynamics of Kr in the structure H clathrate hydrate quench recovered at 77 K is also investigated. The Kr phonon density of states obtained from the experimental NRIXS data are compared with molecular dynamics simulations. The temperature and pressure dependence of the phonon spectra provide details of the Kr dynamics in the clathrate hydrate cages. Comparison with the dynamics of Kr atoms in the low-pressure structure II obtained previously was made. The Lamb-Mossbauer factor obtained from NRIXS experiments and molecular dynamics calculations are in excellent agreement and are shown to yield unique information on the strength and temperature dependence of guest-host interactions.

  19. 78 FR 26337 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open...; Committee Business; FY 2012 Arctic Production test--data and results; Update on the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management's Lower 48 Assessment; Results of Consortium for Ocean Leadership Workshop; Update...

  20. Hydration dynamics near a model protein surface

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-09-01

    The evolution of water dynamics from dilute to very high concentration solutions of a prototypical hydrophobic amino acid with its polar backbone, N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA), is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation for both the completely deuterated and completely hydrogenated leucine monomer. We observe several unexpected features in the dynamics of these biological solutions under ambient conditions. The NALMA dynamics shows evidence of de Gennes narrowing, an indication of coherent long timescale structural relaxation dynamics. The translational water dynamics are analyzed in a first approximation with a jump diffusion model. At the highest solute concentrations, the hydration water dynamics is significantly suppressed and characterized by a long residential time and a slow diffusion coefficient. The analysis of the more dilute concentration solutions takes into account the results of the 2.0M solution as a model of the first hydration shell. Subtracting the first hydration layer based on the 2.0M spectra, the translational diffusion dynamics is still suppressed, although the rotational relaxation time and residential time are converged to bulk-water values. Molecular dynamics analysis shows spatially heterogeneous dynamics at high concentration that becomes homogeneous at more dilute concentrations. We discuss the hydration dynamics results of this model protein system in the context of glassy systems, protein function, and protein-protein interfaces.

  1. Hydrated Minerals on Asteroids: The Astronomical Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkin, A. S.; Howell, E. S.; Vilas, F.; Lebofsky, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of the hydrated mineral inventory on the asteroids is important for deducing the origin of Earth's water, interpreting the meteorite record, and unraveling the processes occurring during the earliest times in solar system history. Reflectance spectroscopy shows absorption features in both the 0.6-0.8 and 2.5-3.5-micron regions, which are diagnostic of or associated with hydrated minerals. Observations in those regions show that hydrated minerals are common in the mid-asteroid belt, and can be found in unexpected spectral groupings as well. Asteroid groups formerly associated with mineralogies assumed to have high-temperature formation, such as M- and E-class steroids, have been observed to have hydration features in their reflectance spectra. Some asteroids have apparently been heated to several hundred degrees Celsius, enough to destroy some fraction of their phyllosilicates. Others have rotational variation suggesting that heating was uneven. We summarize this work, and present the astronomical evidence for water- and Hydroxl-bearing minerals on asteroids.

  2. The phase behavior of hydrated cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Loomis, C R; Shipley, G G; Small, D M

    1979-05-01

    The thermotropic phase behavior of cholesterol monohydrate in water was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, polarizing light microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. In contrast to anhydrous cholesterol which undergoes a polymorphic crystalline transition at 39 degrees C and a crystalline to liquid transition at 151 degrees C, the closed system of cholesterol monohydrate and water exhibited three reversible endothermic transitions at 86, 123, and 157 degrees C. At 86 degrees C, cholesterol monohydrate loses its water of hydration, forming the high temperature polymorph of anhydrous cholesterol. At least 24 hours were required for re-hydration of cholesterol and the rate of hydration was dependent on the polymorphic crystalline form of anhydrous cholesterol. At 123 degrees C, anhydrous crystalline cholesterol in the presence of excess water undergoes a sharp transition to a birefringent liquid crystalline phase of smectic texture. The x-ray diffraction pattern obtained from this phase contained two sharp low-angle reflections at 37.4 and 18.7 A and a diffuse wide-angle reflection centered at 5.7 A, indicating a layered smectic type of liquid crystalline structure with each layer being two cholesterol molecules thick. The liquid crystalline phase is stable over the temperature range of 123 to 157 degrees C before melting to a liquid dispersed in water. The observation of a smectic liquid crystalline phase for hydrated cholesterol correlates with its high surface activity and helps to explain its ability to exist in high concentrations in biological membranes. PMID:458269

  3. Weight-of-evidence approach in assessment of ecotoxicological risks of acid sulphate soils in the Baltic Sea river estuaries.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Jaana; Karjalainen, Anna K; Schultz, Eija; Järvistö, Johanna; Leppänen, Matti; Vuori, Kari-Matti

    2015-03-01

    Acidity and leaching of metals from acid sulphate soils (ASSs) impair the water quality of receiving surface waters. The largest ASS areas in Europe are found in the coasts of the northern Baltic Sea. We used weight-of-evidence (WoE) approach to assess potential risks in 14 estuary sites affected by ASS in the Gulf of Finland, northern Baltic Sea. The assessment was based on exposure and effect profiles utilizing sediment and water metal concentrations and concurrent pH variation, sediment toxicity tests using the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri and the midge Chironomus riparius, and the ecological status of benthic macroinvertebrate communities. Sediment metal concentrations were compared to national sediment quality criteria/guidelines, and water metal concentrations to environmental quality standards (EQSs). Hazard quotients (HQs) were established for maximum aluminium, cadmium and zinc concentrations at low pH based on applicable US EPA toxicity database. Sediment metal concentrations were clearly elevated in most of the studied estuaries. The EQS of cadmium (0.1 μg/l) was exceeded in 3 estuaries out of 14. The pH-minima were below the national threshold value (5.5) between good and satisfactory water quality in 10 estuaries. V. fischeri bioluminescence indicated toxicity of the sediments but toxic response was not observed in the C. riparius emergence test. Benthic invertebrate communities were deteriorated in 6 out of 14 sites based on the benthic invertebrate quality index. The overall ecotoxicological risk was assessed as low in five, moderate in three and high in five of the estuary sites. The risk assessment utilizing the WoE approach indicated that harmful effects of ASSs are likely to occur in the Baltic Sea river estuaries located at the ASS hotspot area. PMID:25506908

  4. Mixing of methane and sulphate due to fluid flow in the Barbados accretionary prism

    SciTech Connect

    Laier, T. )

    1996-01-01

    Methane concentrations above background level in sulphate-containing (15 mmol/l) pore waters have been observed in the d6collement zone of the Barbados accretionary prism. The peak in methane concentration in the decollement was found at a number of sites by headspace analysis of cores retrieved during ODP Legs 110 156 at the toe of the accretionary prism. [delta][sup 13]C[sub 1] values between -22[per thousand] and -36[per thousand] indicate that methane oxidation occurs possibly due to sulphate reduction. Thus, the presence of both methane and sulphate at the same depths suggests mixing of fluids due to fluid flow. Fluid flow is also indicated by the distinct minima in chloride concentrations at the same depths. In the case of on-going methane oxidation, mixing of sulphate and methane fluids is anticipated to have occurred fairly recently. Sulphate concentration decreases only little with depth in the Pleistocene to lower Miocene sediments where TOC is very low, <0.2 %. Sulphate decreases more rapidly with depth in the Oligocene to Eocene sediments where numerous relatively thin turbidites occur. The turbidites have significantly higher TOC, 0.5-1.5 %, than the interbedded hemipelagic sediments, TOC <0.2 %. High methane concentrations were not found in any of the boreholes, but the trends in sulphate and methane in boreholes indicate that high methane concentrations exist in older sediments not reached by drilling. The decollement zone is composed of lower Miocene to upper Oligocene sediments near the toe of the prism, but deepens into stratigraphically lower sediments prism ward. Thus, methane originating from these older sediments may have been brought to shallower depths by active fluid flow in the decollement.

  5. Mixing of methane and sulphate due to fluid flow in the Barbados accretionary prism

    SciTech Connect

    Laier, T.

    1996-12-31

    Methane concentrations above background level in sulphate-containing (15 mmol/l) pore waters have been observed in the d6collement zone of the Barbados accretionary prism. The peak in methane concentration in the decollement was found at a number of sites by headspace analysis of cores retrieved during ODP Legs 110 & 156 at the toe of the accretionary prism. {delta}{sup 13}C{sub 1} values between -22{per_thousand} and -36{per_thousand} indicate that methane oxidation occurs possibly due to sulphate reduction. Thus, the presence of both methane and sulphate at the same depths suggests mixing of fluids due to fluid flow. Fluid flow is also indicated by the distinct minima in chloride concentrations at the same depths. In the case of on-going methane oxidation, mixing of sulphate and methane fluids is anticipated to have occurred fairly recently. Sulphate concentration decreases only little with depth in the Pleistocene to lower Miocene sediments where TOC is very low, <0.2 %. Sulphate decreases more rapidly with depth in the Oligocene to Eocene sediments where numerous relatively thin turbidites occur. The turbidites have significantly higher TOC, 0.5-1.5 %, than the interbedded hemipelagic sediments, TOC <0.2 %. High methane concentrations were not found in any of the boreholes, but the trends in sulphate and methane in boreholes indicate that high methane concentrations exist in older sediments not reached by drilling. The decollement zone is composed of lower Miocene to upper Oligocene sediments near the toe of the prism, but deepens into stratigraphically lower sediments prism ward. Thus, methane originating from these older sediments may have been brought to shallower depths by active fluid flow in the decollement.

  6. Biosynthesis of heparan sulphate with diverse structures and functions: two alternatively spliced forms of human heparan sulphate 6-O-sulphotransferase-2 having different expression patterns and properties.

    PubMed Central

    Habuchi, Hiroko; Miyake, Goichiro; Nogami, Ken; Kuroiwa, Asato; Matsuda, Yoichi; Kusche-Gullberg, Marion; Habuchi, Osami; Tanaka, Masayuki; Kimata, Koji

    2003-01-01

    Heparan sulphate 6- O -sulphotransferase (HS6ST) catalyses the transfer of sulphate from adenosine 3'-phosphate, 5'-phosphosulphate to the 6th position of the N -sulphoglucosamine residue in HS. We previously described the occurrence of three isoforms of mouse HS6ST, mHS6ST-1, -2, and -3 [Habuchi, Tanaka, Habuchi, Yoshida, Suzuki, Ban and Kimata (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 2859-2868]. In the present study, we have characterized HS6ST-2 and HS6ST-1 human isologues, including their chromosomal localizations. In the process of their cDNA cloning, we found two forms of HS6ST-2: the original (hHS6ST-2) and a short form (hHS6ST-2S) with 40 amino acids deleted. Both hHS6ST-2 and hHS6ST-2S catalysed the same sulphation reaction, but their preferences for sulphation sites in HS substrates were different. Dot-blot analysis of the two forms showed that the original form was exclusively expressed in adult and foetal brain tissues, whereas the short form was expressed preferentially in ovary, placenta and foetal kidney, suggesting that the expression of two forms of hHS6ST-2 is strictly regulated to yield tissue-dependent differences in the fine structure of HS. A refined analysis of their reaction products has led us to another finding, that HS6STs could also transfer sulphate to N -sulphoglucosamine residues located at the non-reducing terminal of HS with high affinity. PMID:12492399

  7. Biosynthesis of heparan sulphate with diverse structures and functions: two alternatively spliced forms of human heparan sulphate 6-O-sulphotransferase-2 having different expression patterns and properties.

    PubMed

    Habuchi, Hiroko; Miyake, Goichiro; Nogami, Ken; Kuroiwa, Asato; Matsuda, Yoichi; Kusche-Gullberg, Marion; Habuchi, Osami; Tanaka, Masayuki; Kimata, Koji

    2003-04-01

    Heparan sulphate 6- O -sulphotransferase (HS6ST) catalyses the transfer of sulphate from adenosine 3'-phosphate, 5'-phosphosulphate to the 6th position of the N -sulphoglucosamine residue in HS. We previously described the occurrence of three isoforms of mouse HS6ST, mHS6ST-1, -2, and -3 [Habuchi, Tanaka, Habuchi, Yoshida, Suzuki, Ban and Kimata (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 2859-2868]. In the present study, we have characterized HS6ST-2 and HS6ST-1 human isologues, including their chromosomal localizations. In the process of their cDNA cloning, we found two forms of HS6ST-2: the original (hHS6ST-2) and a short form (hHS6ST-2S) with 40 amino acids deleted. Both hHS6ST-2 and hHS6ST-2S catalysed the same sulphation reaction, but their preferences for sulphation sites in HS substrates were different. Dot-blot analysis of the two forms showed that the original form was exclusively expressed in adult and foetal brain tissues, whereas the short form was expressed preferentially in ovary, placenta and foetal kidney, suggesting that the expression of two forms of hHS6ST-2 is strictly regulated to yield tissue-dependent differences in the fine structure of HS. A refined analysis of their reaction products has led us to another finding, that HS6STs could also transfer sulphate to N -sulphoglucosamine residues located at the non-reducing terminal of HS with high affinity. PMID:12492399

  8. Ab initio molecular dynamics study of polarization effects on ionic hydration in aqueous AlCl3 solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Takashi; Hirata, Masaru; Kimura, Takaumi

    2003-12-01

    The solvation shell structure and dynamics of Al3+ and Cl- in an aqueous solution of 0.8 M AlCl3 are studied under ambient conditions by using an ab initio molecular dynamics method. The solvation structures obtained from our ab initio simulations are in good agreement with the experimental ones for both Al3+ and Cl-. A detailed analysis of intramolecular geometry of hydration waters and dipole moments of the ingredients shows that the polarization has substantial effects on the structures and dynamics of both the cation and anion hydration shells. Implications for metal hydrolysis of Al3+ will also be given.

  9. Direct measurement of methane hydrate composition along the hydrate equilibrium boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    The composition of methane hydrate, namely nW for CH 4??nWH2O, was directly measured along the hydrate equilibrium boundary under conditions of excess methane gas. Pressure and temperature conditions ranged from 1.9 to 9.7 MPa and 263 to 285 K. Within experimental error, there is no change in hydrate composition with increasing pressure along the equilibrium boundary, but nW may show a slight systematic decrease away from this boundary. A hydrate stoichiometry of n W = 5.81-6.10 H2O describes the entire range of measured values, with an average composition of CH4??5.99(??0.07) H2O along the equilibrium boundary. These results, consistent with previously measured values, are discussed with respect to the widely ranging values obtained by thermodynamic analysis. The relatively constant composition of methane hydrate over the geologically relevant pressure and temperature range investigated suggests that in situ methane hydrate compositions may be estimated with some confidence. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  10. Three-dimensional distribution of gas hydrate beneath southern Hydrate Ridge: constraints from ODP Leg 204

    SciTech Connect

    Trehu, Ann M.; Long, Philip E.; Torres, M E.; Bohrmann, G; Rack, F R.; Collett, T S.; Goldberg, D S.; Milkov, A V.; Riedel, M; Schultheiss, P; Bangs, N L.; Barr, S R.; Borowski, W S.; Claypool, G E.; Delwiche, Mark E.; Dickens, G R.; Gracia, E; Guerin, G; Holland, M; Johnson, Jerry E.; Lee, Y J.; Liu, C S.; Su, X; Teichert, B; Tomaru, H; Vanneste, M; Watanabe, M; Weinberger, Jill L.

    2004-03-01

    Large uncertainties about the energy resource potential and role in global climate change of gas hydrates result from uncertainty about how much hydrate is contained in marine sediments. During Leg 204 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) to the accretionary complex of the Cascadia subduction zone, the entire gas hydrate stability zone was sampled in contrasting geological settings defined by a 3D seismic survey. By integrating results from different methods, including several new techniques developed for Leg 204, we overcome the problem of spatial under-sampling inherent in robust methods traditionally used for estimating the hydrate content of cores and obtain a high-resolution, quantitative estimate of the total amount and spatial variability of gas hydrate in this structural system. We conclude that high gas hydrate content (30-40% of pore space of 20-26% of total volume) is restricted to the upper tens of meters below the seafloor near the summit of the structure, where vigorous fluid venting occurs.

  11. Hydration dependent viscoelastic tensile behavior of cornea.

    PubMed

    Hatami-Marbini, Hamed

    2014-08-01

    The cornea is a protective transparent connective tissue covering the front of the eye. The standard uniaxial tensile experiments are among the most popular techniques for investigating biomechanical properties of the cornea. This experimental method characterizes the stress-strain response of corneal strips immersed in a bathing solution. In the present study, the important roles of corneal hydration on tensile viscoelastic properties were investigated. The thickness was used as a surrogate for hydration and uniaxial tensile experiments were performed on bovine corneal samples with four different average thickness (hydration), i.e., 1100 μm (4.87 mg water/mg dry tissue), 900 μm (4.13 mg water/mg dry tissue), 700 μm (3.20 mg water/mg dry tissue), and 500 μm (1.95 mg water/mg dry tissue). The samples were immersed in mineral oil in order to prevent their swelling during the experiments. A quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) model was used to analyze the experimental measurements and determine viscoelastic material constants. It was observed that both maximum and equilibrium (relaxed) stresses were exponentially increased with decreasing tissue thickness (hydration). Furthermore, the QLV model successfully captured the corneal viscoelastic response with an average R (2) value greater than 0.99. Additional experiments were conducted in OBSS in order to confirm that these significant changes in viscoelastic properties were because of corneal hydration and not the bathing solution. The findings of this study suggest that extra care must be taken in interpreting the results of earlier uniaxial tensile testings and their correspondence to the corneal biomechanical properties. PMID:24668183

  12. Phyllosilicate and Hydrated Sulfate Deposits in Meridiani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, S. M.; Avidson, R. E.; Murchie, S.; Poulet, F.; Andrews-Hanna, J. C.; Morris, R. V.; Seelos, F. P.

    2008-01-01

    Several phyllosilicate and hydrated sulfate deposits in Meridiani have been mapped in detail with high resolution MRO CRISM [1] data. Previous studies have documented extensive exposures of outcrop in Meridiani (fig 1), or etched terrain (ET), that has been interpreted to be sedimentary in origin [e.g., 2,3]. These deposits have been mapped at a regional scale with OMEGA data and show enhanced hydration (1.9 m absorption) in several areas [4]. However, hydrated sulfate detections were restricted to valley exposures in northern Meridiani ET [5]. New high resolution CRISM images show that hydrated sulfates are present in several spatially isolated exposures throughout the ET (fig 1). The hydrated sulfate deposits in the valley are vertically heterogeneous with layers of mono and polyhydrated sulfates and are morphologically distinct from other areas of the ET. We are currently mapping the detailed spatial distribution of sulfates and searching for distinct geochemical horizons that may be traced back to differential ground water recharge and/or evaporative loss rates. The high resolution CRISM data has allowed us to map out several phyllosilicate deposits within the fluvially dissected Noachian cratered terrain (DCT) to the south and west of the hematite-bearing plains (Ph) and ET (fig 1). In Miyamoto crater, phyllosilicates are located within 30km of the edge of Ph, which is presumably underlain by acid sulfate deposits similar to those explored by Opportunity. The deposits within this crater may record the transition from fluvial conditions which produced and/or preserved phyllosilicates deposits to a progressively acid sulfate dominated groundwater system in which large accumulations of sulfate-rich evaporites were deposited .

  13. Natural Methane and Carbon Dioxide Hydrates in the Earth System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Research Team; Milkereit, B.

    2004-05-01

    Both CH4 and CO2 are abundant volatiles in the earth's crust. Methane hydrates occur in permafrost regions and continental slopes of oceans. It is currently estimated that the energy stored in CH4 hydrate reserves totals more than twice the global reserves of all conventional oil, gas, and coal deposits combined. This means that methane hydrate could prove to be a very important source of energy in the future. Pressure versus temperature phase diagrams for methane and carbon dioxide define characteristic stability fields for gas, fluid and hydrates states. Sequestration of carbon dioxide in the earths crust and production of methane hydrate reservoirs are critically dependent on knowledge of the in situ elastic moduli of natural hydrates. The physical properties of simple methane and carbon dioxide hydrates are similar [1]. Our compilation of experimental data confirms high compressional wave velocities and elastic moduli for CH4 and CO2 hydrates and low compressional wave velocities for the fluid and gas phases. As methane and carbon dioxide hydrates are stable over similar pressure-temperature ranges, the two types of hydrates form in similar settings in the earth's crust. For example, temperature and pressure conditions in deepwater marine environments require both CO2 and CH4 to be in hydrate phase. However, not much is known about the origin, distribution and total volume of natural carbon dioxide hydrates stored in the earth's crust. For a number of tectonic/geological settings, CO2-rich fluids from deep crustal reservoirs must be considered: rifted margins, volcanic arcs, deepwater vents [2], mud volcanoes and mud diapirs [3]. Both methane and carbon dioxide hydrates work to cement sea floors in similar ways. Slope failure, a phenomenon usually taken as a hallmark of the presence of methane hydrate, could also be attributed to the existence of carbon dioxide hydrates. Perhaps most critically, many of the estimations of the amounts of methane hydrates are

  14. Effect of hydration on the structure of caveolae membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Caracciolo, Giulio; Sciubba, Fabio; Caminiti, Ruggero

    2009-04-13

    In situ energy dispersive x-ray diffraction was used to investigate the effect of hydration on the structure of caveolae membranes. The structure of caveolae membrane was found to be strongly dependent on hydration. At low hydration two lamellar phases with distinct repeat spacings were found to coexist with segregated cholesterol crystallites. Upon hydration, the lamellar phases did swell, while diffraction peak of cholesterol crystals disappeared suggesting that cholesterol molecules redistributed homogeneously within the caveolae membrane. At full hydration, unbinding of caveolae membrane occurred. Upon dehydration the system returned to the bound state, demonstrating that the unbinding transition is fully reversible.

  15. Biogenic sulphide plays a major role on the riboflavin-mediated decolourisation of azo dyes under sulphate-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Francisco J; Enríquez, Javier E; Galindo-Petatán, Eden; Arvayo, Héctor; Razo-Flores, Elías; Field, Jim A

    2007-06-01

    The effect of high concentrations of sulphate on the reductive decolourisation of different azo dyes by anaerobic sludge was studied in batch cultures. Sludge cultures were pre-incubated under sulphate-reducing conditions prior addition of dyes. Little or no effects of sulphate (5-10 g sulphate l(-1)) on the rate of decolourisation of Reactive Orange 14 (RO14), Direct Blue 53 (DB53) and Direct Blue 71 (DB71) were observed when no external redox mediator was provided. However, an increase in sulphate concentration, in the presence of riboflavin (20 microM), enhanced the decolourisation of all dyes. The first-rate constant of decolourisation (k) was increased up to 2-, 3.6- and 2-fold for RO14, DB53 and DB71, respectively, by supplying high sulphate concentrations, compared to the controls lacking sulphate, in the presence of the redox mediator. Sulphate reduction did not take place during the course of azo reductions, but was only evident before dye addition and after complete decolourisation, suggesting azo dyes reduction out-competed sulphate reduction for the available reducing equivalents. The experimental data suggest that reduction of azo dyes by riboflavin, which had been reduced by biogenic sulphide, was the major mechanism implicated during decolourisations, which was corroborated by abiotic incubations. Riboflavin greatly accelerated the abiotic reduction of RO14, so that the k value was increased up to 44-fold compared to the control lacking riboflavin. PMID:17350080

  16. Sulphatation Does Not Appear to Be a Protective Mechanism to Prevent Oxysterol Accumulation in Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Acimovic, Jure; Lövgren-Sandblom, Anita; Olin, Maria; Ali, Zeina; Heverin, Maura; Schüle, Rebecca; Schöls, Ludger; Fischler, Björn; Fickert, Peter; Trauner, Michael; Björkhem, Ingemar

    2013-01-01

    24S- and 27-hydroxycholesterol (24OHC and 27OHC) are potent regulators of different biochemical systems in vitro and are the major circulating oxysterols. A small fraction of these oxysterols has been reported to be sulphated but there are no detailed studies. We considered the possibility that sulphatation is a protective mechanism preventing accumulation of free oxysterols. Using an accurate assay we found the sulphated fraction of 24OHC and 27OHC in circulation of adults to be less than 15% of total. In two patients with a mutation in CYP7B1 and markedly increased levels of 27OHC the sulphated fraction was 8% and 10% respectively. Infants with severe neonatal cholestasis had however markedly increased sulphate fraction of the above oxysterols. In untreated mice the degree of sulphatation of 24OHC and 27OHC in serum varied between 0 and 16%. Similar degree of sulphatation was found in two mouse models with markedly increased levels of 27OHC and 24OHC respectively. Bile duct ligated mice had higher levels of oxysterols than sham-operated controls but the sulphate fraction was not increased. We conclude that a primary increase in the levels of the oxysterols due to increased synthesis or reduced metabolism in adults and mice does not induce increased sulphatation. PMID:23844150

  17. Methane hydrate in the global organic carbon cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    2002-01-01

    The global occurrence of methane hydrate in outer continental margins and in polar regions, and the magnitude of the amount of methane sequestered in methane hydrate suggest that methane hydrate is an important component in the global organic carbon cycle. Various versions of this cycle have emphasized the importance of methane hydrate, and in the latest version the role of methane hydrate is considered to be analogous to the workings of an electrical circuit. In this circuit the methane hydrate is a condenser and the consequences of methane hydrate dissociation are depicted as a resistor and inductor, reflecting temperature change and changes in earth surface history. These consequences may have implications for global change including global climate change.

  18. Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gay Hydrate Production Methods

    SciTech Connect

    M. D. White; B. P. McGrail; S. K. Wurstner

    2009-06-30

    Displacing natural gas and petroleum with carbon dioxide is a proven technology for producing conventional geologic hydrocarbon reservoirs, and producing additional yields from abandoned or partially produced petroleum reservoirs. Extending this concept to natural gas hydrate production offers the potential to enhance gas hydrate recovery with concomitant permanent geologic sequestration. Numerical simulation was used to assess a suite of carbon dioxide injection techniques for producing gas hydrates from a variety of geologic deposit types. Secondary hydrate formation was found to inhibit contact of the injected CO{sub 2} regardless of injectate phase state, thus diminishing the exchange rate due to pore clogging and hydrate zone bypass of the injected fluids. Additional work is needed to develop methods of artificially introducing high-permeability pathways in gas hydrate zones if injection of CO{sub 2} in either gas, liquid, or micro-emulsion form is to be more effective in enhancing gas hydrate production rates.

  19. Rapid gas hydrate formation processes: Will they work?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Bernardo, Mark P.

    2010-06-07

    Researchers at DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETL’s 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. The results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuousmore » formation of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve.« less

  20. Competitive Oxidation and Hydration During Aqueous Alteration of Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolotov, M. Y.; Mironenko, M. V.; Shock, E. L.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Studies of chondrites show that incorporation of H2O ice during formation of asteroids followed by radioactive heating caused partial oxidation and hydration of primary reduced and anhydrous rocks. Oxidation of kamacite, phosphides, troilite and organic polymers occurred through consumption of water s oxygen and release of H2. Hydration caused formation of serpentine, saponite, chlorite, talc and hydrated salts. Since H2O was the major reactant in oxidation and hydration, these processes could have been competitive. Redox reactions in asteroids should have been closely connected to hydration (dehydration) during aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism. For example, dehydration and reduction release H2O that can be consumed in oxidation and hydration, respectively. We model asteroidal processes in order to quantify the fate of H2O and water s oxygen in major redox and hydration/dehydration reactions. Model: Equilibrium compositions in the gas-solid-liquid

  1. Seismic reflections identify finite differences in gas hydrate resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, W.; Max, M.

    1999-01-01

    What processes control methane hydrate concentrations? Gas hydrate occurs naturally at the pressure/ temperature/chemical conditions that are present within ocean floor sediments at water depths greater than about 500 meters. The gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) extends from the sea bottom downward to a depth where the natural increase in temperature causes the hydrate to melt (dissociate), even though the downward pressure increase is working to increase gas hydrate stability. Thus, the base of the GHSZ tends to parallel the seafloor at any given water depth (pressure), because the sub-seafloor isotherms (depths of constant temperature) generally parallel the seafloor. The layer at which gas hydrate is stable commonly extends from the sea floor to several hundred meters below it. The gas in most gas hydrates is methane, generated by bacteria in the sediments. In some cases, it can be higher carbon-number, thermogenic hydrocarbon gases that rise from greater depths.

  2. Rapid gas hydrate formation processes: Will they work?

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Bernardo, Mark P.

    2010-06-07

    Researchers at DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETL’s 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. The results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuous formation of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve.

  3. Resistance of class C fly ash belite cement to simulated sodium sulphate radioactive liquid waste attack.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, A; Goñi, S; Allegro, V R

    2009-01-30

    The resistance of class C fly ash belite cement (FABC-2-W) to concentrated sodium sulphate salts associated with low level wastes (LLW) and medium level wastes (MLW) is discussed. This study was carried out according to the Koch and Steinegger methodology by testing the flexural strength of mortars immersed in simulated radioactive liquid waste rich in sulphate (48,000 ppm) and demineralised water (used as a reference), at 20 degrees C and 40 degrees C over a period of 180 days. The reaction mechanisms of sulphate ion with the mortar was carried out through a microstructure study, which included the use of Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), porosity and pore-size distribution and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the FABC mortar was stable against simulated sulphate radioactive liquid waste (SSRLW) attack at the two chosen temperatures. The enhancement of mechanical properties was a result of the formation of non-expansive ettringite inside the pores and an alkaline activation of the hydraulic activity of cement promoted by the ingress of sulphate. Accordingly, the microstructure was strongly refined. PMID:18524482

  4. A new sulphate metabolite as a long-term marker of metandienone misuse.

    PubMed

    Gómez, C; Pozo, O J; Garrostas, L; Segura, J; Ventura, R

    2013-12-11

    Metandienone is one of the most frequently detected anabolic androgenic steroids in sports drug testing. Metandienone misuse is commonly detected by monitoring different metabolites excreted free or conjugated with glucuronic acid using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) after hydrolysis with β-glucuronidase and liquid-liquid extraction. It is known that several metabolites are the result of the formation of sulphate conjugates in C17, which are converted to their 17-epimers in urine. Therefore, sulphation is an important phase II metabolic pathway of metandienone that has not been comprehensively studied. The aim of this work was to evaluate the sulphate fraction of metandienone metabolism by LC-MS/MS. Seven sulphate metabolites were detected after the analysis of excretion study samples by applying different neutral loss scan, precursor ion scan and SRM methods. One of the metabolites (M1) was identified and characterised by GC-MS/MS and LC-MS/MS as 18-nor-17β-hydroxymethyl-17α-methylandrost-1,4,13-triene-3-one sulphate. M1 could be detected up to 26 days after the administration of a single dose of metandienone (5 mg), thus improving the period in which the misuse can be reported with respect to the last long-term metandienone metabolite described (18-nor-17β-hydroxymethyl-17α-methylandrost-1,4,13-triene-3-one excreted in the glucuronide fraction). PMID:24055830

  5. Oligosaccharide mapping of heparan sulphate by polyacrylamide-gradient-gel electrophoresis and electrotransfer to nylon membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, J E; Gallagher, J T

    1988-01-01

    A new method that we have called 'oligosaccharide mapping' is described for the analysis of radiolabelled heparan sulphate and other glycosaminoglycans. The method involves specific enzymic or chemical scission of polysaccharide chains followed by high-resolution separation of the degradation products by polyacrylamide-gradient-gel electrophoresis. The separated oligosaccharides are immobilized on charged nylon membranes by electrotransfer and detected by fluorography. A complex pattern of discrete bands is observed covering an oligosaccharide size range from degree of polymerization (d.p.) 2 (disaccharide) to approximately d.p. 40. Separation is due principally to differences in Mr, though the method also seems to detect variations in conformation of oligosaccharide isomers. Resolution of oligosaccharides is superior to that obtained with isocratic polyacrylamide-gel-electrophoresis systems or gel chromatography, and reveals structural details that are not accessible by other methods. For example, in this paper we demonstrate a distinctive repeating doublet pattern of iduronate-rich oligosaccharides in heparitinase digests of mouse fibroblast heparan sulphate. This pattern may be a general feature of mammalian heparan sulphates. Oligosaccharide mapping should be a valuable method for the analysis of fine structure and sequence of heparan sulphate and other complex polysaccharides, and for making rapid assessments of the molecular distinctions between heparan sulphates from different sources. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2969727

  6. Vibrational spectroscopic characterization of the sulphate-halide mineral sulphohalite - Implications for evaporites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Scholz, Ricardo; López, Andrés; Theiss, Frederick L.

    2014-12-01

    The mineral sulphohalite - Na6(SO4)2FCl is a rare sodium halogen sulphate and occurs associated with evaporitic deposits. Sulphohalite formation is important in saline evaporites and in pipe scales. Sulphohalite is an anhydrous sulphate-halide with an apparent variable anion ratio of formula Na6(SO4)2FCl. Such a formula with oxyanions lends itself to vibrational spectroscopy. The Raman band at 1003 cm-1 is assigned to the (SO4)2- ν1 symmetric stretching mode. Shoulders to this band are found at 997 and 1010 cm-1. The low intensity Raman bands at 1128, 1120 and even 1132 cm-1 are attributed to the (SO4)2- ν3 antisymmetric stretching vibrations. Two symmetric sulphate stretching modes are observed indicating at least at the molecular level the non-equivalence of the sulphate ions in the sulphohalite structure. The Raman bands at 635 and 624 cm-1 are assigned to the ν4 SO42- bending modes. The ν2 (SO4)2- bending modes are observed at 460 and 494 cm-1. The observation of multiple bands supports the concept of a reduction in symmetry of the sulphate anion from Td to C3v or even C2v. No evidence of bands attributable to the halide ions was found.

  7. Vibrational spectroscopic characterization of the sulphate-halide mineral sulphohalite - implications for evaporites.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Scholz, Ricardo; López, Andrés; Theiss, Frederick L

    2014-12-10

    The mineral sulphohalite - Na6(SO4)2FCl is a rare sodium halogen sulphate and occurs associated with evaporitic deposits. Sulphohalite formation is important in saline evaporites and in pipe scales. Sulphohalite is an anhydrous sulphate-halide with an apparent variable anion ratio of formula Na6(SO4)2FCl. Such a formula with oxyanions lends itself to vibrational spectroscopy. The Raman band at 1003cm(-1) is assigned to the (SO4)(2-) ν1 symmetric stretching mode. Shoulders to this band are found at 997 and 1010cm(-1). The low intensity Raman bands at 1128, 1120 and even 1132cm(-1) are attributed to the (SO4)(2-) ν3 antisymmetric stretching vibrations. Two symmetric sulphate stretching modes are observed indicating at least at the molecular level the non-equivalence of the sulphate ions in the sulphohalite structure. The Raman bands at 635 and 624cm(-1) are assigned to the ν4 SO4(2-) bending modes. The ν2 (SO4)(2-) bending modes are observed at 460 and 494cm(-1). The observation of multiple bands supports the concept of a reduction in symmetry of the sulphate anion from Td to C3v or even C2v. No evidence of bands attributable to the halide ions was found. PMID:25000566

  8. Evidence for the presence of a large keratan sulphate proteoglycan in the human uterine cervix.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, D C; Henning, A; Winkler, M; Rath, W; Haubeck, H D; Greiling, H

    1996-01-01

    Profound changes occur in the uterine cervix during pregnancy. In particular, the extracellular matrix of the connective tissue is remodelled extensively. To elucidate the mechanisms involved in this process, we have analysed the proteoglycan pattern in the human cervix from pregnant and non-pregnant women. Proteoglycans of the cervix tissue specimen were extracted with 4 M guanidine hydrochloride and precipitated with 80% ethanol. Purification of proteoglycans was performed by several chromatographic steps. Characterization of proteoglycans was done by SDS/PAGE before and after digestion with glycosaminoglycan-specific enzymes. Proteoglycans were detected by combined Alcian Blue/silver staining or, after blotting of biotin-labelled proteoglycans on to poly(vinylidene difluoride) membrane, with peroxidase-conjugated avidin or by the use of keratan sulphate- or decorin-specific monoclonal antibodies. In contrast with previous reports, where only chondroitin/dermatan sulphate proteoglycans have been found in the uterine cervix, we have shown in the present study the existence of a large keratan sulphate proteoglycan with an M(r) > 220,000 in cervix samples from non-pregnant and pregnant women. This proteoglycan showed a strong reaction with the keratan sulphate-specific monoclonal antibody 5D4 and could be degraded by keratanases. The size of the core protein of this keratan sulphate proteoglycan was estimated to be about M(r) 220,000. PMID:8973545

  9. Evidence for the presence of a large keratan sulphate proteoglycan in the human uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Fischer, D C; Henning, A; Winkler, M; Rath, W; Haubeck, H D; Greiling, H

    1996-12-01

    Profound changes occur in the uterine cervix during pregnancy. In particular, the extracellular matrix of the connective tissue is remodelled extensively. To elucidate the mechanisms involved in this process, we have analysed the proteoglycan pattern in the human cervix from pregnant and non-pregnant women. Proteoglycans of the cervix tissue specimen were extracted with 4 M guanidine hydrochloride and precipitated with 80% ethanol. Purification of proteoglycans was performed by several chromatographic steps. Characterization of proteoglycans was done by SDS/PAGE before and after digestion with glycosaminoglycan-specific enzymes. Proteoglycans were detected by combined Alcian Blue/silver staining or, after blotting of biotin-labelled proteoglycans on to poly(vinylidene difluoride) membrane, with peroxidase-conjugated avidin or by the use of keratan sulphate- or decorin-specific monoclonal antibodies. In contrast with previous reports, where only chondroitin/dermatan sulphate proteoglycans have been found in the uterine cervix, we have shown in the present study the existence of a large keratan sulphate proteoglycan with an M(r) > 220,000 in cervix samples from non-pregnant and pregnant women. This proteoglycan showed a strong reaction with the keratan sulphate-specific monoclonal antibody 5D4 and could be degraded by keratanases. The size of the core protein of this keratan sulphate proteoglycan was estimated to be about M(r) 220,000. PMID:8973545

  10. Methane production and simultaneous sulphate reduction in anoxic, salt marsh sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Marsh, L.M.; Polcin, S.

    1982-01-01

    It has been generally believed that sulphate reduction precludes methane generation during diagenesis of anoxic sediments1,2. Because most biogenic methane formed in nature is thought to derive either from acetate cleavage or by hydrogen reduction of carbon dioxide3-6, the removal of these compounds by the energetically more efficient sulphate-reducing bacteria can impose a substrate limitation on methanogenic bacteria 7-9. However, two known species of methanogens, Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanococcus mazei, can grow on and produce methane from methanol and methylated amines10-13. In addition, these compounds stimulate methane production by bacterial enrichments from the rumen11,14 and aquatic muds13,14. Methanol can enter anaerobic food webs through bacterial degradation of lignins15 or pectin16, and methylated amines can be produced either from decomposition of substances like choline, creatine and betaine13,14 or by bacterial reduction of trimethylamine oxide17, a common metabolite and excretory product of marine animals. However, the relative importance of methanol and methylated amines as precursors of methane in sediments has not been previously examined. We now report that methanol and trimethylamine are important substrates for methanogenic bacteria in salt marsh sediments and that these compounds may account for the bulk of methane produced therein. Furthermore, because these compounds do not stimulate sulphate reduction, methanogenesis and sulphate reduction can operate concurrently in sulphate-containing anoxic sediments. ?? 1982 Nature Publishing Group.

  11. Removal of Heavy Metals from Industrial Wastewaters Using Local Alum and Other Conventional Coagulants-A Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunfowokan, A. O.; Durosinmi, L. M.; Oyekunle, J. A. O.; Ogunkunle, O. A.; Igbafe, I. T.

    The present study aimed at effective management and purification of industrial wastewaters using cheaper and locally available local alum for removal of heavy metals as a substitute to convectional coagulants. The effect of local alum, aluminum sulphate and ferric chloride on the metal contents of industrial wastewaters was investigated in the pH range of 5.9-7.5. Wastewater samples from battery, paint and textile industries were treated with different doses of locally available alum, aluminum sulphate and ferric chloride in order to determine and compare their effectiveness in removing heavy metal contents of the wastewaters. The percentage removal of the metals from the industrial wastewaters increased with mg L-l dosage of the coagulants used with optimal performance generally at a slightly alkaline pH. Local alum proved to be equally effective in removing heavy metals from the industrial wastewater samples compared with the conventional aluminum sulphate and ferric chloride.

  12. Pharmacological Role of Anions (Sulphate, Nitrate, Oxalate and Acetate) on the Antibacterial Activity of Cobalt(II), Copper(II) and Nickel(II) Complexes With Nicotinoylhydrazine-Derived ONO, NNO and SNO Ligands.

    PubMed

    Chohan, Z H; Rauf, A

    1996-01-01

    Mixed ligands biologically active complexes of cobalt(II), copper(II) and nickel(II) with nicotinoylhydrazine-derived ONO, NNO and SNO donor schiff-base ligands having the same metal ion but different anions such as sulphate, nitrate, oxalate and acetate have been synthesised and characterised on the basis of their physical, analytical and spectral data. In order to evaluate the role of anions on their bioability, these ligands and their synthesised metal complexes with various anions have been screened against bacterial species such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus and the title studies have proved a definative role of anions in increasing the biological activity. PMID:18472896

  13. Pharmacological Role of Anions (Sulphate, Nitrate, Oxalate and Acetate) on the Antibacterial Activity of Cobalt(II), Copper(II) and Nickel(II) Complexes With Nicotinoylhydrazine-Derived ONO, NNO and SNO Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Rauf, Abdur

    1996-01-01

    Mixed ligands biologically active complexes of cobalt(II), copper(II) and nickel(II) with nicotinoylhydrazine-derived ONO, NNO and SNO donor schiff-base ligands having the same metal ion but different anions such as sulphate, nitrate, oxalate and acetate have been synthesised and characterised on the basis of their physical, analytical and spectral data. In order to evaluate the role of anions on their bioability, these ligands and their synthesised metal complexes with various anions have been screened against bacterial species such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus and the title studies have proved a definative role of anions in increasing the biological activity PMID:18472896

  14. Leaching of chloride, sulphate, heavy metals, dissolved organic carbon and phenolic organic pesticides from contaminated concrete.

    PubMed

    Van Praagh, M; Modin, H

    2016-10-01

    Concrete samples from demolition waste of a former pesticide plant in Sweden were analysed for total contents and leachate concentrations of potentially hazardous inorganic substances, TOC, phenols, as well as for pesticide compounds such as phenoxy acids, chlorophenols and chlorocresols. Leachates were produced by means of modified standard column leaching tests and pH-stat batch tests. Due to elevated contents of chromium and lead, as well as due to high chloride concentrations in the first leachate from column tests at L/S 0.1, recycling of the concrete as a construction material in groundworks is likely to be restricted according to Swedish guidelines. The studied pesticide compounds appear to be relatively mobile at the materials own pH>12, 12, 9 and 7. Potential leaching of pesticide residues from recycled concrete to ground water and surface water might exceed water quality guidelines for the remediation site and the EU Water Framework Directive. Results of this study stress the necessity to systematically study the mechanism behind mobility of organic contaminants from alkaline construction and demolition wastes rather than rely on total content limit values. PMID:27449537

  15. The effect of sulfate activation on the early age hydration of BFS:PC composite cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, N. C.; Li, X.; Bai, Y.; Milestone, N. B.

    2015-09-01

    Blast furnace slag/Portland cement composites are routinely used for immobilising intermediate level nuclear wastes in the UK. Using high cement replacement levels reduces hydration exotherm and lowers pH. Although a lower grout pH will be beneficial in reducing the corrosion of certain encapsulated reactive metals such as aluminium, the degree of slag reaction will also be lower which may result in the formation of less hydration products and which in turn may reduce the capacity to immobilise waste ions. Adding neutral salts such as calcium and sodium sulfate to the composite cement can potentially increase slag activation without significantly altering the pH of the cement matrix. Thus the corrosion of any encapsulated metals would not be affected. This paper describes some of the properties of a hydrated 9:1 blast furnace slag:Portland cement matrix containing added sulfates of calcium and sodium. The findings show that all additives caused an increase in the amount of slag that reacted when cured for up to 28 days. This produced more material able to chemically bind waste ions. Activation with gypsum produced the highest rate of slag reaction.

  16. Stabilization/solidification on chromium (III) wastes by C(3)A and C(3)A hydrated matrix.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangguo; He, Chao; Bai, Yun; Ma, Baoguo; Wang, Guandong; Tan, Hongbo

    2014-03-15

    Hazardous wastes are usually used in the Portland cement production in order to save energy, costs and/or stabilize toxic substances and heavy metals inside the clinker. This work focus on the stabilization/solidification on chromium (III) wastes by C(3)A and C(3)A hydrated matrix. The immobilization rate of chromium in C(3)A and the leaching characteristics of the C(3)A hydrated matrixes containing chromium were investigated by ICP-AES. The results indicated that C(3)A had a good solidifying effect on chromium using the clinkering process, however, the Cr leaching content of Cr-doped C(3)A was higher than that of hydrated C(3)A matrix in Cr(NO(3))3 solution and was lower than that of the hydrated C(3)A matrix in K(2)CrO(4) solution, no matter the leachant was sulphuric acid & nitric acid or water. To explain this, C(3)A formation, chemical valence states of chromium in C(3)A, hydration products and Cr distribution in the C(3)A-gypsum hydrated matrixes were studied by XRD, XPS and FESEM-EDS. The investigation showed that part of Cr(3+) was oxidized to Cr(6+) in the clinkering process and identified as the chromium compounds Ca(4)Al(6)O(12)CrO(4) (3CaO·Al(20O(3)·CaCrO(4)), which resulted in the higher leaching of hydrated matrix of Cr-doped C(3)A. PMID:24468527

  17. Physicochemical characteristics and bioactivities of the exopolysaccharide and its sulphated polymer from Streptococcus thermophilus GST-6.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Cao, Yongqiang; Wang, Ji; Guo, Xialei; Zheng, Yi; Zhao, Wen; Mei, Xueyang; Guo, Ting; Yang, Zhennai

    2016-08-01

    Exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by Streptococcus thermophilus GST-6 in skim milk was extracted and purified. The EPS was composed of glucose and galactose in a molar ratio of 1.80:1.03 with identical primary structure to the EPS from S. thermophilus ST1 reported previously. The purified EPS was sulphated at a sulphonation degree of 0.26±0.03, and presence of sulphate groups in the sulphated EPS (SEPS) was confirmed. Microstructural studies demonstrated a porous web with coarse surface for the EPS while the SEPS appeared as stacked flakes with relatively uniform shapes. Sulphonation of the EPS slightly decreased its degrading temperature from 234.6°C to 232.5°C. The DPPH, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals scavenging activities of the EPS were significantly (P<0.05) improved after sulphonation. The SEPS also showed stronger inhibitory activity than the EPS against Eschericia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:27112886

  18. Changes in the Small Intestine of a Cat Associated with Barium Sulphate Following Contrast Radiography.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, H; Oishi, M; Ohno, K; Tsuboi, M; Irie, N; Uchida, K; Tsujimoto, H

    2016-01-01

    A 7-year-old neutered male domestic short-haired cat that had undergone contrast radiography of the bowel with barium sulphate after acute episodes of vomiting 2 months previously, was presented with chronic vomiting, anorexia and weight loss. Abdominal radiography and ultrasonography revealed residual contrast enhancement and an obstruction of the small intestine. A contracted and stenosed ileum and distal jejunum were identified by exploratory laparotomy and surgically resected; subsequently, the clinical signs resolved. Histopathological examination of the ileum revealed mucosal ulceration with severe submucosal granulation tissue formation associated with scattered foreign crystalline material. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that the crystals contained barium sulphate. This is the first report in animals of the rare complication of barium sulphate incorporation into the gastrointestinal mucosa after contrast radiography. PMID:26997652

  19. Influence of sulphate, chloride, and thiocyanate salts on formation of β-lactoglobulin-pectin microgels.

    PubMed

    Hirt, Stacey; Jones, Owen G; Adijanto, Marilyn; Gilbert, Jay

    2014-12-01

    Effects of sulphate, chloride, and thiocyanate salts on the heat-induced formation of protein-based microgels from β-lactoglobulin-pectin complexes were determined as a function of pH and protein-to-polysaccharide ratio. Aggregation temperatures were initially decreased at low ionic strength due to shielding of electrostatic interactions between β-lactoglobulin and pectin but increased with further increases in ionic strength. Turbidity of heated mixtures and associated sizes of formed microgels were increased with up to 75 mmol kg(-1) ionic strength. Aggregation and microgel formation were relatively increased in the presence of thiocyanate salts compared to chloride salts and relatively decreased in the presence of sulphate salts, indicating that the inverse Hofmeister series was relevant in this system. Topographical analysis of dried microgels by atomic force microscopy verified that microgels were smallest in the presence of sulphate salts and showed that added ions, particularly thiocyanate, increased the deformability of microgels during drying. PMID:24996306

  20. Synthesis and characterization of new electroactive polypyrrole-chondroitin sulphate A substrates.

    PubMed

    Serra Moreno, J; Panero, S; Artico, M; Filippini, P

    2008-02-01

    Novel composite polypyrrole/chondroitin-4-sulphate films with cation-exchange properties were synthesized by the electrochemical polymerization of pyrrole in the presence of chondroitin-4-sulphate (CSA) sodium salt, acting as dopant anion at neutral pH. The negatively charged biomolecule was found to be permanently entrapped in the polypyrrole (PPy) membrane which resulted, as expected, facilitated in the mass transport by mobile cationic counterions. The porous nature of the substrates was identified as the most influential factor controlling the morphology. The morphology, in turn, affects the interaction between the material surface and the tissues on a cellular level. In this work in vitro analyses of human fibroblast response to polypyrrole/chondroitin-4-sulphate films were performed to focus on the different steps of cell reactions towards defined surface properties. PMID:18155969