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Sample records for metal-dielectric-semiconductor germanium nanowires

  1. Surface Passivation of Germanium Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikari, Hemant; Sun, Shiyu; Pianetta, Piero; Chidsey, Chirstopher E.D.; McIntyre, Paul C.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-05-13

    The surface of single crystal, cold-wall CVD-grown germanium nanowires was studied by synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (SR-PES) and also by conventional XPS. The as-grown germanium nanowires seem to be hydrogen terminated. Exposure to laboratory atmosphere leads to germanium oxide growth with oxidation states of Ge{sup 1+}, Ge{sup 2+}, Ge{sup 3+}, while exposure to UV light leads to a predominance of the Ge{sup 4+} oxidation state. Most of the surface oxide could be removed readily by aqueous HF treatment which putatively leaves the nanowire surface hydrogen terminated with limited stability in air. Alternatively, chlorine termination could be achieved by aq. HCl treatment of the native oxide-coated nanowires. Chlorine termination was found to be relatively more stable than the HF-last hydrogen termination.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of germanium nanowires and germanium/silicon radially heterostructured nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldthorpe, Irene Anne

    Semiconductor nanowires offer new opportunities to study physical phenomena in low-dimensional nanostructures. They also possess technologically useful properties for applications in electronics, optics, sensing, and thermoelectrics. Germanium nanowires are of particular interest, because of germanium's compatibility with standard silicon integrated circuit fabrication processes, its high electronic carrier mobilities, and the low temperature required for germanium nanowire growth. In this work, epitaxially-aligned germanium nanowires are grown on silicon substrates by chemical vapor deposition through the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. Uniform nanowire diameters between 5 and 50 nm are obtained through the use of monodisperse gold colloids as catalysts. The crystallographic orientation of the nanowires, their strain, and their heteroepitaxial relationship with the substrate are characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). A process for removing the gold catalysts from the tips of the germanium nanowires is demonstrated. Silicon shells are then heteroepitaxially deposited around the wires to fabricate radial heterostructures. These shells passivate the germanium nanowire surface, create electronic band offsets to confine holes away the surface where they can scatter or recombine, and induce strain which could allow for the engineering of properties such as band gap and carrier mobilities. However, analogous to planar heteroepitaxy, surface roughening and misfit dislocations can relax this strain. The effects of coaxial dimensions on strain relaxation in these structures are analyzed quantitatively by TEM and synchrotron XRD, and these results are related to continuum elasticity models. Lessons learned generated two successful strategies for synthesizing coherent core-shell nanowires with large misfit strain: chlorine surface passivation and growth of nanowires with low-energy sidewall facets. Both approaches avoid the strain

  3. Synthesis of silicon and germanium nanowires.

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, Teresa J.; Hsu, Julia W. P.

    2007-11-01

    The vapor-liquid-solid growth process for synthesis of group-IV semiconducting nanowires using silane, germane, disilane and digermane precursor gases has been investigated. The nanowire growth process combines in situ gold seed formation by vapor deposition on atomically clean silicon (111) surfaces, in situ growth from the gaseous precursor(s), and real-time monitoring of nanowire growth as a function of temperature and pressure by a novel optical reflectometry technique. A significant dependence on precursor pressure and growth temperature for the synthesis of silicon and germanium nanowires is observed, depending on the stability of the specific precursor used. Also, the presence of a nucleation time for the onset of nanowire growth has been found using our new in situ optical reflectometry technique.

  4. Synthesis and thermoluminescence of boron-doped germanium nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedifar, M.; Hosseinmardi, F.; Eshraghi, L.; Ganjipour, B.

    2011-03-01

    Boron doped germanium nanowires were synthesized using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with Au nanoparticles as nucleating centers, germanium tetrachloride as the source of germanium and B 2H 6 gas as source of boron impurity. Au nanoparticles were deposited on Si using 3-aminopropyltriethylsilane (APTES). The single crystal Ge nanowires with diameters ranging from 19 to 200 nm were grown in a controllable manner. Effects of Au nanoparticle size, argon gas flow, temperature and duration of growth on diameter and length of nanowires were investigated. This is the first report on thermoluminescence (TL) properties of boron doped germanium nanowires. Glow curves were fitted using computerized glow curve deconvolution program and seven overlapped peaks were obtained. Further the response of synthesized nanowires to different dose levels of UV was studied and linear response regime was determined.

  5. Promoting Cell Proliferation Using Water Dispersible Germanium Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Bezuidenhout, Michael; Liu, Pai; Singh, Shalini; Kiely, Maeve

    2014-01-01

    Group IV Nanowires have strong potential for several biomedical applications. However, to date their use remains limited because many are synthesised using heavy metal seeds and functionalised using organic ligands to make the materials water dispersible. This can result in unpredicted toxic side effects for mammalian cells cultured on the wires. Here, we describe an approach to make seedless and ligand free Germanium nanowires water dispersible using glutamic acid, a natural occurring amino acid that alleviates the environmental and health hazards associated with traditional functionalisation materials. We analysed the treated material extensively using Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), High resolution-TEM, and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Using a series of state of the art biochemical and morphological assays, together with a series of complimentary and synergistic cellular and molecular approaches, we show that the water dispersible germanium nanowires are non-toxic and are biocompatible. We monitored the behaviour of the cells growing on the treated germanium nanowires using a real time impedance based platform (xCELLigence) which revealed that the treated germanium nanowires promote cell adhesion and cell proliferation which we believe is as a result of the presence of an etched surface giving rise to a collagen like structure and an oxide layer. Furthermore this study is the first to evaluate the associated effect of Germanium nanowires on mammalian cells. Our studies highlight the potential use of water dispersible Germanium Nanowires in biological platforms that encourage anchorage-dependent cell growth. PMID:25237816

  6. Doping of germanium nanowires grown in presence of PH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutuc, E.; Chu, J. O.; Ott, J. A.; Guha, S.

    2006-12-01

    The authors study the Au-catalyzed chemical vapor growth of germanium (Ge) nanowires in the presence of phosphine (PH3), used as a dopant precursor. The device characteristics of the ensuing nanowire field effect transistors (FETs) indicate n-type, highly doped nanowires. Using a combination of different nanowire growth sequences and their FET characteristics, the authors determine that phosphorus incorporates predominately via the conformal growth, which accompanies the acicular, nanowire growth. As such, the Ge nanowires grown in the presence of PH3 contain a phosphorus doped shell and an undoped core. The authors determine the doping level in the shell to be ≃(1-4)×1019cm-3.

  7. Synthesis of silicon and germanium nanowires and silicon/germanium nanowire heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Teresa J.

    2007-12-01

    The vapor-liquid-solid growth process for synthesis of group-IV semiconducting nanowires using silane, germane, disilane and digermane precursor gases has been investigated. The nanowire growth process combines in situ gold seed formation by vapor deposition on atomically clean silicon (111) surfaces, in situ growth from the gaseous precursor(s), and real-time monitoring of nanowire growth as a function of temperature and pressure by a novel optical reflectometry technique. A significant dependence on precursor pressure and growth temperature for the synthesis of silicon and germanium nanowires is observed, depending on the stability of the specific precursor used. Also, the presence of a nucleation time for the onset of nanowire growth has been found using our new in situ optical reflectometry technique. Thermal annealing of the deposited gold seeds prior to nanowire growth is shown to lead to ripening of the gold seeds and the formation of pillars several nanometers in height under the seeds. These pillars are demonstrated to result from the catalytic collection of surface Si adatoms and provide a method to obtain 100% vertical growth of nanowires on Si (111) substrates. The growth of nanowire heterostructures has also been investigated with specific attention paid to the strain induced within these structures. Strain in axial and core-shell Si/Ge nanowire heterostructures provides a unique opportunity for modifying bandstructures of specific nanoscale heterostructures. Specific precursor selection adds an additional control by which we are able to grow specific heterostructures---axial or core-shell. Axial heterowires form more easily by catalyzing silane at the Au eutectic seed, while core-shell heterowires grow more easily by stabilizing lateral growth using disilane or digermane. Strain mapping of nanowires based on geometric phase analysis of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy lattice imaging reveals large strains present in core-shell Si

  8. Electric current induced modification of germanium nanowire NEM switch contact.

    PubMed

    Meija, R; Kosmaca, J; Jasulaneca, L; Petersons, K; Biswas, S; Holmes, J D; Erts, D

    2015-05-15

    We present an investigation of contact properties of a germanium (Ge) nanowire based nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switch in its ON state. The contact stiffness in the ON state was evaluated by detecting the nanowire's resonance frequency. It was found that the resonance frequency increases when electric current flows through the nanowire/counter electrode contact area. The reason for modification in the contact area is referred to as electric-current-induced processes in the native oxide layer covering the nanowires. The presented resonance shift method is a simple way to indicate strengthening of the nanowire/counter electrode contact area without disassembling the contact. PMID:25902759

  9. Electric current induced modification of germanium nanowire NEM switch contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meija, R.; Kosmaca, J.; Jasulaneca, L.; Petersons, K.; Biswas, S.; Holmes, J. D.; Erts, D.

    2015-05-01

    We present an investigation of contact properties of a germanium (Ge) nanowire based nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switch in its ON state. The contact stiffness in the ON state was evaluated by detecting the nanowire’s resonance frequency. It was found that the resonance frequency increases when electric current flows through the nanowire/counter electrode contact area. The reason for modification in the contact area is referred to as electric-current-induced processes in the native oxide layer covering the nanowires. The presented resonance shift method is a simple way to indicate strengthening of the nanowire/counter electrode contact area without disassembling the contact.

  10. Germanium nanowire growth controlled by surface diffusion effects

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidtbauer, Jan; Bansen, Roman; Heimburger, Robert; Teubner, Thomas; Boeck, Torsten; Fornari, Roberto

    2012-07-23

    Germanium nanowires (NWs) were grown onto Ge(111) substrates by the vapor-liquid-solid process using gold droplets. The growth was carried out in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber at substrate temperatures between 370 Degree-Sign C and 510 Degree-Sign C. The resulting nanowire growth rate turns out to be highly dependent on the substrate temperature exhibiting the maximum at T = 430 Degree-Sign C. The temperature dependence of growth rate can be attributed to surface diffusion both along the substrate and nanowire sidewalls. Analyzing the diffusive material transport yields a diffusion length of 126 nm at a substrate temperature of 430 Degree-Sign C.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of silicon and germanium nanowires, silica nanotubes, and germanium telluride/tellurium nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuan, Hsing-Yu

    A supercritical fluid-liquid solid (SFLS) nanowire growth process using alkanethiol-coated Au nanoparticles to seed silicon nanowires was developed for synthesizing silicon nanowires in solution. The organic solvent was found to significantly influence the silicon precursor decomposition in solution. 46.8 mg of silicon nanowires with 63% yield of silicon nanowire synthesis were achieved while using benzene as a solvent. The most widely used metal for seeding Si and Ge nanowires is Au. However, Au forms deep trap in both Si and Ge and alternative metal seeds are more desirable for electronic applications. Different metal nanocrystals were studied for Si and Ge nanowire synthesis, including Co, Ni, CuS, Mn, Ir, MnPt 3, Fe2O3, and FePt. All eight metals have eutectic temperatures with Si and Ge that are well above the nanowire growth temperature. Unlike Au nanocrystals, which seed nanowire growth through the formation of a liquid Au:Si (Au:Ge) alloy, these other metals seed nanowires by forming solid silicide alloys, a process we have called "supercritical fluid-solid-solid" (SFSS) growth. Moreover, Co and Ni nanoparticles were found to catalyze the decomposition of various silane reactants that do not work well to make Si nanowires using Au seeds. In addition to seeding solid nanowires, CuS nanoparticles were found to seed silica nanotubes via a SFSS like mechanism. 5% of synthesized silica nanotubes were coiled. Heterostructured nanomaterials are interesting since they merge the properties of the individual materials and can be used in diverse applications. GeTe/Te heterostructures were synthesized by reacting diphenylgermane (DPG) and TOP-Te in the presence of organic surfactants. Aligned Te nanorods were grown on the surface facets of micrometer-size germanium telluride particles.

  12. Spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy on indium-catalyzed core-shell germanium nanowires: size effects.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Y; Zardo, I; Cao, L Y; Garma, T; Heiss, M; Morante, J R; Arbiol, J; Brongersma, M L; Fontcuberta I Morral, A

    2010-03-12

    The structure of indium-catalyzed germanium nanowires is investigated by atomic force microscopy, scanning confocal Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The nanowires are formed by a crystalline core and an amorphous shell. We find that the diameter of the crystalline core varies along the nanowire, down to few nanometers. Phonon confinement effects are observed in the regions where the crystalline region is the thinnest. The results are consistent with the thermally insulating behavior of the core-shell nanowires. PMID:20154375

  13. Direct Bandgap Light Emission from Strained Germanium Nanowires Coupled with High-Q Nanophotonic Cavities.

    PubMed

    Petykiewicz, Jan; Nam, Donguk; Sukhdeo, David S; Gupta, Shashank; Buckley, Sonia; Piggott, Alexander Y; Vučković, Jelena; Saraswat, Krishna C

    2016-04-13

    A silicon-compatible light source is the final missing piece for completing high-speed, low-power on-chip optical interconnects. In this paper, we present a germanium nanowire light emitter that encompasses all the aspects of potential low-threshold lasers: highly strained germanium gain medium, strain-induced pseudoheterostructure, and high-Q nanophotonic cavity. Our nanowire structure presents greatly enhanced photoluminescence into cavity modes with measured quality factors of up to 2000. By varying the dimensions of the germanium nanowire, we tune the emission wavelength over more than 400 nm with a single lithography step. We find reduced optical loss in optical cavities formed with germanium under high (>2.3%) tensile strain. Our compact, high-strain cavities open up new possibilities for low-threshold germanium-based lasers for on-chip optical interconnects. PMID:26907359

  14. Growth of epitaxial silicon and germanium nanowires using the gold catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailey, Eric J.

    The growth of silicon and germanium nanowires and their nanowire heterostructures has been investigated using the gold catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. The Au catalyst particles were deposited under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions onto vicinal Si(111) surfaces using physical vapor deposition. Nanowires were grown in a home built UHV-chemical vapor deposition (CVD) chamber using silane, disilane, germane, and digermane as gas precursors. Silicon nanowire morphology was determined to be dependent on the stability of the gold catalyst particle at the tip of the nanowire. Specifically, silicon nanowires grow along <111> orientations when gold wets the nanowire sidewalls and along <112> orientations when gold does not wet the nanowire sidewalls except under a very narrow pressure range. The dependence of gold coverage on CVD parameters on the sidewalls of <111> and <112> silicon nanowires was also determined revealing a liquid metal wetting of cylinders phenomenon. A new "seedless" VLS mechanism for nanowire growth was also determined in which the Stranski-Krastanov planar gold layer on Si(111) dewets under certain CVD conditions resulting in 15 nm diameter gold seeds that then form nanowires via the VLS mechanism. Both core/shell and axial nanowire heterostructures were also investigated with a focus on the effect of nanowire orientation on heterostructure formation. For core/shell heterostructures, only the <110> germanium core/silicon shell heterostructures were determined to form with smooth shell deposition while all other orientations underwent shell roughening. Various germanium core diameters and silicon shell thicknesses for <110> germanium core/silicon shell heterostructures were analyzed to determine the effect of nanowire diameter on shell coherency limits and to determine the strain within the nanowire heterostructures. Lastly, axial nanowire heterostructures were investigated to determine the ability to form axial heterostructures using

  15. Young’s modulus of [111] germanium nanowires

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maksud, M.; Yoo, J.; Harris, C. T.; Palapati, N. K. R.; Subramanian, A.

    2015-11-02

    Our paper reports a diameter-independent Young’s modulus of 91.9 ± 8.2 GPa for [111] Germanium nanowires (Ge NWs). When the surface oxide layer is accounted for using a core-shell NW approximation, the YM of the Ge core approaches a near theoretical value of 147.6 ± 23.4 GPa. The ultimate strength of a NW device was measured at 10.9 GPa, which represents a very high experimental-to-theoretical strength ratio of ~75%. Furthermore, with increasing interest in this material system as a high-capacity lithium-ion battery anode, the presented data provide inputs that are essential in predicting its lithiation-induced stress fields and fracture behavior.

  16. Young’s modulus of [111] germanium nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Maksud, M.; Palapati, N. K. R.; Subramanian, A.; Yoo, J.; Harris, C. T.

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports a diameter-independent Young’s modulus of 91.9 ± 8.2 GPa for [111] Germanium nanowires (Ge NWs). When the surface oxide layer is accounted for using a core-shell NW approximation, the YM of the Ge core approaches a near theoretical value of 147.6 ± 23.4 GPa. The ultimate strength of a NW device was measured at 10.9 GPa, which represents a very high experimental-to-theoretical strength ratio of ∼75%. With increasing interest in this material system as a high-capacity lithium-ion battery anode, the presented data provide inputs that are essential in predicting its lithiation-induced stress fields and fracture behavior.

  17. Strain distribution in single, suspended germanium nanowires studied using nanofocused x-rays.

    PubMed

    Keplinger, Mario; Grifone, Raphael; Greil, Johannes; Kriegner, Dominik; Persson, Johan; Lugstein, Alois; Schülli, Tobias; Stangl, Julian

    2016-02-01

    Within the quest for direct band-gap group IV materials, strain engineering in germanium is one promising route. We present a study of the strain distribution in single, suspended germanium nanowires using nanofocused synchrotron radiation. Evaluating the probed Bragg reflection for different illumination positions along the nanowire length results in corresponding strain components as well as the nanowire's tilting and bending. By using these findings we determined the complete strain state with the help of finite element modelling. The resulting information provides us with the possibility of evaluating the validity of the strain investigations following from Raman scattering experiments which are based on the assumption of purely uniaxial strain. PMID:26753909

  18. Bending-induced Symmetry Breaking of Lithiation in Germanium Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Meng; Yang, Hui; Perea, Daniel E.; Zhang, Jiguang; Zhang, Sulin; Wang, Chong M.

    2014-08-01

    From signal transduction of living cells to oxidation and corrosion of metals, mechanical stress intimately couples with chemical reactions, regulating these biological and physiochemical processes. The coupled effect is particularly evident in electrochemical lithiation/delithiation cycling of high-capacity electrodes, such as silicon (Si), where on one hand lithiation-generated stress mediates lithiation kinetics, and on the other electrochemical reaction rate regulates stress generation and mechanical failure of the electrodes. Here we report for the first time the evidence on the controlled lithiation in germanium nanowires (GeNWs) through external bending. Contrary to the symmetric core-shell lithiation in free-standing GeNWs, we show bending GeNWs breaks the lithiation symmetry, speeding up lithaition at the tensile side while slowing down at the compressive side of the GeNWs. The bending-induced symmetry breaking of lithiation in GeNWs is further corroborated by chemomechanical modeling. In the light of the coupled effect between lithiation kinetics and mechanical stress in the electrochemical cycling, our findings shed light on strain/stress engineering of durable high-rate electrodes and energy harvesting through mechanical motion.

  19. Germanium-catalyzed growth of single-crystal GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Umar; Wang, Hong; Peyrot, David; Olivier, Aurélien; Zhang, Jun; Coquet, Philippe; Ng, Serene Lay Geok

    2016-04-01

    We report the use of Germanium (Ge) as catalyst for Gallium Nitride (GaN) nanowires growth. High-yield growth has been achieved with Ge nanoparticles obtained by dewetting a thin layer of Ge on a Si (100) substrate. The nanowires are long and grow straight with very little curvature. The GaN nanowires are single-crystalline and show a Wurtzite structure growing along the [0001] axis. The growth follows a metal-free Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) mechanism, further allowing a CMOS technology compatibility. The synthesis of nanowires has been done using an industrial Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (LPCVD) system.

  20. Structural and optical properties of axial silicon-germanium nanowire heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Tsybeskov, L.; Kamins, T. I.; Wu, X.; Lockwood, D. J.

    2015-12-21

    Detailed studies of the structural and optical properties of axial silicon-germanium nanowire heterojunctions show that despite the 4.2% lattice mismatch between Si and Ge they can be grown without a significant density of structural defects. The lattice mismatch induced strain is partially relieved due to spontaneous SiGe intermixing at the heterointerface during growth and lateral expansion of the Ge segment of the nanowire. The mismatch in Ge and Si coefficients of thermal expansion and low thermal conductivity of Si/Ge nanowire heterojunctions are proposed to be responsible for the thermally induced stress detected under intense laser radiation in photoluminescence and Raman scattering measurements.

  1. Structural and optical properties of axial silicon-germanium nanowire heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Tsybeskov, L.; Kamins, T. I.; Wu, X.; Lockwood, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Detailed studies of the structural and optical properties of axial silicon-germanium nanowire heterojunctions show that despite the 4.2% lattice mismatch between Si and Ge they can be grown without a significant density of structural defects. The lattice mismatch induced strain is partially relieved due to spontaneous SiGe intermixing at the heterointerface during growth and lateral expansion of the Ge segment of the nanowire. The mismatch in Ge and Si coefficients of thermal expansion and low thermal conductivity of Si/Ge nanowire heterojunctions are proposed to be responsible for the thermally induced stress detected under intense laser radiation in photoluminescence and Raman scattering measurements.

  2. Operando X-ray scattering and spectroscopic analysis of germanium nanowire anodes in lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Katharine E; Lowe, Michael A; Richards, Benjamin; Gao, Jie; Hanrath, Tobias; Abruña, Héctor D

    2015-02-17

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements have been employed to determine structural and bonding changes, as a function of the lithium content/state of charge, of germanium nanowires used as the active anode material within lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Our data, collected throughout the course of battery cycling (operando), indicate that lithium incorporation within the nanostructured germanium occurs heterogeneously, preferentially into amorphous regions over crystalline domains. Maintenance of the molecular structural integrity within the germanium nanowire is dependent on the depth of discharge. Discharging to a shallower cutoff voltage preserves partial crystallinity for several cycles. PMID:25616130

  3. In operandi observation of dynamic annealing: A case study of boron in germanium nanowire devices

    SciTech Connect

    Koleśnik-Gray, Maria M.; Krstić, Vojislav; Sorger, Christian; Weber, Heiko B.; Biswas, Subhajit; Holmes, Justin D.

    2015-06-08

    We report on the implantation of boron in individual, electrically contacted germanium nanowires with varying diameter and present a technique that monitors the electrical properties of a single device during implantation of ions. This method gives improved access to study the dynamic annealing ability of the nanowire at room temperature promoted by its quasi-one-dimensional confinement. Based on electrical data, we find that the dopant activation efficiency is nontrivially diameter dependent. As the diameter decreases, a transition from a pronounced dynamic-annealing to a radiation-damage dominated regime is observed.

  4. Electric field effect thermoelectric transport in individual silicon and germanium/silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovman, Yuri M.; Small, Joshua P.; Hu, Yongjie; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M.; Kim, Philip

    2016-06-01

    We have simultaneously measured conductance and thermoelectric power (TEP) of individual silicon and germanium/silicon core/shell nanowires in the field effect transistor device configuration. As the applied gate voltage changes, the TEP shows distinctly different behaviors while the electrical conductance exhibits the turn-off, subthreshold, and saturation regimes, respectively. At room temperature, peak TEP value of ˜300 μ V/K is observed in the subthreshold regime of the Si devices. The temperature dependence of the saturated TEP values is used to estimate the carrier doping of Si nanowires.

  5. Germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Major-Sosias, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Germanium is an important semiconductor material, or metalloid which, by definition, is a material whose electrical properties are halfway between those of metallic conductors and electrical insulators. This paper describes the properties, sources, and market for germanium.

  6. Solution-grown germanium nanowire anodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Chockla, Aaron M; Klavetter, Kyle C; Mullins, C Buddie; Korgel, Brian A

    2012-09-26

    Solution-grown germanium (Ge) nanowires were tested as high capacity anodes in lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries. Nanowire films were formulated and cast as slurries with conductive carbon (7:1 Ge:C w/w), PVdF binder and 1.0 M LiPF(6) dissolved in various solvents as electrolyte. The addition of fluorethylene carbonate (FEC) to the electrolyte was critical to achieving stable battery cycling and reversible capacities as high as 1248 mA h g(-1) after 100 cycles, which is close to the theoretical capacity of 1,384 mA h g(-1). Ge nanowire anodes also exhibited high rate capability, with reversible cycling above 600 mA h g(-1) for 1200 cycles at a rate of 1C. The batteries could also be discharged at 10C with a capacity of 900 mA h g(-1) when charged at 1C. PMID:22894797

  7. Solution synthesis of germanium nanowires using a Ge+2 alkoxide precursor.

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Tribby, Louis, J; Bunge, Scott D.; Han, Sang M.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Gerung, Henry

    2006-02-01

    A simple solution synthesis of germanium (Ge{sup 0}) nanowires under mild conditions (<400 C and 1 atm) was demonstrated using germanium 2,6 dibutylphenoxide Ge(DBP){sub 2} (1) as the precursor where DBP = OC{sub 6}H{sub 3}(C(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}-2,6. Compound 1, synthesized from Ge(NR{sub 2}){sub 2} where R = SiMe{sub 3} and two equivalents of DBP-H, was characterized as a mononuclear species by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Dissolution of 1 in oleylamine, followed by rapid injection into a 1-octadecene solution heated to 300 C under an atmosphere of Ar, led to the formation of Ge{sup 0} nanowires. The Ge{sup 0} nanowires were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. These characterizations revealed that the nanowires are single crystalline in the cubic phase and coated with oleylamine surfactant. We also observed that the nanowire length (0.1 to 10 {micro}m) increases with increasing temperature (285 to 315 C) and time (5 to 60 min). Two growth mechanisms are proposed based on the TEM images intermittently taken during the growth process as a function of time: (1) self-seeding mechanism where one of two overlapping nanowires serves as a seed, while the other continues to grow as a wire and (2) self-assembly mechanism where an aggregate of small rods (< 50 nm in diameter) recrystallize on the tip of a longer wire, extending its length.

  8. Thermal Conductivity Suppression in Nanostructured Silicon and Germanium Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özden, Ayberk; Kandemir, Ali; Ay, Feridun; Perkgöz, Nihan Kosku; Sevik, Cem

    2016-03-01

    The inherent low lattice thermal conductivity (TC) of semiconductor nanowires (s-NW) due to one-dimensional phonon confinement might provide a solution for the long-lasting figure-of-merit problem for highly efficient thermoelectric (TE) applications. Standalone diameter modulation or alloying of s-NW serve as a toolkit for TC control, but realizing the full potential of nanowires requires new atomic-scale designs, growth, characterization, and understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the structure-property (TC) relationship. Before undertaking time-consuming and expensive experimental work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations serve as an excellent probe to investigate new designs and understand how nanostructures affect thermal transport properties through their capability to capture various phenomena such as phonon boundary scattering, phonon coherence resonance, and phonon backscattering. On the other hand, because different research groups use different structural and MD parameters in their simulations, it is rather difficult to make comparisons between different nanostructures and select appropriate ones for potential TE applications. Therefore, in this work, we systematically investigated pristine, core-shell (C-S), holey (H-N), superlattice (SL), sawtooth (ST), and superlattice sawtooth (SL-ST) nanowires with identical structural parameters. Specifically, we aim to compare the relative TC reduction achieved by these nanostructures with respect to pristine nanowires in order to propose the best structural design with the lowest lattice TC, using Green-Kubo method-based equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at 300 K. Our results show that the TC can be minimized by changing specific parameters such as the core diameter and monolayer separation for C-S, H-N, and ST structures. In the case of SL structures, the TC is found to be independent of these parameters. However, surface roughness in the form of a ST morphology provides a TC value below 2 W

  9. Tailoring thermal conductivity of silicon/germanium nanowires utilizing core-shell architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarikurt, S.; Ozden, A.; Kandemir, A.; Sevik, C.; Kinaci, A.; Haskins, J. B.; Cagin, T.

    2016-04-01

    Low-dimensional nanostructured materials show large variations in their thermal transport properties. In this work, we investigate the influence of the core-shell architecture on nanowire (1D) thermal conductivity and evaluate its validity as a strategy to achieve a better thermoelectric performance. To obtain the thermal conductivity values, equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are conducted for core-shell nanowires of silicon and germanium. To explore the parameter space, we have calculated thermal conductivity values of the Si-core/Ge-shell and Ge-core/Si-shell nanowires having different cross-sectional sizes and core contents at several temperatures. Our results indicate that (1) increasing the cross-sectional area of pristine Si and pristine Ge nanowires increases the thermal conductivity, (2) increasing the Ge core size in the Ge-core/Si-shell structure results in a decrease in the thermal conductivity at 300 K, (3) the thermal conductivity of the Si-core/Ge-shell nanowires demonstrates a minima at a specific core size, (4) no significant variation in the thermal conductivity is observed in nanowires for temperatures larger than 300 K, and (5) the predicted thermal conductivity within the frame of applied geometrical constraints is found to be around 10 W/(mK) for the Si and Ge core-shell architecture with a smooth interface. The value is still higher than the amorphous limit (1 W/(mK)). This represents a significant reduction in thermal conductivity with respect to their bulk crystalline and pristine nanowire forms. Furthermore, we observed additional suppression of thermal conductivity through the introduction of interface roughness to Si/Ge core-shell nanowires.

  10. Geometrical and band-structure effects on phonon-limited hole mobility in rectangular cross-sectional germanium nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, H.; Mori, S.; Morioka, N.; Suda, J.; Kimoto, T.

    2014-12-01

    We calculated the phonon-limited hole mobility in rectangular cross-sectional [001], [110], [111], and [112]-oriented germanium nanowires, and the hole transport characteristics were investigated. A tight-binding approximation was used for holes, and phonons were described by a valence force field model. Then, scattering probability of holes by phonons was calculated taking account of hole-phonon interaction atomistically, and the linearized Boltzmann's transport equation was solved to calculate the hole mobility at low longitudinal field. The dependence of the hole mobility on nanowire geometry was analyzed in terms of the valence band structure of germanium nanowires, and it was found that the dependence was qualitatively reproduced by considering an average effective mass and the density of states of holes. The calculation revealed that [110] germanium nanowires with large height along the [001] direction show high hole mobility. Germanium nanowires with this geometry are also expected to exhibit high electron mobility in our previous work, and thus they are promising for complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) applications.

  11. Geometrical and band-structure effects on phonon-limited hole mobility in rectangular cross-sectional germanium nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, H. Mori, S.; Morioka, N.; Suda, J.; Kimoto, T.

    2014-12-21

    We calculated the phonon-limited hole mobility in rectangular cross-sectional [001], [110], [111], and [112]-oriented germanium nanowires, and the hole transport characteristics were investigated. A tight-binding approximation was used for holes, and phonons were described by a valence force field model. Then, scattering probability of holes by phonons was calculated taking account of hole-phonon interaction atomistically, and the linearized Boltzmann's transport equation was solved to calculate the hole mobility at low longitudinal field. The dependence of the hole mobility on nanowire geometry was analyzed in terms of the valence band structure of germanium nanowires, and it was found that the dependence was qualitatively reproduced by considering an average effective mass and the density of states of holes. The calculation revealed that [110] germanium nanowires with large height along the [001] direction show high hole mobility. Germanium nanowires with this geometry are also expected to exhibit high electron mobility in our previous work, and thus they are promising for complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) applications.

  12. Electronic states of lithium passivated germanium nanowires: An ab-initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Trejo, A.; Carvajal, E.; Vázquez-Medina, R.; Cruz-Irisson, M.

    2014-05-15

    A study of the electronic and structural properties of germanium nanowires (GeNWs) was performed using the ab-initio Density Functional Theory within the generalized gradient approximation where electron-ion interactions are described by ultrasoft pseudopotentials. To study the effects of the lithium in the surface of the GeNWs we compare the electronic band structures of Hydrogen passivated GeNWs with those of partial and totally Li passivated GeNWs. The nanowires were constructed in the [001], [111] and [110] directions, using the supercell model to create different wire diameters. The results show that in the case of partial Li passivation there are localized orbitals near the valence band maximum, which would create a p-doped-kind of state. The total Li passivation created metallic states for all the wires.

  13. Formation of compositionally abrupt axial heterojunctions in silicon-germanium nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wen, C-Y; Reuter, M C; Bruley, J; Tersoff, J; Kodambaka, S; Stach, E A; Ross, F M

    2009-11-27

    We have formed compositionally abrupt interfaces in silicon-germanium (Si-Ge) and Si-SiGe heterostructure nanowires by using solid aluminum-gold alloy catalyst particles rather than the conventional liquid semiconductor-metal eutectic droplets. We demonstrated single interfaces that are defect-free and close to atomically abrupt, as well as quantum dots (i.e., Ge layers tens of atomic planes thick) embedded within Si wires. Real-time imaging of growth kinetics reveals that a low solubility of Si and Ge in the solid particle accounts for the interfacial abruptness. Solid catalysts that can form functional group IV nanowire-based structures may yield an extended range of electronic applications. PMID:19965471

  14. Tuning the Electro-optical Properties of Germanium Nanowires by Tensile Strain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this Letter we present the electrical and electro-optical characterization of single crystalline germanium nanowires (NWs) under tensile strain conditions. The measurements were performed on vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) grown germanium (Ge) NWs, monolithically integrated into a micromechanical 3-point strain module. Uniaxial stress is applied along the ⟨111⟩ growth direction of individual, 100 nm thick Ge NWs while at the same time performing electrical and optical characterization at room temperature. Compared to bulk germanium, an anomalously high and negative-signed piezoresistive coefficient has been found. Spectrally resolved photocurrent characterization on strained NWs gives experimental evidence on the strain-induced modifications of the band structure. Particularly we are revealing a rapid decrease in resistivity and a red-shift in photocurrent spectra under high strain conditions. For a tensile strain of 1.8%, resistivity decreased by a factor of 30, and the photocurrent spectra shifted by 88 meV. Individual stressed NWs are recognized as an ideal platform for the exploration of strain-related electronic and optical effects and may contribute significantly to the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, strain-enhanced field-effect transistors (FETs), or highly sensitive strain gauges. PMID:23146072

  15. Significant thermal conductivity reduction of silicon nanowire forests through discrete surface doping of germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Ying; Hong, Guo; Raja, Shyamprasad N.; Zimmermann, Severin; Poulikakos, Dimos; Tiwari, Manish K.

    2015-03-02

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are promising materials for the realization of highly-efficient and cost effective thermoelectric devices. Reduction of the thermal conductivity of such materials is a necessary and viable pathway to achieve sufficiently high thermoelectric efficiencies, which are inversely proportional to the thermal conductivity. In this article, vertically aligned forests of SiNW and germanium (Ge)-doped SiNW with diameters around 100 nm have been fabricated, and their thermal conductivity has been measured. The results show that discrete surface doping of Ge on SiNW arrays can lead to 23% reduction in thermal conductivity at room temperature compared to uncoated SiNWs. Such reduction can be further enhanced to 44% following a thermal annealing step. By analyzing the binding energy changes of Ge-3d and Si-2p using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we demonstrate that surface doped Ge interacts strongly with Si, enhancing phonon scattering at the Si-Ge interface as has also been shown in non-equilibrium molecular dynamics studies of single nanowires. Overall, our results suggest a viable pathway to improve the energy conversion efficiency of nanowire-forest thermoelectric nanomaterials.

  16. Leakage current of germanium-on-insulator-based junctionless nanowire transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chuanchuan; Liang, Renrong; Liu, Libin; Wang, Jing; Xu, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Junctionless nanowire transistors (JNTs) have been fabricated on ultra-thin-body germanium-on-insulator (GOI) substrates using a simple Si-compatible top-down process. These JNTs, which have gate lengths and widths that are both less than 100 nm, exhibit good electrical characteristics (Ion/Ioff ratio of ˜105 at Vd = -1 V). The effects of the back gate voltage, temperature, the device dimensions, and the channel doping concentration on the leakage currents of the fabricated devices were experimentally analyzed in detail. The results indicate that the leakage current is mainly affected by the gate tunneling current, the Shockley-Read-Hall generation current, the band-to-band tunneling current and the trap-assisted tunneling current. Design guidelines were then proposed to reduce the leakage currents of GOI-based JNTs.

  17. Strongly Enhanced THz Emission caused by Localized Surface Charges in Semiconducting Germanium Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo-Jung; Ma, Jin Won; Bae, Jung Min; Jeong, Kwang-Sik; Cho, Mann-Ho; Kang, Chul; Wi, Jung-Sub

    2013-01-01

    A principal cause of THz emission in semiconductor nanostructures is deeply involved with geometry, which stimulates the utilization of indirect bandgap semiconductors for THz applications. To date, applications for optoelectronic devices, such as emitters and detectors, using THz radiation have focused only on direct bandgap materials. This paper reports the first observation of strongly enhanced THz emission from Germanium nanowires (Ge NWs). The origin of THz generation from Ge NWs can be interpreted using two terms: high photoexcited electron-hole carriers (Δn) and strong built-in electric field (Eb) at the wire surface based on the relation . The first is related to the extensive surface area needed to trigger an irradiated photon due to high aspect ratio. The second corresponds to the variation of Fermi-level determined by confined surface charges. Moreover, the carrier dynamics of optically excited electrons and holes give rise to phonon emission according to the THz region. PMID:23760467

  18. Broadband absorptance enhancement of silicon nanowire arrays with germanium as the substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Xia, Xin-Lin

    2013-08-01

    A composite structure with silicon nanowire arrays on germanium substrate is proposed as a good candidate for highly efficient solar cells. The Bruggeman approximation considering anisotropic wave propagating in uniaxial media is employed to calculate the radiative properties. Meantime, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is used to verify for both normal and oblique incidence. It is found that the composite structure has superior absorption characteristics over thin Si film, particularly near the bandgap. With a thickness only of 4 μm, the composite structure improved the absorptance to above 0.6 across the whole wavelength band with the lattice constant of 100 nm, and the ultimate efficiency about 10% is higher than that of infinite bulk silicon, owing to the combined effects of suppressed reflection and high light trapping capability. To better understand the absorption enhancement process in the composite structure, the photogeneration profiles are provided by using FDTD method.

  19. Screening of the quantum-confined Stark effect in AlN/GaN nanowire superlattices by germanium doping

    SciTech Connect

    Hille, P. Müßener, J.; Becker, P.; Teubert, J.; Schörmann, J.; Eickhoff, M.; Mata, M. de la; Rosemann, N.; Chatterjee, S.; Magén, C.; Arbiol, J.

    2014-03-10

    We report on electrostatic screening of polarization-induced internal electric fields in AlN/GaN nanowire heterostructures with germanium-doped GaN nanodiscs embedded between AlN barriers. The incorporation of germanium at concentrations above 10{sup 20} cm{sup –3} shifts the photoluminescence emission energy of GaN nanodiscs to higher energies accompanied by a decrease of the photoluminescence decay time. At the same time, the thickness-dependent shift in emission energy is significantly reduced. In spite of the high donor concentration, a degradation of the photoluminescence properties is not observed.

  20. Germanium doping of self-assembled GaN nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Schörmann, Jörg; Hille, Pascal; Schäfer, Markus; Müßener, Jan; Becker, Pascal; Klar, Peter J.; Hofmann, Detlev M.; Teubert, Jörg; Eickhoff, Martin; Kleine-Boymann, Matthias; Rohnke, Marcus; Mata, Maria de la; Arbiol, Jordi

    2013-09-14

    Germanium doping of GaN nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on Si(111) substrates is studied. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements reveal a constant Ge-concentration along the growth axis. A linear relationship between the applied Ge-flux and the resulting ensemble Ge-concentration with a maximum content of 3.3×10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} is extracted from energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements and confirmed by a systematic increase of the conductivity with Ge-concentration in single nanowire measurements. Photoluminescence analysis of nanowire ensembles and single nanowires reveals an exciton localization energy of 9.5 meV at the neutral Ge-donor. A Ge-related emission band at energies above 3.475 eV is found that is assigned to a Burstein-Moss shift of the excitonic emission.

  1. Modeling of surface roughness scattering in nanowires based on atomistic wave function: Application to hole mobility in rectangular germanium nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hajime; Suda, Jun; Kimoto, Tsunenobu

    2016-04-01

    The authors present a calculation model of surface roughness scattering (SRS) in nanowires (NWs) based on atomistic description of electronic states by an s p3d5s* tight-binding scheme, and then this model is applied to hole transport in rectangular cross-sectional germanium (Ge) NWs. In this SRS model, the change of electronic band structures due to width or height reduction is first computed, and then it is expressed using an equivalent potential near the surface. The perturbation corresponding to a surface roughness is calculated from this equivalent potential. Using the aforementioned SRS model, hole mobility in Ge NWs was computed taking into account phonon scattering and SRS. The impacts of SRS on hole mobility in Ge NWs were analyzed, focusing on the valence band structure and hole states of NWs. The main results are as follows. At low hole density, the impacts of SRS are strongly dependent on NW geometry, and Ge NWs with high phonon-limited hole mobility, such as rectangular cross-sectional [110]-oriented NWs with large height along the [001] direction and square cross-sectional [111]-oriented NWs, tend to be less affected by SRS. At high hole density, however, the geometry dependence of hole mobility becomes weaker. These are understood from the nature of hole states and the valence band structure.

  2. Modulating the electronic properties of germanium nanowires via applied strain and surface passivation.

    PubMed

    Sk, Mahasin Alam; Ng, Man-Fai; Huang, Lin; Lim, Kok Hwa

    2013-04-28

    We report a systematic study on the surface passivation and strain effects on the electronic properties of hydrogenated germanium nanowires (H-GeNWs) with different growth orientations and diameters using density functional theory calculations. We show that increasing the coverage percentage of halogen passivations--fluorine (F) and chlorine (Cl) in particular--reduces the band gap of the GeNWs drastically but not linearly, depending on the chemical environment of the passivation sites. Moreover, we find that in general, applying strain--either compression or tensile--can only induce a decreased band gap in GeNWs but exception is found in <110> GeNWs: an increased band gap can be induced which is determined to be related to their surface structures. The current work reveals that electronic response upon structural changes caused by external factors is more sensitive in <110> GeNWs than in <100> GeNWs, suggesting that GeNWs with selected growth orientation can be applied in specialized applications that require different degrees of sensitivity or robustness. PMID:23493789

  3. Inuence of Gold-Copper Alloy Catalyst Composition on Crystal Growth and Dopant Distribution in Silicon and Germanium Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, Justin G.

    A combination of local electrode atom probe tomography (LEAP) and transmission electron microscopy characterization were used to investigate growth of and dopant incorporation in silicon and germanium nanowires (Si and GeNWs) via the vapor-liquid- solid (VLS) mechanism. A sample structure was developed that enabled isolation of the catalyst-mediated contribution to doping in individual nanowires during LEAP analysis. As a result, the distribution coefficient - a thermodynamic quantity describing axial junction abruptness - was measured in nanowires for the first time, providing a fundamental framework for comparison of junction abruptness in nanowires. These investigations also enabled the identification of a previously unknown radial anisotropy in dopant incorporation through the catalyst, with variations in dopant concentration across the VLS-defined diameter of the nanowire as large as two orders of magnitude. Finite element modeling of the doping process, coupled with in situ TEM observations reported in the literature, suggests that this radially inhomogeneous dopant distribution is a direct consequence of growth from a faceted liquid-solid interface, rather than the commonly assumed planar interface. Au-Cu alloy catalysts were explored as alternatives to Au-catalyzed VLS nanowire growth as a means to alleviate or eliminate axial and radial doping gradients in nanowires. Both an aqueous solution and electron beam lithographic method for creating Au-Cu alloy catalysts of controlled composition were developed, and GeNW growth was demonstrated from both types of catalyst. LEAP characterization of Au-Cu alloy catalyzed P-doped GeNWs revealed that alloying with Cu results in more abrupt axial doping junctions, as well as a more homogeneous radial distribution of dopants within the VLS-defined diameter of the nanowire.

  4. Effects of surface oxide formation on germanium nanowire band-edge photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Minaye Hashemi, Fatemeh Sadat; Laboratoire des Materiaux Semiconducteurs, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne ; Thombare, Shruti; Brongersma, Mark L.; Morral, Anna Fontcuberta i; McIntyre, Paul C.; Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305

    2013-06-24

    The effect of intentional surface oxide formation on band-edge photoluminescence (PL) of Ge nanowires was investigated. Thermal oxidation in molecular O{sub 2} was used to produce a surface oxide layer on assemblies of single crystal nanowires grown by the vapor-liquid-solid method. With increasing oxidation of the wires, the band-edge PL associated with the indirect gap transition becomes more intense. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the formation of an increasingly GeO{sub 2}-like surface oxide under annealing conditions that enhance the indirect-gap PL, consistent with surface oxide passivation of nonradiative recombination centers initially present on the nanowire surface.

  5. Fabrication and optical properties of (I) Erbium-doped nanowires containing germanium and/or zinc oxide and (II) Porous germanium nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xuezhen

    Nanomaterials have attracted great attention in the past two decades due to their superior mechanical, thermal, chemical, electrical and optical properties entirely different from bulk materials, which lead to numerous potential applications in nanodevices and nanoelectronics, such as FETs, LEDs, single electron memory devices, spin polarized electronics, quantum computing, sensors, photonic crystals/devices, solar cells etc. Based on the previous work on Er-doped GeNWs, a core-shell nanostructure was built by introducing Zn/ZnO shell onto Er-doped GeNWs. It was found that Zn sources and corresponding surface modification processes (CVD and PVD) have important impact on Er3+ PL and ZnO UV/visible PL due to Zn2GeO4 formation, which were confirmed by HRTEM and XRD measurements. In another work, Ge and Er were used to modify the surface of ZnO tetrapods. Both strong ZnO visible PL and Er3+ PL were observed; considerable enhancement of Er3+ PL was made possible by Ge deposition as a sensitizer layer. The Zn2GeO4 phase observed could either separate from the ZnO phase or mix uniformly with the ZnO phase. As a control system, Er/GeOx/ZnO nanofibers were fabricated by electrospinning of selected sol-gel precursor solutions. These types of nanofibers exhibited strong Er3+ near IR PL at 1.54 mum after annealing to remove the polymer template. XRD spectra indicate that the Er/Ge/Zn mixture likely forms a disordered phase, especially with high Er3+ concentrations, which contributes to the strong Er 3+ PL with the reduction of Er-Er interactions. In another work, the fabrication of F-doped ZnO nanowires was investigated on different substrates with or without carrier gas (Ar). ZnO UV/visible PL spectra indicate that F-doping diminished the intensity of defect light emission at ˜2.4 eV. Furthermore, ZnO/F-doped ZnO core-shell NWs were fabricated either by PVD or CVD processes; the PVD method provides better crystalline shell structures after annealing. The last work describes

  6. Synthesis of silicon-germanium axial nanowire heterostructures in a solvent vapor growth system using indium and tin catalysts.

    PubMed

    Mullane, E; Geaney, H; Ryan, K M

    2015-03-14

    Here we describe a relatively facile synthetic protocol for the formation of Si-Ge and Si-Ge-Si1-xGex axial nanowire heterostructures. The wires are grown directly on substrates with an evaporated catalytic layer placed in the vapour zone of a high boiling point solvent with the silicon and germanium precursors injected as liquids sequentially. We show that these heterostructures can be formed using either indium or tin as the catalyst seeds which form in situ during the thermal anneal. There is a direct correlation between growth time and segment length allowing good control over the wire composition. The formation of axial heterostructures of Si-Ge-Si1-xGex nanowires using a triple injection is further discussed with the alloyed Si1-xGex third component formed due to residual Ge precursor and its greater reactivity in comparison to silicon. It was found that the degree of tapering at each hetero-interface varied with both the catalyst type and composition of the NW. The report shows the versatility of the solvent vapour growth system for the formation of complex Si-Ge NW heterostructures. PMID:25676188

  7. Vapor-liquid-solid growth of silicon and silicon germanium nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmatoori, Pramod

    2009-12-01

    Si and Si1-xGex nanowires are promising materials with potential applications in various disciplines of science and technology. Small diameter nanowires can act as model systems to study interesting phenomena such as tunneling that occur in the nanometer regime. Furthermore, technical challenges in fabricating nanoscale size devices from thin films have resulted in interest and research on nanowires. In this perspective, vertical integrated nanowire field effect transistors (VINFETs) fabricated from Si nanowires are promising devices that offer better control on device properties and push the transistor architecture into the third dimension potentially enabling ultra-high transistor density circuits. Transistors fabricated from Si/Si 1-xGex nanowires have also been proposed that can have high carrier mobility. In addition, the Si and Si1-xGe x nanowires have potential to be used in various applications such as sensing, thermoelectrics and solar cells. Despite having considerable potential, the understanding of the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism utilized to fabricate these wires is still rudimentary. Hence, the objective of this thesis is to understand the effects of nanoscale size and the role of catalyst that mediates the wire growth on the growth rate of Si and Si1-xGe x nanowires and interfacial abruptness in Si/Si1-xGe x axial heterostructure nanowires. Initially, the growth and structural properties of Si nanowires with tight diameter distribution grown from 10, 20 and 50 nm Au particles dispersed on a polymer-modified substrate was studied. A nanoparticle application process was developed to disperse Au particles on the substrate surface with negligible agglomeration and sufficient density. The growth temperature and SiH4 partial pressure were varied to optimize the growth conditions amenable to VLS growth with smooth wire morphology and negligible Si thin film deposition on wire sidewalls. The Si nanowire growth rate was studied as a function of growth

  8. Analysis of ballistic and quasi-ballistic hole transport properties in germanium nanowires based on an extended "Top of the Barrier" model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hajime; Suda, Jun; Kimoto, Tsunenobu

    2016-09-01

    The ballistic hole transport properties in rectangular cross-sectional germanium nanowire transistors with various geometries were studied based on the "Top of the Barrier" model. Then, by an extension of this model, the quasi-ballistic hole transport was discussed taking into account phonon and surface roughness scattering in the channel and source-to-drain direct tunneling. Among several nanowire geometries targeted in this study, the [1 1 0]-oriented nanowire with large height along [1 1 bar 0] ([1 1 0]/(1 1 bar 0) NW) exhibited the largest ballistic current. This was understood from its large density of states and resulting high hole density. Large density of states, however, enhances backscattering in the channel. An approximation analysis of quasi-ballistic transport suggested that the [1 1 0]/(0 0 1) NW with higher mobility can outperform [1 1 0]/(1 1 bar 0) NW when scattering and tunneling are considered.

  9. Growth and electrical rectification in axial in-situ doped p-n junction germanium nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Picraux, Samuel T; Dayeh, Shadi; Zaslavsky, Alexander; Le, Son T

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth and electrical properties of axial in-situ doped p-n junction Ge nanowires (NWs). In-situ doping of the NWs was accomplished by introducing dopant gases (diborane and phosphine) together with GeH{sub 4} in the growth process. By changing dopant sources during growth, a p-n junction can be realized along the axis of the NWs. Metal contacts to the wires were defined using e-beam lithography patterning, followed by 100 nm Ni sputter deposition and lift-off. Four-point measurements of the fabricated devices at room temperature and at 77 K clearly show rectification with on/off current ratio up to two orders of magnitude when the bias is applied across the p-n junction. The ideality factor of the junction current points to a significant generation-recombination contribution. The Ohmic characteristics in the p and n regions outside the junction make it possible to estimate the doping levels. We also observed backgate control of the NW junction current.

  10. Effect of gold migration on the morphology of germanium nanowires grown by a two-step growth method with temperature modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhengyu; Usami, Koichi; Simanullang, Marolop; Noguchi, Tomohiro; Kawano, Yukio; Oda, Shunri

    2016-08-01

    Germanium nanowires (Ge NWs) grown at high temperatures (HTs) are investigated because of the demand for impurity doping. However, gold agglomeration, which occurs at HTs, results in undesired moundlike structures. A two-step growth technique with temperature modulation from low temperatures (LTs) to HTs was adopted to prevent gold agglomeration, thus revealing high-yield HT Ge NWs on top of LT Ge NWs. These Ge NWs can be classified into two groups on the basis of their shape. The timing of gold migration plays a crucial role in determining the shape of these NWs. Fat core–shell-like Ge NWs, where gold migration occurs as temperature increases, are due to the enhanced radial growth at HTs generated from the migrated gold nanoparticles on the NW sidewalls. However, for thin NWs, because Au seeds were stabilized on top of NWs until synthesis ended, the axial growth of Ge NWs continued at HTs.

  11. Non-equilibrium induction of tin in germanium: towards direct bandgap Ge1-xSnx nanowires.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Subhajit; Doherty, Jessica; Saladukha, Dzianis; Ramasse, Quentin; Majumdar, Dipanwita; Upmanyu, Moneesh; Singha, Achintya; Ochalski, Tomasz; Morris, Michael A; Holmes, Justin D

    2016-01-01

    The development of non-equilibrium group IV nanoscale alloys is critical to achieving new functionalities, such as the formation of a direct bandgap in a conventional indirect bandgap elemental semiconductor. Here, we describe the fabrication of uniform diameter, direct bandgap Ge1-xSnx alloy nanowires, with a Sn incorporation up to 9.2 at.%, far in excess of the equilibrium solubility of Sn in bulk Ge, through a conventional catalytic bottom-up growth paradigm using noble metal and metal alloy catalysts. Metal alloy catalysts permitted a greater inclusion of Sn in Ge nanowires compared with conventional Au catalysts, when used during vapour-liquid-solid growth. The addition of an annealing step close to the Ge-Sn eutectic temperature (230 °C) during cool-down, further facilitated the excessive dissolution of Sn in the nanowires. Sn was distributed throughout the Ge nanowire lattice with no metallic Sn segregation or precipitation at the surface or within the bulk of the nanowires. The non-equilibrium incorporation of Sn into the Ge nanowires can be understood in terms of a kinetic trapping model for impurity incorporation at the triple-phase boundary during growth. PMID:27095012

  12. Non-equilibrium induction of tin in germanium: towards direct bandgap Ge1-xSnx nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Subhajit; Doherty, Jessica; Saladukha, Dzianis; Ramasse, Quentin; Majumdar, Dipanwita; Upmanyu, Moneesh; Singha, Achintya; Ochalski, Tomasz; Morris, Michael A.; Holmes, Justin D.

    2016-04-01

    The development of non-equilibrium group IV nanoscale alloys is critical to achieving new functionalities, such as the formation of a direct bandgap in a conventional indirect bandgap elemental semiconductor. Here, we describe the fabrication of uniform diameter, direct bandgap Ge1-xSnx alloy nanowires, with a Sn incorporation up to 9.2 at.%, far in excess of the equilibrium solubility of Sn in bulk Ge, through a conventional catalytic bottom-up growth paradigm using noble metal and metal alloy catalysts. Metal alloy catalysts permitted a greater inclusion of Sn in Ge nanowires compared with conventional Au catalysts, when used during vapour-liquid-solid growth. The addition of an annealing step close to the Ge-Sn eutectic temperature (230 °C) during cool-down, further facilitated the excessive dissolution of Sn in the nanowires. Sn was distributed throughout the Ge nanowire lattice with no metallic Sn segregation or precipitation at the surface or within the bulk of the nanowires. The non-equilibrium incorporation of Sn into the Ge nanowires can be understood in terms of a kinetic trapping model for impurity incorporation at the triple-phase boundary during growth.

  13. Non-equilibrium induction of tin in germanium: towards direct bandgap Ge1−xSnx nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Subhajit; Doherty, Jessica; Saladukha, Dzianis; Ramasse, Quentin; Majumdar, Dipanwita; Upmanyu, Moneesh; Singha, Achintya; Ochalski, Tomasz; Morris, Michael A.; Holmes, Justin D.

    2016-01-01

    The development of non-equilibrium group IV nanoscale alloys is critical to achieving new functionalities, such as the formation of a direct bandgap in a conventional indirect bandgap elemental semiconductor. Here, we describe the fabrication of uniform diameter, direct bandgap Ge1−xSnx alloy nanowires, with a Sn incorporation up to 9.2 at.%, far in excess of the equilibrium solubility of Sn in bulk Ge, through a conventional catalytic bottom-up growth paradigm using noble metal and metal alloy catalysts. Metal alloy catalysts permitted a greater inclusion of Sn in Ge nanowires compared with conventional Au catalysts, when used during vapour–liquid–solid growth. The addition of an annealing step close to the Ge-Sn eutectic temperature (230 °C) during cool-down, further facilitated the excessive dissolution of Sn in the nanowires. Sn was distributed throughout the Ge nanowire lattice with no metallic Sn segregation or precipitation at the surface or within the bulk of the nanowires. The non-equilibrium incorporation of Sn into the Ge nanowires can be understood in terms of a kinetic trapping model for impurity incorporation at the triple-phase boundary during growth. PMID:27095012

  14. Advances in the Application of Silicon and Germanium Nanowires for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Tadhg; Brandon, Michael; Ryan, Kevin M

    2016-07-01

    Li-alloying materials such as Si and Ge nanowires have emerged as the forerunners to replace the current, relatively low-capacity carbonaceous based Li-ion anodes. Since the initial report of binder-free nanowire electrodes, a vast body of research has been carried out in which the performance and cycle life has significantly progressed. The study of such electrodes has provided invaluable insights into the cycling behavior of Si and Ge, as the effects of repeated lithiation/delithiation on the material can be observed without interference from conductive additives or binders. Here, some of the key developments in this area are looked at, focusing on the problems encountered by Li-alloying electrodes in general (e.g., pulverization, loss of contact with current collector etc.) and how the study of nanowire electrodes has overcome these issues. Some key nanowire studies that have elucidated the consequences of the alloying/dealloying process on the morphology of Si and Ge are also considered, in particular looking at the impact that effects such as pore formation and lithium-assisted welding have on performance. Finally, the challenges for the practical implementation of nanowire anodes within the context of the current understanding of such systems are discussed. PMID:26855084

  15. Synthesis and Raman scattering studies of novel semiconductor nanostructures: silicon, germanium and gallium arsenide twinning superlattice nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adu, Kofi Wi

    This thesis work focuses on synthesis of novel semiconductor nanostructures: nanowires, quantum dots and twinning superlattices by Pulsed Laser Vaporization (PLV) and Thermal Batch Process (TBP) and the studies of their optical properties. We have developed growth and synthesis routes to produce Ge and Si nanowires of diameters ranging from 3nm to 10nm that exhibit quantum confinement effects. The asymmetric Raman lineshape predicted for scattering from confined optical phonon by Richter, and the Fano interference lineshape in n-type Si and Ge are found to be similar. However, the physics of either phenomenon is distinctively different. We performed a series of Raman scattering experiments on Si and Ge nanowires to determine the true origin of the asymmetry. The experiments were conducted under two conditions: high wire density and low wire density, corresponding to poor thermal anchorage and good thermal anchorage on substrate. We identified three physical phenomena that contribute to the lineshape: Phonon confinement, photo-stimulated and thermally induced Fano scattering. We can distinguish each of these processes based on the diameter of the wire and the laser flux dependence of the scattering and the evolution of the lineshape at low laser power with nanowire diameter. Which effect dominates depends on the contact of the Raman sample to the substrate, the substrate thermal properties, and the diameter of the nanowires. We have proposed a coupled phenomenological model which takes the phonon confinement and Fano processes into account that best describe the observed asymmetry in the phonon lineshapes. We are the first to report true phonon confinement in Si and Ge nanowires that shows the evolution of the lineshape asymmetry with diameter (3 nm to 30 nm) first predicted by Richter. We have also investigated the effect of oxide layer, and strain induced by the oxide layer on the first order Raman scattering from Si nanowires. Our data reveal that: (a) one can

  16. Nanowire Photovoltaic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, David

    2015-01-01

    Firefly Technologies, in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, developed synthesis methods for highly strained nanowires. Two synthesis routes resulted in successful nanowire epitaxy: direct nucleation and growth on the substrate and a novel selective-epitaxy route based on nanolithography using diblock copolymers. The indium-arsenide (InAs) nanowires are implemented in situ within the epitaxy environment-a significant innovation relative to conventional semiconductor nanowire generation using ex situ gold nanoparticles. The introduction of these nanoscale features may enable an intermediate band solar cell while simultaneously increasing the effective absorption volume that can otherwise limit short-circuit current generated by thin quantized layers. The use of nanowires for photovoltaics decouples the absorption process from the current extraction process by virtue of the high aspect ratio. While no functional solar cells resulted from this effort, considerable fundamental understanding of the nanowire epitaxy kinetics and nanopatterning process was developed. This approach could, in principle, be an enabling technology for heterointegration of dissimilar materials. The technology also is applicable to virtual substrates. Incorporating nanowires onto a recrystallized germanium/metal foil substrate would potentially solve the problem of grain boundary shunting of generated carriers by restricting the cross-sectional area of the nanowire (tens of nanometers in diameter) to sizes smaller than the recrystallized grains (0.5 to 1 micron(exp 2).

  17. Semiconductor nanowires: Synthesis, passivation, and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannathan, Hemanth

    Semiconductor nanowires have received much attention in recent years to further the scaling of electronic devices, and for their use in memory, sensors, photonics, and 3-D integrated devices. Germanium nanowires, in particular, are of great interest due to their low synthesis temperatures and high carrier mobility compared to silicon. However, there exists little work to date exploring the low-temperature controlled-synthesis of germanium nanowires. This work studies the heteroepitaxy of germanium nanowires on silicon substrates. Key parameters such as substrate orientation, growth temperature, partial pressure of reactive gas, thermal history, and exposure to ambient atmosphere are identified, and their effects on the resulting epitaxial nanowire synthesis are studied. Additionally, self-assembled highly oriented cylindrical mesopores are used as templates for controlling nanowire synthesis and serve as an attractive alternative to epitaxy. In this method, the orientations and dimensions of the pores control the growth of nanowires (direction, density, order, and size) irrespective of the starting substrate. Stable passivation techniques post-growth to prevent subsequent oxidation are also essential for realizing the large scale integration of nanowires. The well known HF treatments that have been used for decades in silicon processing are ineffective in passivating germanium surfaces, thus beckoning the need for new passivation solutions. This dissertation presents systematic studies performed to passivate germanium nanowires using aqueous halides (HF, HCl, HBr, and HI). Hydrogen bromide passivated germanium surfaces for well over 24 hours with negligible etching of germanium, and is consequently identified as the most promising candidate among the aqueous hydrogen halides. The final portion of this dissertation discusses the integration of nanowires into back-gate field-effect transistors. Important considerations in the choice of source/drain electrode

  18. Solution synthesis of germanium nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Gerung, Henry; Boyle, Timothy J.; Bunge, Scott D.

    2009-09-22

    A method for providing a route for the synthesis of a Ge(0) nanometer-sized material from. A Ge(II) precursor is dissolved in a ligand heated to a temperature, generally between approximately 100.degree. C. and 400.degree. C., sufficient to thermally reduce the Ge(II) to Ge(0), where the ligand is a compound that can bond to the surface of the germanium nanomaterials to subsequently prevent agglomeration of the nanomaterials. The ligand encapsulates the surface of the Ge(0) material to prevent agglomeration. The resulting solution is cooled for handling, with the cooling characteristics useful in controlling the size and size distribution of the Ge(0) materials. The characteristics of the Ge(II) precursor determine whether the Ge(0) materials that result will be nanocrystals or nanowires.

  19. EDITORIAL: Nanowires Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadish, Chennupati

    2010-02-01

    Nanowires are considered as building blocks for the next generation of electronics, photonics, sensors and energy applications. One-dimensional nanostructures offer unique opportunities to control the density of states of semiconductors, and in turn their electronic and optical properties. Nanowires allow the growth of axial heterostructures without the constraints of lattice mismatch. This provides flexibility to create heterostructures of a broad range of materials and allows integration of compound semiconductor based optoelectronic devices with silicon based microelectronics. Nanowires are widely studied and the number of papers published in the field is growing exponentially with time. Already nanowire lasers, nanowire transistors, nanowire light emitting diodes, nanowire sensors and nanowire solar cells have been demonstrated. This special issue on semiconductor nanowires features 17 invited papers from leading experts in the field. In this special issue, the synthesis and growth of semiconductor nanowires of a broad range of materials have been addressed. Both axial and radial heterostructures and their structural properties have been discussed. Electrical transport properties of nanowires have been presented, as well as optical properties and carrier dynamics in a range of nanowires and nanowire heterostructures. Devices such as nanowire lasers and nanowire sensors have also been discussed. I would like to thank the Editorial Board of the journal for suggesting this special issue and inviting me to serve as the Guest Editor. Sincere thanks are due to all the authors for their contributions to this special issue. I am grateful to the reviewers and editorial staff at Semiconductor Science and Technology and the Institute of Physics Publishing for their excellent efforts. Special thanks are due to Dr Claire Bedrock for coordinating this special issue.

  20. Mineral commodity profiles: Germanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butterman, W.C.; Jorgenson, John D.

    2005-01-01

    Overview -- Germanium is a hard, brittle semimetal that first came into use a half-century ago as a semiconductor material in radar units and as the material from which the first transistor was made. Today it is used principally as a component of the glass in telecommunications fiber optics; as a polymerization catalyst for polyethylene terephthalate (PET), a commercially important plastic; in infrared (IR) night vision devices; and as a semiconductor and substrate in electronics circuitry. Most germanium is recovered as a byproduct of zinc smelting, although it also has been recovered at some copper smelters and from the fly ash of coal-burning industrial powerplants. It is a highly dispersed element, associated primarily with base-metal sulfide ores. In the United States, germanium is recovered from zinc smelter residues and manufacturing scrap and is refined by two companies at four germanium refineries. One of the four refineries is dedicated to processing scrap. In 2000, producers sold zone-refined (high-purity) germanium at about $1,250 per kilogram and electronic-grade germanium dioxide (GeO2) at $800 per kilogram. Domestic refined production was valued at $22 million. Germanium is a critical component in highly technical devices and processes. It is likely to remain in demand in the future at levels at least as high as those of 2000. U.S. resources of germanium are probably adequate to meet domestic needs for several decades.

  1. Germanium detector passivated with hydrogenated amorphous germanium

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, William L.; Haller, Eugene E.

    1986-01-01

    Passivation of predominantly crystalline semiconductor devices (12) is provided for by a surface coating (21) of sputtered hydrogenated amorphous semiconductor material. Passivation of a radiation detector germanium diode, for example, is realized by sputtering a coating (21) of amorphous germanium onto the etched and quenched diode surface (11) in a low pressure atmosphere of hydrogen and argon. Unlike prior germanium diode semiconductor devices (12), which must be maintained in vacuum at cryogenic temperatures to avoid deterioration, a diode processed in the described manner may be stored in air at room temperature or otherwise exposed to a variety of environmental conditions. The coating (21) compensates for pre-existing undesirable surface states as well as protecting the semiconductor device (12) against future impregnation with impurities.

  2. Lithium drifted germanium system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fjarlie, E. J.

    1969-01-01

    General characteristics of the lithium-drifted germanium photodiode-Dewar-preamplifier system and particular operating instructions for the device are given. Information is included on solving operational problems.

  3. Segmented nanowires displaying locally controllable properties

    DOEpatents

    Sutter, Eli Anguelova; Sutter, Peter Werner

    2013-03-05

    Vapor-liquid-solid growth of nanowires is tailored to achieve complex one-dimensional material geometries using phase diagrams determined for nanoscale materials. Segmented one-dimensional nanowires having constant composition display locally variable electronic band structures that are determined by the diameter of the nanowires. The unique electrical and optical properties of the segmented nanowires are exploited to form electronic and optoelectronic devices. Using gold-germanium as a model system, in situ transmission electron microscopy establishes, for nanometer-sized Au--Ge alloy drops at the tips of Ge nanowires (NWs), the parts of the phase diagram that determine their temperature-dependent equilibrium composition. The nanoscale phase diagram is then used to determine the exchange of material between the NW and the drop. The phase diagram for the nanoscale drop deviates significantly from that of the bulk alloy.

  4. Bridgman Growth of Germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szofran, F. R.; Volz, M. P.; Cobb, S. D.; Motakef, S.

    1997-01-01

    The high-magnetic-field crystal growth facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center will be briefly described. This facility has been used to grow bulk germanium by the Bridgman technique in magnetic fields up to 5 Tesla. The results of investigations of ampoule material on the interface shape and thermal field applied to the melt on stability against convection will be discussed.

  5. Germanium detector vacuum encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, N. W.; Malone, D. F.; Pehl, R. H.; Cork, C. P.; Luke, P. N.; Landis, D. A.; Pollard, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an encapsulation technology that should significantly improve the viability of germanium gamma-ray detectors for a number of important applications. A specialized vacuum chamber has been constructed in which the detector and the encapsulating module are processed in high vacuum. Very high vacuum conductance is achieved within the valveless encapsulating module. The detector module is then sealed without breaking the chamber vacuum. The details of the vacuum chamber, valveless module, processing, and sealing method are presented.

  6. Nanowires enabling strained photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Greil, J.; Bertagnolli, E.; Lugstein, A.; Birner, S.

    2014-04-21

    Photovoltaic nano-devices have largely been relying on charge separation in conventional p-n junctions. Junction formation via doping, however, imposes major challenges in process control. Here, we report on a concept for photovoltaic energy conversion at the nano scale without the need for intentional doping. Our approach relies on charge carrier separation in inhomogeneously strained germanium nanowires (Ge NWs). This concept utilizes the strain-induced gradient in bandgap along tapered NWs. Experimental data confirms the feasibility of strain-induced charge separation in individual vapor-liquid-solid grown Ge NW devices with an internal quantum efficiency of ∼5%. The charge separation mechanism, though, is not inherently limited to a distinct material. Our work establishes a class of photovoltaic nano-devices with its opto-electronic properties engineered by size, shape, and applied strain.

  7. Germanium-76 Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-04-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0νββ). The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, and the first one gram sample was received from the supplier for analysis on April 24, 2011. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility, a DOE user facility at PNNL, was used to make the required isotopic and chemical purity measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The results of this first analysis are reported here.

  8. Stable and metastable nanowires displaying locally controllable properties

    DOEpatents

    Sutter, Eli Anguelova; Sutter, Peter Werner

    2014-11-18

    Vapor-liquid-solid growth of nanowires is tailored to achieve complex one-dimensional material geometries using phase diagrams determined for nanoscale materials. Segmented one-dimensional nanowires having constant composition display locally variable electronic band structures that are determined by the diameter of the nanowires. The unique electrical and optical properties of the segmented nanowires are exploited to form electronic and optoelectronic devices. Using gold-germanium as a model system, in situ transmission electron microscopy establishes, for nanometer-sized Au--Ge alloy drops at the tips of Ge nanowires (NWs), the parts of the phase diagram that determine their temperature-dependent equilibrium composition. The nanoscale phase diagram is then used to determine the exchange of material between the NW and the drop. The phase diagram for the nanoscale drop deviates significantly from that of the bulk alloy.

  9. Germanium: An aqueous processing review

    SciTech Connect

    Lier, R.J.M. van; Dreisinger, D.B.

    1995-08-01

    In industrial aqueous solutions, germanium generally occurs in trace amounts amid high concentrations of other metals, such as zinc, copper and iron. Separation of germanium from these metals as well as its isolation from gallium and indium pose a real challenge to the hydrometallurgist. After a brief discussion of the aqueous chemistry of germanium, this paper reviews the flowsheet of the Apex Mine in Utah. The Apex property was the only mine in the world to be operated primarily for production of gallium and germanium, but apparently closed due to great operating difficulties. Several process variants proposed for the treatment of the Apex ore, including bioleaching methods, are addressed. Following a more general description of the behavior of germanium in hydrometallurgical zinc processing streams, available technology for its recovery from aqueous solutions is summarized. Precipitation, solvent extraction, ion exchange, electrowinning, ion flotation and liquid-membrane separation are all outlined in terms of the aqueous chemistry of germanium. Finally, the production of high purity germanium dioxide and metal is briefly discussed. 61 refs.

  10. Germanium geochemistry and mineralogy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bernstein, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    Germanium is enriched in the following geologic environments: 1. (1) iron meteorites and terrestrial iron-nickel; 2. (2) sulfide ore deposits, particularly those hosted by sedimentary rocks; 3. (3) iron oxide deposits; 4. (4) oxidized zones of Ge-bearing sulfide deposits; 5. (5) pegmatites, greisens, and skarns; and 6. (6) coal and lignitized wood. In silicate melts, Ge is highly siderophile in the presence of native iron-nickel; otherwise, it is highly lithophile. Among silicate minerals, Ge is concentrated in those having less polymerized silicate tetrahedra such as olivine and topaz. In deposits formed from hydrothermal solutions, Ge tends to be enriched mostly in either sulfides or in fluorine-bearing phases; it is thus concentrated both in some hydrothermal sulfide deposits and in pegmatites, greisens, and skarns. In sulfide deposits that formed from solutions having low to moderate sulfur activity, Ge is concentrated in sphalerite in amounts up to 3000 ppm. Sulfide deposits that formed from solutions having higher sulfur activity allowed Ge to either form its own sulfides, particularly with Cu, or to substitute for As, Sn, or other metals in sulfosalts. The Ge in hydrothermal fluids probably derives from enrichment during the fractional crystallization of igneous fluids, or is due to the incorporation of Ge from the country rocks, particularly from those containing organic material. Germanium bonds to lignin-derivative organic compounds that are found in peat and lignite, accounting for its common concentration in coals and related organic material. Germanium is precipitated from water together with iron hydroxide, accounting for its concentration in some sedimentary and supergene iron oxide deposits. It also is able to substitute for Fe in magnetite in a variety of geologic environments. In the oxidized zone of Ge-bearing sulfide deposits, Ge is concentrated in oxides, hydroxides, and hydroxy-sulfates, sometimes forming its own minerals. It is particularly

  11. Slow Crack Growth of Germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The fracture toughness and slow crack growth parameters of germanium supplied as single crystal beams and coarse grain disks were measured. Although germanium is anisotropic (A=1.7), it is not as anisotropic as SiC, NiAl, or Cu, as evidence by consistent fracture toughness on the 100, 110, and 111 planes. Germanium does not exhibit significant slow crack growth in distilled water. (n=100). Practical values for engineering design are a fracture toughness of 0.7 MPam and a Weibull modulus of m=6+/-2. For well ground and reasonable handled coupons, fracture strength should be greater than 30 MPa.

  12. Hafnium germanium telluride

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Gyung-Joo; Yun, Hoseop

    2008-01-01

    The title hafnium germanium telluride, HfGeTe4, has been synthesized by the use of a halide flux and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. HfGeTe4 is isostructural with stoichiometric ZrGeTe4 and the Hf site in this compound is also fully occupied. The crystal structure of HfGeTe4 adopts a two-dimensional layered structure, each layer being composed of two unique one-dimensional chains of face-sharing Hf-centered bicapped trigonal prisms and corner-sharing Ge-centered tetra­hedra. These layers stack on top of each other to complete the three-dimensional structure with undulating van der Waals gaps. PMID:21202163

  13. Nitrogen in germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambouleyron, I.; Zanatta, A. R.

    1998-07-01

    The known properties of nitrogen as an impurity in, and as an alloy element of, the germanium network are reviewed in this article. Amorphous and crystalline germanium-nitrogen alloys are interesting materials with potential applications for protective coatings and window layers for solar conversion devices. They may also act as effective diffusion masks for III-V electronic devices. The existing data are compared with similar properties of other group IV nitrides, in particular with silicon nitride. To a certain extent, the general picture mirrors the one found in Si-N systems, as expected from the similar valence structure of both elemental semiconductors. However, important differences appear in the deposition methods and alloy composition, the optical properties of as grown films, and the electrical behavior of nitrogen-doped amorphous layers. Structural studies are reviewed, including band structure calculations and the energies of nitrogen-related defects, which are compared with experimental data. Many important aspects of the electronic structure of Ge-N alloys are not yet completely understood and deserve a more careful investigation, in particular the structure of defects associated with N inclusion. The N doping of the a-Ge:H network appears to be very effective, the activation energy of the most effectively doped samples becoming around 120 meV. This is not the case with N-doped a-Si:H, the reasons for the difference remaining an open question. The lack of data on stoichiometric β-Ge3N4 prevents any reasonable assessment on the possible uses of the alloy in electronic and ceramic applications.

  14. Local structure of germanium-sulfur, germanium-selenium, and germanium-tellurium vitreous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bordovsky, G. A.; Terukov, E. I.; Anisimova, N. I.; Marchenko, A. V.; Seregin, P. P.

    2009-09-15

    {sup 119}Sn and {sup 129}Te ({sup 129}I) Moessbauer spectroscopy showed that chalcogen-enriched Ge{sub 100-y}X{sub y} (X = S, Se, Te) glasses are constructed of structural units including two-coordinated chalcogen atoms in chains such as Ge-X-Ge- and Ge-X-X-Ge-. Germanium in these glasses is only tetravalent and four-coordinated, and only chalcogen atoms are in the local environment of germanium atoms. Chalcogen-depleted glasses are constructed of structural units including two-coordinated (in Ge-X-Ge- chains) and three-coordinated chalcogen atoms (in -Ge-X-Ge- chains). Germanium in these glasses stabilizes in both the tetravalent four-coordinated and divalent three-coordinated states, and only chalcogen atoms are in the local environment of germanium atoms.

  15. Resonant germanium nanoantenna photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Cao, Linyou; Park, Joon-Shik; Fan, Pengyu; Clemens, Bruce; Brongersma, Mark L

    2010-04-14

    On-chip optical interconnection is considered as a substitute for conventional electrical interconnects as microelectronic circuitry continues to shrink in size. Central to this effort is the development of ultracompact, silicon-compatible, and functional optoelectronic devices. Photodetectors play a key role as interfaces between photonics and electronics but are plagued by a fundamental efficiency-speed trade-off. Moreover, engineering of desired wavelength and polarization sensitivities typically requires construction of space-consuming components. Here, we demonstrate how to overcome these limitations in a nanoscale metal-semiconductor-metal germanium photodetector for the optical communications band. The detector capitalizes on antenna effects to dramatically enhance the photoresponse (>25-fold) and to enable wavelength and polarization selectivity. The electrical design featuring asymmetric metallic contacts also enables ultralow dark currents (approximately 20 pA), low power consumption, and high-speed operation (>100 GHz). The presented high-performance photodetection scheme represents a significant step toward realizing integrated on-chip communication and manifests a new paradigm for developing miniaturized optoelectronics components. PMID:20230043

  16. Nanowire Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couteau, C.; Larrue, A.; Wilhelm, C.; Soci, C.

    2015-05-01

    We review principles and trends in the use of semiconductor nanowires as gain media for stimulated emission and lasing. Semiconductor nanowires have recently been widely studied for use in integrated optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs), solar cells, and transistors. Intensive research has also been conducted in the use of nanowires for subwavelength laser systems that take advantage of their quasione- dimensional (1D) nature, flexibility in material choice and combination, and intrinsic optoelectronic properties. First, we provide an overview on using quasi-1D nanowire systems to realize subwavelength lasers with efficient, directional, and low-threshold emission. We then describe the state of the art for nanowire lasers in terms of materials, geometry, andwavelength tunability.Next,we present the basics of lasing in semiconductor nanowires, define the key parameters for stimulated emission, and introduce the properties of nanowires. We then review advanced nanowire laser designs from the literature. Finally, we present interesting perspectives for low-threshold nanoscale light sources and optical interconnects. We intend to illustrate the potential of nanolasers inmany applications, such as nanophotonic devices that integrate electronics and photonics for next-generation optoelectronic devices. For instance, these building blocks for nanoscale photonics can be used for data storage and biomedical applications when coupled to on-chip characterization tools. These nanoscale monochromatic laser light sources promise breakthroughs in nanophotonics, as they can operate at room temperature, can potentially be electrically driven, and can yield a better understanding of intrinsic nanomaterial properties and surface-state effects in lowdimensional semiconductor systems.

  17. The Germanium Dichotomy in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humayun, M.; Yang, S.; Righter, K.; Zanda, B.; Hewins, R. H.

    2016-01-01

    Germanium is a moderately volatile and siderophile element that follows silicon in its compatibility during partial melting of planetary mantles. Despite its obvious usefulness in planetary geochemistry germanium is not analyzed routinely, with there being only three prior studies reporting germanium abundances in Martian meteorites. The broad range (1-3 ppm) observed in Martian igneous rocks is in stark contrast to the narrow range of germanium observed in terrestrial basalts (1.5 plus or minus 0.1 ppm). The germanium data from these studies indicates that nakhlites contain 2-3 ppm germanium, while shergottites contain approximately 1 ppm germanium, a dichotomy with important implications for core formation models. There have been no reliable germanium abundances on chassignites. The ancient meteoritic breccia, NWA 7533 (and paired meteorites) contains numerous clasts, some pristine and some impact melt rocks, that are being studied individually. Because germanium is depleted in the Martian crust relative to chondritic impactors, it has proven useful as an indicator of meteoritic contamination of impact melt clasts in NWA 7533. The germanium/silicon ratio can be applied to minerals that might not partition nickel and iridium, like feldspars. We report germanium in minerals from the 3 known chassignites, 2 nakhlites and 5 shergottites by LAICP- MS using a method optimized for precise germanium analysis.

  18. Submicron fabrication by local anodic oxidation of germanium thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. B.; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G.; Azevedo, A.

    2009-08-01

    Here we describe a lithography scheme based on the local anodic oxidation of germanium film by a scanning atomic force microscope in a humidity-controlled atmosphere. The oxidation kinetics of the Ge film were investigated by a tapping mode, in which a pulsed bias voltage was synchronized and applied with the resonance frequency of the cantilever, and by a contact mode, in which a continuous voltage was applied. In the tapping mode we clearly identified two regimes of oxidation as a function of the applied voltage: the trench width increased linearly during the vertical growth and increased exponentially during the lateral growth. Both regimes of growth were interpreted taking into consideration the Cabrera-Mott mechanism of oxidation applied to the oxide/Ge interface. We also show the feasibility of the bottom-up fabrication process presented in this work by showing a Cu nanowire fabricated on top of a silicon substrate.

  19. Thermal conductivity of tubular nanowire composites based on a thermodynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebon, Georgy; Machrafi, Hatim

    2015-07-01

    A formula for the effective heat conductivity of a nanocomposite with cylindrical nanowire inclusions is derived. Both transversal and longitudinal heating along the wires are investigated. Several effects are examined: the volume fraction and sizes of the nanowires, the type of scattering at the particle-matrix interface and temperature. As illustration, silicon nanowires inclusions in a germanium matrix is considered; the results are shown to be in good agreement with other models and numerical solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation. Our main contribution consists of using extended irreversible thermodynamics to cope with the nano dimensions of the wires.

  20. Germanium Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Zachary Charles

    Greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere are approaching historically unprecedented levels from burning fossil fuels to meet the ever-increasing world energy demand. A rapid transition to clean energy sources is necessary to avoid the potentially catastrophic consequences of global warming. The sun provides more than enough energy to power the world, and solar cells that convert sunlight to electricity are commercially available. However, the high cost and low efficiency of current solar cells prevent their widespread implementation, and grid parity is not anticipated to be reached for at least 15 years without breakthrough technologies. Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) show promise for cheap multi-junction photovoltaic devices. To compete with photovoltaic materials that are currently commercially available, NCs need to be inexpensively cast into dense thin films with bulk-like electrical mobilities and absorption spectra that can be tuned by altering the NC size. The Group II-VI and IV-VI NC communities have had some success in achieving this goal by drying and then chemically treating colloidal particles, but the more abundant and less toxic Group IV NCs have proven more challenging. This thesis reports thin films of plasma-synthesized Ge NCs deposited using three different techniques, and preliminary solar cells based on these films. Germanium tetrachloride is dissociated in the presence of hydrogen in a nonthermal plasma to nucleate Ge NCs. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction indicate that the particles are nearly monodisperse (standard deviations of 10-15% the mean particle diameter) and the mean diameter can be tuned from 4-15 nm by changing the residence time of the Ge NCs in the plasma. In the first deposition scheme, a Ge NC colloid is formed by reacting nanocrystalline powder with 1-dodecene and dispersing the functionalized NCs in a solvent. Films are then formed on substrates by drop-casting the colloid and allowing it to dry

  1. Nanowire Bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Jeffrey B.; Bolinger, A. T.; Berzyadin, A.; Bock, D.; Garcia, K.

    2003-02-01

    Cryogenic tests of a prototype superconducting nanowire bolometer are presented. The device has such low thermal conductance it should be sensitive when used as a direct detector. Because of the small size of the active area we anticipate that this bolometer may also be fast enough to be used as a wideband mixer.

  2. Silver nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff, A.; Wagner, D.; Ditlbacher, H.; Kreibig, U.

    2005-07-01

    Free silver nanowires were produced in aqueous electrolyte by a novel chemical reaction. Their diameters are about 27 nm, the lengths range up to more than 70 μm, yielding extreme length to thickness-ratios up to 2500. Their structure was identified by TEM analysis (SAED) and HRTEM to consist of a lattice aligned bundle of five monocrystalline rods of triangular cross-section forming an almost regular pentagonal cross-section. It is demonstrated that, for application purposes, single free nanowires can be mounted between contact areas. This manipulation is enabled by observing the nanowires in real time at atmosphere by Zsigmondy-Siedentopf farfield darkfield microscopy. Experimental results are presented concerning electrical dc conductivity and optical plasmon polariton excitation, the latter obtained from a single free wire without substrate and a single wire deposited on quartz glass. We also report about a present research cooperation with the Graz group of Aussenegg and Krenn which is devoted to investigate plasmon propagation in our Ag nanowires and to prove application possibilities as information guide fibers in analogy to optical fibers which may be integrated into micro- and nanoelectronic circuits.

  3. Three dimensional architectures of ultra-high density semiconducting nanowires deposited on chip.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Kevin M; Erts, Donats; Olin, Hakan; Morris, Michael A; Holmes, Justin D

    2003-05-21

    We report a "clean" and fast process, utilizing supercritical carbon dioxide, for producing ultrahigh densities, up to 10(12) nanowires per square centimeter, of ordered germanium nanowires on silicon and quartz substrates. Uniform mesoporous thin films were employed as templates for the nucleation and growth of unidirectional nanowire arrays orientated almost perpendicular to a substrate surface. Additionally, these nanocomposite materials display room-temperature photoluminescence (PL), the energy of which is dependent on the diameter of the encased nanowires. The ability to synthesis ultrahigh-density arrays of semiconducting nanowires on-chip is a key step in future "bottom-up" fabrication of multilayered device architectures for nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices. PMID:12785861

  4. Radiation damage of germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pehl, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Energetic particles can produce interstitial-vacancy pairs in a crystal by knocking the atoms from their normal positions. Detectors are unique among semiconductor devices in depending on very low concentrations of electrically active impurities, and also on efficient transport of holes and electrons over relatively large distances. Because the dense regions of damage produced by energetic particles may result in donors and/or acceptors, and also provide trapping sites for holes and electrons, detectors are very sensitive to radiation damage. In addition to these effects occurring within the detector, radiation may also change the characteristics of the exposed surfaces causing unpredictable effects on the detector leakage current. Radiation-induced surface degradation has rarely, if ever, been observed for germanium detectors. The possibility of minimizing hole trapping in charge collection by the use of a high-purity germanium coaxial detector configured with the p (+) contact on the coaxial periphery is discussed.

  5. Calibration of Germanium Resistance Thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladner, D.; Urban, E.; Mason, F. C.

    1987-01-01

    Largely completed thermometer-calibration cryostat and probe allows six germanium resistance thermometers to be calibrated at one time at superfluid-helium temperatures. In experiments involving several such thermometers, use of this calibration apparatus results in substantial cost savings. Cryostat maintains temperature less than 2.17 K through controlled evaporation and removal of liquid helium from Dewar. Probe holds thermometers to be calibrated and applies small amount of heat as needed to maintain precise temperature below 2.17 K.

  6. Epitaxial Deposition Of Germanium Doped With Gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Epitaxial layers of germanium doped with gallium made by chemical vapor deposition. Method involves combination of techniques and materials used in chemical vapor deposition with GeH4 or GeCl4 as source of germanium and GaCl3 as source of gallium. Resulting epitaxial layers of germanium doped with gallium expected to be highly pure, with high crystalline quality. High-quality material useful in infrared sensors.

  7. Mineral resource of the month: germanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guberman, David

    2010-01-01

    The article provides information on germanium, an element with electrical properties between those of a metal and an insulator. Applications of germanium include its use as a component of the glass in fiber-optic cable, in infrared optics devices and as a semiconductor and substrate used in electronic and solar applications. Germanium was first isolated by German chemist Clemens Winkler in 1886 and was named after Winkler's native country. In 2008, the leading sources of primary germanium from coal or zinc include Canada, China and Russia.

  8. Nanowire Optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihuan; Nabet, Bahram

    2015-12-01

    Semiconductor nanowires have been used in a variety of passive and active optoelectronic devices including waveguides, photodetectors, solar cells, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), lasers, sensors, and optical antennas. We review the optical properties of these nanowires in terms of absorption, guiding, and radiation of light, which may be termed light management. Analysis of the interaction of light with long cylindrical/hexagonal structures with subwavelength diameters identifies radial resonant modes, such as Leaky Mode Resonances, or Whispering Gallery modes. The two-dimensional treatment should incorporate axial variations in "volumetric modes,"which have so far been presented in terms of Fabry-Perot (FP), and helical resonance modes. We report on finite-difference timedomain (FDTD) simulations with the aim of identifying the dependence of these modes on geometry (length, width), tapering, shape (cylindrical, hexagonal), core-shell versus core-only, and dielectric cores with semiconductor shells. This demonstrates how nanowires (NWs) form excellent optical cavities without the need for top and bottommirrors. However, optically equivalent structures such as hexagonal and cylindrical wires can have very different optoelectronic properties meaning that light management alone does not sufficiently describe the observed enhancement in upward (absorption) and downward transitions (emission) of light inNWs; rather, the electronic transition rates should be considered. We discuss this "rate management" scheme showing its strong dimensional dependence, making a case for photonic integrated circuits (PICs) that can take advantage of the confluence of the desirable optical and electronic properties of these nanostructures.

  9. Germanium recycling in the United States in 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgenson, John D.

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the recycling flow of germanium in the United States in 2000, as well as other germanium material flow streams. Germanium was recycled mostly from new scrap that was generated during the manufacture of germanium-containing fiber optic cables and from new and old scrap products of germanium-containing infrared imaging devices. In 2000, about 11.5 metric tons of germanium was recycled, about 40 percent of which was derived from old scrap. The germanium recycling rate was estimated to be 50 percent, and germanium scrap recycling efficiency, 76 percent.

  10. Mineral resource of the month: germanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgenson, John D.

    2003-01-01

    Germanium is a hard, brittle semimetal that first came into use over a half-century ago as a semiconductor material in radar units and in the first transistor ever made. Most germanium is recovered as a byproduct of zinc smelting, but it has also been recovered at some copper smelters and from the fly ash of coal-burning industrial power plants.

  11. APPLICATION OF GERMANIUM DETECTORS TO ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is one of the most economical and wide-ranging tools for monitoring the environment for radiological impact. This report examines the problems involved in applying germanium detectors to the analysis of environmental samples. All aspects of germanium spectr...

  12. Reactions of germanium tetrahalides with ketene acetals

    SciTech Connect

    Efimova, I.V.; Kazankova, M.A.; Lutsenko, I.F.

    1985-05-01

    Recently, the authors reported that alkyl vinyl ethers and terminal alkynes are readily germylated by germanium tetrahalides in the presence of a tertiary amine. To extend the range of applicability of this reaction and to obtain additional information on its mechanism, the authors study reactions of ketene acetals with germanium tetrachloride and tetrabromide in the presence of triethylamine.

  13. Germanium multiphase equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, Scott D.; Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia De; Kress, Joel D.; Rudin, Sven P.

    2014-05-07

    A new SESAME multiphase germanium equation of state (EOS) has been developed using the best available experimental data and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The equilibrium EOS includes the Ge I (diamond), the Ge II (β-Sn) and the liquid phases. The foundation of the EOS is based on density functional theory calculations which are used to determine the cold curve and the Debye temperature. Results are compared to Hugoniot data through the solid-solid and solid-liquid transitions. We propose some experiments to better understand the dynamics of this element

  14. MAJORANA Collaboration's experience with germanium detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mertens, S.; Abgrall, N.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Buuck, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y. -D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Efremenko, Yu; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; MacMullin, J.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S. J.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Snyder, N.; Tedeschi, D.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, C. -H.; Yumatov, V.

    2015-05-01

    The goal of the Majorana Demonstrator project is to search for 0νββ decay in 76Ge. Of all candidate isotopes for 0νββ, 76Ge has some of the most favorable characteristics. Germanium detectors are a well established technology, and in searches for 0νββ, the high purity germanium crystal acts simultaneously as source and detector. Furthermore, p-type germanium detectors provide excellent energy resolution and a specially designed point contact geometry allows for sensitive pulse shape discrimination. This paper will summarize the experiences the MAJORANA collaboration made with enriched germanium detectors manufactured by ORTEC®®. The process from production, to characterization and integration in MAJORANA mounting structure will be described. A summary of the performance of all enriched germanium detectors will be given.

  15. MAJORANA Collaboration's experience with germanium detectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mertens, S.; Abgrall, N.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Buuck, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; et al

    2015-05-01

    The goal of the Majorana Demonstrator project is to search for 0νββ decay in 76Ge. Of all candidate isotopes for 0νββ, 76Ge has some of the most favorable characteristics. Germanium detectors are a well established technology, and in searches for 0νββ, the high purity germanium crystal acts simultaneously as source and detector. Furthermore, p-type germanium detectors provide excellent energy resolution and a specially designed point contact geometry allows for sensitive pulse shape discrimination. This paper will summarize the experiences the MAJORANA collaboration made with enriched germanium detectors manufactured by ORTEC®®. The process from production, to characterization and integration in MAJORANAmore » mounting structure will be described. A summary of the performance of all enriched germanium detectors will be given.« less

  16. Chemical Sensing with Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penner, Reginald M.

    2012-07-01

    Transformational advances in the performance of nanowire-based chemical sensors and biosensors have been achieved over the past two to three years. These advances have arisen from a better understanding of the mechanisms of transduction operating in these devices, innovations in nanowire fabrication, and improved methods for incorporating receptors into or onto nanowires. Nanowire-based biosensors have detected DNA in undiluted physiological saline. For silicon nanowire nucleic acid sensors, higher sensitivities have been obtained by eliminating the passivating oxide layer on the nanowire surface and by substituting uncharged protein nucleic acids for DNA as the capture strands. Biosensors for peptide and protein cancer markers, based on both semiconductor nanowires and nanowires of conductive polymers, have detected these targets at physiologically relevant concentrations in both blood plasma and whole blood. Nanowire chemical sensors have also detected several gases at the parts-per-million level. This review discusses these and other recent advances, concentrating on work published in the past three years.

  17. Interfacial properties of germanium nitride dielectric layers in germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiners, L. G.

    The first year's effort on this project has been primarily devoted to the design and construction of a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition system for growth of the germanium nitride layers. The gas manifold layout is shown schematically, as is the reactor assembly, and the vacuum pumping assembly. The generator-cavity system is capable of delivering 0-600 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz. The power generating section has been constructed from components contained in a portable home microwave oven and the cavity was assembled from easily machinable pieces. The cw magnetron source was mounted directly on a cylindrical microwave cavity. The plasma was contained in an on-axis 20-mm o.d. quartz tube. Design tradeoffs and operating information are discussed.

  18. Propulsion of nanowire diodes.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Marzal, Percy; Sattayasamitsathit, Sirilak; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Windmiller, Joshua R; Dao, Cuong; Wang, Joseph

    2010-03-14

    The propulsion of semiconductor diode nanowires under external AC electric field is described. Such fuel-free electric field-induced nanowire propulsion offers considerable promise for diverse technological applications. PMID:20177595

  19. Silicon and Germanium Nanostructures for Photovoltaic Applications: Ab-Initio Results

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Actually, most of the electric energy is being produced by fossil fuels and great is the search for viable alternatives. The most appealing and promising technology is photovoltaics. It will become truly mainstream when its cost will be comparable to other energy sources. One way is to significantly enhance device efficiencies, for example by increasing the number of band gaps in multijunction solar cells or by favoring charge separation in the devices. This can be done by using cells based on nanostructured semiconductors. In this paper, we will present ab-initio results of the structural, electronic and optical properties of (1) silicon and germanium nanoparticles embedded in wide band gap materials and (2) mixed silicon-germanium nanowires. We show that theory can help in understanding the microscopic processes important for devices performances. In particular, we calculated for embedded Si and Ge nanoparticles the dependence of the absorption threshold on size and oxidation, the role of crystallinity and, in some cases, the recombination rates, and we demonstrated that in the case of mixed nanowires, those with a clear interface between Si and Ge show not only a reduced quantum confinement effect but display also a natural geometrical separation between electron and hole. PMID:21076696

  20. Silicon and Germanium Nanostructures for Photovoltaic Applications: Ab-Initio Results.

    PubMed

    Ossicini, Stefano; Amato, Michele; Guerra, Roberto; Palummo, Maurizia; Pulci, Olivia

    2010-01-01

    Actually, most of the electric energy is being produced by fossil fuels and great is the search for viable alternatives. The most appealing and promising technology is photovoltaics. It will become truly mainstream when its cost will be comparable to other energy sources. One way is to significantly enhance device efficiencies, for example by increasing the number of band gaps in multijunction solar cells or by favoring charge separation in the devices. This can be done by using cells based on nanostructured semiconductors. In this paper, we will present ab-initio results of the structural, electronic and optical properties of (1) silicon and germanium nanoparticles embedded in wide band gap materials and (2) mixed silicon-germanium nanowires. We show that theory can help in understanding the microscopic processes important for devices performances. In particular, we calculated for embedded Si and Ge nanoparticles the dependence of the absorption threshold on size and oxidation, the role of crystallinity and, in some cases, the recombination rates, and we demonstrated that in the case of mixed nanowires, those with a clear interface between Si and Ge show not only a reduced quantum confinement effect but display also a natural geometrical separation between electron and hole. PMID:21076696

  1. High Efficiency Germanium Immersion Gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmenko, P J; Davis, P J; Little, S L; Little, L M; Bixler, J V

    2006-05-01

    We have fabricated several germanium immersion gratings by single crystal, single point diamond flycutting on an ultra-precision lathe. Use of a dead sharp tool produces groove corners less than 0.1 micron in radius and consequently high diffraction efficiency. We measured first order efficiencies in immersion of over 80% at 10.6 micron wavelength. Wavefront error was low averaging 0.06 wave rms (at 633 nm) across the full aperture. The grating spectral response was free of ghosts down to our detection limit of 1 part in 10{sup 4}. Scatter should be low based upon the surface roughness. Measurement of the spectral line profile of a CO{sub 2} laser sets an upper bound on total integrated scatter of 0.5%.

  2. High efficiency germanium immersion gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmenko, Paul J.; Davis, Pete J.; Little, Steve L.; Little, Liesl M.; Bixler, Jay V.

    2006-06-01

    We have fabricated several germanium immersion gratings by single crystal, single point diamond flycutting on an ultra-precision lathe. Use of a dead sharp tool produces groove corners less than 0.1 micron in radius and consequently high diffraction efficiency. We measured first order efficiencies in immersion of over 80% at 10.6 micron wavelength. Wavefront error was low averaging 0.06 wave rms (at 633 nm) across the full aperture. The grating spectral response was free of ghosts down to our detection limit of 1 part in 104. Scatter should be low based upon the surface roughness. Measurement of the spectral line profile of a CO II laser sets an upper bound on total integrated scatter of 0.5%.

  3. Nanowire-based detector

    DOEpatents

    Berggren, Karl K; Hu, Xiaolong; Masciarelli, Daniele

    2014-06-24

    Systems, articles, and methods are provided related to nanowire-based detectors, which can be used for light detection in, for example, single-photon detectors. In one aspect, a variety of detectors are provided, for example one including an electrically superconductive nanowire or nanowires constructed and arranged to interact with photons to produce a detectable signal. In another aspect, fabrication methods are provided, including techniques to precisely reproduce patterns in subsequently formed layers of material using a relatively small number of fabrication steps. By precisely reproducing patterns in multiple material layers, one can form electrically insulating materials and electrically conductive materials in shapes such that incoming photons are redirected toward a nearby electrically superconductive materials (e.g., electrically superconductive nanowire(s)). For example, one or more resonance structures (e.g., comprising an electrically insulating material), which can trap electromagnetic radiation within its boundaries, can be positioned proximate the nanowire(s). The resonance structure can include, at its boundaries, electrically conductive material positioned proximate the electrically superconductive nanowire such that light that would otherwise be transmitted through the sensor is redirected toward the nanowire(s) and detected. In addition, electrically conductive material can be positioned proximate the electrically superconductive nanowire (e.g. at the aperture of the resonant structure), such that light is directed by scattering from this structure into the nanowire.

  4. Germanium: giving microelectronics an efficiency boost

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, Celestine N.

    2015-01-01

    Germanium is an essentially nontoxic element, with the exception of only a few compounds. However, if dissolved concentrations in drinking water are as high as one or more parts per million chronic diseases may occur.

  5. Germanium Resistance Thermometer For Subkelvin Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castles, Stephen H.

    1993-01-01

    Improved germanium resistance thermometer measures temperatures as small as 0.01 K accurately. Design provides large area for electrical connections (to reduce electrical gradients and increase sensitivity to changes in temperatures) and large heat sink (to minimize resistance heating). Gold pads on top and bottom of germanium crystal distribute electrical current and flow of heat nearly uniformly across crystal. Less expensive than magnetic thermometers or superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID's) otherwise used.

  6. Dangling bonds and vacancies in germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, J. R.; Janotti, A.; Van de Walle, C. G.

    2013-01-01

    The quest for metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) with higher carrier mobility has triggered great interest in germanium-based MOSFETs. Still, the performance of germanium-based devices lags significantly behind that of their silicon counterparts, possibly due to the presence of defects such as dangling bonds (DBs) and vacancies. Using screened hybrid functional calculations we investigate the role of DBs and vacancies in germanium. We find that the DB defect in germanium has no levels in the band gap; it acts as a negatively charged acceptor with the (0/-1) transition level below the valence-band maximum (VBM). This explains the absence of electron-spin-resonance observations of DBs in germanium. The vacancy in germanium has a much lower formation energy than the vacancy in silicon and is stable in a number of charge states, depending on the position of the Fermi level. We find the (0/-1) and (-1/-2) transition levels at 0.16 and 0.38 eV above the VBM; the spacing of these levels is explained based on the strength of intraorbital repulsion. We compare these results with calculations for silicon, as well as with available experimental data.

  7. Fabrication of multilayer nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasveer; Singh, Avtar; Kumar, Davinder; Thakur, Anup; Kaur, Raminder

    2016-05-01

    Multilayer nanowires were fabricated by potentiostate ectrodeposition template synthesis method into the pores of polycarbonate membrane. In present work layer by layer deposition of two different metals Ni and Cu in polycarbonate membrane having pore size of 600 nm were carried out. It is found that the growth of nanowires is not constant, it varies with deposition time. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to study the morphology of fabricated multilayer nanowires. An energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) results confirm the composition of multilayer nanowires. The result shows that multilayer nanowires formed is dense.

  8. Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Menke, E J; Thompson, M A; Xiang, C; Yang, L C; Penner, R M

    2006-11-01

    Nanowire fabrication methods can be classified either as 'top down', involving photo- or electron-beam lithography, or 'bottom up', involving the synthesis of nanowires from molecular precursors. Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE) combines attributes of photolithography with the versatility of bottom-up electrochemical synthesis. Photolithography defines the position of a sacrificial nickel nanoband electrode, which is recessed into a horizontal trench. This trench acts as a 'nanoform' to define the thickness of an incipient nanowire during its electrodeposition. The electrodeposition duration determines the width of the nanowire. Removal of the photoresist and nickel exposes a polycrystalline nanowire--composed of gold, platinum or palladium--characterized by thickness and width that can be independently controlled down to 18 and 40 nm, respectively. Metal nanowires prepared by LPNE may have applications in chemical sensing and optical signal processing, and as interconnects in nanoelectronic devices. PMID:17057701

  9. Silicon Nanowire Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamins, Theodore

    2006-03-01

    Metal-catalyzed, self-assembled, one-dimensional semiconductor nanowires are being considered as possible device elements to augment and supplant conventional electronics and to extend the use of CMOS beyond the physical and economic limits of conventional technology. Such nanowires can create nanostructures without the complexity and cost of extremely fine scale lithography. The well-known and controllable properties of silicon make silicon nanowires especially attractive. Easy integration with conventional electronics will aid their acceptance and incorporation. For example, connections can be formed to both ends of a nanowire by growing it laterally from a vertical surface formed by etching the top silicon layer of a silicon-on-insulator structure into isolated electrodes. Field-effect structures are one class of devices that can be readily built in silicon nanowires. Because the ratio of surface to volume in a thin nanowire is high, conduction through the nanowire is very sensitive to surface conditions, making it effective as the channel of a field-effect transistor or as the transducing element of a gas or chemical sensor. As the nanowire diameter decreases, a greater fraction of the mobile charge can be modulated by a given external charge, increasing the sensitivity. Having the gate of a nanowire transistor completely surround the nanowire also enhances the sensitivity. For a field-effect sensor to be effective, the charge must be physically close to the nanowire so that the majority of the compensating charge is induced in the nanowire and so that ions in solution do not screen the charge. Because only induced charge is being sensed, a coating that selectively binds the target species should be added to the nanowire surface to distinguish between different species in the analyte. The nanowire work at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories was supported in part by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

  10. Photoelectrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide using Ge doped GaN nanowire photoanodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yichen; AlOtaibi, Bandar; Chowdhury, Faqrul A.; Fan, Shizhao; Kibria, Md G.; Li, Lu; Li, Chao-Jun; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    We report on the direct conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a photoelectrochemical cell consisting of germanium doped gallium nitride nanowire anode and copper (Cu) cathode. Various products including methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), and formic acid (HCOOH) were observed under light illumination. A Faradaic efficiency of ˜10% was measured for HCOOH. Furthermore, this photoelectrochemical system showed enhanced stability for 6 h CO2 reduction reaction on low cost, large area Si substrates.

  11. Germanium anode with excellent lithium storage performance in a germanium/lithium-cobalt oxide lithium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuwan; Yang, Zhibo; Fu, Yujun; Qiao, Li; Li, Dan; Yue, Hongwei; He, Deyan

    2015-02-24

    Germanium is a highly promising anode material for lithium-ion batteries as a consequence of its large theoretical specific capacity, good electrical conductivity, and fast lithium ion diffusivity. In this work, Co3O4 nanowire array fabricated on nickel foam was designed as a nanostructured current collector for Ge anode. By limiting the voltage cutoff window in an appropriate range, the obtained Ge anode exhibits excellent lithium storage performance in half- and full-cells, which can be mainly attributed to the designed nanostructured current collector with good conductivity, enough buffering space for the volume change, and shortened ionic transport length. More importantly, the assembled Ge/LiCoO2 full-cell shows a high energy density of 475 Wh/kg and a high power density of 6587 W/kg. A high capacity of 1184 mA h g(-1) for Ge anode was maintained at a current density of 5000 mA g(-1) after 150 cycles. PMID:25629917

  12. Electrolytic Formation of Crystalline Silicon/Germanium Alloy Nanotubes and Hollow Particles with Enhanced Lithium-Storage Properties.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wei; Zhou, Jing; Yu, Le; Wang, Dihua; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2016-06-20

    Crystalline silicon(Si)/germanium(Ge) alloy nanotubes and hollow particles are synthesized for the first time through a one-pot electrolytic process. The morphology of these alloy structures can be easily tailored from nanotubes to hollow particles by varying the overpotential during the electro-reduction reaction. The continuous solid diffusion governed by the nanoscale Kirkendall effect results in the formation of inner void in the alloy particles. Benefitting from the compositional and structural advantages, these SiGe alloy nanotubes exhibit much enhanced lithium-storage performance compared with the individual solid Si and Ge nanowires as the anode material for lithium-ion batteries. PMID:27159140

  13. Recovery of germanium-68 from irradiated targets

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Hamilton, Virginia T.

    1993-01-01

    A process for selective separation of germanium-68 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets is provided and includes dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first ion-containing solution, contacting the first ion-containing solution with a cationic resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium and rubidium remain in a second ion-containing solution while ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium and zirconium are selectively adsorbed by the first resin, adjusting the pH of the second ion-containing solution to within a range of from about 0.7 to about 3.0, adjusting the soluble metal halide concentration in the second ion-containing solution to a level adapted for subsequent separation of germanium, contacting the pH-adjusted, soluble metal halide-containing second ion-containing solution with a dextran-based material whereby germanium ions are separated by the dextran-based material, and recovering the germanium from the dextran-based material, preferably by distillation.

  14. Recovery of germanium-68 from irradiated targets

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.R.; Jamriska, D.J. Sr.; Hamilton, V.T.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a process for selective separation of germanium-68 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets is provided and includes dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first ion-containing solution, contacting the first ion-containing solution with a cationic resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium,vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium and rubidium remain in a second ion-containing solution while ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium and zirconium are selectively adsorbed by the first resin, adjusting the pH of the second ion-containing solution to within a range of from about 0.7 to about 3.0, adjusting the soluble metal halide concentration in the second ion-containing solution to a level adapted for subsequent separation of germanium, contacting the pH-adjusted, soluble metal halide-containing second ion-containing solution with a dextran-based material whereby germanium ions are separated by the dextran-based material, and recovering the germanium from the dextran-based material, preferably by distillation.

  15. Recovery of germanium-68 from irradiated targets

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.R.; Jamriska, D.J. Sr.; Hamilton, V.T.

    1993-03-02

    A process for selective separation of germanium-68 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets is provided and includes dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first ion-containing solution, contacting the first ion-containing solution with a cationic resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium and rubidium remain in a second ion-containing solution while ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium and zirconium are selectively adsorbed by the first resin, adjusting the pH of the second ion-containing solution to within a range of from about 0.7 to about 3.0, adjusting the soluble metal halide concentration in the second ion-containing solution to a level adapted for subsequent separation of germanium, contacting the pH-adjusted, soluble metal halide-containing second ion-containing solution with a dextran-based material whereby germanium ions are separated by the dextran-based material, and recovering the germanium from the dextran-based material, preferably by distillation.

  16. Multicolored Vertical Silicon Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Kwanyong; Wober, Munib; Steinvurzel, P.; Schonbrun, E.; Dan, Yaping; Ellenbogen, T.; Crozier, K. B.

    2011-04-13

    We demonstrate that vertical silicon nanowires take on a surprising variety of colors covering the entire visible spectrum, in marked contrast to the gray color of bulk silicon. This effect is readily observable by bright-field microscopy, or even to the naked eye. The reflection spectra of the nanowires each show a dip whose position depends on the nanowire radii. We compare the experimental data to the results of finite difference time domain simulations to elucidate the physical mechanisms behind the phenomena we observe. The nanowires are fabricated as arrays, but the vivid colors arise not from scattering or diffractive effects of the array, but from the guided mode properties of the individual nanowires. Each nanowire can thus define its own color, allowing for complex spatial patterning. We anticipate that the color filter effect we demonstrate could be employed in nanoscale image sensor devices.

  17. From nanodiamond to nanowires.

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, A.; Materials Science Division

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in the fabrication and characterization of semiconductor and metallic nanowires are proving very successful in meeting the high expectations of nanotechnologists. Although the nanoscience surrounding sp{sup 3} bonded carbon nanotubes has continued to flourish over recent years the successful synthesis of the sp{sup 3} analogue, diamond nanowires, has been limited. This prompts questions as to whether diamond nanowires are fundamentally unstable. By applying knowledge obtained from examining the structural transformations in nanodiamond, a framework for analyzing the structure and stability of diamond nanowires may be established. One possible framework will be discussed here, supported by results of ab initio density functional theory calculations used to study the structural relaxation of nanodiamond and diamond nanowires. The results show that the structural stability and electronic properties of diamond nanowires are dependent on the surface morphology, crystallographic direction of the principal axis, and the degree of surface hydrogenation.

  18. Front End Spectroscopy ASIC for Germanium Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulf, Eric

    Large-area, tracking, semiconductor detectors with excellent spatial and spectral resolution enable exciting new access to soft (0.2-5 MeV) gamma-ray astrophysics. The improvements from semiconductor tracking detectors come with the burden of high density of strips and/or pixels that require high-density, low-power, spectroscopy quality readout electronics. CMOS ASIC technologies are a natural fit to this requirement and have led to high-quality readout systems for all current semiconducting tracking detectors except for germanium detectors. The Compton Spectrometer and Imager (COSI), formerly NCT, at University of California Berkeley and the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) at Goddard Space Flight Center utilize germanium cross-strip detectors and are on the forefront of NASA's Compton telescope research with funded missions of long duration balloon flights. The development of a readout ASIC for germanium detectors would allow COSI to replace their discrete electronics readout and would enable the proposed Gamma-Ray Explorer (GRX) mission utilizing germanium strip-detectors. We propose a 3-year program to develop and test a germanium readout ASIC to TRL 5 and to integrate the ASIC readout onto a COSI detector allowing a TRL 6 demonstration for the following COSI balloon flight. Our group at NRL led a program, sponsored by another government agency, to produce and integrate a cross-strip silicon detector ASIC, designed and fabricated by Dr. De Geronimo at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The ASIC was designed to handle the large (>30 pF) capacitance of three 10 cm^2 detectors daisy-chained together. The front-end preamplifier, selectable inverter, shaping times, and gains make this ASIC compatible with a germanium cross-strip detector as well. We therefore have the opportunity and expertise to leverage the previous investment in the silicon ASIC for a new mission. A germanium strip detector ASIC will also require precise timing of the signals at

  19. Extrinsic germanium Blocked Impurity Bank (BIB) detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabach, Timothy N.; Huffman, James E.; Watson, Dan M.

    1989-01-01

    Ge:Ga blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detectors with long wavelength thresholds greater than 190 microns and peak quantum efficiencies of 4 percent, at an operating temperature of 1.8 K, have been fabricated. These proof of concept devices consist of a high purity germanium blocking layer epitaxially grown on a Ga-doped Ge substrate. This demonstration of BIB behavior in germanium enables the development of far infrared detector arrays similar to the current silicon-based devices. Present efforts are focussed on improving the chemical vapor deposition process used to create the blocking layer and on the lithographic processing required to produce monolithic detector arrays in germanium. Approaches to test the impurity levels in both the blocking and active layers are considered.

  20. Magnetic-field-induced photocurrent in metal-dielectric-semiconductor heterostructures based on cobalt nanoparticles SiO2(Co)/GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, V. V.; Lutsev, L. V.; Usachev, P. A.; Astretsov, A. A.; Stognij, A. I.; Novitskii, N. N.; Pisarev, R. V.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic-field influence on photocurrent in heterostructures of silicon dioxide films with cobalt nanoparticles SiO2(Co) grown on gallium arsenide GaAs substrate has been studied in the avalanche regime at room temperature. High values of magnetic-field-induced photocurrent were found in the vicinity and above the GaAs bandgap of ∼1.4 eV. For photon energies E > 1.4 eV the photocurrent significantly increases, while the avalanche process is suppressed by the magnetic field, and the current flowing through the heterostructure decreases. The photocurrent is enhanced in the SiO2(Co 60 at%)/GaAs heterostructure at the magnetic field H=1.65 kOe by factor of about 10 for the photon energy E=1.5 eV. This phenomenon is explained by a model based on electronic transitions in magnetic fields with the spin-dependent recombination process at deep impurity centers in the SiO2(Co)/GaAs interface region.

  1. Silicon and germanium nanocrystals: properties and characterization

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Alexandra; Coutinho, José

    2014-01-01

    Summary Group-IV nanocrystals have emerged as a promising group of materials that extends the realm of application of bulk diamond, silicon, germanium and related materials beyond their traditional boundaries. Over the last two decades of research, their potential for application in areas such as optoelectronic applications and memory devices has been progressively unraveled. Nevertheless, new challenges with no parallel in the respective bulk material counterparts have arisen. In this review, we consider what has been achieved and what are the current limitations with regard to growth, characterization and modeling of silicon and germanium nanocrystals and related materials. PMID:25383290

  2. Germanium-Based Nanomaterials for Rechargeable Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songping; Han, Cuiping; Iocozzia, James; Lu, Mingjia; Ge, Rongyun; Xu, Rui; Lin, Zhiqun

    2016-07-01

    Germanium-based nanomaterials have emerged as important candidates for next-generation energy-storage devices owing to their unique chemical and physical properties. In this Review, we provide a review of the current state-of-the-art in germanium-based materials design, synthesis, processing, and application in battery technology. The most recent advances in the area of Ge-based nanocomposite electrode materials and electrolytes for solid-state batteries are summarized. The limitations of Ge-based materials for energy-storage applications are discussed, and potential research directions are also presented with an emphasis on commercial products and theoretical investigations. PMID:27281435

  3. Neutron-transmutation-doped germanium bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaio, N. P.; Rodder, M.; Haller, E. E.; Kreysa, E.

    1983-01-01

    Six slices of ultra-pure germanium were irradiated with thermal neutron fluences between 7.5 x 10 to the 16th and 1.88 x 10 to the 18th per sq cm. After thermal annealing the resistivity was measured down to low temperatures (less than 4.2 K) and found to follow the relationship rho = rho sub 0 exp(Delta/T) in the hopping conduction regime. Also, several junction FETs were tested for noise performance at room temperature and in an insulating housing in a 4.2 K cryostat. These FETs will be used as first stage amplifiers for neutron-transmutation-doped germanium bolometers.

  4. Germanium-overcoated niobium Dayem bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, L. B.; Peters, P. N.

    1976-01-01

    Overcoating constriction microbridges with semiconducting germanium provides additional thermal conductivity at liquid-helium temperatures to reduce the effects of self-heating in these Josephson junctions. Microwave-induced steps were observed in the I-V characteristics of an overcoated Dayem bridge fabricated in a 15-nm-thick niobium film; at least 20 steps could be counted at 4.2 K. No steps were observed in the I-V characteristics of the bridge prior to overcoating. In addition, the germanium overcoat can protect against electrical disturbances at room temperature.

  5. Structural characterization of nanowires and nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Catherine Rose

    Nanowires, which have diameter less than a few hundred nanometers and high aspect ratios, may have the same properties as their corresponding bulk materials, or may exhibit unique properties due to their confined dimensions and increased surface to volume ratios. They are a popular field of technological investigation in applications that depend on the transport of charge carriers, because of expectations that microcircuit miniaturization will lead to the next boom in the electronics industry. In this work, the high spatial resolution afforded by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to study nanowires formed by electrochemical deposition into porous alumina templates. The goal is to determine the effect of the synthesis and subsequent processing on the microstructure and crystallinity of the wires. A thorough understanding of the microstructural features of a material is vital for optimizing its performance in a desired application. Two material systems were studied in this work. The first is bismuth telluride (Bi 2Te3), which is used in thermoelectric applications. The second is metallic copper, the electrochemical deposition of which is of interest for interconnects in semiconductor devices. The first part of this work utilized TEM to obtain a thorough characterization of the microstructural features of individual Bi2Te3 nanowires following release from the templates. As deposited, the nanowires are fine grained and exhibit significant lattice strain. Annealing increases the grain size and dislocations are created to accommodate the lattice strain. The degree of these microstructural changes depends on the thermal treatment. However, no differences were seen in the nanowire microstructure as a function of the synthetic parameters. The second part of this work utilized a modified dark field TEM technique in order to obtain a spatially resolved, semi-quantitative understanding of the evolution of preferred orientation as a function of the electrochemical

  6. Electroluminescence from silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, J.; Solanki, R.; Freeouf, J. L.; Carruthers, J. R.

    2004-12-01

    Room temperature electroluminescence has been demonstrated from undoped silicon nanowires that were grown from disilane. Ensembles of nanowires were excited by capacitively coupling them to an ac electric field. The emission peak occurred at about 600 nm from wires of average diameter of about 4 nm. The emission appears to result from band-to-band electron-hole recombination.

  7. Nanowires for energy generation.

    PubMed

    Hiralal, Pritesh; Unalan, Husnu Emrah; Amaratunga, Gehan A J

    2012-05-17

    As a result of their morphology, nanowires bring new properties and the promise of performance for a range of electronic devices. This review looks into the properties of nanowires and the multiple ways in which they have been exploited for energy generation, from photovoltaics to piezoelectric generators. PMID:22538769

  8. Metallic nanowire networks

    DOEpatents

    Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A.

    2012-11-06

    A metallic nanowire network synthesized using chemical reduction of a metal ion source by a reducing agent in the presence of a soft template comprising a tubular inverse micellar network. The network of interconnected polycrystalline nanowires has a very high surface-area/volume ratio, which makes it highly suitable for use in catalytic applications.

  9. Temperature dependent electrical transport in single Ge nanowires near insulator-metal transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raychaudhuri, Arup Kumar; Seth, Shaili; Das, Kaustuv

    We report low temperature (4K <= T <= 300K) electrical transport in single strands of Germanium Nanowires of radius well below 50 nm. The nanowires, grown from vapour phase with Au catalyst have carrier concentrations ranging from intrinsic to near the insulator-metal transition boundary. The nanowires were characterized extensively by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope and established their crystalline quality. A single nanowire dispersed on a Si/SiO2 substrate was connected by Cr/Au contacts made by electron beam lithography in 2-probe / 4-probe configurations. The undoped nanowires have a room temperature resistivity (ρ) of 2 ohm.cm or more (estimated carrier concentration ~1015/cm3) and below the 25K (where it shows carrier freeze out) the ρ rises to high value of 35 ohm.cm. For nanowires with ρ <= .01 ohm.cm at 300K , low temperature ρ becomes finite, signaling transition to a metallic state with negative temperature co-efficient of ρ. The critical composition for the insulator-metal transition is more than an order higher than that observed in the bulk. At low T (<25K) resistivity data in this regime can be fitted to weak-localization form ρ =ρ0 - aTp/2 with ρ0 the NW's ~ 0.5-3.5 mohm.cm, with the exponent p ~ 3-4 as expected from theoretical predictions. Acknowldge Financial Support from Department od Science and Technology, Government of India for Sponsored Project.

  10. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W.

    1988-02-01

    This report describes the effects of the germanium fraction in hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium alloys on various parameters, especially those that are indicators of film quality, and the impact of deposition methods, feedgas mixtures, and other deposition parameters on a SiGe:H and a-SiGe:H:F film characteristics and quality. Literature data show the relationship between germanium content, hydrogen content, deposition method (various glow discharges and CVD), feedgas lmixture, and other parameters and properties, such as optical band gap, dark and photoconductivities, photosensitivity, activation energy, Urbach parameter, and spin density. Some of these are convenient quality indicators; another is the absence of microstructure. Examining RF glow discharge with both a diode and triode geometry, DC proximity glow discharge, microwave glow discharge, and photo-CVD, using gas mixtures such as hydrogen-diluted and undiluted mixtures of silane/germane, disilane/germane, silane/germaniumtetrafluoride, and others, it was observed that hydrogen dilution (or inert gas dilution) is essential in achieving high photosensitivity in silicon-germanium alloys (in contradistinction to amorphous hydrogenated silicon). Hydrogen dilution results in a higher photosensitivity than do undiluted gas mixtures. 81 refs., 42 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Dopant precipitation in silicon-germanium alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raag, V.

    1972-01-01

    The model commonly used to describe dopant precipitation in silicon-germanium alloys is discussed. The results of an experimental program are fit to the model in order to determine the long-term behavior of the thermoelectric properties of the n-type 80 at. % Si/20 at. % Ge alloy. Thermoelectric property projections to twelve years of operating time are given.

  12. Germanium JFET for Cryogenic Readout Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, N. C.; Monroy, C.; Jhabvala, M.; Shu, P.

    1999-01-01

    The n-channel Germanium junction field effect transistor (Ge-JFET) was designed and fabricated for cryogenic applications. The Ge-JFET exhibits superior noise performance at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). From the device current voltage characteristics of n-channel JFETs, it is seen that transconductance increases monotonically with the lowering of temperature to 4.2 K (liquid helium temperature).

  13. Electron tunnelling into amorphous germanium and silicon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.; Clark, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of tunnel conductance versus bias, capacitance versus bias, and internal photoemission were made in the systems aluminum-oxide-amorphous germanium and aluminium-oxide-amorphous silicon. A function was extracted which expresses the deviation of these systems from the aluminium-oxide-aluminium system.

  14. Method for copper staining of germanium crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivet, E. J.

    1969-01-01

    Proper conditions for copper staining of germanium crystals include a low solution temperature of 3 degrees C, illumination of the sample by infrared light, and careful positioning of the light source relative to the sample so as to minimize absorption of the infrared light.

  15. Semiconductor nanowire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Samuel W.; Fu, Anthony; Wong, Andrew B.; Ning, Cun-Zheng; Yang, Peidong

    2016-06-01

    The discovery and continued development of the laser has revolutionized both science and industry. The advent of miniaturized, semiconductor lasers has made this technology an integral part of everyday life. Exciting research continues with a new focus on nanowire lasers because of their great potential in the field of optoelectronics. In this Review, we explore the latest advancements in the development of nanowire lasers and offer our perspective on future improvements and trends. We discuss fundamental material considerations and the latest, most effective materials for nanowire lasers. A discussion of novel cavity designs and amplification methods is followed by some of the latest work on surface plasmon polariton nanowire lasers. Finally, exciting new reports of electrically pumped nanowire lasers with the potential for integrated optoelectronic applications are described.

  16. Single nanowire photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bozhi; Kempa, Thomas J; Lieber, Charles M

    2009-01-01

    This tutorial review focuses on recent work addressing the properties and potential of semiconductor nanowires as building blocks for photovoltaic devices based on investigations at the single nanowire level. Two central nanowire motifs involving p-i-n dopant modulation in axial and coaxial geometries serve as platforms for fundamental studies. Research illustrating the synthesis of these structural motifs will be reviewed first, followed by an examination of recent studies of single axial and coaxial p-i-n silicon nanowire solar cells. Finally, challenges and opportunities for improving efficiency enabled by controlled synthesis of more complex nanowire structures will be discussed, as will their potential applications as power sources for emerging nanoelectronic devices. PMID:19088961

  17. Nanowire Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnett, Erik C.; Brongersma, Mark L.; Cui, Yi; McGehee, Michael D.

    2011-08-01

    The nanowire geometry provides potential advantages over planar wafer-based or thin-film solar cells in every step of the photoconversion process. These advantages include reduced reflection, extreme light trapping, improved band gap tuning, facile strain relaxation, and increased defect tolerance. These benefits are not expected to increase the maximum efficiency above standard limits; instead, they reduce the quantity and quality of material necessary to approach those limits, allowing for substantial cost reductions. Additionally, nanowires provide opportunities to fabricate complex single-crystalline semiconductor devices directly on low-cost substrates and electrodes such as aluminum foil, stainless steel, and conductive glass, addressing another major cost in current photovoltaic technology. This review describes nanowire solar cell synthesis and fabrication, important characterization techniques unique to nanowire systems, and advantages of the nanowire geometry.

  18. Semiconductor Nanowires: What's Next?

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Peidong; Yan, Ruoxue; Fardy, Melissa

    2010-04-28

    In this perspective, we take a critical look at the research progress within the nanowire community for the past decade. We discuss issues on the discovery of fundamentally new phenomena versus performance benchmarking for many of the nanowire applications. We also notice that both the bottom-up and top-down approaches have played important roles in advancing our fundamental understanding of this new class of nanostructures. Finally we attempt to look into the future and offer our personal opinions on what the future trends will be in nanowire research.

  19. Programmability of nanowire networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellew, A. T.; Bell, A. P.; McCarthy, E. K.; Fairfield, J. A.; Boland, J. J.

    2014-07-01

    Electrical connectivity in networks of nanoscale junctions must be better understood if nanowire devices are to be scaled up from single wires to functional material systems. We show that the natural connectivity behaviour found in random nanowire networks presents a new paradigm for creating multi-functional, programmable materials. In devices made from networks of Ni/NiO core-shell nanowires at different length scales, we discover the emergence of distinct behavioural regimes when networks are electrically stressed. We show that a small network, with few nanowire-nanowire junctions, acts as a unipolar resistive switch, demonstrating very high ON/OFF current ratios (>105). However, large networks of nanowires distribute an applied bias across a large number of junctions, and thus respond not by switching but instead by evolving connectivity. We demonstrate that these emergent properties lead to fault-tolerant materials whose resistance may be tuned, and which are capable of adaptively reconfiguring under stress. By combining these two behavioural regimes, we demonstrate that the same nanowire network may be programmed to act both as a metallic interconnect, and a resistive switch device with high ON/OFF ratio. These results enable the fabrication of programmable, multi-functional materials from random nanowire networks.Electrical connectivity in networks of nanoscale junctions must be better understood if nanowire devices are to be scaled up from single wires to functional material systems. We show that the natural connectivity behaviour found in random nanowire networks presents a new paradigm for creating multi-functional, programmable materials. In devices made from networks of Ni/NiO core-shell nanowires at different length scales, we discover the emergence of distinct behavioural regimes when networks are electrically stressed. We show that a small network, with few nanowire-nanowire junctions, acts as a unipolar resistive switch, demonstrating very high ON

  20. Template-free preparation of crystalline Ge nanowire film electrodes via an electrochemical liquid-liquid-solid process in water at ambient pressure and temperature for energy storage.

    PubMed

    Gu, Junsi; Collins, Sean M; Carim, Azhar I; Hao, Xiaoguang; Bartlett, Bart M; Maldonado, Stephen

    2012-09-12

    The direct electrodeposition of crystalline germanium (Ge) nanowire film electrodes from an aqueous solution of dissolved GeO(2) using discrete 'flux' nanoparticles capable of dissolving Ge(s) has been demonstrated. Electrodeposition of Ge at inert electrode substrates decorated with small (<100 nm), discrete indium (In) nanoparticles resulted in crystalline Ge nanowire films with definable nanowire diameters and densities without the need for a physical or chemical template. The Ge nanowires exhibited strong polycrystalline character as-deposited, with approximate crystallite dimensions of 20 nm and a mixed orientation of the crystallites along the length of the nanowire. Energy dispersive spectroscopic elemental mapping of individual Ge nanowires showed that the In nanoparticles remained at the base of each nanowire, indicating good electrical communication between the Ge nanowire and the underlying conductive support. As-deposited Ge nanowire films prepared on Cu supports were used without further processing as Li(+) battery anodes. Cycling studies performed at 1 C (1624 mA g(-1)) indicated the native Ge nanowire films supported stable discharge capacities at the level of 973 mA h g(-1), higher than analogous Ge nanowire film electrodes prepared through an energy-intensive vapor-liquid-solid nanowire growth process. The cumulative data show that ec-LLS is a viable method for directly preparing a functional, high-activity nanomaterials-based device component. The work presented here is a step toward the realization of simple processes that make fully functional energy conversion/storage technologies based on crystalline inorganic semiconductors entirely through benchtop, aqueous chemistry and electrochemistry without time- or energy-intensive process steps. PMID:22900746

  1. Constraining neutrino electromagnetic properties by germanium detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Chi, Hsin-Chang; Huang, Keh-Ning; Li, Hau-Bin; Liu, C.-P.; Singh, Lakhwinder; Wong, Henry T.; Wu, Chih-Liang; Wu, Chih-Pan

    2015-01-01

    The electromagnetic properties of neutrinos, which are either trivial or negligible in the context of the Standard Model, can probe new physics and have significant implications in astrophysics and cosmology. The current best direct limits on the neutrino millicharges and magnetic moments are both derived from data taken with germanium detectors with low thresholds at keV levels. In this paper, we discuss in detail a robust, ab initio method: the multiconfiguration relativistic random-phase approximation, that enables us to reliably understand the germanium detector response at the sub-keV level, where atomic many-body physics matters. By using existing data with sub-keV thresholds, limits on the reactor antineutrino's millicharge, magnetic moment, and charge radius squared are derived. The projected sensitivities for next-generation experiments are also given and discussed.

  2. A Germanium-Based, Coded Aperture Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, K P; Madden, N; Hull, E; William, C; Lavietes, T; Cork, C

    2001-10-31

    We describe a coded-aperture based, gamma-ray imager that uses a unique hybrid germanium detector system. A planar, germanium strip detector, eleven millimeters thick is followed by a coaxial detector. The 19 x 19 strip detector (2 mm pitch) is used to determine the location and energy of low energy events. The location of high energy events are determined from the location of the Compton scatter in the planar detector and the energy is determined from the sum of the coaxial and planar energies. With this geometry, we obtain useful quantum efficiency in a position-sensitive mode out to 500 keV. The detector is used with a 19 x 17 URA coded aperture to obtain spectrally resolved images in the gamma-ray band. We discuss the performance of the planar detector, the hybrid system and present images taken of laboratory sources.

  3. Spin transport in p-type germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rortais, F.; Oyarzún, S.; Bottegoni, F.; Rojas-Sánchez, J.-C.; Laczkowski, P.; Ferrari, A.; Vergnaud, C.; Ducruet, C.; Beigné, C.; Reyren, N.; Marty, A.; Attané, J.-P.; Vila, L.; Gambarelli, S.; Widiez, J.; Ciccacci, F.; Jaffrès, H.; George, J.-M.; Jamet, M.

    2016-04-01

    We report on the spin transport properties in p-doped germanium (Ge-p) using low temperature magnetoresistance measurements, electrical spin injection from a ferromagnetic metal and the spin pumping-inverse spin Hall effect method. Electrical spin injection is carried out using three-terminal measurements and the Hanle effect. In the 2-20 K temperature range, weak antilocalization and the Hanle effect provide the same spin lifetime in the germanium valence band (≈1 ps) in agreement with predicted values and previous optical measurements. These results, combined with dynamical spin injection by spin pumping and the inverse spin Hall effect, demonstrate successful spin accumulation in Ge. We also estimate the spin Hall angle {θ\\text{SHE}} in Ge-p (6-7× {{10}-4} ) at room temperature, pointing out the essential role of ionized impurities in spin dependent scattering.

  4. The first spectroscopic observation of germanium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Jose I.

    Electronic spectroscopy was used to obtain gas phase spectrum of the germanium carbide molecule in emission from a corona excited supersonic expansion source. The (2) 3pi -- X 3pi electronic transition was observed around the 21250 cm-1 region. In this system, vibrational bands and the rotational lines of the O = 0, 1, and 2 components were obtained and analyzed. The equilibrium transition energy is found at 21120.3 cm-1 and the fundamental vibrational frequency for the lowest energy ground state O = 2 component is 795.3 cm -1. This is the first spectroscopic observation of germanium carbide. An unsuccessful attempt to obtain the first electronic emission spectrum of aluminum boride is also described.

  5. Spin transport in p-type germanium.

    PubMed

    Rortais, F; Oyarzún, S; Bottegoni, F; Rojas-Sánchez, J-C; Laczkowski, P; Ferrari, A; Vergnaud, C; Ducruet, C; Beigné, C; Reyren, N; Marty, A; Attané, J-P; Vila, L; Gambarelli, S; Widiez, J; Ciccacci, F; Jaffrès, H; George, J-M; Jamet, M

    2016-04-27

    We report on the spin transport properties in p-doped germanium (Ge-p) using low temperature magnetoresistance measurements, electrical spin injection from a ferromagnetic metal and the spin pumping-inverse spin Hall effect method. Electrical spin injection is carried out using three-terminal measurements and the Hanle effect. In the 2-20 K temperature range, weak antilocalization and the Hanle effect provide the same spin lifetime in the germanium valence band (≈1 ps) in agreement with predicted values and previous optical measurements. These results, combined with dynamical spin injection by spin pumping and the inverse spin Hall effect, demonstrate successful spin accumulation in Ge. We also estimate the spin Hall angle θ(SHE) in Ge-p (6-7 x 10(-4) at room temperature, pointing out the essential role of ionized impurities in spin dependent scattering. PMID:26988255

  6. Electronic structure of intrinsic defects in crystalline germanium telluride.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Pineda, Andrew C.; Umrigar, Cyrus J.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Edwards, Arthur H.; Martin, Marcus Gary

    2005-05-01

    Germanium telluride undergoes rapid transition between polycrystalline and amorphous states under either optical or electrical excitation. While the crystalline phases are predicted to be semiconductors, polycrystalline germanium telluride always exhibits p-type metallic conductivity. We present a study of the electronic structure and formation energies of the vacancy and antisite defects in both known crystalline phases. We show that these intrinsic defects determine the nature of free-carrier transport in crystalline germanium telluride. Germanium vacancies require roughly one-third the energy of the other three defects to form, making this by far the most favorable intrinsic defect. While the tellurium antisite and vacancy induce gap states, the germanium counterparts do not. A simple counting argument, reinforced by integration over the density of states, predicts that the germanium vacancy leads to empty states at the top of the valence band, thus giving a complete explanation of the observed p-type metallic conduction.

  7. Germanium films by polymer-assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Quanxi; Burrell, Anthony K.; Bauer, Eve; Ronning, Filip; McCleskey, Thomas Mark; Zou, Guifu

    2013-01-15

    Highly ordered Ge films are prepared directly on single crystal Si substrates by applying an aqueous coating solution having Ge-bound polymer onto the substrate and then heating in a hydrogen-containing atmosphere. A coating solution was prepared by mixing water, a germanium compound, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and polyethyleneimine to form a first aqueous solution and then subjecting the first aqueous solution to ultrafiltration.

  8. Large Cryogenic Germanium Detector. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mandic, Vuk

    2013-02-13

    The goal of this project was to investigate possible ways of increasing the size of cryogenic Ge detectors. This project identified two possible approaches to increasing the individual cryogenic Ge detector size. The first approach relies on using the existing technology for growing detector-grade (high-purity) germanium crystals of dislocation density 100-7000 cm{sup -2}. The second approach is to consider dislocation-free Ge crystals.

  9. Xenon Filled Silicon Germanium Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewinter, F.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis is presented that shows the desirability and feasibility of using a xenon fill in the initial stages of operation of a silicon-germanium radioisotope thermoelectric generator to be used in outer-planetary exploration. The xenon cover gas offers protection against oxidation and against material sublimation, and allows the generator to deliver required power throughout the prelaunch and launch phases. The protective mechanisms afforded by the xenon cover gas and the mechanization of a xenon supply system are also discussed.

  10. Semiconductor nanowires: A versatile approach to nanoscale electronic and photonic circuit elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greytak, Andrew Bardeen

    Semiconductor nanowires provide a unique interface between the macroscopic and microscopic world. Lengths in the tens of microns make it easy to form electrical contact and to observe and interact with them via optical signals, while diameters as small as a few nanometers allow them to address electrical and optical signals with extreme resolution, and to exhibit high sensitivity toward highly localized stimulus. The research in this thesis examines nanowire synthesis, classical and quantum carrier transport, and waveguiding and modulation of light, and is undertaken with a view toward developing the potential of nanoscale semiconductor materials as building blocks for integrated electronic and photonic systems. The first project concerns indium arsenide nanowires (formed by metal nanocluster-catalyzed growth, using a laser ablation InAs source), in which quantum interference phenomena suggestive of an Aharonov-Bohm effect are evident in low-temperature magneto-conductance measurements. In a second project, n-channel and p-channel single germanium nanowire field-effect transistors (FETs) were demonstrated, in which the current drive and transconductance meet or exceed those reported for recent planar Ge FETs. The Ge nanowires were synthesized via a multi-step chemical vapor deposition procedure involving in situ surface doping, and enabled the first demonstration of ohmic contacts, high transconductance, and comparable current drives for both n-type and p-type doping in the same nanowire material. Synthetic subtleties brought to light in this work have broad significance for the growth of doped or alloyed nanowire materials. The third body of work involves the development and study of nanoscale photonic circuit elements made from cadmium sulfide and gallium nitride nanowire waveguides, in which the nanowires confine optical modes via dielectric contrast, and at the same time participate actively in optical signal transduction via semiconductor band edge transitions

  11. Thermal conductivity modeling of core-shell and tubular nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ronggui; Chen, Gang; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2005-06-01

    The heteroepitaxial growth of crystalline core-shell nanostructures of a variety of materials has become possible in recent years, allowing the realization of various novel nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. The increased surface or interface area will decrease the thermal conductivity of such nanostructures and impose challenges for the thermal management of such devices. In the meantime, the decreased thermal conductivity might benefit the thermoelectric conversion efficiency. In this paper, we present modeling results on the lattice thermal conductivity of core-shell and tubular nanowires along the wire axis direction using the phonon Boltzmann equation. We report the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the surface conditions and the core-shell geometry for silicon core-germanium shell and tubular silicon nanowires at room temperature. The results show that the effective thermal conductivity changes not only with the composition of the constituents but also with the radius of the nanowires and nanopores due to the nature of the ballistic phonon transport. The results in this work have implications for the design and operation of a variety of nanoelectronic devices, optoelectronic devices, and thermoelectric materials and devices. PMID:15943452

  12. Bottom-up assembly of metallic germanium

    PubMed Central

    Scappucci, Giordano; Klesse, Wolfgang M.; Yeoh, LaReine A.; Carter, Damien J.; Warschkow, Oliver; Marks, Nigel A.; Jaeger, David L.; Capellini, Giovanni; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Hamilton, Alexander R.

    2015-01-01

    Extending chip performance beyond current limits of miniaturisation requires new materials and functionalities that integrate well with the silicon platform. Germanium fits these requirements and has been proposed as a high-mobility channel material, a light emitting medium in silicon-integrated lasers, and a plasmonic conductor for bio-sensing. Common to these diverse applications is the need for homogeneous, high electron densities in three-dimensions (3D). Here we use a bottom-up approach to demonstrate the 3D assembly of atomically sharp doping profiles in germanium by a repeated stacking of two-dimensional (2D) high-density phosphorus layers. This produces high-density (1019 to 1020 cm−3) low-resistivity (10−4Ω · cm) metallic germanium of precisely defined thickness, beyond the capabilities of diffusion-based doping technologies. We demonstrate that free electrons from distinct 2D dopant layers coalesce into a homogeneous 3D conductor using anisotropic quantum interference measurements, atom probe tomography, and density functional theory. PMID:26256239

  13. On the geological availability of germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenzel, Max; Ketris, Marina P.; Gutzmer, Jens

    2014-04-01

    Based on a detailed statistical analysis of chemical data published in the scientific literature, estimates were made of the minimum amounts of recoverable Ge contained within sulphidic zinc ores and coals, given current processing technologies. It is expected that at least 119 kt (˜7 kt in zinc ores and ˜112 kt in coal) of recoverable germanium exist within proven reserves (at present stage of knowledge) at grades in excess of 100 ppm in sphalerite and 200 ppm in coal, while at least 440 kt (˜50 kt in zinc ores and ˜390 kt in coal) should become recoverable in the future, being associated to coal reserves at 8-200 ppm Ge and zinc resources containing in excess of 100 ppm Ge in sphalerite. Mississippi Valley Type (MVT) deposits are expected to be the most important hosts of germanium-rich sphalerite, while both brown and hard coals are expected to be equally important as hosts of germanium. The approach taken in this publication shows that reliable minimum estimates for the availability of by-product metals lacking suitable reserve/resource data may be attained by using robust statistical methods and geochemical data published in the scientific literature

  14. Germanium-76 Sample Analysis: Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2011-09-19

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}). The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia. The first one-gram sample was received from the supplier for analysis on April 24, 2011. The second one-gram sample was received from the supplier for analysis on July 12, 2011. The third sample, which came from the first large shipment of germanium from the vendor, was received from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on September 13, 2011. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility, a DOE user facility at PNNL, was used to make the required isotopic and chemical purity measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The results of these analyses are reported here. The isotopic composition of a sample of natural germanium was also measured twice. Differences in the result between these two measurements led to a re-measurement of the second 76Ge sample.

  15. Bottom-up assembly of metallic germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scappucci, Giordano; Klesse, Wolfgang M.; Yeoh, Lareine A.; Carter, Damien J.; Warschkow, Oliver; Marks, Nigel A.; Jaeger, David L.; Capellini, Giovanni; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Hamilton, Alexander R.

    2015-08-01

    Extending chip performance beyond current limits of miniaturisation requires new materials and functionalities that integrate well with the silicon platform. Germanium fits these requirements and has been proposed as a high-mobility channel material, a light emitting medium in silicon-integrated lasers, and a plasmonic conductor for bio-sensing. Common to these diverse applications is the need for homogeneous, high electron densities in three-dimensions (3D). Here we use a bottom-up approach to demonstrate the 3D assembly of atomically sharp doping profiles in germanium by a repeated stacking of two-dimensional (2D) high-density phosphorus layers. This produces high-density (1019 to 1020 cm-3) low-resistivity (10-4Ω · cm) metallic germanium of precisely defined thickness, beyond the capabilities of diffusion-based doping technologies. We demonstrate that free electrons from distinct 2D dopant layers coalesce into a homogeneous 3D conductor using anisotropic quantum interference measurements, atom probe tomography, and density functional theory.

  16. Nanowire Electron Scattering Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Brian; Bronikowsky, Michael; Wong, Eric; VonAllmen, Paul; Oyafuso, Fablano

    2009-01-01

    Nanowire electron scattering spectroscopy (NESS) has been proposed as the basis of a class of ultra-small, ultralow-power sensors that could be used to detect and identify chemical compounds present in extremely small quantities. State-of-the-art nanowire chemical sensors have already been demonstrated to be capable of detecting a variety of compounds in femtomolar quantities. However, to date, chemically specific sensing of molecules using these sensors has required the use of chemically functionalized nanowires with receptors tailored to individual molecules of interest. While potentially effective, this functionalization requires labor-intensive treatment of many nanowires to sense a broad spectrum of molecules. In contrast, NESS would eliminate the need for chemical functionalization of nanowires and would enable the use of the same sensor to detect and identify multiple compounds. NESS is analogous to Raman spectroscopy, the main difference being that in NESS, one would utilize inelastic scattering of electrons instead of photons to determine molecular vibrational energy levels. More specifically, in NESS, one would exploit inelastic scattering of electrons by low-lying vibrational quantum states of molecules attached to a nanowire or nanotube.

  17. Nanowire structures and electrical devices

    DOEpatents

    Bezryadin, Alexey; Remeika, Mikas

    2010-07-06

    The present invention provides structures and devices comprising conductive segments and conductance constricting segments of a nanowire, such as metallic, superconducting or semiconducting nanowire. The present invention provides structures and devices comprising conductive nanowire segments and conductance constricting nanowire segments having accurately selected phases including crystalline and amorphous states, compositions, morphologies and physical dimensions, including selected cross sectional dimensions, shapes and lengths along the length of a nanowire. Further, the present invention provides methods of processing nanowires capable of patterning a nanowire to form a plurality of conductance constricting segments having selected positions along the length of a nanowire, including conductance constricting segments having reduced cross sectional dimensions and conductance constricting segments comprising one or more insulating materials such as metal oxides.

  18. Catalyst patterning for nanowire devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor); Han, Jie (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nanowire devices may be provided that are based on carbon nanotubes or single-crystal semiconductor nanowires. The nanowire devices may be formed on a substrate. Catalyst sites may be formed on the substrate. The catalyst sites may be formed using lithography, thin metal layers that form individual catalyst sites when heated, collapsible porous catalyst-filled microscopic spheres, microscopic spheres that serve as masks for catalyst deposition, electrochemical deposition techniques, and catalyst inks. Nanowires may be grown from the catalyst sites.

  19. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica; Letant, Sonia; Stadermann, Michael; Artyukhin, Alexander B.

    2010-06-29

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  20. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica; Letant, Sonia; Stadermann, Michael; Artyukhin, Alexander B.

    2009-06-09

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  1. Nanowire Thermoelectric Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borshchevsky, Alexander; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Herman, Jennifer; Ryan, Margaret

    2005-01-01

    Nanowire thermoelectric devices, now under development, are intended to take miniaturization a step beyond the prior state of the art to exploit the potential advantages afforded by shrinking some device features to approximately molecular dimensions (of the order of 10 nm). The development of nanowire-based thermoelectric devices could lead to novel power-generating, cooling, and sensing devices that operate at relatively low currents and high voltages. Recent work on the theory of thermoelectric devices has led to the expectation that the performance of such a device could be enhanced if the diameter of the wires could be reduced to a point where quantum confinement effects increase charge-carrier mobility (thereby increasing the Seebeck coefficient) and reduce thermal conductivity. In addition, even in the absence of these effects, the large aspect ratios (length of the order of tens of microns diameter of the order of tens of nanometers) of nanowires would be conducive to the maintenance of large temperature differences at small heat fluxes. The predicted net effect of reducing diameters to the order of tens of nanometers would be to increase its efficiency by a factor of .3. Nanowires made of thermoelectric materials and devices that comprise arrays of such nanowires can be fabricated by electrochemical growth of the thermoelectric materials in templates that contain suitably dimensioned pores (10 to 100 nm in diameter and 1 to 100 microns long). The nanowires can then be contacted in bundles to form devices that look similar to conventional thermoelectric devices, except that a production version may contain nearly a billion elements (wires) per square centimeter, instead of fewer than a hundred as in a conventional bulk thermoelectric device or fewer than 100,000 as in a microdevice. It is not yet possible to form contacts with individual nanowires. Therefore, in fabricating a nanowire thermoelectric device, one forms contacts on nanowires in bundles of the

  2. Germanium: From Its Discovery to SiGe Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E.

    2006-06-14

    Germanium, element No.32, was discovered in 1886 by Clemens Winkler. Its first broad application was in the form of point contact Schottky diodes for radar reception during WWII. The addition of a closely spaced second contact led to the first all-solid-state electronic amplifier device, the transistor. The relatively low bandgap, the lack of a stable oxide and large surface state densities relegated germanium to the number 2 position behind silicon. The discovery of the lithium drift process, which made possible the formation of p-i-n diodes with fully depletable i-regions several centimeters thick, led germanium to new prominence as the premier gamma-ray detector. The development of ultra-pure germanium yielded highly stable detectors which have remained unsurpassed in their performance. New acceptors and donors were discovered and the electrically active role of hydrogen was clearly established several years before similar findings in silicon. Lightly doped germanium has found applications as far infrared detectors and heavily Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) germanium is used in thermistor devices operating at a few milliKelvin. Recently germanium has been rediscovered by the silicon device community because of its superior electron and hole mobility and its ability to induce strains when alloyed with silicon. Germanium is again a mainstream electronic material.

  3. Nanowire mesh solar fuels generator

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Chan, Candace; Sun, Jianwei; Liu, Bin

    2016-05-24

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to a nanowire mesh solar fuels generator. In one aspect, a nanowire mesh solar fuels generator includes (1) a photoanode configured to perform water oxidation and (2) a photocathode configured to perform water reduction. The photocathode is in electrical contact with the photoanode. The photoanode may include a high surface area network of photoanode nanowires. The photocathode may include a high surface area network of photocathode nanowires. In some embodiments, the nanowire mesh solar fuels generator may include an ion conductive polymer infiltrating the photoanode and the photocathode in the region where the photocathode is in electrical contact with the photoanode.

  4. Analog/Digital System for Germanium Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodhouse, Christopher

    1988-01-01

    Electronic system containing analog and digital circuits makes high-precision, four-wire measurements of resistance of each germanium resistance thermometer (GRT) in array of devices, using alternating current (ac) of 1 micro-A. At end measurement interval, contents of negative register subtracted from positive one, resulting in very-narrow-band synchronous demodulation of carrier wave and suppression of out-of-band noise. Microprocessor free to perform other duties after measurement complete. Useful in noisy terrestrial environments encountered in factories.

  5. Tensile strain mapping in flat germanium membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Rhead, S. D. Halpin, J. E.; Myronov, M.; Patchett, D. H.; Allred, P. S.; Wilson, N. R.; Leadley, D. R.; Shah, V. A.; Kachkanov, V.; Dolbnya, I. P.; Reparaz, J. S.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.

    2014-04-28

    Scanning X-ray micro-diffraction has been used as a non-destructive probe of the local crystalline quality of a thin suspended germanium (Ge) membrane. A series of reciprocal space maps were obtained with ∼4 μm spatial resolution, from which detailed information on the strain distribution, thickness, and crystalline tilt of the membrane was obtained. We are able to detect a systematic strain variation across the membranes, but show that this is negligible in the context of using the membranes as platforms for further growth. In addition, we show evidence that the interface and surface quality is improved by suspending the Ge.

  6. The first spectroscopic observation of germanium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazier, Christopher R.; Ruiz, José I.

    2011-11-01

    The gas phase spectrum of the germanium carbide radical has been observed at low temperature in emission from a corona excited supersonic expansion source. Many vibrational bands involving the Ω = 0, 1, and 2 components of the (2) 3Π-X 3Π system were recorded and analyzed. The equilibrium transition energy is found at 21120.3 cm -1, in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The fundamental vibrational frequency for the lowest energy ground state Ω = 2 component is 795.3 cm -1.

  7. Anisotropy-Driven Spin Relaxation in Germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengke; Li, Jing; Qing, Lan; Dery, Hanan; Appelbaum, Ian

    2013-12-01

    A unique spin depolarization mechanism, induced by the presence of g-factor anisotropy and intervalley scattering, is revealed by spin-transport measurements on long-distance germanium devices in a magnetic field longitudinal to the initial spin orientation. The confluence of electron-phonon scattering (leading to Elliott-Yafet spin flips) and this previously unobserved physics enables the extraction of spin lifetime solely from spin-valve measurements, without spin precession, and in a regime of substantial electric-field-generated carrier heating. We find spin lifetimes in Ge up to several hundreds of nanoseconds at low temperature, far beyond any other available experimental results.

  8. All-Inorganic Germanium Nanocrystal Films by Cationic Ligand Exchange.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Lance M; Nichols, Asa W; Chernomordik, Boris D; Anderson, Nicholas C; Beard, Matthew C; Neale, Nathan R

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a new paradigm for group IV nanocrystal surface chemistry based on room temperature surface activation that enables ionic ligand exchange. Germanium nanocrystals synthesized in a gas-phase plasma reactor are functionalized with labile, cationic alkylammonium ligands rather than with traditional covalently bound groups. We employ Fourier transform infrared and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies to demonstrate the alkylammonium ligands are freely exchanged on the germanium nanocrystal surface with a variety of cationic ligands, including short inorganic ligands such as ammonium and alkali metal cations. This ionic ligand exchange chemistry is used to demonstrate enhanced transport in germanium nanocrystal films following ligand exchange as well as the first photovoltaic device based on an all-inorganic germanium nanocrystal absorber layer cast from solution. This new ligand chemistry should accelerate progress in utilizing germanium and other group IV nanocrystals for optoelectronic applications. PMID:26796765

  9. All-inorganic Germanium nanocrystal films by cationic ligand exchange

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wheeler, Lance M.; Nichols, Asa W.; Chernomordik, Boris D.; Anderson, Nicholas C.; Beard, Matthew C.; Neale, Nathan R.

    2016-01-21

    In this study, we introduce a new paradigm for group IV nanocrystal surface chemistry based on room temperature surface activation that enables ionic ligand exchange. Germanium nanocrystals synthesized in a gas-phase plasma reactor are functionalized with labile, cationic alkylammonium ligands rather than with traditional covalently bound groups. We employ Fourier transform infrared and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies to demonstrate the alkylammonium ligands are freely exchanged on the germanium nanocrystal surface with a variety of cationic ligands, including short inorganic ligands such as ammonium and alkali metal cations. This ionic ligand exchange chemistry is used to demonstrate enhanced transport inmore » germanium nanocrystal films following ligand exchange as well as the first photovoltaic device based on an all-inorganic germanium nanocrystal absorber layer cast from solution. This new ligand chemistry should accelerate progress in utilizing germanium and other group IV nanocrystals for optoelectronic applications.« less

  10. Germanium resistance thermometer calibration at superfluid helium temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, F.C.

    1985-01-01

    The rapid increase in resistance of high purity semi-conducting germanium with decreasing temperature in the superfluid helium range of temperatures makes this material highly adaptable as a very sensitive thermometer. Also, a germanium thermometer exhibits a highly reproducible resistance versus temperature characteristic curve upon cycling between liquid helium temperatures and room temperature. These two factors combine to make germanium thermometers ideally suited for measuring temperatures in many cryogenic studies at superfluid helium temperatures. One disadvantage, however, is the relatively high cost of calibrated germanium thermometers. In space helium cryogenic systems, many such thermometers are often required, leading to a high cost for calibrated thermometers. The construction of a thermometer calibration cryostat and probe which will allow for calibrating six germanium thermometers at one time, thus effecting substantial savings in the purchase of thermometers is considered.

  11. Investigation of intrinsic gettering for germanium doped Czochralski silicon wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiahe; Yang, Deren; Ma, Xiangyang; Wang, Weiyan; Zeng, Yuheng; Que, Duanlin

    2007-06-01

    The intrinsic gettering (IG) effects in a germanium-doped Czochralski (GCz) silicon wafer have been investigated through a processing simulation of dynamic random access memory making and an evaluation on IG capability for copper contamination. It has been suggested that both the good quality defect-free denuded zones (DZs) and the high-density bulk microdefect (BMD) regions could be generated in GCz silicon wafer during device fabrication. Meanwhile, it was also indicated that the tiny oxygen precipitates were hardly presented in DZs of silicon wafer with the germanium doping. Furthermore, it was found in GCz silicon wafer that the BMDs were higher in density but smaller in size in contrast to that in conventional Cz silicon wafer. Promoted IG capability for metallic contamination was therefore induced in the germanium-doped Cz silicon wafer. A mechanism of the germanium doping on oxygen precipitation in Cz silicon was discussed, which was based on the hypothesis of germanium-related complexes.

  12. Single-nanowire photoelectrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Su, Yude; Liu, Chong; Brittman, Sarah; Tang, Jinyao; Fu, Anthony; Kornienko, Nikolay; Kong, Qiao; Yang, Peidong

    2016-07-01

    Photoelectrochemistry is one of several promising approaches for the realization of efficient solar-to-fuel conversion. Recent work has shown that photoelectrodes made of semiconductor nano-/microwire arrays can have better photoelectrochemical performance than their planar counterparts because of their unique properties, such as high surface area. Although considerable research effort has focused on studying wire arrays, the inhomogeneity in the geometry, doping, defects and catalyst loading present in such arrays can obscure the link between these properties and the photoelectrochemical performance of the wires, and correlating performance with the specific properties of individual wires is difficult because of ensemble averaging. Here, we show that a single-nanowire-based photoelectrode platform can be used to reliably probe the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of individual nanowires. We find that the photovoltage output of ensemble array samples can be limited by poorly performing individual wires, which highlights the importance of improving nanowire homogeneity within an array. Furthermore, the platform allows the flux of photogenerated electrons to be quantified as a function of the lengths and diameters of individual nanowires, and we find that the flux over the entire nanowire surface (7-30 electrons nm(-2) s(-1)) is significantly reduced as compared with that of a planar analogue (∼1,200 electrons nm(-2) s(-1)). Such characterization of the photogenerated carrier flux at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface is essential for designing nanowire photoelectrodes that match the activity of their loaded electrocatalysts. PMID:27018660

  13. Single-nanowire photoelectrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yude; Liu, Chong; Brittman, Sarah; Tang, Jinyao; Fu, Anthony; Kornienko, Nikolay; Kong, Qiao; Yang, Peidong

    2016-07-01

    Photoelectrochemistry is one of several promising approaches for the realization of efficient solar-to-fuel conversion. Recent work has shown that photoelectrodes made of semiconductor nano-/microwire arrays can have better photoelectrochemical performance than their planar counterparts because of their unique properties, such as high surface area. Although considerable research effort has focused on studying wire arrays, the inhomogeneity in the geometry, doping, defects and catalyst loading present in such arrays can obscure the link between these properties and the photoelectrochemical performance of the wires, and correlating performance with the specific properties of individual wires is difficult because of ensemble averaging. Here, we show that a single-nanowire-based photoelectrode platform can be used to reliably probe the current–voltage (I–V) characteristics of individual nanowires. We find that the photovoltage output of ensemble array samples can be limited by poorly performing individual wires, which highlights the importance of improving nanowire homogeneity within an array. Furthermore, the platform allows the flux of photogenerated electrons to be quantified as a function of the lengths and diameters of individual nanowires, and we find that the flux over the entire nanowire surface (7–30 electrons nm–2 s–1) is significantly reduced as compared with that of a planar analogue (∼1,200 electrons nm–2 s–1). Such characterization of the photogenerated carrier flux at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface is essential for designing nanowire photoelectrodes that match the activity of their loaded electrocatalysts.

  14. Experience from operating germanium detectors in GERDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palioselitis, Dimitrios; GERDA Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    Phase I of the Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, searching for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge, was completed in September 2013. The most competitive half-life lower limit for the 0νββ decay of 76Ge was set (T-0ν1/2 > 2.1 · 1025 yr at 90% C.L.). GERDA operates bare Ge diodes immersed in liquid argon. During Phase I, mainly refurbished semi-coaxial high purity Ge detectors from previous experiments were used. The experience gained with handling and operating bare Ge diodes in liquid argon, as well as the stability and performance of the detectors during GERDA Phase I are presented. Thirty additional new enriched BEGe-type detectors were produced and will be used in Phase II. A subgroup of these detectors has already been used successfully in GERDA Phase I. The present paper gives an overview of the production chain of the new germanium detectors, the steps taken to minimise the exposure to cosmic radiation during manufacturing, and the first results of characterisation measurements in vacuum cryostats.

  15. High-purity germanium crystal growing

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.

    1982-10-01

    The germanium crystals used for the fabrication of nuclear radiation detectors are required to have a purity and crystalline perfection which is unsurpassed by any other solid material. These crystals should not have a net electrically active impurity concentration greater than 10/sup 10/cm/sup -3/ and be essentially free of charge trapping defects. Such perfect crystals of germanium can be grown only because of the highly favorable chemical and physical properties of this element. However, ten years of laboratory scale and commercial experience has still not made the production of such crystals routine. The origin and control of many impurities and electrically active defect complexes is now fairly well understood but regular production is often interrupted for long periods due to the difficulty of achieving the required high purity or to charge trapping in detectors made from crystals seemingly grown under the required conditions. The compromises involved in the selection of zone refining and crystal grower parts and ambients is discussed and the difficulty in controlling the purity of key elements in the process is emphasized. The consequences of growing in a hydrogen ambient are discussed in detail and it is shown how complexes of neutral defects produce electrically active centers.

  16. Germanium avalanche receiver for low power interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virot, Léopold; Crozat, Paul; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Cassan, Eric; Boeuf, Frédéric; Vivien, Laurent

    2014-09-01

    Recent advances in silicon photonics have aided the development of on-chip communications. Power consumption, however, remains an issue in almost all integrated devices. Here, we report a 10 Gbit per second waveguide avalanche germanium photodiode under low reverse bias. The avalanche photodiode scheme requires only simple technological steps that are fully compatible with complementary metal oxide semiconductor processes and do not need nanometre accuracy and/or complex epitaxial growth schemes. An intrinsic gain higher than 20 was demonstrated under a bias voltage as low as -7 V. The Q-factor relating to the signal-to-noise ratio at 10 Gbit per second was maintained over 20 dB without the use of a trans-impedance amplifier for an input optical power lower than -26 dBm thanks to an aggressive shrinkage of the germanium multiplication region. A maximum gain over 140 was also obtained for optical powers below -35 dBm. These results pave the way for low-power-consumption on-chip communication applications.

  17. EDITORIAL: Nanowires for energy Nanowires for energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaPierre, Ray; Sunkara, Mahendra

    2012-05-01

    This special issue of Nanotechnology focuses on studies illustrating the application of nanowires for energy including solar cells, efficient lighting and water splitting. Over the next three decades, nanotechnology will make significant contributions towards meeting the increased energy needs of the planet, now known as the TeraWatt challenge. Nanowires in particular are poised to contribute significantly in this development as presented in the review by Hiralal et al [1]. Nanowires exhibit light trapping properties that can act as a broadband anti-reflection coating to enhance the efficiency of solar cells. In this issue, Li et al [2] and Wang et al [3] present the optical properties of silicon nanowire and nanocone arrays. In addition to enhanced optical properties, core-shell nanowires also have the potential for efficient charge carrier collection across the nanowire diameter as presented in the contribution by Yu et al [4] for radial junction a-Si solar cells. Hybrid approaches that combine organic and inorganic materials also have potential for high efficiency photovoltaics. A Si-based hybrid solar cell is presented by Zhang et al [5] with a photoconversion efficiency of over 7%. The quintessential example of hybrid solar cells is the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) where an organic absorber (dye) coats an inorganic material (typically a ZnO nanostructure). Herman et al [6] present a method of enhancing the efficiency of a DSSC by increasing the hetero-interfacial area with a unique hierarchical weeping willow ZnO structure. The increased surface area allows for higher dye loading, light harvesting, and reduced charge recombination through direct conduction along the ZnO branches. Another unique ZnO growth method is presented by Calestani et al [7] using a solution-free and catalyst-free approach by pulsed electron deposition (PED). Nanowires can also make more efficient use of electrical power. Light emitting diodes, for example, will eventually become the

  18. Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Chengxiang

    Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE) is a new method for fabricating polycrystalline metal nanowires using electrodeposition. In LPNE, a sacrificial metal (M1 = silver or nickel) layer, 5 - 100 nm in thickness, is first vapor deposited onto a glass, oxidized silicon, or Kapton polymer film. A photoresist (PR) layer is then deposited, photopatterned, and the exposed Ag or Ni is removed by wet etching. The etching duration is adjusted to produce an undercut ≈300 nm in width at the edges of the exposed PR. This undercut produces a horizontal trench with a precisely defined height equal to the thickness of theM1 layer. Within this trench, a nanowire of metal M2 is electrodeposited (M2 = gold, platinum, palladium, or bismuth). Finally the PR layer and M1 layer are removed. The nanowire height and width can be independently controlled down to minimum dimensions of 5 nm (h) and 11 nm (w), for example, in the case of platinum. These nanowires can be 1 cm in total length. We measure the temperature-dependent resistance of 100 um sections of Au and Pd wires in order to estimate an electrical grain size for comparison with measurements by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Nanowire arrays can be postpatterned to produce two-dimensional arrays of nanorods. Nanowire patterns can also be overlaid one on top of another by repeating the LPNE process twice in succession to produce, for example, arrays of low-impedance, nanowirenanowire junctions. The resistance, R, of single gold nanowires was measured in situ during electrooxidation in aqueous 0.10 M sulfuric acid. Electrooxidation caused the formation of a gold oxide that is approximately 0.8 monolayers (ML) in thickness at +1.1 V vs saturated mercurous sulfate reference electrode (MSE) based upon coulometry and ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis. As the gold nanowires were electrooxidized, R increased by an amount that depended on the wire thickness, ranging from

  19. Disorder induced interface states and their influence on the Al/Ge nanowires Schottky devices

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, R. A.; Kamimura, H.; Chiquito, A. J.; Berengue, O. M.; Leite, E. R.

    2013-12-28

    It has been demonstrated that the presence of oxide monolayers in semiconductor surfaces alters the electronic potential at surfaces and, consequently, can drastically affect the electronic transport features of a practical device such as a field effect transistor. In this work experimental and theoretical approaches to characterize Al/germanium nanowire Schottky devices by using samples covered with a thin oxide layer (2 nm width) were explored. It was also demonstrated that the oxide layer on Ge causes a weak dependence of the metal work function on Schottky barrier heights indicating the presence of Fermi level pinning. From theoretical calculations the pinning factor S was estimated to range between 0.52 and 0.89, indicating a weak Fermi level pinning which is induced by the presence of charge localization at all nanowires' surface coming from interface states.

  20. Disorder induced interface states and their influence on the Al/Ge nanowires Schottky devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, R. A.; Kamimura, H.; Berengue, O. M.; Leite, E. R.; Chiquito, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    It has been demonstrated that the presence of oxide monolayers in semiconductor surfaces alters the electronic potential at surfaces and, consequently, can drastically affect the electronic transport features of a practical device such as a field effect transistor. In this work experimental and theoretical approaches to characterize Al/germanium nanowire Schottky devices by using samples covered with a thin oxide layer (2 nm width) were explored. It was also demonstrated that the oxide layer on Ge causes a weak dependence of the metal work function on Schottky barrier heights indicating the presence of Fermi level pinning. From theoretical calculations the pinning factor S was estimated to range between 0.52 and 0.89, indicating a weak Fermi level pinning which is induced by the presence of charge localization at all nanowires' surface coming from interface states.

  1. Preparation and characterization of hydrogenated amorphous germanium and hydrogenated amorphous germanium carbide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hai-Sheng

    1989-02-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous germanium (a-Ge:H) and germanium carbide (a-Ge(1-x)Cx:H) films were prepared by rf sputtering of a polycrystalline Ge target in a vacuum approximately 4 x 10 to the 7th Torr at various rf power 50 less than or equal to P less than or equal to 600 W (0.27 to 3.3 W/sq cm), target-substrate distance 1 less than or equal to d less than or equal to 7 minutes, varying partial pressures of Ar, H2, and C3H8, and flow rates f. The vibrational and opto-electronic properties such as infrared (IR) absorption, optical gap, electron-spin-resonance (ESR) signals, and conductivities vary with deposition conditions. The photoconductivity sigma sub ph, in particular, was carefully monitored as a function of the deposition conditions to optimize it.

  2. Sputtered germanium/silicon devices for photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nujhat, N.; Papouloute, J.-P.; DeBerry, M.; Jiang, L.; Korivi, N. S.

    2015-08-01

    We report on the ongoing investigation of magnetron sputtered germanium on silicon for photonics applications. Direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering has been used to deposit germanium layers on silicon at low growth temperatures and medium range vacuum levels. Standard photolithography has been used to make germanium photodetectors for the 1550 nm wavelength range. Electrical characterization, more specifically current-voltage measurements indicate that the devices function as intended. Sputtered silicon waveguides have also been fabricated and evaluated for possible applications in photonics integration. The sputtering-based developments in our present research are expected to provide for a flexible and economically viable manufacturing process for such devices.

  3. Ultra High-Rate Germanium (UHRGe) Modeling Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Rodriguez, Douglas C.

    2012-06-07

    The Ultra-High Rate Germanium (UHRGe) project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is conducting research to develop a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector that can provide both the high resolution typical of germanium and high signal throughput. Such detectors may be beneficial for a variety of potential applications ranging from safeguards measurements of used fuel to material detection and verification using active interrogation techniques. This report describes some of the initial radiation transport modeling efforts that have been conducted to help guide the design of the detector as well as a description of the process used to generate the source spectrum for the used fuel application evaluation.

  4. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Chroneos, A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2015-06-15

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  5. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chroneos, A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2015-06-01

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  6. Interactions of germanium atoms with silica surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Scott K.; Coffee, Shawn S.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2005-11-01

    GeH 4 is thermally cracked over a hot filament depositing 0.7-15 ML Ge onto 2-7 nm SiO 2/Si(1 0 0) at substrate temperatures of 300-970 K. Ge bonding changes are analyzed during annealing with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ge, GeH x, GeO, and GeO 2 desorption is monitored through temperature programmed desorption in the temperature range 300-1000 K. Low temperature desorption features are attributed to GeO and GeH 4. No GeO 2 desorption is observed, but GeO 2 decomposition to Ge through high temperature pathways is seen above 750 K. Germanium oxidization results from Ge etching of the oxide substrate. With these results, explanations for the failure of conventional chemical vapor deposition to produce Ge nanocrystals on SiO 2 surfaces are proposed.

  7. Electron paramagnetic resonance at dislocations in germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Pakulis, E.J.

    1982-06-01

    The first observation of the paramagnetic resonance of electrons at dislocations in germanium single crystals is reported. Under subband gap optical excitation, two sets of lines are detected: four lines about the <111> axes with g/sub perpendicular to/ = 0.34 and g/sub parallel/ = 1.94, and 24 lines with g/sub perpendicular to/ = 0.73 and g/sub parallel/ = 1.89 about <111> axes with the six-fold 1.2/sup 0/ distortion. This represents the first measurement of the disortion angle of a dislocation dangling bond. The possibility that the distortion results from a Peierls transition along the dislocation line is discussed.

  8. Thermodynamic properties of germanium/carbon microclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielgus, Pawel; Roszak, Szczepan; Majumdar, Devashis; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2005-12-01

    Theoretical studies on the GenCm (n =1,2; m =1-3) microclusters have been performed using the state of the art calculations. Several alternative structures of these clusters were studied to locate the lowest-energy isomers. It is observed that the structures of the complexes result from the competition between ionic Ge-C, conjugated covalent C-C, and metallic Ge-Ge bonds. The ionization of the molecules enhances the ionic character of the Ge-C bond and has significant structural consequences. Using theoretically determined partition functions, thermodynamic data are computed and experimental enthalpies are enhanced. The ab initio atomization energies of germanium carbides compare well with corrected experimental functions. The experimental appearance potentials are well reproduced by the theoretical ionization potentials.

  9. Germanium Detectors in Homeland Security at PNNL

    SciTech Connect

    Stave, Sean C.

    2015-05-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray detection is used for non-proliferation and national security applications. While lower energy resolution detectors such as NaI(Tl) have their place, high purity germanium (HPGe) also has a role to play. A detection with HPGe is often a characterization due to the very high energy resolution. However, HPGe crystals remain small and expensive leaving arrays of smaller crystals as an excellent solution. PNNL has developed two similar HPGe arrays for two very different applications. One array, the Multisensor Aerial Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a fieldable array that has been tested on trucks, boats, and helicopters. The CASCADES HPGe array is an array designed to assay samples in a low background environment. The history of HPGe arrays at PNNL and the development of MARS and CASCADES will be detailed in this paper along with some of the other applications of HPGe at PNNL.

  10. Germanium detectors in homeland security at PNNL

    SciTech Connect

    Stave, S.

    2015-05-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray detection is used for non-proliferation and national security applications. While lower energy resolution detectors such as NaI(Tl) have their place, high purity germanium (HPGe) also has a role to play. A detection with HPGe is often a characterization due to the very high energy resolution. However, HPGe crystals remain small and expensive leaving arrays of smaller crystals as an excellent solution. PNNL has developed two similar HPGe arrays for two very different applications. One array, the Multisensor Aerial Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a fieldable array that has been tested on trucks, boats, and helicopters. The CASCADES HPGe array is an array designed to assay samples in a low background environment. The history of HPGe arrays at PNNL and the development of MARS and CASCADES will be detailed in this paper along with some of the other applications of HPGe at PNNL.

  11. Germanium detectors in homeland security at PNNL

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stave, S.

    2015-05-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray detection is used for non-proliferation and national security applications. While lower energy resolution detectors such as NaI(Tl) have their place, high purity germanium (HPGe) also has a role to play. A detection with HPGe is often a characterization due to the very high energy resolution. However, HPGe crystals remain small and expensive leaving arrays of smaller crystals as an excellent solution. PNNL has developed two similar HPGe arrays for two very different applications. One array, the Multisensor Aerial Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a fieldable array that has been tested on trucks, boats, and helicopters. The CASCADESmore » HPGe array is an array designed to assay samples in a low background environment. The history of HPGe arrays at PNNL and the development of MARS and CASCADES will be detailed in this paper along with some of the other applications of HPGe at PNNL.« less

  12. Tin impurity centers in glassy germanium chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Bordovsky, G. A.; Gladkikh, P. V.; Kozhokar, M. Yu.; Marchenko, A. V.; Seregin, P. P.; Terukov, E. I.

    2011-10-15

    Tin atoms produced by radioactive decay of {sup 119mm}Sn and {sup 119}Sn impurity atoms in the structure of Ge{sub x}S{sub 1-x} and Ge{sub x}Se{sub 1-x} glasses are stabilized in the form of Sn{sup 2+} and Sn{sup 4+} ions and correspond to ionized states of the amphoteric two-electron center with negative correlation energy (Sn{sup 2+} is an ionized acceptor, and Sn{sup 4+} is an ionized donor), whereas the neutral state of the Sn{sup 3+} center appears to be unstable. {sup 119}Sn atoms produced by radioactive decay of {sup 119m}Te impurity atoms in the structure of Ge{sub x}S{sub 1-x} and Ge{sub x}Se{sub 1-x} glasses are stabilized at both chalcogen sites (they are electrically inactive) and germanium sites.

  13. Electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; Joseph Mauger, G.; Anderson, Eric H.

    1999-02-01

    We have successfully developed and fielded an electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector (EMC-HPGe) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This detector system was designed to provide optimum energy resolution, long lifetime, and extremely reliable operation for unattended and portable applications. For most analytical applications, high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are the standard detectors of choice, providing an unsurpassed combination of high energy resolution performance and exceptional detection efficiency. Logistical difficulties associated with providing the required liquid nitrogen (LN) for cooling is the primary reason that these systems are found mainly in laboratories. The EMC-HPGe detector system described in this paper successfully provides HPGe detector performance in a portable instrument that allows for isotopic analysis in the field. It incorporates a unique active vibration control system that allows the use of a Sunpower Stirling cycle cryocooler unit without significant spectral degradation from microphonics. All standard isotopic analysis codes, including MGA and MGA++ [1], GAMANL [2], GRPANL [3]and MGAU [4], typically used with HPGe detectors can be used with this system with excellent results. Several national and international Safeguards organisations including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have expressed interest in this system. The detector was combined with custom software and demonstrated as a rapid Field Radiometric Identification System (FRIS) for the U.S. Customs Service [5]. The European Communities' Safeguards Directorate (EURATOM) is field-testing the first Safeguards prototype in their applications. The EMC-HPGe detector system design, recent applications, and results will be highlighted.

  14. Reduction of Defects in Germanium-Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Crystals grown without contact with a container have far superior quality to otherwise similar crystals grown in direct contact with a container. In addition to float-zone processing, detached- Bridgman growth is a promising tool to improve crystal quality, without the limitations of float zoning or the defects introduced by normal Bridgman growth. Goals of this project include the development of the detached Bridgman process to be reproducible and well understood and to quantitatively compare the defect and impurity levels in crystals grown by these three methods. Germanium (Ge) and germanium-silicon (Ge-Si) alloys are being used. At MSFC, we are responsible for the detached Bridgman experiments intended to differentiate among proposed mechanisms of detachment, and to confirm or refine our understanding of detachment. Because the contact angle is critical to determining the conditions for detachment, the sessile drop method was used to measure the contact angles as a function of temperature and composition for a large number of substrates made of potential ampoule materials. Growth experiments have used pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN) and fused silica ampoules with the majority of the detached results occurring predictably in the pBN. Etch pit density (EPD) measurements of normal and detached Bridgman-grown Ge samples show a two order of magnitude improvement in the detached-grown samples. The nature and extent of detachment is determined by using profilometry in conjunction with optical and electron microscopy. The stability of detachment has been analyzed, and an empirical model for the conditions necessary to achieve sufficient stability to maintain detached growth for extended periods has been developed. We have investigated the effects on detachment of ampoule material, pressure difference above and below the melt, and Si concentration; samples that are nearly completely detached can be grown repeatedly in pBN. Current work is concentrated on developing a

  15. Electrochemically Grown Single Nanowire Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Minhee; Lee, Choonsup; Vasquez, Richard P.; Penner, Reginald; Bangar, Mangesh; Mulchandani, Ashok; Myung, Nosang V.

    2004-01-01

    We report a fabrication technique that is potentially capable of producing arrays of individually addressable nanowire sensors with controlled dimensions, positions, alignments, and chemical compositions. The concept has been demonstrated with electrodeposition of palladium wires with 75 nm to 350 nm widths. We have also fabricated single and double conducting polymer nanowires (polyaniline and polypyrrole) with 100nm and 200nm widths using electrochemical direct growth. Using single Pd nanowires, we have also demonstrated hydrogen sensing. It is envisioned that these are the first steps towards nanowire sensor arrays capable of simultaneously detecting multiple chemical species.

  16. Transport Phenomena in Liquid Phase Diffusion Growth of Silicon Germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armour, Neil Alexander

    Silicon Germanium, SiGe, is an important emerging semiconductor material. In order to optimize growth techniques for SiGe production, such as Liquid Phase Diffusion, LPD, or Melt Replenishment Czochralski, a good understanding of the transport phenomena in the melt is required. In the context of the Liquid Phase Diffusion growth technique, the transport phenomena of silicon in a silicon-germanium melt has been explored. Experiments isolating the dissolution and transport of silicon into a germanium melt have been conducted under a variety of flow conditions. Preliminary modeling of these experiments has also been conducted and agreement with experiments has been shown. In addition, full LPD experiments have also been conducted under varying flow conditions. Altered flow conditions were achieved through the application of a variety of magnetic fields. Through the experimental and modeling work better understanding of the transport mechanisms at work in a silicon-germanium melt has been achieved.

  17. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1986-11-15

    Research has been continued on hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms. Progress in the period November 16, 1985 to November 15, 1986 is reviewed in the following areas: (1) Recoil atom reaction studies. (2) Reactions of thermally generated free atoms.

  18. Near-infrared emission from mesoporous crystalline germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Boucherif, Abderraouf; Aimez, Vincent; Arès, Richard; Korinek, Andreas

    2014-10-15

    Mesoporous crystalline germanium was fabricated by bipolar electrochemical etching of Ge wafer in HF-based electrolyte. It yields uniform mesoporous germanium layers composed of high density of crystallites with an average size 5-7 nm. Subsequent extended chemical etching allows tuning of crystallites size while preserving the same chemical composition. This highly controllable nanostructure exhibits photoluminescence emission above the bulk Ge bandgap, in the near-infrared range (1095-1360nm) with strong evidence of quantum confinement within the crystallites.

  19. Near-infrared emission from mesoporous crystalline germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucherif, Abderraouf; Korinek, Andreas; Aimez, Vincent; Arès, Richard

    2014-10-01

    Mesoporous crystalline germanium was fabricated by bipolar electrochemical etching of Ge wafer in HF-based electrolyte. It yields uniform mesoporous germanium layers composed of high density of crystallites with an average size 5-7 nm. Subsequent extended chemical etching allows tuning of crystallites size while preserving the same chemical composition. This highly controllable nanostructure exhibits photoluminescence emission above the bulk Ge bandgap, in the near-infrared range (1095-1360nm) with strong evidence of quantum confinement within the crystallites.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of group IV semiconductor nanowires by vapor-liquid-solid growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, Kok-Keong

    There is currently intense interest in one-dimensional nanostructures, such as nanotubes and nanowires, due to their potential to test fundamental concepts of dimensionality and to serve as building blocks for nanoscale devices. Vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth, which is one of the most common fabrication methods, has been used to produce single crystal semiconductor nanowires such as silicon (Si), germanium (Ge), and gallium arsenide (GaAs). In the VLS growth of Group IV semiconductor nanowires, a metal, such as gold (Au) is used as a catalyst agent to nucleate whisker growth from a Si-containing (silane (SIH4)) or Ge-containing vapor (germane (GeH 4)). Au and Si/Ge form a liquid alloy that has a eutectic temperature of around 360°C, which, upon supersaturation, nucleates the growth of a Si or Ge wire. The goal of this work is to develop a more fundamental understanding of VLS growth kinetics and intentional doping of Group IV semiconductor nanowires in order to better control the properties of the nanowires. The fabrication of p-type and n-type Si nanowires will be studied via the addition of dopant gases such as diborane (B2H 6), trimethylboron (TMB), and phosphine (PH3) during growth. The use of gaseous dopant sources provides more flexibility in growth, particularly for the fabrication of p-n junctions and structures with axial dopant variations (e.g. p+-p- p+). The study is then extended to fabricate SiGe alloy nanowires by mixing SiH4 and GeH4. Bandgap engineering in Si/SiGe heterostructures can lead to novel devices with improved performance compared to those made entirely of Si. The scientific findings will lead to a better understanding of the fabrication of Si/SiGe axial and radial heterostructure nanowires for functional nanowire device structures, such as heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) and high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Eventually, the central theme of this research is to provide a scientific knowledge base and foundation for

  1. Modified silicon-germanium alloys with improved performance. [thermoelectric material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisharody, R. K.; Garvey, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a program on the modification of silicon-germanium alloys by means of small extraneous material additions in order to improve their figures-of-merit. A review of the properties that constitute the figure-of-merit indicates that it is the relatively high thermal conductivity of silicon-germanium alloys that is responsible for their low values of figure-of-merit. The intent of the effort discussed in this paper is therefore the reduction of the thermal conductivity of silicon-germanium alloys by minor alloy additions and/or changes in the basic structure of the material. Because Group III and V elements are compatible with silicon and germanium, the present effort in modifying silicon-germanium alloys has concentrated on additions of gallium phosphide. A significant reduction in thermal conductivity, approximately 40 to 50 percent, has been demonstrated while the electrical properties are only slightly affected as a result. The figure-of-merit of the resultant material is enhanced over that of silicon-germanium alloys and when fully optimized is potentially better than that of any other presently available thermoelectric material.

  2. Protective infrared antireflection coating based on sputtered germanium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Des; Waddell, Ewan; Placido, Frank

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes optical, durablility and environmental performance of a germanium carbide based durable antireflection coating. The coating has been demonstrated on germanium and zinc selenide infra-red material however is applicable to other materials such as zinc sulphide. The material is deposited using a novel reactive closed field magnetron sputtering technique, offering significant advantages over conventional evaporation processes for germanium carbide such as plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. The sputtering process is "cold", making it suitable for use on a wide range of substrates. Moreover, the drum format provide more efficient loading for high throughput production. The use of the closed field and unbalanced magnetrons creates a magnetic confinement that extends the electron mean free path leading to high ion current densities. The combination of high current densities with ion energies in the range ~30eV creates optimum thin film growth conditions. As a result the films are dense, spectrally stable, supersmooth and low stress. Films incorporate low hydrogen content resulting in minimal C-H absorption bands within critical infra-red passbands such as 3 to 5um and 8 to 12um. Tuning of germanium carbide (Ge(1-x)Cx) film refractive index from pure germanium (refractive index 4) to pure germanium carbide (refractive index 1.8) will be demonstrated. Use of film grading to achieve single and dual band anti-reflection performance will be shown. Environmental and durability levels are shown to be suitable for use in harsh external environments.

  3. Method of fabricating germanium and gallium arsenide devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, Murzban (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method of semiconductor diode fabrication is disclosed which relies on the epitaxial growth of a precisely doped thickness layer of gallium arsenide or germanium on a semi-insulating or intrinsic substrate, respectively, of gallium arsenide or germanium by either molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) or by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The method involves: depositing a layer of doped or undoped silicon dioxide on a germanium or gallium arsenide wafer or substrate, selectively removing the silicon dioxide layer to define one or more surface regions for a device to be fabricated thereon, growing a matched epitaxial layer of doped germanium or gallium arsenide of an appropriate thickness using MBE or MOCVD techniques on both the silicon dioxide layer and the defined one or more regions; and etching the silicon dioxide and the epitaxial material on top of the silicon dioxide to leave a matched epitaxial layer of germanium or gallium arsenide on the germanium or gallium arsenide substrate, respectively, and upon which a field effect device can thereafter be formed.

  4. Nanowire liquid pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian Yu; Lo, Yu-Chieh; Niu, Jun Jie; Kushima, Akihiro; Qian, Xiaofeng; Zhong, Li; Mao, Scott X.; Li, Ju

    2013-04-01

    The ability to form tiny droplets of liquids and control their movements is important in printing or patterning, chemical reactions and biological assays. So far, such nanofluidic capabilities have principally used components such as channels, nozzles or tubes, where a solid encloses the transported liquid. Here, we show that liquids can flow along the outer surface of solid nanowires at a scale of attolitres per second and the process can be directly imaged with in situ transmission electron microscopy. Microscopy videos show that an ionic liquid can be pumped along tin dioxide, silicon or zinc oxide nanowires as a thin precursor film or as beads riding on the precursor film. Theoretical analysis suggests there is a critical film thickness of ~10 nm below which the liquid flows as a flat film and above which it flows as discrete beads. This critical thickness is the result of intermolecular forces between solid and liquid, which compete with liquid surface energy and Rayleigh-Plateau instability.

  5. Graphene-based nanowire supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Yu, Dingshan; Xiong, Wei; Liu, Peipei; Liu, Yong; Dai, Liming

    2014-04-01

    We present a new type of electrochemical supercapacitors based on graphene nanowires. Graphene oxide (GO)/polypyrrole (PPy) nanowires are prepared via electrodepostion of GO/PPy composite into a micoroporous Al2O3 template, followed by the removal of template. PPy is electrochemically doped by oxygen-containing functional groups of the GO to enhance the charging/discharging rates of the supercapacitor. A high capacitance 960 F g(-1) of the GO/PPy nanowires is obtained due to the large surface area of the vertically aligned nanowires and the intimate contact between the nanowires and the substrate electrode. The capacitive performance remains stable after charging and discharging for 300 cycles. To improve the thermal stability and long-term charge storage, GO is further electrochemically reduced into graphene and PPy is subsequently thermally carbonized, leading to a high capacitance of 200 F g(-1) for the resultant pure reduced graphene oxide/carbon based nanowire supercapacitor. This value of capacitance (200 F g(-1)) is higher than that of conventional porous carbon materials while the reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanowires show a lower Faraday resistance and higher thermal stability than the GO/PPy nanowires. PMID:24588395

  6. Discrete-contact nanowire photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitambar, Michelle J.; Wen, Wen; Maldonado, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    A series of finite-element simulations have been performed to assess the operational characteristics of a new semiconductor nanowire solar cell design operating under high-level injection conditions. Specifically, the steady-state current-voltage behavior of a cylindrical silicon (Si) nanowire with a series of discrete, ohmic-selective contacts under intense sunlight illumination was investigated. The scope of the analysis was limited to only the factors that impact the net internal quantum yield for solar to electricity conversion. No evaluations were performed with regards to optical light trapping in the modeled structures. Several aspects in a discrete-contact nanowire device that could impact operation were explored, including the size and density of ohmic-selective contacts, the size of the nanowire, the electronic quality and conductivity of the nanowire, the surface defect density of the nanowire, and the type of ohmic selectivity employed at each contact. The analysis showed that there were ranges of values for each parameter that supported good to excellent photoresponses, with certain combinations of experimentally attainable material properties yielding internal energy conversion efficiencies at the thermodynamic limit for a single junction cell. The merits of the discrete-contact nanowire cell were contrasted with "conventional" nanowire photovoltaic cells featuring a uniform conformal contact and also with planar point-contact solar cells. The unique capacity of the discrete-contact nanowire solar cell design to operate at useful energy conversion efficiencies with low quality semiconductor nanowires (i.e., possessing short charge-carrier lifetimes) with only light doping is discussed. This work thus defines the impetus for future experimental work aimed at developing this photovoltaic architecture.

  7. Tunnel current across linear homocatenated germanium chains

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Yukihito

    2014-01-28

    The electronic transport properties of germanium oligomers catenating into linear chains (linear Ge chains) have been theoretically studied using first principle methods. The conduction mechanism of a Ge chain sandwiched between gold electrodes was analyzed based on the density of states and the eigenstates of the molecule in a two-probe environment. Like that of silicon chains (Si chains), the highest occupied molecular orbital of Ge chains contains the extended σ-conjugation of Ge 4p orbitals at energy levels close to the Fermi level; this is in contrast to the electronic properties of linear carbon chains. Furthermore, the conductance of a Ge chain is expected to decrease exponentially with molecular length L. The decay constant β, which is defined as e{sup −βL}, of a Ge chain is similar to that of a Si chain, whereas the conductance of the Ge chains is higher than that of Si chains even though the Ge–Ge bond length is longer than the Si–Si bond length.

  8. Detached Growth of Germanium and Germaniumsilicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dold, P.; Schweizer, M.; Szofran, F.; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    Up to now, detached growth was observed mainly under microgravity, i.e. under the absence of hydrostatic pressure that hinders the formation of a free melt meniscus. the detached growth of germanium doped with gallium was obtained under 1 g conditions, the growth was performed in quartz-glass ampoule. Part of the crystal grew without wall contact, the detached growth was observed in-situ with a CCD-camera as well as after the growth process in form of growth lines and the formation of <111> facets on the crystal surface. GeSi crystal (oriientation: <111>, maximum silicon content: 4 at%, seed material: Ge) was grown in a pBN crucible (excluding the possibility of in-situ monitoring of the growth process). The grown crystal exhibits three growth facets, indicating also wall free growth. Surface analysis of the crystals (NDIC, SEM) and characterization of crystal segregation (EDAX, resistivity measurement) and defect structure (EPD, x-ray diffraction measurements) will be presented.

  9. Optical properties of colloidal germanium nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    WILCOXON,JESS P.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; SAMARA,GEORGE A.

    2000-05-01

    Highly crystalline germanium (Ge) nanocrystals in the size range 2--10 nm were grown in inverse micelles and purified and size-separated by high pressure liquid chromatography with on-line optical and electrical diagnostics. The nanocrystals retain the diamond structure of bulk Ge down to at least 2.0 nm (containing about 150 Ge atoms). The background- and impurity-free extinction and photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these nanocrystals revealed rich structure which was interpreted in terms of the bandstructure of Ge shifted to higher energies by quantum confinement. The shifts ranged from {minus}0.1 eV to over 1 eV for the various transitions. PL in the range 350--700 nm was observed from nanocrystals 2--5 nm in size. The 2.0 nm nanocrystals yielded the most intense PL (at 420 nm) which is believed to be intrinsic and attributed to direct recombination at {Gamma}. Excitation at high energy (250 nm) populates most of the conduction bands resulting in competing recombination channels and the observed broad PL spectra.

  10. Preparation and characterization of hydrogenated amorphous germanium and hydrogenated amorphous germanium-carbide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous germanium (a-Ge:H) and germanium carbide (a-Ge{sub 1{minus}x}C{sub x}:H) films were prepared by rf sputtering of a polycrystalline Ge target in a vacuum {approximately}4 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} Torr at various rf power, target-substrate distance, varying partial pressures of Ar, H{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}H{sub 8}, and flow rates. The vibrational and opto-electronic properties such as infrared (IR) absorption, optical gap, electron-spin-resonance (ESR) signals, and conductivities vary with deposition conditions. The photoconductivity, in particular, was carefully monitored as a function of the deposition conditions to optimize it. The concentration of Ge-H bonds and the optical gap generally decrease as P is increased. Results of annealing showed the enhanced segregation effect of Ge-C bonds {ge} 300{degree}C. The evolution of bonded hydrogen with temperature is studied. Deposition rates of a-Ge:H films are estimated and compared. The thermalization curve for a Ge target is constructed. Deposition rate was found to decrease exponentially with increasing target-substrate distances to decrease with increasing partial pressures of H{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 8} and increasing flow rates. Hydrogen incorporation markedly increased photoconductivity.

  11. Determination of the Wetting Angle of Germanium and Germanium-Silicon Melts on Different Substrate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Natalie; Croell, Arne; Szofran, F. R.; Cobb. S. D.; Dold, P.; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    During Bridgman growth of semiconductors detachment of the crystal and the melt meniscus has occasionally been observed, mainly under microgravity (microg) conditions. An important factor for detached growth is the wetting angle of the melt with the crucible material. High contact angles are more likely to result in detachment of the growing crystal from the ampoule wall. In order to achieve detached growth of germanium (Ge) and germanium-silicon (GeSi) crystals under 1g and microg conditions, sessile drop measurements were performed to determine the most suitable ampoule material as well as temperature dependence of the surface tension for GeSi. Sapphire, fused quartz, glassy carbon, graphite, SiC, pyrolytic Boron Nitride (pBN), AIN, and diamond were used as substrates. Furthermore, different cleaning procedures and surface treatments (etching, sandblasting, etc.) of the same substrate material and their effect on the wetting behavior were studied during these experiments. pBN and AIN substrates exhibited the highest contact angles with values around 170 deg.

  12. Preparation and characterization of hydrogenated amorphous germanium and hydrogenated amorphous germanium carbide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hai-Sheng

    1989-02-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous germanium (a-Ge:H) and germanium carbide (a-Ge/sub 1-x/C/sub x/:H) films were prepared by rf sputtering of a polycrystalline Ge target in a vacuum /approximately/ 4 /times/ 10/sup /minus/7/ Torr at various rf power 50 less than or equal to P less than or equal to 600 W (0. 27-3.3 W/cm/sup 2/), target-substrate distance 1 less than or equal to d less than or equal to 7'', varying partial pressures of Ar, H/sub 2/, and C/sub 3/H/sub 8/, and flow rates f. The vibrational and opto-electronic properties such as infrared (IR) absorption, optical gap, electron-spin-resonance (ESR) signals, and conductivities vary with deposition conditions. The photoconductivity sigma/sub ph/, in particular, was carefully monitored as a function of the deposition conditions to optimize it. 96 refs., 49 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1990-11-01

    The goal of this project was to increase the authors understanding of the interplay between the kinetic and electronic energy of free atoms and their chemical reactivity by answering the following questions: (1) what is the chemistry of high-energy carbon silicon and germanium atoms recoiling from nuclear transformations; (2) how do the reactions of recoiling carbon, silicon and germanium atoms take place - what are the operative reaction mechanisms; (3) how does the reactivity of free carbon, silicon and germanium atoms vary with energy and electronic state, and what are the differences in the chemistry of these three isoelectronic atoms This research program consisted of a coordinated set of experiments capable of achieving these goals by defining the structures, the kinetic and internal energy, and the charge states of the intermediates formed in the gas-phase reactions of recoiling silicon and germanium atoms with silane, germane, and unsaturated organic molecules, and of recoiling carbon atoms with aromatic molecules. The reactions of high energy silicon, germanium, and carbon atoms created by nuclear recoil were studied with substrates chosen so that their products illuminated the mechanism of the recoil reactions. Information about the energy and electronic state of the recoiling atoms at reaction was obtained from the variation in end product yields and the extent of decomposition and rearrangement of primary products (usually reactive intermediates) as a function of total pressure and the concentration of inert moderator molecules that remove kinetic energy from the recoiling atoms and can induce transitions between electronic spin states. 29 refs.

  14. Single-molecule conductance in atomically precise germanium wires.

    PubMed

    Su, Timothy A; Li, Haixing; Zhang, Vivian; Neupane, Madhav; Batra, Arunabh; Klausen, Rebekka S; Kumar, Bharat; Steigerwald, Michael L; Venkataraman, Latha; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-09-30

    While the electrical conductivity of bulk-scale group 14 materials such as diamond carbon, silicon, and germanium is well understood, there is a gap in knowledge regarding the conductivity of these materials at the nano and molecular scales. Filling this gap is important because integrated circuits have shrunk so far that their active regions, which rely so heavily on silicon and germanium, begin to resemble ornate molecules rather than extended solids. Here we unveil a new approach for synthesizing atomically discrete wires of germanium and present the first conductance measurements of molecular germanium using a scanning tunneling microscope-based break-junction (STM-BJ) technique. Our findings show that germanium and silicon wires are nearly identical in conductivity at the molecular scale, and that both are much more conductive than aliphatic carbon. We demonstrate that the strong donor ability of C-Ge σ-bonds can be used to raise the energy of the anchor lone pair and increase conductance. Furthermore, the oligogermane wires behave as conductance switches that function through stereoelectronic logic. These devices can be trained to operate with a higher switching factor by repeatedly compressing and elongating the molecular junction. PMID:26373928

  15. Application of germanium carbide in durable multilayer IR coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Chris J.; Orr, James S.; Gordon, H.; Traub, Leonard T.; Lettington, Alan H.

    1990-08-01

    Infrared transparent amorphous hydrogenated alloys of germanium and carbon (germanium carbide) have been deposited by plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition (PACVD) using germane (GeH4 ) and butane (C 4Hid as the feedstocks and by reactive sputtering of germanium with a CH1g-Ar plasma. The effects of varying various deposition conditions have been assessed on a number of coating properties . Germanium Carbide has good environmental durability and can be deposited in thick layers. Using PACVD it can be deposited with any refractive index in the range 2 to 4 while the sputtering process is limited to indices in the range 3 to 4 . One advantage of the sputtering process is the high deposition rates achievable which can be up to '-lOum/h compared with lum/h for the PACVD process. When used in conjunction with "diamond-like" carbon (a-'C:H) , germanium carbide offers the prospect of rnultilayer antireflection coatings for 8 to 12 urn optics with durabilities which hitherto have been impossible to achieve. Antireflection coatings for zinc sulphide windows which are subject to hostile environmental conditions have been investigated and the performance of the coatings is presented. The factors affecting the practical realisation of these coatings on a production scale are discussed.

  16. First-principles calculations of multivacancies in germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sholihun; Ishii, Fumiyuki; Saito, Mineo

    2016-01-01

    We carry out density-functional-theory calculations to study the stability of germanium multivacancies. We use supercells containing 216 atomic sites and simulate two configurations called the “part of hexagonal ring” (PHR) and fourfold configurations of the tri-, tetra-, and pentavacancies. We find that the fourfold configurations of the tetra- and pentavacancies are the most stable and these configurations are also the most stable in the case of silicon. However, we find that the PHR and fourfold configurations have similar energies in the case of the germanium trivacancy. These results are in contrast to those of the silicon trivacancy; the fourfold configuration has substantially lower energy than the PHR configuration. This difference between germanium and silicon is expected to originate from the fact that the four bonds in the fourfold configurations in the germanium trivacancy are weaker than those in the silicon one. By calculating dissociation energies, we find that the silicon tetravacancy is not easy to dissociate, whereas the germanium tetravacancy is not very stable compared with the silicon one.

  17. Investigation of germanium Raman lasers for the mid-infrared.

    PubMed

    De Leonardis, Francesco; Troia, Benedetto; Soref, Richard A; Passaro, Vittorio M N

    2015-06-29

    In this paper we present a detailed theoretical investigation of integrated racetrack Raman lasers based on the germanium material system operating in the mid-infrared beyond the germanium two-photon absorption cut-off wavelength of 3.17 μm. The effective Raman gain has been estimated in waveguides based on germanium-on-silicon, germanium-on-SOI and germanium-on-Si3N4 technology platforms as a function of their crystallographic orientations. Furthermore, general design guidelines have been determined by means of a comparative analysis of Raman laser performance, i.e. the threshold power, polarization and directionality of the excited Stokes signals as a function of racetrack cavity length and directional-coupler dimensions. Finally, the emitted Raman laser power has been evaluated as a function of overall propagation losses and operative wavelengths up to 3.8 μm, while the time dynamics of Raman lasers has been simulated assuming continuous and pulse waves as input pump signals. PMID:26191733

  18. Low temperature exfoliation process in hydrogen-implanted germanium layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferain, I. P.; Byun, K. Y.; Colinge, C. A.; Brightup, S.; Goorsky, M. S.

    2010-03-01

    The feasibility of transferring hydrogen-implanted germanium to silicon with a reduced thermal budget is demonstrated. Germanium samples were implanted with a splitting dose of 5×1016 H2+ cm-2 at 180 keV and a two-step anneal was performed. Surface roughness and x-ray diffraction pattern measurements, combined with cross-sectional TEM analysis of hydrogen-implanted germanium samples were carried out in order to understand the exfoliation mechanism as a function of the thermal budget. It is shown that the first anneal performed at low temperature (≤150 °C for 22 h) enhances the nucleation of hydrogen platelets significantly. The second anneal is performed at 300 °C for 5 min and is shown to complete the exfoliation process by triggering the formation of extended platelets. Two key results are highlighted: (i) in a reduced thermal budget approach, the transfer of hydrogen-implanted germanium is found to follow a mechanism similar to the transfer of hydrogen-implanted InP and GaAs, (ii) such a low thermal budget (<300 °C) is found to be suitable for directly bonded heterogeneous substrates, such as germanium bonded to silicon, where different thermal expansion coefficients are involved.

  19. POSITION SENSITIVE GERMANIUM DETECTORS FOR GAMMA-RAY IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gamma-ray imaging with position-sensitive germanium detectors offers the advantages of excellent energy resolution, high detection efficiency, and potentially good sptial resolution. The development of the amorphous-semiconductor electrical contact technology for germanium detec...

  20. Nanoantennas for nanowire photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Alisafaee, Hossein; Fiddy, Michael A.

    2014-09-15

    We consider the use of plasmonic nanoantenna elements, hemispherical and cylindrical, for application in semiconductor nanowire (NW) vertical arrays. Using Mie theory and a finite element method, scattering and absorption efficiencies are obtained for the desired enhancement of interaction with light in the NWs. We find an optimal mixture of nanoantennae for efficient scattering of solar spectrum in the NW array. Spectral radiation patterns of scattered light are computed, and, for representing the total response of the nanoantenna-equipped NWs to the solar AM1.5G spectrum, the weighted average of scattering patterns for unpolarized normal incidence is obtained showing an advantageous overall directivity toward the NWs.

  1. Metal nanowire grating patterns.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, G U; Radha, B

    2010-10-01

    Metal nanowire patterning in the form of grating structures has been carried out using a wide range of lithography techniques, and many hybrid methods derived from them. The challenge is to achieve sub-100 nm linewidths with controllable spacing and thickness over large areas of substrates with high throughput. In particular, the patterns with linewidth and spacing of a few tens of nm offer properties of great interest in optoelectronics and plasmonics. Crossbar grating structures--two gratings patterned perpendicular to each other--will play an important role as ultra-high density electrode grids in memristive devices for non-volatile memory. PMID:20945550

  2. Nanowire terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Grange, Thomas

    2014-10-06

    Quantum cascade lasers made of nanowire axial heterostructures are proposed. The dissipative quantum dynamics of their carriers is theoretically investigated using non-equilibrium Green functions. Their transport and gain properties are calculated for varying nanowire thickness, from the classical-wire regime to the quantum-wire regime. Our calculation shows that the lateral quantum confinement provided by the nanowires allows an increase of the maximum operation temperature and a strong reduction of the current density threshold compared to conventional terahertz quantum cascade lasers.

  3. Boron nanowires for flexible electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jifa; Cai, Jinming; Hui, Chao; Zhang, Chendong; Bao, Lihong; Gao, Min; Shen, Chengmin; Gao, Hongjun

    2008-09-01

    Flexible boron nanowires have been synthesized via thermoreduction in boron-oxygen compounds with magnesium. These as-prepared nanowires, which are structurally uniform and single crystalline, represent good semiconductor at high temperature. Tensile stress measurements demonstrate excellent mechanical property of boron nanowires as well as resistance to mechanical fracture even under a strain of 3%. Importantly, simultaneous electrical measurement reveals that the corresponding electrical conductance is very robust and remains constant under mechanical strain. Our results can be briefly explained by Mott's variable range hopping model.

  4. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hochbaum, A.I.; Gargas, Daniel; Jeong Hwang, Yun; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-04

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. These porous nanowires also retain the crystallographic orientation of the wafer from which they are etched. Electron microscopy and diffraction confirm their single-crystallinity and reveal the silicon surrounding the pores is as thin as several nanometers. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the photoluminescence (PL) of these arrays emanate from the nanowires themselves, and their PL spectrum suggests that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  5. Conducting polyaniline nanowire electrode junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaikwad, Sumedh; Bodkhe, Gajanan; Deshmukh, Megha; Patil, Harshada; Rushi, Arti; Shirsat, Mahendra D.; Koinkar, Pankaj; Kim, Yun-Hae; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a synthesis of conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction (CPNEJ) has been reported. Conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction on Si/SiO2 substrate (having 3 μm gap between two gold microelectrodes) is prepared. Polyaniline nanowires with diameter (ca. 140 nm to 160 nm) were synthesized by one step electrochemical polymerization using galvanostatic (constant current) technique to bridge this gap. The surface morphology of CPNEJ was studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The synthesized CPNEJ is an excellent platform for biosensor applications.

  6. Hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon germanium thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusoff, A. R. M.; Syahrul, M. N.; Henkel, K.

    2007-08-01

    Hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon germanium thin films (nc-SiGe:H) is an interesting alternative material to replace hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) as the narrow bandgap absorber in an a-Si/a-SiGe/nc-SiGe(nc-Si) triple-junction solar cell due to its higher optical absorption in the wavelength range of interest. In this paper, we present results of optical, structural investigations and electrical characterization of nc-SiGe:H thin films made by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) with a coil-shaped tungsten filament and with a disilane/germane/hydrogen gas mixture. The optical band gaps of a-SiGe:H and nc-SiGe:H thin-films, which are deposited with the same disilane/germane/hydrogen gas mixture ratio of 3.4:1.7:7, are about 1.58 eV and 2.1 eV, respectively. The nc-SiGe:H thin film exhibits a larger optical absorption coefficient of about 2-4 in the 600-900 nm range when compared to nc-Si:H thin film. Therefore, a thinner nc-SiGe:H layer of sim500 nm thickness may be sufficient for the narrow bandgap absorber in an a-Si based multiple-junction solar cell. We enhanced the transport properties as measured by the photoconductivity frequency mixing technique. These improved alloys do not necessarily show an improvement in the degree of structural heterogeneity on the nanometer scale as measured by small-angle X-ray scattering. Decreasing both the filament temperature and substrate temperature produced a film with relatively low structural heterogeneity while photoluminescence showed an order of magnitude increase in defect density for a similar change in the process.

  7. Stability of Detached Grown Germanium Single Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweizer, M.; Volz, M. P.; Cobb, S. D.; Vujisic, L.; Szofran, F. R.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Detachment of the melt meniscus from the crucible during semiconductor Bridgman growth experiments has been observed in recent years, especially under microgravity experiments. Under earth conditions, the hydrostatic pressure counteracts the mechanism, whereby it is more difficult to achieve detached Bridgman growth. Attempts to get stable detached growth under terrestrial conditions have been discussed in the literature and have been the subject of recent experiments in our own group. The advantage of crystals grown without wall contact is obvious: In general, they possess a higher crystal quality than conventional Bridgman grown crystals with wall contact. However, due to the interaction of different parameters such as the wetting behavior of the melt with the crucible, and the dependence of the growth angle with the shape of the melt meniscus, the mechanism leading to detachment is very complicated and not completely understood. We have grown several doped and undoped Germanium crystals with the detached Bridgman and the normal Bridgman growth technique. Pyrolytic boron nitride containers were used for all growth experiments. In the detached grown crystals the typical gap thickness between the pBN crucible and the crystal is in the range of 10 to 100 micrometers, which was determined by performing profilometer measurements. Etch pit density measurements were also performed and a comparison between detached and attached grown crystals will be given. An interesting feature was detected on the surface of a detached grown crystal. Strong surface striations with an average axial distance of 0.5 mm were observed around the whole circumference. The maximum fluctuation of the gap thickness is in the range of 5-10 micrometers. These variations of the detached gap along the crystal axis can be explained by a kind of stiction of the melt/crucible interface and thus by a variation of the meniscus shape. This phenomenon leading to the fluctuation of the gap thickness will be

  8. Stability of Detached Grown Germanium Single Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweizer, M.; Volz, M. P.; Cobb, S. D.; Motakef, S.; Szofran, F. R.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Detachment of the melt meniscus from the crucible during semiconductor Bridgman growth experiments has been observed in recent years especially, under microgravity experiments. Under earth conditions, the hydrostatic pressure counteracts the mechanism, whereby it is more difficult to achieve detached Bridgman growth. Attempts to get stable detached growth under terrestrial conditions have been discussed in the literature and have been the subject of recent experiments in our own group. The advantage of crystals grown without wall contact is obvious: In general, they possess a higher crystal quality than conventional Bridgman grown crystals with wall contact. However, due to the interaction of different parameters such as the wetting behavior of the melt with the crucible, and the dependence of the growth angle with the shape of the melt meniscus, the mechanism leading to detachment is very complicated and not completely understood. We have grown several doped and undoped Germanium crystals with the detached Bridgman and the normal Bridgman growth technique. Pyrolytic boron nitride containers were used for all growth experiments. In the detached grown crystals the typical gap thickness between the pBN crucible and the crystal is in the range of 10 to 100 microns, which was determined by performing profilometer measurements. Etch pit density measurements were also performed and a comparison between detached and attached grown crystals will be given. An interesting feature was detected on the surface of a detached grown crystal. Strong surface striations with an average axial distance of 0.5mm were observed around the whole circumference. The maximum fluctuation of the gap thickness is in the range of 5-10 microns. These variations of the detached gap along the crystal axis can be explained by a kind of stiction of the melt/crucible interface and thus by a variation of the meniscus shape. This phenomenon leading to the fluctuation of the gap thickness will be

  9. Next Generation Device Grade Silicon-Germanium on Insulator

    PubMed Central

    Littlejohns, Callum G.; Nedeljkovic, Milos; Mallinson, Christopher F.; Watts, John F.; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Reed, Graham T.; Gardes, Frederic Y.

    2015-01-01

    High quality single crystal silicon-germanium-on-insulator has the potential to facilitate the next generation of photonic and electronic devices. Using a rapid melt growth technique we engineer tailored single crystal silicon-germanium-on-insulator structures with near constant composition over large areas. The proposed structures avoid the problem of laterally graded SiGe compositions, caused by preferential Si rich solid formation, encountered in straight SiGe wires by providing radiating elements distributed along the structures. This method enables the fabrication of multiple single crystal silicon-germanium-on-insulator layers of different compositions, on the same Si wafer, using only a single deposition process and a single anneal process, simply by modifying the structural design and/or the anneal temperature. This facilitates a host of device designs, within a relatively simple growth environment, as compared to the complexities of other methods, and also offers flexibility in device designs within that growth environment. PMID:25656076

  10. Silicon-germanium technology program of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Winter, F.; Stapfer, G.

    1972-01-01

    The outer planetary exploration missions studied by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory require silicon-germanium radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) in which the factors of safety are as low as is compatible with the reliable satisfaction of the power needs. Work on silicon germanium sublimation performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is presented. Analytical modeling work on the solid-diffusion process involved in the steady-state (free) sublimation of silicon germanium is described. Analytical predictions are made of the sublimation suppression which can be achieved by using a cover gas. A series of accelerated (high-temperature) tests which were performed on simulated hardware (using four SiGe couples) to study long-term sublimation and reaction mechanisms are also discussed.

  11. Simulations for Tracking Cosmogenic Activation in Germanium and Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Orrell, John L.

    2011-11-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in copper cryostats and shielding materials are used in measurements of the extraordinarily rare nuclear decay process, neutrinoless double-beta decay (0νββ), and for dark matter searches. Cosmogenic production of 68Ge and 60Co in the germanium and copper represent an irreducible background to these experiments as the subsequent decays of these isotopes can mimic the signals of interest. These radioactive isotopes can be removed by chemical and/or isotopic separation, but begin to grow-in to the material after separation until the material is moved deep underground. This work is motivated by the need to have a reliable, experimentally benchmarked simulation tool for evaluating shielding materials used during transportation and near-surface manufacturing of experiment components. The resulting simulations tool has been used to enhance the effectiveness of an existing transport shield used to ship enriched germanium from the separations facility to the detector manufacturing facility.

  12. Moth's eye anti-reflection gratings on germanium freeform surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Meng; Shultz, Jason A.; Owen, Joseph D.; Davies, Matthew A.; Suleski, Thomas J.

    2014-09-01

    Germanium is commonly used for optical components in the infrared, but the high refractive index of germanium causes significant losses due to Fresnel reflections. Anti-reflection (AR) surfaces based on subwavelength "moth's eye" gratings provide one means to significantly increase optical transmission. As found in nature, these gratings are conformal to the curved surfaces of lenslets in the eye of the moth. Engineered optical systems inspired by biological examples offer possibilities for increased performance and system miniaturization, but also introduce significant challenges to both design and fabrication. In this paper, we consider the design and fabrication of conformal moth's eye AR structures on germanium freeform optical surfaces, including lens arrays and Alvarez lenses. Fabrication approaches and limitations based on both lithography and multi-axis diamond machining are considered. Rigorous simulations of grating performance and approaches for simulation of conformal, multi-scale optical systems are discussed.

  13. Germanium FCC structure from a colloidal crystal template

    SciTech Connect

    Miguez, H.; Meseguer, F.; Lopez, C.; Holgado, M.; Andreasen, G.; Mifsud, A.; Fornes, V.

    2000-05-16

    Here, the authors show a method to fabricate a macroporous structure in which the pores, essentially identical, arrange regularly in a face-centered cubic (FCC) lattice. The result is a network of air spheres in a germanium medium. This structure presents the highest dielectric contrast ({epsilon}{sub Ge}/{epsilon}{sub air} = 16) ever achieved in the optical regime in such periodic structures, which could result in important applications in photonics. The authors employ solid silica colloidal crystals (opals) as templates within which a cyclic germanium growth process is carried out. Thus, the three-dimensional periodicity of the host is inherited by the guest. Afterward, the silica is removed and a germanium opal replica is obtained.

  14. 40 CFR 421.180 - Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. 421.180 Section 421.180 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary and Secondary Germanium and Gallium Subcategory § 421.180 Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  15. 40 CFR 421.180 - Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. 421.180 Section 421.180 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary and Secondary Germanium and Gallium Subcategory § 421.180 Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  16. 40 CFR 421.180 - Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. 421.180 Section 421.180 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary and Secondary Germanium and Gallium Subcategory § 421.180 Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  17. 40 CFR 421.180 - Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. 421.180 Section 421.180 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary and Secondary Germanium and Gallium Subcategory § 421.180 Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  18. 40 CFR 421.180 - Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. 421.180 Section 421.180 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary and Secondary Germanium and Gallium Subcategory § 421.180 Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  19. Deposition and characterizations of ultrasmooth silver thin films assisted with a germanium wetting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junce; Fryauf, David M.; Diaz Leon, Juan J.; Garrett, Matthew; VJ, Logeeswaran; Islam, Saif M.; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, silver thin films deposited on SiO2 substrates with a germanium wetting layer fabricated by electron-beam evaporation were studied. The characterization methods of XTEM, FTIR, XRD and XRR were used to study the structural properties of silver thin films with various thicknesses of germanium layers. Silver films deposited with very thin (1-5nm) germanium wetting layers show about one half of improvement in the crystallite sizes comparing silver films without germanium layer. The surface roughness of silver thin films significantly decrease with a thin germanium wetting layer, reaching a roughness minimum around 1-5nm of germanium, but as the germanium layer thickness increases, the silver thin film surface roughness increases. The relatively higher surface energy of germanium and bond dissociation energy of silver-germanium were introduced to explain the effects the germanium layer made to the silver film deposition. However, due to the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode of germanium layer, germanium island formation started with increased thickness (5-15nm), which leads to a rougher surface of silver films. The demonstrated silver thin films are very promising for large-scale applications as molecular anchors, optical metamaterials, plasmonic devices, and several areas of nanophotonics.

  20. Superconducting nanowire networks formed on nanoporous membrane substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qiong

    Introducing a regular array of holes into superconducting thin films has been actively pursued to stabilize and pin the vortex lattice against external driving forces, enabling higher current capabilities. If the width of the sections between neighboring holes is comparable to the superconducting coherence length, the circulation of the Cooper pairs in around the holes in the presence of a magnetic field can also produce the Little-Parks effect, i.e. periodic oscillation of the critical temperature. These two mechanisms, commensurate vortex pinning enhancement by the hole-array and the critical temperature oscillations of a wire network due to Little-Parks effect can induce similar experimental observations such as magnetoresistance oscillation and enhancement of the critical current at specific magnetic fields. This dissertation work investigates the effect of a hole-array on the properties of superconducting films deposited onto nanoporous substrates. Experiments on anisotropies of the critical temperature for niobium films on anodic aluminum oxide membrane substrates containing a regular hole-array reveal that the critical temperature exhibits two strong anisotropic effects: Little-Parks oscillations whose period varies with field direction superimposed on a smooth background arising from one dimensional confinement by the finite lateral space between neighboring holes. The two components of the anisotropy are intrinsically linked and appear in concert. That is, the hole-array changes the dimensionality of a two-dimensional (2D) film to a network of 1D nanowire network. Network of superconducting nanowires with transverse dimensions as small as few nanometers were achieved by coating molybdenum germanium (MoGe) layer onto commercially available filtration membranes which have extremely dense nanopores. The magnetoresistance, magnetic field dependence of the critical temperature and the anisotropies of the synthesized MoGe nanowire networks can be consistently

  1. Nanowire liquid pumps.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian Yu; Lo, Yu-Chieh; Niu, Jun Jie; Kushima, Akihiro; Qian, Xiaofeng; Zhong, Li; Mao, Scott X; Li, Ju

    2013-04-01

    The ability to form tiny droplets of liquids and control their movements is important in printing or patterning, chemical reactions and biological assays. So far, such nanofluidic capabilities have principally used components such as channels, nozzles or tubes, where a solid encloses the transported liquid. Here, we show that liquids can flow along the outer surface of solid nanowires at a scale of attolitres per second and the process can be directly imaged with in situ transmission electron microscopy. Microscopy videos show that an ionic liquid can be pumped along tin dioxide, silicon or zinc oxide nanowires as a thin precursor film or as beads riding on the precursor film. Theoretical analysis suggests there is a critical film thickness of ∼10 nm below which the liquid flows as a flat film and above which it flows as discrete beads. This critical thickness is the result of intermolecular forces between solid and liquid, which compete with liquid surface energy and Rayleigh-Plateau instability. PMID:23542904

  2. Nanowire lithography on silicon.

    PubMed

    Colli, Alan; Fasoli, Andrea; Pisana, Simone; Fu, Yongqing; Beecher, Paul; Milne, William I; Ferrari, Andrea C

    2008-05-01

    Nanowire lithography (NWL) uses nanowires (NWs), grown and assembled by chemical methods, as etch masks to transfer their one-dimensional morphology to an underlying substrate. Here, we show that SiO2 NWs are a simple and compatible system to implement NWL on crystalline silicon and fabricate a wide range of architectures and devices. Planar field-effect transistors made of a single SOI-NW channel exhibit a contact resistance below 20 kOmega and scale with the channel width. Further, we assess the electrical response of NW networks obtained using a mask of SiO2 NWs ink-jetted from solution. The resulting conformal network etched into the underlying wafer is monolithic, with single-crystalline bulk junctions; thus no difference in conductivity is seen between a direct NW bridge and a percolating network. We also extend the potential of NWL into the third dimension, by using a periodic undercutting that produces an array of vertically stacked NWs from a single NW mask. PMID:18386934

  3. Characterisation of two AGATA asymmetric high purity germanium capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colosimo, S. J.; Moon, S.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cresswell, J. R.; Harkness-Brennan, L.; Judson, D. S.; Lazarus, I. H.; Nolan, P. J.; Simpson, J.; Unsworth, C.

    2015-02-01

    The AGATA spectrometer is an array of highly segmented high purity germanium detectors. The spectrometer uses pulse shape analysis in order to track Compton scattered γ-rays to increase the efficiency of nuclear spectroscopy studies. The characterisation of two high purity germanium detector capsules for AGATA of the same A-type has been performed at the University of Liverpool. This work will examine the uniformity of performance of the two capsules, including a comparison of the resolution and efficiency as well as a study of charge collection. The performance of the capsules shows good agreement, which is essential for the efficient operation of the γ-ray tracking array.

  4. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Structure of densified amorphous germanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micoulaut, Matthieu

    2004-03-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the structure of densified germanium dioxide (GeO2). It is found that the coordination number of germanium changes with increasing density (pressure) while pressure released systems exhibit only a marked angular change in local structure as compared to the virgin system. The structural modification with pressure appears to be stepwise and gradually affects long-range (through the reduction of the long-range correlations as seen from the shift of the first sharp diffraction peak), intermediate-range (by angular reduction) and finally short-range structure (by tetrahedron distortion).

  5. The GALATEA test-facility for high purity germanium detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Dönmez, B.; Garbini, L.; Irlbeck, S.; Majorovits, B.; Palermo, M.; Schulz, O.; Seitz, H.; Stelzer, F.

    2015-05-01

    GALATEA is a test facility designed to investigate bulk and surface effects in high purity germanium detectors. A vacuum tank houses a cold volume with the detector inside. A system of three precision motorized stages allows an almost complete scan of the detector. The main feature of GALATEA is that there is no material between source and detector. This allows the usage of alpha and beta sources to study surface effects. A 19-fold segmented true-coaxial germanium detector was used for commissioning. A first analysis of data obtained with an alpha source is presented here.

  6. The Novel Synthesis of Silicon and Germanium Nanocrystallites

    SciTech Connect

    Kauzlarich, S M; Liu, Q; Yin, S C; Lee, W H; Taylor, B

    2001-04-03

    Interest in the synthesis of semiconductor nanoparticles has been generated by their unusual optical and electronic properties arising from quantum confinement effects. We have synthesized silicon and germanium nanoclusters by reacting Zintl phase precursors with either silicon or germanium tetrachloride in various solvents. Strategies have been investigated to stabilize the surface, including reactions with RLi and MgBrR (R = alkyl). This synthetic method produces group IV nanocrystals with passivated surfaces. These nanoparticle emit over a very large range in the visible region. These particles have been characterized using HRTEM, FTIR, UV-Vis, solid state NMR, and fluorescence. The synthesis and characterization of these nanoclusters will be presented.

  7. Silicon germanium semiconductive alloy and method of fabricating same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A silicon germanium (SiGe) semiconductive alloy is grown on a substrate of single crystalline Al.sub.2O.sub.3. A {111} crystal plane of a cubic diamond structure SiGe is grown on the substrate's {0001} C-plane such that a <110> orientation of the cubic diamond structure SiGe is aligned with a <1,0,-1,0> orientation of the {0001} C-plane. A lattice match between the substrate and the SiGe is achieved by using a SiGe composition that is 0.7223 atomic percent silicon and 0.2777 atomic percent germanium.

  8. Nanocrystal Inks without Ligands: Stable Colloids of Bare Germanium Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, Zachary C.; Kortshagen, Uwe R.

    2011-05-11

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals typically have ligands attached to their surfaces that afford solubility in common solvents but hinder charge transport in nanocrystal films. Here, an alternative route is explored in which bare germanium nanocrystals are solubilized by select solvents to form stable colloids without the use of ligands. A survey of candidate solvents shows that germanium nanocrystals are completely solubilized by benzonitrile, likely because of electrostatic stabilization. Films cast from these dispersions are uniform, dense, and smooth, making them suitable for device applications without postdeposition treatment.

  9. Tensile-strained germanium microdisks with circular Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kurdi, M.; Prost, M.; Ghrib, A.; Elbaz, A.; Sauvage, S.; Checoury, X.; Beaudoin, G.; Sagnes, I.; Picardi, G.; Ossikovski, R.; Boeuf, F.; Boucaud, P.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate the combination of germanium microdisks tensily strained by silicon nitride layers and circular Bragg reflectors. The microdisks with suspended lateral Bragg reflectors form a cavity with quality factors up to 2000 around 2 μm. This represents a key feature to achieve a microlaser with a quasi-direct band gap germanium under a 1.6% biaxial tensile strain. We show that lowering the temperature significantly improves the quality factor of the quasi-radial modes. Linewidth narrowing is observed in a range of weak continuous wave excitation powers. We finally discuss the requirements to achieve lasing with these kind of structures.

  10. Large-size germanium crystal growth for rare event physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Dongming; Wang, Guojian; Mei, Hao; Guan, Yutong; Yang, Gang; Govani, Jayesh; Cubed Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Cosmogenic production in germanium crystals grown on the surface can limit the sensitivity for the next generation deep underground experiments in searching for rare event physics beyond the Standard Model. One of the best solutions to eliminate unwanted cosmogenics is to produce the germanium crystals and detectors in an underground environment. The goal of this project is to create state-of-the-art detectors to advance neutrinoless double-beta decay and dark matter exploration research and technology while simultaneously paving the way for infrastructure to support an underground laboratory for zone refining, crystal growth, and detector fabrication. The greatest challenge in the growth of germanium crystals is a lack of precise control of individual crystal properties such as the impurity distribution, the dislocation density, and the crystalline structure. With knowledge gained from the pioneers in the field of crystal growth, the researchers have developed a novel technique to grow detector-grade crystals. In this paper, we will report detector-grade large-size germanium crystal growth at the University of South Dakota. Cosmogenic production in germanium crystals grown on the surface can limit the sensitivity for the next generation deep underground experiments in searching for rare event physics beyond the Standard Model. One of the best solutions to eliminate unwanted cosmogenics is to produce the germanium crystals and detectors in an underground environment. The goal of this project is to create state-of-the-art detectors to advance neutrinoless double-beta decay and dark matter exploration research and technology while simultaneously paving the way for infrastructure to support an underground laboratory for zone refining, crystal growth, and detector fabrication. The greatest challenge in the growth of germanium crystals is a lack of precise control of individual crystal properties such as the impurity distribution, the dislocation density, and the