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Sample records for metallic single-wall carbon

  1. Metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes and production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Dillon, Anne C.; Heben, Michael J.; Gennett, Thomas; Parilla, Philip A.

    2007-01-09

    Metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes and production thereof. The metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes may be produced according to one embodiment of the invention by combining single-walled carbon nanotube precursor material and metal in a solution, and mixing the solution to incorporate at least a portion of the metal with the single-walled carbon nanotube precursor material. Other embodiments may comprise sputter deposition, evaporation, and other mixing techniques.

  2. Random telegraph noise in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hyun-Jong; Woo Uhm, Tae; Won Kim, Sung; Gyu You, Young; Wook Lee, Sang; Ho Jhang, Sung; Campbell, Eleanor E. B.; Woo Park, Yung

    2014-05-12

    We have investigated random telegraph noise (RTN) observed in individual metallic carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Mean lifetimes in high- and low-current states, τ{sub high} and τ{sub low}, have been studied as a function of bias-voltage and gate-voltage as well as temperature. By analyzing the statistics and features of the RTN, we suggest that this noise is due to the random transition of defects between two metastable states, activated by inelastic scattering with conduction electrons. Our results indicate an important role of defect motions in the 1/f noise in CNTs.

  3. Process for separating metallic from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Ya-Ping (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method for separating semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes is disclosed. The method utilizes separation agents that preferentially associate with semiconducting nanotubes due to the electrical nature of the nanotubes. The separation agents are those that have a planar orientation, .pi.-electrons available for association with the surface of the nanotubes, and also include a soluble portion of the molecule. Following preferential association of the separation agent with the semiconducting nanotubes, the agent/nanotubes complex is soluble and can be solubilized with the solution enriched in semiconducting nanotubes while the residual solid is enriched in metallic nanotubes.

  4. Filling single-wall carbon nanotubes with d- and f-metal chloride and metal nanowires.

    PubMed

    Satishkumar, B C; Taubert, A; Luzzi, D E

    2003-01-01

    Nanowires of magnetic metals (Fe, Co, Ho, Gd) have been synthesized inside the hollow interiors of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by filling SWNTs with precursor metal chlorides and subsequent reduction. SWNTs have been filled by either the melt-phase sealed-tube reaction or a solution-phase method. Among the metal chlorides investigated in this study, HoCl3 and GdCl3 filled the SWNTs to a significantly higher extent. The nanowires have been imaged by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy carried out in conjunction with TEM and STEM confirmed the presence of metal chloride and metal nanowires. PMID:12908245

  5. Growth of metal-catalyst-free nitrogen-doped metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Cheng; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Zhang, Lili; Liu, Chang; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2014-10-21

    Nitrogen-doped (N-doped) single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using SiOx nanoparticles as a catalyst and ethylenediamine as the source of both carbon and nitrogen. The N-doped SWCNTs have a mean diameter of 1.1 nm and a narrow diameter range, with 92% of them having diameters from 0.7 to 1.4 nm. Multi-wavelength laser Raman spectra and temperature-dependent electrical resistance indicate that the SWCNT sample is enriched with metallic nanotubes. These N-doped SWCNTs showed excellent electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction and highly selective and sensitive sensing ability for dopamine detection. PMID:25189467

  6. Growth of metal-catalyst-free nitrogen-doped metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-Cheng; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Zhang, Lili; Liu, Chang; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Nitrogen-doped (N-doped) single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using SiOx nanoparticles as a catalyst and ethylenediamine as the source of both carbon and nitrogen. The N-doped SWCNTs have a mean diameter of 1.1 nm and a narrow diameter range, with 92% of them having diameters from 0.7 to 1.4 nm. Multi-wavelength laser Raman spectra and temperature-dependent electrical resistance indicate that the SWCNT sample is enriched with metallic nanotubes. These N-doped SWCNTs showed excellent electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction and highly selective and sensitive sensing ability for dopamine detection.Nitrogen-doped (N-doped) single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using SiOx nanoparticles as a catalyst and ethylenediamine as the source of both carbon and nitrogen. The N-doped SWCNTs have a mean diameter of 1.1 nm and a narrow diameter range, with 92% of them having diameters from 0.7 to 1.4 nm. Multi-wavelength laser Raman spectra and temperature-dependent electrical resistance indicate that the SWCNT sample is enriched with metallic nanotubes. These N-doped SWCNTs showed excellent electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction and highly selective and sensitive sensing ability for dopamine detection. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional information including Raman spectra, ORR polarization curves, CV curves, etc. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03172e

  7. Transition of single-walled carbon nanotubes from metallic to semiconducting in field-effect transistors by hydrogen plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Gang; Li, Qunqing; Jiang, Kaili; Zhang, Xiaobo; Chen, Jia; Ren, Zheng; Fan, Shoushan

    2007-06-01

    We report hydrogen plasma treatment results on converting the metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes to semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes. We found that the as-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be sorted as three groups which behave as metallic, as-metallic, and semiconducting SWNTs. These three groups have different changes under hydrogen plasma treatment and successive annealing process. The SWNTs can be easily hydrogenated in the hydrogen plasma environment and the as-metallic SWNTs can be transformed to semiconducting SWNTs. The successive annealing process can break the C-H bond, so the conversion is reversible. PMID:17508771

  8. Selective interaction of a soluble pentacene derivative with metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cai-Hong; Liu, Yi-Yang; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Wei, Rui-Rui; Li, Bing-Rui; Zhang, Hao-Li; Chen, Yong

    2009-03-01

    We report a soluble pentacene derivative, 6,13-bis(2-(trimethylsilyl)ethynyl)pentacene, can be used for efficient extraction of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), which is proven by resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS), Vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy and conductivity measurements. RRS studies reveal that the separation is solvent-dependent and is more efficient for small diameter tubes. Theoretical simulation suggests that the adsorption of pentacene on (7, 7) metallic SWCNT is about 34% more favorable than that on (13, 0) semiconducting SWCNT. This work provides a new direction in seeking reagents to facilitate high efficiency and nondestructive separation of metallic and semiconducting SWCNTs.

  9. Endofullerenes with metal atoms inside as precursors of nuclei of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Krestinin, A V; Kislov, M B; Ryabenko, A G

    2004-04-01

    Thermodynamic estimations have been made which show that amorphous carbon cannot be the source of single-walled carbon nanotube growth during carbon/metal vapor condensation. Thus the source of carbon material for nanotube growth seems to be small carbon clusters into gas phase or clusters in the adsorbed state on the nanotube surface. Kinetic analysis of carbon/metal vapor condensation in the arc process was performed and showed that metal vapor becomes supersaturated at temperatures that are close to the temperature of the highest rate of fullerene shell formation. A new model of the nucleation of single-walled carbon nanotubes is proposed. In the model an endometallofullerene serves as the precursor of a nanotube nucleus, and the nucleus itself forms as an adduct arising after metal atoms attach to the endofullerene shell. The relative efficiencies of La/Ni, Gd/Ni, Ce/Ni, and Pr/Ni catalysts, in comparison with Y/Ni catalyst, were measured, and their high efficiency in buckytube formation was demonstrated. This fact was explained by the double action of a metal catalyst in buckytube nucleus formation. First, metal takes part in the formation of endometallofullerenes. Second, the metal atoms attach to the endofullerene shell to transform an endofullerene into a nanotube nucleus. The high performance of bimetallic catalysts lies in adjusting the values of two metal concentrations separately for each of these purposes. In accordance with observations, the proposed model predicts increasing size of endofullerenes with increasing concentration of the metal that controls endofullerene formation. PMID:15296228

  10. Characterizations of Enriched Metallic Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Polymer Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Bin; Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang; Cinke, Martin; Au, Dyng; Harmon, Julie P.; Muisener, Patricia Anne O.; Clayton, LaNetra; D'Angelo, John

    2003-01-01

    Using different processing conditions, we disperse the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) into the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) to form composites. In the melt-blended sample, the SWNTs originally semiconducting - became predominantly metallic after dispersion into the melt-blended composite. The interaction of the PMMA and SWNT is investigated by the polarized Raman studies. The structure changes in the PMMA and SWNT shows that the anisotropic interactions are responsible for SWNT electronic density of states (DOS) changes. The increased metallic SWNT percentage is confirmed by the conductivity and dielectric constant measurements .

  11. Double Layer Charging for Conductivity Enhancement of Pure Metallic and Semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Nathanael; Kuznetsov, Alexander; Zakhidov, Anvar

    2011-03-01

    Injecting high electronic charge densities can profoundly change the optical, electrical, and magnetic properties of materials. Evidence suggests a possibility of significantly improving conductivity of carbon nanotubes through double layer charge injection. Double layer charge injection can prove to be a powerful method when applied to carbon nanotubes because of theirs high surface area and chemical stability. Investigation has commenced on the effect of charging on various types of carbon nanotubes, specifically 99% purified single wall semiconducting and single wall metallic tubes. An electrical double layer is electrochemically introduced upon a sheet of carbon nanotubes via application of potential (up to +/- 5 volts) to a sample immersed in ionic-liquid-based electrolyte. Resistance of carbon nanotube as a function of applied charging voltage is recorded to determine the effects of charge injection. Results show that the electrical double layer considerably reduces the resistance across both samples. ESR/LFMA studies combined with low temperature magnetic and transport measurements are conducted to search for charge injection induced superconductivity in carbon nanotubes. Supported by AFOSR grant FA 9550-09-1-0384.

  12. Photogenerated Free Carrier Dynamics in Metal and Semiconductor Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, M. C.; Blackburn, J. L.; Heben, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    Time-resolved THz spectroscopy (TRTS) is employed to study the photogenerated charge-carrier dynamics in transparent films of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two films were investigated: a film with 94% semiconducting-type tubes (s-SWNTs) and a film with only 7% s-SWNT and 93% metal-type tubes (m-SWNTs). We conclude that charge-carriers are generated with >60% yields at low light intensities in both films. Free-carriers are generated by a linear exciton dissociation process that occurs within 1 ps and is independent of excitation wavelength or tube type.

  13. Selective etching of metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes with hydrogen plasma.

    PubMed

    Hassanien, A; Tokumoto, M; Umek, P; Vrbanič, D; Mozetič, M; Mihailović, D; Venturini, P; Pejovnik, S

    2005-02-01

    We present Raman scattering and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) measurements on hydrogen plasma etched single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Interestingly, both the STM and Raman spectroscopy show that the metallic SWNTs are dramatically altered and highly defected by the plasma treatment. In addition, structural characterizations show that metal catalysts are detached from the ends of the SWNT bundles. For semiconducting SWNTs we observe no feature of defects or etching along the nanotubes. Raman spectra in the radial breathing mode region of plasma-treated SWNT material show that most of the tubes are semiconducting. These results show that hydrogen plasma treatment favours etching of metallic nanotubes over semiconducting ones and therefore could be used to tailor the electronic properties of SWNT raw materials. PMID:21727436

  14. Transport of metal oxide nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes in human mucus

    PubMed Central

    Jachak, Ashish; Lai, Samuel K; Hida, Kaoru; Suk, Jung Soo; Markovic, Nina; Biswal, Shyam; Breysse, Patrick N.; Hanes, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Whether mucus layers lining entrance points into the body, including the lung airways, provide protection against the penetration of engineered nanoparticles remains poorly understood. We measured the diffusion coefficients of hundreds of individual nanoparticles of three different metal oxides (nMeOs) and two types of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in undiluted human mucus. We found that the vast majority of these nanoparticles are efficiently trapped in human mucus and, further, that the mechanism of trapping is adhesive interactions as opposed to steric obstruction. However, a small fraction of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles moved at rates fast enough to penetrate airway mucus layers. We conclude that human mucus layers probably provide considerable protection for mucosal tissues from the penetration of most nMeOs and SWCNTs, and suggest that further investigation of the potential health risks of exposure to ZnO nanoparticles is warranted. PMID:21800953

  15. Potentiating toxicological interaction of single-walled carbon nanotubes with dissolved metals.

    PubMed

    Al-Shaeri, Majed; Ahmed, Dina; McCluskey, Fiona; Turner, Gavin; Paterson, Lynn; Dyrynda, Elisabeth A; Hartl, Mark G J

    2013-12-01

    The present study explored the ecotoxicology of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and their likely interaction with dissolved metals, with a focus on the effect of in vivo exposure in marine mussels. Any nano-scale effects were negated by the tendency of uncoated SWCNTs to agglomerate in water, particularly with high ionic strength as is the case in estuarine and full-strength seawater. However, SWCNTs, in combination with natural organic matter, remained suspended in seawater for long enough to become available to filter-feeding mussels, leading to their concentration on and increased contact with gill epithelia during exposure. For the first time, the authors describe a potentiating toxicological effect, expressed as DNA strand breaks obtained using the comet assay, on divalent metals afforded by negatively charged SWCNT agglomerates in seawater at concentrations as low as 5 µg L⁻¹. This is supported by the observation that SWCNTs alone were only toxic at concentrations ≥100 µg L⁻¹ and that the SWCNT-induced DNA damage was correlated with oxidative stress only in the absence of metals. If these laboratory experiments are confirmed in the natural environment, the present results will have implications for the understanding of the role of carbon nanotubes in environmental metal dynamics, toxicology, and consequently, regulatory requirements. PMID:23982896

  16. The effect of single wall carbon nanotube metallicity on genomic DNA-mediated chirality enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Steve S.; Hisey, Colin L.; Kuang, Zhifeng; Comfort, Donald A.; Farmer, Barry L.; Naik, Rajesh R.

    2013-05-01

    Achieving highly enriched single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is one of the major hurdles today because their chirality-dependent properties must be uniform and predictable for use in nanoscale electronics. Due to the unique wrapping and groove-binding mechanism, DNA has been demonstrated as a highly specific SWNT dispersion and fractionation agent, with its enrichment capabilities depending on the DNA sequence and length as well as the nanotube properties. Salmon genomic DNA (SaDNA) offers an inexpensive and scalable alternative to synthetic DNA. In this study, SaDNA enrichment capabilities were tested on SWNT separation with varying degrees of metallicity that were formulated from mixtures of commercial metallic (met-) and semiconducting (sem-) abundant SWNTs. The results herein demonstrate that the degree of metallicity of the SWNT sample has a significant effect on the SaDNA enrichment capabilities, and this effect is modeled based on deconvolution of the near-infrared (NIR) absorption spectra and verified with photoluminescence emission (PLE) measurements. Using molecular dynamics and circular dichroism, the preferential SaDNA mediated separation of the (6, 5) sem-tube is shown to be largely influenced by the presence of met-SWNTs.Achieving highly enriched single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is one of the major hurdles today because their chirality-dependent properties must be uniform and predictable for use in nanoscale electronics. Due to the unique wrapping and groove-binding mechanism, DNA has been demonstrated as a highly specific SWNT dispersion and fractionation agent, with its enrichment capabilities depending on the DNA sequence and length as well as the nanotube properties. Salmon genomic DNA (SaDNA) offers an inexpensive and scalable alternative to synthetic DNA. In this study, SaDNA enrichment capabilities were tested on SWNT separation with varying degrees of metallicity that were formulated from mixtures of commercial metallic (met-) and semiconducting (sem-) abundant SWNTs. The results herein demonstrate that the degree of metallicity of the SWNT sample has a significant effect on the SaDNA enrichment capabilities, and this effect is modeled based on deconvolution of the near-infrared (NIR) absorption spectra and verified with photoluminescence emission (PLE) measurements. Using molecular dynamics and circular dichroism, the preferential SaDNA mediated separation of the (6, 5) sem-tube is shown to be largely influenced by the presence of met-SWNTs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00458a

  17. Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by High Melting Point Metal Oxide Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yang; Xiang, Rong; An, Hua; Inoue, Taiki; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    We report on the growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from Co oxide catalysts. The concept is using the relatively lower mobility of metal oxide (than metal) to suppress catalyst aggregation at high temperatures. Compared to the SWNTs grown by pre-reduced catalysts, SWNTs grown from oxidized Co catalysts have shown narrower diameter distribution and smaller average diameter. Different growth parameters are discussed regarding the resulting morphology of SWNTs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations reveal the information that Co catalysts are transformed to Co3O4 after reduction-calcination process. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigations indicate that Co3O4 has decomposed to CoO before growth at a typical growth temperature (800 ºC) in Ar atmosphere. We propose that CoO has higher melting point than Co and thus is more stable during the growth. Our results indicate that besides the bimetallic catalysts, monometallic catalytic system could also be useful in stabilizing the catalysts to grow chirality-specific SWNTs by transforming the relatively low melting point metal catalysts to high melting point metal oxide catalysts. Yang Qian was supported through ``Global Leader Program for Social Design and Management''.

  18. A Facile Route to Metal Oxides/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Macrofilm Nanocomposites for Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zeyuan; Wei, Bingqing

    2015-05-01

    Nanocomposites consisting of transition-metal oxides and carbon nanomaterials with a desired size and structure are highly demanded for high performance energy storage devices. Here, a facile two-step and cost-efficient approach relying on directly thermal treatment of chemical-vapor-deposition products is developed as a general synthetic method to prepare a family of metal oxides (MxOy (M=Fe, Co, Ni))/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) macrofilm nanocomposites. The MxOy nanoparticles obtained are of 3-17 nm in diameter and homogeneously anchor on the free-standing SWNT macrofilms. NiO/SWNT also exhibits a high specific capacitance of 400 F g-1 and fast charge-transfer Faradaic redox reactions to achieve asymmetric supercapacitors with a high power and energy density. All MxOy/SWNT nanocomposites could deliver a high capacity beyond 1000 mAh g-1 and show excellent cycling stability for lithium-ion batteries. The impressive results demonstrate the promise for energy storage devices and the general approach may pave the way to synthesize other functional nanocomposites.

  19. Conversion of metallic single-walled carbon nanotube networks to semiconducting through electrochemical ornamentation.

    PubMed

    Asheghali, Darya; Vichchulada, Pornnipa; Lay, Marcus D

    2013-05-22

    Field-effect transistors (FETs) that incorporate single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks experience decreased on-off current ratios (I(on)/I(off)) due to the presence of metallic nanotubes. Herein, we describe a method to increase I(on)/I(off) without the need for either specialized SWNT growth methods or post growth processing steps to remove metallic nanotubes. SWNTs that were grown using conventional arc discharge methods were deposited from aqueous suspension. Then, the SWNTs in the network were decorated with Cu2O nanoparticles that acted as controllable valves that restricted current flow at positive gate voltages. This resulted in an unprecedented reduction in I(off), as the sub-10 nm sized nanoclusters acted as numerous tunable valves, providing greatly improved network sensitivity to gate voltages in the relatively small range of ±10 V, increasing I(on)/I(off) by up to 205-fold. Larger nanoclusters were found to increase the network conductivity but decrease I(on)/I(off). The ability to convert metallic SWNTs to semiconducting without removing them allows for enhanced I(on) and lower noise while still achieving greatly enhanced magnitudes of I(on)/I(off). PMID:23607878

  20. Thermal analysis for laser selective removal of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jizhou; Li, Yuhang; Du, Frank; Xie, Xu; Rogers, John A.; Huang, Yonggang

    2015-04-28

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been envisioned as one of the best candidates for future semiconductors due to their excellent electrical properties and ample applications. However, SWNTs grow as mixture of both metallic and semiconducting tubes and this heterogeneity hampers their practical applications. Laser radiation shows promises to remove metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs) in air under an appropriate condition. We established a scaling law, validated by finite element simulations, for the temperature rise of m-SWNTs under a pulsed laser with a Gaussian spot. It is shown that the maximum normalized m-SWNT temperature rise only depends on two non-dimensional parameters: the normalized pulse duration time and the normalized interfacial thermal resistance. In addition, the maximum temperature rise is inversely proportional to the square of spot size and proportional to the incident laser power. These results are very helpful to understand the underlying physics associated with the removal process and provides easily interpretable guidelines for further optimizations.

  1. Metal coated functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes for composite applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qiang

    This study is considered as a method for producing multifunctional composite materials by using metals coated Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs). In this research, various metals (Ni, Cu, Ag) were successfully deposited onto the surface of SWCNTs. It has been found that homogenous dispersion and dense nucleation sites are the necessary conditions to form uniform coatings on SWCNTs. Functionalization has been applied to achieve considerable improvement in the dispersion of purified SWCNTs and creates more nucleation sites for subsequent metal deposition. A three-step electroless plating approach was used and the coating mechanism is described in the paper. The samples were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Bulk copper/aluminum-SWNT composites were processed by powder metallurgy with wet mixing techniques. Coated SWCNTs were well dispersed in the metal matrix. Cold pressing followed by sintering was applied to control porosity. The relationships between hardness and SWCNTs addition were discussed. Ni-SWCNTs composite coatings were prepared by electro-composite deposition. SWCNTs were suspended in a Ni deposition electrolyte and deposited together with nickel during electrodeposition. SWCNTs concentrations in the coatings were found to be related to the SWCNTs concentration in the solution, current density and agitation rate. The microstructure of the coatings has been examined by electron microscopy. Ni coated SWCNTs were also incorporated into the high temperature Bismaleimide (BMI)/graphite composite to improve Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) shielding and surface conductivity. The vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) was used to process these composites. Surface and volume resistivity and EMI shielding effectiveness of the composites were assessed. A comparison with baseline data of unfilled BMI fiber reinforced composites is presented.

  2. Gate-Free Electrical Breakdown of Metallic Pathways in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Crossbar Networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinghua; Franklin, Aaron D; Liu, Jie

    2015-09-01

    Aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) synthesized by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method have exceptional potential for next-generation nanoelectronics. However, the coexistence of semiconducting (s-) and metallic (m-) SWNTs remains a considerable challenge since the latter causes significant degradation in device performance. Here we demonstrate a facile and effective approach to selectively break all m-SWNTs by stacking two layers of horizontally aligned SWNTs to form crossbars and applying a voltage to the crossed SWNT arrays. The introduction of SWNT junctions amplifies the disparity in resistance between s- and m-pathways, leading to a complete deactivation of m-SWNTs while minimizing the degradation of the semiconducting counterparts. Unlike previous approaches that required an electrostatic gate to achieve selectivity in electrical breakdown, this junction process is gate-free and opens the way for straightforward integration of thin-film s-SWNT devices. Comparison to electrical breakdown in junction-less SWNT devices without gating shows that this junction-based breakdown method yields more than twice the average on-state current retention in the resultant s-SWNT arrays. Systematic studies show that the on/off ratio can reach as high as 1.4 × 10(6) with a correspondingly high retention of on-state current compared to the initial current value before breakdown. Overall, this method provides important insight into transport at SWNT junctions and a simple route for obtaining pure s-SWNT thin film devices for broad applications. PMID:26263184

  3. Development of Metal-impregnated Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Toxic Gas Contaminant Control in Advanced Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisharody, Suresh A.; Fisher, John W.; Wignarajah, K.

    2002-01-01

    The success of physico-chemical waste processing and resource recovery technologies for life support application depends partly on the ability of gas clean-up systems to efficiently remove trace contaminants generated during the process with minimal use of expendables. Carbon nanotubes promise superior performance over conventional approaches to gas clean-up due to their ability to direct the selective uptake of gaseous species based on their controlled pore size, high surface area, ordered chemical structure that allows functionalization and their effectiveness also as catalyst support materials for toxic gas conversion. We present results and findings from a preliminary study on the effectiveness of metal impregnated single walled nanotubes as catalyst/catalyst support materials for toxic gas contaminate control. The study included the purification of single walled nanotubes, the catalyst impregnation of the purified nanotubes, the experimental characterization of the surface properties of purified single walled nanotubes and the characterization of physisorption and chemisorption of uptake molecules.

  4. Synthesis and catalytic activity of heteroatom doped metal-free single-wall carbon nanohorns.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaohui; Cui, Longbin; Tang, Pei; Hu, Ziqi; Ma, Ding; Shi, Zujin

    2016-04-01

    Boron-, phosphorus-, nitrogen-doped and co-doped single-wall carbon nanohorns were produced using an arc-vaporization method. These as-prepared doped materials consist of uniform isolated nanohorns and exhibit greatly enhanced catalytic capabilities in the reduction reaction of nitrobenzene and a volcano-shape trend between their activities with a B dopant content is found. Moreover, the B-C3 and P-C3 species in doped nanohorns might act as the acidic and basic sites to promote this reaction. PMID:27006980

  5. Copper chloride functionalization of semiconducting and metallic fractions of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremina, Valentina A.; Fedotov, Pavel V.; Obraztsova, Elena D.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a separation of arc-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) over conductivity type has been performed with an aqueous two-phase separation method. The separated fractions were used to synthesize copper chloride (CuCl) at SWNTs hybrid materials. These nanohybrids were studied using UV-vis-NIR optical absorption and Raman techniques. The changes in electronic and optical properties of functionalized SWNTs were revealed. A significant p-type doping of SWNTs by CuCl was considered as a main reason for modification of nanotube optical properties.

  6. DFT studies of low concentration substitutional doping of transition-metals on single-walled carbon nanotube surface.

    PubMed

    Mashapa, Matete G; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2010-12-01

    Using first principles-density functional theory, a theoretical study of the electronic properties of (5, 5) armchair single-walled carbon nanotube doped with transitions metals (Fe, Co and Ni) is presented. The generalized gradient approximation was used for the exchange-correlation potentials. The energy cut-off of 500 eV was adopted in the study. The main features of electronic band structure and density of states are shown. A systematic comparison of the density of states as well as band structures of pure and doped SWCNT is made. The contribution of the different bands was analyzed from the total and partial density of states curves. These metals are used as catalysts during synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes and hence, the choice we have made. Where data is available, the results are compared with previous calculations and with experimental measurements. PMID:21121313

  7. Structure and dynamics of metallic and carburized catalytic Ni nanoparticles: effects on growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Ballesteros, Jose L; Balbuena, Perla B

    2015-06-14

    Understanding the evolution of the catalyst structure and interactions with the nascent nanotube under typical chemical vapor deposition (CVD) conditions for the synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes is an essential step to discover a way to guide growth toward desired chiralities. We use density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations on model metallic and carburized Ni clusters to explore changes in the fundamental features of the nanocatalyst: geometric and electronic structure, dynamics and stability of the carburized nanocatalyst, and interactions with nascent nanotube caps at two different temperatures (750 and 1000 K) and different carbon composition ratios. This allows us to gain insight about the evolution of these aspects during the pre-growth and growth stages of CVD synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes and their implications for reactivity and control of the nanotube structure. PMID:25989515

  8. Optical and Conductive Characteristics of Metallic Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes with Three Basic Colors; Cyan, Magenta, and Yellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2008-03-01

    We present protocols to prepare high-purity metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with three basic colors, cyan, magenta, and yellow, through density gradient centrifugations. Addition of deoxycholate sodium salts as a co-surfactant could improve separation capability for metallic SWCNTs in centrifugations. We applied the improved separation protocols to the SWCNTs with different average diameters (1.34, 1.0, and 0.84 nm), and obtained the metallic SWCNTs with cyan, magenta, and yellow colors. Their optical/conductive characteristics were revealed, and conductive color films were formed from the metallic SWCNTs.

  9. Growth of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with metallic chirality through faceted FePt-Au catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Toshiyuki; Iwama, Hiroki; Shima, Toshiyuki

    2016-02-01

    Direct synthesis of vertically aligned metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (m-SWCNT forests) is a difficult challenge. We have successfully synthesized m-SWCNT forests using faceted iron platinum-gold catalysts epitaxially grown on a single crystalline magnesium oxide substrate. The metallic content of the forests estimated by Raman spectroscopy reaches 90%. From the standpoint of growth rate of the forests, the growth mechanism is probably based on the catalyst of solid state. It is suggested that preferential growth of m-SWCNTs is achieved when both factors are satisfied, namely, {111} dominant octahedral facet and ideal size (fine particles) of FePt particles.

  10. Theory of shot noise in single-walled metallic carbon nanotubes weakly coupled to nonmagnetic and ferromagnetic leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymann, I.; Barnaś, J.; Krompiewski, S.

    2007-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of shot noise in single-walled metallic carbon nanotubes weakly coupled to either nonmagnetic or ferromagnetic leads. Using the real-time diagrammatic technique, we calculate the current, Fano factor, and tunnel magnetoresistance in the sequential tunneling regime. It is shown that the differential conductance displays characteristic fourfold periodicity, indicating single-electron charging. Such a periodicity is also visible in tunnel magnetoresistance of the system as well as in the Fano factor. The present studies elucidate the impact of ferromagnetic (vs nonmagnetic) contacts on the transport characteristics under consideration.

  11. Effect of first row transition metals on the conductivity of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feihu; Itkis, Mikhail E.; Bekyarova, Elena B.; Tian, Xiaojuan; Sarkar, Santanu; Pekker, Aron; Kalinina, Irina; Moser, Matthew L.; Haddon, Robert C.

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrate the ability of first row transition metals to form electrically conducting interconnects between semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by constructive rehybridization between sidewall benzene rings as a result of the formation of bis-hexahapto-metal-bonds [(η6-SWNT)M(η6-SWNT)], which bridge adjacent SWNTs. Metal deposition on SWNT films enhances the conductivity by three distinct mechanisms: physisorption of gold leads to the formation of a non-interacting gold film and a monotonic conductivity increase; ionic chemisorption of lithium strongly increases the conductivity due to charge transfer to the SWNTs; covalent chemisorption of first row transition metals leads to an abrupt change in conductivity due to formation of (η6-SWNT)M(η6-SWNT) interconnects.

  12. Development of Metal-impregnated Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Toxic Gas Contaminant Control in Advanced Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cinke, Martin; Li, Jing; Chen, Bin; Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai; Pisharody, Suresh A.; Fisher, John W.; Delzeit, Lance; Meyyappan, Meyya; Partridge, Harry; Clark, Kimberlee

    2003-01-01

    The success of physico-chemical waste processing and resource recovery technologies for life support application depends partly on the ability of gas clean-up systems to efficiently remove trace contaminants generated during the process with minimal use of expendables. Highly purified metal-impregnated carbon nanotubes promise superior performance over conventional approaches to gas clean-up due to their ability to direct the selective uptake gaseous species based both on the nanotube s controlled pore size, high surface area, and ordered chemical structure that allows functionalization and on the nanotube s effectiveness as a catalyst support material for toxic contaminants removal. We present results on the purification of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and efforts at metal impregnation of the SWCNT's.

  13. Rare-earth metal halogenide encapsulation-induced modifications in Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlamova, M. V.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, a detailed Raman spectroscopy investigation on the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) filled with praseodymium chloride, terbium chloride and thulium chloride was performed. The salts were incorporated inside the SWCNTs by a capillary filling method using melts, and the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy data proved the high filling degree of the nanotube channels. A thorough analysis of the radial breathing mode and G-band of the Raman spectra of the pristine and filled SWCNTs showed that the encapsulated salts cause acceptor doping of the host nanotubes, and the doping efficiency depends on the compound. The incorporated thulium chloride has the strongest doping effect on the SWCNTs, whereas praseodymium chloride has the weakest effect. It was found that the encapsulated salts modify more significantly the electronic structure of metallic nanotubes than semiconducting SWCNTs.

  14. Impregnation of Catalytic Metals in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Toxic Gas Conversion in Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai; Cinke, Marty; Partridge, Harry; Fisher, John

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess extraordinary properties such as high surface area, ordered chemical structure that allows functionalization, larger pore volume, and very narrow pore size distribution that have attracted considerable research attention from around the world since their discovery in 1991. The development and characterization of an original and innovative approach for the control and elimination of gaseous toxins using single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) promise superior performance over conventional approaches due to the ability to direct the selective uptake of gaseous species based on their controlled pore size, increased adsorptive capacity due to their increased surface area and the effectiveness of carbon nanotubes as catalyst supports for gaseous conversion. We present our recent investigation of using SWNTs as catalytic supporting materials to impregnate metals, such as rhodium (Rh), palladium (Pd) and other catalysts. A protocol has been developed to oxidize the SWNTs first and then impregnate the Rh in aqueous rhodium chloride solution, according to unique surface properties of SWNTs. The Rh has been successfully impregnated in SWNTs. The Rh-SWNTs have been characterized by various techniques, such as TGA, XPS, TEM, and FTIR. The project is funded by a NASA Research Announcement Grant to find applications of single walled nanocarbons in eliminating toxic gas Contaminant in life support system. This knowledge will be utilized in the development of a prototype SWNT KO, gas purification system that would represent a significant step in the development of high efficiency systems capable of selectively removing specific gaseous for use in regenerative life support system for human exploration missions.

  15. Effect of Lanthanide Metal Complexation on the Properties and Electronic Structure of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films.

    PubMed

    Moser, Matthew L; Pekker, Aron; Tian, Xiaojuan; Bekyarova, Elena; Itkis, Mikhail E; Haddon, Robert C

    2015-12-30

    We spectroscopically analyze the effect of e-beam deposition of lanthanide metals on the electronic structure and conductivities of films of semiconducting (SC) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in high vacuum. We employ near-infrared and Raman spectroscopy to interpret the changes in the electronic structure of SWNTs on exposure to small amounts of the lanthanides (Ln = Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Yb), based on the behavior of the reference metals (M = Li, Cr) which are taken to exemplify ionic and covalent bonding, respectively. The analysis shows that while the lanthanides are more electropositive than the transition metals, in most cases they exhibit similar conductivity behavior which we interpret in terms of the formation of covalent bis-hexahapto bonds [(?(6)-SWNT)M(?(6)-SWNT), where M = La, Nd, Gd, Dy, Ho]. However, only M = Eu, Sm, Yb show the continually increasing conductivity characteristic of Li, and this supports our contention that these metals provide the first examples of mixed covalent-ionic bis-hexahapto bonds [(?(6)-SWNT)M(?(6)-SWNT), where M = Sm, Eu, Yb]. PMID:25902843

  16. 3-D perpendicular assembly of single walled carbon nanotubes for complimentary metal oxide semiconductor interconnects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hoon; Yilmaz, Cihan; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Busnaina, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Due to their superior electrical properties such as high current density and ballistic transport, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are considered as a potential candidate for future Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) interconnects. However, direct incorporation of CNTs into Complimentary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) architecture by conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth method is problematic since it requires high temperatures that might damage insulators and doped semiconductors in the underlying CMOS circuits. In this paper, we present a directed assembly method to assemble aligned CNTs into pre-patterned vias and perpendicular to the substrate. A dynamic electric field with a static offset is applied to provide the force needed for directing the SWNT assembly. It is also shown that by adjusting assembly parameters the density of the assembled CNTs can be significantly enhanced. This highly scalable directed assembly method is conducted at room temperature and pressure and is accomplished in a few minutes. I-V characterization of the assembled CNTs was conducted using a Zyvex nanomanipulator in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the measured value of the resistance is found to be 270 komega s. PMID:24734611

  17. Chirality assignment for metallic species via coherent phonon oscillations in arc-discharge single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seong-Il; Lim, Yong-Sik; Kim, Myung Jong

    2015-09-01

    We performed transient absorption measurements with sub-10-fs pulses to observe coherent phonon (CP) oscillations of species in a micelle-suspended arc-discharge single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) ensemble. We applied a spectral-resolved measurement scheme to investigate the photon-wavelength dependence of CP oscillations of the radial breathing mode (RBM) specific to each species, covering a broad photon wavelength range from 700 to 1000 nm (1.771 - 1.240 eV). With a linear prediction singular value decomposition (LPSVD) method as a robust alternative for resolving closely-overlapped vibration modes, we divided multiple RBM peaks into two components, the M 11-excited metallic species and the S 22-excited semiconducting species, respectively. We resolved the RBM peaks into 22 metallic and 29 semiconducting species. Resolved metallic tubes showed a wide distribution in diameters from 1.3 to 2.3 nm, forming a chirality distribution from (2 n + m) = 33 family to 51 family.

  18. Hydrogen Storage in metal-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ahn

    2004-04-30

    It has been known for over thirty years that potassium-intercalated graphites can readily adsorb and desorb hydrogen at {approx}1 wt% at 77 K. These levels are much higher than can be attained in pure graphite, owing to a larger thermodynamic enthalpy of adsorption. This increased enthalpy may allow hydrogen sorption at higher temperatures. Potassium has other beneficial effects that enable the design of a new material: (a) Increased adsorption enthalpy in potassium-intercalated graphite compared to pure graphite reduces the pressure and increases the temperature required for a given fractional coverage of hydrogen adsorption. We expect the same effects in potassium-intercalated SWNTs. (b) As an intercalant, potassium separates c-axis planes in graphite. Potassium also separates the individual tubes of SWNTs ropes producing swelling and increased surface area. Increased surface area provides more adsorption sites, giving a proportionately higher capacity. The temperature of adsorption depends on the enthalpy of adsorption. The characteristic temperature is roughly the adsorption enthalpy divided by Boltzmann's constant, k{sub B}. For the high hydrogen storage capacity of SWNTs to be achieved at room temperature, it is necessary to increase the enthalpy of adsorption. Our goal for this project was to use metal modifications to the carbon surface of SWNTs in order to address both enhanced adsorption and surface area. For instance, the enthalpy of sorption of hydrogen on KC8 is 450 meV/H{sub 2}, whereas it is 38 meV/H{sub 2} for unmodified SWNTs. By adsorption thermodynamics we expect approximately that the same performance of SWNTs at 77 K will be achieved at a temperature of [450/38] 77 K = 900 K. This is a high temperature, so we expect that adsorption on nearly all the available sites for hydrogen will occur at room temperature under a much lower pressure. This pressure can be estimated conveniently, since the chemical potential of hydrogen is approximately proportional to the logarithm of the pressure. Using 300 K for room temperature, the 100 bar pressure requirement is reduced to exp(-900/300) 100 bar = 5 bar at room temperature. This is in the pressure range used for prior experimental work such as that of Colin and Herold in the late 1960's and early 1970's.

  19. Long-term colloidal stability and metal leaching of single wall carbon nanotubes: effect of temperature and extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Adeleye, Adeyemi S; Keller, Arturo A

    2014-02-01

    Long term (90 day) stability, aggregation kinetics in the presence and absence of natural organic materials (NOM), and metal leaching of five commercial single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in waters (e.g. freshwater, seawater, stormwater, wastewater, and groundwater) were studied, as well as the effect of temperature on SWCNT stability and metal leaching. Zeta (ζ) potential of SWCNT decreased in magnitude with increase in temperature. In wastewater, SWCNT sedimented from the water column to below detectable levels after 30 days when kept at 40 °C, but at 20 °C 19% suspension was still observed after the same exposure time. Addition of 0.1 mg-C L(-1) EPS shifted the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) of SRNOM-stabilized SWCNT from 15 mM to 54 mM NaCl via additional electrostatic and possibly steric stabilization. Attachment efficiencies (α) of SWCNT in waters ranged from ∼0.001 in DI with 10 mg L(-1) SRNOM to 1 in seawater. However, sedimentation of SWCNT in seawater (and other high ionic strength conditions) was not as fast as expected due to improved buoyancy and/or drag. Purified forms of SWCNTs exhibited better dispersibility and stability in most waters, but as expected, the total metal leached out was higher in the raw variants. Metal leaching from CNT in these studies was controlled by metal and water chemistries, CNT pretreatment, leachable metal fraction, exposure time, and presence of NOM. PMID:24342047

  20. Metal nanoparticles and DNA co-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Heng C.; Zhang, Miluo; Bosze, Wayne; Lim, Jae-Hong; Myung, Nosang V.

    2013-12-01

    Metal/DNA/SWNT hybrid nanostructure-based gas sensor arrays were fabricated by means of ink jet printing of metal ion chelated DNA/SWNTs on microfabricated electrodes, followed by electroless deposition to reduce metal ions to metal. DNA served as a dispersing agent to effectively solubilize pristine SWNTs in water and as metal ion chelating centers for the formation of nanoparticles. Noble metals including palladium, platinum, and gold were used because the high binding affinity toward specific analytes enhances the selectivity and sensitivity. The sensitivity and selectivity of the gas sensors toward various gases such as H2, H2S, NH3, and NO2 were determined at room temperature. Sensing results indicated the enhancement of the sensitivity and selectivity toward certain analytes by functionalizing with different metal nanoparticles (e.g., Pd/DNA/SWNTs for H2 and H2S). The combined responses give a unique pattern or signature for each analyte by which the system can identify and quantify an individual gas.

  1. Metal nanoparticles and DNA co-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Su, Heng C; Zhang, Miluo; Bosze, Wayne; Lim, Jae-Hong; Myung, Nosang V

    2013-12-20

    Metal/DNA/SWNT hybrid nanostructure-based gas sensor arrays were fabricated by means of ink jet printing of metal ion chelated DNA/SWNTs on microfabricated electrodes, followed by electroless deposition to reduce metal ions to metal. DNA served as a dispersing agent to effectively solubilize pristine SWNTs in water and as metal ion chelating centers for the formation of nanoparticles. Noble metals including palladium, platinum, and gold were used because the high binding affinity toward specific analytes enhances the selectivity and sensitivity. The sensitivity and selectivity of the gas sensors toward various gases such as H2, H2S, NH3, and NO2 were determined at room temperature. Sensing results indicated the enhancement of the sensitivity and selectivity toward certain analytes by functionalizing with different metal nanoparticles (e.g., Pd/DNA/SWNTs for H2 and H2S). The combined responses give a unique pattern or signature for each analyte by which the system can identify and quantify an individual gas. PMID:24284477

  2. Electrically Robust Metal Nanowire Network Formation by In-Situ Interconnection with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jong Seok; Han, Joong Tark; Jung, Sunshin; Jang, Jeong In; Kim, Ho Young; Jeong, Hee Jin; Jeong, Seung Yol; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of the junction resistance between metallic nanowires is a crucial factor for high performance of the network-structured conducting film. Here, we show that under current flow, silver nanowire (AgNW) network films can be stabilised by minimizing the Joule heating at the NW-NW junction assisted by in-situ interconnection with a small amount (less than 3 wt%) of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). This was achieved by direct deposition of AgNW suspension containing SWCNTs functionalised with quadruple hydrogen bonding moieties excluding dispersant molecules. The electrical stabilisation mechanism of AgNW networks involves the modulation of the electrical transportation pathway by the SWCNTs through the SWCNT-AgNW junctions, which results in a relatively lower junction resistance than the NW-NW junction in the network film. In addition, we propose that good contact and Fermi level matching between AgNWs and modified SWCNTs lead to the modulation of the current pathway. The SWCNT-induced stabilisation of the AgNW networks was also demonstrated by irradiating the film with microwaves. The development of the high-throughput fabrication technology provides a robust and scalable strategy for realizing high-performance flexible transparent conductor films. PMID:24763208

  3. Separation of the semiconducting and the metallic types of single-wall carbon nanotube by electrophoresis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsi-Chao; Yen, Chih-Feng; Chen, Guan-Jhen; Hsiao, Tzu-Ti; Zhou, Yang; Huang, Kuo-Ting; Lee, Hsin-Ta; Yang, Wan-Ting

    2014-09-01

    This study was to separate the semiconducting and the metallic types of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by electrophoresis with the different dispersants that are deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), Triton X-100 and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), respectively. The dispersants modify the surface of SWNTs and disperse in the de-ionized water. and used electric power supply 100V to electrophoresis. However, the different dispersants such as DNA, Triton X-100 and SDS coated on SWNTs have different property of electronic field. Hence, in the same power of electrophoresis was applied to separate out s-SWNT and m-SWNT from the raw-SWNT. In addition, the DNA base pair and quantitative can be determine by electrophoresis with standard mark. The electrophoresis has features that low sample need, low energy required and efficiently for this fabrication. The results of Raman spectrum could verify the separation efficiency and determine the electrical of the samples with the radial breathing mode (RBM, 100-400cm-1) of SWNT. After the dispersion process with DNA, a new peak (~1450 cm-1) has been observed between D-band (~1350cm-1) and G-band (~1550cm-1) that also can identify s-SWNT and m-SWNT.

  4. Surfactant free fractions of metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes via optimised gel chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Lukaszczuk, Pawel; Ruemmeli, Mark H.; Knupfer, Martin; Kalenczuk, Ryszard J.; Borowiak-Palen, Ewa

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The application of gel permeation chromatography technique in a field of SWCNT separation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-commercial agarose gel used as a column filling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Purification route is presented, quality and quantity estimation is shown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Process is ready for high-scale separation of SWCNTs. -- Abstract: We report the procedure of sorting/purification of carbon nanotubes by electronic type using chromatographic column with sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and sodium deoxycholate (DOC) solutions as the eluents. The non-commercial agarose gel in different concentrations has been tested in the process. It was found that in optimal gel concentration the fractionation resulted in {approx}96.2% yield of semiconducting species. Importantly, to get surfactant-free fractions the post-separation purification procedure has been carried out. The UV-vis-NIR and Raman spectroscopy have been utilised for the samples analysis. High resolution transmission microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis allowed to study the sample morphology and purity, respectively.

  5. Cutting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Kirk J.; Gu, Zhenning; Shaver, Jonah; Chen, Zheyi; Flor, Erica L.; Schmidt, Daniel J.; Chan, Candace; Hauge, Robert H.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2005-07-01

    A two-step process is utilized for cutting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The first step requires the breakage of carbon-carbon bonds in the lattice while the second step is aimed at etching at these damage sites to create short, cut nanotubes. To achieve monodisperse lengths from any cutting strategy requires control of both steps. Room-temperature piranha and ammonium persulfate solutions have shown the ability to exploit the damage sites and etch SWNTs in a controlled manner. Despite the aggressive nature of these oxidizing solutions, the etch rate for SWNTs is relatively slow and almost no new sidewall damage is introduced. Carbon-carbon bond breakage can be introduced through fluorination to ~C2F, and subsequent etching using piranha solutions has been shown to be very effective in cutting nanotubes. The final average length of the nanotubes is approximately 100 nm with carbon yields as high as 70-80%.

  6. Use of alkali metal salts to prepare high purity single-walled carbon nanotube solutions and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashour, Rakan F.

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) display interesting electronic and optical properties desired for many advanced thin film applications, such as transparent conductive electrodes or thin-film transistors. Large-scale production of SWCNTs generally results in polydispersed mixtures of nanotube structures. Since SWCNT electronic character (conducting or semiconducting nature) depends on the nanotube structure, application performance is being held back by this inability to discretely control SWCNT synthesis. Although a number of post-production techniques are able to separate SWCNTs based on electronic character, diameter, or chirality, most still suffer from the disadvantage of high costs of materials, equipment, or labor intensity to be relevant for large-scale production. On the other hand, chromatographic separation has emerged as a method that is compatible with large scale separation of metallic and semiconducting SWCNTs. In this work, SWCNTs, in an aqueous surfactant suspension of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), are separated by their electronic character using a gel chromatography process. Metallic SWCNTs (m-SWCNTs) are collected as initial fractions since they show minimum interaction with the gel medium, whereas, semiconducting SWCNTs (sc- SWCNTs) remain adsorbed to the gel. The process of sc-SWCNT retention in the gel is found to be driven by the packing density of SDS around the SWCNTs. Through a series of separation experiments, it is shown that sc-SWCNTs can be eluted from the gel simply by disturbing the configuration of the SDS/SWCNT micellar structure. This is achieved by either introducing a solution containing a co-surfactant, such as sodium cholate (SC), or solutions of alkali metal ionic salts. Analysis of SWCNT suspensions by optical absorption provides insights into the effect of changing the metal ion (M+ = Li+, Na+, and K+) in the eluting solution. Salts with smaller metal ions (e.g. Li+) require higher concentrations to achieve separation. By using salts with different anionic groups (cholate, Cl-, I-, and SCN-), it is concluded that the SWCNT separation using salt solutions is mainly driven by the cations in the solution. Additionally, different methods for depositing separated SWCNTs on glass substrates are described. In one method, SWCNTs are first isolated from their surfactant by introducing organic solvents such as methanol or acetone to aqueous suspensions of previously separated m- and/or sc-SWCNTs. Following the induced SWCNT dissolution, desired nanomaterials can be redispersed directly in another solvent, such as methanol, for deposition on substrates. In another method, separated SWCNTs are deposited on glass substrates by the process of evaporation driven self-assembly. Different morphologies on the substrate are formed by changing the viscosity of the evaporating SWCNT/SDS suspensions. The results are described using the Stokes-Einstein equation for diffusion in one dimension.

  7. Hyperelastic behavior of single wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Xianwu; Atluri, S. N.

    2007-03-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are shown to obey a hyperelastic constitutive model at moderate strains and temperatures. The finite temperature is considered via the local harmonic approach. The equilibrium configurations were obtained by minimizing the Helmholtz free energy of a representative atom in an atom-based cell model. While the concept of strain-dependent tangent modulus using linear elasticity was considered in prior literature, a constant μ for Ogden's hyperelastic model [R. W. Ogden, Nonlinear Elastic Deformation (Horwood, England, 1984)] is found in the current work for large tubes subjected to moderately large strains up to 900 K.

  8. Strain Sensitivity in Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Multifunctional Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. M. (Technical Monitor); Smits, Jan M., VI

    2005-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes represent the future of structural aerospace vehicle systems due to their unparalleled strength characteristics and demonstrated multifunctionality. This multifunctionality rises from the CNT's unique capabilities for both metallic and semiconducting electron transport, electron spin polarizability, and band gap modulation under strain. By incorporating the use of electric field alignment and various lithography techniques, a single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) test bed for measurement of conductivity/strain relationships has been developed. Nanotubes are deposited at specified locations through dielectrophoresis. The circuit is designed such that the central, current carrying section of the nanotube is exposed to enable atomic force microscopy and manipulation in situ while the transport properties of the junction are monitored. By applying this methodology to sensor development a flexible single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) based strain sensitive device has been developed. Studies of tensile testing of the flexible SWNT device vs conductivity are also presented, demonstrating the feasibility of using single walled HiPCO (high-pressure carbon monoxide) carbon nanotubes as strain sensing agents in a multi-functional materials system.

  9. Electrochemical hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotube paper.

    PubMed

    Guo, Z P; Ng, S H; Wang, J Z; Huang, Z G; Liu, H K; Too, C O; Wallace, G G

    2006-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) papers were successfully prepared by dispersing SWNTs in Triton X-100 solution, then filtered by PVDF membrane (0.22 microm pore size). The electrochemical behavior and the reversible hydrogen storage capacity of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) papers have been investigated in alkaline electrolytic solutions (6 N KOH) by cyclic voltammetry, linear micropolarization, and constant current charge/discharge measurements. The effect of thickness and the addition of carbon black on hydrogen adsorption/desorption were also investigated. It was found that the electrochemical charge-discharge mechanism occurring in SWNT paper electrodes is somewhere between that of carbon nanotubes (physical process) and that of metal hydride electrodes (chemical process), and consists of a charge-transfer reaction (Reduction/Oxidation) and a diffusion step (Diffusion). PMID:16573126

  10. Is there a Difference in Van Der Waals Interactions between Rare Gas Atoms Adsorbed on Metallic and Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes?

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, De-Li; Mandeltort, Lynn; Saidi, Wissam A.; Yates, John T.; Cole, Milton W.; Johnson, J. Karl

    2013-03-01

    Differences in polarizabilities of metallic (M) and semiconducting (S) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) might give rise to differences in adsorption potentials. We show from experiments and van der Waals-corrected density functional theory (DFT) that binding energies of Xe adsorbed on M- and S-SWNTs are nearly identical. Temperature programmed desorption of Xe on purified M- and S-SWNTs give similar peak temperatures, indicating that desorption kinetics and binding energies are independent of the type of SWNT. Binding energies computed from vdW-corrected DFT are in good agreement with experiments.

  11. Highly efficient metal-free growth of nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes on plasma-etched substrates for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dingshan; Zhang, Qiang; Dai, Liming

    2010-11-01

    We have for the first time developed a simple plasma-etching technology to effectively generate metal-free particle catalysts for efficient metal-free growth of undoped and/or nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Compared with undoped CNTs, the newly produced metal-free nitrogen-containing CNTs were demonstrated to show relatively good electrocatalytic activity and long-term stability toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an acidic medium. Owing to the highly generic nature of the plasma etching technique, the methodology developed in this study can be applied to many other substrates for efficient growth of metal-free CNTs for various applications, ranging from energy related to electronic and to biomedical systems. PMID:20929222

  12. Thermochemistry of fluorinated single wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bettinger, H F; Kudin, K N; Scuseria, G E

    2001-12-26

    The gradient corrected Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof density functional in conjunction with a 3-21G basis set and periodic boundary conditions was employed to investigate the geometries and energies of C(2)F fluorinated armchair single wall carbon nanotubes (F-SWNT's) with diameters ranging from 16.4 to 4.2 A [(12,12) to (3,3)] as well as a C(2)F graphene sheet fluorinated on one side only. Using an isodesmic equation, we find that the thermodynamic stability of F-SWNT's increases with decreasing tube diameter. On the other hand, the mean bond dissociation energies of the C-F bonds increase as the tubes become thinner. The C-F bonds in the (5,5) F-SWNT's are about as strong as those in graphite fluoride (CF)(n)() and are also covalent albeit slightly (<0.04 A) stretched. Whereas a fluorine atom is found not to bind covalently to the concave surface of [60]fullerene, endohedral covalent binding is possible inside a (5,5) SWNT despite a diameter similar to that of the C(60) cage. PMID:11749543

  13. Toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ong, Li-Chu; Chung, Felicia Fei-Lei; Tan, Yuen-Fen; Leong, Chee-Onn

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an important class of nanomaterials, which have numerous novel properties that make them useful in technology and industry. Generally, there are two types of CNTs: single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled nanotubes. SWNTs, in particular, possess unique electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties, allowing for a wide range of applications in various fields, including the electronic, computer, aerospace, and biomedical industries. However, the use of SWNTs has come under scrutiny, not only due to their peculiar nanotoxicological profile, but also due to the forecasted increase in SWNT production in the near future. As such, the risk of human exposure is likely to be increased substantially. Yet, our understanding of the toxicological risk of SWNTs in human biology remains limited. This review seeks to examine representative data on the nanotoxicity of SWNTs by first considering how SWNTs are absorbed, distributed, accumulated and excreted in a biological system, and how SWNTs induce organ-specific toxicity in the body. The contradictory findings of numerous studies with regards to the potential hazards of SWNT exposure are discussed in this review. The possible mechanisms and molecular pathways associated with SWNT nanotoxicity in target organs and specific cell types are presented. We hope that this review will stimulate further research into the fundamental aspects of CNTs, especially the biological interactions which arise due to the unique intrinsic characteristics of CNTs. PMID:25273022

  14. Breakdown of metallic single-wall carbon nanotube paths by NiO nanoparticle point etching for high performance thin film transistors.

    PubMed

    Li, Shisheng; Sakurai, Shunsuke; Futaba, Don N; Hata, Kenji

    2015-01-28

    A selective and highly local etching of the metallic single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was demonstrated by using a NiO nanoparticle (NP) point etching technique. Following the NiO NP point etching at temperatures ranging from 250 to 350 °C, the current on/off ratios of the SWCNT field effect transistors (FETs) increased over 50-fold from ∼10 s to ∼10(4). Furthermore, the unavoidable drop in on-state current due to the reduction in current paths could be minimized to within one order of magnitude. Atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy studies supported the view that the improvement in FET performance was attributed to the efficient and localized etching of metallic SWCNT paths solely around the NiO NPs, resulting in minimal damage to the semiconducting SWCNT networks. PMID:25492495

  15. Breakdown of metallic single-wall carbon nanotube paths by NiO nanoparticle point etching for high performance thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shisheng; Sakurai, Shunsuke; Futaba, Don N.; Hata, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    A selective and highly local etching of the metallic single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was demonstrated by using a NiO nanoparticle (NP) point etching technique. Following the NiO NP point etching at temperatures ranging from 250 to 350 °C, the current on/off ratios of the SWCNT field effect transistors (FETs) increased over 50-fold from ~10 s to ~104. Furthermore, the unavoidable drop in on-state current due to the reduction in current paths could be minimized to within one order of magnitude. Atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy studies supported the view that the improvement in FET performance was attributed to the efficient and localized etching of metallic SWCNT paths solely around the NiO NPs, resulting in minimal damage to the semiconducting SWCNT networks.

  16. Improvements in Production of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balzano, Leandro; Resasco, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development has been directed toward improvement of a prior batch process in which single-walled carbon nanotubes are formed by catalytic disproportionation of carbon monoxide in a fluidized-bed reactor. The overall effect of the improvements has been to make progress toward converting the process from a batch mode to a continuous mode and to scaling of production to larger quantities. Efforts have also been made to optimize associated purification and dispersion post processes to make them effective at large scales and to investigate means of incorporating the purified products into composite materials. The ultimate purpose of the program is to enable the production of high-quality single-walled carbon nanotubes in quantities large enough and at costs low enough to foster the further development of practical applications. The fluidized bed used in this process contains mixed-metal catalyst particles. The choice of the catalyst and the operating conditions is such that the yield of single-walled carbon nanotubes, relative to all forms of carbon (including carbon fibers, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and graphite) produced in the disproportionation reaction is more than 90 weight percent. After the reaction, the nanotubes are dispersed in various solvents in preparation for end use, which typically involves blending into a plastic, ceramic, or other matrix to form a composite material. Notwithstanding the batch nature of the unmodified prior fluidized-bed process, the fluidized-bed reactor operates in a continuous mode during the process. The operation is almost entirely automated, utilizing mass flow controllers, a control computer running software specific to the process, and other equipment. Moreover, an important inherent advantage of fluidized- bed reactors in general is that solid particles can be added to and removed from fluidized beds during operation. For these reasons, the process and equipment were amenable to modification for conversion from batch to continuous production.

  17. Metal impurities provide useful tracers for identifying exposures to airborne single-wall carbon nanotubes released from work-related processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Pat E.; Jayawardene, Innocent; Gardner, H. David; Chénier, Marc; Levesque, Christine; Niu, Jianjun

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the use of metal impurities in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as potential tracers to distinguish engineered nanomaterials from background aerosols. TEM and SEM were used to characterize parent material and aerosolized agglomerates collected on PTFE filters using a cascade impactor. SEM image analysis indicated that the SWCNT agglomerates contained about 45% amorphous carbon and backscatter electron analysis indicated that metal impurities were concentrated within the amorphous carbon component. Two elements present as impurities (Y and Ni) were selected as appropriate tracers in this case as their concentrations were found to be highly elevated in the SWCNT parent material (% range) compared to ambient air particles (μg/g range), and background air concentrations were below detection limits for both elements. Bioaccessibility was also determined using physiologically-based extractions at pH conditions relevant to both ingestion and inhalation pathways. A portable wet electrostatic precipitation system effectively captured airborne Y and Ni released during sieving processes, in proportions similar to the bulk sample. These observations support the potential for catalysts and other metal impurities in carbon nanotubes to serve as tracers that uniquely identify emissions at source, after an initial analysis to select appropriate tracers.

  18. Comparison of sample digestion techniques for the determination of trace and residual catalyst metal content in single-wall carbon nanotubes by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Patricia; Sturgeon, Ralph E.; Diehl, Liange de O.; Bizzi, Cezar A.; Flores, Erico M. M.

    2015-03-01

    A single-wall carbon nanotube material produced by laser ablation of renewable biochar in the presence of Ni and Co catalyst was characterized for residual catalyst (Co and Ni) as well as trace metal impurity content (Fe, Mo, Cr, Pb and Hg) by isotope dilution ICP-MS following sample digestion. Several matrix destruction procedures were evaluated, including a multi-step microwave-assisted acid digestion, dry ashing at 450 °C and microwave-induced combustion with oxygen. Results were benchmarked against those derived from neutron activation analysis and also supported by solid sampling continuum source GF-AAS for several of the elements. Although laborious to execute, the multi-step microwave-assisted acid digestion proved to be most reliable for recovery of the majority of the analytes, although content of Cr remained biased low for each approach, likely due to its presence as refractory carbide.

  19. Self-formation of highly aligned metallic, semiconducting and single chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes assemblies via a crystal template method

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Hideki; Hasegawa, Kai; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Oyane, Ayako; Naitoh, Yasuhisa

    2014-09-01

    The fabrication of an aligned array of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a single chiral state has been a significant challenge for SWCNT applications as well as for basic science research. Here, we developed a simple, unique technique to produce assemblies in which metallic, semiconducting, and single chiral state SWCNTs were densely and highly aligned. We utilized a crystal of surfactant as a template on which mono-dispersed SWCNTs in solution self-assembled. Micro-Raman measurements and scanning electron microscopy measurements clearly showed that the SWCNTs were highly and densely aligned parallel to the crystal axis, indicating that approximately 70% of the SWCNTs were within 7° of being parallel. Moreover, the assemblies exhibited good field effect transistor characteristics with an on/off ratio of 1.3 × 10{sup 5}.

  20. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  1. Catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction of transition metal porphyrins covalently linked to single-walled carbon nanotubes: A density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, Walter

    2011-10-01

    The interaction of molecular oxygen with the metal center of transition metal porphyrins (MP, with M = Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni) covalently linked to single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are addressed by density functional theory calculations. Two geometries for the CNT sidewall functionalization with porphyrin radicals are proposed, considering sp2 and sp3 chemical bonds. By computing the stability and electronic properties of the CNT-MP complexes, and the interaction of the O2 molecule with the metal center, we investigate their catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). According to our results, CNT-MnP, CNT-CoP, and CNT-FeP linked by sp2 covalent bonds are highly stable, preserving the CNT metallic character. We also find a significant O-O bond weakening after the oxygen adsorption on the porphyrin metal center, showing favorable conditions toward ORR. These results support experimental evidences of ORR activity in CNT-based transition metal-N4 centers.

  2. Polarized spectroscopy of aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J.; Gommans, H. H.; Ugawa, A.; Tashiro, H.; Haggenmueller, R.; Winey, K. I.; Fischer, J. E.; Tanner, D. B.; Rinzler, A. G.

    2000-11-15

    Polarized resonant Raman and optical spectroscopy of aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes show that the optical transitions are strongly polarized along the nanotubes axis. This behavior is consistent with recent electronic structure calculations.

  3. Metal-Organic Polymers Containing Discrete Single-Walled Nanotube as a Heterogeneous Catalyst for the Cycloaddition of Carbon Dioxide to Epoxides.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; He, Cheng; Xiu, Jinghai; Yang, Lu; Duan, Chunying

    2015-12-01

    The cycloaddition of carbon dioxide to epoxides to produce cyclic carbonates is quite promising and does not result in any side products. A discrete single-walled metal-organic nanotube was synthesized by incorporating a tetraphenyl-ethylene moiety as the four-point connected node. The assembled complex has a large cross-section, with an exterior wall diameter of 3.6 nm and an interior channel diameter of 2.1 nm. It features excellent activity toward the cycloaddition of carbon dioxide, with a turnover number of 17,500 per mole of catalyst and an initial turnover frequency as high as 1000 per mole of catalyst per hour. Only minimal decreases in the catalytic activity were observed after 70 h under identical reaction conditions, and a total turnover number as high as 35,000 was achieved. A simple comparison of relative porous MOFs suggested that the cross-section of the channels is an important factor influencing the transport of the substrates and products through the channel. PMID:26584402

  4. Center for Applications of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Resasco, Daniel E

    2008-02-21

    This report describes the activities conducted under a Congressional Direction project whose goal was to develop applications for Single-walled carbon nanotubes, under the Carbon Nanotube Technology Center (CANTEC), a multi-investigator program that capitalizes on OU’s advantageous position of having available high quality carbon nanotubes. During the first phase of CANTEC, 11 faculty members and their students from the College of Engineering developed applications for carbon nanotubes by applying their expertise in a number of areas: Catalysis, Reaction Engineering, Nanotube synthesis, Surfactants, Colloid Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Spectroscopy, Tissue Engineering, Biosensors, Biochemical Engineering, Cell Biology, Thermal Transport, Composite Materials, Protein synthesis and purification, Molecular Modeling, Computational Simulations. In particular, during this phase, the different research groups involved in CANTEC made advances in the tailoring of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) of controlled diameter and chirality by Modifying Reaction Conditions and the Nature of the catalyst; developed kinetic models that quantitatively describe the SWNT growth, created vertically oriented forests of SWNT by varying the density of metal nanoparticles catalyst particles, and developed novel nanostructured SWNT towers that exhibit superhydrophobic behavior. They also developed molecular simulations of the growth of Metal Nanoparticles on the surface of SWNT, which may have applications in the field of fuell cells. In the area of biomedical applications, CANTEC researchers fabricated SWNT Biosensors by a novel electrostatic layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition method, which may have an impact in the control of diabetes. They also functionalized SWNT with proteins that retained the protein’s biological activity and also retained the near-infrared light absorbance, which finds applications in the treatment of cancer.

  5. Three-Dimensional Flexible Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Logic Circuits Based On Two-Layer Stacks of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yudan; Li, Qunqing; Xiao, Xiaoyang; Li, Guanhong; Jin, Yuanhao; Jiang, Kaili; Wang, Jiaping; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-02-23

    We have proposed and fabricated stable and repeatable, flexible, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin film transistor (TFT) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits based on a three-dimensional (3D) structure. Two layers of SWCNT-TFT devices were stacked, where one layer served as n-type devices and the other one served as p-type devices. On the basis of this method, it is able to save at least half of the area required to construct an inverter and make large-scale and high-density integrated CMOS circuits easier to design and manufacture. The 3D flexible CMOS inverter gain can be as high as 40, and the total noise margin is more than 95%. Moreover, the input and output voltage of the inverter are exactly matched for cascading. 3D flexible CMOS NOR, NAND logic gates, and 15-stage ring oscillators were fabricated on PI substrates with high performance as well. Stable electrical properties of these circuits can be obtained with bending radii as small as 3.16 mm, which shows that such a 3D structure is a reliable architecture and suitable for carbon nanotube electrical applications in complex flexible and wearable electronic devices. PMID:26768020

  6. Resonant cavities in metallic single-wall nanotubes: Green's function calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jódar, Esther; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio; Díaz-Sánchez, Anastasio

    2006-05-01

    We study the electronic transport of a metallic single-wall carbon nanotube sandwiched between two equal metallic single-wall nanotubes of different radii. We calculate the transmission function and the density of states using the Green’s function method. This cavity behaves as a resonant box with quasibound states producing resonances and antiresonances in transmission. This behavior is a consequence of the different band structures for nanotubes forming the cavity.

  7. Thermoelectric power of a single-walled carbon nanotubes rope.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang; Hu, Lijun; Zhou, Haiqing; Qiu, Caiyu; Yang, Huaichao; Chen, Minjiang; Lu, Jianglei; Sun, Lianfeng

    2013-02-01

    In this work, a rope of single-walled carbon nanotubes is prepared by using a diamond wire drawing die. At atmospheric condition, the electrical conductance and the thermoelectric voltage of single-walled carbon nanotubes rope have been investigated with the hot-side temperature ranging from 292 to 380 K, and cold-side temperature at 292 K. For different temperatures in the range of 292 to 380 K at hot-side, the current-voltage curves are almost parallel to each other, indicating that the electrical conductance does not change. The dynamic characteristics of voltage at positive, zero and negative current bias demonstrate that a thermoelectric voltage is induced with a direction from hot- to cold-side. The induced thermoelectric voltage shows linear dependence on the temperature difference between hot- and cold-side. The thermoelectric power of single-walled carbon nanotubes rope is found to be positive and has a value about 17.8 +/- 1.0 microV/K. This result suggests the hole-like carriers in single-walled carbon nanotubes rope. This study will pave the way for single-walled carbon nanotubes based thermoelectric devices. PMID:23646631

  8. Single Wall Carbon Nanotube-Based Structural Health Sensing Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Ingram, JoAnne L.; Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Smits, Jan M.; Williams, Phillip A.

    2004-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based materials represent the future aerospace vehicle construction material of choice based primarily on predicted strength-to-weight advantages and inherent multifunctionality. The multifunctionality of SWCNTs arises from the ability of the nanotubes to be either metallic or semi-conducting based on their chirality. Furthermore, simply changing the environment around a SWCNT can change its conducting behavior. This phenomenon is being exploited to create sensors capable of measuring several parameters related to vehicle structural health (i.e. strain, pressure, temperature, etc.) The structural health monitor is constructed using conventional electron-beam lithographic and photolithographic techniques to place specific electrode patterns on a surface. SWCNTs are then deposited between the electrodes using a dielectrophoretic alignment technique. Prototypes have been constructed on both silicon and polyimide substrates, demonstrating that surface-mountable and multifunctional devices based on SWCNTs can be realized.

  9. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as excitonic optical wires.

    PubMed

    Joh, Daniel Y; Kinder, Jesse; Herman, Lihong H; Ju, Sang-Yong; Segal, Michael A; Johnson, Jeffreys N; Chan, Garnet K-L; Park, Jiwoong

    2011-01-01

    Although metallic nanostructures are useful for nanoscale optics, all of their key optical properties are determined by their geometry. This makes it difficult to adjust these properties independently, and can restrict applications. Here we use the absolute intensity of Rayleigh scattering to show that single-walled carbon nanotubes can form ideal optical wires. The spatial distribution of the radiation scattered by the nanotubes is determined by their shape, but the intensity and spectrum of the scattered radiation are determined by exciton dynamics, quantum-dot-like optical resonances and other intrinsic properties. Moreover, the nanotubes display a uniform peak optical conductivity of approximately 8 e(2)/h, which we derive using an exciton model, suggesting universal behaviour similar to that observed in nanotube conductance. We further demonstrate a radiative coupling between two distant nanotubes, with potential applications in metamaterials and optical antennas. PMID:21170038

  10. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes as Transparent Electrodes for Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, C.; Peltola, J.; Levitsky, I.; Glatkowski, P.; van de Lagemaat, J.; Rumbles, G.; Barnes, T.; Coutts, T.

    2006-01-01

    Transparent and electrically conductive coatings and films have a variety of uses in the fast-growing field of optoelectronic applications. Transparent electrodes typically include semiconductive metal oxides such as indium tin oxide (ITO), and conducting polymers such as poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), doped and stabilized with poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS). In recent years, Eikos, Inc. has conceived and developed technologies to deliver novel alternatives using single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT). These technologies offer products having a broad range of conductivity, excellent transparency, neutral color tone, good adhesion, abrasion resistance as well as mechanical robustness. Additional benefits include ease of ambient processing and patterning capability. This paper reports our recent findings on achieving 2.6% and 1.4% efficiencies on nonoptimized organic photovoltaic cells employing SWNT as a transparent electrode.

  11. Laser ablation process for single-walled carbon nanotube production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    Different types of lasers are now routinely used to prepare single-walled carbon nanotubes. The original method developed by researchers at Rice University used a "double-pulse laser oven" process. Several researchers have used variations of the lasers to include one-laser pulse (green or infrared), different pulse widths (ns to micros as well as continuous wave), and different laser wavelengths (e.g., CO2, or free electron lasers in the near to far infrared). Some of these variations are tried with different combinations and concentrations of metal catalysts, buffer gases (e.g., helium), oven temperatures, flow conditions, and even different porosities of the graphite targets. This article is an attempt to cover all these variations and their relative merits. Possible growth mechanisms under these different conditions will also be discussed.

  12. DNA-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Chris; Guthold, Martin; Falvo, Michael; Washburn, Sean; Superfine, Richard; Erie, Dorothy

    2002-10-01

    We present here the use of amino-terminated DNA strands in functionalizing the open ends and defect sites of oxidatively prepared single-walled carbon nanotubes, an important first step in realizing a DNA-guided self-assembly process for carbon nanotubes.

  13. Purification Procedures for Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorelik, Olga P.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the comparison of a variety of procedures used to purify carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotube material is produced by the arc process and laser oven process. Most of the procedures are tested using laser-grown, single-wall nanotube (SWNT) material. The material is characterized at each step of the purification procedures by using different techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The identified impurities are amorphous and graphitic carbon, catalyst particle aggregates, fullerenes, and hydrocarbons. Solvent extraction and low-temperature annealing are used to reduce the amount of volatile hydrocarbons and dissolve fullerenes. Metal catalysts and amorphous as well as graphitic carbon are oxidized by reflux in acids including HCl, HNO3 and HF and other oxidizers such as H2O2. High-temperature annealing in vacuum and in inert atmosphere helps to improve the quality of SWNTs by increasing crystallinity and reducing intercalation.

  14. Mechanically interlocked single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    de Juan, Alberto; Pouillon, Yann; Ruiz-González, Luisa; Torres-Pardo, Almudena; Casado, Santiago; Martín, Nazario; Rubio, Ángel; Pérez, Emilio M

    2014-05-19

    Extensive research has been devoted to the chemical manipulation of carbon nanotubes. The attachment of molecular fragments through covalent-bond formation produces kinetically stable products, but implies the saturation of some of the C-C double bonds of the nanotubes. Supramolecular modification maintains the structure of the SWNTs but yields labile species. Herein, we present a strategy for the synthesis of mechanically interlocked derivatives of SWNTs (MINTs). In the key rotaxane-forming step, we employed macrocycle precursors equipped with two π-extended tetrathiafulvalene SWNT recognition units and terminated with bisalkenes that were closed around the nanotubes through ring-closing metathesis (RCM). The mechanically interlocked nature of the derivatives was probed by analytical, spectroscopic, and microscopic techniques, as well as by appropriate control experiments. Individual macrocycles were observed by HR STEM to circumscribe the nanotubes. PMID:24729452

  15. Electronic Raman Scattering On Individual Semiconducting Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Zhu, Bairen; Zhang, Anmin; Zeng, Hualing; Zhang, Qingming; Cui, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    We report experimental measurements of electronic Raman scattering by electrons (holes) in individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) under resonant conditions. The Raman scattering at low frequency range reveals a single particle excitation feature. And the dispersion of electronic structure around the center of Brillouin zone of a semiconducting SWNT (14, 13) is extracted. PMID:25095891

  16. A Computational Experiment on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Scott; Lonie, David C.; Chen, Jiechen; Zurek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    A computational experiment that investigates single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been developed and employed in an upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. Computations were carried out to determine the electronic structure, radial breathing modes, and the influence of the nanotube's diameter on the…

  17. A Computational Experiment on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Scott; Lonie, David C.; Chen, Jiechen; Zurek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    A computational experiment that investigates single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been developed and employed in an upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. Computations were carried out to determine the electronic structure, radial breathing modes, and the influence of the nanotube's diameter on the

  18. Thermogravimetric Analysis of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga

    2010-01-01

    An improved protocol for thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of samples of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) material has been developed to increase the degree of consistency among results so that meaningful comparisons can be made among different samples. This improved TGA protocol is suitable for incorporation into the protocol for characterization of carbon nanotube material. In most cases, TGA of carbon nanotube materials is performed in gas mixtures that contain oxygen at various concentrations. The improved protocol is summarized.

  19. Electrical characterization of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berliocchi, Marco; Brunetti, Francesca; Di Carlo, Aldo; Lugli, Paolo; Orlanducci, Silvia; Terranova, Maria Letizia

    2003-04-01

    Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) based nanotechnology appears to be promising for future nanoelectronics. The SWCNT may be either metallic or semiconducting and both metallic and semiconducting types of SWCNTs have been observed experimentally. This gives rise to intriguing possibilities to put together semiconductor-semiconductor and semiconductor-metal junctions for diodes and transistors. The potential for nanotubes in nanoelectronics devices, displays and nanosensors is enormous. However, in order to realize the potential of SWCNTs, it is critical to understand the properties of charge transport and to control phase purity, elicity and arrangement according to specific architectures. We have investigated the electrical properties of various SWCNTs samples whit different organization: bundles of SWCNTs, SWCNT fibres and different membranes and tablets obtained using SWCNTs purified and characterized. Electrical characterizations were carried out by a 4155B Agilent Semiconductor Parameter Analyser. In order to give a mechanical stability to SWCNTs fibres and bundles we have used a nafion matrix coating, so an electrical characterization has been performed on samples with and without this layer. I-V measurements were performed in vacuum and in air using aluminium interdigitated coplanar-electrodes (width=20mm or 40mm) on glass substrates. The behaviour observed is generally supralinear with currents of the order of mA in vacuum and lower values in air with the exception of the tablet samples where the behaviour is ohmic, the currents are higher and similar values of current are detected in air and vacuum.

  20. Thermionic Emission of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Measured

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Krainsky, Isay L.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Elich, Jeffrey M.; Landi, Brian J.; Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2004-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center, in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology, have investigated the thermionic properties of high-purity, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for use as electron-emitting electrodes. Carbon nanotubes are a recently discovered material made from carbon atoms bonded into nanometer-scale hollow tubes. Such nanotubes have remarkable properties. An extremely high aspect ratio, as well as unique mechanical and electronic properties, make single-wall nanotubes ideal for use in a vast array of applications. Carbon nanotubes typically have diameters on the order of 1 to 2 nm. As a result, the ends have a small radius of curvature. It is these characteristics, therefore, that indicate they might be excellent potential candidates for both thermionic and field emission.

  1. Structure of single-wall carbon nanotubes: a graphene helix.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Kap; Lee, Sohyung; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Min, Bong-Ki; Kim, Yong-Il; Lee, Kyung-Il; An, Kay Hyeok; John, Phillip

    2014-08-27

    Evidence is presented in this paper that certain single-wall carbon nanotubes are not seamless tubes, but rather adopt a graphene helix resulting from the spiral growth of a nano-graphene ribbon. The residual traces of the helices are confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The analysis also shows that the tubular graphene material may exhibit a unique armchair structure and the chirality is not a necessary condition for the growth of carbon nanotubes. The description of the structure of the helical carbon nanomaterials is generalized using the plane indices of hexagonal space groups instead of using chiral vectors. It is also proposed that the growth model, via a graphene helix, results in a ubiquitous structure of single-wall carbon nanotubes. PMID:24838196

  2. Chirality Characterization of Dispersed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Williams, Phillip A.; Mayweather, Candis D.; Wincheski, Buzz; Park, Cheol; Namkung, Juock S.

    2005-01-01

    Raman scattering and optical absorption spectroscopy are used for the chirality characterization of HiPco single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dispersed in aqueous solution with the surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate. Radial breathing mode (RBM) Raman peaks for semiconducting and metallic SWNTs are identified by directly comparing the Raman spectra with the Kataura plot. The SWNT diameters are calculated from these resonant peak positions. Next, a list of (n, m) pairs, yielding the SWNT diameters within a few percent of that obtained from each resonant peak position, is established. The interband transition energies for the list of SWNT (n, m) pairs are calculated based on the tight binding energy expression for each list of the (n, m) pairs, and the pairs yielding the closest values to the corresponding experimental optical absorption peaks are selected. The results reveal that (1, 11), (4, 11), and (0, 11) as the most probable chiralities of the semiconducting nanotubes. The results also reveal that (4, 16), (6, 12) and (8, 8) are the most probable chiralities for the metallic nanotubes. Directly relating the Raman scattering data to the optical absorption spectra, the present method is considered the simplest technique currently available. Another advantage of this technique is the use of the E(sup 8)(sub 11) peaks in the optical absorption spectrum in the analysis to enhance the accuracy in the results.

  3. Directed Assembly of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Penzo, Erika; Palma, Matteo; Chenet, Daniel A; Ao, Geyou; Zheng, Ming; Hone, James C; Wind, Shalom J

    2016-02-23

    The outstanding electronic properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have made them prime candidates for future nanoelectronics technologies. One of the main obstacles to the implementation of advanced SWCNT electronics to date is the inability to arrange them in a manner suitable for complex circuits. Directed assembly of SWCNT segments onto lithographically patterned and chemically functionalized substrates is a promising way to organize SWCNTs in topologies that are amenable to integration for advanced applications, but the placement and orientational control required have not yet been demonstrated. We have developed a technique for assembling length sorted and chirality monodisperse DNA-wrapped SWCNT segments on hydrophilic lines patterned on a passivated oxidized silicon substrate. Placement of individual SWCNT segments at predetermined locations was achieved with nanometer accuracy. Three terminal electronic devices, consisting of a single SWCNT segment placed either beneath or on top of metallic source/drain electrodes were fabricated. Devices made with semiconducting nanotubes behaved as typical p-type field effect transistors (FETs), whereas devices made with metallic nanotubes had a finite resistance with little or no gate modulation. This scalable, high resolution approach represents an important step forward toward the potential implementation of complex SWCNT devices and circuits. PMID:26807948

  4. Production of single-walled carbon nanotube grids

    DOEpatents

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong; Pheasant, Sean

    2013-12-03

    A method of forming a nanotube grid includes placing a plurality of catalyst nanoparticles on a grid framework, contacting the catalyst nanoparticles with a gas mixture that includes hydrogen and a carbon source in a reaction chamber, forming an activated gas from the gas mixture, heating the grid framework and activated gas, and controlling a growth time to generate a single-wall carbon nanotube array radially about the grid framework. A filter membrane may be produced by this method.

  5. Spectroscopy-Based Characterization of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Namkung, Juock S.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Seo, J.; Park, Cheol

    2003-01-01

    We present the initial results of our combined investigation of Raman scattering and optical absorption spectroscopy in a batch of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The SWNT diameters are first estimated from the four radial breathing mode (RBM) peaks using a simple relation of omega(sub RBM) = 248/cm nm/d(sub t)(nm). The calculated diameter values are related to the optical absorption peaks through the expressions of first interband transition energies, i.e., E(sup S)(sub 11) = 2a gamma/d(sub t) for semiconducting and E(sup S)(sub 11) = 6a gamma/d(sub t) for metallic SWNTs, respectively, where a is the carbon-carbon bond length (0.144 nm) and gamma is the energy of overlapping electrons from nearest neighbor atoms, which is 2.9 eV for a SWNT. This analysis indicates that three RBM peaks are from semiconducting tubes, and the remaining one is from metallic tubes. The detailed analysis in the present study is focused on these three peaks of the first absorption band by determining the values of the representative (n,m) pairs. The first step of analysis is to construct a list of possible (n,m) pairs from the diameters calculated from the positions of the RBM peaks. The second step is to compute the first interband transition energy, E(sub 11), by substituting the constructed list of (n,m) into the expression of Reich and Thomsen, and Saito et al. Finally, the pairs with the energies closest to the experimental values are selected.

  6. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Rachel M; Voy, Brynn H; Glass-Mattie, Dana F; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Saxton, Arnold; Donnel, Robert L.; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 {micro}g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs or an equal volume of vehicle control by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post-exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post-exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.

  7. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Rachel M; Voy, Brynn H; Glass-Mattie, Dana F; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Saxton, Arnold; Donnel, Robert L.; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may be pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.

  8. Synthesis, assembly, and applications of single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Koungmin

    This dissertation presents the synthesis and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, and their applications in both nano-electronics such as transistor and integrated circuits and macro-electronics in energy conversion devices as transparent conducting electrodes. Also, the high performance chemical sensor using metal oxide nanowire has been demonstrated. Chapter 1 presents a brief introduction of carbon nanotube, followed by discussion of a new synthesis technique using nanosphere lithography to grow highly aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes atop quartz and sapphire substrates. This method offers great potential to produce carbon nanotube arrays with simultaneous control over the nanotube orientation, position, density, diameter and even chirality. Chapter 3 introduces the wafer-scale integration and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, including full-wafer scale synthesis and transfer of massively aligned carbon nanotube arrays, and nanotube device fabrication on 4 inch Si/SiO2 wafer to yield submicron channel transistors with high on-current density ˜ 20 muA/mum and good on/off ratio and CMOS integrated circuits. In addition, various chemical doping methods for n-type nanotube transistors are studied to fabricate CMOS integrated nanotube circuits such as inverter, NAND and NOR logic devices. Furthermore, defect-tolerant circuit design for NAND and NOR is proposed and demonstrated to guarantee the correct operation of logic circuit, regardless of the presence of mis-aligned or mis-positioned nanotubes. Carbon nanotube flexible electronics and smart textiles for ubiquitous computing and sensing are demonstrated in chapter 4. A facile transfer printing technique has been introduced to transfer massively aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes from the original sapphire/quartz substrates to virtually any other substrates, including glass, silicon, polymer sheets, and even fabrics. The characterization of transferred nanotubes reveals that the transferred nanotubes are highly conductive, transparent, and flexible as well. Based on transferred nanotube arrays on fabric, we have successfully demonstrated nanotube transistors with on/off ratios ˜ 105, and chemical sensors for low-concentration NO2 and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). In Chapter 5, I present the study of transparent conductive thin films made with two kinds of commercial carbon nanotubes: HiPCO and arc-discharge nanotubes. These films have been further exploited as hole-injection electrodes for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) on both rigid glass and flexible substrates. Our experiments reveal that films based on arc discharge nanotubes are overwhelmingly better than HiPCO-nanotube-based films in all the critical aspects, including the surface roughness, sheet resistance, and transparency. The optimized films show a typical sheet resistance of ˜160O/□ at 87% transparency and have been successfully used to make OLEDs with high stability and long lifetime. Lastly, I present the fast and scalable integration of nanowire chemical sensors with micromachined hotplates built on SiN membranes. These hotplates allowed nanowire chemical sensors to operate at elevated temperatures in order to enhance the sensitivity of chemical sensors to target gases. By applying different current through the platinum heating filament, we can easily vary the device temperature from room temperature to 350°C. These nanosensors with integrated hot plates have been exploited for the detection of ethanol, CO and hydrogen down to concentrations of 1 ppm, 10 ppm and 50 ppm, respectively.

  9. Probing Scattering in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblatt, Sami

    2005-03-01

    Transport measurements and atomic force microscopy were used to study electron scattering rates in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes. From scaling of the resistance of the same nanotube with length in the low and high bias regimes, the mean free paths for both regimes are inferred. The observed scattering rates are consistent with calculations for acoustic phonon scattering at low biases and zone boundary/optical phonon scattering at high biases. We have also developed techniques to probe the high frequency transport properties of nanotube transistors. We have used the nanotube transistor as a microwave mixer operating at frequencies up to 50 GHz. The long-term goal is to directly measure the fundamental excitations and scattering rates. The author would like to acknowledge Ji-Yong Park, Yuval Yaish, Vera Sazonova, Xinjian Zhou, Hao Lin, Hande Ustunel, Stephan Braig, T.A. Arias, Piet W. Brower, Sandip Tiwari and Paul L. McEuen of Cornell University for their contributions to this work.

  10. Optoelectronic properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Nanot, Sbastien; Hroz, Erik H; Kim, Ji-Hee; Hauge, Robert H; Kono, Junichiro

    2012-09-18

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), with their uniquely simple crystal structures and chirality-dependent electronic and vibrational states, provide an ideal laboratory for the exploration of novel 1D physics, as well as quantum engineered architectures for applications in optoelectronics. This article provides an overview of recent progress in optical studies of SWCNTs. In particular, recent progress in post-growth separation methods allows different species of SWCNTs to be sorted out in bulk quantities according to their diameters, chiralities, and electronic types, enabling studies of (n,m)-dependent properties using standard macroscopic characterization measurements. Here, a review is presented of recent optical studies of samples enriched in 'armchair' (n = m) species, which are truly metallic nanotubes but show excitonic interband absorption. Furthermore, it is shown that intense ultrashort optical pulses can induce ultrafast bandgap oscillations in SWCNTs, via the generation of coherent phonons, which in turn modulate the transmission of a delayed probe pulse. Combined with pulse-shaping techniques, coherent phonon spectroscopy provides a powerful method for studying exciton-phonon coupling in SWCNTs in a chirality-selective manner. Finally, some of the basic properties of highly aligned SWCNT films are highlighted, which are particularly well-suited for optoelectronic applications including terahertz polarizers with nearly perfect extinction ratios and broadband photodetectors. PMID:22911973

  11. Synthesis of NiO/carbon shell/single-walled carbon nanotube composites as anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yufan; Sheng, Leimei; Zhao, Hongbin; An, Kang; Yu, Liming; Xu, Jiaqiang; Zhao, Xinluo

    2015-08-01

    In this study, NiO/carbon shell/single-walled carbon nanotube composites are prepared by heat treating the single-walled carbon nanotube samples synthesized by direct current arc discharge method. The morphology and nanostructure of the composites are affected by the heat treatment temperature according to the X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy results. The electrochemical measurements are evaluated in coin-type cells versus metallic lithium. After heat treatment in H2 at 600 °C for 1 h and in air at 300 °C for 10 h, the NiO nanoparticles encapsulated by carbon shells are evenly distributed on the surface of web-like single-walled carbon nanotubes and a perfect NiO/carbon shell/single-walled carbon nanotube nanostructure is formed. This NiO/carbon shell/single-walled carbon nanotube composite shows a high reversible specific capacity of 758 mA h g-1 after 60 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g-1 and an excellent rate capacity of about 594 mA h g-1 even at a high current density of 1600 mA g-1. Therefore, the NiO/carbon shell/single-walled carbon nanotube composites have significant potential for applications in energy storage devices.

  12. Wiring-up hydrogenase with single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Timothy J; Svedruzic, Drazenka; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Zhang, S B; King, Paul W; Heben, Michael J

    2007-11-01

    Many envision a future where hydrogen is the centerpiece of a sustainable, carbon-free energy supply. For example, the energy in sunlight may be stored by splitting water into H2 and O2 using inorganic semiconductors and photoelectrochemical approaches or with artificial photosynthetic systems that seek to mimic the light absorption, energy transfer, electron transfer, and redox catalysis that occurs in green plants. Unfortunately, large scale deployment of artificial water-splitting technologies may be impeded by the need for the large amounts of precious metals required to catalyze the multielectron water-splitting reactions. Nature provides a variety of microbes that can activate the dihydrogen bond through the catalytic activity of [NiFe] and [FeFe] hydrogenases, and photobiological approaches to water splitting have been advanced. One may also consider a biohybrid approach; however, it is difficult to interface these sensitive, metalloenzymes to other materials and systems. Here we show that surfactant-suspended carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) spontaneously self-assemble with [FeFe] hydrogenases in solution to form catalytically active biohybrids. Photoluminescence excitation and Raman spectroscopy studies show that SWNTs act as molecular wires to make electrical contact to the biocatalytic region of hydrogenase. Hydrogenase mediates electron injection into nanotubes having appropriately positioned lowest occupied molecular orbital levels when the H2 partial pressure is varied. The hydrogenase is strongly attached to the SWNTs, so mass transport effects are eliminated and the absolute potential of the electronic levels of the nanotubes can be unambiguously measured. Our findings reveal new nanotube physics and represent the first example of "wiring-up" an hydrogenase with another nanoscale material. This latter advance offers a nonprecious metal route to the design of new biohybrid architectures and building blocks for hydrogen-related technologies. PMID:17967044

  13. Reinforcement of Epoxies Using Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorti, Ramanan; Sharma, Jitendra; Chatterjee, Tirtha

    2008-03-01

    The reinforcement of bisphenol-A and bisphenol-F epoxies using single walled carbon nanotubes has been approached experimentally by understanding the nature of interactions between the matrices and nanotubes. Unassisted dispersions of single walled carbon nanotubes in epoxies were studied by a combination of radiation scattering (elastic small angle scattering and inelastic scattering), DSC based glass transition determination, melt rheology and solid-state mechanical testing in order to understand and correlate changes in local and global dynamics to the tailoring of composite mechanical properties. Significant changes in the glass transition temperature of the matrix can successfully account for changes in the viscoelastic properties of the epoxy dispersions for concentrations below the percolation threshold, while above the percolation threshold the network superstructure formed by the nanotubes controls the viscoelastic properties.

  14. Dynamic terahertz polarization in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. L.; Parkinson, P.; Chuang, K.-C.; Johnston, M. B.; Nicholas, R. J.; Herz, L. M.

    2010-08-01

    We have investigated the anisotropic dynamic dielectric response of aligned and well-isolated single-walled carbon nanotubes using optical-pump terahertz (THz)-probe techniques. The polarization anisotropy measurements demonstrate that the THz radiation interacts only with radiation polarized parallel to the nanotubes which have been selectively excited by a polarized pump pulse thus allowing controlled THz polarization to be achieved from unaligned nanotubes.

  15. Modified Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes for Reinforce Thermoplastic Polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron-COlon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    A significant improvement in the mechanical properties of the thermoplastic polyimide film was obtained by the addition of noncovalently functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Polyimide films were reinforced using pristine SWNTs and functionalized SWNTs (F-SWNTs). The tensile strengths of the polyimide films containing F-SWNTs were found to be approximately 1.4 times higher than those prepared from pristine SWNTs.

  16. Supramolecularly knitted tethered oligopeptide/single-walled carbon nanotube organogels.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jiong; He, Xun; Fan, Jingwei; Raymond, Jeffery E; Wooley, Karen L

    2014-07-14

    A facile polymerization of an allyl-functionalized N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) monomer is utilized to construct an A-B-A-type triblock structure containing β-sheet-rich oligomeric peptide segments tethered by a poly(ethylene oxide) chain, which are capable of dispersing and gelating single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) noncovalently in organic solvents, resulting in significant enhancement of the mechanical properties of polypeptide-based organogels. PMID:24961389

  17. Titanium dioxide, single-walled carbon nanotube composites

    DOEpatents

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Gonghu; Gray, Kimberly; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-07-14

    The present invention provides titanium dioxide/single-walled carbon nanotube composites (TiO.sub.2/SWCNTs), articles of manufacture, and methods of making and using such composites. In certain embodiments, the present invention provides membrane filters and ceramic articles that are coated with TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material. In other embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material to purify a sample, such as a water or air sample.

  18. Band gap opening and semiconductor-metal phase transition in (n, n) single-walled carbon nanotubes with distinctive boron-nitrogen line defect.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ming; Xie, Yuanyuan; Gao, Xianfeng; Li, Jianyang; Deng, Yelin; Guan, Dongsheng; Ma, Lulu; Yuan, Chris

    2016-02-01

    Band gap opening and modulating are critical in dictating the functionalities of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a broad array of nano-devices. Using first-principles density functional theory calculations, a class of semiconducting armchair SWCNTs with a distinctive BN line defect are studied, showing a super capacity to open the band gap of (4, 4) SWCNT to as large as 0.86 eV, while the opened band gap are found decreasing with the increasing diameters of SWCNTs. The opened band gap of SWCNTs can also be successfully modulated through both mechanical and electrical approaches by applying compressive uniaxial strain and electric field. This study provides novel insights into the large band gap opening and modulating of SWCNTs and could be useful in facilitating future applications of SWCNTs in electronic, optical and thermoelectric devices. PMID:26794602

  19. Green luminescence from triphenylphosphine functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Rima; Kumbhakar, P.; Mitra, A. K.

    2011-05-01

    In a simple wet chemical process, purified single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are treated with triphenylphosphine (Ph 3P) at room temperature. The functionalized material is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. HRTEM micrograph clearly reveals that triphenylphosphine nanocrystals of nearly uniform size are attached to the surfaces of SWCNTs. The hybrid structure shows remarkable green luminescence with peak emission at around 500 nm, under UV excitation. The photoluminescence may be attributed to charge transfer from the electron-donating phosphorous atoms to the carbon nanotubes.

  20. Aligned arrays of single walled carbon nanotubes for transparent electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Frank; Rogers, John A.

    2013-06-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes have garnered substantial interest in the electronic materials research community due to their unparalleled intrinsic electrical properties. In addition, their mechanical robustness and thin geometries make SWNTs ideal candidates for transparent electronics. Aligned arrays of SWNTs grown via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on quartz enable device uniformity and wafer scale integration with existing commercial semiconductor processing methods. A crucial roadblock in incorporation of SWNTs in commercial electronics has been the co-existence of metallic and semiconducting SWNTs. Demanding device metrics in high performance and complex integrated electrical devices, sensors, and other applications dictate the necessity of pristine, purely semiconducting arrays of SWNTs. By exploiting a novel process in nanoscale flow of thin film organic coatings, we have demonstrated a method to purify as-grown aligned arrays to produce such as result. Comparison with single nanotube statistics, characterization using a novel thermal scanning probe microscopy technique, as well as corroboration with thermal modeling validated the result. Thin film field effect transistors exhibiting mobilities exceeding ~1000cm2/Vs and on/off ratios exceeding 10,000 were fabricated using the purified semiconducting SWNTs. This manuscript reviews some of these results, which represent the first successful demonstration of purification of aligned arrays of SWNTs, in a robust and scalable scheme that allows integration of aligned arrays into complex, high performance electrical devices. We separately also describe new results on the advanced development of soft lithography techniques with the ability to transfer print aligned arrays of SWNTs onto transparent substrates after synthesis and processing, thereby completing a direct pathway to achieve complex, high performance, and highly integrated transparent SWNTs electronics, sensors, or other devices.

  1. Growth of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Liu, Chang; Wang, Bing-Wei; Jiang, Hua; Chen, Mao-Lin; Sun, Dong-Ming; Li, Jin-Cheng; Cong, Hong-Tao; Kauppinen, Esko I; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The growth of high-quality semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution is crucial for the fabrication of high-performance electronic devices. However, the single-wall carbon nanotubes grown from traditional metal catalysts usually have diversified structures and properties. Here we design and prepare an acorn-like, partially carbon-coated cobalt nanoparticle catalyst with a uniform size and structure by the thermal reduction of a [Co(CN)6](3-) precursor adsorbed on a self-assembled block copolymer nanodomain. The inner cobalt nanoparticle functions as active catalytic phase for carbon nanotube growth, whereas the outer carbon layer prevents the aggregation of cobalt nanoparticles and ensures a perpendicular growth mode. The grown single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very narrow diameter distribution centred at 1.7 nm and a high semiconducting content of >95%. These semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very small band-gap difference of ∼0.08 eV and show excellent thin-film transistor performance. PMID:27025784

  2. Growth of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Liu, Chang; Wang, Bing-Wei; Jiang, Hua; Chen, Mao-Lin; Sun, Dong-Ming; Li, Jin-Cheng; Cong, Hong-Tao; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The growth of high-quality semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution is crucial for the fabrication of high-performance electronic devices. However, the single-wall carbon nanotubes grown from traditional metal catalysts usually have diversified structures and properties. Here we design and prepare an acorn-like, partially carbon-coated cobalt nanoparticle catalyst with a uniform size and structure by the thermal reduction of a [Co(CN)6]3− precursor adsorbed on a self-assembled block copolymer nanodomain. The inner cobalt nanoparticle functions as active catalytic phase for carbon nanotube growth, whereas the outer carbon layer prevents the aggregation of cobalt nanoparticles and ensures a perpendicular growth mode. The grown single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very narrow diameter distribution centred at 1.7 nm and a high semiconducting content of >95%. These semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very small band-gap difference of ∼0.08 eV and show excellent thin-film transistor performance. PMID:27025784

  3. Growth of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Liu, Chang; Wang, Bing-Wei; Jiang, Hua; Chen, Mao-Lin; Sun, Dong-Ming; Li, Jin-Cheng; Cong, Hong-Tao; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2016-03-01

    The growth of high-quality semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution is crucial for the fabrication of high-performance electronic devices. However, the single-wall carbon nanotubes grown from traditional metal catalysts usually have diversified structures and properties. Here we design and prepare an acorn-like, partially carbon-coated cobalt nanoparticle catalyst with a uniform size and structure by the thermal reduction of a [Co(CN)6]3- precursor adsorbed on a self-assembled block copolymer nanodomain. The inner cobalt nanoparticle functions as active catalytic phase for carbon nanotube growth, whereas the outer carbon layer prevents the aggregation of cobalt nanoparticles and ensures a perpendicular growth mode. The grown single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very narrow diameter distribution centred at 1.7 nm and a high semiconducting content of >95%. These semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very small band-gap difference of ~0.08 eV and show excellent thin-film transistor performance.

  4. 40 CFR 721.10156 - Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Single-walled carbon nanotubes... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10156 Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic). (a) Chemical substance... single-walled carbon nanotubes (PMN P-08-328) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10156 - Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Single-walled carbon nanotubes... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10156 Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic). (a) Chemical substance... single-walled carbon nanotubes (PMN P-08-328) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10156 - Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Single-walled carbon nanotubes... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10156 Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic). (a) Chemical substance... single-walled carbon nanotubes (PMN P-08-328) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10156 - Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Single-walled carbon nanotubes... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10156 Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic). (a) Chemical substance... single-walled carbon nanotubes (PMN P-08-328) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  8. Key roles of carbon solubility in single-walled carbon nanotube nucleation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Maoshuai; Amara, Hakim; Jiang, Hua; Hassinen, Jukka; Bichara, Christophe; Ras, Robin H. A.; Lehtonen, Juha; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Loiseau, Annick

    2015-11-01

    Elucidating the roles played by carbon solubility in catalyst nanoparticles is required to better understand the growth mechanisms of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Here, we highlight that controlling the level of dissolved carbon is of key importance to enable nucleation and growth. We first performed tight binding based atomistic computer simulations to study carbon incorporation in metal nanoparticles with low solubilities. For such metals, carbon incorporation strongly depends on their structures (face centered cubic or icosahedral), leading to different amounts of carbon close to the nanoparticle surface. Following this idea, we then show experimentally that Au nanoparticles effectively catalyze SWNT growth when in a face centered cubic structure, and fail to do so when icosahedral. Both approaches emphasize that the presence of subsurface carbon in the nanoparticles is necessary to enable the cap lift-off, making the nucleation of SWNTs possible.Elucidating the roles played by carbon solubility in catalyst nanoparticles is required to better understand the growth mechanisms of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Here, we highlight that controlling the level of dissolved carbon is of key importance to enable nucleation and growth. We first performed tight binding based atomistic computer simulations to study carbon incorporation in metal nanoparticles with low solubilities. For such metals, carbon incorporation strongly depends on their structures (face centered cubic or icosahedral), leading to different amounts of carbon close to the nanoparticle surface. Following this idea, we then show experimentally that Au nanoparticles effectively catalyze SWNT growth when in a face centered cubic structure, and fail to do so when icosahedral. Both approaches emphasize that the presence of subsurface carbon in the nanoparticles is necessary to enable the cap lift-off, making the nucleation of SWNTs possible. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06045a

  9. Controlling nonequilibrium phonon populations in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Mathias; Qian, Huihong; Hartschuh, Achim; Meixner, Alfred Johann

    2007-08-01

    We studied spatially isolated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) immobilized in a quasi-planar optical lambda/2-microresonator using confocal microscopy and spectroscopy. The modified photonic mode density within the resonator is used to selectively enhance or inhibit different Raman transitions of SWNTs. Experimental spectra are presented that exhibit single Raman bands only. Calculations of the relative change in the Raman scattering cross sections underline the potential of our microresonator for the optical control of nonequilibrium phonon populations in SWNT. PMID:17629345

  10. Electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ural, Ant

    2006-10-01

    We first demonstrate efficient patterning of conductive and transparent single-walled carbon nanotube films by photo- and e-beam lithography and subsequent reactive ion etching in an ICP-RIE system. We then study the geometry dependent transport characteristics of the film patterned into four point probe structures. We find that resistivity is independent of film length, while increasing significantly when width and thickness of the film shrink. We explain this behavior by a geometrical argument. The ability to pattern the film could enable the integration of nanotube films into electronic devices; however, the strong resistivity scaling should be carefully taken into account when designing submicron devices.

  11. Characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes for environmental implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Agnihotri, S.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Adsorption capacities of N2 and various organic vapors (methyl-ethyl ketone (MEK), toluene, and cyclohexane) on select electric-arc and HiPco produced single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) were measured at 77 and 298 K, respectively. The amount of N2 adsorbed on a SWNT sample depended on the sample purity, methodology, and on the sample age. Adsorption capacities of organic vapors (100-1000 ppm vol) on SWNT in humid conditions were much higher than those for microporous activated carbons. These results established a foundation for additional studies related to potential environmental applications of SWNT. The MEK adsorption capacities of samples EA95 and CVD80 and mesoporous tire-derived activated carbon in humid conditions were lower than in dry conditions. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the AIChE Annual Meeting (Austin, TX 11/7-12/2004).

  12. Functionalization of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes with Carboxylic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Sriram; Britt, Phillip F.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Puretzky, Alex A.; Lance, Michael J.; Geohegan, David B.; Oak Ridge National Laboratory Collaboration

    2003-03-01

    The chemical functionalization of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is necessary to solubilize the materials and to assist in the dispersion of the bundles for a variety of applications. One approach has been to derivatize the pendant carboxyl groups that are formed in the oxidative purification of the SWNT. Unfortunately, these carboxyl groups are found in low concentrations because the purification conditions also leads to decarboxylation. Thus, methods were investigated to increase the concentration of carboxylic acids on SWNT by chemical oxidation with a variety of reagents including potassium permanganate, sulfuric acid/nitric acid, and sulfuric acid/hydrogen peroxide. The concentration of carboxylic acids was analyzed by FTIR, and the samples were characterized by TGA, Raman spectroscopy, SEM, and TEM. Surprisingly, many of the oxidative methods lead to the formation of amorphous carbon and little if any increase in carboxyl content of the SWNT.

  13. Storage of Hydrogen in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A. C.; Jones, K. M.; Bekkedahl, T. A.; Kiang, C. H.; Bethune, D. S.; Heben, M. J.

    1997-03-27

    Pores of molecular dimensions can adsorb large quantities of gases owing to the enhanced density of the adsorbed material inside the pores, a consequence of the attractive potential of the pore walls. Pederson and Broughton have suggested that carbon nanotubes, which have diameters of typically a few nanometres, should be able to draw up liquids by capillarity, and this effect has been seen for low-surface-tension liquids in large-diameter, multi-walled nanotubes. Here we show that a gas can condense to high density inside narrow, single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs). Temperature-programmed desorption spectroscopy shows that hydrogen will condense inside SWNTs under conditions that do not induce adsorption within a standard mesoporous activated carbon. The very high hydrogen uptake in these materials suggests that they might be effective as a hydrogen-storage material for fuel-cell electric vehicles.

  14. Single Wall Carbon Nano Tube Films and Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekumar, T. V.; Kumar, Satish; Ericson, Lars M.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2002-03-01

    Purified single wall carbon nano tubes (SWNTs) produced from the high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPCO) process have been dissolved /dispersed in oleum. These solutions /dispersions were optically homogeneous and have been used to form stand-alone SWNT films. The washed, dried, and heat-treated films are isotropic. The scanning electron micrographs of the film surface shows that the nanotube ropes (or fibrils) of about 20 nm diameters are arranged just like macroscopic fibers in a non-woven fabric. Polarized Raman spectroscopy of the SWNT film confirms the isotropic nature of these films. The films are being characterized for their thermal, mechanical as well electrical properties. Thin nano tube coatings, including optically transparent coatings, have also been made on a variety of substrates such as glass, polyethylene, polystyrene, polypropylene, silicon wafer, as well as stainless steel.

  15. Oxidative Process for Cutting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaver, Jonah

    2005-03-01

    Cut single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are needed for many applications. An efficient way to produce bulk amounts of cut SWNTs is a two step process consisting of sidewall damage and oxidative exploitation. In these experiments sidewall damage is introduced by ozonation in a perfluoropolyether (PFPE) while monitoring the degree of functionalization with in-situ Raman spectroscopy. Use of PFPE allows for a high degree of sidewall functionalization at room temperature, mainly in the form of epoxides. These damaged SWNTs are exposed to piranha (4:1 96%H2SO4:H2O2) for one hour and then quenched. The piranha exposed samples are then functionalized with alkyl groups and spin cast on mica for length analysis. The cut samples are found to have significantly shorter lengths while maintaining a relatively high carbon yield.

  16. Size engineering of metal nanoparticles to diameter-specified growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes with horizontal alignment on quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Ju; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Jeong, Goo-Hwan

    2012-03-01

    The electronic, physical and optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are governed by their diameter and chirality, and thus much research has been focused on controlling the diameter and chirality of SWNTs. To date, control of the catalyst particle size has been thought to be one of the most promising approaches to control the diameter or chirality of SWNTs owing to the correlation between catalyst particle size and tube diameter. In this study, we demonstrate the size engineering of catalytic nanoparticles for the controlled growth of diameter-specified and horizontally aligned SWNTs on quartz substrates. Uniformly sized iron nanoparticles derived from ferritin molecules were used as a catalyst, and their size was intentionally decreased via thermal heat treatment at 900 °C under atmospheric Ar ambient. ST-cut quartz wafers were used as growth substrates in order to elucidate the effect of the size of the nanoparticles on the tube diameter and the effect of catalyst size on the degree of parallel alignment on the quartz substrates. SWNTs grown by chemical vapor deposition using methane as feedstock exhibited a high degree of horizontal alignment when the particle density was low enough to produce individual SWNTs without bundling. Annealing for 60 min at 900 °C produced a reduction of nanoparticle diameter from 2.6 to 1.8 nm and a decrease in the mean tube diameter from 1.2 to 0.8 nm, respectively. Raman spectroscopy results corroborated the observation that prolonged heat treatment of nanoparticles yields thinner tubes with narrower size distributions. The results of this work suggest that straightforward thermal annealing can be a facile way to obtain uniform-sized SWNTs as well as catalytic nanoparticles.

  17. Phonon sidebands of photoluminescence in single wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guili; Liang, Qifeng; Jia, Yonglei; Dong, Jinming

    2010-01-01

    The multiphonon-assisted photoluminescence (PL) of the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been studied by solving the Schrödinger equation, showing a set of phonon sidebands, both the Stokes and anti-Stokes lines, which are induced by the longitudinal optical phonon and radial breathing mode phonon. All the calculated results are in a good agreement with the recent experimental PL spectra of the SWNTs [F. Plentz, H. B. Ribeiro, A. Jorio, M. S. Strano, and M. A. Pimenta, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 247401 (2005)] and J. Lefebvre and P. Finnie, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 167406 (2007)]. In addition, it is very interesting to find in the calculated PL several additional phonon sidebands with rather weak intensities, which are caused by the exciton's coupling with two kinds of phonons, and expected to be observed in future experiments.

  18. Single Wall Carbon Nanotube-polymer Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Landi, Brian J.; Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer solar cells has been conducted towards developing alternative lightweight, flexible devices for space power applications. Photovoltaic devices were constructed with regioregular poly(3-octylthiophene)-(P3OT) and purified, >95% w/w, laser-generated SWNTs. The P3OT composites were deposited on ITO-coated polyethylene terapthalate (PET) and I-V characterization was performed under simulated AM0 illumination. Fabricated devices for the 1.0% w/w SWNT-P3OT composites showed a photoresponse with an open-circuit voltage (V(sub oc)) of 0.98 V and a short-circuit current density (I(sub sc)) of 0.12 mA/sq cm. Optimization of carrier transport within these novel photovoltaic systems is proposed, specifically development of nanostructure-SWNT complexes to enhance exciton dissociation.

  19. Molecular Imaging with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hao; Gao, Ting; Cai, Weibo

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based molecular imaging has emerged as an interdisciplinary field which involves physics, chemistry, engineering, biology, and medicine. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have unique properties which make them suitable for applications in a variety of imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance, near-infrared fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, photoacoustic tomography, and radionuclide-based imaging. In this review, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of SWCNTs in molecular imaging applications. Multifunctionality is the key advantage of nanoparticles over traditional approaches. Targeting ligands, imaging labels, therapeutic drugs, and many other agents can all be integrated into the nanoparticle to allow for targeted molecular imaging and molecular therapy by encompassing many biological and biophysical barriers. A multifunctional, SWCNT-based nanoplatform holds great potential for clinical applications in the future. PMID:21754949

  20. Thermoelectric Power of Single-wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, H.; Sumanasekera, G. U.; Pradhan, B. K.; Eklund, P. C.

    2001-03-01

    The interpretation of the large thermoelectric power of single-wall carbon nanotubes still remains controversial. Large positive thermopowers S> 30 μ V/K (at T ~300 K) are observed in mats when the tubes are O_2-doped, and large negative thermopowers are found for mat samples degassed in a vacuum, i.e., \\vert S\\vert >30μ V/K (at T ~300 K). We present an overview of the models reported to explain this anomalous data, including one in which an impurity band near the Fermi energy is responsible for the anomalous thermopower. New experimental studies of the effect of uniaxial pressure on both thermopower (S) and resistivity (ρ) will be presented and discussed in terms of these models. This work was supported by ONR (ONR # N00014-99-1-0619).

  1. Thermally induced nonlinear vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Heeyuen; Cannon, James J.; Shiga, Takuma; Shiomi, Junichiro; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2015-07-01

    The thermally induced nonlinear vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was investigated, focusing on the peak broadening and/or multiple peaks of the frequency spectra. From Poincaré maps of SWNT tip trajectories, we observed two distinguishable patterns of vibration: planar and nonplanar (whirling) motion which appeared repeatedly. The alternation of the pattern is sometimes accompanied by a change of rotational direction. Proposed approximate solutions of nonlinear beam equations can reproduce well the alternation of the patterns for both cantilevered and suspended SWNTs. By using this analytical approach, we have found that multiple peaks of experimentally observed frequency spectra are due to the repeated and sudden alternations of two modes, induced by nonlinear effects.

  2. Generalizing thermodynamic properties of bulk single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Kenneth R. Nanney, Warren A.; Maddux, Cassandra J.A.; Martínez, Hernán L.; Malone, Marvin A.; Coe, James V.

    2014-12-15

    The enthalpy and Gibbs free energy thermodynamical potentials of single walled carbon nanotubes were studied of all types (armchairs, zig-zags, chirals (n>m), and chiral (n

  3. Radiation Protection Using Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M.; Lu, Meng; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca; Leonard, Ashley; Doyle, Condell Dewayne; Kosynkin, Dimitry V.; Price, Brandi Katherine

    2011-01-01

    This invention is a means of radiation protection, or cellular oxidative stress mitigation, via a sequence of quenching radical species using nano-engineered scaffolds, specifically single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and their derivatives. The material can be used as a means of radiation protection by reducing the number of free radicals within, or nearby, organelles, cells, tissue, organs, or living organisms, thereby reducing the risk of damage to DNA and other cellular components (i.e., RNA, mitochondria, membranes, etc.) that can lead to chronic and/or acute pathologies, including but not limited to cancer, cardiovascular disease, immuno-suppression, and disorders of the central nervous system. In addition, this innovation could be used as a prophylactic or antidote for accidental radiation exposure, during high-altitude or space travel where exposure to radiation is anticipated, or to protect from exposure from deliberate terrorist or wartime use of radiation- containing weapons.

  4. Generalizing thermodynamic properties of bulk single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Kenneth R.; Nanney, Warren A.; A. Maddux, Cassandra J.; Martnez, Hernn L.

    2014-01-01

    The enthalpy and Gibbs free energy thermodynamical potentials of single walled carbon nanotubes were studied of all types (armchairs, zig-zags, chirals (n>m), and chiral (n

  5. Growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes on silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hideto; Uchiyama, Tetsuya; Kikkawa, Jun; Takeda, Seiji

    2007-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been grown on silicon nanowires (SiNWs) by ethanol chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with Co catalysts. We have found that a surface SiO x layer of SiNWs is necessary for the formation of active Co catalysts. In fact, the yield of the SWNT/SiNW heterojunctions gradually decreases as the thickness of the surface SiO x layer decreases. Since thin SiNWs are transparent to an electron beam, the Co nanoparticles on SiNWs can be easily observed as well as SWNTs by TEM. Therefore, the relationship between the diameters of each SWNT and its catalyst nanoparticle has been investigated. The diameters of SWNTs are equal to or slightly smaller than those of the catalyst nanoparticles.

  6. Extracellular entrapment and degradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrera, Consol; Bhattacharya, Kunal; Lazzaretto, Beatrice; Andón, Fernando T.; Hultenby, Kjell; Kotchey, Gregg P.; Star, Alexander; Fadeel, Bengt

    2014-05-01

    Neutrophils extrude neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) consisting of a network of chromatin decorated with antimicrobial proteins to enable non-phagocytic killing of microorganisms. Here, utilizing a model of ex vivo activated human neutrophils, we present evidence of entrapment and degradation of carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in NETs. The degradation of SWCNTs was catalyzed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) present in purified NETs and the reaction was facilitated by the addition of H2O2 and NaBr. These results show that SWCNTs can undergo acellular, MPO-mediated biodegradation and imply that the immune system may deploy similar strategies to rid the body of offending microorganisms and engineered nanomaterials.Neutrophils extrude neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) consisting of a network of chromatin decorated with antimicrobial proteins to enable non-phagocytic killing of microorganisms. Here, utilizing a model of ex vivo activated human neutrophils, we present evidence of entrapment and degradation of carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in NETs. The degradation of SWCNTs was catalyzed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) present in purified NETs and the reaction was facilitated by the addition of H2O2 and NaBr. These results show that SWCNTs can undergo acellular, MPO-mediated biodegradation and imply that the immune system may deploy similar strategies to rid the body of offending microorganisms and engineered nanomaterials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Suppl. Fig. 1 - length distribution of SWCNTs; suppl. Fig. 2 - characterization of pristine vs. oxidized SWCNTs; suppl. Fig. 3 - endotoxin evaluation; suppl. Fig. 4 - NET characterization; suppl. Fig. 5 - UV-Vis/NIR analysis of biodegradation of oxidized SWCNTs; suppl. Fig. 6 - cytotoxicity of partially degraded SWCNTs. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06047k

  7. Investigation of covalent functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes using surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Alattar, Nebras; Al-Majmaie, Rasoul; Kopf, Ilona; Giordani, Silvia; Rice, James H.

    2012-06-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERs) of functionalization HiPco single wall carbon nanotubes are performed. SWCNTs with covalently bonded amine groups were investigated using SERs assessing the impact of altering the electronic arrangement of the nanotube surface. The Raman frequencies of tangential, disorder modes and radial breathing modes have been used to make comparison between SWCNTs conjugated with Fluoresceinamine. Excitation of nanotube samples at wavelengths in resonance with both metallic and semiconductor nanotubes was undertaken.

  8. Growth and characterization of high-density mats of single-walled carbon nanotubes for interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.; Zhong, G.; Telg, H.; Thomsen, C.; Warner, J. H.; Briggs, G. A. D.; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Roth, S.

    2008-10-20

    We grow high-density, aligned single wall carbon nanotube mats for use as interconnects in integrated circuits by remote plasma chemical vapor deposition from a Fe-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film catalyst. We carry out extensive Raman characterization of the resulting mats, and find that this catalyst system gives rise to a broad range of nanotube diameters, with no preferential selectivity of semiconducting tubes, but with at least 1/3 of metallic tubes.

  9. AC Power Consumption of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Interconnects: Non-Equilibrium Green's Function Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Sasaoka, Kenji; Watanabe, Satoshi

    2012-04-01

    We theoretically investigate the emittance and dynamic dissipation of a nanoscale interconnect consisting of a metallic single-walled carbon nanotube using the non-equilibrium Green's function technique for AC electronic transport. We show that the emittance and dynamic dissipation depend strongly on the contact conditions of the interconnect and that the power consumption can be reduced by adjusting the contact conditions. We propose an appropriate condition of contact that yields a high power factor and low apparent power.

  10. Fast electron beam-plasma interaction in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2013-04-01

    A theoretical study on the plasmon-polariton modes coupled with a fast electron beam inside a metallic single-walled carbon nanotube is presented. The Maxwell's equations coupled with a linearized hydrodynamic model for the nanotube's charge oscillations are used. By considering the electron beam effects, general expression of dispersion relation of electromagnetic modes on nanotube's surface is obtained. It is shown numerically that by considering the electron beam effects, the polariton frequency shifts to lower values.

  11. Dispersionless propagation of electron wavepackets in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosati, Roberto; Rossi, Fausto; Dolcini, Fabrizio

    2015-06-15

    We investigate the propagation of electron wavepackets in single-walled carbon nanotubes via a Lindblad-based density-matrix approach that enables us to account for both dissipation and decoherence effects induced by various phonon modes. We show that, while in semiconducting nanotubes the wavepacket experiences the typical dispersion of conventional materials, in metallic nanotubes its shape remains essentially unaltered, even in the presence of the electron-phonon coupling, up to micron distances at room temperature.

  12. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Anodes for Lithium Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Raffaelle, Ryne; Gennett, Tom; Kumta, Prashant; Maranchi, Jeff; Heben, Mike

    2006-01-01

    In recent experiments, highly purified batches of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have shown promise as superior alternatives to the graphitic carbon-black anode materials heretofore used in rechargeable thin-film lithium power cells. The basic idea underlying the experiments is that relative to a given mass of graphitic carbon-black anode material, an equal mass of SWCNTs can be expected to have greater lithium-storage and charge/discharge capacities. The reason for this expectation is that whereas the microstructure and nanostructure of a graphitic carbon black is such as to make most of the interior of the material inaccessible for intercalation of lithium, a batch of SWCNTs can be made to have a much more open microstructure and nanostructure, such that most of the interior of the material is accessible for intercalation of lithium. Moreover, the greater accessibility of SWCNT structures can be expected to translate to greater mobilities for ion-exchange processes and, hence, an ability to sustain greater charge and discharge current densities.

  13. Ab initio simulations of doped single-walled carbon nanotube sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talla, Jamal A.

    2012-01-01

    The interactions between oxygen and nitrogen atoms with single-walled carbon nanotubes were investigated for nanotubes with two different geometrical configurations using first-principle calculations within the framework of the density functional theory. We introduced a new type of toxic gas sensor that can detect the presence of H 2, Cl 2, CO, and NO molecules. We also demonstrated that the sensitivity of this device can be controlled by the concentration of the dopants on the surface of the nanotube. In addition, the transport properties of the doped nanotube were studied for different concentrations of oxygen or nitrogen atoms that were randomly distributed on the surface of the single-walled carbon nanotube. We observed that small amounts of dopants can modify the electronic and transport properties of the nanotube and can lend metallic properties to the nanotube. Band-gap narrowing occurs when the nanotube is doped with either oxygen or nitrogen atoms.

  14. Controlled Patterning and Growth of Single Wall and Multi-wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Method and system for producing a selected pattern or array of at least one of a single wall nanotube and/or a multi-wall nanotube containing primarily carbon. A substrate is coated with a first layer (optional) of a first selected metal (e.g., Al and/or Ir) and with a second layer of a catalyst (e.g., Fe, Co, Ni and/or Mo), having selected first and second layer thicknesses provided by ion sputtering, arc discharge, laser ablation, evaporation or CVD. The first layer and/or the second layer may be formed in a desired non-uniform pattern, using a mask with suitable aperture(s), to promote growth of carbon nanotubes in a corresponding pattern. A selected heated feed gas (primarily CH4 or C2Hn with n=2 and/or 4) is passed over the coated substrate and forms primarily single wall nanotubes or multiple wall nanotubes, depending upon the selected feed gas and its temperature. Nanofibers, as well as single wall and multi-wall nanotubes, are produced using plasma-aided growth from the second (catalyst) layer. An overcoating of a selected metal or alloy can be deposited, over the second layer, to provide a coating for the carbon nanotubes grown in this manner.

  15. Phototransformation-Induced Aggregation of Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: The Importance of Amorphous Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with proper functionalization are desirable for applications that require dispersion in aqueous and biological environments, and functionalized SWCNTs also serve as building blocks for conjugation with specific molecules in these applicatio...

  16. Potassium-Decorated, Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, A. M.; Richter, E.; Menon, M.; Subbaswamy, K. R.; Eklund, P. C.; Thess, A.; Smalley, R. E.

    1997-03-01

    Crystalline ropes of single-wall carbon nanotubes have been reacted in sealed glass tubes with potassium vapor and Raman scattering has been used to monitor the vibrational modes as a function of reaction time. An overall broadening and downshifting of the Raman bands is observed. For example, huge downshifts (40 cm-1) in the high frequency tangential modes observed near 1593 cm-1 in the pristine tubes are detected. These downshifts are attributed to significant charge transfer of K 4s electrons into antibonding pz states of the nanotube which should expand the tube diameter and soften the lattice. Presumably, the potassium ions are chemisorbed onto the walls of the nanotubes, rather than inside the nanotube, although no structural information to support this model has yet been collected. Theoretical results on electron doped armchair symmetry nanotubes using the Generalized Tight Binding Molecular Dynamics model will also be presented to help explain experimental results. The Kentucky group was supported by the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and NSF Grant No. OSR-94-52895 and DOE Contract No. DE-F22-90PC90029. The work at Rice was supported by the Office of Naval Research Contract N0014-91-J1794.

  17. On the Stability and Abundance of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Hedman, Daniel; Reza Barzegar, Hamid; Rosén, Arne; Wågberg, Thomas; Andreas Larsson, J.

    2015-01-01

    Many nanotechnological applications, using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), are only possible with a uniform product. Thus, direct control over the product during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of SWNT is desirable, and much effort has been made towards the ultimate goal of chirality-controlled growth of SWNTs. We have used density functional theory (DFT) to compute the stability of SWNT fragments of all chiralities in the series representing the targeted products for such applications, which we compare to the chiralities of the actual CVD products from all properly analyzed experiments. From this comparison we find that in 84% of the cases the experimental product represents chiralities among the most stable SWNT fragments (within 0.2 eV) from the computations. Our analysis shows that the diameter of the SWNT product is governed by the well-known relation to size of the catalytic nanoparticles, and the specific chirality is normally determined by the product’s relative stability, suggesting thermodynamic control at the early stage of product formation. Based on our findings, we discuss the effect of other experimental parameters on the chirality of the product. Furthermore, we highlight the possibility to produce any tube chirality in the context of recent published work on seeded-controlled growth. PMID:26581125

  18. Interaction between alkyl radicals and single wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Denis, Pablo A

    2012-06-30

    The addition of primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl radicals to single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was studied by means of dispersion corrected density functional theory. The PBE, B97-D, M06-L, and M06-2X functionals were used. Consideration of Van der Waals interactions is essential to obtain accurate addition energies. In effect, the enthalpy changes at 298 K, for the addition of methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, and tert-butyl radicals onto a (5,5) SWCNT are: -25.7, -25.1, -22.4, and -16.6 kcal/mol, at the M06-2X level, respectively, whereas at PBE/6-31G* level they are significantly lower: -25.0, -19.0, -16.7, and -5.0 kcal/mol respectively. Although the binding energies are small, the attached alkyl radicals are expected to be stable because of the large desorption barriers. The importance of nonbonded interactions was more noticeable as we moved from primary to tertiary alkyl radicals. Indeed, for the tert-butyl radical, physisorption onto the (11,0) SWCNT is preferred rather than chemisorption. The bond dissociation energies determined for alkyl radicals and SWCNT follow the trend suggested by the consideration of radical stabilization energies. However, they are in disagreement with some degrees of functionalization observed in recent experiments. This discrepancy would stem from the fact that for some HiPco nanotubes, nonbonded interactions with alkyl radicals are stronger than covalent bonds. PMID:22522651

  19. Curvature effect of vacancies in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, GuiXiao; Pan, Fei; Bao, JinXiao; Song, XiWen; Zhang, YongFan

    2015-03-01

    Defect curvature was developed based on our previous proposed direction curvature theory. Defect curvature, as a universal criterion, was used to identify reactivities of mono- and di-vacancies in single-walled carbon nanotubes. Calculated results at B3LYP/6-31G* level showed that, regardless of mono- and di-vacancies, vacancy formation energies Ef decreased with increasing defect curvature KV1 (for mono-vacancies) or KV2 (for di-vacancies). Each defect model of mono-vacancies had two types of structural products. However, each defect model of di-vacancies was only corresponding to one structural product. In mono- or di-vacancies, large included angles between new formed C-C bonds (for mono-vacancies) or the linked C-C bonds of the 5-ring and 8-ring (for di-vacancies) and the tubular axis were corresponding to short C-C bonds and small Ef. These product structures for di-vacancies were related to the magnitude of KV2.

  20. On the Stability and Abundance of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedman, Daniel; Reza Barzegar, Hamid; Rosén, Arne; Wågberg, Thomas; Andreas Larsson, J.

    2015-11-01

    Many nanotechnological applications, using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), are only possible with a uniform product. Thus, direct control over the product during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of SWNT is desirable, and much effort has been made towards the ultimate goal of chirality-controlled growth of SWNTs. We have used density functional theory (DFT) to compute the stability of SWNT fragments of all chiralities in the series representing the targeted products for such applications, which we compare to the chiralities of the actual CVD products from all properly analyzed experiments. From this comparison we find that in 84% of the cases the experimental product represents chiralities among the most stable SWNT fragments (within 0.2 eV) from the computations. Our analysis shows that the diameter of the SWNT product is governed by the well-known relation to size of the catalytic nanoparticles, and the specific chirality is normally determined by the product’s relative stability, suggesting thermodynamic control at the early stage of product formation. Based on our findings, we discuss the effect of other experimental parameters on the chirality of the product. Furthermore, we highlight the possibility to produce any tube chirality in the context of recent published work on seeded-controlled growth.

  1. Observation and Modeling of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Bend Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Anantram, M. P.; Jaffe, R. L.; Kong, J.; Dai, H.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bends, with diameters from approx. 1.0 to 2.5 nm and bend angles from 18 deg. to 34 deg., are observed in catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons at 600 - 1200 C. An algorithm using molecular dynamics simulation (MD) techniques is developed to model these structures that are considered to be SWNT junctions formed by topological defects (i.e. pentagon-heptagon pairs). The algorithm is used to predict the tube helicities and defect configurations for bend junctions using the observed tube diameters and bend angles. The number and arrangement of the defects at the junction interfaces are found to depend on the tube helicities and bend angle. The structural and energetic calculations using the Brenner potential show a number of stable junction configurations for each bend angle with the 34 deg. bends being more stable than the others. Tight binding calculations for local density of state (LDOS) and transmission coefficients are carried out to investigate electrical properties of the bend junctions.

  2. Bulk Mechanical Properties of Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giarra, Matthew; Landi, Brian; Cress, Cory; Raffaelle, Ryne

    2007-03-01

    The unique properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) make them especially well suited for use as electrodes in power devices such as lithium ion batteries, hydrogen fuel cells, solar cells, and supercapacitors. The performances of such devices are expected to be influenced, at least in part, by the mechanical properties of the SWNTs used in composites or in stand alone ``papers.'' Therefore, the elastic moduli and ultimate tensile strengths of SWNT papers were measured as functions of temperature, SWNT purity, SWNT length, and SWNT bundling. The SWNTs used to produce the papers were synthesized in an alexandrite laser vaporization reactor at 1100^oC and purified using conventional acid-reflux conditions. Characterization of the SWNTs was performed using SEM, BET, TGA, and optical and Raman spectroscopy. The purified material was filtered and dried to yield papers of bundled SWNTs which were analyzed using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). It was observed that the mechanical properties of acid-refluxed SWNT papers were significantly improved by controlled thermal oxidation and strain-hardening. Elastic moduli of SWNT papers were measured between 3 and 6 GPa. Ultimate (breaking) tensile stresses were measured between 45 and 90 MPa at 1-3% strain. These results and their implications in regard to potential applications in power devices will be discussed.

  3. Coarse-grained potentials of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junhua; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Wang, Lifeng; Guo, Wanlin; Rabczuk, Timon

    2014-11-01

    We develop the coarse-grained (CG) potentials of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in CNT bundles and buckypaper for the study of the static and dynamic behaviors. The explicit expressions of the CG stretching, bending and torsion potentials for the nanotubes are obtained by the stick-spiral and the beam models, respectively. The non-bonded CG potentials between two different CG beads are derived from analytical results based on the cohesive energy between two parallel and crossing SWCNTs from the van der Waals interactions. We show that the CG model is applicable to large deformations of complex CNT systems by combining the bonded potentials with non-bonded potentials. Checking against full atom molecular dynamics calculations and our analytical results shows that the present CG potentials have high accuracy. The established CG potentials are used to study the mechanical properties of the CNT bundles and buckypaper efficiently at minor computational cost, which shows great potential for the design of micro- and nanomechanical devices and systems.

  4. Reinforced Thermoplastic Polyimide with Dispersed Functionalized Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.; Gaier, James R.; Sola, Francisco; Scheiman, Daniel A.; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular pi-complexes were formed from pristine HiPCO single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and 1-pyrene- N-(4- N'-(5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxyimido)phenyl butanamide, 1. Polyimide films were prepared with these complexes as well as uncomplexed SWCNTs and the effects of nanoadditive addition on mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of these films were evaluated. Although these properties were enhanced by both nanoadditives, larger increases in tensile strength and thermal and electrical conductivities were obtained when the SWCNT/1 complexes were used. At a loading level of 5.5 wt %, the Tg of the polyimide increased from 169 to 197 C and the storage modulus increased 20-fold (from 142 to 3045 MPa). The addition of 3.5 wt % SWCNT/1 complexes increased the tensile strength of the polyimide from 61.4 to 129 MPa; higher loading levels led to embrittlement and lower tensile strengths. The electrical conductivities (DC surface) of the polyimides increased to 1 x 10(exp -4) Scm(exp -1) (SWCNT/1 complexes loading level of 9 wt %). Details of the preparation of these complexes and their effects on polyimide film properties are discussed.

  5. Oxygen-Assisted Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, O.; Rajapakse, Arith; Collins, Philip

    2013-03-01

    Water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has become a standard synthesis method for high quality single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Some drawbacks of the water-assisted method, however, include good control of water concentrations in the feedstock and poor control of SWCNT diameters below 2.0 nm. Here, we describe a variation of water-assisted CVD that uses dry feedstocks with a small, controlled quantity of molecular oxygen. Reactions of oxygen with hydrogen in the reaction zone provide all the benefits of water-assisted growth at the substrate while maintaining dry valves and flowmeters. In addition, the oxygen-based technique allows water concentrations in the system to be varied precisely and with short time constants. Perhaps because of the improved control, we find that the SWCNT diameter can be easily tuned by changing the oxygen concentration during the growth phase. Changing the oxygen concentration over the range of 0.5% to 1% varied the resulting SWCNT diameters from 1.5 to 0.5 nm, with typical diameter distributions less than +/- 30%. Control of SWCNT growth within this diameter range is ideal for probing opto-electronic properties of individual SWCNTs and SWCNT devices.

  6. Ultrathin single-walled carbon nanotube network framed graphene hybrids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Hong, Tu; Xu, Ya-Qiong

    2015-03-11

    Graphene and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have shown superior potential in electronics and optoelectronics because of their excellent thermal, mechanical, electronic, and optical properties. Here, a simple method is developed to synthesize ultrathin SWNT-graphene films through chemical vapor deposition. These novel two-dimensional hybrids show enhanced mechanical strength that allows them to float on water without polymer supporting layers. Characterizations by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicate that SWNTs can interlace as a concrete backbone for the subsequent growth of monolayer graphene. Optical and electrical transport measurements further show that SWNT-graphene hybrids inherit high optical transparency and superior electrical conductivity from monolayer graphene. We also explore the local optoelectronic properties of SWNT-graphene hybrids through spatially resolved photocurrent microscopy and find that the interactions between SWNTs and graphene can induce a strong photocurrent response in the areas where SWNTs link different graphene domains together. These fundamental studies may open a door for engineering optoelectronic properties of SWNT-graphene hybrids by controlling the morphologies of the SWNT frames. PMID:25686199

  7. Hypergolic fuel detection using individual single walled carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, S. C.; Willitsford, A. H.; Sumanasekera, G. U.; Yu, M.; Tian, W. Q.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2010-06-01

    Accurate and reliable detection of hypergolic fuels such as hydrazine (N2H4) and its derivatives is vital to missile defense, aviation, homeland security, and the chemical industry. More importantly these sensors need to be capable of operation at low temperatures (below room temperature) as most of the widely used chemical sensors operate at high temperatures (above 300 °C). In this research a simple and highly sensitive single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network sensor was developed for real time monitoring of hydrazine leaks to concentrations at parts per million levels. Upon exposure to hydrazine vapor, the resistance of the air exposed nanotubes (p-type) is observed to increase rapidly while that of the vacuum-degassed nanotubes (n-type) is observed to decrease. It was found that the resistance of the sample can be recovered through vacuum pumping and exposure to ultraviolet light. The experimental results support the electrochemical charge transfer mechanism between the oxygen redox couple of the ambient and the Fermi level of the SWNT. Theoretical results of the hydrazine-SWNT interaction are compared with the experimental observations. It was found that a monolayer of water molecules on the SWNT is necessary to induce strong interactions between hydrazine and the SWNT by way of introducing new occupied states near the bottom of the conduction band of the SWNT.

  8. Tuning Thermoelectric Properties of Chirality Selected Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Oshima, Yuki; Kitamura, Yoshimasa; Maniwa, Yutaka

    Thermoelectrics are a very important technology for efficiently converting waste heat into electric power. Hicks and Dresselhaus proposed an important approach to innovate the performance of thermoelectric devices, which involves using one-dimensional materials and properly tuning their Fermi level (PRB 1993). Therefore, understanding the relationship between the thermoelectric performance and the Fermi level of one-dimensional materials is of great importance to maximize their thermoelectric performance. Single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is an ideal model for one-dimensional materials. Previously we reported continuous p-type and n-type control over the Seebeck coefficients of semiconducting SWCNT networks with diameter of 1.4 nm through an electric double layer transistor setup using an ionic liquid as the electrolyte (Yanagi et al., Nano Lett. 14, 6437 2014). We clarified the thermoelectric properties of semiconducting SWCNTs with diameter of 1.4 nm as a function of Fermi level. In this study, we investigated how the chiralities or electronic structures of SWCNTs influence on the thermoelectric properties. We found the significant difference in the line-shape of Seebeck coefficient as a function of gate voltage between the different electronic structures of SWCNTs.

  9. Concentration of lysozyme/single-walled carbon nanotube dispersions.

    PubMed

    Horn, Daniel W; Davis, Virginia A

    2016-03-01

    The dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) in aqueous solutions of biological materials enables the production of bulk films and fibers that combine natural biological activity with SWNT's intrinsic mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties. In this work, we report the rheology and phase behavior of concentrated lysozyme (LSZ)/SWNT dispersions. Even at low concentration, the LSZ's globular structure causes a deviation from the rheological behavior expected of rigid rods such as SWNT. With increasing concentration, stabilized SWNT typically form lyotropic liquid crystalline phases. However, in this case, the LSZ results in depletion attraction and the formation of large dense SWNT aggregates surrounded by a LSZ network. At intermediate concentrations, the microstructure and rheological properties are a complex function of the initial dispersion state, the absolute concentrations, and the LSZ to SWNT ratio. The rheological effects of concentrating mixtures comprised of aggregates, a range of bundle sizes, and individual SWNT were compared to the effects of concentrating supernatants comprised solely of individual SWNT and small bundles. In general, lysozyme concentration has the greatest impact on dispersion viscoelasticity. However, the inherent viscosity was a function of SWNT concentration; data from both initial mixtures and supernatants spanning two orders of magnitude in concentration could be collapsed onto a single master curve. This work provides a foundation for exploring the behavior of other globular protein-SWNT dispersions. PMID:26722820

  10. Optimization of Xe adsorption kinetics in single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, A.; Yates, J. T.; Simonyan, V. V.; Johnson, J. K.; Huffman, C. B.; Smalley, R. E.

    2001-10-01

    Closed end (10, 10) single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been opened by oxidation at their ends and at wall defect sites, using ozone. Oxidation with ozone, followed by heating to 973 K to liberate CO and CO2, causes etching of the nanotube surface at carbon atom vacancy defect sites. The rate of adsorption of Xe has been carefully measured as a function of the degree of nanotube etching by ozone. It is found that a level of etching corresponding to wall openings of about 5-7 Å radius is optimal for maximizing the rate of Xe adsorption. Beyond this level of etching, the rate of Xe adsorption decreases as the surface area of the SWNTs decreases due to further carbon atom removal. Both experiment and modeling show that the presence of polar oxidized groups, such as -COOH or -COR groups, with dipole moments in the range 1.5-3.0 D at the perimeter of the defect sites, causes a retardation of the rate of Xe adsorption due to dipole-induced dipole interactions. This effect is larger for smaller radius defect sites and decreases as the defect sites increase in size beyond about 7 Å radius. At large defect radii, the energetic profile of the adsorption pathway controls the physisorption rate. Modeling shows that after Xe adsorption has been completed inside the nanotubes, then Xe clusters begin to form on the outer surface of the nanotubes at the defect sites where polar groups are present. The Xe clustering effect also occurs to a smaller degree when the defect sites are not decorated by polar groups. The experiments and modeling demonstrate how one may optimize the rate of adsorption of a gas into nanotubes by the adjustment of the size and polar character of the vacancy-site entry ports in the walls of the nanotubes.

  11. Single-walled carbon nanotube-induced mitotic disruption⋆

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, L.M.; Hubbs, A.F.; Young, S.-H.; Kashon, M.L.; Dinu, C.Z.; Salisbury, J.L.; Benkovic, S.A.; Lowry, D.T.; Murray, A.R.; Kisin, E.R.; Siegrist, K.J.; Battelli, L.; Mastovich, J.; Sturgeon, J.L.; Bunker, K.L.; Shvedova, A.A.; Reynolds, S.H.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were among the earliest products of nanotechnology and have many potential applications in medicine, electronics, and manufacturing. The low density, small size, and biological persistence of carbon nanotubes create challenges for exposure control and monitoring and make respiratory exposures to workers likely. We have previously shown mitotic spindle aberrations in cultured primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells exposed to 24, 48 and 96 μg/cm2 single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). To investigate mitotic spindle aberrations at concentrations anticipated in exposed workers, primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells were exposed to SWCNT for 24–72 h at doses equivalent to 20 weeks of exposure at the Permissible Exposure Limit for particulates not otherwise regulated. We have now demonstrated fragmented centrosomes, disrupted mitotic spindles and aneuploid chromosome number at those doses. The data further demonstrated multipolar mitotic spindles comprised 95% of the disrupted mitoses. The increased multipolar mitotic spindles were associated with an increased number of cells in the G2 phase of mitosis, indicating a mitotic checkpoint response. Nanotubes were observed in association with mitotic spindle microtubules, the centrosomes and condensed chromatin in cells exposed to 0.024, 0.24, 2.4 and 24 μg/cm2 SWCNT. Three-dimensional reconstructions showed carbon nanotubes within the centrosome structure. The lower doses did not cause cytotoxicity or reduction in colony formation after 24 h; however, after three days, significant cytotoxicity was observed in the SWCNT-exposed cells. Colony formation assays showed an increased proliferation seven days after exposure. Our results show significant disruption of the mitotic spindle by SWCNT at occupationally relevant doses. The increased proliferation that was observed in carbon nanotube-exposed cells indicates a greater potential to pass the genetic damage to daughter cells. Disruption of the centrosome is common in many solid tumors including lung cancer. The resulting aneuploidy is an early event in the progression of many cancers, suggesting that it may play a role in both tumorigenesis and tumor progression. These results suggest caution should be used in the handling and processing of carbon nanotubes. PMID:22178868

  12. Effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on soil microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Chung, H.; Son, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are novel materials that have the potential to be used in various commercial fields due to their unique physicochemical properties. As a result of commercial development of nanotechnology, SWCNTs may be discharged to the soil environment with unknown consequences. However, there are as yet no data in the scientific literature that demonstrate the effects of SWCNTs on microbial function in soils. Therefore, we aimed to determine the effects of SWCNTs on soil microbial activity through a 2-week incubation study on urban soils supplemented with different concentrations of SWCNTs ranging from 0 to 1000 μg CNT/g soil. Fluorometric test using fluorogenic substrates were employed for the measurement of several enzyme activities in soil samples. More specifically, we determined the changes in the activities of cellobiohydrolase, β-1,4-glucosidase, β-1,4-xylosidase, β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase, L-leucine aminopeptidase and acid phosphatase which play important roles in the carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles in response to the addition of SWCNTs. We found that microbial enzyme activities decreased as the concentrations of SWCNT added increased. The lowest enzyme activities were observed under 1000 μg CNT/g soil. The overall pattern shows that enzyme activities decreased slightly in the first 2-3 days and increased in the later stage of the incubation. Our results suggest that relatively high concentrations of SWCNTs can inhibit microbial activities, and this may be due to microbial cell membrane damage caused by SWCNTs. However, further study needs to be conducted to determine the mechanism responsible for inhibitory effect of SWCNTs on soil microbial activity. It can be concluded that changes in the activities of extracellular enzymes can indicate the effect of SWCNTs on soil microorganisms and nutrient cycling.

  13. Radiation effects in single-walled carbon nanotube papers

    SciTech Connect

    Cress, Cory D.; Messenger, Scott R.; Walters, Robert J.; Schauerman, Christopher M.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.

    2010-01-15

    The effects of ionizing radiation on the temperature-dependent conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) papers have been investigated in situ in a high vacuum environment. Irradiation of the SWCNT papers with 4.2 MeV alpha particles results in a steady decrease in the SWCNT paper conductivity, resulting in a 25% reduction in room temperature conductivity after a fluence of 3x10{sup 12} alpha particles/cm{sup 2}. The radiation-induced temperature-dependent conductivity modification indicates that radiation damage causes an increase in the effective activation barrier for tunneling-like conductivity and a concomitant increase in wavefunction localization of charge carriers within individual SWCNTs. The spatial defect generation within the SWCNT paper was modeled and confirms that a uniform displacement damage dose was imparted to the paper. This allows the damage coefficient (i.e., differential change in conductivity with fluence) for alpha particles, carbon ions, and protons to be compared with the corresponding nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) of the incident particle. The resulting nonlinear relationship with NIEL between these parameters is distinct from the more typical linear response observed in many bulk semiconductors and superconductors and indicates that localized radiation damage in the SWCNT papers has a greater impact than distributed damage. Although SWCNT papers behave largely as a bulk material with properties that are a convolution of the underlying SWCNT distribution, the radiation response appears to be largely dominated by degradation in the preferred one-dimensional conduction within these two-dimensionally confined nanostructures.

  14. Elastomer Filled With Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Files, Bradley S.; Forest, Craig R.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments have shown that composites of a silicone elastomer with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are significantly stronger and stiffer than is the unfilled elastomer. The large strengthening and stiffening effect observed in these experiments stands in contrast to the much smaller strengthening effect observed in related prior efforts to reinforce epoxies with SWNTs and to reinforce a variety of polymers with multiple-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). The relative largeness of the effect in the case of the silicone-elastomer/SWNT composites appears to be attributable to (1) a better match between the ductility of the fibers and the elasticity of the matrix and (2) the greater tensile strengths of SWNTs, relative to MWNTs. For the experiments, several composites were formulated by mixing various proportions of SWNTs and other filling materials into uncured RTV-560, which is a silicone adhesive commonly used in aerospace applications. Specimens of a standard "dog-bone" size and shape for tensile testing were made by casting the uncured elastomer/filler mixtures into molds, curing the elastomer, then pressing the specimens from a "cookie-cutter" die. The results of tensile tests of the specimens showed that small percentages of SWNT filler led to large increases in stiffness and tensile strength, and that these increases were greater than those afforded by other fillers. For example, the incorporation of SWNTs in a proportion of 1 percent increased the tensile strength by 44 percent and the modulus of elasticity (see figure) by 75 percent. However, the relative magnitudes of the increases decreased with increasing nanotube percentages because more nanotubes made the elastomer/nanotube composites more brittle. At an SWNT content of 10 percent, the tensile strength and modulus of elasticity were 125 percent and 562 percent, respectively, greater than the corresponding values for the unfilled elastomer.

  15. Electronic Durability of Flexible Transparent Films from Type-Specific Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J; Iyer, S; Bernhardt, A; Huh, JY; Hudson, S; Fagan, J; Hobbie, E.

    2011-12-11

    The coupling between mechanical flexibility and electronic performance is evaluated for thin films of metallic and semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) deposited on compliant supports. Percolated networks of type-purified SWCNTs are assembled as thin conducting coatings on elastic polymer substrates, and the sheet resistance is measured as a function of compression and cyclic strain through impedance spectroscopy. The wrinkling topography, microstructure and transparency of the films are independently characterized using optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and optical absorption spectroscopy. Thin films made from metallic SWCNTs show better durability as flexible transparent conductive coatings, which we attribute to a combination of superior mechanical performance and higher interfacial conductivity.

  16. Donor doping of single-walled carbon nanotubes by filling of channels with silver

    SciTech Connect

    Kharlamova, M. V.; Niu, J. J.

    2012-09-15

    The channels of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are filled with metallic silver. The synthesized nanocomposites are studied by Raman spectroscopy and optical absorption spectroscopy, and these data indicate a substantial modification of the electronic structure of the nanotubes upon their filling. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the incorporation of the metal leads to a change in the work function of SWNTs due to the Fermi level upshift and to the transfer of an electron density from inserted nanoparticles to the nanotube walls. Thus, the filling of the channels with silver results in donor doping of the nanotubes.

  17. Red-emitting π-conjugated oligomers infused single-wall carbon nanotube sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Toshihiko; Urita, Koki

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the one-step thermal fusion and infusion of pyrene molecules inside single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Despite the presence of metallic-SWCNTs, which behave as a quencher due to gapless electronic states, the nanohybrids consisting of pyrene and/or azupyrene oligomers infused SWCNT sheets exhibit red fluorescence by the ultraviolet, blue, and green light excitations. The wavelength-independent light-emitting behavior is explained by (1) infused PAH oligomers inside semiconducting-SWCNTs and (2) the peculiar π-π interaction through mixed π-conjugated state between the π-conjugated oligomers and non-armchair metallic-SWCNTs.

  18. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as near-infrared optical biosensors for life sciences and biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Jain, Astha; Homayoun, Aida; Bannister, Christopher W; Yum, Kyungsuk

    2015-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that emit photostable near-infrared fluorescence have emerged as near-infrared optical biosensors for life sciences and biomedicine. Since the discovery of their near-infrared fluorescence, researchers have engineered single-walled carbon nanotubes to function as an optical biosensor that selectively modulates its fluorescence upon binding of target molecules. Here we review the recent advances in the single-walled carbon nanotube-based optical sensing technology for life sciences and biomedicine. We discuss the structure and optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, the mechanisms for molecular recognition and signal transduction in single-walled carbon nanotube complexes, and the recent development of various single-walled carbon nanotube-based optical biosensors. We also discuss the opportunities and challenges to translate this emerging technology into biomedical research and clinical use, including the biological safety of single-walled carbon nanotubes. The advances in single-walled carbon nanotube-based near-infrared optical sensing technology open up a new avenue for in vitro and in vivo biosensing with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution, beneficial for many areas of life sciences and biomedicine. PMID:25676253

  19. Study on the Microwave Permittivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiaolai; Zhao, Donglin

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we studied the microwave permittivity of the complex of the single-walled carbon nanotube and paraffin in 2-18GHz. In the range, the dielectric loss of single-walled carbon nanotube is higher, and the real part and the imaginary part of the dielectric constant decrease with the increase of frequency, and the dielectric constant…

  20. Photovoltaic device using single wall carbon nanotubes and method of fabricating the same

    SciTech Connect

    Biris, Alexandru S.; Li, Zhongrui

    2012-11-06

    A photovoltaic device and methods for forming the same. In one embodiment, the photovoltaic device has a silicon substrate, and a film comprising a plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes disposed on the silicon substrate, wherein the plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes forms a plurality of heterojunctions with the silicon in the substrate.

  1. Noncovalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with porphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassiouk, María; Basiuk, Vladimir A.; Basiuk, Elena V.; Álvarez-Zauco, Edgar; Martínez-Herrera, Melchor; Rojas-Aguilar, Aaron; Puente-Lee, Iván

    2013-06-01

    The covalent and noncovalent interactions of porphyrins and related tetraazamacrocyclic compounds with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is a subject of increasing research effort, directed toward the design of novel hybrid nanomaterials combining unique electronic and optical properties of both molecular species. In this report, we used different experimental techniques as well as molecular mechanics (MM) calculations to analyze the adsorption of meso-tetraphenylporphine (or 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphine, H2TPP) and its complexes with Ni(II) and Co(II) (NiTPP and CoTPP, respectively), as well as hemin (a natural porphyrin), onto the surface of SWNTs. Altogether, the results suggested that all four porphyrin species noncovalently interact with SWNTs, forming hybrid nanomaterials. Nevertheless, of all four porphyrin species, the strongest interaction with SWNTs occurs in the case of CoTPP, which is able to intercalate and considerably disperse SWNT bundles, and therefore absorb onto the surface of individual SWNTs. In contrast, NiTPP, CoTPP and hemin, due to a weaker interaction, are unable to do so and therefore are only capable to adsorb onto the surface of SWNT bundles. According to the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging and MM results, the adsorption of CoTPP onto SWNT sidewalls results in the formation of porphyrin arrays in the shape of long-period interacting helixes with variable periodicity, possibly due to different diameters and chiralities of SWNTs present in the samples. Since the remaining porphyrin species were found to adsorb onto the surface of SWNT bundles, the precise geometry of the corresponding porphyrin/SWNT complexes is difficult to characterize.

  2. Toroidal Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Fullerene Crop Circles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We investigate energetics and structure of circular and polygonal single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using large scale molecular simulations on NAS SP2, motivated by their unusual electronic and magnetic properties. The circular tori are formed by bending tube (no net whereas the polygonal tori are constructed by turning the joint of two tubes of (n, n), (n+1, n-1) and (n+2, n-2) with topological pentagon-heptagon defect, in which n =5, 8 and 10. The strain energy of circular tori relative to straight tube decreases by I/D(sup 2) where D is torus diameter. As D increases, these tori change from buckling to an energetically stable state. The stable tori are perfect circular in both toroidal and tubular geometry with strain less than 0. 03 eV/atom when D greater than 10, 20 and 40 nm for torus (5,5), (8,8) and (10, 10). Polygonal tori, whose strain is proportional to the number of defects and I/D are energetically stable even for D less than 10 nm. However, their strain is higher than that of perfect circular tori. In addition, the local maximum strain of polygonal tori is much higher than that of perfect circular tori. It is approx. 0.03 eV/atom or less for perfect circular torus (5,5), but 0.13 and 0.21 eV/atom for polygonal tori (6,4)/(5,5) and (7,3)/(5,5). Therefore, we conclude that the circular tori with no topological defects are more energetically stable and kinetically accessible than the polygonal tori containing the pentagon-heptagon defects for the laser-grown SWNTs and Fullerene crop circles.

  3. Sequestration of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bley, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Sequestration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) in a suitably chosen polymer is under investigation as a means of promoting the dissolution of the nanotubes into epoxies. The purpose of this investigation is to make it possible to utilize SWCNs as the reinforcing fibers in strong, lightweight epoxy-matrix/carbon-fiber composite materials. SWCNs are especially attractive for use as reinforcing fibers because of their stiffness and strength-to-weight ratio: Their Young s modulus has been calculated to be 1.2 TPa, their strength has been calculated to be as much as 100 times that of steel, and their mass density is only one-sixth that of steel. Bare SWCNs cannot be incorporated directly into composite materials of the types envisioned because they are not soluble in epoxies. Heretofore, SWCNS have been rendered soluble by chemically attaching various molecular chains to them, but such chemical attachments compromise their structural integrity. In the method now under investigation, carbon nanotubes are sequestered in molecules of poly(m-phenylenevinylene-co-2,5-dioctyloxy-p-phenylenevinylene) [PmPV]. The strength of the carbon nanotubes is preserved because they are not chemically bonded to the PmPV. This method exploits the tendency of PmPV molecules to wrap themselves around carbon nanotubes: the wrapping occurs partly because there exists a favorable interface between the conjugated face of a nanotube and the conjugated backbone of the polymer and partly because of the helical molecular structure of PmPV. The constituents attached to the polymer backbones (the side chains) render the PmPV-wrapped carbon nanotubes PmPV soluble in organic materials that, in turn, could be used to suspend the carbon nanotubes in epoxy precursors. At present, this method is being optimized: The side chains on the currently available form of PmPV are very nonpolar and unable to react with the epoxy resins and/or hardeners; as a consequence, SWCN/PmPV composites have been observed to precipitate out of epoxies while the epoxies were being cured. If the side chains of the PmPV molecules were functionalized to make them capable of reacting with the epoxy matrices, it might be possible to make progress toward practical applications. By bonding the side chains of the PmPV molecules to an epoxy matrix, one would form an PmPV conduit between the epoxy matrix and the carbon nanotubes sequestered in the PmPV. This conduit would transfer stresses from the epoxy matrix to the nanotubes. This proposed load-transfer mode is similar to that of the current practice in which silane groups are chemically bonded to both the epoxy matrices and the fibers (often glass fibers) in epoxymatrix/fiber composites.

  4. Effect of atomic interconnects on percolation in single-walled carbon nanotube thin film networks.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaojuan; Moser, Matthew L; Pekker, Aron; Sarkar, Santanu; Ramirez, Jason; Bekyarova, Elena; Itkis, Mikhail E; Haddon, Robert C

    2014-07-01

    The formation of covalent bonds to single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) or graphene surfaces usually leads to a decrease in the electrical conductivity and mobility as a result of the structural rehybridization of the functionalized carbon atoms from sp(2) to sp(3). In the present study, we explore the effect of metal deposition on semiconducting (SC-) and metallic (MT-) SWNT thin films in the vicinity of the percolation threshold and we are able to clearly delineate the effects of weak physisorption, ionic chemisorption with charge transfer, and covalent hexahapto (η(6)) chemisorption on these percolating networks. The results support the idea that for those metals capable of forming bis-hexahapto-bonds, the generation of covalent (η(6)-SWNT)M(η(6)-SWNT) interconnects provides a conducting pathway in the SWNT films and establishes the transition metal bis-hexahapto organometallic bond as an electronically conjugating linkage between graphene surfaces. PMID:24893323

  5. New Method Developed To Purify Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes have attracted considerable attention because of their remarkable mechanical properties and electrical and thermal conductivities. Use of these materials as primary or secondary reinforcements in polymers or ceramics could lead to new materials with significantly enhanced mechanical strength and electrical and thermal conductivity. Use of carbon-nanotube-reinforced materials in aerospace components will enable substantial reductions in component weight and improvements in durability and safety. Potential applications for single wall carbon nanotubes include lightweight components for vehicle structures and propulsion systems, fuel cell components (bipolar plates and electrodes) and battery electrodes, and ultra-lightweight materials for use in solar sails. A major barrier to the successful use of carbon nanotubes in these components is the need for methods to economically produce pure carbon nanotubes in large enough quantities to not only evaluate their suitability for certain applications but also produce actual components. Most carbon nanotube synthesis methods, including the HiPCO (high pressure carbon monoxide) method developed by Smalley and others, employ metal catalysts that remain trapped in the final product. These catalyst impurities can affect nanotube properties and accelerate their decomposition. The development of techniques to remove most, if not all, of these impurities is essential to their successful use in practical applications. A new method has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to purify gram-scale quantities of single wall carbon nanotubes. This method, a modification of a gas phase purification technique previously reported by Smalley and others, uses a combination of high-temperature oxidations and repeated extractions with nitric and hydrochloric acid. This improved procedure significantly reduces the amount of impurities (catalyst and nonnanotube forms of carbon) within the nanotubes, increasing their stability significantly. The onset of decomposition of the purified nanotubes (determined by thermal gravimetric analysis in air) is more than 300 C higher than that of the crude nanotubes. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of nanotubes purified by this method reveals near complete removal of iron catalyst particles. Analysis of the nanotubes using inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy revealed that the iron content of the nanotubes was reduced from 22.7 wt% in the crude nanotubes to less than 0.02 wt%. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed a decrease in iron content after purification as well as an increase in oxygen content due to the formation of carboxylic acid groups on the surface of the nanotubes. Nanotubes purified by this improved method can be readily dispersed in common organic solvents, in particular N,N-dimethylformamide, using prolonged ultrasonic treatment. These dispersions can then be used to incorporate single wall carbon nanotubes into polymer films.

  6. Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Glow Discharge Fine Particle Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Imazato, N.; Imano, M.; Hayashi, Y.

    2008-09-07

    Carbon fine particles were synthesized being negatively charged and confined in a glow discharge plasma. The deposited fine particles were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and were confirmed to include single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  7. Temperature dependence of plasmon resonance in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Takahiro; Ichida, Masao; Ikemoto, Yuka; Okazaki, Toshiya

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of the optical response in the far-infrared (FIR) region of metallic and semiconducting rich single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was investigated by micro-Fourier transform infrared spectrometry with a focused beam of synchrotron radiation. The temperature dependence of the FIR spectra of both types of SWCNT showed negligibly small variations within a wide temperature range from 4 to 300 K. Upon comparison with a theoretical model for the diffusive region, it is speculated that these results might have been caused by a strong suppression of phonon scattering in relatively short CNTs with lengths of less than 1 μm.

  8. Stabilities and mechanical and electronic properties on BN doped zigzag single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vongachariya, Arthit; Parasuk, Vudhichai

    2015-12-01

    Electronic structures of undoped and BN doped zigzag (8,0) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) were investigated using density functional theoretical calculations. Their stabilities due to BN doping and spin states were considered and those with the shortest B-N distance and singlet spin is the most stable. The BN substitution also causes the reduction of the band gap energy. While the BN doping reduces the band gap energy from 0.606 to 0.183 eV, it has no effect on the Young's modulus value. The band gap energy of SWCNTs can be varied upon applying stress. At high stress ratio, SWCNT could become metallic.

  9. Electrical Detection of ssDNA by Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Zhang, Yuexing; Ong, Phuan; Cox, Edward

    2005-03-01

    We report conductance measurements of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) in the presense of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The characteristic I-V curves of our metallic SWNT samples changed from linear (ohmic) to non-ohmic in the presence of ssDNA dissolved in DI water, and remained so when the sample was dried. The results imply possible applications of SWNT in the electronic detection of ssDNA, detection of hybridization of ssDNA, and sequencing of DNA.

  10. Increasing the length of single-wall carbon nanotubes in a magnetically enhanced arc discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Keidar, Michael; Levchenko, Igor; Ostrikov, Kostya; Arbel, Tamir; Alexander, Myriam; Waas, Anthony M.

    2008-01-28

    It is demonstrated that a magnetic field has a profound effect on the length of a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) synthesized in the arc discharge. The average length of SWCNT increases by a factor of 2 in discharge with magnetic field as compared with the discharge without magnetic field, and the yield of long nanotubes with lengths above 5 {mu}m also increases. A model of SWCNT growth on metal catalyst in arc plasma was developed. Monte-Carlo simulations confirm that the increase of the plasma density in the magnetic field leads to an increase in the nanotube growth rate and thus leads to longer nanotubes.

  11. Controlling the doping of single-walled carbon nanotube networks by proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.; Mann, C. J.; Panetta, C. J.; Alaan, D. R.; Hopkins, A. R.; Liu, S. H.

    2012-09-03

    We demonstrate the controlled desorption of adventitious dopants on networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with 100 keV proton irradiation. Networks of sorted metallic, semiconducting SWNTs, and unsorted SWNTs were investigated. The removal of dopants was indicated by an increase in sheet resistances along with an increase in the absorption of the low energy absorption band of semiconducting SWNTs. Semiconducting and unsorted SWNT networks exhibited the largest change in their sheet resistance, which indicates the conductivity of unsorted SWNT networks is dominated by the tube-tube junctions of semiconducting SWNTs.

  12. Fast Characterization of Magnetic Impurities in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Feng; Xue, Y. Y.; Hadijiev, Viktor G.; Chu, C. W.; Nikolaev, Pasha; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2003-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the magnetic susceptibility measurement is a non-destructive, fast and accurate method to determine the residual metal catalysts in a few microgram single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) sample. We have studied magnetic impurities in raw and purified SWCNT by magnetic susceptibility measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and thermogravimetry. The data suggest that the saturation magnetic moment and the effective field, which is caused by the interparticle interactions, decreases and increases respectively with the decrease of the particle size. Methods are suggested to overcome the uncertainty associated.

  13. Growth of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by using ceria as catalyst supports.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaojun; Peng, Fei; Yang, Feng; He, Xiaohui; Huang, Huixin; Luo, Da; Yang, Juan; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Haichao; Peng, Lianmao; Li, Yan

    2014-02-12

    The growth of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) on flat substrates is essential for the application of SWNTs in electronic and optoelectronic devices. We developed a flexible strategy to selectively grow s-SWNTs on silicon substrates using a ceria-supported iron or cobalt catalysts. Ceria, which stores active oxygen, plays a crucial role in the selective growth process by inhibiting the formation of metallic SWNTs via oxidation. The so-produced ultralong s-SWNT arrays are immediately ready for building field effect transistors. PMID:24392872

  14. Charge Transport and Tunneling in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Lucci, M.; Orlanducci, S.; Ottaviani, I.; Terranova, M. L.; Toschi, F.

    2008-12-01

    We investigate experimentally the transport properties of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles as a function of temperature and applied current over broad intervals of these variables. The analysis is performed on arrays of nanotube bundles whose axes are aligned along the direction of the externally supplied bias current. The data are found consistent with a charge transport model governed by the tunneling between metallic regions occurring through potential barriers generated by a nanotube’s contact areas or bundle surfaces. Based on this model and on experimental data, we describe quantitatively the dependencies of the height of these barriers upon bias current and temperature.

  15. Diffusion of single-walled carbon nanotube under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Judkins, John; Lee, Hyun Ho; Tung, Steve; Kim, Jin-Woo

    2013-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) can be functionalized to target cells for drug delivery or cancer cells for their detection and therapy. Understanding their transport phenomena in vivo is a necessary step to unlock their medical potential. This work estimates the diffusion characteristics of SWNTs and their DNA-conjugated bio-hybrids under simulated or postulated physiological conditions using EPI-fluorescence microscopy (EFM). SWNT was shortened and dispersed in aqueous solution with the average length and diameter of 253 nm (+/-30.6 nm) and 1.6 nm (+/-0.34 nm), respectively, and tagged with a fluorophore, 1-pyrenebutanoic succinimidyl ester (PSE), through non-covalent pi stacking. DNA was attached to the PSE-SWNTs through carboxiimide based coupling procedure. Using the EFM, real-time videos were recorded under four different viscosities corresponding to four kinds of human body fluids: lymph (1.4 cP), bile (2.4 cP), blood (3-6 cP), and cytoplasm (10-30 cP), and processed to calculate diffusion coefficients based on random walk and speed. At 37 degreeC, diffusion coefficients of the SWNTs were estimated to be: 1.45 (+/-0.652) x 10(4) nm2/s (lymph), 0.91 (+/-0.205) x 10(4) nm2/s (bile), 0.59 (+/-0.179)x 10(4) nm2/s (blood), and 0.26 (+/-0.114)x 10(4) nm2/s (cytoplasm). Estimated diffusion coefficients of SWNT-DNA bio-hybrids were: 1.45 (+/-0.402) x 10(4) nm2/s (plasma), 0.62 (+/-0.212) x 10(4) nm2/s (bile), 0.41 (+/-0.142) x 10(4) nm2/s (blood), 0.38 (+/-0.257) x 10(4) nm2/s (cytoplasm). These outcomes should serve as key data for developing mathematical models of SWNT-based drug delivery, cell targeting, and its biodistribution. PMID:23858971

  16. Single Walled Carbon Nanohorns as Photothermal Cancer Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, John; Sarkar, Saugata; Zhang, Jianfei; Do, Thao; Manson, Mary kyle; Campbell, Tom; Puretzky, Alexander A; Rouleau, Christopher M; More, Karren Leslie; Geohegan, David B; Rylander, Christopher; Dorn, Harry C; Rylander, Nichole M

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles have significant potential as selective photo-absorbing agents for laser based cancer treatment. This study investigates the use of single walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) as thermal enhancers when excited by near infrared (NIR) light for tumor cell destruction. Absorption spectra of SWNHs in deionized water at concentrations of 0, 0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.085, and 0.1 mg/ml were measured using a spectrophotometer for the wavelength range of 200-1,400 nm. Mass attenuation coefficients were calculated using spectrophotometer transmittance data. Cell culture media containing 0, 0.01, 0.085, and 0.333 mg/ml SWNHs was laser irradiated at 1,064 nm wavelength with an irradiance of 40 W/cm{sup 2} for 0-5 minutes. Temperature elevations of these solutions during laser irradiation were measured with a thermocouple 8 mm away from the incident laser beam. Cell viability of murine kidney cancer cells (RENCA) was measured 24 hours following laser treatment with the previously mentioned laser parameters alone or with SWNHs. Cell viability as a function of radial position was determined qualitatively using trypan blue staining and bright field microscopy for samples exposed to heating durations of 2 and 6 minutes alone or with 0.085 mg/ml SWNHs. A Beckman Coulter Vi-Cell instrument quantified cell viability of samples treated with varying SWNH concentration (0, 0.01, 0.085, and 0.333 mg/ml) and heating durations of 0-6 minutes. Spectrophotometer measurements indicated inclusion of SWNHs increased light absorption and attenuation across all wavelengths. Utilizing SWNHs with laser irradiation increased temperature elevation compared to laser heating alone. Greater absorption and higher temperature elevations were observed with increasing SWNH concentration. No inherent toxicity was observed with SWNH inclusion. A more rapid and substantial viability decline was observed over time in samples exposed to SWNHs with laser treatment compared with samples experiencing laser heating or SWNH treatment alone. Samples heated for 6 minutes with 0.085 mg/ml SWNHs demonstrated increasing viability as the radial distance from the incident laser beam increased. The significant increases in absorption, temperature elevation, and cell death with inclusion of SWNHs in laser therapy demonstrate the potential of their use as agents for enhancing photothermal tumor destruction.

  17. Antimicrobial Biomaterials based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, Seyma

    Biomaterials that inactivate bacteria are needed to eliminate medical device infections. We investigate the antimicrobial nature of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) incorporated within biomedical polymers. In the first part, we focus on SWNT dispersed in the common biomedical polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) as a potential antimicrobial biomaterial. We find Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis viability and metabolic activity to be significantly diminished in the presence of SWNT-PLGA, and to correlate with SWNT length and concentration. Up to 98 % of bacteria die within one hour of SWNT-PLGA versus 15-20% on pure PLGA. Shorter SWNT are found to be more toxic, possibly due to an increased density of open tube ends. In the second part, we investigate the antimicrobial activity of SWNT layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled with the polyelectrolytes poly(L-lysine) (PLL) and poly(L-glutamic acid) (PGA). The dispersibility of SWNT in aqueous solution is significantly improved via the biocompatible nonionic surfactant polyoxyethylene(20)sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20) and the amphiphilic polymer phospholipid-poly(ethylene glycol) (PL-PEG). Absorbance spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show SWNT with either Tween 20 or PL-PEG in aqueous solution to be well dispersed. Quartz crystal microgravimetry with dissipation (QCMD) measurements show both SWNT-Tween and SWNT-PL-PEG to LbL assemble with PLL and PGA into multilayer films, with the PL-PEG system yielding the greater final SWNT content. Bacterial inactivation rates are significantly higher (up to 90%) upon 24 hour incubation with SWNT containing films, compared to control films (ca. 20%). In the third part, we study the influence of bundling on the LbL assembly of SWNT with charged polymers, and on the antimicrobial properties of the assembled film. QCMD measurements show the bundled SWNT system to adsorb in an unusually strong fashion—to an extent three times greater than that of isolated SWNT. Scanning electron micrographs reveal Escherichia coli on bundled SWNT films to be essentially engulfed by the nanotubes, whereas the bacteria rest upon the isolated SWNT films. While both systems inactivate 90% of bacteria following 24 h, the bundled SWNT system is "fast-acting", reaching this inactivation rate in 1 hr. This thesis demonstrates the potential usefulness of SWNT/polymer thin films as antimicrobial biomaterials.

  18. Optical heating and temperature determination of core-shell gold nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotube microparticles.

    PubMed

    Yashchenok, Alexey; Masic, Admir; Gorin, Dmitry; Inozemtseva, Olga; Shim, Bong Sup; Kotov, Nicholas; Skirtach, Andre; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2015-03-18

    The real-time temperature measurement of nanostructured materials is particularly attractive in view of increasing needs of local temperature probing with high sensitivity and resolution in nanoelectronics, integrated photonics, and biomedicine. Light-induced heating and Raman scattering of single-walled carbon nanotubes with adsorbed gold nanoparticles decorating silica microparticles are reported, by both green and near IR lasers. The plasmonic shell is used as nanoheater, while the single-walled carbon nanotubes are Raman active and serve as a thermometer. Stokes and Anti-Stokes Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes serve to estimate the effective light-induced temperature rise on the metal nanoparticles. The temperature rise is constant with time, indicating stability of the adsorption density. The effective temperatures derived from Stokes and Anti-Stokes intensities are correlated with those measured in a heating stage. The resolution of the thermal experiments in our study was found to be 5-40 K. PMID:25367373

  19. Selective Oxidation of Amorphous Carbon Layers without Damaging Embedded Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young Chul; Lim, Seong Chu

    2013-11-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were synthesized by arc discharge, and then purified by selective oxidation of amorphous carbon layers that were found to encase SWCNT bundles and catalyst metal particles. In order to remove selectively the amorphous carbon layers with SWCNTs being intact, we have systematically investigated the thermal treatment conditions; firstly, setting the temperature by measuring the activation energies of SWCNTs and amorphous carbon layers, and then, secondly, finding the optimal process time. As a consequence, the optimal temperature and time for the thermal treatment was found to be 460 °C and 20 min, respectively. The complete elimination of surrounding amorphous carbon layers makes it possible to efficiently disperse the SWCNT bundles, resulting in high absorbance of SWCNT-ink. The SWCNTs which were thermal-treated at optimized temperature (460 °C) and duration (20 min) showed much better crystallinity, dispersibility, and transparent conducting properties, compared with as-synthesized and the nanotubes thermal-treated at different experimental conditions.

  20. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Production by the Arc Process: A Parametric Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Gorelik, Olga; Proft, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes are produced using the arc discharge process. Graphite anodes are filled with a mixture of nickel and yttrium metallic powders, then vaporized by creating a high current arc. By varying the current, gap distance, and ambient pressure it is shown that the best yield of single wall carbon nanotubes is obtained within a narrow range of conditions. The relative yield and purity of the product are indicated semi-quantitatively from scanning electric microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Two types of anodes have been investigated. The first is hollow and filled with a powder mixture of graphite, nickel and yttrium. The second is filled with a paste made of a mixture of metal nitrates, graphite powder and carbon adhesive, then reduced in an argon atmosphere at high temperature. Product purity and yield will be compared for the two types of anodes. The graphite in the anodes may have hydrogen attached in the pores. To remove this impurity anodes have been baked up to 1400 - 1500 C. The effect of baking the anodes on impurities in the product will be given.

  1. Single-walled carbon nanotube buckypaper and mesophase pitch carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin Gyu; Yun, Nam Gyun; Park, Young Bin; Liang, Richard; Lumata, Lloyd; Brooks, James; Zhang, Chuck; Wang, Ben; High-Performance Materials Institute, Fsu Collaboration; National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Fsu Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    Carbon/carbon composites consisting of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) buckypaper (BP) and mesophase pitch resin have been produced through impregnation of BP with pitch using toluene as a solvent. Drying, stabilization and carbonization processes were performed sequentially, and repeated to increase the pitch content. Voids in the carbon/carbon composite samples decreased with increasing impregnation process cycles. Electrical conductivity and density of the composites increased with carbonization by two to three times that of pristine BP. These results indicate that discontinuity and intertube contact barriers of SWCNTs in the BP are partially overcome by the carbonization process of pitch. The temperature dependence of the Raman shift shows that mechanical strain is increased since carbonized pitch matrix surrounds the nanotubes. High-Performance Materials Institute, NSF DMR-0602859, NSF DMR-0654118.

  2. A Novel Synthesis Route for Bimetallic CoCr–MCM-41 Catalysts with Higher Metal Loadings. Their Application in the High Yield, Selective Synthesis of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zoican Loebick, C.; Lee, S; Derrouiche, S; Schwab, M; Chen, Y; Haller, G; Pfefferle, L

    2010-01-01

    We present a study on CoCr-MCM-41 catalysts with stable nm-sized particles. The focus is their promoting effect on the synthesis of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT). Bimetallic CoCr-MCM-41 catalysts were synthesized by combined grafting and incorporation of metals in the framework. This synthesis allowed an increase in the maximum metal loading in the MCM-41 framework while maintaining nm-sized Co particles stable in high-temperature reactive environments. The SWNT yield was increased by more than 100% from the Co-MCM-41 catalyst. Cobalt is responsible for SWNT nucleation. The role of chromium is to anchor small cobalt particles during reduction and prevent their sintering into large unreactive particles. A larger fraction of the cobalt in the bimetallic catalysts becomes available for the SWNT synthesis when compared to the monometallic one, leading to a significant yield increase. Another effect of the addition of Cr was a shift of the SWNT diameter distribution to smaller nanotubes.

  3. Structural modification of nanoporous carbon with single wall carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Bo

    A novel CC nanocomposite was synthesized by pyrolysis of well dispersed individual functionalized SWNTs in a thermosetting resin, poly(furfuryl alcohol) (PFA). Strong interaction between SWNT and nanoporous carbon derived from PFA (PFA-NPC) was obtained with this strategy and the integrity of SWNTs was maintained after heat treatment. Usually, it is challenging to separate SWNT bundles and disperse them in preparation of composites. 50 wt% SWNT/NPC composites prepared with solution blending showed mass transfer rate of ˜140% higher than the original NPC. The improvement was not significant due to poor dispersion and the bundle structure of SWNTs. Functionalization of SWNTs successfully separated the SWNT bundles and solved the problems of dispersion. In this process, the SWNTs were first functionalized with sulfonic acid groups (SA-SWNT) on sidewall. Then they were converted to PFA-grafted SWNT (PFA-SWNT) by in situ polymerization of furfuryl alcohol (FA). NPC/SWNT nanocomposite was generated by pyrolysis of PFA-SWNT at 600°C. The structural transformation of NPC/SWNT at high temperature was studied by heating it at temperatures from 1200 to 2000°C in vacuum and characterized with HRTEM and Raman spectra. It was found that NPC and SWNT coalesce upon heat treatment and NPC tended to graphitize along the axis of neighboring nanotubes at temperature higher than 1400°C. Complete graphitization of NPC and SWNTs was obtained at 2000°C, when the NPC transformed to graphitic nanoribbons (GNRs) and SWNT or DWNT collapsed within the confines of the GNR. The mass transfer rate in 0.05 wt% SWNT/NPC nanocomposite was ˜2 times higher than that in the pure NPC. Similar improvement required SWNT concentration of ˜60 wt% in the SWNT/NPC composites prepared by solution blending. SWNT/NPC nanocomposite fibers prepared from 0.1 wt% SA-SWNT/FA had ˜13% increase of Young's modulus over the pure NPC fibers when they were pyrolyzed at 400 -- 1600ºC. The augment was slightly higher than Halpin-Tsai's model prediction for composites with randomly dispersed fibers, indicating that the strong interaction between NPC and SWNT strengthened the material.

  4. Single-wall carbon nanotubes as attractive toughening agents in alumina-based nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Guo-Dong; Kuntz, Joshua D; Wan, Julin; Mukherjee, Amiya K

    2003-01-01

    The extraordinary mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes have prompted intense research into a wide range of applications in structural materials, electronics, chemical processing and energy management. Attempts have been made to develop advanced engineering materials with improved or novel properties through the incorporation of carbon nanotubes in selected matrices (polymers, metals and ceramics). But the use of carbon nanotubes to reinforce ceramic composites has not been very successful; for example, in alumina-based systems only a 24% increase in toughness has been obtained so far. Here we demonstrate their potential use in reinforcing nanocrystalline ceramics. We have fabricated fully dense nanocomposites of single-wall carbon nanotubes with nanocrystalline alumina (Al2O3) matrix at sintering temperatures as low as 1,150 degrees C by spark-plasma sintering. A fracture toughness of 9.7 MPa m 1/2, nearly three times that of pure nanocrystalline alumina, can be achieved. PMID:12652671

  5. Ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes in a lipid bilayer as a new nanopore sensor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Yang, Chun; Zhao, Kai; Li, Jingyuan; Wu, Hai-Chen

    2013-01-01

    An important issue in nanopore sensing is to construct stable and versatile sensors that can discriminate analytes with minute differences. Here we report a means of creating nanopores that comprise ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes inserted into a lipid bilayer. We investigate the ion transport and DNA translocation through single-walled carbon nanotube nanopores and find that our results are fundamentally different from previous studies using much longer single-walled carbon nanotubes. Furthermore, we utilize the new single-walled carbon nanotube nanopores to selectively detect modified 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in single-stranded DNA, which may have implications in screening specific genomic DNA sequences. This new nanopore platform can be integrated with many unique properties of carbon nanotubes and might be useful in molecular sensing such as DNA-damage detection, nanopore DNA sequencing and other nanopore-based applications. PMID:24352224

  6. 75 FR 56880 - Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes; Significant New Use Rules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 9 and 721 RIN 2070-AB27 Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Single-Walled Carbon...). The two chemical substances are identified generically as multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) (PMN P-08-177) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) (PMN P-08-328). This action requires persons...

  7. Photoconductivity of Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Illuminated with Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narkis, Todd; Barnes, Bryan; Marcus, Matthew; Eriksson, Mark; Lagally, Max

    2003-03-01

    The unique band structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be studied though induced photocurrents. We perform variable-energy photocurrent studies using synchrotron radiation to reveal information about the multiple Van Hove singularities in the electronic density-of-states of carbon nanotubes. We perform these studies on individual SWNTs, allowing us to see the photoconductive effect for a single tube. We discuss the ramifications of illuminating a metal-nanotube-metal device with different energies of light and at different bias voltages and explain what we can learn by doing so. This work supported by NSF CAREER and MRSEC programs and by the Research Corporation. The Synchrotron Radiation Center is funded by the National Science Foundation (Award No. DMR-0084402).

  8. Preparation and characterization of transparent and conductive thin films of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yutaka; Komoriya, Kazuki; Sode, Katsuya; Higo, Junki; Nakamura, Takayuki; Yamada, Michio; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Akasaka, Takeshi; Saito, Takeshi; Lu, Jing; Nagase, Shigeru

    2011-04-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), synthesized using the arc-discharge method and the direct-injection-pyrolytic synthesis (DIPS) method, were dispersed in a tetrahydrofuran solution containing propylamine and used to prepare transparent and conductive thin films on PET films using an airbrush technique. The SWNTs were analyzed using vis-near infrared absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The surface resistivity of the SWNT films on the substrates was measured using a four-point probe conductivity measurement. The results revealed that the purity, length, and proportion of the metallic SWNTs are important factors in decreasing the sheet resistance.Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), synthesized using the arc-discharge method and the direct-injection-pyrolytic synthesis (DIPS) method, were dispersed in a tetrahydrofuran solution containing propylamine and used to prepare transparent and conductive thin films on PET films using an airbrush technique. The SWNTs were analyzed using vis-near infrared absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The surface resistivity of the SWNT films on the substrates was measured using a four-point probe conductivity measurement. The results revealed that the purity, length, and proportion of the metallic SWNTs are important factors in decreasing the sheet resistance. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SEM images and absorption spectra of SWNT films. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00940g

  9. Nickel-cobalt nanoparticles supported on single-walled carbon nanotubes and their catalytic hydrogenation activity.

    PubMed

    Lekgoathi, Mpho D S; Augustyn, Willem G; Heveling, Josef

    2011-08-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized from graphite using the arc discharge technique. A nickel/yttrium/graphite mixture was used as the catalyst. After purification by sonication in a Triton X-100 solution, nickel-cobalt metal nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of the single-walled carbon nanotubes. The resulting material and/or the nanotubes themselves were characterized by physisorption, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution transition electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the nanotubes, prepared by the arc discharge technique, are semi-conducting with a diameter centering at 1.4 nm. The average nickel-cobalt particle size is estimated to be in the region of 8 nm. The catalytic activity of the material was examined for the hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters obtained from avocado oil. The carbon nanotube supported nickel-cobalt particles effectively hydrogenate polyunsaturated methyl linoleate to monounsaturated methyl oleate. In contrast to a conventional nickel on kieselghur catalyst, further hydrogenation of methyl oleate to undesired methyl stearate was not observed. PMID:22103112

  10. Interaction between fullerene halves Cn (n ≤ 40) and single wall carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Amrish; Kaur, Sandeep; Mudahar, Isha

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated the structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotube with small fullerene halves Cn (n ≤ 40) which are covalently bonded to the side wall of an armchair single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) using first principle method based on density functional theory. The fullerene size results in weak bonding between fullerene halves and carbon nanotube (CNT). Further, it was found that the C-C bond distance that attaches the fullerene half and CNT is of the order of 1.60 Å. The calculated binding energies indicate the stability of the complexes formed. The HOMO-LUMO gaps and electron density of state plots points towards the metallicity of the complex formed. Our calculations on charge transfer reveal that very small amount of charge is transferred from CNT to fullerene halves.

  11. Synthesis, photochemistry, and electrochemistry of single-wall carbon nanotubes with pendent pyridyl groups and of their metal complexes with zinc porphyrin. Comparison with pyridyl-bearing fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Alvaro, Mercedes; Atienzar, Pedro; de la Cruz, Pilar; Delgado, Juan L; Troiani, Vincent; Garcia, Hermenegildo; Langa, Fernando; Palkar, Amit; Echegoyen, Luis

    2006-05-24

    A soluble, functionalized Py-SWNT has been synthesized and characterized by solution (1)H and (13)C NMR, FT-Raman, and electron microscopy. Experimental data indicate that Py-SWNT has short tubes with pentyl esters at the tips and pyridyl isoxazolino units along the walls. The synthesis of Py-SWNT is based on a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of a nitrile oxide on the SWNT walls, similar to 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions that are common for fullerene functionalization. The resulting Py-SWNT forms a complex with a zinc porphyrin (ZnPor) in a way similar to that reported for pyridyl-functionalized [60]-fullerenes. Formation of this metal-ligand complex was firmly established by a detailed electrochemical study. However, in contrast to the behavior observed for the ZnPor/Py-C(60) complex, photochemical excitation of the complex between ZnPor/Py-SWNT does not lead to electron transfer with the generation of charge-separated states. Fluorescence and laser flash studies indicate that the main process is energy transfer from the singlet ZnPor excited state to the Py-SWNT with observation of emission from Py-SWNT. Triplet ZnPor excited-state quenching by Py-SWNT is only observed in polar solvents such as DMF, but not in benzonitrile. PMID:16704263

  12. Low-temperature growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes by water plasma chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Min, Yo-Sep; Bae, Eun Ju; Oh, Byung Seok; Kang, Donghun; Park, Wanjun

    2005-09-14

    Preferential growth of pure single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) over multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was demonstrated at low temperature by water plasma chemical vapor deposition. Water plasma lowered the growth temperature down to 450 degrees C, and the grown nanotubes were single-walled without carbonaceous impurities and MWNTs. The preferential growth of pure SWNTs over MWNTs was proven with micro-Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and electrical characterization of the grown nanotube networks. PMID:16144391

  13. van der Waals interaction between a microparticle and a single-walled carbon nanotube

    SciTech Connect

    Blagov, E. V.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.

    2007-06-15

    The Lifshitz-type formulas describing the free energy and the force of the van der Waals interaction between an atom (molecule) and a single-walled carbon nanotube are obtained. The single-walled nanotube is considered as a cylindrical sheet carrying a two-dimensional free-electron gas with appropriate boundary conditions on the electromagnetic field. The obtained formulas are used to calculate the van der Waals free energy and force between a hydrogen atom (molecule) and single-walled carbon nanotubes of different radii. Comparison studies of the van der Waals interaction of hydrogen atoms with single-walled and multiwalled carbon nanotubes show that depending on atom-nanotube separation distance, the idealization of graphite dielectric permittivity is already applicable to nanotubes with only two or three walls.

  14. Low temperature conductive tip scanning of single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prior, Matthew

    The low temperature conductance measurements of Carbon Nanotubes (CNT), and other nanostructures, are commonly conducted on samples with fixed leads, which provide the global information about the nanostructure's electronic properties. To measure local electronic properties, we have built a conductive tip Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). This AFM allows us to place a mobile contact anywhere along the tube and carry out local transport investigation, including measurements taken while we radially deform the nanotube with the tip. Our low temperature conductive tip AFM is suitable for operation in a helium refrigerator with a bore 1.25" or more, at temperatures of 4K or less. It uses a thermally compensated, nonmagnetic design based on the "Besocke Beetle". All movements are achieved by piezotubes, so heat load at low temperatures is small. For tip-surface distance control, we use a homemade frequency detection system based on a commercially available quartz tuning fork. The scanning tip is mounted on the tuning fork. We use a platinum/iridium tip rather than the more commonly used tungsten, as it does not form a native oxide. The tip is independently wired which allows us to measure the current flow along the tube. Previous low temperature AFMs used the conductive tip only to gate the nanotube. Our samples are CVD grown carbon nanotubes upon a silicon dioxide substrate, contacted by a palladium/gold grid. With our AFM, we have carried out the first low temperature scanning of conductance along nanotubes on insulating substrates. While radially deforming a metallic carbon nanotube with our tip, we have observed a reversible gap opening, indicating a metallic to semi-conducting transition. This result qualitatively matches theoretical predictions. We have observed Coulomb blockade in transport between carbon nanotubes and the tip by AFM for the first time. By gently perturbing the nanotube with the tip, we have increased the strength of some single electron conductance peaks while diminishing others. This result is probably due the perturbation of the probability density functions inside the nanotube. This novel instrument will allow us to study the local properties of a broad class of conductive nanostructures positioned on insulating substrates.

  15. Oxidative enzymatic response of white-rot fungi to single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Berry, Timothy D; Filley, Timothy R; Blanchette, Robert A

    2014-10-01

    Although carbon nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are becoming increasingly prevalent in manufacturing, there is little knowledge on the environmental fate of these materials. Environmental degradation of SWCNT is hindered by their highly condensed aromatic structure as well as the size and aspect ratio, which prevents intracellular degradation and limits microbial decomposition to extracellular processes such as those catalyzed by oxidative enzymes. This study investigates the peroxidase and laccase enzymatic response of the saprotrophic white-rot fungi Trametes versicolor and Phlebia tremellosa when exposed to SWCNTs of different purity and surface chemistry under different growth conditions. Both unpurified, metal catalyst-rich SWCNT and purified, carboxylated SWCNTs promoted significant changes in the oxidative enzyme activity of the fungi while pristine SWCNT did not. These results suggest that functionalization of purified SWCNT is essential to up regulate enzymes that may be capable of decomposing CNT in the environment. PMID:25047356

  16. Lithium intercalation into single-walled carbon nanotubes network electrode: Storage mechanisms and impurity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoro, Luciano Andrey; Matsubara, Elaine Yoshiko; Rosolen, José Maurício

    2014-07-01

    This is a detailed study of how impurities can affect the mechanisms of lithium storage in composite electrodes consisting of a three-dimensional single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles network. To remove impurities such as fullerenes, amorphous carbon, catalyst, and nanographite, we submitted the SWCNT bundles to an appropriate chemical treatment before using them to prepare the electrode. Then, we analyzed how this treatment influenced electrode potential, fading capacity, and specific capacity. Additionally, we evaluated the electrode prepared with high-purity SWNCT bundles by galvanostatic intermittent titration, to obtain lithium transport parameters under thermodynamic conditions. We achieved an intrinsic specific capacity of 400 mAh g-1 for the purified SWCNT bundles prepared by an arc-reactor method. The transport parameters revealed that the electrode underwent electronic transition of the semiconducting-metal type. The chemical diffusion coefficient ranged from 10-4 to 10-18 cm2 s-1 with decreasing electrode potential.

  17. Separation of surfactant functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes via free solution electrophoresis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibe, Blazej; Rümmeli, Mark H.; Borowiak-Palen, Ewa; Kalenczuk, Ryszard J.

    2011-04-01

    This work presents the application of the free solution electrophoresis method (FSE) in the metallic / semiconductive (M/S) separation process of the surfactant functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The SWCNTs synthesized via laser ablation were purified through high vacuum annealing and subsequent refluxing processes in aqua regia solution. The purified and annealed material was divided into six batches. First three batches were dispersed in anionic surfactants: sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium cholate (SC) and sodium deoxycholate (DOC). The next three batches were dispersed in cationic surfactants: cetrimonium bromide (CTAB), benzalkonium chloride (BKC) and cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). All the prepared SWCNTs samples were subjected to FSE separation process. The fractionated samples were recovered from control and electrode areas and annealed in order to remove the adsorbed surfactants on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) surface. The changes of the van Hove singularities (vHS) present in SWCNTs spectra were investigated via UV-Vis-NIR optical absorption spectroscopy (OAS).

  18. Ultrafast nonlinear photoresponse of single-wall carbon nanotubes: a broadband degenerate investigation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuo; Wang, Fengqiu; Zhu, Chunhui; Meng, Yafei; Liu, Yujie; Liu, Wenqing; Tang, Jingyi; Liu, Kaihui; Hu, Guohua; Howe, Richard C T; Hasan, Tawfique; Zhang, Rong; Shi, Yi; Xu, Yongbing

    2016-04-28

    Understanding of the fundamental photoresponse of carbon nanotubes has broad implications for various photonic and optoelectronic devices. Here, Z-scan and pump-probe spectroscopy performed across 600-2400 nm were combined to give a broadband 'degenerate' mapping of the nonlinear absorption properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In contrast to the views obtained from non-degenerate techniques, sizable saturable absorption is observed from the visible to the near-infrared range, including the spectral regions between semiconducting excitonic peaks and metallic tube transitions. In addition, the broadband mapping unambiguously reveals a photobleaching to photoinduced absorption transition feature within the first semiconducting excitonic band ∼2100 nm, quantitatively marking the long-wavelength cut-off for saturable absorption of the SWNTs investigated. Our findings present a much clearer physical picture of SWNTs' nonlinear absorption characteristics, and help provide updated design guidelines for SWNT based nonlinear optical devices. PMID:27088630

  19. Properties of single wall carbon nanotubes array antennas in the optical regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaofang; Jiang, Yuesong; Hua, Houqiang

    2014-11-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be metallic, depending on their chirality. For their nanoscale geometric dimension, SWCNTs can be used as antennas to convert high-frequency electromagnetic radiation such as optical radiation into localized energy and vice versa. However, at optical frequencies, traditional antenna design theory fails for metals behave as strongly coupled plasmas. As a matter of fact, an optical antenna responds to a shorter effective wavelength which depends on the material properties and geometric parameters. In this letter, we derived the relationship of effective wavelength with the wavelength of incident radiation for SWCNTs optical antenna, assuming that the SWCNTs can be described by a free electron gas according to the Drude model. SWCNTs optical antenna holds great promise for increasing solar energy conversion efficiency.

  20. Ultrafast nonlinear photoresponse of single-wall carbon nanotubes: a broadband degenerate investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuo; Wang, Fengqiu; Zhu, Chunhui; Meng, Yafei; Liu, Yujie; Liu, Wenqing; Tang, Jingyi; Liu, Kaihui; Hu, Guohua; Howe, Richard C. T.; Hasan, Tawfique; Zhang, Rong; Shi, Yi; Xu, Yongbing

    2016-04-01

    Understanding of the fundamental photoresponse of carbon nanotubes has broad implications for various photonic and optoelectronic devices. Here, Z-scan and pump-probe spectroscopy performed across 600-2400 nm were combined to give a broadband `degenerate' mapping of the nonlinear absorption properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In contrast to the views obtained from non-degenerate techniques, sizable saturable absorption is observed from the visible to the near-infrared range, including the spectral regions between semiconducting excitonic peaks and metallic tube transitions. In addition, the broadband mapping unambiguously reveals a photobleaching to photoinduced absorption transition feature within the first semiconducting excitonic band ~2100 nm, quantitatively marking the long-wavelength cut-off for saturable absorption of the SWNTs investigated. Our findings present a much clearer physical picture of SWNTs' nonlinear absorption characteristics, and help provide updated design guidelines for SWNT based nonlinear optical devices.Understanding of the fundamental photoresponse of carbon nanotubes has broad implications for various photonic and optoelectronic devices. Here, Z-scan and pump-probe spectroscopy performed across 600-2400 nm were combined to give a broadband `degenerate' mapping of the nonlinear absorption properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In contrast to the views obtained from non-degenerate techniques, sizable saturable absorption is observed from the visible to the near-infrared range, including the spectral regions between semiconducting excitonic peaks and metallic tube transitions. In addition, the broadband mapping unambiguously reveals a photobleaching to photoinduced absorption transition feature within the first semiconducting excitonic band ~2100 nm, quantitatively marking the long-wavelength cut-off for saturable absorption of the SWNTs investigated. Our findings present a much clearer physical picture of SWNTs' nonlinear absorption characteristics, and help provide updated design guidelines for SWNT based nonlinear optical devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00652c

  1. Single walled carbon nanotube network—Tetrahedral amorphous carbon composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Ajai; Kaskela, Antti; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Liu, Xuwen; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Koskinen, Jari

    2015-06-01

    Single walled carbon nanotube network (SWCNTN) was coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) using a pulsed Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc system to form a SWCNTN—ta-C composite film. The effects of SWCNTN areal coverage density and ta-C coating thickness on the composite film properties were investigated. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements prove the presence of high quality sp3 bonded ta-C coating on the SWCNTN. Raman spectroscopy suggests that the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) forming the network survived encapsulation in the ta-C coating. Nano-mechanical testing suggests that the ta-C coated SWCNTN has superior wear performance compared to uncoated SWCNTN.

  2. Single walled carbon nanotube network—Tetrahedral amorphous carbon composite film

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Ajai Liu, Xuwen; Koskinen, Jari; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Johansson, Leena-Sisko

    2015-06-14

    Single walled carbon nanotube network (SWCNTN) was coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) using a pulsed Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc system to form a SWCNTN—ta-C composite film. The effects of SWCNTN areal coverage density and ta-C coating thickness on the composite film properties were investigated. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements prove the presence of high quality sp{sup 3} bonded ta-C coating on the SWCNTN. Raman spectroscopy suggests that the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) forming the network survived encapsulation in the ta-C coating. Nano-mechanical testing suggests that the ta-C coated SWCNTN has superior wear performance compared to uncoated SWCNTN.

  3. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grigorian, Leonid; Hornyak, Louis; Dillon, Anne C; Heben, Michael J

    2014-09-23

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  4. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grigorian, Leonid; Hornyak, Louis; Dillon, Anne C; Heben, Michael J

    2008-10-07

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  5. All-printed and transparent single walled carbon nanotube thin film transistor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajed, Farzam; Rutherglen, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    We present fully transparent single-walled all-carbon nanotube thin film transistors (SWCNT TFT) fabricated using low-cost inkjet printing methods. Such a demonstration provides a platform towards low cost fully printed transparent electronics. The SWCNT TFTs were printed with metallic and semiconducting SWCNT using a room temperature printing process, without the requirement of expensive cleanroom facilities. The unoptimized SWCNT TFTs fabricated exhibited an Ion/off ratio of 92 and mobility of 2.27 cm2V-1s-1 and transmissivity of 82%. The combination of both high electrical performance and high transparency make all-SWCNT TFTs desirable for next generation transparent display backplanes and products such as Google Glass.

  6. Microfabrication and characterization of spray-coated single-wall carbon nanotube film strain gauges.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongil; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Lee, Chul Jin; Park, Chan Won; Min, Nam Ki

    2011-11-11

    We present the design, fabrication, and characterization results of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) film strain gauges for potential applications as highly sensitive strain, weight, or pressure sensors on the macro-scale. A batch microfabrication process was developed for practical device construction and packaging using spray-coated SWCNTs and a conventional semiconductor process. The prototype was characterized using a commercial metal foil gauge with tensile and compressive testing on a binocular load cell. Our test results demonstrated that the proposed SWCNT film gauges have a linear relationship between resistance changes and externally applied strain. The gauge factor ranged from 7.0 to 16.4 for four different micro-grid configurations, indicating that the maximum strain sensitivity of the prototype was approximately eight times greater than that of commercial gauges. PMID:21993311

  7. The controlled growth of single walled carbon nanotubes from ordered substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuhuang; Kittrell, Carter; Kim, Myung Jong; Brinson, Bruce E.; Ripley, Steve; Ramesh, Sivarajan; Hauge, Robert H.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2003-03-01

    We explore a single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) growth process starting with an ordered substrate similar to a "bed-of-nails" membrane of SWNTs. The membrane consists of closely packed SWNTs aligned along the normal of the substrate. Each nanotube end is etched open such that a nanometer sized metal particle can be docked to the open end to serve as the catalyst. We have successfully grown SWNTs following this general scheme. The conditions will be optimized to enhance the possibility of growing a continuous fiber with the aid of the van der Waals force between SWNTs. If successful this may present a first step toward the synthesis of continuous fibers of crystalline nanotube materials comprising long, parallel nanotubes in an ordered array that have all the same extraordinary mechanical, chemical, thermal, and electrical properties that SWNT exhibits on the nanometer scale.

  8. Temperature induced modification of the mid-infrared response of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuba, Mikhail V.; Paddubskaya, Alesia G.; Kuzhir, Polina P.; Maksimenko, Sergey A.; Valusis, Gintaras; Poklonski, Nikolai A.; Bellucci, Stefano; Kenanakis, George; Kafesaki, Maria

    2016-03-01

    The temperature dependences of the absorbance spectra of thin free-standing single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were studied in the infrared range (700-6200 cm-1) while heating the air from 300 to 575 K. The observed temperature variation in the infrared absorbance spectra has been explained by two different physical factors. The first one is the strong temperature dependence of the conductivity of p-type doped semiconducting SWCNTs. The second one is the temperature dependence of electron relaxation time of intraband electron transitions in metallic SWCNTs. The possibility of the separation of contributions from the interband and intraband transitions to the infrared spectra of SWCNT films has been demonstrated.

  9. Heteroepitaxial Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes from Boron Nitride

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Dai-Ming; Zhang, Li-Li; Liu, Chang; Yin, Li-Chang; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Jiang, Hua; Zhu, Zhen; Li, Feng; Liu, Bilu; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with predefined structure is of great importance for both fundamental research and their practical applications. Traditionally, SWCNTs are grown from a metal catalyst with a vapor-liquid-solid mechanism, where the catalyst is in liquid state with fluctuating structures, and it is intrinsically unfavorable for the structure control of SWCNTs. Here we report the heteroepitaxial growth of SWCNTs from a platelet boron nitride nanofiber (BNNF), which is composed of stacked (002) planes and is stable at high temperatures. SWCNTs are found to grow epitaxially from the open (002) edges of the BNNFs, and the diameters of the SWCNTs are multiples of the BN (002) interplanar distance. In situ transmission electron microscopy observations coupled with first principles calculations reveal that the growth of SWCNTs from the BNNFs follows a vapor-solid-solid mechanism. Our work opens opportunities for the control over the structure of SWCNTs by hetero-crystallographic epitaxy. PMID:23240076

  10. Vertical single-wall carbon nanotube forests as plasmonic heat pipes.

    PubMed

    Nemilentsau, Andrei M; Rotkin, Slava V

    2012-05-22

    High thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes (NTs) is attractive for the heat removal applications. However, the problem of efficient thermal coupling to the heater/cooler still needs to be resolved. We study near-field electromagnetic tunneling as a mechanism of heat transfer across the interface. We report interface thermal (Kapitza) conductance between a low-density vertical metallic single-wall NT forest and a quartz substrate on the order of 50 MW/Km(2) and explain it by strong electromagnetic interaction and near-field entanglement between the surface phonon-polaritons in the polar dielectric and the NT plasmons. We predict that the thickness of the NT film can be tweaked to the resonance wavelength of these entangled modes for performance optimization of nanocarbon thermal interconnects. PMID:22480248

  11. Single-walled carbon nanotubes/hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium obtained by electrochemical deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Xibo; Zeng, Yongxiang; He, Rui; Li, Zhongjie; Tian, Lingyang; Wang, Jian; Wan, Qianbing; Li, Xiaoyu; Bao, Hong

    2014-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes/hydroxyapatite (SWNTs/HA) composite coatings were successfully fabricated by electrochemical deposition technique. Different concentrations of SWNTs were incorporated into the apatite coating by adding functionalized SWNTs into the electrolyte. Homogeneous and crack-free SWNTs/HA composite coatings were achieved and the coatings had higher crystallinity compared to pure HA coating. In addition, the highest bonding strength of the SWNTs/HA coating reached 25.7 MPa, which was nearly 70% higher than that of pure HA coating. The in-vitro cellular biocompatibility tests revealed that SWNTs/HA composite coatings exhibited higher in-vitro bioactivity than that of pure HA coating and pure titanium (Ti). It suggests that SWNTs/HA composite coating may have enormous potential applications in the field of biomaterials, especially for the metal implants.

  12. Spin-orbit coupling and the static polarizability of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Diniz, Ginetom S. Ulloa, Sergio E.

    2014-07-14

    We calculate the static longitudinal polarizability of single-wall carbon tubes in the long wavelength limit taking into account spin-orbit effects. We use a four-orbital orthogonal tight-binding formalism to describe the electronic states and the random phase approximation to calculate the dielectric function. We study the role of both the Rashba as well as the intrinsic spin-orbit interactions on the longitudinal dielectric response, i.e., when the probing electric field is parallel to the nanotube axis. The spin-orbit interaction modifies the nanotube electronic band dispersions, which may especially result in a small gap opening in otherwise metallic tubes. The bandgap size and state features, the result of competition between Rashba and intrinsic spin-orbit interactions, result in drastic changes in the longitudinal static polarizability of the system. We discuss results for different nanotube types and the dependence on nanotube radius and spin-orbit couplings.

  13. X-ray Absorption Improvement of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube through Gadolinium Encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimin; Narsito, I.; Kartini; Santosa, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    X-ray absorption improvement of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) through gadolinium (Gd) encapsulation has been studied. The liquid phase adsorption using ethanol has been performed for the doping treatment. The Gd-doped SWCNT (Gd@SWCNT) was characterized by nitrogen adsorption isotherms, Raman spectroscopy, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques. A relatively high residual weight of Gd@SWCNT compared to non-doped SWCNT (n-SWCNT) indicated that Gd has been doped in the nanotube. Even though Gd nanoparticles could not be observed clearly by TEM image, however, a significant decrease of nitrogen uptakes at low pressure and RBM (Radial Breathing Mode) upshift of Raman spectra of Gd@SWCNT specimen suggest that the metal nanoparticles might be encapsulated in the internal tube spaces of the nanotube. It was found that Gd-doped in the SWCNT increased significantly mass attenuation coefficient of the nanotube.

  14. Three-dimensional polymeric structures of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Chao-Sheng; Wang, Jian-Tao

    2014-05-28

    We explore by ab initio calculations the possible crystalline phases of polymerized single-wall carbon nanotubes (P-SWNTs) and determine their structural, elastic, and electronic properties. Based on direct cross-linking and intertube sliding-assisted cross-linking mechanisms, we have identified a series of stable three-dimensional polymeric structures for the zigzag nanotubes up to (10,0). Among proposed P-SWNT phases, the structures with favorable diamond-like sp{sup 3} intertube bonding configuration and small tube cross-section distortion are found to be the most energetically stable ones. These polymeric crystalline phases exhibit high bulk and shear moduli superior to SWNT bundles, and show metallic or semiconducting properties depending on the diameter of constituent tubes. We also propose by hydrostatic pressure simulations that the intertube sliding between van der Waals bonded nanotubes may be an effective route to promote the polymerization of SWNTs under pressure.

  15. Ion irradiation effects on conduction in single-wall carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skákalová, V.; Kaiser, A. B.; Osváth, Z.; Vértesy, G.; Biró, L. P.; Roth, S.

    2008-03-01

    We have measured how irradiation by Ar+ and N+ ions modifies electronic conduction in single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks, finding dramatically different effects for different thicknesses. For very thin transparent networks, ion irradiation increases localization of charge carriers and reduces the variable-range hopping conductivity, especially at low temperatures. However, for thick networks (SWNT paper) showing metallic conductivity, we find a relatively sharp peak in conductivity as a function of irradiation dose. Our investigation of this peak reveals the important role of thermal annealing extending beyond the range of the irradiating ions, and shows the dependence on the morphology of the samples. We propose a simple model that accounts for the temperature-dependent conductivity.

  16. Systematic Conversion of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes into n-type Thermoelectric Materials by Molecular Dopants

    PubMed Central

    Nonoguchi, Yoshiyuki; Ohashi, Kenji; Kanazawa, Rui; Ashiba, Koji; Hata, Kenji; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Adachi, Chihaya; Tanase, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Thermoelectrics is a challenging issue for modern and future energy conversion and recovery technology. Carbon nanotubes are promising active thermoelectic materials owing to their narrow bandgap energy and high charge carrier mobility, and they can be integrated into flexible thermoelectrics that can recover any waste heat. We here report air-stable n-type single walled carbon nanotubes with a variety of weak electron donors in the range of HOMO level between ca. −4.4 eV and ca. −5.6 eV, in which partial uphill electron injection from the dopant to the conduction band of single walled carbon nanotubes is dominant. We display flexible films of the doped single walled carbon nanotubes possessing significantly large thermoelectric effect, which is applicable to flexible ambient thermoelectric modules. PMID:24276090

  17. Systematic conversion of single walled carbon nanotubes into n-type thermoelectric materials by molecular dopants.

    PubMed

    Nonoguchi, Yoshiyuki; Ohashi, Kenji; Kanazawa, Rui; Ashiba, Koji; Hata, Kenji; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Adachi, Chihaya; Tanase, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Thermoelectrics is a challenging issue for modern and future energy conversion and recovery technology. Carbon nanotubes are promising active thermoelectic materials owing to their narrow bandgap energy and high charge carrier mobility, and they can be integrated into flexible thermoelectrics that can recover any waste heat. We here report air-stable n-type single walled carbon nanotubes with a variety of weak electron donors in the range of HOMO level between ca. -4.4 eV and ca. -5.6 eV, in which partial uphill electron injection from the dopant to the conduction band of single walled carbon nanotubes is dominant. We display flexible films of the doped single walled carbon nanotubes possessing significantly large thermoelectric effect, which is applicable to flexible ambient thermoelectric modules. PMID:24276090

  18. Heat-induced transformations in coronene-single-walled carbon nanotube systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, Alexander I.; Fedotov, Pavel V.; Krylov, Alexander S.; Vtyurin, Alexander N.; Obraztsova, Elena D.

    2016-03-01

    Coronene molecules are used as filler for single-walled carbon nanotubes. Variation of the synthesis temperature regimes leads to formation of different types of carbon nanostructures inside the nanotubes. Accurate determination of the structures by optical spectroscopy methods remains an important issue in composite materials. Clear distinction between adsorbed organic molecules on the surface of the tubes and filled structures may be accessed by Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopies. We perform additional heat treatment after the initial synthesis procedure and show the evolution of the optical spectral features corresponding to the filled structures and adsorbed materials on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  19. Electron spectrum of a single-wall carbon nanotube in the framework of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    SciTech Connect

    Ishkhanyan, H. A.; Krainov, V. P.

    2015-08-15

    The electron spectrum of a single-wall carbon metal nanotube is analyzed numerically. The interaction of a free electron with atomic ions and bound electrons is approximated by an attractive delta-function potential in the single-particle Schrödinger equation. The interaction of an electron with other free electrons is presented by the Hartree nonlinear repulsive short-range potential.

  20. Dissolution of single-walled carbon nanotubes in alkanol-cholic acid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyshin, A. A.; Eliseeva, O. V.; Bondarenko, G. V.; Kiselev, M. G.

    2015-09-01

    A procedure for dispersing the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) for preparing stable suspensions with high concentrations of individual nanotubes in various alcohols was described. The obtained suspensions were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The solubility of the single-walled carbon nanotubes in alcohols was found to depend on the concentration of cholic acid. The ethanol-surfactant mixture was shown to be the best solvent for all alkanol-cholic acid mixtures (0.018 mol/kg) under study used for preparing time-stable suspensions of single-walled carbon nanotubes. The dissolving ability of aliphatic alcohols was found to decrease in the series: ethanol-isopropanol- tert-butanol-butanol-propanol.

  1. Shape transition of unstrained flattest single-walled carbon nanotubes under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Weihua E-mail: muwh@itp.ac.cn; Cao, Jianshu; Ou-Yang, Zhong-can

    2014-01-28

    Single walled carbon nanotube's (SWCNT's) cross section can be flattened under hydrostatic pressure. One example is the cross section of a single walled carbon nanotube successively deforms from the original round shape to oval shape, then to peanut-like shape. At the transition point of reversible deformation between convex shape and concave shape, the side wall of nanotube is flattest. This flattest tube has many attractive properties. In the present work, an approximate approach is developed to determine the equilibrium shape of this unstrained flattest tube and the curvature distribution of this tube. Our results are in good agreement with recent numerical results, and can be applied to the study of pressure controlled electric properties of single walled carbon nanotubes. The present method can also be used to study other deformed inorganic and organic tube-like structures.

  2. A green access to highly pure single-walled carbon nanotubes by taurocholate-assistant dispersion and centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yongfu

    2009-09-01

    Raw single-walled carbon nanotubes produced by arc discharge were oxidized in the air to eliminate amorphous carbon, and then dispersed in the aqueous solution of sodium taurocholate supersonically. Thus obtained stable dispersion was subjected to centrifugation, and the metal catalysts and varying carbon impurities were separated with carbon nanotubes. The efficiency of the above procedure was confirmed by scanning electron microscope observation, thermogravimetry, and optical absorption and Raman spectroscopic analyses. The advantage of this procedure lies in easiness, high purity, and no pollution to environment.

  3. Fabrication of thermoelectric devices using precisely Fermi level-tuned semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Yuki; Kitamura, Yoshimasa; Maniwa, Yutaka; Yanagi, Kazuhiro

    2015-07-01

    Precisely Fermi level-tuned one-dimensional materials have great potential for highly efficient thermoelectric devices. Here, we report continuous control of thermoelectric power using precisely Fermi level-tuned thermoelectric devices, in which P-type and N-type single-wall carbon nanotube networks are connected electrically in series and thermally in parallel. We fabricated thermoelectric devices with two channels using semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes and tuned the Seebeck polarity of one side to the N-type using electric double-layer carrier injections and then enhanced the thermoelectric power of the device by tuning the gate voltage.

  4. Investigation on vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes by variational iteration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi Asoor, A. A.; Valipour, P.; Ghasemi, S. E.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the variational iteration method (VIM) has been used to investigate the non-linear vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) based on the nonlocal Timoshenko beam theory. The accuracy of results is examined by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta numerical method. Comparison between VIM solutions with numerical results leads to highly accurate solutions. Also, the behavior of deflection and frequency in vibrations of SWCNTs are studied. The results show that frequency of single walled carbon nanotube versus amplitude increases by increasing the values of B.

  5. NASA-JSC Protocol for the Characterization of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Material Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pasha; Gorelik, Olga; Hadjiev, Victor; Holmes, William; Devivar, Rodrigo; Files, Bradley; Yowell, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that the raw as well as purified single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) material always contain certain amount of impurities of varying composition (mostly metal catalyst and non-tubular carbon). Particular purification method also creates defects and/or functional groups in the SWCNT material and therefore affects the its dispersability in solvents (important to subsequent application development). A number of analytical characterization tools have been used successfully in the past years to assess various properties of nanotube materials, but lack of standards makes it difficult to compare these measurements across the board. In this work we report the protocol developed at NASA-JSC which standardizes measurements using TEM, SEM, TGA, Raman and UV-Vis-NIR absorption techniques. Numerical measures are established for parameters such as metal content, homogeneity, thermal stability and dispersability, to allow easy comparison of SWCNT materials. We will also report on the recent progress in quantitative measurement of non-tubular carbon impurities and a possible purity standard for SWCNT materials.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Thermal Conductivity of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Mohamed; Srivastava, Deepak

    2000-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have very attractive electronic, mechanical, and thermal properties. Recently, measurements of thermal conductivity in single wall CNT mats showed estimated thermal conductivity magnitudes ranging from 17.5 to 58 W/cm-K at room temperature, which are better than bulk graphite. The cylinderical symmetry of CNT leads to large thermal conductivity along the tube axis, additionally, unlike graphite, CNTs can be made into ropes that can be used as heat conducting pipes for nanoscale applications. The thermal conductivity of several single wall carbon nanotubes has been calculated over temperature range from 100K to 600K using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics using Tersoff-Brenner potential for C-C interactions. Thermal conductivity of single wall CNTs shows a peaking behavior as a function of temperature. Dependence of the peak position on the chirality and radius of the tube will be discussed and explained in this presentation.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Thermal Conductivity of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osman, M.; Srivastava, Deepak; Govindan,T. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have very attractive electronic, mechanical. and thermal properties. Recently, measurements of thermal conductivity in single wall CNT mats showed estimated thermal conductivity magnitudes ranging from 17.5 to 58 W/cm-K at room temperature. which are better than bulk graphite. The cylinderical symmetry of CNT leads to large thermal conductivity along the tube axis, additionally, unlike graphite. CNTs can be made into ropes that can be used as heat conducting pipes for nanoscale applications. The thermal conductivity of several single wall carbon nanotubes has been calculated over temperature range from l00 K to 600 K using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics using Tersoff-Brenner potential for C-C interactions. Thermal conductivity of single wall CNTs shows a peaking behavior as a function of temperature. Dependence of the peak position on the chirality and radius of the tube will be discussed and explained in this presentation.

  8. Optimal helicity of single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengli

    2001-07-01

    We find that the optimal helical angle of the SWNT varies with its length for the fixed number of carbon hexagons along the tubular perimeter. The longer the tube is, the larger the helical angle is, in which the helical angle is defined with respect to the zigzag configuration. The armchair is the optimal helical configuration of the SWNT when its length is long enough.

  9. Optical and mechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Matthew S.

    The experiments presented in this thesis provide insight into the optical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes. In the process of studying the properties of carbon nanotube structures we also discovered some interesting features of intermittent contact atomic force microscopy. Phase data from non-contact AFM reveals in-plane material properties . In the process of characterizing carbon nanotubes with an intermittent contact AFM (ICAFM), we discovered something quite interesting: ICAFM is sensitive to in-plane properties. We found that phase contrast in ICAFM reveals in-plane mechanical properties of the poly-di-acetylene films. Our measurements are possible because, during ICAFM, the cantilever tip oscillates not just perpendicular but also parallel to the sample surface along the long axis of the cantilever. Understanding photo-induced conductivity changes in carbon nanotubes . The basic process for using a nanotube as a photo-detector involves using light to change the conductivity of the nanotube, typically measured as a change in current. We review the different mechanisms for how light changes the conductivity of a nanotube, and then focus on a photo-gating mechanism. In a photo-gating mechanism, light interacts with the nanotube's environment changing the conductivity of the nanotube. Thermally driven oscillations play a significant role in chemical vapor deposition growth. The elevated temperatures during the CVD growth thermally drive nanotube oscillations with amplitudes on the order of 80nm. Nanotubes suspended a small distance above the substrate will often oscillate with an amplitude as large as the suspension height and interact with the substrate. The large binding energy between the nanotube and the substrate causes the nanotube to become stuck: the nanotube is no longer suspended. Using data from CVD growths on our suspended structures we are able to extract a Young's modulus value for our nanotubes which both validates the thermally driven oscillation picture, as well as provides another method for modulus measurement.

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube-Amorphous Diamond Thin-Film Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Schittenhelm, Henrik; Geohegan, David B; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Puretzky, Alexander A; Lance, Michael J; Britt, Phillip F

    2002-01-01

    Thin-film single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) composites synthesized by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) are reported. Ultrahard, transparent, pure-carbon, electrically insulating, amorphous diamond thin films were deposited by PLD as scratch-resistant, encapsulating matrices for disperse, electrically conductive mats of SWNT bundles. In situ resistance measurements of the mats during PLD, as well as ex situ Raman spectroscopy, current-voltage measurements, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy, are used to understand the interaction between the SWNT and the highly energetic ({approx}100 eV) carbon species responsible for the formation of the amorphous diamond thin film. The results indicate that a large fraction of SWNT within the bundles survive the energetic bombardment from the PLD plume, preserving the metallic behavior of the interconnected nanotube mat, although with higher resistance. Amorphous diamond film thicknesses of only 50 nm protect the SWNT against wear, providing scratch hardness up to 25 GPa in an optically transmissive, all-carbon thin-film composite.

  11. Carbon Single-Wall Nanatube Growth in a Volumetrically Confined Arc Discharge System

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, K.J.; Alleman, J.L.; Jones, K.M.; Dillon, A.C.; Heben, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes hold significant promise for a vast number of materials applications due to their unique mechanical, electrical, and gas storage properties. Although carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) have been synthesized since 1993 by the arc discharge method, and numerous other synthesis methods have since been developed, no method has yet produced 100% pure carbon nanotubes. Instead, a significant amount of impurities—various carbon structures and metal catalysts—are present in the raw soot. While arc discharge was the first method for SWNT synthesis, it also produces more impure raw soot in comparison to the more recently developed laser vaporization, which has produced the purest raw soot to date but is much slower. Geometry and thermal gradient are appreciably different between traditional arc discharge systems and laser vaporization systems. We report that, by incorporating some characteristics inherent to a laser vaporization system into an arc discharge system, improvement in the yield of SWNT raw soot may be achieved. This is accomplished by confining the arc within a 50 mm diameter quartz tube, similar to laser vaporization. We find through transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy that SWNTs are made in significant numbers in this confined arc discharge system, comparable to laser vaporization synthesized material. Further study is, however, required to prove reproducibility and attain an exact value for the purity of the produced raw soot.

  12. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Separated via Aqueous Two-Phase Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J. R.; Fagan, J. A.; Hight Walker, A. R.

    2015-03-01

    We report resonance Raman Spectroscopy measurements of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) samples dispersed in aqueous solutions via surfactant wrapping and separated using aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) into chirality-enriched semiconducting and metallic SWCNT species. ATPE provides a rapid, robust, and remarkably tunable separation technique that allows isolation of high-purity, individual SWCNT chiralities via modification of the surfactant environment. We report RRS measurements of individual SWCNT species of various chiral index including, semiconductors, armchair and zigzag metals. Raman provides a powerful technique to quantify the metallic SWCNTs in ATPE fractions separated for metallicity. We measure Raman spectra over a wide range of excitation wavelengths from (457 to 850) nm using a series of discrete and continuously tunable laser sources coupled to a triple-grating spectrometer. The spectra reveal Raman-active vibrational modes, including the low-frequency radial breathing mode (RBM) and higher-order modes. SWCNT chiral vectors are determined from Raman spectra, specifically the RBM frequencies and corresponding energy excitation profiles, together with input from theoretical models.

  13. Gas detection mechanism for single-walled carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Anthony; Dube, Isha; Fedorov, Georgy; Paranjape, Makarand; Barbara, Paola; Georgetown/RRC Kurchatov Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    We study field-effect transistors fabricated with carbon nanotube (CNT) networks to determine whether the gas sensing mechanism is due to molecules adsorbed on the nanotubes, or changes at the interface between the nanotubes and the contacts. Our previous work showed that in devices made with isolated CNT, the response to nitrogen dioxide was mainly due to the contact interfaces. Here, we focus on CNT networks and use SU-8 layers patterned with e-beam lithography to passivate the contact interfaces, while leaving the network exposed. We look to investigate possible differences in sensing mechanism for devices made with isolated tubes versus networks. Work funded by NSF, DMR 1008242.

  14. Vibrational Behavior of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, I.-Ling; Huang, Chang-Ming

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the vibrational behaviors of both armchair and zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The natural longitudinal/flexural/torsional/radial frequencies of CNTs were extracted and analyzed simultaneously from an equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation without imposing any initial modal displacement or force. Initial random atomic velocities, which were assigned to fit the simulated temperature, could be considered as an excitation on CNTs composing of wide range of spatial frequencies. The position and velocity of each atom at every time step was calculated using finite difference algorithm, and fast Fourier transform (FFT) was used to perform time-to-frequency domain transform. The effects of CNT length, radius, chirality, and boundary condition on the vibrational behaviors of CNTs were systematically examined. Moreover, the simulated natural frequencies and mode shapes were compared with the predictions based on continuum theories, i.e., rod, Euler-Bernoulli beam and nonlocal Timoshenko beam, to examine their applicability in nanostructures.

  15. A Remote Sensor for Detecting Methane Based on Palladium-Decorated Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Li, Guomin

    2013-01-01

    The remote detection of the concentration of methane at room temperature is performed by a sensor that is configured by the combination of radio frequency identification (RFID), and functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The proposed sensor is schemed as a thin film RFID tag in a polyethylene substrate, on which a metal trace dipole, a metal trace T impedance matching networks, a 0.5 μm-CMOS RF/DC rectifier chipset and a sensor head of palladium-decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (Pd-SWCNTs) are surface mounted in cascade. The performances of the sensor are examined and described by the defined parameters of the received signal strength index (RSSI) and the comparative analog identifier (ΔAID). Results validate the sensor's ability to detect molecules of methane at room temperature, showing that the RSSI can increase 4 dB and the ΔAID can increase 3% in response to methane concentrations ranging from zero to 100 ppm. PMID:23845931

  16. Gate-tuned spin to charge conversion in semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigematsu, Ei; Nagano, Hiroshi; Dushenko, Sergey; Ando, Yuichiro; Tsuda, Tetsuya; Kuwabata, Susumu; Takenobu, Taishi; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kataura, Hiromichi; Shinjo, Teruya; Shiraishi, Masashi

    Interconversion of spin and charge current is a hot topic in the molecular spintronics. It was achieved for the first time in a conducting conjugated polymer 1, and shortly followed by spin-charge conversion in graphene. However, control over carrier type has not been shown yet. In this study we focused on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Spin injection into semiconductor from metal ferromagnet is challenging due to the presence of Schottky barrier and conductance mismatch problem. To bypass it, we used ionic liquid electric gate and ferrimagnetic insulator. We prepared SWNT layer on top of ferrimagnetic yttrium iron garnet substrate. Using spin pumping we successfully observed spin-charge conversion in metallic SWNT. As for a semiconducting SWNT, we applied a top gate using ionic liquid. The drain-source current vs. gate voltage dependence showed tuning of the Fermi level and changing of carrier type. Under gate voltage application we measured electromotive force induced by spin pumping. Detected voltage changed its sign together with carrier type. This is first evidence of spin-charge conversion in carbon nanotubes 2. 1 K. Ando et al., Nature Mater. 12, 622 (2013). 2 E. Shigematsu et al., submitted.

  17. Thermal transpiration through single walled carbon nanotubes and graphene channels

    SciTech Connect

    Thekkethala, Joe Francis; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2013-11-07

    Thermal transpiration through carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene channels is studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The system consists of two reservoirs connected by a CNT. It is observed that a flow is developed inside the CNT from the low temperature reservoir to the high temperature reservoir when the two reservoirs are maintained at different temperatures. The influence of channel size and temperature gradient on the mean velocity is analysed by varying the CNT diameter and the temperature of one of the reservoirs. Larger flow rate is observed in the smaller diameter CNTs showing an increase in the mean velocity with increase in the temperature gradient. For the flow developed inside the CNTs, slip boundaries occur and the slip length is calculated using the velocity profile. We examine the effect of fluid-wall interaction strength (ε{sub fw}), diffusivity (D), and viscosity of the fluid (μ) on the temperature induced fluid transport through the CNTs. Similar investigations are also carried out by replacing the CNT with a graphene channel. Results show that the mean velocity of the fluid atoms in the graphene channel is lower than that through the CNTs. This can be attributed to the higher degree of confinement observed in the CNTs.

  18. Filtration Patterning of Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, David A.; Wu, Zhuangchun; Rinzler, Andrew G.

    2006-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are increasingly being explored for applications exploiting the bulk electrical conductivity of aggregate nanotubes in the form of fibers and films. Attractive in this regard are electrical conductivities orders of magnitude greater than those of conducting polymers, while retaining many of the useful features of polymers, e.g. flexibility, transparency (in thin films) and alternative device fabrication strategies. Here we describe a novel, non-lithographic patterning technique that should also be applicable to other nano-materials. The technique is based on our method for forming thin, pure nanotube films on the surface of a filtration membrane followed by transfer of the film to the desired substrate.^1 To generate patterned films we block the pores of the filtration membrane in the inverse of the ultimately desired film pattern, prior to film formation on the surface of the membrane. The nanotubes only accumulate in the membrane regions that are not occluded, resulting in the desired pattern. Blocking of the membrane pores is accomplished with use of a commercial printer. Implementation and limitations of the technique will be discussed. 1. Z. Wu, Z. Chen, X. Du, J. M. Logan, J. Sippel, M. Nikolou, K. Kamaras, J. R. Reynolds, D. B. Tanner, A. F. Hebard, A. G. Rinzler, Science 305, 1273 (2004).

  19. Dispersion of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes by in situ Polymerization Under Sonication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Watson, Kent A.; Crooks, Roy E.; Smith, Joseph, Jr.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Connell, John W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; St.Clair, Terry L.

    2002-01-01

    Single wall nanotube reinforced polyimide nanocomposites were synthesized by in situ polymerization of monomers of interest in the presence of sonication. This process enabled uniform dispersion of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles in the polymer matrix. The resultant SWNT-polyimide nanocomposite films were electrically conductive (antistatic) and optically transparent with significant conductivity enhancement (10 orders of magnitude) at a very low loading (0.1 vol%). Mechanical properties as well as thermal stability were also improved with the incorporation of the SWNT.

  20. Infrared Analysis of Amine Treated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Produced by Decomposition of CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennrich, Frank; Kappes, Manfred M.; Strano, Michael S.; Hauge, Robert H.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2003-10-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes produced by gas-phase decomposition of CO (HiPco process) were treated with nitric acid to generate carboxylic functions which were exploited for three different coupling approaches to functionalize the tubes with an amine to form an amide. Thin films of the reaction products were characterized with infrared spectroscopy.

  1. One-step synthesis of fluorescently labelled, single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Guaragno, Michelle L; Gottardi, Riccardo; Fedorchak, Morgan V; Roy, Abhijit; Kumta, Prashant N; Little, Steven R

    2015-12-18

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be labelled with functional moieties that endow them with a number of unique characteristics, which can be applicable to biomedical applications such as imaging. Herein we describe a facile, one-step esterification process to functionalize SWNT with fluorescein. PMID:26458421

  2. Green's function theory of electrical and thermal transport in single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin-Chung, P. J.; Rajagopal, A. K.

    2002-03-01

    The temperature dependencies of electrical conductivity and thermopower are studied for single-wall carbon nanotubes using a Green's-function theory developed to incorporate band structure, dielectric function, and electron-phonon interaction effects. Armchair and zigzag tubes are considered. They exhibit quite different temperature dependencies of the transport coefficients. Some experimental results are compared with the present calculations.

  3. Chirality sensitive binding of tryptophan enantiomers with pristine single wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Tamoghna; Roy, Sarita; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr

    2014-07-28

    We report the differential binding nature of pristine single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with tryptophan enantiomers. The differential co-operative response between the pristine SWNTs (topologically chiral) and L- and D-tryptophan (geometrically chiral) provides the insight that geometrical chirality itself manifests with topological chirality in a complex way. PMID:24921981

  4. MICROWAVE-INDUCED RAPID CHEMICAL FUNCTIONALIZATION OF SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES (R830901)

    EPA Science Inventory


    Abstract

    The microwave-induced chemical functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is reported. The major advantage of this high-energy procedure is that it reduced the reaction time to the order of minutes and the number of steps in the reac...

  5. Environmental Detection of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Utilizing Near-Infrared Fluorescence

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are a growing number of applications for carbon nanotubes (CNT) in modern technologies and, subsequently, growth in production of CNT has expanded rapidly. Single-walled CNT (SWCNT) consist of a graphene sheet rolled up into a tube. With growing manufacture and use, the ...

  6. Aggregation Kinetics and Transport of Single-Walled CarbonNanotubes at Low Surfactant Concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known about how low levels of surfactants can affect the colloidal stability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and how surfactant-wrapping of SWNTs can impact ecological exposures in aqueous systems. In this study, SWNTs were suspended in water with sodium ...

  7. Production of vertical arrays of small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong

    2013-08-13

    A hot filament chemical vapor deposition method has been developed to grow at least one vertical single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT). In general, various embodiments of the present invention disclose novel processes for growing and/or producing enhanced nanotube carpets with decreased diameters as compared to the prior art.

  8. On the Likelihood of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Causing Adverse Marine Ecological Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    This brief article discusses the ecological effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)in the marine environment. Based on new research and a review of the scientific literature, the paper concludes that SWNTs are unlikely to cause adverse ecological effects in the marine ...

  9. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Properties of Vertically-Aligned Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, K.; Tripon-Canseliet, C.; Hivin, Q.; Ducournau, G.; Teo, E.; Coquet, P.; Tay, B. K.; Lepilliet, S.; Avramovic, V.; Chazelas, J.; Decoster, D.

    2016-05-01

    We present the experimental determination of the complex permittivity of vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) films grown on quartz substrates in the microwave regime from 10 MHz up to 67 GHz, with the electrical field perpendicular to the main axis of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), based on coplanar waveguide transmission line approach together with the measurement of the microwave impedance of top metalized vertically—aligned SWCNTs grown on conductive silicon substrates up to 26 GHz. From coplanar waveguide measurements, we obtain a real part of the permittivity almost equal to unity, which is interpreted in terms of low carbon atom density (3 × 1019 at/cm3) associated with a very low imaginary part of permittivity (<10-3) in the frequency range considered due to a very small perpendicular conductivity. The microwave impedance of a vertically aligned CNTs bundle equivalent to a low resistance reveals a good conductivity (3 S/cm) parallel to the CNTs axis. From these two kinds of data, we experimentally demonstrate the tensor nature of the vertically grown CNTs bundles.

  10. Influence of Electronic Type Purity on the Lithiation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Jaber-Ansari, Laila; Iddir, Hakim; Curtiss, Larry A.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2014-02-08

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have emerged as one of the leading additives for high-capacity nanocomposite lithium ion battery electrodes due to their ability to improve electrode conductivity, current collection efficiency, and charge/discharge rate for high power applications. However, since as-grown SWCNTs possess a distribution of physical and electronic structures, it is of high interest to determine which subpopulations of SWCNTs possess the highest lithiation capacity and to develop processing methods that can enhance the lithiation capacity of underperforming SWCNT species. Toward this end, SWCNT electronic type purity is controlled via density gradient ultracentrifugation, enabling a systematic study of the lithiation of SWCNTs as a function of metal versus semiconducting content. Experimentally, vacuum-filtered freestanding films of metallic SWCNTs are found to accommodate lithium with an order of magnitude higher capacity than their semiconducting counterparts, which is consistent with ab initio molecular dynamics and density functional theory calculations in the limit of isolated SWCNTs. In contrast, SWCNT film densification leads to the enhancement of the lithiation capacity of semiconducting SWCNTs to levels comparable to metallic SWCNTs, which is corroborated by theoretical calculations that show increased lithiation of semiconducting SWCNTs in the limit of small SWCNT*SWCNT spacing. Overall, these results will inform ongoing efforts to utilize SWCNTs as conductive additives in nanocomposite lithium ion battery electrodes.

  11. Advantages of flattened electrode in bottom contact single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Setiadi, Agung; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi Saito, Akira; Kuwahara, Yuji

    2014-09-01

    We fabricated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistor (FET) devices on flattened electrodes, in which there are no height difference between metal electrodes and the substrate. SWNT-FET fabricated using bottom contact technique have some advantages, such that the SWNTs are free from electron irradiation, have direct contact with the desired metal electrodes, and can be functionalized before or after deposition. However, the SWNTs can be bent at the contact point with the metal electrodes leading to a different electrical characteristic of the devices. The number of SWNT direct junctions in short channel length devices is drastically increased by the use of flattened electrodes due to strong attractive interaction between SWNT and the substrate. The flattened electrodes show a better balance between their hole and electron mobility compared to that of the non-flattened electrodes, that is, ambipolar FET characteristic. It is considered that bending of the SWNTs in the non-flattened electrode devices results in a higher Schottky barrier for the electrons.

  12. Direct Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Silicon and Quartz-Based Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Yoichi; Chiashi, Shohei; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2004-03-01

    A newly developed technique of synthesizing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) directly on the surface of Si and quartz substrates is introduced in this report. This technique adopted a liquid-based dip-coating method to mount a very small amount of catalyst metals on the surface of substrates using Mo/Co bimetallic acetate solution. The merits of this approach lie in its easy, costless, and geometry-flexible nature compared with conventional sputtering and deposition approaches. We used the alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition (ACCVD) method that can produce relatively high-quality SWNTs even at low temperatures down to 600°C. This low-temperature process contributes to the prevention of the agglomeration of catalytic metals on the surface and chemical reaction between catalytic metal and silicon, which helps us to eliminate any kind of intermediating support materials. Thereby synthesized SWNTs on Si and quartz substrates under various CVD conditions are characterized by means of SEM, TEM, Raman scattering, and optical absorbance measurements. The underlying reasons our experimental procedure and choice of catalyst worked for the synthesis of SWNTs are discussed through comparative studies. At the end of this report, some possible applications of this technique are stated.

  13. Science of single-wall carbon nanotubes: Purification, characterization and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Ivana Wan-Ting

    Characterization of raw nanotube materials produced by different methods is demonstrated. Depending on the production methods, tubes of different diameters can be produced. Purification of single wall carbon nanotubes produced by laser-oven and HiPco process is also discussed. Metal catalyzed oxidation at low temperature has been shown to selectively remove non-SWNT carbon and permit extraction of metals with concentrated HCl. These multi-stage purification methods have been investigated and the sample purity is documented by EDAX, ESEM, TGA, Raman and UV-vis-Nir spectroscopy. Covalent attachment of functional groups and molecules, including fluorine, methyl, n-butyl and n-hexyl groups, to the sidewalls of single wall carbon nanotubes has been achieved. Further fluorination study is done to investigate the effect of HF which is used as catalysts. Parallel fluorination experiments are performed on both laser-oven-grown and HiPco SWNTs. Larger diameter tubes, i.e. laser-oven-grown SWNTs, require higher fluorination temperatures. A limiting stoichiometry of C2F can be reach for Fluorotubes. Quantitative measurement of the alkylation was done by thermal gravimetric analysis. A mechanism involving electron transfer and effects of reaction temperature, solvents and steric effects of the alkyl groups are discussed. Prolonged exposure of small diameter SWNT ropes (diameters < 5 nm) to hot fuming sulfuric acid has been shown to grow super-ropes with approximately 10,000 tubes in cross-section from rope sizes of approximately 10 tubes. This represents the largest rope sizes ever seen. Examination of the spectral properties of the SWNTs indicates that the roping occurs without changing the chemical state of the nanotubes. Acid intercalation of single wall carbon nanotubes is examined. Several super acids and strong acids are used to study the charge transfer and protonation effects on SWNTs. The degree of charge transfer is clearly correlated with the ability of acid to intercalate into the nanotube packs. A molecular mechanics calculation is used to optimize the proposed Fluorotube structures. This is the first theoretical work on the modeling of Fluorotubes. Results show that fluorine would like to add along the circumference of the tubes instead of going down the tube axis. The (1,4) isomer has the lower total steric energy (TSE) between the two proposed Fluorotube structures, but the energy difference is small. Scanning tunneling microscopy has been used for atomic scale imaging of the fluorotubes. Significant band features are seen on fluorotubes, not on pristine carbon nanotubes. Butylated tubes have also been investigated by STM imaging. Instead of bands, relatively large, distinct features with spacings of about 50 A are observed. Both theoretical and experimental results indicated the (1,4) isomer with bands around the tubes should be the preferred structure.

  14. Nanoscale thermocapillarity enabled purification for horizontally aligned arrays of single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Sung Hun; Dunham, Simon; Xie, Xu; Rogers, John A.

    2015-09-01

    Among the remarkable variety of semiconducting nanomaterials that have been discovered over the past two decades, single-walled carbon nanotubes remain uniquely well suited for applications in high-performance electronics, sensors and other technologies. The most advanced opportunities demand the ability to form perfectly aligned, horizontal arrays of purely semiconducting, chemically pristine carbon nanotubes. Here, we present strategies that offer this capability. Nanoscale thermos-capillary flows in thin-film organic coatings followed by reactive ion etching serve as highly efficient means for selectively removing metallic carbon nanotubes from electronically heterogeneous aligned arrays grown on quartz substrates. The low temperatures and unusual physics associated with this process enable robust, scalable operation, with clear potential for practical use. Especially for the purpose of selective joule heating over only metallic nanotubes, two representative platforms are proposed and confirmed. One is achieved by selective joule heating associated with thin film transistors with partial gate structure. The other is based on a simple, scalable, large-area scheme through microwave irradiation by using micro-strip dipole antennas of low work-function metals. In this study, based on purified semiconducting SWNTs, we demonstrated field effect transistors with mobility (> 1,000 cm2/Vsec) and on/off switching ratio (~10,000) with current outputs in the milliamp range. Furthermore, as one demonstration of the effectiveness over large area-scalability and simplicity, implementing the micro-wave based purification, on large arrays consisting of ~20,000 SWNTs completely removes all of the m-SWNTs (~7,000) to yield a purity of s-SWNTs that corresponds, quantitatively, to at least to 99.9925% and likely significantly higher.

  15. Control of the Diameter and Chiral Angle Distributions during Production of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolaev, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Many applications of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), especially in microelectronics, will benefit from use of certain (n,m) nanotube types (metallic, small gap semiconductor, etc.) Especially fascinating is the possibility of quantum conductors that require metallic armchair nanotubes. However, as produced SWCNT samples are polydisperse, with many (n,m) types present and typical approx.1:2 metal/semiconductor ratio. Nanotube nucleation models predict that armchair nuclei are energetically preferential due to formation of partial triple bonds along the armchair edge. However, nuclei can not reach any meaningful thermal equilibrium in a rapidly expanding and cooling plume of carbon clusters, leading to polydispersity. In the present work, SWCNTs were produced by a pulsed laser vaporization (PLV) technique. The carbon vapor plume cooling rate was either increased by change in the oven temperature (expansion into colder gas), or decreased via "warm-up" with a laser pulse at the moment of nucleation. The effect of oven temperature and "warm-up" on nanotube type population was studied via photoluminescence, UV-Vis-NIR absorption and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that reduced temperatures leads to smaller average diameters, progressively narrower diameter distributions, and some preference toward armchair structures. "Warm-up" shifts nanotube population towards arm-chair structures as well, but the effect is small. Possible improvement of the "warm-up" approach to produce armchair SWCNTs will be discussed. These results demonstrate that PLV production technique can provide at least partial control over the nanotube (n,m) population. In addition, these results have implications for the understanding the nanotube nucleation mechanism in the laser oven.

  16. Nanocatalyst structure as a template to define chirality of nascent single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gualdrón, Diego A; Zhao, Jin; Balbuena, Perla B

    2011-01-01

    Chirality is a crucial factor in a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) because it determines its optical and electronic properties. A chiral angle spanning from 0° to 30° results from twisting of the graphene sheet conforming the nanotube wall and is equivalently expressed by chiral indexes (n,m). However, lack of chirality control during SWCNT synthesis is an obstacle for a widespread use of these materials. Here we use first-principles density functional theory (DFT) and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to propose and illustrate basic concepts supporting that the nanocatalyst structure may act as a template to control the chirality during nanotube synthesis. DFT optimizations of metal cluster (Co and Cu)∕cap systems for caps of various chiralities are used to show that an inverse template effect from the nascent carbon nanostructure over the catalyst may exist in floating catalysts; such effect determines a negligible chirality control. Classical MD simulations are used to investigate the influence of a strongly interacting substrate on the structure of a metal nanocatalyst and illustrate how such interaction may help preserve catalyst crystallinity. Finally, DFT optimizations of carbon structures on stepped (211) and (321) cobalt surfaces are used to demonstrate the template effect imparted by the nanocatalyst surface on the growing carbon structure at early stages of nucleation. It is found that depending on the step structure and type of building block (short chains, single atoms, or hexagonal rings), thermodynamics favor armchair or zigzag termination, which provides guidelines for a chirality controlled process based on tuning the catalyst structure and the type of precursor gas. PMID:21219018

  17. Nanocatalyst structure as a template to define chirality of nascent single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Gualdrón, Diego A.; Zhao, Jin; Balbuena, Perla B.

    2011-01-01

    Chirality is a crucial factor in a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) because it determines its optical and electronic properties. A chiral angle spanning from 0° to 30° results from twisting of the graphene sheet conforming the nanotube wall and is equivalently expressed by chiral indexes (n,m). However, lack of chirality control during SWCNT synthesis is an obstacle for a widespread use of these materials. Here we use first-principles density functional theory (DFT) and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to propose and illustrate basic concepts supporting that the nanocatalyst structure may act as a template to control the chirality during nanotube synthesis. DFT optimizations of metal cluster (Co and Cu)/cap systems for caps of various chiralities are used to show that an inverse template effect from the nascent carbon nanostructure over the catalyst may exist in floating catalysts; such effect determines a negligible chirality control. Classical MD simulations are used to investigate the influence of a strongly interacting substrate on the structure of a metal nanocatalyst and illustrate how such interaction may help preserve catalyst crystallinity. Finally, DFT optimizations of carbon structures on stepped (211) and (321) cobalt surfaces are used to demonstrate the template effect imparted by the nanocatalyst surface on the growing carbon structure at early stages of nucleation. It is found that depending on the step structure and type of building block (short chains, single atoms, or hexagonal rings), thermodynamics favor armchair or zigzag termination, which provides guidelines for a chirality controlled process based on tuning the catalyst structure and the type of precursor gas.

  18. Computational and experimental studies of the interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, John J.; Rozo, Ciro E.; Castillo-León, Jaime; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Svendsen, Winnie E.; Rozlosnik, Noemi; Boisen, Anja; Martínez, Fernando

    2013-03-01

    This Letter involved the preparation of a conjugate between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid that was obtained without covalent chemical functionalization using a simple 'one pot' synthesis method. Subsequently, the conjugate was investigated by a computational hybrid method: our own N-layered Integrated Molecular Orbital and Molecular Mechanics (B3LYP(6-31G(d):UFF)). The results confirmed that the interaction occurred via hydrogen bonding between protons of the glutamic moiety from folic acid and π electrons from the carbon nanotubes. The single-walled carbon nanotube-folic acid conjugate presented herein is believed to lead the way to new potential applications as carbon nanotube-based drug delivery systems.

  19. Chirality-Dependent Vapor-Phase Epitaxial Growth and Termination of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bilu; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Chongwu; USC nanolab Team

    2014-03-01

    Chirality-pure single-wall carbon nanotubes are highly desired for both fundamental study and many of their technological applications. Recently, we have shown that chirality-pure short nanotubes can be used as seeds for vapor-phase epitaxial cloning growth, opening up a new route toward chirality-controlled carbon nanotube synthesis. Nevertheless, the yield of vapor-phase epitaxial growth is rather limited at the present stage, due to the lack of mechanistic understanding of the process. Here we report chirality-dependent growth kinetics and termination mechanism for the vapor-phase epitaxial growth of seven single- chirality nanotubes of (9, 1), (6, 5), (8, 3), (7, 6), (10, 2), (6, 6), and (7, 7), covering near zigzag, medium chiral angle, and near armchair semiconductors, as well as armchair metallic nanotubes. Our results reveal that the growth rates of nanotubes increase with their chiral angles while the active lifetimes of the growth hold opposite trend. Consequently, the chirality distribution of a nanotube ensemble is jointly determined by both growth rates and lifetimes. These results correlate nanotube structures and properties with their growth behaviors and deepen our understanding of chirality-controlled growth of nanotubes.

  20. Effect of gelatin on the water dispersion and centrifugal purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanium Maria, Kazi; Mieno, Tetsu

    2016-01-01

    We report a convenient and effective procedure for the water dispersion and purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The purification procedure involves a combination of dispersion and centrifugation, in which gelatin; an environmentally friendly material is used as a dispersing agent. It has been found that an aqueous solution of gelatin effectively disperses SWNTs for more than a month. Another advantage of using gelatin as a dispersing agent is that it can be easily removed by washing with water and filtration. The centrifugation procedure employs a centrifugal force of about 2500 times the gravitational force to separate the particles. Although carbonaceous and metallic impurities usually have higher density than SWNTs in arc-produced carbon soot, the centrifugation can easily remove impurities leaving undamaged SWNTs in solution when appropriate centrifugal force and a centrifugation time are used. Centrifugation is carried out for three times to sufficiently remove impurities. Finally, the SWNTs are separated from the gelatin by heating in water and filtering.

  1. Single-walled Carbon Nanotube Generation by Laser-heated ACCVD Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiashi, Shohei; Murakami, Yoichi; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Einarsson, Erik; Maruyama, Shigeo

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized by the laser-heated ACCVD method on the sample stage of an environmental AFM with Raman scattering measurement capabilities. Fe/Co or Co/Mo metal particles, which were supported on zeolite particles or silicon substrates, were used as catalyst, and ethanol vapor was used as the carbon source. The catalysts on the AFM sample stage were heated (to about 800°C) in ethanol vapor (0.01˜1 Torr) by Ar-ion laser irradiation, and SWNTs grew from the catalyst particles. Though this laser-heated ACCVD method was simple, Raman scattering spectra, AFM images, and SEM images showed that high-quality SWNTs were generated. By using the laser-heated ACCVD method, in-situ Raman scattering, which was caused by the heating laser irradiation, was measured during the entire CVD process. The G-band from SWNTs and the silicon peak appeared in in-situ Raman scattering spectra. The intensity of the G-band showed the growth of SWNTs, and the temperature dependence of the Raman shift of the silicon peak was used to determine the sample temperature. In-situ Raman scattering elucidated the lifetime of the catalyst and the existence of an incubation time before the onset of SWNT growth. SWNTs started to grow rapidly after the incubation time and the growth rate gradually decreased. The incubation time was strongly dependent on the pressure of the ethanol gas.

  2. Controllability of the arc plasma-based synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Volotskova, Olga; Shashurin, Alexey; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Keidar, Michael

    2010-11-01

    The focus of this work is to understand the mechanism of magnetic-field-enhanced plasma synthesis, further to establish the fundamental correlation between parameters of arc plasma and characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and increase the controllability and flexibility of arc discharge method. The influence of magnetic field on SWNT parameters is demonstrated as following: (i) It can increase the length of SWNT by a factor of 2 and the population of long nanotubes with the length above 5 μm. (ii) It can result in substantial fractions of produced SWCNTs being of small diameter, less than 1.3 nm. (iii) It can change the chirality distribution of SWNT and the ratio of metallic to semiconducting SWNT. Additionally, the explanations of these findings are presented in the study of voltage-current characteristics of arc plasma, the analysis of size distribution of catalyst particles, the diffusion model of carbon adatom by Monte Carlo and numerical simulation of arc discharge ablation.

  3. Commercial single-walled carbon nanotubes effects in fibrinolysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rodrguez-Yez, Yury; Bahena-Uribe, Daniel; Chvez-Mungua, Bibiana; Lpez-Marure, Rebeca; Gonzlez-Monroy, Stuart; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Albores, Arnulfo

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) induce platelet aggregation, endothelial dysfunction and vascular thrombosis. However, there is little information on the effects of CNTs on fibrinolysis. We investigated the role of pristine-commercial single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with <3% Co content in fibrinolysis and their contribution to the induction of pro-thrombotic processes in human vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). SWCNTs alone produced concentration-dependent oxidation, as measured by a dithiothreitol oxidation assay. Internalized SWCNTs were located in HUVEC treated with 25 ?g/ml using transmission electron microscopy, whereas treatment with 50 ?g/ml compromised cell viability, and oxidative stress increased significantly at 5 ?g/ml. The study showed that in HUVEC treated with 25 ?g SWCNT/ml, fibrinolysis-related gene expression and protein levels had increased by 3-12 h after treatment (serpine-1: 13-fold; PLAT: 11-fold and PLAU: 2-fold), but only the PAI-1 protein was increased (1.5-fold), whereas tissue and urokinase plasminogen activator proteins (tPA and uPA, respectively) tended to decrease. In summary, pristine SWCNTs treatment resulted in evident HUVEC damage caused by cell fiber contact, internalization, and oxidative stress due to contaminant metals. The generation of endothelial dysfunction, as shown by the altered expression of genes and proteins involved in fibrinolysis, suggest that SWCNTs display pro-thrombotic effects. PMID:25790727

  4. Microwave purification of large-area horizontally aligned arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xu; Jin, Sung Hun; Wahab, Muhammad A.; Islam, Ahmad E.; Zhang, Chenxi; Du, Frank; Seabron, Eric; Lu, Tianjian; Dunham, Simon N.; Cheong, Hou In; Tu, Yen-Chu; Guo, Zhilin; Chung, Ha Uk; Li, Yuhang; Liu, Yuhao; Lee, Jong-Ho; Song, Jizhou; Huang, Yonggang; Alam, Muhammad A.; Wilson, William L.; Rogers, John A.

    2014-11-01

    Recent progress in the field of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) significantly enhances the potential for practical use of this remarkable class of material in advanced electronic and sensor devices. One of the most daunting challenges is in creating large-area, perfectly aligned arrays of purely semiconducting SWNTs (s-SWNTs). Here we introduce a simple, scalable, large-area scheme that achieves this goal through microwave irradiation of aligned SWNTs grown on quartz substrates. Microstrip dipole antennas of low work-function metals concentrate the microwaves and selectively couple them into only the metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs). The result allows for complete removal of all m-SWNTs, as revealed through systematic experimental and computational studies of the process. As one demonstration of the effectiveness, implementing this method on large arrays consisting of ~20,000 SWNTs completely removes all of the m-SWNTs (~7,000) to yield a purity of s-SWNTs that corresponds, quantitatively, to at least to 99.9925% and likely significantly higher.

  5. All-Organic Actuator Fabricated with Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowther, Sharon E.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Kang, Jinho; Park, Cheol; Park, Chan Eon

    2008-01-01

    Compliant electrodes to replace conventional metal electrodes have been required for many actuators to relieve the constraint on the electroactive layer. Many conducting polymers have been proposed for the alternative electrodes, but they still have a problem of poor thermal stability. This article reports a novel all-organic actuator with single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films as the alternative electrode. The SWCNT film was obtained by filtering a SWCNT solution through an anodized alumina membrane. The conductivity of the SWCNT film was about 280 S/cm. The performance of the SWCNT film electrode was characterized by measuring the dielectric properties of NASA Langley Research Center - Electroactive Polymer (LaRC-EAP) sandwiched by the SWCNT electrodes over a broad range of temperature (from 25 C to 280 C) and frequency (from 1 KHz to 1 MHz). The all-organic actuator with the SWCNT electrodes showed a larger electric field-induced strain than that with metal electrodes, under identical measurement conditions.

  6. Microwave purification of large-area horizontally aligned arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xu; Jin, Sung Hun; Wahab, Muhammad A; Islam, Ahmad E; Zhang, Chenxi; Du, Frank; Seabron, Eric; Lu, Tianjian; Dunham, Simon N; Cheong, Hou In; Tu, Yen-Chu; Guo, Zhilin; Chung, Ha Uk; Li, Yuhang; Liu, Yuhao; Lee, Jong-Ho; Song, Jizhou; Huang, Yonggang; Alam, Muhammad A; Wilson, William L; Rogers, John A

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in the field of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) significantly enhances the potential for practical use of this remarkable class of material in advanced electronic and sensor devices. One of the most daunting challenges is in creating large-area, perfectly aligned arrays of purely semiconducting SWNTs (s-SWNTs). Here we introduce a simple, scalable, large-area scheme that achieves this goal through microwave irradiation of aligned SWNTs grown on quartz substrates. Microstrip dipole antennas of low work-function metals concentrate the microwaves and selectively couple them into only the metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs). The result allows for complete removal of all m-SWNTs, as revealed through systematic experimental and computational studies of the process. As one demonstration of the effectiveness, implementing this method on large arrays consisting of ~20,000 SWNTs completely removes all of the m-SWNTs (~7,000) to yield a purity of s-SWNTs that corresponds, quantitatively, to at least to 99.9925% and likely significantly higher. PMID:25387684

  7. Pulsed laser CVD investigations of single-wall carbon nanotube growth dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Styers-Barnett, D. J.; Puretzky, A. A.; Rouleau, C. M.; Yuan, D.; Ivanov, I. N.; Xiao, K.; Liu, J.; Geohegan, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    The nucleation and rapid growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were explored by pulsed-laser assisted chemical vapor deposition (PLA-CVD). A special high-power, Nd:YAG laser system with tunable pulse width (>0.5 ms) was implemented to rapidly heat (>3×104°C/s) metal catalyst-covered substrates to different growth temperatures for very brief (sub-second) and controlled time periods as measured by in situ optical pyrometry. Utilizing growth directly on transmission electron microscopy grids, exclusively SWNTs were found to grow under rapid heating conditions, with a minimum nucleation time of >0.1 s. By measuring the length of nanotubes grown by single laser pulses, extremely fast growth rates (up to 100 microns/s) were found to result from the rapid heating and cooling induced by the laser treatment. Subsequent laser pulses were found not to incrementally continue the growth of these nanotubes, but instead activate previously inactive catalyst nanoparticles to grow new nanotubes. Localized growth of nanotubes with variable density was demonstrated through this process and was applied for the reliable direct-write synthesis of SWNTs onto pre-patterned, catalyst-covered metal electrodes for the synthesis of SWNT field-effect transistors.

  8. Pulsed Laser CVD Investigations of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Growth Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Geohegan, David B; Liu, Zuqin; Styers-Barnett, David J; Puretzky, Alexander A; Rouleau, Christopher M; Yuan, Dongning; Ivanov, Ilia N; Xiao, Kai; Liu, Jie

    2008-01-01

    The nucleation and rapid growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were explored by pulsed-laser assisted chemical vapor deposition (PLA-CVD). A special high-power, Nd:YAG laser system with tunable pulse width (> 0.5 ms) was implemented to rapidly heat (>30,000 C/s) metal catalyst-covered substrates to different growth temperatures for very brief (sub-second) and controlled time periods as measured by in situ optical pyrometry. Utilizing growth directly on transmission electron microscopy grids, exclusively SWNTs were found to grow under rapid heating conditions, with a minimum nucleation time of >0.10 s. By measuring the length of nanotubes grown by single laser pulses, extremely fast growth rates (up to 100 microns/s) were found to result from the rapid heating and cooling induced by the laser treatment. Subsequent laser pulses were found not to incrementally continue the growth of these nanotubes, but instead activate previously inactive catalyst nanoparticles to grow new nanotubes. Localized growth of nanotubes with variable density was demonstrated through this process, and was applied for the reliable direct-write synthesis of SWNTs onto pre-patterned, catalyst-covered metal electrodes for the synthesis of SWNT field-effect transistors.

  9. In situ mass spectroscopic analysis of alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition process for single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomie, Takashi; Inoue, Shuhei; Iba, Yushi; Matsumura, Yukihiko

    2012-05-01

    In situ mass spectroscopic analysis was carried out to clarify the growth mechanism of single-walled carbon nanotube grown by alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition. When catalysts were used, pyrolysis could be accomplished at a temperature of 600 °C; without the use of catalysts, successful pyrolysis required a temperature of more than 800 °C. Ethylene and acetylene are important products for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes, and fusion of the metal catalyst is the cause of failure of synthesis at high temperatures. This fact indicates that the degradation and polymerization of ethanol are not the cause of the failure of synthesis.

  10. Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Alignment Mechanisms for Non-Destructive Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Seunghun

    2002-01-01

    As proposed in our original proposal, we developed a new innovative method to assemble millions of single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based circuit components as fast as conventional microfabrication processes. This method is based on surface template assembly strategy. The new method solves one of the major bottlenecks in carbon nanotube based electrical applications and, potentially, may allow us to mass produce a large number of SWCNT-based integrated devices of critical interests to NASA.

  11. Molecular Beam-Controlled Nucleation and Growth of Vertically Aligned Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Eres, Gyula; Kinkhabwala, Anika A; Cui, Hongtao; Geohegan, David B; Puretzky, Alexander A; Lowndes, Douglas H

    2005-01-01

    The main obstacle to widespread application of single-wall carbon nanotubes is the lack of reproducible synthesis methods of pure material. We describe a new growth method for single-wall carbon nanotubes that uses molecular beams of precursor gases that impinge on a heated substrate coated with a catalyst thin film. In this growth environment the gas and the substrate temperature are decoupled and carbon nanotube growth occurs by surface reactions without contribution from homogeneous gas-phase reactions. This controlled reaction environment revealed that SWCNT growth is a complex multicomponent reaction in which not just C, but also H, and O play a critical role. These experiments identified acetylene as a prolific direct building block for carbon network formation that is an order of magnitude more efficient than other small-molecule precursors. The molecular jet experiments show that with optimal catalyst particle size the incidence rate of acetylene molecules plays a critical role in the formation of single-wall carbon nanotubes and dense vertically aligned arrays in which they are the dominant component. The threshold for vertically aligned growth, the growth rate, the diameter, and the number of walls of the carbon nanotubes are systematically correlated with the acetylene incidence rate and the substrate temperature.

  12. Manifestation of Structure of Electron Bands in Double-Resonant Raman Spectra of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Stubrov, Yurii; Nikolenko, Andrii; Gubanov, Viktor; Strelchuk, Viktor

    2016-12-01

    Micro-Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the range of two-phonon 2D bands are investigated in detail. The fine structure of two-phonon 2D bands in the low-temperature Raman spectra of the mixture and individual single-walled carbon nanotubes is considered as the reflection of structure of their π-electron zones. The dispersion behavior of 2D band fine structure components in the resonant Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotube mixture is studied depending on the energy of excitating photons. The role of incoming and outgoing electron-phonon resonances in the formation of 2D band fine structure in Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes is analyzed. The similarity of dispersion behavior of 2D phonon bands in single-walled carbon nanotubes, one-layer graphene, and bulk graphite is discussed. PMID:26729220

  13. Manifestation of Structure of Electron Bands in Double-Resonant Raman Spectra of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubrov, Yurii; Nikolenko, Andrii; Gubanov, Viktor; Strelchuk, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Micro-Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the range of two-phonon 2D bands are investigated in detail. The fine structure of two-phonon 2D bands in the low-temperature Raman spectra of the mixture and individual single-walled carbon nanotubes is considered as the reflection of structure of their π-electron zones. The dispersion behavior of 2D band fine structure components in the resonant Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotube mixture is studied depending on the energy of excitating photons. The role of incoming and outgoing electron-phonon resonances in the formation of 2D band fine structure in Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes is analyzed. The similarity of dispersion behavior of 2D phonon bands in single-walled carbon nanotubes, one-layer graphene, and bulk graphite is discussed.

  14. Chirality-specific growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes on solid alloy catalysts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Daqi; Yang, Juan; Luo, Da; Xu, Ziwei; Wei, Jiake; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Xu, Zhi; Peng, Fei; Li, Xuemei; Li, Ruoming; Li, Yilun; Li, Meihui; Bai, Xuedong; Ding, Feng; Li, Yan

    2014-06-26

    Carbon nanotubes have many material properties that make them attractive for applications. In the context of nanoelectronics, interest has focused on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) because slight changes in tube diameter and wrapping angle, defined by the chirality indices (n, m), will shift their electrical conductivity from one characteristic of a metallic state to one characteristic of a semiconducting state, and will also change the bandgap. However, this structure-function relationship can be fully exploited only with structurally pure SWNTs. Solution-based separation methods yield tubes within a narrow structure range, but the ultimate goal of producing just one type of SWNT by controlling its structure during growth has proved to be a considerable challenge over the last two decades. Such efforts aim to optimize the composition or shape of the catalyst particles that are used in the chemical vapour deposition synthesis process to decompose the carbon feedstock and influence SWNT nucleation and growth. This approach resulted in the highest reported proportion, 55 per cent, of single-chirality SWNTs in an as-grown sample. Here we show that SWNTs of a single chirality, (12, 6), can be produced directly with an abundance higher than 92 per cent when using tungsten-based bimetallic alloy nanocrystals as catalysts. These, unlike other catalysts used so far, have such high melting points that they maintain their crystalline structure during the chemical vapour deposition process. This feature seems crucial because experiment and simulation both suggest that the highly selective growth of (12, 6) SWNTs is the result of a good structural match between the carbon atom arrangement around the nanotube circumference and the arrangement of the catalytically active atoms in one of the planes of the nanocrystal catalyst. We anticipate that using high-melting-point alloy nanocrystals with optimized structures as catalysts paves the way for total chirality control in SWNT growth and will thus promote the development of SWNT applications. PMID:24965654

  15. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering on single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Harald; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Lefrant, Serge

    2004-11-15

    Exploiting the effect of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), the Raman signal of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be enhanced by up to 14 orders of magnitude when the tubes are in contact with silver or gold nanostructures and Raman scattering takes place predominantly in the enhanced local optical fields of the nanostructures. Such a level of enhancement offers exciting opportunities for ultrasensitive Raman studies on SWNTs and allows resonant and non-resonant Raman experiments to be done on single SWNTs at relatively high signal levels. Since the optical fields are highly localized within so-called "hot spots" on fractal silver colloidal clusters, lateral confinement of the Raman scattering can be as small as 5 nm, allowing spectroscopic selection of a single nanotube from a larger population. Moreover, since SWNTs are very stable "artificial molecules" with a high aspect ratio and a strong electron-phonon coupling, they are unique "test molecules" for investigating the SERS effect itself and for probing the "electromagnetic field contribution" and "charge transfer contribution" to the effect. SERS is also a powerful tool for monitoring the "chemical" interaction between the nanotube and the metal nanostructure. PMID:15482983

  16. Two photon polymerization lithography for 3D microfabrication of single wall carbon nanotube/polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushiba, Shota; Shoji, Satoru; Kuray, Preeya; Masui, Kyoko; Kono, Junichiro; Kawata, Satoshi

    2013-03-01

    Two photon polymerization (TPP) lithography has been established as a powerful tool to develop 3D fine structures of polymer materials, opening up a wide range applications such as micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). TPP lithography is also promising for 3D micro fabrication of nanocomposites embedded with nanomaterials such as metal nanoparticles. Here, we make use of TPP lithography to fabricate 3D micro structural single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/polymer composites. SWCNTs exhibit remarkable mechanical, electrical, thermal and optical properties, which leads to enhance performances of polymers by loading SWCNTs. SWCNTs were uniformly dispersed in an acrylate UV-curable monomer including a few amounts of photo-initiator and photo-sensitizer. A femtosecond pulsed laser emitting at 780 nm was focused onto the resin, resulting in the photo-polymerization of a nanometric volume of the resin through TPP. By scanning the focus spot three dimensionally, arbitrary 3D structures were created. The spatial resolution of the fabrication was sub-micrometer, and SWCNTs were embedded in the sub-micro sized structures. The fabrication technique enables one to fabricate 3D micro structural SWCNT/polymer composites into desired shapes, and thus the technique should open up the further applications of SWCNT/polymer composites such as micro sized photomechanical actuators.

  17. Raman Spectroscopy of Charge Transfer Interactions Between Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes and [FeFe] Hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, J. L. Svedruzic, D.; McDonald, T. J.; Kim, Y. H.; King, P. W.; Heben, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    We report a Raman spectroscopy study of charge transfer interactions in complexes formed by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and [FeFe] hydrogenase I (CaHydI) from Clostridium acetobutylicum. The choice of Raman excitation wavelength and sample preparation conditions allows differences to be observed for complexes involving metallic (m) and semiconducting (s) species. Adsorbed CaHydI can reversibly inject electronic charge into the LUMOs of s-SWNTs, while charge can be injected and removed from m-SWNTs at lower potentials just above the Fermi energy. Time-dependent enzymatic assays demonstrated that the reduced and oxidized forms of CaHydI are deactivated by oxygen, but at rates that varied by an order of magnitude. The time evolution of the oxidative decay of the CaHydI activity reveals different time constants when complexed with m-SWNTs and s-SWNTs. The correlation of enzymatic assays with time-dependent Raman spectroscopy provides a novel method by which the charge transfer interactions may be investigated in the various SWNT-CaHydI complexes. Surprisingly, an oxidized form of CaHydI is apparently more resistant to oxygen deactivation when complexed to m-SWNTs rather than s-SWNTs.

  18. A structure-reactivity relationship for single walled carbon nanotubes reacting with 4-hydroxybenzene diazonium salt.

    PubMed

    Nair, Nitish; Kim, Woo-Jae; Usrey, Monica L; Strano, Michael S

    2007-04-01

    The first structure-reactivity relationship for electron-transfer reactions of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been derived and experimentally validated using 4-hydroxybenzene diazonium as a model electron acceptor. The model describes steady-state reaction data using an adsorption-controlled scheme, and electron transfer theories are used to explain the difference in reactivities between different nanotube chiralities. The formalism provides a mechanistic insight into electronically selective reactions. The influence of reagent concentration and external illumination (approximately 0.764 mW/cm2) on the reaction selectivity is described by the rate model, with quantitative descriptions of the changes in the UV-vis-nIR absorption spectra of nanotubes during reaction. Illumination was shown to decrease the selectivity of the reagent to metallic SWNTs over semiconducting SWNTs. We attribute this to the greater activity of the reagent in solution when exposed to light, resulting in greater extents of reaction for each SWNT and, hence, lower selectivity. PMID:17352473

  19. Uncovering the ultimate performance of single-walled carbon nanotube films as transparent conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustonen, K.; Laiho, P.; Kaskela, A.; Susi, T.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Kauppinen, E. I.

    2015-10-01

    The ultimate performance—ratio of electrical conductivity to optical absorbance—of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) transparent conductive films (TCFs) is an issue of considerable application relevance. Here, we present direct experimental evidence that SWCNT bundling is detrimental for their performance. We combine floating catalyst synthesis of non-bundled, high-quality SWCNTs with an aggregation chamber, in which bundles with mean diameters ranging from 1.38 to 2.90 nm are formed from identical 3 μm long SWCNTs. The as-deposited TCFs from 1.38 nm bundles showed sheet resistances of 310 Ω/□ at 90% transparency, while those from larger bundles of 1.80 and 2.90 nm only reached values of 475 and 670 Ω/□, respectively. Based on these observations, we elucidate how networks formed by smaller bundles perform better due to their greater interconnectivity at a given optical density. Finally, we present a semi-empirical model for TCF performance as a function of SWCNT mean length and bundle diameter. This gives an estimate for the ultimate performance of non-doped, random network mixed-metallicity SWCNT TCFs at ˜80 Ω/□ and 90% transparency.

  20. Raman spectroscopy of template grown single wall carbon nanotubes in zeolite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulman, Martin; Kuzmany, Hans; Dubay, Orest; Kresse, Georg; Li, Ling; Tang, Z. K.

    2003-08-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes with diameter 0.4 nm grown in the channels of AlPO4-5 crystals were studied by Raman spectroscopy and ab initio density functional calculations. In the experiment up to 19 different laser lines were used to characterize vibrational properties. Spectra depend strongly on the energy of the laser line used for excitation. Even though the observed Raman spectra were very rich on lines only two types of nanotubes with different chiralities, (5,0) and (4,2), were found to be responsible for the observed response. The frequencies of the radial breathing modes were reliably assigned. Even though the (5,0) is metallic, the A1g mode does not couple to the electronic continuum and the Peierls-type mechanism does not shift the mode toward lower frequencies. A strong response was also observed for frequencies around 1250 cm-1. The positions of two peaks assigned to the (5,0) do not depend on the laser energy whereas only one peak was observed for the (4,2) nanotube. Its frequency shifts with the laser energy like the D line of large diameter nanotubes, but the rate of the shift is only one half of the value known for the latter. These unexpected results could be traced back to the phonon dispersion of the narrow tubes.

  1. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Polyamidoamine Dendrimer Hybrids for Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Giacalone, Francesco; Campisciano, Vincenzo; Calabrese, Carla; La Parola, Valeria; Syrgiannis, Zois; Prato, Maurizio; Gruttadauria, Michelangelo

    2016-04-26

    We report the synthesis and catalytic properties of single-walled carbon nanotube-polyamidoamine dendrimers hybrids (SWCNT-PAMAM), prepared via a convergent strategy. The direct reaction of cystamine-based PAMAM dendrimers (generations 2.5 and 3.0) with pristine SWCNTs in refluxing toluene, followed by immobilization and reduction of [PdCl4](2-), led to the formation of highly dispersed small palladium nanoparticles homogeneously confined throughout the nanotube length. One of these functional materials proved to be an efficient catalyst in Suzuki and Heck reactions, able to promote the above processes down to 0.002 mol % showing a turnover number (TON) of 48 000 and a turnover frequency (TOF) of 566 000 h(-1). In addition, the hybrid material could be recovered and recycled for up to 6 times. No leaching of the metal has been detected during the Suzuki coupling. Additional experiments carried out on the spent catalyst permitted to suggest that a "release and catch" mechanism is operative in both reactions, although during Heck reaction small catalytically active soluble Pd species are also present. PMID:26974262

  2. One-dimensional superconductivity of 0.4 nm single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Z. K.; Zhang, L. Y.; Wang, N.; Li, Z. M.; Zhang, X. X.; Wang, J. N.; Chan, C. T.; Sheng, P.

    2002-10-01

    Mono-sized ultra-small (0.4 nm in diameter) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared by pyrolysis of tripropylamine molecules in the channels of porous zeolite AlPO4-5 (AFI) single crystals. These ultra-small nanotubes perhaps constitute the best example of one-dimensional (1D) quantum wires. Because these SWNTs are highly aligned and uniform in size, they show interesting electrical transport properties. Local density functional calculations indicate that when the diameter of the SWNT is smaller than 0.5 nm, strong curvature effects induce strong σ-π mixing of the unoccupied orbitals. In this regime, metallicity can no longer be predicted by the simple band-folding picture, and these small-radius SWNTs generally have finite density of states at the Fermi level. Investigation of the magnetic and transport properties of these SWNTs revealed that at temperatures below 20 K, the 0.4nm tubes exhibit superconducting behavior manifest as an anisotropic Meissner effect, with a superconducting gap and fluctuation supercurrent. The measured superconducting characteristics display smooth temperature variations owing to one-dimensional fluctuations, with a mean-field superconducting transition temperature of 15 K. Statistical mechanic calculations based on the Ginzburg-Landau free energy functional yield predictions that are in excellent agreement with the experiments.

  3. DNA-templated synthesis of Pt nanoparticles on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lifeng

    2009-11-01

    A series of electron microscopy characterizations demonstrate that single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (ssDNA) can bind to nanotube surfaces and disperse bundled single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) into individual tubes. The ssDNA molecules on the nanotube surfaces demonstrate various morphologies, such as aggregated clusters and spiral wrapping around a nanotube with different pitches and spaces, indicating that the morphology of the SWCNT/DNA hybrids is not related solely to the base sequence of the ssDNA or the chirality or the diameter of the nanotubes. In addition to serving as a non-covalent dispersion agent, the ssDNA molecules bonded to the nanotube surface can provide addresses for localizing Pt(II) complexes along the nanotubes. The Pt nanoparticles obtained by a reduction of the Pt2+-DNA adducts are crystals with a size of <=1-2 nm. These results expand our understanding of the interactions between ssDNA and SWCNTs and provide an efficient approach for positioning Pt and other metal particles, with uniform sizes and without aggregations, along the nanotube surfaces for applications in direct ethanol/methanol fuel cells and nanoscale electronics.

  4. DNA-templated synthesis of Pt nanoparticles on single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lifeng

    2009-11-18

    A series of electron microscopy characterizations demonstrate that single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (ssDNA) can bind to nanotube surfaces and disperse bundled single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) into individual tubes. The ssDNA molecules on the nanotube surfaces demonstrate various morphologies, such as aggregated clusters and spiral wrapping around a nanotube with different pitches and spaces, indicating that the morphology of the SWCNT/DNA hybrids is not related solely to the base sequence of the ssDNA or the chirality or the diameter of the nanotubes. In addition to serving as a non-covalent dispersion agent, the ssDNA molecules bonded to the nanotube surface can provide addresses for localizing Pt(II) complexes along the nanotubes. The Pt nanoparticles obtained by a reduction of the Pt2+-DNA adducts are crystals with a size of < or =1-2 nm. These results expand our understanding of the interactions between ssDNA and SWCNTs and provide an efficient approach for positioning Pt and other metal particles, with uniform sizes and without aggregations, along the nanotube surfaces for applications in direct ethanol/methanol fuel cells and nanoscale electronics. PMID:19843998

  5. Review of Laser Ablation Process for Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2003-01-01

    Different types of lasers are now routinely used to prepare single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The original method developed by researchers at Rice University utilized a "double pulse laser oven" process. A graphite target containing about 1 atomic percent of metal catalysts is ablated inside a 1473K oven using laser pulses (10 ns pulse width) in slow flowing argon. Two YAG lasers with a green pulse (532 nm) followed by an IR pulse (1064 nm) with a 50 ns delay are used for ablation. This set up produced single wall carbon nanotube material with about 70% purity having a diameter distribution peaked around 1.4 nm. The impurities consist of fullerenes, metal catalyst clusters (10 to 100 nm diameter) and amorphous carbon. The rate of production with the initial set up was about 60 mg per hour with 10Hz laser systems. Several researchers have used variations of the lasers to improve the rate, consistency and study effects of different process parameters on the quality and quantity of SWCNTs. These variations include one to three YAG laser systems (Green, Green and IR), different pulse widths (nano to microseconds as well as continuous) and different laser wavelengths (Alexandrite, CO, CO2, free electron lasers in the near to far infrared). It is noted that yield from the single laser (Green or IR) systems is only a fraction of the two laser systems. The yield seemed to scale up with the repetition rate of the laser systems (10 to 60 Hz) and depended on the beam uniformity and quality of the laser pulses. The shift to longer wavelength lasers (free electron, CO and CO2) did not improve the quality, but increased the rate of production because these lasers are either continuous (CW) or high repetition rate pulses (kHz to MHz). The average power and the peak power of the lasers seem to influence the yields. Very high peak powers (MegaWatts per square centimeter) are noted to increase ablation of bigger particles with reduced yields of SWCNTs. Increased average powers seem to help the conversion of the carbon from target into vapor phase to improve formation of nanotubes. The use of CW far infrared lasers reduced the need for the oven, at the expense of controlled ablation. Some of these variations are tried with different combinations and concentrations of metal catalysts (Nickel with Cobalt, Iron, Palladium and Platinum) different buffer gases (e.g. Helium); with different oven temperatures (Room temperature to 1473K); under different flow conditions (1 to 1000 kPa) and even different porosities of the graphite targets. It is to be noted that the original Cobalt and Nickel combination worked best, possibly because of improved carbonization with stable crystalline phases. The mean diameter and yield seemed to increase with increasing oven temperatures. Thermal conductivity of the buffer gas and flow conditions dictate the quality as well as quantity of the SWCNTs. Faster flows, lower pressures and heavier gases seem to increase the yields. This review will attempt to cover all these variations and their relative merits. Possible growth mechanisms under these different conditions will also be discussed.

  6. Absolute potential of the Fermi level of single-walled carbon nanotubes via hydrogenase complex formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Timothy; Svedruzic, Drazenka; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Blackburn, Jeffrey; Zhang, Shengbai; King, Paul; Heben, Michael

    2007-03-01

    The absolute potential of the Fermi level of nanotubes as a function of nanotube type is not presently understood, and is important for many nanotube applications and sorting strategies. Here, we study complexes of recombinant [FeFe] hydrogenases and single-walled carbon nanotubes. We find evidence that novel charge-transfer complexes are formed and are stable, which enables further study and application of this system. The hydrogenase functions as a hydrogen electrode sensitizing the nanotubes to the redox half-reaction for hydrogen. Thus the potential can be altered by changing the molecular hydrogen concentration, and this tunability is utilized to bleach various semiconducting nanotube transitions. By observing which are bleached and which remain emissive, we determine the alignment of the potential of the Fermi level of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes. The experimentally determined Fermi level alignment is confirmed theoretically by the first-principles DFT-PBE method.

  7. Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Reporters for the Optical Detection of Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Paul W.; Strano, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews current efforts to make glucose sensors based on the inherent optical properties of single walled carbon nanotubes. The advantages of single walled carbon nanotubes over traditional organic and nanoparticle fluorophores for in vivo-sensing applications are discussed. Two recent glucose sensors made by our group are described, with the first being an enzyme-based glucose sensor that couples a reaction mediator, which quenches nanotube fluorescence, on the surface of the nanotube with the reaction of the enzyme. The second sensor is based on competitive equilibrium binding between dextran-coated nanotubes and concanavalin A. The biocompatibility of a model sensor is examined using the chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane as a tissue model. The advantages of measuring glucose concentration directly, like most optical sensors, versus measuring the flux in glucose concentration, like most electrochemical sensors, is discussed. PMID:20144355

  8. A black body absorber from vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kohei; Ishii, Juntaro; Kishida, Hideo; Hayamizu, Yuhei; Yasuda, Satoshi; Futaba, Don N.; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Among all known materials, we found that a forest of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes behaves most similarly to a black body, a theoretical material that absorbs all incident light. A requirement for an object to behave as a black body is to perfectly absorb light of all wavelengths. This important feature has not been observed for real materials because materials intrinsically have specific absorption bands because of their structure and composition. We found a material that can absorb light almost perfectly across a very wide spectral range (0.2–200 μm). We attribute this black body behavior to stem from the sparseness and imperfect alignment of the vertical single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:19339498

  9. Diameter selective electron transfer from encapsulated ferrocenes to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizumi, Yoko; Suzuki, Hironori; Tange, Masayoshi; Okazaki, Toshiya

    2014-10-01

    The diameter selective photoluminescence quenching of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is observed upon ferrocene encapsulation, which can be attributed to electron transfer from the encapsulated ferrocenes to the SWCNTs. Interestingly, the dependence of the electron transfer process on the nanotube diameter is governed by the molecular orientation of the ferrocenes in the SWCNT rather than the reduction potentials of the SWCNT.The diameter selective photoluminescence quenching of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is observed upon ferrocene encapsulation, which can be attributed to electron transfer from the encapsulated ferrocenes to the SWCNTs. Interestingly, the dependence of the electron transfer process on the nanotube diameter is governed by the molecular orientation of the ferrocenes in the SWCNT rather than the reduction potentials of the SWCNT. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Calculated binding energies of FeCp2@SWCNTs and additional spectroscopic characterization are described in ESI. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04398g

  10. Synthesis of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes by Plasma Arc: Role of Plasma Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhart, Samir; Scott, Carl D.

    2000-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are porous objects on the molecular scale and have a low density, which gives them potential applications as adsorbent for molecular hydrogen. Their H2 absorption capacity published in the literature varies from 4 to 10% by mass according to the purity of the materials and storage conditions. Optimization of production methods of SWNTs should permit improving these new materials for storage of hydrogen. In this article, we show the potential of using SWNTs in hydrogen storage. In particular, we pose problems associated with synthesis, purification, and opening up of the nanotubes. We present an electric arc process currently used at laboratory scale to produce single wall carbon nanotubes. We discuss, in particular, operating conditions that permit growth of nanotubes and some plasma parameters that assure control of the material. Analysis of the process is carried out with the aid of local measurements of temperature and scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the materials.

  11. Intense photoluminescence from dried double-stranded DNA and single-walled carbon nanotube hybrid

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Ito, Y.; Hayashida, T.; Nii, D.; Umemura, K.; Homma, Y.

    2014-01-27

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) show near-infrared photoluminescence (PL) when they are individually isolated. This was an obstacle to use photonic properties of SWNTs on a solid surface. We show that SWNTs wrapped with DNA maintain intense PL under the dry conditions. SWNTs are well isolated individually by DNA even when the DNA-SWNT hybrids are agglomerated. This finding opens up application of SWNTs to photonic devices.

  12. Structure and Characterization of Vertically Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Márquez, Francisco; López, Vicente; Morant, Carmen; Roque-Malherbe, Rolando; Domingo, Concepción; Elizalde, Eduardo; Zamora, Félix

    2010-01-01

    Arrmore » ays of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube bundles, SWCNTs, have been synthesized by simple alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition process, carried out at 800°C. The formed SWCNTs are organized in small groups perpendicularly aligned and attached to the substrate. These small bundles show a constant diameter of ca. 30 nm and are formed by the adhesion of no more than twenty individual SWCNTs perfectly aligned along their length.« less

  13. Photochemistry of single wall carbon nanotubes embedded in a mesoporous silica matrix.

    PubMed

    Alvaro, Mercedes; Atienzar, Pedro; Bourdelande, José L; García, Hermenegildo

    2002-12-21

    By embedding single wall carbon nanotubes in a mesoporous silica matrix (SWNT@SiO2) the photochemical properties have been measured upon laser excitation at 266 nm; the SWNT@SiO2 exhibits long-lived emission (lambda em = 400 nm, tau = 0.95 microsecond), transient absorption (lambda max = 390 nm, tau = 11 microseconds) and is able to generate singlet oxygen in D2O. PMID:12536788

  14. Single-walled carbon nanotubes template the one-dimensional ordering of a polythiophene derivative.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Atsushi; Nobusawa, Kazuyuki; Hamano, Tomoe; Kikuchi, Jun-ichi

    2006-11-23

    We have used a mechanochemical high-speed vibration milling (HSVM) technique to solubilize single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in organic solvents through the formation of complexes between the SWNTs and a polythiophene (PT) derivative. This HSVM approach is superior to the conventional sonication method used to solubilize SWNTs in organic solvents. Moreover, we found that in these supramolecular complexes the PT chains were ordered one-dimensionally on the SWNT surfaces in organic solvents. [structure: see text]. PMID:17107054

  15. Chirality-dependent boron-mediated growth of nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltshire, Joseph G.; Li, Lain-Jong; Herz, Laura M.; Nicholas, Robin J.; Glerup, Marianne; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Khlobystov, Andrei N.

    2005-11-01

    A change in the relative abundance of single-walled carbon nanotubes, due to the presence of both nitrogen and boron during synthesis, has been identified through Raman and absorption spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy shows that for two specific branches boron mediates the growth of smaller-diameter zigzag or near-zigzag nanotubes. We combine our experimental results with an improved Kataura model to identify two of the preferentially grown species as (16,0) and (14,1).

  16. Supramolecularly-knitted Tethered Oligopeptide/Single-walled Carbon Nanotube Organogels

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jiong; He, Xun; Fan, Jingwei; Raymond, Jeffery E.

    2014-01-01

    A facile polymerization of an allyl-functional N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) monomer is utilized to construct an A-B-A type triblock structure containing β-sheet-rich oligomeric peptide segments tethered by a poly(ethylene oxide) chain, which are capable of dispersing and gelating single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) noncovalently in organic solvents, resulting in significant enhancement of the mechanical properties of polypeptide-based organogels. PMID:24961389

  17. Fabrication of Discrete Nanosized Cobalt Particles Encapsulated Inside Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zoican Loebick, C.; Majewska, M; Ren, F; Haller, G; Pfefferle, L

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with encapsulated nanosized cobalt particles have been synthesized by a facile and scalable method. In this approach, SWNT were filled with a cobalt acetylacetonate solution in dichloromethane by ultrasonication. In a second step, exposure to hydrogen at different temperatures released discrete cobalt particles of controllable size inside the SWNT cavity. The SWNT-Co particles systems were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis.

  18. Electron-ion quantum plasma excitations in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Afshin

    2009-01-28

    The effect of a uniform static external magnetic field in the Voigt configuration on electron-ion quantum plasma oscillations in single-walled carbon nanotubes is discussed using the linearized quantum hydrodynamic model in conjunction with Maxwell's equations. Transverse magnetic waves which propagate parallel to the surface of the nanotubes, in the presence of an external magnetic field, yield a spectrum containing a quantum magnetosonic branch in addition to the magnetoplasmon branch. PMID:21715799

  19. Wrinkling and strain softening in single-wall carbon nanotube membranes.

    PubMed

    Hobbie, E K; Simien, D O; Fagan, J A; Huh, J Y; Chung, J Y; Hudson, S D; Obrzut, J; Douglas, J F; Stafford, C M

    2010-03-26

    The nonlinear elasticity of thin supported membranes assembled from length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes is analyzed through the wrinkling instability that develops under uniaxial compression. In contrast with thin polymer films, pristine nanotube membranes exhibit strong softening under finite strain associated with bond slip and network fracture. We model the response as a shift in percolation threshold generated by strain-induced nanotube alignment in accordance with theoretical predictions. PMID:20366547

  20. Improving the mechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube sheets by intercalation of polymeric adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Jonathan N.; Blau, Werner J.; Dalton, Alan B.; Muñoz, Edgar; Collins, Steve; Kim, Bog G.; Razal, Joselito; Selvidge, Miles; Vieiro, Guillermo; Baughman, Ray H.

    2003-03-01

    Organic polymers, such as poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), and poly(styrene), were intercalated into single-walled carbon nanotube sheets by soaking the sheets in polymer solutions. Even for short soak times, significant polymer intercalation into existing free volume was observed. Tensile tests on intercalated sheets showed that the Young's modulus, strength, and toughness increased by factors of 3, 9, and 28, respectively, indicating that the intercalated polymer enhances load transmission between nanotubes.

  1. The Effects of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes on the Shear Piezoelectricity of Biopolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, Conrad; Fitz-Gerald, James M.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Park, Cheol

    2008-01-01

    Shear piezoelectricity was investigated in a series of composites consisting of increased loadings of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in poly (gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate), or PBLG. The effects of the SWCNTs on this material property in PBLG will be discussed. Their influence on the morphology of the polymer (degree of orientation and crystallinity), and electrical and dielectric properties of the composite will be reported

  2. Thermal and electrical transport in ultralow density single-walled carbon nanotube networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke Jia; Yadav, Abhishek; Kim, Kyu Hun; Oh, Youngseok; Islam, Mohammad F; Uher, Ctirad; Pipe, Kevin P

    2013-06-01

    The thermal, electrical, and thermoelectric properties of aerogels of single-walled carbon nanotubes are characterized. Their ultralow density enables the transport properties of the junctions to be distinguished from those of the nanotubes themselves. Junction thermal and electrical conductances are found to be orders of magnitude larger than those found in typical dense SWCNT networks. In particular, the average junction thermal conductance is close to the theoretical maximum for a van der Waals bonded SWCNT junction. PMID:23606438

  3. Conductivity of Thin Films Based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakov, M. S.; Kosobutsky, A. V.; Sevostyanov, O. G.; Russakov, D. M.; Lomakin, M. V.; Chirkova, I. M.; Shandakov, S. D.

    2015-03-01

    Electrical and optical properties of thin films of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) obtained by aerosol chemical vapor deposition using ethanol, ferrocene, and sulfur are studied. Structural and geometrical characteristics of the synthesis products are determined by the methods of Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The effect of sulfur on the properties of the SWCNTs and thin films based on them is found.

  4. Tutorial: Linear surface conductivity of an achiral single-wall carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemilentsau, Andrei M.

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical consideration of electromagnetic scattering by single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and SWNT arrays requires knowledge of the linear surface conductivity of an SWNT. An expression for the surface conductivity of an infinitely long SWNT was derived by Slepyan et al. [Phys. Rev. B 60, 17136-17149 (1999)]. The twin purposes of this tutorial are to succinctly discuss the derivation using the density matrix formalism and to provide ready-to-use expressions.

  5. Molecular simulation of hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes and idealized carbon slit pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qinyu; Johnson, J. Karl

    1999-01-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen gas into single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and idealized carbon slit pores is studied by computer simulation. Hydrogen-hydrogen interactions are modeled with the Silvera-Goldman potential. The Crowell-Brown potential is used to model the hydrogen-carbon interactions. Calculations include adsorption inside the tubes, in the interstitial regions of tube arrays, and on the outside surface of isolated tubes. Quantum effects are included through implementation of the path integral formalism. Comparison with classical simulations gives an indication of the importance of quantum effects for hydrogen adsorption. Quantum effects are important even at 298 K for adsorption in tube interstices. We compare our simulations with experimental data for SWNTs, graphitic nanofibers, and activated carbon. Adsorption isotherms from simulations are in reasonable agreement with experimental data for activated carbon, but do not confirm the large uptake reported for SWNTs and nanofibers. Although the adsorption potential for hydrogen in SWNTs is enhanced relative to slit pores of the same size, our calculations show that the storage capacity of an array of tubes is less than that for idealized slit pore geometries, except at very low pressures. Ambient temperature isotherms indicate that an array of nanotubes is not a suitable sorbent material for achieving DOE targets for vehicular hydrogen storage.

  6. Method for separating single-wall carbon nanotubes and compositions thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Sivarajan, Ramesh (Inventor); Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Bachilo, Sergei M. (Inventor); Weisman, R. Bruce (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a process for sorting and separating a mixture of (n, m) type single-wall carbon nanotubes according to (n, m) type. A mixture of (n, m) type single-wall carbon nanotubes is suspended such that the single-wall carbon nanotubes are individually dispersed. The nanotube suspension can be done in a surfactant-water solution and the surfactant surrounding the nanotubes keeps the nanotube isolated and from aggregating with other nanotubes. The nanotube suspension is acidified to protonate a fraction of the nanotubes. An electric field is applied and the protonated nanotubes migrate in the electric fields at different rates dependent on their (n, m) type. Fractions of nanotubes are collected at different fractionation times. The process of protonation, applying an electric field, and fractionation is repeated at increasingly higher pH to separated the (n, m) nanotube mixture into individual (n, m) nanotube fractions. The separation enables new electronic devices requiring selected (n, m) nanotube types.

  7. High-power supercapacitor electrodes from single-walled carbon nanohorn/nanotube composite.

    PubMed

    Izadi-Najafabadi, Ali; Yamada, Takeo; Futaba, Don N; Yudasaka, Masako; Takagi, Hideyuki; Hatori, Hiroaki; Iijima, Sumio; Hata, Kenji

    2011-02-22

    A novel composite is presented as a supercapacitor electrode with a high maximum power rating (990 kW/kg; 396 kW/l) exceeding power performances of other electrodes. The high-power capability of the electrode stemmed from its unique meso-macro pore structure engineered through the utilization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (20 wt %) as scaffolding for single-walled carbon nanohorns (80 wt %). The novel composite electrode also exhibited durable operation (6.5% decline in capacitance over 100 000 cycles) as a result of its monolithic chemical composition and mechanical stability. The novel composite electrode was benchmarked against another high-power electrode made from single-walled carbon nanotubes (Bucky paper electrode). While the composite electrode had a lower surface area compared to the Bucky paper electrode (280 vs 470 m(2)/g from nitrogen adsorption), it had a higher meso-macro pore volume (2.6 vs 1.6 mL/g from mercury porosimetry) which enabled the composite electrode to retain more electrolyte, ensuring facile ion transport, hence achieving a higher maximum power rating (970 vs 400 kW/kg). PMID:21210712

  8. Helicity-dependent single-walled carbon nanotube alignment on graphite for helical angle and handedness recognition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yabin; Shen, Ziyong; Xu, Ziwei; Hu, Yue; Xu, Haitao; Wang, Sheng; Guo, Xiaolei; Zhang, Yanfeng; Peng, Lianmao; Ding, Feng; Liu, Zhongfan; Zhang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Aligned single-walled carbon nanotube arrays provide a great potential for the carbon-based nanodevices and circuit integration. Aligning single-walled carbon nanotubes with selected helicities and identifying their helical structures remain a daunting issue. The widely used gas-directed and surface-directed growth modes generally suffer the drawbacks of mixed and unknown helicities of the aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. Here we develop a rational approach to anchor the single-walled carbon nanotubes on graphite surfaces, on which the orientation of each single-walled carbon nanotube sensitively depends on its helical angle and handedness. This approach can be exploited to conveniently measure both the helical angle and handedness of the single-walled carbon nanotube simultaneously at a low cost. In addition, by combining with the resonant Raman spectroscopy, the (n,m) index of anchored single-walled carbon nanotube can be further determined from the (d,θ) plot, and the assigned (n,m) values by this approach are validated by both the electronic transition energy Eii measurement and nanodevice application. PMID:23892334

  9. Helicity-dependent single-walled carbon nanotube alignment on graphite for helical angle and handedness recognition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yabin; Shen, Ziyong; Xu, Ziwei; Hu, Yue; Xu, Haitao; Wang, Sheng; Guo, Xiaolei; Zhang, Yanfeng; Peng, Lianmao; Ding, Feng; Liu, Zhongfan; Zhang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Aligned single-walled carbon nanotube arrays provide a great potential for the carbon-based nanodevices and circuit integration. Aligning single-walled carbon nanotubes with selected helicities and identifying their helical structures remain a daunting issue. The widely used gas-directed and surface-directed growth modes generally suffer the drawbacks of mixed and unknown helicities of the aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. Here we develop a rational approach to anchor the single-walled carbon nanotubes on graphite surfaces, on which the orientation of each single-walled carbon nanotube sensitively depends on its helical angle and handedness. This approach can be exploited to conveniently measure both the helical angle and handedness of the single-walled carbon nanotube simultaneously at a low cost. In addition, by combining with the resonant Raman spectroscopy, the (n,m) index of anchored single-walled carbon nanotube can be further determined from the (d,θ) plot, and the assigned (n,m) values by this approach are validated by both the electronic transition energy Eii measurement and nanodevice application. PMID:23892334

  10. Covalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes through attachment of aromatic diisocyanate molecules from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goclon, Jakub; Kozlowska, Mariana; Rodziewicz, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    We performed first-principle calculations of the covalent functionalization of metallic (6,0) and semiconducting (10,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with aromatic diisocyanate molecules, namely, 4,4‧-methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) and toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI). The corresponding binding energies of the attached molecules were scrutinized. We analyzed the changes in the electronic band structure of SWCNTs caused by the amide bond formation after the functionalization process. Furthermore, the MDI-MDI and TDI-TDI mutual interactions on the nanotube surface were investigated.

  11. Enrichment of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by carbothermic reaction for use in all-nanotube field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Li, Shisheng; Liu, Chang; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Sun, Dong-Ming; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2012-11-27

    Selective removal of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and consequent enrichment of semiconducting SWCNTs were achieved through an efficient carbothermic reaction with a NiO thin film at a relatively low temperature of 350 °C. All-SWCNT field effect transistors (FETs) were fabricated with the aid of a patterned NiO mask, in which the as-grown SWCNTs behaving as source/drain electrodes and the remaining semiconducting SWCNTs that survive in the carbothermic reaction as a channel material. The all-SWCNT FETs demonstrate improved current ON/OFF ratios of ∼10(3). PMID:23025663

  12. Influence of nanoparticle size to the electrical properties of naphthalenediimide on single-walled carbon nanotube wiring.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hirofumi; Hong, Liu; Fukumori, Minoru; Negishi, Ryota; Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Daisuke; Ogawa, Takuji

    2012-06-01

    Nanoparticles of N,N'-bis(n-alkyl)tetracarbonatenaphthalenediimide (NDI) were adsorbed on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) wires dispersed on a SiO(2) substrate. The electrical properties were measured along the long axis of the SWNTs, and in all cases through the nanoparticles showed rectification in semiconducting I-V curve. The plateau width of the I-V curve through the NDI nanoparticles on metallic SWNTs decreased as the particle size increased, while the rectification ratio increased. The conduction mechanism was changed from tunneling conduction to Schottky-like conduction and their boundary is at about 3 nm diameter. PMID:22551735

  13. Evidence for large hydrogen storage capacity in single-walled carbon nanotubes encapsulated by electroplating Pd onto a Pd substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Lipson, A. G.; Lyakhov, B. F.; Saunin, E. I.; Tsivadze, A. Yu.

    2008-02-15

    We report a study of hydrogen storage in an alternative material, representing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) encapsulated by thin Pd layers onto a Pd substrate. A synergetic effect resulting in combination of the Pd and the SWCNTs properties with regards to hydrogen has been achieved. Adding SWCNTs increases the H{sub 2} capacity of the Pd-SWCNT composite by up to 25% relative to Pd metal alone under electrochemical loading. This results in a storage capacity of 8-12 wt %. with regard to the added SWCNTs.

  14. Temperature and voltage dependent current-voltage behavior of single-walled carbon nanotube transparent conducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ze-Chen; Geng, Hong-Zhang; Wang, Yan; Yang, Hai-Jie; Da, Shi-Xun; Ding, Er-Xiong; Liu, Juncheng; Yu, Ping; Fu, Yun-Qiao; Li, Xu; Pan, Hui

    2015-11-01

    High purified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were dispersed in water and transparent conducting films (TCFs) were fabricated by a spray coating. The produced uniform SWCNT-TCFs treated by nitric acid have a relatively low sheet resistance and high transmittance. The current-voltage (I-V) behaviors of the TCFs were measured at room to higher temperature during the heating or cooling process. It was found that the I-V behavior of TCFs strongly dependent on the temperature and applied voltage. The sheet resistance showed semiconductor behavior at low temperature and low voltage, while it showed metallic behavior at high temperature and high voltage.

  15. Nano-Plasticity of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Under Uniaxial Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Menon, Madu; Cho, Kyeongjae

    1999-01-01

    Nano-plasticity of thin single-wall carbon nanotubes under uniaxial compression is investigated through generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GTBMD) and ab-initio electronic structure methods. A novel mechanism of nano-plasticity of carbon nanotubes under uniaxial compression is observed in which bonding geometry collapses from a graphitic (sp(sup 2)) to a localized diamond like (sp(sup 3)) reconstruction. The computed critical stress (approximately equals 153 G Pa) and the shape of the resulting plastic deformation is in good agreement with recent experimental observation of collapse and fracture of compressed carbon nanotubes in polymer composites.

  16. Single-walled carbon nanotubes growing radially from YC2 particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dan; Seraphin, Supapan; Wang, Su

    1994-09-01

    In the primary soot produced by arc discharge using an yttrium carbide loaded anode, bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWT) are observed, protruding radially from YC2 particles coated with graphitic multilayers. The graphitic cages separating YC2 particle and SWT bundles fall into the narrow range of 10-20 layers. The morphology of the clusters suggests a two-step growth model: The radial SWT growth pattern is first initiated by catalytic action between the YC2 droplet and the carbon in the gas phase. Second, and upon cooling, the graphitic cage starts by segregating excess carbon from the YC2 bulk, arresting further growth of SWT.

  17. Electron transport properties of a single-walled carbon nanotube in the presence of hydrogen cyanide: first-principles analysis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anurag; Sharma, Vikash; Kaur, Kamalpreet; Khan, Md Shahzad; Ahuja, Rajeev; Rao, V K

    2015-07-01

    First-principles analysis based on density functional theory was performed to compute the electronic and transport properties of a single-walled carbon nanotube in the presence of hydrogen cyanide. A chiral (4,1) carbon nanotube was found to become less metallic as the number of hydrogen cyanide molecules nearby increased. When there were a sufficient number of hydrogen cyanide molecules close to the nanotube, it became semiconducting. This metallic to semiconducting transformation of the nanotube was verified by analyzing its conductance and current as a function of the number of molecules of hydrogen cyanide present. The conductivity of the carbon nanotube was very high when no hydrogen cyanide molecules were present, but decreased considerably when even just a single hydrogen cyanide molecule approached the surface of the nanotube. PMID:26072123

  18. Exposure to carbon nanotube material: aerosol release during the handling of unrefined single-walled carbon nanotube material.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Andrew D; Baron, Paul A; Foley, Michael; Shvedova, Anna A; Kisin, Elena R; Castranova, Vincent

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes represent a relatively recently discovered allotrope of carbon that exhibits unique properties. While commercial interest in the material is leading to the development of mass production and handling facilities, little is known of the risk associated with exposure. In a two-part study, preliminary investigations have been carried out into the potential exposure routes and toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotube material (SWCNT)--a specific form of the allotrope. The material is characterized by bundles of fibrous carbon molecules that may be a few nanometers in diameter, but micrometers in length. The two production processes investigated use-transition metal catalysts, leading to the inclusion of nanometer-scale metallic particles within unrefined SWCNT material. A laboratory-based study was undertaken to evaluate the physical nature of the aerosol formed from SWCNT during mechanical agitation. This was complemented by a field study in which airborne and dermal exposure to SWCNT was investigated while handling unrefined material. Although laboratory studies indicated that with sufficient agitation, unrefined SWCNT material can release fine particles into the air, concentrations generated while handling material in the field were very low. Estimates of the airborne concentration of nanotube material generated during handling suggest that concentrations were lower than 53 microg/m(3) in all cases. Glove deposits of SWCNT during handling were estimated at between 0.2 mg and 6 mg per hand. PMID:14668113

  19. Direct measurement of the absolute absorption spectrum of individual semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Paillet, Matthieu; Tran, Huy Nam; Than, Xuan Tinh; Guebrou, Samuel Aberra; Ayari, Anthony; Miguel, Alfonso San; Phan, Ngoc-Minh; Zahab, Ahmed-Azmi; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Fatti, Natalia Del; Vallée, Fabrice

    2013-09-01

    The optical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes are very promising for developing novel opto-electronic components and sensors with applications in many fields. Despite numerous studies performed using photoluminescence or Raman and Rayleigh scattering, knowledge of their optical response is still partial. Here we determine using spatial modulation spectroscopy, over a broad optical spectral range, the spectrum and amplitude of the absorption cross-section of individual semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes. These quantitative measurements permit determination of the oscillator strength of the different excitonic resonances and their dependencies on the excitonic transition and type of semiconducting nanotube. A non-resonant background is also identified and its cross-section comparable to the ideal graphene optical absorbance. Furthermore, investigation of the same single-wall nanotube either free standing or lying on a substrate shows large broadening of the excitonic resonances with increase of oscillator strength, as well as stark weakening of polarization-dependent antenna effects, due to nanotube-substrate interaction.

  20. Direct measurement of the absolute absorption spectrum of individual semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Paillet, Matthieu; Tran, Huy Nam; Than, Xuan Tinh; Guebrou, Samuel Aberra; Ayari, Anthony; San Miguel, Alfonso; Phan, Ngoc-Minh; Zahab, Ahmed-Azmi; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Del Fatti, Natalia; Vallée, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    The optical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes are very promising for developing novel opto-electronic components and sensors with applications in many fields. Despite numerous studies performed using photoluminescence or Raman and Rayleigh scattering, knowledge of their optical response is still partial. Here we determine using spatial modulation spectroscopy, over a broad optical spectral range, the spectrum and amplitude of the absorption cross-section of individual semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes. These quantitative measurements permit determination of the oscillator strength of the different excitonic resonances and their dependencies on the excitonic transition and type of semiconducting nanotube. A non-resonant background is also identified and its cross-section comparable to the ideal graphene optical absorbance. Furthermore, investigation of the same single-wall nanotube either free standing or lying on a substrate shows large broadening of the excitonic resonances with increase of oscillator strength, as well as stark weakening of polarization-dependent antenna effects, due to nanotube-substrate interaction. PMID:24071824

  1. Plasma-synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, R.; Kaneko, T.; Kato, T.; Li, Y. F.

    2011-05-01

    Plasma-based nanotechnology is a rapidly developing area of research ranging from physics of gaseous and liquid plasmas to material science, surface science and nanofabrication. In our case, nanoscopic plasma processing is performed to grow single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with controlled chirality distribution and to further develop SWNT-based materials with new functions corresponding to electronic and biomedical applications. Since SWNTs are furnished with hollow inner spaces, it is very interesting to inject various kinds of atoms and molecules into their nanospaces based on plasma nanotechnology. The encapsulation of alkali-metal atoms, halogen atoms, fullerene or azafullerene molecules inside the carbon nanotubes is realized using ionic plasmas of positive and negative ions such as alkali-fullerene, alkali-halogen, and pair or quasipair ion plasmas. Furthermore, an electrolyte solution plasma with DNA negative ions is prepared in order to encapsulate DNA molecules into the nanotubes. It is found that the electronic and optical properties of various encapsulated SWNTs are significantly changed compared with those of pristine ones. As a result, a number of interesting transport phenomena such as air-stable n- and p-type behaviour, p-n junction characteristic, and photoinduced electron transfer are observed. Finally, the creation of an emerging SWNTs-based nanobioelectronics system is challenged. Specifically, the bottom-up electric-field-assisted reactive ion etching is proposed to control the chirality of SWNTs, unexplored SWNT properties of magnetism and superconductivity are aimed at being pioneered, and innovative biomedical-nanoengineering with encapsulated SWNTs of higher-order structure are expected to be developed by applying advanced gas-liquid interfacial plasmas.

  2. Debundling and dissolution of single-walled carbon nanotubes in amide solvents.

    PubMed

    Furtado, C A; Kim, U J; Gutierrez, H R; Pan, Ling; Dickey, E C; Eklund, Peter C

    2004-05-19

    Wet chemical methods involving ultrasound and amide solvents were used to purify and separate large bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into individual nanotubes that could then be transported to silicon or mica substrates. The SWNTs studied were produced by the arc-discharge process. Dry oxidation was used in an initial step to remove amorphous carbon. Subsequently, two acid purification schemes were investigated (HCl- and HNO(3)-reflux) to remove the metal growth catalyst (Ni-Y). Finally, ultrasonic dispersion of isolated tubes into either N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) or N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) was carried out. Raman scattering, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and electron microscopy were used to study the evolution of the products. Raman scattering was used to probe possible wall damage during the chemical processing. We found that both HCl and HNO(3) could be used to successfully remove the Ni-Y below approximately 1 wt %. However, the HNO(3)-reflux produced significant wall damage (that could be reversed by vacuum annealing at 1000 degrees C). In the dispersion step, both amide solvents (DMF and NMP) produced a high degree of isolated tubes in the final product, and no damage during this dispersion step was observed. HNO(3)-refluxed tubes were found to disperse the best into the amide solvents, perhaps because of significant wall functionalization. AFM was used to study the filament diameter and length distributions in the final product, and interesting differences in these distributions were observed, depending on the chemical processing route. PMID:15137775

  3. Control of the Diameter and Chiral Angle Distributions during Production of Single-wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolaev, Pavel; Holmes, William; Sosa, Edward; Boul, Peter; Arepalli, Sivaram; Yowell, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    Many applications of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), especially in microelectronics, will benefit from use of certain (n,m) nanotube types (metallic, small gap semiconductor, etc.). However, as produced SWCNT samples are polydispersed, with many (n,m) types present and typical approximate 1:2 metal/semiconductor ratio. It has been recognized that production of SWCNTs with narrow 'tube type populations' is beneficial for their use in applications, as well as for the subsequent sorting efforts. In the present work, SWCNTs were produced by a pulsed laser vaporization (PLV) technique. The nanotube type populations were studied with respect to the production temperature with two catalyst compositions: Co/Ni and Rh/Pd. The nanotube type populations were measured via photoluminescence, UV-Vis-NIR absorption and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that in the case of Co/Ni catalyst, decreased production temperature leads to smaller average diameter, exceptionally narrow diameter distribution, and strong preference toward (8,7) nanotubes. The other nanotubes present are distributed evenly in the 7-30 deg chiral angle range. In the case of Rh/Pd catalyst, a decrease in the temperature leads to a small decrease in the average diameter, with the chiral angle distribution skewed towards 30 o and a preference toward (7,6), (8,6) and (8,7) nanotubes. However, the diameter distribution remains rather broad. These results demonstrate that PLV production technique can provide at least partial control over the nanotube (n,m) populations. In addition, these results have implications for the understanding the nanotube nucleation mechanism in the laser oven.

  4. Formation of alumina features and cadmium chalcogenide coatings of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loscutova, Ryan

    Acetate- and methoxy(ethoxyethoxy)acetate-functionalized alumina nanoparticles (A-alumoxane and MEEA-alumoxane, respectively) have been investigated as processable, water soluble precursors to 3-dimensional (3D) ceramic features. The ceramic features can be formed by slip-casting aqueous solutions of the alumoxanes into polydimethylsiloxane molds, into which negative images of the desired features are molded. The ability to form features in the range from 50 to 450 mum in width and approximately 70 mum in depth have been investigated. The formation of the 'green body' upon drying of the alumoxane solution and its sintering to ceramic have been studied with regard to shrinkage and cracking. Physical mixtures of the two alumoxanes were investigated to determine optimum conditions for the controlled fabrication of ceramic features. Doping of MEEA-alumoxanes with metals is known to form mixed-metal phases of alumina, and the ability to form the corresponding aluminate ceramic was examined. Green body and ceramic samples were characterized by SEM, XRD, BET, and Vickers hardness measurements. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and cadmium chalcogenides (CdE) are two classes of materials that have been extensively researched for applications in optoelectronics-based devices. The ability to use liquid-phase deposition (LPD) to create CdE-SWNT composites and CdE-SWNT thin coatings has been investigated in both organic and aqueous solvent systems. Raman spectroscopy has been performed on CdE-SWNT coating baths during the deposition process, to examine the effects of the combination of these two materials on the previously characterized fluorescence bands resulting from individually encased semiconducting nanotubes in micelles. Liquid-phase deposition of silica has been previously been shown to be seeded by the presence of fullerenols in solution under acidic conditions. The applicability of this mechanism towards LPD of CdS under basic conditions has been examined.

  5. Simultaneous synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene in a magnetically-enhanced arc plasma.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Shashurin, Alexey; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Keidar, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and graphene attract a deluge of interest of scholars nowadays due to their very promising application for molecular sensors, field effect transistor and super thin and flexible electronic devices(1-4). Anodic arc discharge supported by the erosion of the anode material is one of the most practical and efficient methods, which can provide specific non-equilibrium processes and a high influx of carbon material to the developing structures at relatively higher temperature, and consequently the as-synthesized products have few structural defects and better crystallinity. To further improve the controllability and flexibility of the synthesis of carbon nanostructures in arc discharge, magnetic fields can be applied during the synthesis process according to the strong magnetic responses of arc plasmas. It was demonstrated that the magnetically-enhanced arc discharge can increase the average length of SWCNT (5), narrow the diameter distribution of metallic catalyst particles and carbon nanotubes (6), and change the ratio of metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes (7), as well as lead to graphene synthesis (8). Furthermore, it is worthwhile to remark that when we introduce a non-uniform magnetic field with the component normal to the current in arc, the Lorentz force along the J×B direction can generate the plasmas jet and make effective delivery of carbon ion particles and heat flux to samples. As a result, large-scale graphene flakes and high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes were simultaneously generated by such new magnetically-enhanced anodic arc method. Arc imaging, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy were employed to analyze the characterization of carbon nanostructures. These findings indicate a wide spectrum of opportunities to manipulate with the properties of nanostructures produced in plasmas by means of controlling the arc conditions. PMID:22330847

  6. Simultaneous Synthesis of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene in a Magnetically-enhanced Arc Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Shashurin, Alexey; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Keidar, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and graphene attract a deluge of interest of scholars nowadays due to their very promising application for molecular sensors, field effect transistor and super thin and flexible electronic devices1-4. Anodic arc discharge supported by the erosion of the anode material is one of the most practical and efficient methods, which can provide specific non-equilibrium processes and a high influx of carbon material to the developing structures at relatively higher temperature, and consequently the as-synthesized products have few structural defects and better crystallinity. To further improve the controllability and flexibility of the synthesis of carbon nanostructures in arc discharge, magnetic fields can be applied during the synthesis process according to the strong magnetic responses of arc plasmas. It was demonstrated that the magnetically-enhanced arc discharge can increase the average length of SWCNT 5, narrow the diameter distribution of metallic catalyst particles and carbon nanotubes 6, and change the ratio of metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes 7, as well as lead to graphene synthesis 8. Furthermore, it is worthwhile to remark that when we introduce a non-uniform magnetic field with the component normal to the current in arc, the Lorentz force along the J×B direction can generate the plasmas jet and make effective delivery of carbon ion particles and heat flux to samples. As a result, large-scale graphene flakes and high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes were simultaneously generated by such new magnetically-enhanced anodic arc method. Arc imaging, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy were employed to analyze the characterization of carbon nanostructures. These findings indicate a wide spectrum of opportunities to manipulate with the properties of nanostructures produced in plasmas by means of controlling the arc conditions. PMID:22330847

  7. Phototransformation-Induced Aggregation of Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: The Importance of Amorphous Carbon.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wen-Che; He, Chen-Jing; Wang, Yi-Sheng; Wang, David K; Zepp, Richard G

    2016-04-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with proper functionalization are desirable for applications that require dispersion in aqueous and biological environments, and functionalized SWCNTs also serve as building blocks for conjugation with specific molecules in these applications. In this study, we examined the phototransformation of carboxylated SWCNTs and associated amorphous carbon impurities in the presence or absence of H2O2 under simulated sunlight conditions. We found that while carboxylated SWCNTs were rather unreactive with respect to direct solar photolysis, they photoreacted in the presence of H2O2, forming CO2 and strongly aggregated SWCNT products that precipitated. Photoreaction caused SWCNTs to lose oxygen-containing functionalities, and interestingly, the resulting photoproducts had spectral characteristics similar to those of parent carboxylated SWCNTs whose amorphous carbon was removed by base washing. These results indicated that photoreaction of the amorphous carbon was likely involved. The removal of amorphous carbon after indirect photoreaction was confirmed with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Further studies using carboxylated SWCNTs with and without base washing indicate that amorphous carbon reduced the extent of aggregation caused by photoreaction. The second-order rate constant for carboxylated SWCNTs reacting with (•)OH was estimated to be in the range of 1.7-3.8 × 10(9) MC(-1) s(-1). The modeled phototransformation half-lives fall in the range of 2.8-280 days in typical sunlit freshwaters. Our study indicates that photosensitized reactions involving (•)OH may be a transformation and removal pathway of functionalized SWCNTs in the aquatic environment, and that the residual amorphous carbon associated with SWCNTs plays a role in SWCNT stabilization. PMID:26928260

  8. The Infinite Possible Growth Ambients that Support Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Forest Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Hiroe; Goto, Jundai; Yasuda, Satoshi; Sakurai, Shunsuke; Yumura, Motoo; Futaba, Don N.; Hata, Kenji

    2013-11-01

    We report the virtually infinite possible carbon feedstocks which support the highly efficient growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using on the water-assisted chemical vapor deposition method. Our results demonstrate that diverse varieties of carbon feedstocks, in the form of hydrocarbons, spanning saturated rings (e.g. trans-deca-hydronaphthalene), saturated chains (e.g. propane), unsaturated rings (e.g. dicyclopentadiene), and unsaturated chains (e.g. ethylene) could be used as a carbon feedstocks with SWCNT forests with heights exceeding 100 ums. Further, we found that all the resultant SWCNTs possessed similar average diameter indicating that the diameter was mainly determined by the catalyst rather than the carbon feedstock within this synthetic system. A demonstration of the generality was the synthesis of a carbon nanotube forest from a highly unorthodox combination of gases where trans-decahydronaphthalene acted as the carbon feedstock and benzaldehyde acted as the growth enhancer.

  9. Ion transport and electrochemical tuning of Fermi level in single-wall carbon nanotube probed by in situ Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Robertson, J.

    2006-10-01

    In situ Raman spectroscopy technique was employed to investigate the ion transport process and to determine the concomitant electrochemical tuning of Fermi level in single-wall carbon nanotube. The variation of structural bonding in single-wall carbon nanotube bundle dipped in aqueous alkaline earth halide electrolyte such as CaCl2 with electrochemical biasing was monitored. It is because Raman can detect changes in C-C bond length through radial breathing mode at ˜184cm-1 that varies inversely with the nanotube diameter and the G band at ˜1590cm-1 that varies with the axial bond length. Consistent reversible and substantial variations in Raman intensity of both the modes induced by electrode potential point at the fine and continuous tuning (alternatively, emptying/depleting or filling) of the specific bonding and antibonding states. Qualitatively, the results were explained in terms of changes in the energy gaps between the one-dimensional van Hove singularities present in the electron density of states arising possibly due to the alterations in the overlap integral of π bonds between the p orbitals of the adjacent carbon atoms. We estimated the extent of variation of the absolute potential of the Fermi level and overlap integral (γ0) between the nearest-neighbor carbon atoms from modeling the electrochemical potential dependence of Raman intensity. Observations also suggest that the work function of the tube is larger for the metallic nanotubes in contrast to the simultaneously present semiconducting nanotubes.

  10. Ring windings from single-wall carbon nanotubes: A distinct element method study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuezhou; Gaidǎu, Cristian; Ostanin, Igor; Dumitricǎ, Traian

    2013-10-01

    Combining mesoscale distinct element method simulations with analytical modeling, we predict the ability of individual single-wall carbon nanotubes to form stable ring windings with multiple turns, in spite of their remarkable stiffness. The stability of these structures arises from the energy balance between the bending strain energy stored in the covalent bonds and the long-ranged van der Waals attraction along the turns. The significant energy density achieved in the ring windings made out of ultralong carbon nanotubes makes these architectures interesting for energy storage applications.

  11. The effect of imposed temperature difference on thermal conductivity in armchair single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehri, Ali; Jamaati, Maryam; Moradi, Moslem

    2015-02-01

    Thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes depends on various factors. The simulation of heat transport in armchair single-walled carbon nanotube by direct nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) method employing Tersoff-Brenner potential indicates that, thermal conductivity decreases with increase in temperature difference between two ends of the tube. Increasing the imposed temperature differential along the tube axis, leads to domination of Umklapp scattering and impacts the heat transport. The applied temperature difference does not influence the behavior of thermal conductivity vs. tube length, diameter and temperature, but changes its value.

  12. Carbohydrate conjugation through microwave-assisted functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes using perfluorophenyl azides.

    PubMed

    Kong, Na; Shimpi, Manishkumar R; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-03-20

    Carbohydrate-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized using microwave-assisted reaction of perfluorophenyl azide with the nanotubes. The results showed that microwave radiation provides a rapid and effective means to covalently attach carbohydrates to SWNTs, producing carbohydrate-SWNT conjugates for biorecognition. The carbohydrate-functionalized SWNTs were furthermore shown to interact specifically with cognate carbohydrate-specific proteins (lectins), resulting in predicted recognition patterns. The carbohydrate-presenting SWNTs constitute a new platform for sensitive protein- or cell recognition, which pave the way for glycoconjugated carbon nanomaterials in biorecognition applications. PMID:25746392

  13. Carbohydrate Conjugation through Microwave-Assisted Functionalization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using Perfluorophenyl Azides

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Na; Shimpi, Manishkumar R.; Park, Jae Hyeung

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized using microwave-assisted reaction of perfluorophenyl azide with the nanotubes. The results showed that microwave radiation provides a rapid and effective means to covalently attach carbohydrates to SWNTs, producing carbohydrate-SWNT conjugates for biorecognition. The carbohydrate-functionalized SWNTs were furthermore shown to interact specifically with cognate carbohydrate-specific proteins (lectins), resulting in predicted recognition patterns. The carbohydrate-presenting SWNTs constitute a new platform for sensitive protein- or cell recognition, which pave the way for glycoconjugated carbon nanomaterials in biorecognition applications. PMID:25746392

  14. Effective permittivity of single-walled carbon nanotube composites: Two-fluid model

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin; Zangeneh, Hamid Reza; Moghadam, Firoozeh Karimi

    2015-12-15

    We develop an effective medium theory to obtain effective permittivity of a composite of two-dimensional (2D) aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. Electronic excitations on each nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of a 2D electron gas represented by two interacting fluids, which takes into account different nature of the σ and π electrons. Calculations of both real and imaginary parts of the effective dielectric function of the system are presented, for different values of the filling factor and radius of carbon nanotubes.

  15. Electrical properties of gas sensors based on graphene and single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrashov, Ivan I.; Sokolov, Igor V.; Rusakov, Pavel S.; Rybin, Maxim G.; Barmin, Alexander A.; Rizakhanov, Razhudin N.; Obraztsova, Elena D.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present investigation of the influence of different gases (carbon dioxide, ammonia, and iodine vapor) on the sensory properties of graphene and single-wall carbon nanotube films. The gas molecules are adsorbed by carbon films (graphene or nanotubes) and change the film's electrical resistance. In the course of this work, the setup for studying the electrophysical properties of carbon nanomaterials has been designed and constructed in the lab. With this home-made equipment, we have demonstrated a high efficiency of graphene and nanotubes as adsorbents of different gases and a possibility to use these materials as gas sensors. We have also performed a chemical modification of graphene and carbon nanotubes by attaching the nanoparticles of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of sensors.

  16. Seed crystals and catalyzed epitaxy of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuhuang

    This thesis demonstrates the continued growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from seeded SWNTs in a way analogous to epitaxy or cloning; that is, the SWNTs grow as a seamless extension to the existing seeded SWNTs and have the same diameter and chirality as those of the SWNT seeds. The experiments were carried out in three key steps, including: (1) preparing a macroscopic array of open-ended SWNTs; (2) reductively docking transition metals as a catalyst to the nanometer-sized open ends; and then (3) heating the whole up to 700--850°C in the presence of a carbon feedstock such as ethanol or ethylene. The resulting SWNT ropes inherit the diameters and chirality from the seeded SWNTs, as indicated by the closely matched frequencies of Raman radial breathing modes before and after the growth. As a control, only sparse nanotubes grew from closed-ended SWNTs, ruling out spontaneous nucleation as a dominating mechanism in our experiments. This experiment proved for the first time the growth of SWNTs can be separated from the nucleation step. The ability to separate the typically inefficient nucleation step from the growth of SWNTs and to restart the growth opens the possibility of amplifying SWNTs with only the desired (n, m). The success in the continued growth was enabled with the creation of macroscopic arrays of open-ended SWNTs from a neat SWNT fiber. A variety of techniques including cryo-microtoming and surface etching chemistry have been developed to produce a macroscopic (˜1200mum2), aligned, and clean---largely free of amorphous carbon, oxides, and metal residuals---SWNT substrate with open-ended SWNTs aligned along the fiber axis. Alternatively, the fiber was milled perpendicular to the fiber axis with a gallium focused ion beam to produce a planar, free-standing, ultra-thin, "bed-of-nails" SWNT membrane---a single layer of parallel SWNTs densely packed and aligned along the normal of the membrane.

  17. G-band resonant Raman study of 62 isolated single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorio, A.; Souza Filho, A. G.; Dresselhaus, G.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Swan, A. K.; Ünlü, M. S.; Goldberg, B. B.; Pimenta, M. A.; Hafner, J. H.; Lieber, C. M.; Saito, R.

    2002-04-01

    We report G-band resonance Raman spectra of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) at the single-nanotube level. By measuring 62 different isolated SWNTs resonant with the incident laser, and having diameters dt ranging between 0.95 nm and 2.62 nm, we have conclusively determined the dependence of the two most intense G-band features on the nanotube structure. The higher-frequency peak is not diameter dependent (ω+G=1591 cm-1), while the lower-frequency peak is given by ω-G=ω+G-C/d2t, with C being different for metallic and semiconducting SWNTs (CM>CS). The peak frequencies do not depend on nanotube chiral angle. The intensity ratio between the two most intense features is in the range 0.1

  18. Carbon nanotunnels form from single-walled carbon nanotubes interacting with a diamond (100)-(2 X 1) surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, D. A.; Sternberg, M.; Zapol, P.; Curtiss, L. A.

    2011-08-01

    A quantum chemical study of the interaction of (5,5), (7,7), (9,9) and (8,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes with a clean (100)-(2 x 1) diamond surface is reported. Stable structures with covalent bonds at the interface were found for carbon nanotubes oriented parallel or perpendicular to the dimer rows on the reconstructed (100) surface. The binding energy of the most stable (5,5) nanotube-diamond structure is 1.7 eV/{angstrom}, and is attributed to strong covalent bonds formed between the carbon nanotube and the diamond surface. The structure of the nanotube is distorted by adsorption on the surface such that it adopts a tunnel-like geometry. Two other nanotunnel geometries were found for the (5,5) nanotube, with binding energies of 1.39 and 1.09 eV/{angstrom}. In the most stable (5,5) nanotube-diamond structure the interaction between the nanotube and the diamond surface produces a 0.6 eV band gap near the Fermi level, but the metallic character of the nanotube is maintained in the two other, less strongly bound nanotunnel structures. No charge transfer occurs between the diamond surface and the nanotunnels in any of the three orientations. Binding energies decrease with increases in tube diameter, to the extent that one of the three nanotunnel structures is not formed by (9,9) carbon nanotubes.

  19. Dithiafulvenyl-grafted phenylene ethynylene polymers as selective and reversible dispersants for single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mulla, Karimulla; Liang, Shuai; Shaik, Haseena; Younes, Eyad A; Adronov, Alex; Zhao, Yuming

    2015-01-01

    Phenylene ethynylene-based ?-conjugated polymers grafted with dithiafulvenyl groups on their side chains were found to be efficient in dispersing single-walled carbon nanotubes in a selective and controllable way. PMID:25388522

  20. Spray deposition of steam treated and functionalized single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotube films for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xin; Chu, Bryan T. T.; Ballesteros, Belén; Wang, Weiliang; Johnston, Colin; Sykes, John M.; Grant, Patrick S.

    2009-02-01

    Steam purified, carboxylic and ester functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) films with homogeneous distribution and flexible control of thickness and area were fabricated on polymeric and metallic substrates using a modified spray deposition technique. By employing a pre-sprayed polyelectrolyte, the adhesion of the carbon nanotube (CNT) films to the substrates was significantly enhanced by electrostatic interaction. Carboxylic and ester functionalization improved electrochemical performance when immersed in 0.1 M H2SO4 and the specific capacitance reached 155 and 77 F g-1 for carboxylic functionalized SWNT and MWNT films respectively. Compared with existing techniques such as hot pressing, vacuum filtration and dip coating, the ambient pressure spray deposition technique is suggested as particularly well suited for preparing CNT films at large scale for applications including providing electrodes for electrochemical supercapacitors and paper batteries.

  1. Modulation of energy/electron transfer in gold nanoclusters by single walled carbon nanotubes and further consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Tarasankar; Maity, Arnab; Mondal, Somen; Purkayastha, Pradipta

    2015-04-01

    Semiconductor or metallic character in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is developed because of their chirality and diameter. Depending upon the extent of these characters in a particular sample of SWCNT, various electronic and mechanical applications are formulated. In this work we used protein protected red emitting gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) to enhance the metallic character in SWCNTs through electron transfer induced by photonic excitation. The AuNCs have been synthesized following a known protocol that generates Au+ protected Au0 clusters. Normal and carboxylic acid functionalized SWCNTs were obtained commercially for usage in the experiments. The non-functionalized SWCNTs facilitate intersystem electron transfer while the functionalized ones defer the phenomenon, which, in turn, affects the metallic character in the nanotubes. Steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy prove the dynamics and electrochemistry supports the intersystem electron transfer process.

  2. Photoinduced spontaneous free-carrier generation in semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaehong; Reid, Obadiah G; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Rumbles, Garry

    2015-01-01

    Strong quantum confinement and low dielectric screening impart single-walled carbon nanotubes with exciton-binding energies substantially exceeding kBT at room temperature. Despite these large binding energies, reported photoluminescence quantum yields are typically low and some studies suggest that photoexcitation of carbon nanotube excitonic transitions can produce free charge carriers. Here we report the direct measurement of long-lived free-carrier generation in chirality-pure, single-walled carbon nanotubes in a low dielectric solvent. Time-resolved microwave conductivity enables contactless and quantitative measurement of the real and imaginary photoconductance of individually suspended nanotubes. The conditions of the microwave conductivity measurement allow us to avoid the complications of most previous measurements of nanotube free-carrier generation, including tube-tube/tube-electrode contact, dielectric screening by nearby excitons and many-body interactions. Even at low photon fluence (approximately 0.05 excitons per ?m length of tubes), we directly observe free carriers on excitation of the first and second carbon nanotube exciton transitions. PMID:26531728

  3. Photoinduced spontaneous free-carrier generation in semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaehong; Reid, Obadiah G.; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Rumbles, Garry

    2015-11-01

    Strong quantum confinement and low dielectric screening impart single-walled carbon nanotubes with exciton-binding energies substantially exceeding kBT at room temperature. Despite these large binding energies, reported photoluminescence quantum yields are typically low and some studies suggest that photoexcitation of carbon nanotube excitonic transitions can produce free charge carriers. Here we report the direct measurement of long-lived free-carrier generation in chirality-pure, single-walled carbon nanotubes in a low dielectric solvent. Time-resolved microwave conductivity enables contactless and quantitative measurement of the real and imaginary photoconductance of individually suspended nanotubes. The conditions of the microwave conductivity measurement allow us to avoid the complications of most previous measurements of nanotube free-carrier generation, including tube-tube/tube-electrode contact, dielectric screening by nearby excitons and many-body interactions. Even at low photon fluence (approximately 0.05 excitons per μm length of tubes), we directly observe free carriers on excitation of the first and second carbon nanotube exciton transitions.

  4. Photoinduced spontaneous free-carrier generation in semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaehong; Reid, Obadiah G.; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Rumbles, Garry

    2015-01-01

    Strong quantum confinement and low dielectric screening impart single-walled carbon nanotubes with exciton-binding energies substantially exceeding kBT at room temperature. Despite these large binding energies, reported photoluminescence quantum yields are typically low and some studies suggest that photoexcitation of carbon nanotube excitonic transitions can produce free charge carriers. Here we report the direct measurement of long-lived free-carrier generation in chirality-pure, single-walled carbon nanotubes in a low dielectric solvent. Time-resolved microwave conductivity enables contactless and quantitative measurement of the real and imaginary photoconductance of individually suspended nanotubes. The conditions of the microwave conductivity measurement allow us to avoid the complications of most previous measurements of nanotube free-carrier generation, including tube–tube/tube–electrode contact, dielectric screening by nearby excitons and many-body interactions. Even at low photon fluence (approximately 0.05 excitons per μm length of tubes), we directly observe free carriers on excitation of the first and second carbon nanotube exciton transitions. PMID:26531728

  5. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günay, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  6. Photoinduced Spontaneous Free-Carrier Generation in Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jaehong; Reid, Obadiah G.; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Rumbles, Garry

    2015-11-04

    The strong quantum confinement and low dielectric screening impart single-walled carbon nanotubes with exciton-binding energies substantially exceeding kBT at room temperature. Despite these large binding energies, reported photoluminescence quantum yields are typically low and some studies suggest that photoexcitation of carbon nanotube excitonic transitions can produce free charge carriers. Here we report the direct measurement of long-lived free-carrier generation in chirality-pure, single-walled carbon nanotubes in a low dielectric solvent. Time-resolved microwave conductivity enables contactless and quantitative measurement of the real and imaginary photoconductance of individually suspended nanotubes. We found that the conditions of the microwave conductivity measurement allow us to avoid the complications of most previous measurements of nanotube free-carrier generation, including tube–tube/tube–electrode contact, dielectric screening by nearby excitons and many-body interactions. At low photon fluence (approximately 0.05 excitons per μm length of tubes), we directly observe free carriers on excitation of the first and second carbon nanotube exciton transitions.

  7. Periodic alignment of Si quantum dots on hafnium oxide coated single wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmedo, Mario; Martinez-Morales, Alfredo A.; Liu, Gang; Yengel, Emre; Ozkan, Cengiz S.; Lau, Chun Ning; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Liu, Jianlin

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate a bottom up approach for the aligned epitaxial growth of Si quantum dots (QDs) on one-dimensional (1D) hafnium oxide (HfO2) ridges created by the growth of HfO2 thin film on single wall carbon nanotubes. This growth process creates a high strain 1D ridge on the HfO2 film, which favors the formation of Si seeds over the surrounding flat HfO2 area. Periodic alignment of Si QDs on the 1D HfO2 ridge was observed, which can be controlled by varying different growth conditions, such as growth temperature, growth time, and disilane flow rate.

  8. Transparent and flexible high-performance supercapacitors based on single-walled carbon nanotube films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanninen, Petri; Dang Luong, Nguyen; Hoang Sinh, Le; Anoshkin, Ilya V.; Tsapenko, Alexey; Seppälä, Jukka; Nasibulin, Albert G.; Kallio, Tanja

    2016-06-01

    Transparent and flexible energy storage devices have garnered great interest due to their suitability for display, sensor and photovoltaic applications. In this paper, we report the application of aerosol synthesized and dry deposited single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin films as electrodes for an electrochemical double-layer capacitor (EDLC). SWCNT films exhibit extremely large specific capacitance (178 F g‑1 or 552 μF cm‑2), high optical transparency (92%) and stability for 10 000 charge/discharge cycles. A transparent and flexible EDLC prototype is constructed with a polyethylene casing and a gel electrolyte.

  9. Temperature Dependence of the Thermal Conductivity of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osman, Mohamed A.; Srivastava, Deepak

    2000-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of several single wall carbon nanotubes (CNT) has been calculated over a temperature range of 100-500 K using molecular dynamics simulations with Tersoff-Brenner potential for C-C interactions. In all cases, starting from similar values at 100K, thermal conductivities show a peaking behavior before falling off at higher temperatures. The peak position shifts to higher temperatures for nanotubes of larger diameter, and no significant dependence on the tube chirality is observed. It is shown that this phenomenon is due to onset of Umklapp scattering, which shifts to higher temperatures for nanotubes of larger diameter.

  10. Electronic modulations in a single wall carbon nanotube induced by the Au(111) surface reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clair, Sylvain; Shin, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Yousoo; Kawai, Maki

    2015-02-01

    The structural and electronic structure of single wall carbon nanotubes adsorbed on Au(111) has been investigated by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The nanotubes were dry deposited in situ in ultrahigh vacuum onto a perfectly clean substrate. In some cases, the native herringbone reconstruction of the Au(111) surface interacted directly with adsorbed nanotubes and produced long-range periodic oscillations in their local density of states, corresponding to charge transfer modulations along the tube axis. This effect, however, was observed not systematically for all tubes and only for semiconducting tubes.

  11. Molecule-induced quantum confinement in single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hida, Akira; Ishibashi, Koji

    2015-04-01

    A method of fabricating quantum-confined structures with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been developed. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy revealed that a parabolic confinement potential appeared when collagen model peptides were attached to both ends of an individual SWNT via the formation of carboxylic anhydrides. On the other hand, the confinement potential was markedly changed by yielding the peptide bonds between the SWNT and the collagen model peptides. Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements showed that a type-II quantum dot was produced in the obtained heterostructure.

  12. In Vivo Delivery of Nitric Oxide-Sensing, Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Nicole M; Strano, Michael S; Wogan, Gerald N

    2015-01-01

    Detection of nitric oxide (NO) in vivo by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is based on the fluorescent properties of SWNT and the ability of NO to quench the fluorescence signal. Alterations of the signal can be utilized to detect a small molecule in vivo that has not previously been possible by other assay techniques. The protocols described here explain the techniques used to prepare NO-detecting SWNTs and to administer them to mice by both intravenous and subcutaneous routes. These techniques can also be utilized with other SWNT sensors as well as non-SWNT sensors. PMID:26344235

  13. The behavior of benzene confined in a single wall carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Fomin, Yury D; Tsiok, Elena N; Ryzhov, Valentin N

    2015-05-01

    We present the molecular dynamics study of benzene molecules confined into the single wall carbon nanotube. The local structure and orientational ordering of benzene molecules are investigated. It is found that the molecules mostly group in the middle distance from the axis of the tube to the wall. The molecules located in the vicinity of the wall demonstrate some deviation from planar shape. There is a tilted orientational ordering of the molecules which depends on the location of the molecule. It is shown that the diffusion coefficient of the benzene molecules is very small at the conditions we report here. PMID:25753740

  14. Toward the suppression of cellular toxicity from single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenghong; Varela, Juan A; Groc, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent

    2016-01-26

    In the multidisciplinary fields of nanobiology and nanomedicine, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have shown great promise due to their unique morphological, physical and chemical properties. However, understanding and suppressing their cellular toxicity is a mandatory step before promoting their biomedical applications. In light of the flourishing recent literature, we provide here an extensive review on SWCNT cellular toxicity and an attempt to identify the key parameters to be considered in order to obtain SWCNT samples with minimal or no cellular toxicity. PMID:26678092

  15. A Facile High-speed Vibration Milling Method to Water-disperse Single- walled Carbon Nanohorns

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Chunying; Zhang, Jianfei; Sim, Jae Hyun; Burke, Brian; Williams, Keith A; Rylander, Nichole M; Campbell, Tom; Puretzky, Alexander A; Rouleau, Christopher M; Geohegan, David B; More, Karren Leslie; Esker, Alan R; Gibson, Harry W; Dorn, Harry C

    2010-01-01

    A high-speed vibration milling (HSVM) method was applied to synthesize water dispersible single- walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs). Highly reactive free radicals (HOOCCH2CH2 ) produced from an acyl peroxide under HSVM conditions react with hydrophobic SWNHs to produce a highly water dispersible derivative (f-SWNHs), which has been characterized in detail by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques together with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and dynamic light scatter- ing (DLS). The carboxylic acid functionalized, water-dispersible SWNHs material are versatile precursors that have potential applications in the biomedical area.

  16. Application of Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy for Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, N.; Jain, S.; Mittal, J.

    2015-03-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is among the few techniques that are available for the characterization of modified single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) having nanometer dimensions (~1-3 nm). CNTs can be modified either by surface functionalization or coating, between bundles of nanotubes by doping, intercalation and fully or partially filling the central core. EELS is an exclusive technique for the identification, composition analysis, and crystallization studies of the chemicals and materials used for the modification of SWCNTs. The present paper serves as a compendium of research work on the application of EELS for the characterization of modified SWCNTs.

  17. Finite length and solvent analysis effects on the squash mode of single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Fréin, C.; Quirke, N.; Zerulla, D.

    2013-10-01

    Nanotube diameters (d) are usually characterized using the radial breathing mode d-1; the squash mode frequency (f) however is predicted to vary as d-2. We demonstrate using the MM+ forcefield that for lengths <9 nm the symmetric squash mode (SSM) and asymmetric squash mode (ASM) ((10,0) SWNT (single wall carbon nanotubes)) are non-degenerate with Δf ≤ 55 cm-1. In solution, the SWNT-water interaction upshifts the ASM by 20 cm-1 and the SSM by 10 cm-1. Such asymmetries could be used to simultaneously characterize the length and diameter of short nanotubes for applications including nanoresonators and biomedical probes.

  18. Purification of single-wall carbon nanotubes by using ultrafine gold particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nihey, Fumiyuki; Mizoguti, Eiji; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; Ichihashi, Toshinari; Nakamura, Kazuo

    2000-03-01

    The purification of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is needed to enable detailed characterization and some application of this material. We report a purification method utilizing ultrafine gold particles as catalysts to selectively oxidize carbonaceous impurities in SWNT soot. The ultrafine gold particles with a diameter of 20 nm were dispersed in the soot in combination with benzalkonium chloride as surfactant. Thermogravimetric analyses and electron microscopy observations revealed that oxidation occured at about 330^circC for carbonaceous impurities and at about 410^circC for SWNTs. This selective oxidation enabled us to purify SWNTs and make the quantitative analyses of SWNTs.

  19. Influence of cysteine doping on photoluminescence intensity from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnosov, N. V.; Leontiev, V. S.; Linnik, A. S.; Karachevtsev, V. A.

    2015-03-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes can be applied for detection of cysteine. It is shown that cysteine doping (from 10-8 to 10-3 M) into aqueous suspension of nanotubes with adsorbed DNA leads to increase of PL intensity. The PL intensity was enhanced by 27% at 10-3 M cysteine concentration in suspension. Most likely, the PL intensity increases due to the passivation of p-defects on the nanotube by the cysteine containing reactive thiol group. The effect of doping with other amino acids without this group (methionine, serine, aspartic acid, lysine, proline) on the PL intensity is essentially weaker.

  20. Influence of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Thermal Expansion of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolovych, V. F.; Bulavin, L. A.; Prylutskyy, Yu. I.; Khrapatiy, S. V.; Tsierkezos, N. G.; Ritter, U.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the results of an investigation of the influence of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) functionalized with carboxyl groups on PVT data of water. Specifically, the impact of an aqueous suspension of SWCNTs (maximum concentration of 3.0 mg mL) on the isobaric thermal expansion of water in the temperature and pressure ranges of 293 K to 342 K and 0.1 MPa to 152.3 MPa, respectively, was investigated. The obtained results are discussed in terms of different structures of water confined inside and outside SWCNTs.

  1. Ultrafast spectroscopy of midinfrared internal exciton transitions in separated single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jigang; Graham, Matt W; Ma, Yingzhong; Fleming, Graham R; Kaindl, Robert A

    2010-04-30

    We report a femtosecond midinfrared study of the broadband low-energy response of individually separated (6,5) and (7,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes. Strong photoinduced absorption is observed around 200 meV, whose transition energy, oscillator strength, resonant chirality enhancement, and dynamics manifest the observation of quasi-one-dimensional intraexcitonic transitions. A model of the nanotube 1s-2p cross section agrees well with the signal amplitudes. Our study further reveals saturation of the photoinduced absorption with increasing phase-space filling of the correlated e-h pairs. PMID:20482139

  2. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Midinfrared Internal Exciton Transitions in Separated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yingzhong; Wang, Jigang; Graham, Matt; Fleming, Graham; Kaindl, Robert

    2010-01-01

    We report a femtosecond midinfrared study of the broadband low-energy response of individually separated (6,5) and (7,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes. Strong photoinduced absorption is observed around 200 meV, whose transition energy, oscillator strength, resonant chirality enhancement, and dynamics manifest the observation of quasi-one-dimensional intraexcitonic transitions. A model of the nanotube 1s-2p cross section agrees well with the signal amplitudes. Our study further reveals saturation of the photoinduced absorption with increasing phase-space filling of the correlated e-h pairs.

  3. Microwave-assisted functionalization of single-wall carbon nanotubes through diazonium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Rodriguez i Zubiri, Mireia; Vigolo, Brigitte; Dossot, Manuel; Humbert, Bernard; Fort, Yves; McRae, Edward

    2007-10-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been functionalized by a diazonium method through both a classical thermal reaction and a microwave-assisted reaction. The functionalized SWNTs have been characterized by nIR-Vis-UV absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis. The results show that SWNTs are covalently functionalized through both reactions and that the microwave-assisted reaction is more rapid. Moreover, optimal choice of the reaction time can prevent the microwave irradiation from the adverse effect of subsequently removing the functional groups on the SWNT surface. PMID:18330167

  4. Upconversion photoluminescence imaging and spectroscopy of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aota, Shun; Akizuki, Naoto; Mouri, Shinichiro; Matsuda, Kazunari; Miyauchi, Yuhei

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate microscopic observations of recently discovered efficient upconversion (anti-Stokes) photoluminescence (UCPL) [Nat. Commun. 6, 8920 (2015)] of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). UCPL images and spectra of the identical isolated SWNTs were obtained. Unlike previous observations on the SWNT ensemble, some individual SWNTs exhibit UCPL spectra coincident with Stokes PL spectra. The excitation polarization dependence of UCPL intensity indicates that the intermediate states in the upconversion process are extrinsic. These observations are likely to facilitate a comprehensive understanding of the UCPL mechanism towards the realization of highly efficient UCPL of SWNTs.

  5. Nonlinear photoluminescence properties of trions in hole-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akizuki, Naoto; Iwamura, Munechiyo; Mouri, Shinichiro; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Kawasaki, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Suemoto, Tohru; Watanabe, Kouta; Asano, Kenichi; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2014-05-01

    We studied the excitation density dependence of photoluminescence (PL) spectra of excitons and trions (charged excitons) in hole-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes. We found that the PL intensity of trions exhibited a strong nonlinear saturation behavior as the excitation density increased, whereas that of excitons exhibited a weak sublinear behavior. The strong PL saturation of trions is attributed to depletion of doped holes that are captured by excitons in the formation processes. Moreover, the effective radiative lifetime of a trion was evaluated to be approximately 20 ns.

  6. Analysis of the Photovoltaic Properties of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube/Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozawa, Daichi; Hiraoka, Kazushi; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Mouri, Shinichiro; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2012-04-01

    We studied the photovoltaic properties of single-walled carbon nanotube/Si (SWNT/Si) heterojunction cells. We observed an optimal thickness of the SWNT network film that maximizes the photovoltaic conversion efficiency. The spectra of incident photon to charge carrier efficiency indicate that the production of carriers in the Si layer mainly contributes to the photovoltaic conversion. The experimental results and loss analysis based on the equivalent circuit model suggest that the fabrication of a high-density semiconducting SWNT network at the interface of Si is the key to improving the conversion efficiency of the SWNT/n-Si heterojunction solar cell.

  7. Creep-resistant composites of alumina and single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata-Solvas, Eugenio; Poyato, Rosalía; Gómez-García, Diego; Domínguez-Rodríguez, Arturo; Radmilovic, Velimir; Padture, Nitin P.

    2008-03-01

    Composites of alumina (Al2O3) ceramic and single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been tested in uniaxial compression at 1300 and 1350°C (Ar atmosphere), and they have been found to be about two orders of magnitude more creep-resistant compared to a pure alumina of about the same grain size (0.5μm). This is attributed to partial blocking of grain-boundary sliding by SWNTs in the composites. Since the grain boundaries in the ceramic/SWNTs composites are amenable to being engineered, this constitutes an attractive approach to the design of creep-resistant ceramic composites.

  8. Evaluation of the drag force on single-walled carbon nanotubes in rarefied gases.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ross Y M; Liu, Chong; Wang, Jun; Chao, Christopher Y H; Li, Zhigang

    2012-03-01

    The drag force on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in dilute gases has been previously derived. However, the drag force formulae involve collision integrals, which are complex functions of the gas-CNT interaction potential. The unavailability of the collision integrals and interaction potential makes the application of the theoretical drag force laws impossible. In this work, we develop a potential model for the interaction between a gas and single-walled CNT. The collision integrals are then calculated based on the potential and empirical expressions are proposed. Finally, the drag force is computed directly through molecular dynamics simulations and compared with the theoretical predictions. PMID:22755052

  9. Molecular adsorption study of nicotine and caffeine on single-walled carbon nanotubes from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyung-June; Kim, Gunn; Kwon, Young-Kyun

    2013-08-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the electronic structures and binding properties of nicotine and caffeine adsorbed on single-walled carbon nanotubes to determine whether CNTs are appropriate for filtering or sensing nicotine and caffeine molecules. We find that caffeine adsorbs more strongly than nicotine. The different binding characteristics are discussed by analyzing the modification of the electronic structure of the molecule-adsorbed CNTs. We also calculate the quantum conductance of the CNTs in the presence of nicotine or caffeine adsorbates and demonstrate that the influence of caffeine is stronger than nicotine on the conductance of the host CNT.

  10. Diameter grouping in bulk samples of single-walled carbon nanotubes from optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, O.; Gorbunov, A. A.; Pompe, W.; Pichler, T.; Friedlein, R.; Knupfer, M.; Reibold, M.; Bauer, H.-D.; Dunsch, L.; Golden, M. S.; Fink, J.

    1999-10-01

    The influence of the synthesis parameters on the mean characteristics of single-wall carbon nanotubes in soot produced by the laser vaporization of graphite has been analyzed using optical absorption spectroscopy. The abundance and mean diameter of the nanotubes were found to be most influenced by the furnace temperature and the cobalt/nickel catalyst mixing ratio. Via an analysis of the fine structure in the optical spectra, the existence of preferred nanotube diameters has been established and their related fractional abundance could be determined. The results are consistent with nanotubes located mainly around the armchair axis.

  11. Enhanced thermoelectric power of single-wall carbon nanotube film blended with ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horike, Shohei; Misaki, Masahiro; Koshiba, Yasuko; Saito, Takeshi; Ishida, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the thermoelectric power of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with an ionic liquid (IL). The SWCNT/IL films showed simultaneous increase in electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient compared with the pristine SWCNT. No thermoelectric power was observed for the IL. The X-ray diffraction pattern and impedance diagram showed a unique behavior with the concentration of IL, which implies that the interaction between the SWCNTs and IL enhances the thermoelectric power of the SWCNTs. As a result of the simultaneous increase in these parameters, the power factor exhibited a 10-fold increase.

  12. Effects of ion beam heating on Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Hulman, Martin; Skakalova, Viera; Krasheninnikov, A. V.; Roth, S.

    2009-02-16

    Free standing films of single-wall carbon nanotubes were irradiated with energetic N{sup +} and C{sup 4+} ions. The observed changes in the Raman line shape of the radial breathing mode and the G band of the C{sup 4+} irradiated samples were similar to those found for a thermally annealed sample. We ascribe these changes to thermal desorption of volatile dopants from the initially doped nanotubes. A simple geometry of the experiment allows us to estimate the temperature rise by one-dimensional heat conductance equation. The calculation indicates that irradiation-mediated increase in temperature may account for the observed Raman spectra changes.

  13. All printed edge-triggered register using single walled carbon nanotube-based thin film transistor.

    PubMed

    Noh, Jinsoo; Jung, Minhun; Jung, Kyunghwan; Lee, Gwangyong; Lim, Soyeon; Kim, Daae; Subramanian, Vivek; Cho, Gyoujin

    2012-05-01

    We have studied the fabrication of Single Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWNT)-based Thin Film Transistors (TFTs) using Roll-to-Roll (R2R) gravure printer and inkjet printer on PET foils to show the possibility of printed electronics in point of mass production and low cost. In this paper, for realization of all printed multi-bits digital circuit, all printed positive-edge triggered master-slave D flip-flop (DFF) was fabricated on PET foil using printed SWNT TFTs. The printed DFF, consists of 8 NAND gates and 4 inverters, exhibit propagation delay of 75 ms at the input clock signal of 5 Hz. PMID:22852386

  14. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with uracil, guanine, thymine and L-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silambarasan, D.; Iyakutti, K.; Vasu, V.

    2014-06-01

    Experimental investigation of functionalization of oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (OSWCNTs) with three nucleic acid bases such as uracil, guanine, thymine and one amino acid, L-alanine is carried out. Initially, the SWCNTs are oxidized by acid treatment. Further, the oxidized SWCNTs are effectively functionalized with aforementioned biological compounds by ultrasonication. The diameter of OSWCNTs has increased after the adsorption of biological compounds. The cumulative Π-Π stacking, hydrogen bond and polar interaction are the key factors to realize the adsorption. The amount of adsorption of each biological compound is estimated. The adsorption of guanine is more among all the four biological compounds.

  15. Thermal buckling analysis of bridged single walled carbon nanotubes using molecular structural mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouz-Abadi, R. D.; Badri-Kouhi, E.

    2015-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the stability analysis of bridged single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) under temperature changes. A molecular structural mechanics model is utilized to investigate the free vibration frequencies and thermal buckling of SWCNT. In comparison with most of the previous studies, a temperature-variable thermal-expansion-coefficient is used that is negative under a certain temperature. Also thermal variation of Young's modulus of the CNTs is considered. Several studies are performed to investigate the critical temperature change due to heating and cooling of SWCNTs with different chiralities and slenderness ratios and the stability boundaries are determined.

  16. Cavity-enhanced Raman scattering of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumikura, Hisashi; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Taniyama, Hideaki; Notomi, Masaya

    2013-06-01

    We have demonstrated the cavity-enhanced Raman scattering of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) deposited in a silicon photonic crystal (Si PhC) nanocavity. In a resonant nanocavity, the detected Raman intensity of the CNTs is 100 times larger than that of the CNTs on a flat Si film. This enhancement results from the large local density of photon states and the large light extraction efficiency of the nanocavity. The cavity-enhanced Raman scattering of the CNTs suggests a way to develop a low-threshold CNT-based Raman laser.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation for flow characteristics in nanochannels and single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuoka, H.; Imae, T.; Kaneda, M.; Suga, K.

    2014-08-01

    Flows in graphite-, diamond- and silicon-walled nanochannels are discussed by performing molecular dynamics simulations. Flows in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene- walled nanochannels are also investigated. It is found that the flow rate in the graphite-walled channel tends to be the largest because of its slippery wall structure by the short bond length and the high molecular density of the CNTs. The flow rate in the single walled CNT at a very narrow diameter tends to increase although such a tendency is not seen in the graphene-walled channel.

  18. Reinforcement of semicrystalline polymers with collagen-modified single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sanjib; Salvetat, Jean-Paul; Saboungi, Marie-Louise

    2006-06-01

    We report on the enhancement of the mechanical properties of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) composites through functionalization of SWNTs with denatured collagen. In addition to improving compatibility with the matrix, the denatured collagen layer was found to increase the PVA matrix crystallinity, which results in a dramatic enhancement of the Young's modulus (260%), tensile strength (300%), and toughness (700%) well above what can be expected with the classical rule of mixture. A supramolecular organization at the interface is associated with an increase of PVA crystallinity as shown by the x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry.

  19. Near-infrared fluorescent single walled carbon nanotube-chitosan composite: Interfacial strain transfer efficiency assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mol Menamparambath, Mini; Arabale, Girish; Nikolaev, Pavel; Baik, Seunghyun; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2013-04-01

    Effective load transfer at the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-polymer interface is most desirable for mechanically reinforced polymer composites. Versatile layer-by-layer assembly technique achieved dispersion and uniform distribution of sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC)-solubilized SWCNTs within the polymer matrix. Electrostatic interaction between positively charged chitosan and negatively charged CMC facilitates design of an optically active biocompatible nanocomposite. Interfacial strain transfer efficiency of SWCNT-chitosan nanocomposite was assessed via SWCNT Raman and photoluminescence band shifts under uniaxial strain. Photoluminescence peak shift rates of individual semiconducting SWCNTs were investigated and compared with tight binding model calculations.

  20. Stable Dispersion of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Polyimide: the Role of Noncovalent Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Kristopher; Park, Cheol; Siochi, Emilie J.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.

    2004-06-21

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been dispersed in a nitrile functionalized polyimide matrix and the resulting composite shows excellent stability with respect to reaggregation of the nanotubes. This contrasts with the behavior of structurally similar polyimides in which the dispersion is only stable for short periods of time. Shifts in certain characteristic FTIR and Raman peaks which indicate a charge transfer interaction between the nanotubes and polymer matrix are observed. A simple model for charge transfer stabilization is presented and shown to be consistent with the experimental observations.

  1. Pore structure of raw and purified HiPco single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinke, Martin; Li, Jing; Chen, Bin; Cassell, Alan; Delzeit, Lance; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-10-01

    Very high purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were obtained from HiPco SWNT samples containing Fe particles by a two-step purification process. The raw and purified samples were characterized using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The purified sample consists of ˜0.4% Fe and the process does not seem to introduce any additional defects. The N 2 adsorption isotherm studies at 77 K reveal that the total surface area of the purified sample increases to 1587 m 2/g from 567 m 2/g for the raw material, which is the highest value reported for SWNTs.

  2. In situ Raman monitoring of single-walled carbon nanotube filling with copper chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, Timofei V.; Tonkikh, Alexander A.; Kudryashova, Ekaterina M.

    2016-03-01

    In situ characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes during their gas-phase filling with copper chloride (CuCl) was performed with Raman spectroscopy. The time dependence of positions and intensities of G, 2D, and radial breathing modes was investigated. It was demonstrated that the adsorption of copper chloride from gas phase on the external and internal surfaces of nanotubes leads to the Raman mode shifting. However, this effect is weaker than in case of formation of one-dimensional CuCl crystals inside nanotubes.

  3. Electronic modulations in a single wall carbon nanotube induced by the Au(111) surface reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Clair, Sylvain; Shin, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Yousoo E-mail: maki@riken.jp; Kawai, Maki E-mail: maki@riken.jp

    2015-02-02

    The structural and electronic structure of single wall carbon nanotubes adsorbed on Au(111) has been investigated by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The nanotubes were dry deposited in situ in ultrahigh vacuum onto a perfectly clean substrate. In some cases, the native herringbone reconstruction of the Au(111) surface interacted directly with adsorbed nanotubes and produced long-range periodic oscillations in their local density of states, corresponding to charge transfer modulations along the tube axis. This effect, however, was observed not systematically for all tubes and only for semiconducting tubes.

  4. The compressive buckling and size effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuzhou Zhu, Yanzhi; Li, Dongxia

    2015-03-10

    A higher-order Bernoulli-Euler beam model is developed to investigate the compressive buckling and size effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes by using a higher-order continuum relationship that has been previously proposed by the present authors. The second-order deformation gradients with respect to the axial direction are also considered, and the beam parameters are obtained by calculating the constitutive response around the circumference. The critical compressive force is analytically provided, and the size effect is studied by estimating the contribution of the higher-order terms.

  5. On the charge transfer between single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Rahul Pierce, Neal; Dasgupta, Archi

    2014-08-18

    It is important to understand the electronic interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphene in order to use them efficiently in multifunctional hybrid devices. Here, we deposited SWNT bundles on graphene-covered copper and SiO{sub 2} substrates by chemical vapor deposition and investigated the charge transfer between them by Raman spectroscopy. Our results revealed that, on both copper and SiO{sub 2} substrates, graphene donates electrons to the SWNTs, resulting in p-type doped graphene and n-type doped SWNTs.

  6. Thermal conductivity measurements of semitransparent single-walled carbon nanotube films by a bolometric technique.

    PubMed

    Itkis, Mikhail E; Borondics, Ferenc; Yu, Aiping; Haddon, Robert C

    2007-04-01

    We introduce a new technique for measurement of the thermal conductivity of ultrathin films of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) utilizing IR radiation as heat source and the SWNT film as thermometer. The technique is applied to study the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of an as-prepared SWNT film obtained in the electric arc discharge process and a film of purified SWNTs prepared by vacuum filtration. The interplay between thermal and electrical transport in SWNT networks is analyzed in relation to the type of intertube junctions and the possibility of optimizing the thermal and electrical properties of SWNT networks for specific applications is discussed. PMID:17385930

  7. Universal empirical formula for optical transition energies of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamal, G. R. Ahmed; Mominuzzaman, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    A general empirical relation for calculating first seven optical transition energies of semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is proposed here for the first time. The proposed formula effectively relates first seven optical transition energies of semiconducting SWCNTs with their chiral indices (n, m) through exponential form containing two specific terms (n+2m) and (2n-m). Both mod 1 and mod 2 types of semiconducting tubes are considered here over a wide diameter range from 0.4 nm to 4.75 nm. It was observed that the proposed empirical relations can predict the recent experimental data of those optical transitions with high accuracy.

  8. Midgap luminescence centers in single-wall carbon nanotubes created by ultraviolet illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Iakoubovskii, Konstantin; Minami, Nobutsugu; Kim, Yeji; Miyashita, Kanae; Kazaoui, Said; Nalini, Balakrishnan

    2006-10-23

    The authors report the effect of ultraviolet (UV) illumination on optical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) isolated using various dispersants. It is demonstrated that even weak UV light ({approx}1 mW/cm{sup 2}) can irreversibly alter the SWCNT structure, thus resulting in the emergence of hitherto unknown, redshifted photoluminescence (PL) peaks with concomitant reduction in some of the original PL peaks. These UV-induced changes are characterized in detail and attributed to the creation of midgap PL centers.

  9. Thermoelectric properties of single-wall carbon nanotube films: Effects of diameter and wet environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Daisuke; Ueda, Tomohiro; Nakai, Yusuke; Kyakuno, Haruka; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Saito, Takeshi; Hata, Kenji; Maniwa, Yutaka

    2016-02-01

    The Seebeck coefficient S and the electrical resistivity ρ of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were investigated as a function of the SWCNT diameter and carrier concentration. The S and ρ significantly changed in humid environments through p-type carrier doping. Experiments, combined with theoretical simulations based on the non-equilibrium Green’s function theory, indicated that the power factor P can be increased threefold by the enrichment of semiconducting SWCNTs, but the nanotube diameter has little effect. The improvement of the film resistivity strongly enhances the film thermoelectric performance, manifested as increasing the value of P above 1200 µW/(m·K2).

  10. The contrast mechanism in low voltage scanning electron microscopy of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. Y.; Wei, Y.; Nagahara, L. A.; Amlani, I.; Tsui, R. K.

    2006-01-01

    The contrast mechanism for scanning electron microscopy images of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is studied for samples on various substrates using low voltage scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM). We show that the contrast of SWNT images is greatly affected by a charging effect, where the brightness strongly depends on the supply of charges available to the SWNTs and the charging characteristics of the substrate. We demonstrate that the charging effect in LVSEM can be utilized to obtain images of various SWNT device structures to provide rapid feedback for the device fabrication process.

  11. Fine Structure of the Low-Frequency Raman Phonon Bands of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliev, M. N.; Litvinchuk, A. P.; Arepalli, S.; Nikolaev, P.; Scott, C. D.

    1999-01-01

    The Raman spectra of singled-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) produced by laser and are process were studied between 5 and 500 kappa. The line width vs. temperature dependence of the low-frequency Raman bands between 150 and 200/ cm deviates from that expected for phonon decay through phonon-phonon scattering mechanism. The experimental results and their analysis provided convincing evidence that each of the low-frequency Raman lines is a superposition of several narrower Raman lines corresponding to tubes of nearly the same diameter. The application of Raman spectroscopy to probe the distribution of SWNT by both diameter and chirality is discussed.

  12. Terahertz response in single-walled carbon nanotube transistor: a real-time quantum dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, R. F.; Lu, Y. P.; Lee, S. Y.; Han, K. L.; Deng, W. Q.

    2009-12-01

    We use time-dependent quantum wavepacket methods to simulate ballistic electron transport in a single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistor at terahertz frequencies (~100 GHz-10 THz). We observe an electron resonance phenomenon in a sub-picosecond-scale time domain. Our simulation results clearly show that the electron resonance corresponds to the formation of the resonance cavity and the interference of the electron wavepackets, which is directly supported by recent experimental measurements (Zhong et al 2008 Nat. Nanotechnol. 3 201).

  13. Transparent and flexible high-performance supercapacitors based on single-walled carbon nanotube films.

    PubMed

    Kanninen, Petri; Luong, Nguyen Dang; Sinh, Le Hoang; Anoshkin, Ilya V; Tsapenko, Alexey; Seppälä, Jukka; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kallio, Tanja

    2016-06-10

    Transparent and flexible energy storage devices have garnered great interest due to their suitability for display, sensor and photovoltaic applications. In this paper, we report the application of aerosol synthesized and dry deposited single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin films as electrodes for an electrochemical double-layer capacitor (EDLC). SWCNT films exhibit extremely large specific capacitance (178 F g(-1) or 552 μF cm(-2)), high optical transparency (92%) and stability for 10 000 charge/discharge cycles. A transparent and flexible EDLC prototype is constructed with a polyethylene casing and a gel electrolyte. PMID:27122323

  14. Inkjet printing of aligned single-walled carbon-nanotube thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Yuki; Nobusa, Yuki; Gocho, Shota; Kudou, Hikaru; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Kataura, Hiromichi; Takenobu, Taishi

    2013-04-01

    We report a method for the inkjet printing of aligned single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWCNT) films by combining inkjet technology with the strong wettability contrast between hydrophobic and hydrophilic areas based on the patterning of self-assembled monolayers. Both the drying process control using the strong wettability boundary and the coffee-stain effect strongly promote the aggregation of SWCNTs along the contact line of a SWCNT ink droplet, thereby demonstrating our achievement of inkjet-printed aligned SWCNT films. This method could open routes for developing high-performance and environmentally friendly SWCNT printed electronics.

  15. Ab initio study of field evaporation from single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaoka, N.; Watanabe, K.

    2002-04-01

    We have performed partitioned real-space density functional (PRDF) calculations of field evaporation of carbon clusters from single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). The calculation results of the activation-energy barrier (AEB) for field evaporation of carbon clusters and hydrocarbon clusters from SWNT's show that the AEB decreases as the electric field increases, and that the atom-relaxation effect largely reduces the AEB. It is also found that evaporation from an open-ended carbon nanotube occurs more easily than from capped nanotubes owing to the difference in the number of C-C bonds between the two types of nanotubes. Most surprisingly, adsorbed hydrogen significantly reduces the AEB. This is clearly explained by the C-C bond weakening due to the adsorbed hydrogen.

  16. Synthesis and chemical modification of single-walled carbon nanotubes and inorganic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bo

    This dissertation describes the study of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), inorganic nanowires, and carbon aerogels. A novel catalyst of iron/molybdenum nanoparticles supported on alumina aerogel was developed for CVD synthesis of SWNTs. Using this catalyst, the yield of SWNTs was enhanced by at least three times compared to previously reported best results. The highest yield of SWNTs was achieved when the reaction temperature was between 850°C and 900°C with CO (˜1000 sccm) as feeding gas. A combination of acid wash and mild oxidation processes was used to purify tire raw SWNT product. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that the majority (>90%) of the purified product was SWNTs. The purified SWNTs were fluorinated by diluted fluorine gas at 250°C. It was found that F-SWNTs could be recovered at an annealing temperature as low as 100°C. The thermal recovery behaviors of metallic and semiconducting SWNTs were very similar at annealing temperature ≥150°C, as suggested by 2D UV-Vis-NIR correlation spectroscopy. F-SWNTs were also added into poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) to form a PEO/F-SWNT composite. Mechanical properties measurements showed that the F-SWNTs significantly increased the strength of the resulting composite. A highly efficient method of SWNT synthesis on surfaces was also developed. It was found that the combination of carbon monoxide and hydrogen as a feeding gas greatly enhanced the surface growth of SWNTs. This method showed a large window of optimal HZ concentration (20%--80%) and synthesis temperature (800--900°C), so the result was very reproducible. In the second project, two novel methods of preparing silicon oxide and tungsten oxide nanowires, respectively, were developed. By using a millimeter-sized liquid gallium ball as a metal solvent at 920--940°C, bulk quantities of ultralong, uniform and well-aligned silicon oxide nanowires were synthesized. XPS and EDX indicated that the atomic ratio of Si to O in the nanowires was 1:1.5. On the other hand, isolated tungsten oxide nanowires were directly grown on tungsten tips and plates by a simple oxidation procedure at elevated temperature. These nanowire preparation techniques are simple, fast and economical. The third project focused on the fabrication of carbon aerogel. Resorcinol and furfural were polymerized in isopropanol using HCl as a catalyst and an organic gel was formed. This gel was dried under the supercritical condition of isopropanol, followed by carbonization at 900°C. Morphology study, surface area and resistance measurements indicated that the obtained carbon aerogel had similar properties to the one prepared under the supercritical condition of carbon oxide, which is a much longer process and requires much more energy.

  17. Evaluation of single-walled carbon nanohorns as sorbent in dispersive micro solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Soto, Juan Manuel; Cárdenas, Soledad; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2012-02-10

    A new dispersive micro solid-phase extraction method which uses single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) as sorbent is proposed. The procedure combines the excellent sorbent properties of the nanoparticles with the efficiency of the dispersion of the material in the sample matrix. Under these conditions, the interaction with the analytes is maximized. The determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was selected as model analytical problem. Two dispersion strategies were evaluated, being the functionalization via microwave irradiation better than the use of a surfactant. The extraction was accomplished by adding 1 mL of oxidized SWHNs (o-SWNHs) dispersion to 10 mL of water sample. After extraction, the mixture was passed through a disposable Nylon filter were the nanoparticles enriched with the PAHs were retained. The elution was carried out with 100 μL of hexane. The limits of detection achieved were between 30 and 60ngL(-1) with a precision (as repeatability) better than 12.5%. The recoveries obtained for the analytes in three different water samples were acceptable in all instances. The performance of o-SWNHs was favourably compared with that provided by carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes and thermally treated carbon nanocones. PMID:22244139

  18. Photo-induced absorption in the pump probe spectroscopy of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zi-Peng

    2013-07-01

    Femtosecond pump probe spectroscopy is employed to study the photo-induced absorption feature in the single-walled carbon nanotube transient spectrum. The two advantages of the experiment, a chirality enriched sample and tuning the pump wavelength to the resonance of a specific nanotube species, greatly facilitate the identification of the photo-induced absorption signal of one tube species. It is found that a photo-induced absorption feature is located at one radial breathing mode to the blue side of the E11 state. This finding prompts a new explanation for the origin of the photo-induced absorption: the transition from the ground state to a phonon coupled state near the Eii state. The explanation suggests a superposition mechanism of the photo-bleach and photo-induced absorption signals, which may serve as a key to the interpretation of the complex pump probe transient spectrum of carbon nanotubes. The finding sheds some light on the understanding of the complex non-radiative relaxation process and the electronic structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  19. Calculating the hydrodynamic volume of poly(ethylene oxylated) single-walled carbon nanotubes and hydrophilic carbon clusters.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla, Alfredo D; Samuel, Errol L G; Tour, James M; Seminario, Jorge M

    2013-01-10

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is widely used to render CNTs suitable as vectors for targeted drug delivery. One recently described PEGylated version uses an oxidized single-walled carbon nanotube called a hydrophilic carbon cluster (HCC). The resulting geometric dimension of the hybrid PEG-CNT or PEG-HCC is an important factor determining its ability to permeate the cellular membrane and to maintain its blood circulation. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to estimate the maximum length and width dimensions for a PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotube in water solution as a model for the PEG-HCC. We ensured maximum PEGylation by functionalizing each carbon atom in a CNT ring with an elongated PEG molecule, avoiding overlapping between PEGs attached to different CNT rings. We suggest that maximum PEGylation is important to achieve an optimal drug delivery platform. PMID:23206183

  20. Chemical vapor deposition growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes with controlled structures for nanodevice applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yabin; Zhang, Jin

    2014-08-19

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), a promising substitute to engineer prospective nanoelectronics, have attracted much attention because of their superb structures and physical properties. The unique properties of SWNTs rely sensitively on their specific chiral structures, including the diameters, chiral angles, and handedness. Furthermore, high-performance and integrated circuits essentially require SWNT samples with well-aligned arrays, of single conductive type and of pure chirality. Although much effort has been devoted to chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of SWNTs, their structure control, growth mechanism, and structural characterizations are still the primary obstacles for the fabrication and application of SWNT-based nanodevices. In this Account, we focus on our established CVD growth methodology to fulfill the requirements of nanodevice applications. A rational strategy was successfully exploited to construct complex architectures, selectively enrich semiconducting (s) or metallic (m) SWNTs, and control chirality. First, well-aligned and highly dense SWNT arrays are beneficial for nanodevice integration. For the directed growth mode, anisotropic interactions between the SWNTs and the crystallographic structure of substrate are crucial for their growth orientation. Just as crystals possess various symmetries, SWNTs with controlled geometries have the corresponding turning angles. Their complex architectures come from the synergetic effect of lattice and gas flow directed modes. Especially, the aligned orientations of SWNTs on graphite are chirality-selective, and their chiral angles, handedness, and (n,m) index have been conveniently and accurately determined. Second, UV irradiation and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) washing-off methods have been explored to selectively remove m-SWNTs, leaving only s-SWNT arrays on the surface. Moreover, the UV-assisted technique takes the advantages of low cost and high efficiency and it directly produces a high ratio of s-SWNT arrays. We also designed a smart scotch tape to sort out the s-SWNTs and m-SWNTs from the as-grown mixture with 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane and triethoxyphenylsilane as glues, respectively. This is analogous to the mechanical exfoliation of a graphene sheet. Third, the obtained SWNT intramolecular junctions obtained by temperature-mediated CVD indicate that temperature can seriously affect the SWNT's chirality during its growth. Importantly, the cloning method can validate the chirality-controlled growth of SWNTs, and the cloning efficiency is significantly improved on a quartz surface. Well-aligned SWNT arrays with a high density and controlled structures are highly desirable for carbon nanoelectronics. We hope that the advanced methodology used here will promote their controlled preparation and provide insights into the growth mechanism of SWNTs. PMID:24926610

  1. Optical Spectroscopy of Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Tony

    2005-03-01

    Optical spectroscopy of individual nanostructures has greatly enhanced our understanding of nanoscale physics. For single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), there is a particularly strong motivation for such techniques, since the properties of SWNTs vary enormously with their precise physical structure. To date, both fluorescence and Raman scattering have shown the sensitivity to probe individual SWNTs. While fluorescence is an excellent experimental method, it is limited to semiconducting nanotubes displaying reasonable fluorescence efficiency. Raman scattering provides complementary information, but is weak and requires the identification of an electronic resonance to observe a signal. In this paper, we describe a new spectroscopic approach for investigating individual SWNTs and other nanostructures.^1 The method is based on Rayleigh scattering. The approach has the advantage of relying on the ubiquitous linear polarizability of the material, a response present for fluorescing and non-fluorescing species alike and displaying resonances at the transition energies of the system. This method has yielded high-quality spectra over the visible and near-IR spectral range from both individual semiconducting and metallic SWNTs. A key element in the experiment is use of supercontinuum radiation as the light source. This source, produced by passing femtosecond laser pulses through a microstructured fiber, provides radiation with the broad spectrum of a light bulb, but with the brightness of a laser. The experiment also employs SWNTs suspended across slit structures and viewed in a dark-field configuration to eliminate background scattering. Rayleigh scattering spectra of electronic transitions in semiconducting and metallic nanotubes will be presented, as will be results on the polarization dependence of the transitions. The method will be shown to be appropriate for the characterization of different spatial segments of a given SWNT and for the examination of tube-tube interactions in small bundles of SWNTs. This work is supported by the NSF NSEC at Columbia University, NYSTAR, and the DOE-BES. It was performed in collaboration with Feng Wang, Matthew Y. Sfeir, Limin Huang, Chia-Chin Chuang, James C. Hone, Stephen P. O'Brien,^ and Louis E. Brus. ^1 M. Y. Sfeir, F. Wang, L. Huang, et al., Science 306, 1540 (2004).

  2. Spectroelectrochemical properties of the single walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with polydiphenylamine doped with heteropolyanions

    SciTech Connect

    Smaranda, I.; Baibarac, M.; Baltog, I.; Mevellec, J.Y.; Lefrant, S.

    2013-01-15

    A combined chemical-electrochemical method was used for covalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) with polydiphenylamine (PDPA) doped with heteropolyanions of H{sub 3}PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{center_dot}xH{sub 2}O. The functionalization process induces in Raman spectra of SWNTs the following changes: (i) an increase in relative intensity of the D band, accompanied a gradual up-shift of the G band in the case of the semiconducting tubes and a decrease in the relative intensity of band peaked at 1540 cm{sup -1} is remarked in the case of the metallic tubes; (ii) in the anti-Stokes Raman spectrum an increase in the relative intensity of Raman line of metallic tubes peaked at -1560 cm{sup -1} is remarked when the cycles number increases. The additional down-shift of the FTIR bands belonging to H{sub 3}PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40} heteropolyanions (at 881, 943 and 1055 cm{sup -1}) and PDPA (at 688, 736 and 1016 cm{sup -1}) originates in hindrance steric effects induced the covalent functionalization of SWNTs with polymer molecules. Using Raman scattering and FTIR spectroscopy we demonstrate that chemical polymerization of diphenylamine in the presence of H{sub 3}PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{center_dot}xH{sub 2}O and SWNTs results in a composite of the type blend based on PDPA in un-doped state and SWNTs doped with H{sub 3}PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40} heteropolyanions. - Graphical abstract: Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectra of the SWNTs before (a) and after electrochemical functionalization with PDPA doped with heteropolyanions by 5 (b) and 25 (c) voltammeter cycles. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A chemical-electrochemical method is used to functionalization of SWNTs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Functionalization of wall-side of tube is evidenced by anti-Stokes Raman studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FTIR spectra proves insertion of heteropolyanions in polydiphenylamine matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FTIR spectra of polymer functionalized SWNTs reveal hindrance steric effects.

  3. Quantum chemistry study on the open end of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Shimin; Shen, Ziyong; Zhao, Xingyu; Xue, Zengquan

    2003-05-01

    Geometrical and electronic structures of open-ended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are calculated using density functional theory (DFT) with hybrid functional (B3LYP) approximation. Due to different distances between carbon atoms along the edge, reconstruction occurs at the open end of the (4,4) armchair SWCNT, i.e., triple bonds are formed in the carbon atom pairs at the mouth; however, for the (6,0) zigzag SWCNT, electrons in dangling bonds still remain at 'no-bonding' states. The ionization potential (IP) of both (4,4) and (6,0) SWCNTs is increased by their negative intrinsic dipole moments, and localized electronic states existed at both of their open ends.

  4. Nerve agent detection using networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, J. P.; Snow, E. S.; Houser, E. J.; Park, D.; Stepnowski, J. L.; McGill, R. A.

    2003-11-01

    We report the use of carbon nanotubes as a sensor for chemical nerve agents. Thin-film transistors constructed from random networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes were used to detect dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a simulant for the nerve agent sarin. These sensors are reversible and capable of detecting DMMP at sub-ppb concentration levels, and they are intrinsically selective against interferent signals from hydrocarbon vapors and humidity. We provide additional chemical specificity by the use of filters coated with chemoselective polymer films. These results indicate that the electronic detection of sub-ppb concentrations of nerve agents and potentially other chemical warfare agents is possible with simple-to-fabricate carbon nanotube devices.

  5. XPS Protocol for the Characterization of Pristine and Functionalized Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosa, E. D.; Allada, R.; Huffman, C. B.; Arepalli, S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent interest in developing new applications for carbon nanotubes (CNT) has fueled the need to use accurate macroscopic and nanoscopic techniques to characterize and understand their chemistry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has proved to be a useful analytical tool for nanoscale surface characterization of materials including carbon nanotubes. Recent nanotechnology research at NASA Johnson Space Center (NASA-JSC) helped to establish a characterization protocol for quality assessment for single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Here, a review of some of the major factors of the XPS technique that can influence the quality of analytical data, suggestions for methods to maximize the quality of data obtained by XPS, and the development of a protocol for XPS characterization as a complementary technique for analyzing the purity and surface characteristics of SWCNTs is presented. The XPS protocol is then applied to a number of experiments including impurity analysis and the study of chemical modifications for SWCNTs.

  6. Simultaneous shunt protection and back contact formation for CdTe solar cells with single wall carbon nanotube layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Adam B.; Khanal, Rajendra R.; Song, Zhaoning; Watthage, Suneth C.; Kormanyos, Kenneth R.; Heben, Michael J.

    2015-12-01

    Thin film photovoltaic (PV) devices and modules prepared by commercial processes can be severely compromised by through-device low resistance electrical pathways. The defects can be due to thin or missing semiconductor material, metal diffusion along grain boundaries, or areas containing diodes with low turn-on potentials. We report the use of single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) layers to enable both protection against these defects and back contact formation for CdTe PV devices. Samples prepared with a SWCNT back contact exhibited good efficiency and did not require shunt protection, while devices prepared without shunt protection using a standard metal back contact performed poorly. We describe the mechanism by which the SWCNT layer functions. In addition to avoiding the need for shunt protection by other means, the SWCNT film also provides a route to higher short circuit currents.

  7. Effect of chemical treatment on electrical conductivity, infrared absorption, and Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Skákalová, V; Kaiser, A B; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U; Hrncariková, K; Roth, S

    2005-04-21

    We investigate the magnitude and temperature dependence of electrical conductivity, the optical and infrared absorption, and the Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) bucky-paper after chemical treatment and determine the correlations between the changes in these properties. Ionic-acceptor doping of the SWNT bucky-paper (with SOCl(2), iodine, H(2)SO(3), etc.) causes an increase of electrical conductivity that correlates with an increase of the absorbance in the far-IR region and an increase in the frequency of Raman spectral lines. Conversely, treatment with other molecules (e.g., aniline, PyPhF(5), PhCH(2)Br, etc.) leads to a decrease in both conductivity and far-IR absorption. The temperature dependence of the conductivity gives a good indication of the presence of metallic charge carriers and is in agreement with the model of interrupted metallic conduction. PMID:16851818

  8. A new protocol for the carboxylic acid sidewall functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darabi, Hossein Reza; Jafar Tehrani, Mohammad; Aghapoor, Kioumars; Mohsenzadeh, Farshid; Malekfar, Rasoul

    2012-09-01

    The carboxylic acid termination of the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) provides a convenient link for covalent bonding between the SWNTs and polymer or biological systems. In this work, two approaches for covalent attachment of carboxylic acid groups to the side-walls of single walled carbon nanotubes are presented. Both protocols are based on chemical manipulation of benzonitrile residues, easily introduced onto the SWNTs by in situ diazonium salt formation of 4-aminobenzonitrile. In the first approach, benzonitrile groups on SWNTs were treated with aq. NaOH solution to form benzoic acid moieties. The second approach on benzonitrile groups is leaded to the formation of benzothiomorpholides via Willgerodt-Kindler reaction which is then converted to benzoic acid moieties on SWNTs. Moreover, a simple one-pot entry into the formation of benzoic acid moieties is presented. SWNTs were characterized by a set of methods including FT-IR, UV/vis, TGA, SEM and Raman techniques. The presence of thioamide groups on SWNT is also proved directly by XPS spectroscopy.

  9. Ultra-sensitive analysis of a cantilevered single-walled carbon nanocone-based mass detector.

    PubMed

    Yan, J W; Liew, K M; He, L H

    2013-03-29

    The ultra-sensitivity of mass detectors using individual cantilevered single-walled carbon nanocone (SWCNC) resonators is first investigated. A higher-order gradient theory, derived at the atomic level, is applied for modeling SWCNC resonators. Numerical simulations using a mesh-free computational framework based on moving Kriging interpolation are conducted to investigate the mass sensitivity of cantilevered SWCNC resonators with extra mass loading as well as with equivalent single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) resonators. Comparison of the magnitude of resonant frequency shifts, the key criterion for mass sensitivity, of these two kinds of resonators demonstrates a far higher mass sensitivity for SWCNC resonators than for SWCNT resonators, thus suggesting a new method for ultra-sensitive mass detection via SWCNC resonators. The dependence of the mass sensitivity of SWCNC resonators on height and top radii has been examined. A reduction in the height of SWCNC resonators gives rise to a considerable increase in mass sensitivity. The mass sensitivity of a 6nm high SWCNC resonator can even reach a level of 10(-22)g. It is noteworthy that the top radii of SWCNC resonators have a slight effect on frequency shifts. Another interesting observed phenomenon is that a deviation in the height of 19.2SWCNC resonators leads to little loss in precision of mass detection when the attached mass is smaller than 10(-20)g. This superior characteristic indicates that SWCNC-based mass detectors have great potential in practical applications. PMID:23459263

  10. Comparative Dynamics and Sequence Dependence of DNA and RNA Binding to Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Markita P.; Vuković, Lela; Kruss, Sebastian; Bisker, Gili; Landry, Alexandra M.; Islam, Shahrin; Jain, Rishabh; Schulten, Klaus; Strano, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Noncovalent polymer-single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) conjugates have gained recent interest due to their prevalent use as electrochemical and optical sensors, SWCNT-based therapeutics, and for SWCNT separation. However, little is known about the effects of polymer-SWCNT molecular interactions on functional properties of these conjugates. In this work, we show that SWCNT complexed with related polynucleotide polymers (DNA, RNA) have dramatically different fluorescence stability. Surprisingly, we find a difference of nearly 2500-fold in fluorescence emission between the most fluorescently stable DNA-SWCNT complex, C30 DNA-SWCNT, compared to the least fluorescently stable complex, (AT)7A-(GU)7G DNA-RNA hybrid-SWCNT. We further reveal the existence of three regimes in which SWCNT fluorescence varies nonmonotonically with SWCNT concentration. We utilize molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the conformation and atomic details of SWCNT-corona phase interactions. Our results show that variations in polynucleotide sequence or sugar backbone can lead to large changes in the conformational stability of the polymer SWCNT corona and the SWCNT optical response. Finally, we demonstrate the effect of the coronae on the response of a recently developed dopamine nanosensor, based on (GT)15 DNA- and (GU)15 RNA-SWCNT complexes. Our results clarify several features of the sequence dependence of corona phases produced by polynucleotides adsorbed to single walled carbon nanotubes, and the implications for molecular recognition in such phases. PMID:26005509

  11. On the characterization of the elastic properties of asymmetric single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadyani, Ghasem; Soufeiani, Leila; Öchsner, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    In order to characterize asymmetric single-walled carbon nanotubes, an algorithm has been developed based on numerical simulation to relate the physical geometry to the elastic properties of asymmetric single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A large number of finite element results for the stiffness of asymmetric SWCNTs has been used to develop a best surface fitting function to define the relationship between the geometry of SWCNTs and their stiffness. However, since the stiffness of asymmetric nanotubes depends upon the configuration parameters, n and m, it was impossible to define any diameter dependency. Based on the maximum reaction force concept and in order to account for the hidden mechanical behavior of asymmetric SWCNTs, the chiral factor (CF) has been employed in this study. The proposed CF converts any asymmetric geometry (n and m) into a value between 0 and 1. A group of the SWCNTs with the same applied boundary condition (n+m=30) and different range of the CF was also used for studying of the shear contribution. The chiral factor dependency, which is developed in this study, is applicable for characterising and selecting asymmetric SWCNTs in the design of advanced nanomaterials. Furthermore, the equation which is calculated in this study can be useful for finding the best criteria for selecting asymmetric SWCNTs.

  12. Structural stability of transparent conducting films assembled from length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Harris; G. R. S. Iyer; D. O. Simien; J. A. Fagan; J. Y. Huh; J. Y. Chung; S. D. Hudson; J. Obrzut; J. F. Douglas; C. M. Stafford; E. K. Hobbie

    2011-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films show significant promise for transparent electronics applications that demand mechanical flexibility, but durability remains an outstanding issue. In this work, thin membranes of length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are uniaxially and isotropically compressed by depositing them on prestrained polymer substrates. Upon release of the strain, the topography, microstructure, and conductivity of the films are characterized using a combination of optical/fluorescence microscopy, light scattering, force microscopy, electron microscopy, and impedance spectroscopy. Above a critical surface mass density, films assembled from nanotubes of well-defined length exhibit a strongly nonlinear mechanical response. The measured strain dependence reveals a dramatic softening that occurs through an alignment of the SWCNTs normal to the direction of prestrain, which at small strains is also apparent as an anisotropic increase in sheet resistance along the same direction. At higher strains, the membrane conductivities increase due to a compression-induced restoration of conductive pathways. Our measurements reveal the fundamental mode of elasto-plastic deformation in these films and suggest how it might be suppressed.

  13. Selective uptake of single-walled carbon nanotubes by circulating monocytes for enhanced tumour delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Bryan Ronain; Ghosn, Eliver Eid Bou; Rallapalli, Harikrishna; Prescher, Jennifer A.; Larson, Timothy; Herzenberg, Leonore A.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2014-06-01

    In cancer imaging, nanoparticle biodistribution is typically visualized in living subjects using `bulk' imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography and whole-body fluorescence. Accordingly, nanoparticle influx is observed only macroscopically, and the mechanisms by which they target cancer remain elusive. Nanoparticles are assumed to accumulate via several targeting mechanisms, particularly extravasation (leakage into tumour). Here, we show that, in addition to conventional nanoparticle-uptake mechanisms, single-walled carbon nanotubes are almost exclusively taken up by a single immune cell subset, Ly-6Chi monocytes (almost 100% uptake in Ly-6Chi monocytes, below 3% in all other circulating cells), and delivered to the tumour in mice. We also demonstrate that a targeting ligand (RGD) conjugated to nanotubes significantly enhances the number of single-walled carbon nanotube-loaded monocytes reaching the tumour (P < 0.001, day 7 post-injection). The remarkable selectivity of this tumour-targeting mechanism demonstrates an advanced immune-based delivery strategy for enhancing specific tumour delivery with substantial penetration.

  14. Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Exhibit Dual-Phase Regulation to Exposed Arabidopsis Mesophyll Cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Herein we are the first to report that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) exhibit dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll cells exposed to different concentration of SWCNTs. The mesophyll protoplasts were prepared by enzyme digestion, and incubated with 15, 25, 50, 100 μg/ml SWCNTs for 48 h, and then were observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured. Partial protoplasts were stained with propidium iodide and 4'-6- diamidino-2-phenylindole, partial protoplasts were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled SWCNTs, and observed by fluorescence microscopy. Results showed that SWCNTs could traverse both the plant cell wall and cell membrane, with less than or equal to 50 μg/ml in the culture medium, SWCNTs stimulated plant cells to grow out trichome clusters on their surface, with more than 50 μg/ml SWCNTs in the culture medium, SWCNTs exhibited obvious toxic effects to the protoplasts such as increasing generation of ROS, inducing changes of protoplast morphology, changing green leaves into yellow, and inducing protoplast cells' necrosis and apoptosis. In conclusion, single walled carbon nanotubes can get through Arabidopsis mesophyll cell wall and membrane, and exhibit dose-dependent dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts such as low dose stimulating cell growth, and high dose inducing cells' ROS generation, necrosis or apoptosis.

  15. Novel method to produce single-walled carbon nanotube films and their thermal and electrical properties.

    PubMed

    Jakubinek, Michael B; Johnson, Michel B; White, Mary Anne; Guan, Jingwen; Simard, Benoit

    2010-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube films are promising candidates for applications requiring transparent conductors due to their low sheet resistance and high transparency in the visible region. Vacuum filtration is a common and easy to implement technique to produce such films but it is complicated by the need to transfer the films to desired substrates. Here we report conditions under which single-walled carbon nanotube films produced by vacuum filtration detach from the filter membrane upon submersion into water, providing a facile method to transfer filtration-produced nanotube films to desired substrates. Sheet resistance and transparency measurements show that these films are competitive with other high conductivity films made through more cumbersome procedures. Films post-treated with nitric acid or made with acid pre-treated nanotubes have superior performance to those made with high-purity nanotubes without any acid treatment. Thermal imaging by scanning thermal microscopy indicates that heat dissipation by the film is comparable to that of a glass substrate. PMID:21121309

  16. Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Exhibit Dual-Phase Regulation to Exposed Arabidopsis Mesophyll Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hengguang; Hu, Shanglian; Huang, Peng; Song, Hua; Wang, Kan; Ruan, Jing; He, Rong; Cui, Daxiang

    2011-12-01

    Herein we are the first to report that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) exhibit dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll cells exposed to different concentration of SWCNTs. The mesophyll protoplasts were prepared by enzyme digestion, and incubated with 15, 25, 50, 100 μg/ml SWCNTs for 48 h, and then were observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured. Partial protoplasts were stained with propidium iodide and 4'-6- diamidino-2-phenylindole, partial protoplasts were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled SWCNTs, and observed by fluorescence microscopy. Results showed that SWCNTs could traverse both the plant cell wall and cell membrane, with less than or equal to 50 μg/ml in the culture medium, SWCNTs stimulated plant cells to grow out trichome clusters on their surface, with more than 50 μg/ml SWCNTs in the culture medium, SWCNTs exhibited obvious toxic effects to the protoplasts such as increasing generation of ROS, inducing changes of protoplast morphology, changing green leaves into yellow, and inducing protoplast cells' necrosis and apoptosis. In conclusion, single walled carbon nanotubes can get through Arabidopsis mesophyll cell wall and membrane, and exhibit dose-dependent dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts such as low dose stimulating cell growth, and high dose inducing cells' ROS generation, necrosis or apoptosis.

  17. Flavin-derived self-organization and chirality separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Sang-Yong

    2008-07-01

    Formed by rolling up a two-dimensional sheet of one or more layer of graphite, graphene, carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are the marvel materials of modern materials science. They are phenomenally strong and stiff, and have the unusual property of being excellent conductors of heat along the tube's axis, but good thermal insulators across it. But it is their electrical characteristics that excite the most interest. Especially, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNTs), formed by one layer of cylindrical graphene, has better physical properties over multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) having over two layer of graphene. Depending on the precise way they are rolled up, which is defined by ( n,m) vector, SWNTs can be made into either metals or semiconductors. So far, SWNTs can generally only be fabricated in batches that vary widely, both in the diameter of the individual tubes and in the orientation of their graphene lattice relative to the tube axis, the property known as chirality. Separating out these various conformations is a challenging, but one that must be solved if nanotubes are ever to fulfill their electrifying potential in devices. This thesis presents that flavin-based helical self-assembly can impart multi degrees of SWNTs separation (i.e., metallicity, diameter, chirality, and handedness). As opening chapters for carbon nanotube and flavin derivative, Chapter 1 provide the introduction of carbon nanotubes, especially single-walled tubes, and the current state-of-the-art nanotube separation. Also, Chapter 1 presents a variety of naturally-occurring flavin derivatives, their redox behavior, and their biological utilization as cofactors for various proteins. Motivated by chemoluminescence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN, phosphorylated form of Vitamin B2) with bacterial luciferase, Chapter 2 discuss about the synthesis and covalent attachment of flavin mononucleotide (FMN, phosphorylated form of Vitamin B2) analogue to oxidized SWNTs. Along with nine step synthesis of synthetic FMN, this study provided two findings: (i) isoalloxazine ring of FMN has strong interaction with the sidewalls of nanotubes and (ii) covalently-attached isoalloxazine ring onto nanotube can be either extended or collapsed by surfactant (long-term) and redox agents or sonication (short-term) from the nanotube surface. The aforementioned two findings lead to utilize strong pi-pi interaction of biologically-relevant FMN for nanotube dispersing agents. Chapter 3 discuss that FMN imparts effective dispersion of SWNTs via helical self-assembly of flavin moiety. This isoalloxazine self-assembly onto nanotube in aqueous media is held by (i) quadruple hydrogen-bonding along the adjacent uracil moiety of isoalloxazine rings, and (ii) concentric pi-pi interaction between isoalloxazine ring toward the underlying nanotube sidewall, and (iii) phosphate group of FMN imparting anionic dispersion and individualization of nanotube in water. In addition, precipitation-less replacement of FMN with sodium dodecyl benzene sulfate (SDBS) enable us to probe the relative binding constant of helical FMN self-organization on SWNTs. The significantly higher affinity of the FMN assembly for (8,6) nanotube results in an 85% chirality enrichment from a nanotube sample with broad diameter distribution. Chapter 4 revisits the surfactant amine-assisted semiconducting ( sem-) SWNTs separation in THF media. For this, we synthesized an asymmetric diacetylenic surfactant amine(57ECA), in which adequate chemical anisotropy was generated along its tail to probe the molecular dynamics in the presence and absence of nanotubes via NMR. This surfactant can simulate the similar sem-SWNTs separation, like ODA. This study suggests that the surfactant amine head is firmly immobilized onto the nanotube surface together with acidic water, while the aliphatic tail progressively gains larger mobility as it gets farther from the SWNT. The spectroscopic results indicate that the sem-enriched sample is populated mainly from small nanotube bundles containing three SWNTs. Molecular simulations in conjunction with previously determined HNO3/H2SO4 oxidation depths for met- and sem-SWNTs indicate that the strong pinning of the amine surfactants on the sem-enriched SWNTs bundles is a result of a well-ordered arrangement of amine salts separated with a monomolecular layer of H2O molecules. Such continuous 2D arrangement of hydrated amine salts can be attained from a specific type and diameter nanotubes, which provides the necessary surfactant stability for effective THF dispersion and subsequent enrichment. In Chapter 5, this thesis and its prospectus of flavin-derived carbon nanotube applications are concluded.

  18. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes regulates their effect on hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, A. V.; Aseychev, A. V.; Kostevich, V. A.; Gusev, A. A.; Gusev, S. A.; Vlasova, I. I.

    2011-04-01

    Applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in medical field imply the use of drug-coupled carbon nanotubes as well as carbon nanotubes functionalized with different chemical groups that change nanotube surface properties and interactions between nanotubes and cells. Covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWNT) is known to prevent the nanotubes from interaction with macrophages. Here we characterized nanotube's ability to stimulate coagulation processes in platelet-poor plasma (PPP), and evaluated the effect of SWNTs on platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Our study showed that PEG-SWNT did not affect the rate of clotting in PPP, while c-SWNT shortened the clot formation time five times compared to the control PPP. Since c-SWNT failed to accelerate coagulation in plasma lacking coagulation factor XI, it may be suggested that c-SWNT affects the contact activation pathway. In PRP, platelets responded to both SWNT types with irreversible aggregation, as evidenced by changes in the aggregate mean radius. However, the rate of aggregation induced by c-SWNT was two times higher than it was with PEG-SWNT. Cytological analysis also showed that c-SWNT was two times more efficient when compared to PEG-SWNT in aggregating platelets in PRP. Taken together, our results show that functionalization of nanoparticles can diminish their negative influence on blood cells. As seen from our data, modification of c-SWNT with PEG, when only a one percent of carbon atoms is bound to polymer (70 wt %), decreased the nanotube-induced coagulation in PRP and repelled the accelerating effect on the coagulation in PPP. Thus, when functionalized SWNTs are used for administration into bloodstream of laboratory animals, their possible pro-coagulant and pro-aggregating properties must be taken into account.

  19. Development of novel single-wall carbon nanotube epoxy composite ply actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Yeo-Heung; Shanov, Vesselin; Schulz, Mark J.; Narasimhadevara, Suhasini; Subramaniam, Srinivas; Hurd, Douglas; Boerio, F. J.

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes a carbon nanotube epoxy ply material that has electrochemical actuation properties. The material was formed by dispersing single-wall carbon nanotubes in a solvent and then solution casting a thin paper using a mold and vacuum oven. In order to take advantage of the high elastic modulus of carbon nanotubes for actuation, epoxy as a chemically inert polymer is considered. An epoxy layer was cast on the surface of the nanotube paper to make a two-layer ply. A wet electrochemical actuator was formed by placing the nanotube epoxy ply in a 2 M NaCl electrolyte solution. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were carried out to characterize the electrochemical properties of the actuator. The voltage-current relationship and power to drive the actuator material were also determined. Compared to previous single-wall carbon nanotube buckypaper tape actuators, which had poor adhesion between the nanotubes and tape, and other nanotube-thermal plastic polymer actuators, which could not provide high strength, the epoxy based actuator has a higher elastic modulus and strength, which will be useful for future structural applications. This demonstrates that a polymer layer can reinforce nanotube paper, which is an important step in building a new structural material that actuates. Further work is under way to develop a solid electrolyte to allow dry actuation. Finally, these actuator plies will be laminated to build a carbon nanocomposite material. This smart structural material will have potential applications that range from use in robotic surgical tools to use as structures that change shape.

  20. Optical and electrical studies of single walled carbon nanotubes for infrared sensing and photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omari, Mones A.

    Carbon nanotubes are emerging as highly promising opto-electro-mechanical device components essential for the development of a variety of hybrid opto-electronic, electro-mechanical and bio-medical technologies on the nanoscale and have been a subject of continued research. In particular, single-walled carbon nanotubes are predicted to exhibit strong light absorption induced by photon-assisted electronic transitions, free carrier and plasmonic-based absorption. Single-walled carbon nanotubes have been confirmed to exhibit a strong photoconduction response in the infrared range, which can provide many new opportunities in engineering nano-photovoltaic and optoelectronic devices. At the same time, the use of strong chemical reagents has been long considered as one of the key processing steps for the separation and purification of single-walled carbon nanotube post-synthesis. In this work, optically-induced voltage in carbon nanotube bundles and thin-films configured as two-terminal resistive elements and operating as junctionless photo-cells in the infrared range as well as the time-dependent wet-processing of HiPCo nanotubes in phosphoric acid and its effect on the structural, transport, infrared light absorption, and photoconduction characteristics were studied. As the photo-voltage generated is found to appear only for asymmetric and off-contact illuminations, the effect is explained based on a photo-generated heat flow model. The engineered cell prototypes were found to yield electrical powers of ˜ 30 pW while demonstrating improved conversion efficiency under high-flux illumination. The cell is also shown to act as an uncooled infrared sensor, with its dark-to-photocurrent ratio improving as temperature increases. The wet-processing of HiPCo nanotubes was done for a nominal time intervals of 1, 2 and 3 hours. The treatment was found to be a two-step process that initially results in the removal and partial replacement of most pre-existing C-O, O-H and CHx groups with phosphorous oxy and carbonyl groups. According to the time dependent current-voltage measurements, the differential conductance, G, of the nanotubes varies with temperature given by G ˜ Tα , with α exhibiting a slight increase as a result of the treatment, attributed to a slight increase in the role of disorder. The nanotubes processed for three hours are also found to show an order of magnitude improvement in their photoconduction response time compared to untreated nanotubes, with their growth and decay characteristic time constants being in the sub-second range.

  1. A parametric study of single-wall carbon nanotube growth by laser ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Holmes, William A.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Hadjiev, Victor G.; Scott, Carl D.

    2004-01-01

    Results of a parametric study of carbon nanotube production by the double-pulse laser oven process are presented. The effect of various operating parameters on the production of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is estimated by characterizing the nanotube material using analytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermo gravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy. The study included changing the sequence of the laser pulses, laser energy, pulse separation, type of buffer gas used, operating pressure, flow rate, inner tube diameter, as well as its material, and oven temperature. It was found that the material quality and quantity improve with deviation from normal operation parameters such as laser energy density higher than 1.5 J/cm2, pressure lower than 67 kPa, and flow rates higher than 100 sccm. Use of helium produced mainly small diameter tubes and a lower yield. The diameter of SWCNTs decreases with decreasing oven temperature and lower flow rates.

  2. Films of bare single-walled carbon nanotubes from superacids with tailored electronic and photoluminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Saha, Avishek; Ghosh, Saunab; Weisman, R Bruce; Martí, Angel A

    2012-06-26

    The use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in fabricating macroscopic devices requires addressing the challenges of nanotube individualization and organization in the desired functional architectures. Previous success in depositing bare SWCNTs from chlorosulfonic acid onto silicon oxide microporous and mesoporous nanoparticles has motivated this study of their deposition onto fused silica substrates. A facile dip-coating method is reported that produces thin homogeneous films in which the carbon nanotubes are not covered by surfactants or shortened by sonication. Photophysical, electrical, chemical, and morphological properties of these SWCNT films have been characterized. When prepared at low densities, the films exhibit near-IR photoluminescence from individualized SWCNTs, whereas when prepared at high densities the films behave as transparent conductors. Sheet resistance of 471 ohm/sq has been achieved with film transmittance of ∼ 86%. PMID:22681339

  3. Enzymatic formation of carbohydrate rings catalyzed by single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Moon Seop; Park, Jong Pil; Seo, Dongkyun; Chang, Sung-Jin; Lee, Seok Jae; Lee, Sang Yup; Kwak, Kyungwon; Park, Tae Jung

    2016-05-01

    Macrocyclic carbohydrate rings were formed via enzymatic reactions around single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as a catalyst. Cyclodextrin glucanotransferase, starch substrate and SWNTs were reacted in buffer solution to yield cyclodextrin (CD) rings wrapped around individual SWNTs. Atomic force microscopy showed the resulting complexes to be rings of 12-50 nm in diameter, which were highly soluble and dispersed in aqueous solution. They were further characterized by Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and molecular simulation using density functional theory calculation. In the absence of SWNT, hydrogen bonding between glucose units determines the structure of maltose (the precursor of CD) and produces the curvature along the glucose chain. Wrapping SWNT along the short axis was preferred with curvature in the presence of SWNTs and with the hydrophobic interactions between the SWNTs and CD molecules. This synthetic approach may be useful for the functionalization of carbon nanotubes for development of nanostructures. PMID:26946491

  4. A theoretical study on the interaction of amphetamine and single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafizi, Hamid; Najafi Chermahini, Alireza; Mohammadnezhad, Gholamhossein; Teimouri, Abbas

    2015-02-01

    The adsorption of 1-phenyl-2-aminopropane (amphetamine) on the (4,4), (5,5), (6,6), and (7,7) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been theoretically investigated. The molecule has been located in different modes including parallel, perpendicular, and oblique on the outer surface of carbon nanotubes. The physisorption of amphetamine onto SWCNT sidewall is thermodynamically favored; as a consequence, it modulates the electronic properties of pristine nanotube in the vicinity of Fermi region. The adsorption energies for the parallel and oblique modes found in the range of -1.13 to -1.88 and -1.27 to -2.01 kcal/mol, respectively. Projected density of states (PDOS) and frontier orbital analysis in the vicinity of Fermi level region suggest the electronic states to be contributed from SWCNT rather than amphetamine molecule.

  5. Magnetic Property Measurements on Single Wall Carbon Nanotube-Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Keun J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Park, Cheol

    2008-01-01

    Temperature and magnetic field dependent magnetization measurements were performed on polyimide nanocomposite samples, synthesized with various weight percentages of single wall carbon nanotubes. It was found that the magnetization of the composite, normalized to the mass of nanotube material in the sample, decreased with increasing weight percentage of nanotubes. It is possible that the interfacial coupling between the carbon nanotube (CNT) fillers and the polyimide matrix promotes the diamagnetic response from CNTs and reduces the total magnetization of the composite. The coercivity of the samples, believed to originate from the residual magnetic catalyst particles, was enhanced and had a stronger temperature dependence as a result of the composite synthesis. These changes in magnetic properties can form the basis of a new approach to investigate the interfacial properties in the CNT nanocomposites through magnetic property measurements.

  6. Multi-Fractal Hierarchy of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Hydrophobic Coatings

    PubMed Central

    De Nicola, Francesco; Castrucci, Paola; Scarselli, Manuela; Nanni, Francesca; Cacciotti, Ilaria; De Crescenzi, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    A hierarchical structure is an assembly with a multi-scale morphology and with a large and accessible surface area. Recent advances in nanomaterial science have made increasingly possible the design of hierarchical surfaces with specific and tunable properties. Here, we report the fractal analysis of hierarchical single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films realized by a simple, rapid, reproducible, and inexpensive filtration process from an aqueous dispersion, then deposited by drytransfer printing method on several substrates, at room temperature. Furthermore, by varying the thickness of carbon nanotube random networks, it is possible tailoring their wettability due to capillary phenomena in the porous films. Moreover, in order to describe the wetting properties of such surfaces, we introduce a two-dimensional extension of the Wenzel-Cassie-Baxter theory. The hierarchical surface roughness of SWCNT coatings coupled with their exceptional and tunable optical and electrical properties provide an ideal hydrophobic composite surface for a new class of optoelectronic and nanofluidic devices. PMID:25716718

  7. The effect of fibronectin on structural and biological properties of single walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh; Farokhi, Mehdi; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Omidvar, Ramin; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2015-06-01

    Despite the attractive properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), cytoxicity and hydrophobicity are two main considerable features which limit their application in biomedical fields. It was well established that treating CNTs with extracellular matrix components could reduce these unfavourable characteristics. In an attempt to address these issues, fibronectin (FN) with different concentrations was loaded on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) substrate. Scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angles and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were preformed in order to characterize FN loaded SWCNTs substrates. According to XPS and AFM results, FN could interact with SWCNTs and for this, the hydrophilicity of SWCNTs was improved. Additionally, SWCNT modified with FN showed less cytotoxicity compared with neat SWCNT. Finally, FN was shown to act as an interesting extracellular component for enhancing the biological properties of SWCNT.

  8. High structural stability of single wall carbon nanotube under quasi-hydrostatic high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jing-Yin; Kim, Minseob; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2009-11-23

    In quasi-hydrostatic conditions, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) exhibit high structural stability to {approx}35 GPa, well beyond the stability of sp{sup 2} C{double_bond}C bonds in graphite, carbon fullerenes, benzene, and other hydrocarbons. The pressure-induced Raman changes of SWNT are completely reversible below 16 GPa, partially reversible between 16 and 35 GPa, and irreversible beyond 35 GPa where it turns into highly disordered graphite. We explain the high stability in terms of the pressure-induced structural modification to an interlinked configuration, which occurs reversibly under substantial sp{sup 3} hybridization ({approx}20%) and, thus, increases the stability of sp{sup 2} C{double_bond}C bonds in the SWNTs.

  9. Swift heavy ion induced modifications of single walled carbon nanotube thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishalli; Raina, K. K.; Avasthi, D. K.; Srivastava, Alok; Dharamvir, Keya

    2016-04-01

    Thin films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett method and irradiated with swift heavy ions, carbon and nickel each of energy 60 MeV. The ion beams have different electronic energy loss (Se) values and the samples were exposed to various irradiation doses. The irradiated films were characterized using Raman and optical absorption spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy results indicate the competing processes of defect creation and healing (annealing) of SWCNTs at lower fluences, while at higher fluences defect creation or damage dominates. In UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy we find that there is decrease in the intensity of characteristic peaks with every increasing fluence, indicating decrease in the optically active states with irradiation.

  10. Raman studies on 0.4 nm diameter single wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorio, A.; Souza Filho, A. G.; Dresselhaus, G.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Righi, A.; Matinaga, F. M.; Dantas, M. S. S.; Pimenta, M. A.; Mendes Filho, J.; Li, Z. M.; Tang, Z. K.; Saito, R.

    2002-01-01

    We performed polarized Raman scattering studies on 0.4 nm diameter single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) grown inside the pores of zeolite crystals, using several different laser lines (1.92⩽ Elaser⩽2.71 eV). The strong diameter-selective resonant behavior of typical SWNTs (1< dt<3 nm) is not observed. The Raman spectra instead show a complicated profile that reflects the sp 2 carbons phonon density of states superimposed on the characteristic SWNT Raman features. We show that the behavior of typical SWNTs can be used qualitatively to analyze the radial breathing mode (RBM), G-band and D-band spectra of the 0.4 nm diameter SWNTs.

  11. Second-Harmonic Generation of Aligned Single-Walled 0.4nm Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kam Sing; Su, Huimin; Ye, Jianting; Tang, Zikang

    2007-03-01

    The second-harmonic generation (SHG) is measured for the first time from monosized and well-aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) in the channel of aluminophosphate AlPO4-5 (AFI) zeolite. The SHG yield scales as quadratic function of the pump laser intensity. Due to the different polarization preference, we are able to discriminate the SHG contribution from the chiral (4,2) CNTs and those from the AFI template. The polarization direction and the anisotropic dependence of the SHG intensity on the excitation polarizations are investigated in the transmission geometry. In the case of normal incidence, the intensity of SHG is maximized when the excitation polarization is 45 degree against the tube axis and the SH radiation is linear-polarized on the plane perpendicular to the tube axis. The experiment results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical prediction of the second-order nonlinear optical process in chiral carbon nanotubes.

  12. Immobilizing shortened single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on gold using a surface condensation method.

    PubMed

    Nan, Xiaolin; Gu, Zhennan; Liu, Zhongfan

    2002-01-15

    We propose a surface condensation method for assembling single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on gold. The as-prepared long and randomly tangled SWNTs were cut into short pipes by chemical oxidation, allowing the nanotubes to be terminated by carboxyl functionalities. A surface condensation reaction was then performed by immersing an amino self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-modified gold substrate into the dimethylformamide suspension of carboxylic nanotubes with the aid of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide condensation agent. Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) results show that a highly aligned assembly of SWNTs has been formed on gold, with the nanotubes standing on the surface stable enough for a long ultrasonication. In combination with the microcontact printing (muCP) technique, we have fabricated patterned nanotube assemblies using this surface condensation method. Moreover, we found that the "giant" carbon nanotubes tend to form bundles on an amino-terminating surface, likely following a nucleation-growth model. PMID:16290365

  13. Photon antibunching in single-walled carbon nanotubes at telecommunication wavelengths and room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Takumi; Ishi-Hayase, Junko; Maki, Hideyuki

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the photoluminescence of individual air-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from 6 to 300 K. Time-resolved and antibunching measurements over the telecommunication wavelength range were performed using a superconducting single-photon detector. We detected moderate temperature independent antibunching behavior over the whole temperature range studied. To investigate the exciton dynamics, which is responsible for the antibunching behavior, we measured excitation-power and temperature dependence of the photoluminescence spectra and lifetime decay curves. These measurements suggested an exciton confinement effect that is likely caused by high-dielectric amorphous carbon surrounding the SWNTs. These results indicate that SWNTs are good candidates for light sources in quantum communication technologies operating in the telecommunication wavelength range and at room temperature.

  14. Zipping, entanglement, and the elastic modulus of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube films.

    PubMed

    Won, Yoonjin; Gao, Yuan; Panzer, Matthew A; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo; Kenny, Thomas W; Cai, Wei; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2013-12-17

    Reliably routing heat to and from conversion materials is a daunting challenge for a variety of innovative energy technologies--from thermal solar to automotive waste heat recovery systems--whose efficiencies degrade due to massive thermomechanical stresses at interfaces. This problem may soon be addressed by adhesives based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, which promise the revolutionary combination of high through-plane thermal conductivity and vanishing in-plane mechanical stiffness. Here, we report the data for the in-plane modulus of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube films using a microfabricated resonator method. Molecular simulations and electron microscopy identify the nanoscale mechanisms responsible for this property. The zipping and unzipping of adjacent nanotubes and the degree of alignment and entanglement are shown to govern the spatially varying local modulus, thereby providing the route to engineered materials with outstanding combinations of mechanical and thermal properties. PMID:24309375

  15. Zipping, entanglement, and the elastic modulus of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube films

    PubMed Central

    Won, Yoonjin; Gao, Yuan; Panzer, Matthew A.; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo; Kenny, Thomas W.; Cai, Wei; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Reliably routing heat to and from conversion materials is a daunting challenge for a variety of innovative energy technologies––from thermal solar to automotive waste heat recovery systems––whose efficiencies degrade due to massive thermomechanical stresses at interfaces. This problem may soon be addressed by adhesives based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, which promise the revolutionary combination of high through-plane thermal conductivity and vanishing in-plane mechanical stiffness. Here, we report the data for the in-plane modulus of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube films using a microfabricated resonator method. Molecular simulations and electron microscopy identify the nanoscale mechanisms responsible for this property. The zipping and unzipping of adjacent nanotubes and the degree of alignment and entanglement are shown to govern the spatially varying local modulus, thereby providing the route to engineered materials with outstanding combinations of mechanical and thermal properties. PMID:24309375

  16. Magnetic-field-induced diameter-selective synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Su, Yanjie; Zhang, Yaozhong; Wei, Hao; Zhang, Liling; Zhao, Jiang; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Yafei

    2012-03-01

    We report a facile and scalable approach to synthesize single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with selected diameter distribution by applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field in the arc plasma region. It is found that this magnetic field-induced diameter-selectivity strategy enables the control of the SWNTs with different diameter distributions in different regions, and the diameter-selective efficiency could be enhanced by modifying the direction of magnetic field. Our results indicate that the motions of the catalysts with different particle sizes, positive carbon ions and electrons are significantly influenced by the magnetic field and electromagnetic force, resulting in the different nucleation and growth processes of SWNTs due to the collective interactions between the magnetic field and arc plasma. This approach would enable a viable route towards the synthesis of SWNTs with desired diameter through the tuning of arc parameters in the arc discharge process. PMID:22301844

  17. Role of the catalyst in the growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Balbuena, Perla B; Zhao, Jin; Huang, Shiping; Wang, Yixuan; Sakulchaicharoen, Nataphan; Resasco, Daniel E

    2006-05-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations are carried out to analyze the physical state of the catalyst, and the growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes under typical temperature and pressure conditions of their experimental synthesis, emphasizing the role of the catalyst/substrate interactions. It is found that a strong cluster/substrate interaction increases the cluster melting point, modifying the initial stages of carbon dissolution and precipitation on the cluster surface. Experiments performed on model Co-Mo catalysts clearly illustrate the existence of an initial period where the catalyst is formed and no nanotube growth is observed. To quantify the nature of the Co-Mo2C interaction, quantum density functional theory is applied to characterize structural and energetic features of small Co clusters deposited on a (001) Mo2C surface, revealing a strong attachment of Co-clusters to the Mo2C surface, which may increase the melting point of the cluster and prevent cluster sintering. PMID:16792351

  18. Hybrid Graphene and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Enhanced Phase-Change Heat Transfer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Han; Yun, Hyung Duk; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Bang, In Cheol

    2016-02-10

    Nucleate boiling is an effective heat transfer method in power generation systems and cooling devices. In this letter, hybrid graphene/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), graphene, and SWCNT films deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces were fabricated to investigate the enhancement of nucleate boiling phenomena described by the critical heat flux and heat transfer coefficient. The graphene films were grown on Cu foils and transferred to ITO surfaces. Furthermore, SWCNTs were deposited on the graphene layer to fabricate hybrid graphene/SWCNT films. We determined that the hybrid graphene/SWCNT film deposited on an ITO surface is the most effective heat transfer surface in pool boiling because of the interconnected network of carbon structures. PMID:26731547

  19. Energy Band Gap Study of Semiconducting Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkadi, Asmaa; Decrossas, Emmanuel; El-Ghazaly, Samir

    2013-01-01

    The electronic properties of multiple semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) considering various distribution inside a bundle are studied. The model derived from the proposed analytical potential function of electron density for na individual s-SWCNT is general and can be easily applied to multiple nanotubes. This work demonstrates that regardless the number of carbon nanotubes, the strong coupling occurring between the closet neighbors reduces the energy band gap of the bundle by 10%. As expected, the coupling is strongly dependent on the distance separating the s-SWCNTs. In addition, based on the developed model, it is proposed to enhance this coupling effect by applying an electric field across the bundle to significantly reduce the energy band gap of the bundle by 20%.

  20. Energy Band Gap Study of Semiconducting Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkadi, Asmaa; Decrossas, Emmanuel; El-Ghazaly, Samir

    2013-01-01

    The electronic properties of multiple semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) considering various distribution inside a bundle are studied. The model derived from the proposed analytical potential function of the electron density for an individual s-SWCNT is general and can be easily applied to multiple nanotubes. This work demonstrates that regardless the number of carbon nanotubes, the strong coupling occurring between the closest neighbours reduces the energy band gap of the bundle by 10%. As expected, the coupling is strongly dependent on the distance separating the s-SWCNTs. In addition, based on the developed model, it is proposed to enhance this coupling effect by applying an electric field across the bundle to significantly reduce the energy band gap of the bundle by 20%.

  1. Interfacial Surfactant Ordering in Thin Films of SDS-Encapsulated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Das, Sushanta K; Sengupta, Sanghamitra; Velarde, Luis

    2016-01-21

    The molecular self-assembly of surfactants on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) is currently a common strategy for the tuning of nanotube properties and the stabilization of carbon nanotube dispersions. Here, we report direct measurements of the degree of interfacial ordering for sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactants adsorbed on colloidal, single-chirality enriched, SWCNTs within a solid film and investigate the dependence of surface alkyl chain order on the surfactant concentration in the precursor solution. The degree of order for the SWCNT-bound SDS molecules, is probed by vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. We find concrete evidence for the presence of highly ordered surface structures at sufficiently high SDS concentrations, attributed here to cylindrical-like micelle assemblies with the SWCNT at the core. As the SDS concentration decreases, the interfacial order is found to decrease as well, generating a more disordered or random adsorption of surfactants on the nanotube surfaces. PMID:26730991

  2. Adsorption equilibrium of organic vapors on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Agnihotri, S.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2005-01-01

    Gravimetric techniques were employed to determine the adsorption capacities of commercially available purified electric arc and HiPco single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for organic compounds (toluene, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), hexane and cyclohexane) at relative pressures, p/p0, ranging from 1 ?? 10-4 to 0.95 and at isothermal conditions of 25, 37 and 50 ??C. The isotherms displayed both type I and type II characteristics. Adsorption isotherm modeling showed that SWNTs are heterogeneous adsorbents, and the Freundlich equation best describes the interaction between organic molecules and SWNTs. The heats of adsorption were 1-4 times the heats of vaporization, which is typical for physical adsorption of organic vapors on porous carbons. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Photon antibunching in single-walled carbon nanotubes at telecommunication wavelengths and room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, Takumi Ishi-Hayase, Junko; Maki, Hideyuki

    2015-03-16

    We investigated the photoluminescence of individual air-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from 6 to 300 K. Time-resolved and antibunching measurements over the telecommunication wavelength range were performed using a superconducting single-photon detector. We detected moderate temperature independent antibunching behavior over the whole temperature range studied. To investigate the exciton dynamics, which is responsible for the antibunching behavior, we measured excitation-power and temperature dependence of the photoluminescence spectra and lifetime decay curves. These measurements suggested an exciton confinement effect that is likely caused by high-dielectric amorphous carbon surrounding the SWNTs. These results indicate that SWNTs are good candidates for light sources in quantum communication technologies operating in the telecommunication wavelength range and at room temperature.

  4. Dispersion and characterization of arc discharge single-walled carbon nanotubes--towards conducting transparent films.

    PubMed

    Rösner, B; Guldi, D M; Chen, J; Minett, A I; Fink, R H

    2014-04-01

    This study addresses a combination of a well-developed and mild dispersion method and high-quality arc discharge single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as starting materials. Thus, we advance in fabrication of transparent, conducting films with extraordinary low material loss during SWCNT processing. The starting material was characterized by means of thermogravimetric analysis, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The quality of the starting material and produced dispersions was evaluated by ultraviolet and visible light absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. A transparent conductive film was fabricated by drop-casting, whereas films were obtained with electrical to optical conductivity ratios (σDC/σOp) as high as 2.2, combined with a loss of nanotube material during processing well below 20 wt%. High pressure carbon monoxide conversion (HiPCO) SWCNTs, which are very well described in the literature, were used for comparison. PMID:24567084

  5. Multi-fractal hierarchy of single-walled carbon nanotube hydrophobic coatings.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Francesco; Castrucci, Paola; Scarselli, Manuela; Nanni, Francesca; Cacciotti, Ilaria; De Crescenzi, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    A hierarchical structure is an assembly with a multi-scale morphology and with a large and accessible surface area. Recent advances in nanomaterial science have made increasingly possible the design of hierarchical surfaces with specific and tunable properties. Here, we report the fractal analysis of hierarchical single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films realized by a simple, rapid, reproducible, and inexpensive filtration process from an aqueous dispersion, then deposited by drytransfer printing method on several substrates, at room temperature. Furthermore, by varying the thickness of carbon nanotube random networks, it is possible tailoring their wettability due to capillary phenomena in the porous films. Moreover, in order to describe the wetting properties of such surfaces, we introduce a two-dimensional extension of the Wenzel-Cassie-Baxter theory. The hierarchical surface roughness of SWCNT coatings coupled with their exceptional and tunable optical and electrical properties provide an ideal hydrophobic composite surface for a new class of optoelectronic and nanofluidic devices. PMID:25716718

  6. Multi-Fractal Hierarchy of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Hydrophobic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Nicola, Francesco; Castrucci, Paola; Scarselli, Manuela; Nanni, Francesca; Cacciotti, Ilaria; de Crescenzi, Maurizio

    2015-02-01

    A hierarchical structure is an assembly with a multi-scale morphology and with a large and accessible surface area. Recent advances in nanomaterial science have made increasingly possible the design of hierarchical surfaces with specific and tunable properties. Here, we report the fractal analysis of hierarchical single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films realized by a simple, rapid, reproducible, and inexpensive filtration process from an aqueous dispersion, then deposited by drytransfer printing method on several substrates, at room temperature. Furthermore, by varying the thickness of carbon nanotube random networks, it is possible tailoring their wettability due to capillary phenomena in the porous films. Moreover, in order to describe the wetting properties of such surfaces, we introduce a two-dimensional extension of the Wenzel-Cassie-Baxter theory. The hierarchical surface roughness of SWCNT coatings coupled with their exceptional and tunable optical and electrical properties provide an ideal hydrophobic composite surface for a new class of optoelectronic and nanofluidic devices.

  7. Conjugated polymer-assisted dispersion of single-wall carbon nanotubes: the power of polymer wrapping.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Suman Kalyan; Fritsch, Martin; Scherf, Ullrich; Gomulya, Widianta; Bisri, Satria Zulkarnaen; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2014-08-19

    The future application of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in electronic (nano)devices is closely coupled to the availability of pure, semiconducting SWNTs and preferably, their defined positioning on suited substrates. Commercial carbon nanotube raw mixtures contain metallic as well as semiconducting tubes of different diameter and chirality. Although many techniques such as density gradient ultracentrifugation, dielectrophoresis, and dispersion by surfactants or polar biopolymers have been developed, so-called conjugated polymer wrapping is one of the most promising and powerful purification and discrimination strategies. The procedure involves debundling and dispersion of SWNTs by wrapping semiflexible conjugated polymers, such as poly(9,9-dialkylfluorene)s (PFx) or regioregular poly(3-alkylthiophene)s (P3AT), around the SWNTs, and is accompanied by SWNT discrimination by diameter and chirality. Thereby, the π-conjugated backbone of the conjugated polymers interacts with the two-dimensional, graphene-like π-electron surface of the nanotubes and the solubilizing alkyl side chains of optimal length support debundling and dispersion in organic solvents. Careful structural design of the conjugated polymers allows for a selective and preferential dispersion of both small and large diameter SWNTs or SWNTs of specific chirality. As an example, with polyfluorenes as dispersing agents, it was shown that alkyl chain length of eight carbons are favored for the dispersion of SWNTs with diameters of 0.8-1.2 nm and longer alkyls with 12-15 carbons can efficiently interact with nanotubes of increased diameter up to 1.5 nm. Polar side chains at the PF backbone produce dispersions with increased SWNT concentration but, unfortunately, cause reduction in selectivity. The selectivity of the dispersion process can be monitored by a combination of absorption, photoluminescence, and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy, allowing identification of nanotubes with specific coordinates [(n,m) indices]. The polymer wrapping strategy enables the generation of SWNT dispersions containing exclusively semiconducting nanotubes. Toward the applications in electronic devices, until now most applied approach is a direct processing of such SWNT dispersions into the active layer of network-type thin film field effect transistors. However, to achieve promising transistor performance (high mobility and on-off ratio) careful removal of the wrapping polymer chains seems crucial, for example, by washing or ultracentrifugation. More defined positioning of the SWNTs can be accomplished in directed self-assembly procedures. One possible strategy uses diblock copolymers containing a conjugated polymer block as dispersing moiety and a second block for directed self-assembly, for example, a DNA block for specific interaction with complementary DNA strands. Another strategy utilizes reactive side chains for controlled anchoring onto patterned surfaces (e.g., by interaction of thiol-terminated alkyl side chains with gold surfaces). A further promising application of purified SWNT dispersions is the field of organic (all-carbon) or hybrid solar cell devices. PMID:25025887

  8. Separation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with DEP-FFF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Howard K.; Peng, Haiqing; Alvarez, Noe; Mendes, Manuel; Pasquali, Matteo

    2011-01-01

    A process using a modified dielectrophoresis device separates single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) according to their polarizability in electric fields. This depends on the size and dielectric constant of individual nanotubes and easily separates metallic from semiconducting nanotubes. Separation by length has also been demonstrated. Partial separation (enrichment) according to bandgap (which is linked to polarizability) has also been shown and can be improved to full separation of individual types of semiconducting SWNTs with better control over operational parameters and the length of SWNT starting material. This process and device can be scaled affordably to generate useful amounts of semiconducting SWNTs for electronic device development and production. In this study, a flow injection dielectrophoresis technique was used with a modified dielectrophoresis device. The length, width, and height of the modified chamber were 28, 2.5, and 0.025 cm, respectively. On the bottom of the chamber, there are two arrays of 50-m-wide, 2-m-thick gold electrodes, which are connected to an AC voltage generator and are alternately arranged so that every electrode is adjacent to two electrodes of the opposite polar. There is an additional plate electrode on the top of the chamber that is negatively biased. During the experiment, a syringe pump constantly pumps in the mobile phase, 1-percent sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) solution, into the chamber. The frequency and voltage are set to 1 MHz and 10 V peak-to-peak, respectively. About 150 micro-L of SWNTs in 1- percent SDBS decanted solution are injected to the mobile phase through a septum near the entrance of the chamber. The flow rate of the mobile phase is set to 0.02 cu cm/min. The injected SWNTs sample flows through the chamber before it is lead into a fluorescence flow-through cell and collected for further analysis. The flow-through cell has three windows, thus allowing the fluorometer to collect fluorescence spectrum and visible absorption spectrums simultaneously. Dielectrophoresis field-flow fractionation (DEP-FFF) generally depends on interaction of a sedimentation force and DEP force for particle separation, and SWNTs are neutrally buoyant in water. In this innovation, the third electrode was added to create a sedimentation force based on DC electrophoresis. This makes this particular device applicable to separations on any neutrally buoyant particles in solution and a more general process for a broad range of nanomaterials sorting and separations.

  9. Electronic properties of optically transparent single-walled carbon nanotube films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, David Samuel

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) films of various densities were fabricated and the optoelectronic properties studied. Several deposition techniques were developed, including filtration, stamping, self-assembly, spraying, and slot coating. Film conductivity was studied as a function of several parameters. At sub-monolayer densities, close to the percolation threshold, the film conductance follows the expected 2D percolation behavior. For films just thicker than a monolayer, the conductivity weakly increases up to a critical thickness, due to interlayer tube coupling. The frequency dependence of the conductivity follows the ac universality power law predicted for disordered systems. Due to the large intertube barriers (relative to the intratube resistance), the film conductivity increases as a power law in the constituent tube length. DC conductivities up to 2400 S/cm were measured, and increased to 6000 S/cm upon exposure to various dopants; however the binding is not stable at room temperature. The overall electrical stability of SWNT films is considered under various conditions. Nanotube films thinner than 100 nm are transparent in the visible and infrared spectrum, with the transmission limited by absorption, rather than by reflection. The visible spectrum is relatively featureless, apart from a weak interband transition at 700 nm; therefore, the films have a neutral, "gray" color. The large ratio of DC to optical conductivity make SWNT films useful for several applications including displays, solar cells, and touch screens. A prototype organic solar cell using a SWNT anode as shown to have efficiencies comparable to cells using an indium tin oxide anode; integration with a metallic grid was demonstrated. Films were coated onto fabric and shown to impart electrical conductivity to the fabric. Films of various densities were fabricated as both the gate and the conducting channel of a field effect transistor (FET), making the first transparent and flexible transistor incorporating SWNTs. SWNT FETs non-covalently functionalized with a porphyrin derivative, were used to monitor the light induced electron transfer between nanotubes and porphyrin. The wavelength and intensity dependence of this process was measured, indicating that the optical changes in the porphyrin electronic structure are coupled to the charge transport through the network.

  10. High performance electronics based on aligned arrays of single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocabas, Coskun

    This dissertation describes a new approach for generating large area homogenous parallel array of single walled carbon nanotubes. The approach uses guided growth, by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), of SWNTs on single crystal quartz substrates. The anisotropic interaction associated with lattice structure of the quartz between SWNT and quartz surface guides SWNT during the deposition process. We have optimized CVD conditions that can produce arrays of individual single walled carbon nanotubes in horizontal configurations with perfect linear shapes, to within experimental uncertainties, and with levels of alignment >99.9%. We took the method one step further by printing these SWNT arrays on unusual substrate such as plastic. Using the developed printing technique, we can fabricate multilayer superstructures of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on a wide range of substrates. In order to understand charge transport through SWNT networks, we studied the scaling behaviours SWNT transistors by systematically varying degrees of alignment and coverage in transistors with a range of channel lengths and orientations perpendicular and parallel to the direction of alignment. We have modelled our experimental results using a first principles stick-percolation based transport model which provides a simple framework to interpret the sometimes counter-intuitive transport parameters measured in these devices. We have used dense, perfectly aligned arrays of long, perfectly linear SWNTs as an effective thin film semiconductor suitable for integration into transistors and other classes of electronic devices. These types of devices show excellent electric performance with mobilities and scaled transconductances approaching ˜2,000 cm2 V-1 s-1 and ˜3,000 S m-1, respectively. MOS and CMOS logic gates and mechanically flexible transistors on plastic were also demonstrated. Finally we have studied the high frequency performance of transistors that use aligned SWNT arrays. For the first time we have observed power gain from SWNT transistors. This achievement allows us to build all of the key functions of analog electronics, including resonant antennas, fixed RF amplifiers, RF mixers and audio amplifiers. Combining these components we have built the first carbon nanotube radio. These results represent important first steps to practical implementation of SWNTs in high speed analog circuits.

  11. Mechanism of Synthesis of Ultra-Long Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Arc Discharge Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Keidar, Michael

    2013-06-23

    In this project fundamental issues related to synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which is relationship between plasma parameters and SWNT characteristics were investigated. Given that among plasma-based techniques arc discharge stands out as very advantageous in several ways (fewer defects, high flexibility, longer lifetime) this techniques warrants attention from the plasma physics and plasma technology standpoint. Both experimental and theoretical investigations of the plasma and SWNTs synthesis were conducted. Experimental efforts focused on plasma diagnostics, measurements of nanostructures parameters, and nanoparticle characterization. Theoretical efforts focused to focus on multi-dimensional modeling of the arc discharge and single wall nanotube synthesis in arc plasmas. It was demonstrated in experiment and theoretically that controlling plasma parameters can affect nanostucture synthesis altering SWNT properties (length and diameter) and leading to synthesis of new structures such as a few-layer graphene. Among clearly identified parameters affecting synthesis are magnetic and electric fields. Knowledge of the plasma parameters and discharge characteristics is crucial for ability to control synthesis process by virtue of both magnetic and electric fields. New graduate course on plasma engineering was introduced into curriculum. 3 undergraduate students were attracted to the project and 3 graduate students (two are female) were involved in the project. Undergraduate student from Historically Black University was attracted and participated in the project during Summer 2010.

  12. Ion Transport Characteristics of Individual Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes Mimic Those of Biological Ion Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Hasti; Shepard, Kenneth; Nuckolls, Colin

    2014-03-01

    Transmembrane ionic channels play a crucial role in vital cellular activities by regulating the transport of ions and fluid across the cell membrane. Their structural complexity and flexibility as well as their many unique operational features, however, make their investigation extremely difficult. The simple, atomically smooth and well-defined structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) provides an excellent template for studying molecular transport at nanoscale. Additionally, CNTs have been suggested as analogues to biological pores since they share several common features such as nanometer size diameter, hydrophobic core and ultrafast water flow. Functionalizing the nanotube entrance can also mimic the selectivity filter of ion channels. In this work, we experimentally study ionic transport through individual single-walled CNTs connecting two fluid reservoirs as a function of pore properties and electrolyte type and concentration. We provide strong evidence that the electrostatic potentials arising from the ionized carboxyl groups at the pore entrance significantly influence the ion permeation in a manner consistent with a simple electrostatic mechanism. Lastly, the similarities of ionic transport mechanisms between individual single-walled CNTs and protein ion channels are discussed.

  13. Effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the bioavailability of PCBs in field-contaminated sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorption of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) to black carbon is a well studied phenomenon. One emerging class of engineered black carbon materials are single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Little research has investigated the potential of SWNT to adsorb and sequester HO...

  14. Single-walled carbon nanotube-based polymer monoliths for the enantioselective nano-liquid chromatographic separation of racemic pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Marwa; Yajadda, Mir Massoud Aghili; Han, Zhao Jun; Su, Dawei; Wang, Guoxiu; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken; Ghanem, Ashraf

    2014-09-19

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes were encapsulated into different polymer-based monolithic backbones. The polymer monoliths were prepared via the copolymerization of 20% monomers, glycidyl methacrylate, 20% ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 60% porogens (36% 1-propanol, 18% 1,4-butanediol) or 16.4% monomers (16% butyl methacrylate, 0.4% sulfopropyl methacrylate), 23.6% ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 60% porogens (36% 1-propanol, 18% 1,4-butanediol) along with 6% single-walled carbon nanotubes aqueous suspension. The effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the chiral separation of twelve classes of pharmaceutical racemates namely; α- and β-blockers, antiinflammatory drugs, antifungal drugs, dopamine antagonists, norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitors, catecholamines, sedative hypnotics, diuretics, antihistaminics, anticancer drugs and antiarrhythmic drugs was investigated. The enantioselective separation was carried out under multimodal elution to explore the chiral recognition capabilities of single-walled carbon nanotubes using reversed phase, polar organic and normal phase chromatographic conditions using nano-liquid chromatography. Baseline separation was achieved for celiprolol, chlorpheniramine, etozoline, nomifensine and sulconazole under multimodal elution conditions. Satisfactory repeatability was achieved through run-to-run, column-to-column and batch-to-batch investigations. Our findings demonstrate that single-walled carbon nanotubes represent a promising stationary phase for the chiral separation and may open the field for a new class of chiral selectors. PMID:25130087

  15. First-principles study of structural and work function properties for nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xiji; Li, Detian; Cai, Jianqiu; Luo, Haijun; Dong, Changkun

    2016-04-01

    The structural and electronic properties of the capped (5, 5) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT), including the structural stability, the work function, and the charge transfer performance, are investigated for the substitutional nitrogen atom doping under different concentrations by first-principles density functional theory. The geometrical structure keeps almost intact with single or two N atom doping, while Csbnd N bonds may break up with serious defects for N concentrations of 23.3 at.% and above. The SWNT remains metallic and the work function drops after doping due to the upward shift of Fermi level, leading to the increase of the electrical conductivity. N doping enhances the oxygen reduction activity stronger than N adsorption because of higher charge transfers.

  16. Thin-film transistors using DNA-wrapped semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with selected chiralities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Yuki; Nihey, Fumiyuki; Ohmori, Shigekazu; Saito, Takeshi

    2015-10-01

    Selected semiconducting chiralities, (7,5), (7,6), and (8,4), of DNA-wrapped single-wall carbon nanotubes (DNA-SWCNTs) were used for thin-film transistors (TFTs). Chirality separation was carried out by ion exchange chromatography (IEX) with the ssDNA of the (TAT)4 sequence. An on/off ratio of 3.8 × 106 with a carrier mobility of 11 cm2/(V·s) was successfully achieved in the fabricated SWCNT-TFTs. The comparison between the on/off ratios obtained before (101-102) and after IEX (104-107) indicated that the IEX separation process sufficiently improves the performance of SWCNT-TFTs because of the reducing metallic SWCNT pathways in the TFT channel.

  17. Direct current injection and thermocapillary flow for purification of aligned arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xu; Wahab, Muhammad A.; Li, Yuhang; Islam, Ahmad E.; Tomic, Bojan; Huang, Jiyuan; Burns, Branden; Seabron, Eric; Dunham, Simon N.; Du, Frank; Lin, Jonathan; Wilson, William L.; Song, Jizhou; Huang, Yonggang; Alam, Muhammad A.; Rogers, John A.

    2015-04-01

    Aligned arrays of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) represent ideal configurations for use of this class of material in high performance electronics. Development of means for removing the metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs) in as-grown arrays represents an essential challenge. Here, we introduce a simple scheme that achieves this type of purification using direct, selective current injection through interdigitated electrodes into the m-SWNTs, to allow their complete removal using processes of thermocapillarity and dry etching. Experiments and numerical simulations establish the fundamental aspects that lead to selectivity in this process, thereby setting design rules for optimization. Single-step purification of arrays that include thousands of SWNTs demonstrates the effectiveness and simplicity of the procedures. The result is a practical route to large-area aligned arrays of purely s-SWNTs with low-cost experimental setups.

  18. Direct current injection and thermocapillary flow for purification of aligned arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xu; Islam, Ahmad E.; Seabron, Eric; Dunham, Simon N.; Du, Frank; Lin, Jonathan; Wilson, William L.; Rogers, John A.; Wahab, Muhammad A.; Alam, Muhammad A.; Li, Yuhang; Tomic, Bojan; Huang, Jiyuan; Burns, Branden; Song, Jizhou; Huang, Yonggang

    2015-04-07

    Aligned arrays of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) represent ideal configurations for use of this class of material in high performance electronics. Development of means for removing the metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs) in as-grown arrays represents an essential challenge. Here, we introduce a simple scheme that achieves this type of purification using direct, selective current injection through interdigitated electrodes into the m-SWNTs, to allow their complete removal using processes of thermocapillarity and dry etching. Experiments and numerical simulations establish the fundamental aspects that lead to selectivity in this process, thereby setting design rules for optimization. Single-step purification of arrays that include thousands of SWNTs demonstrates the effectiveness and simplicity of the procedures. The result is a practical route to large-area aligned arrays of purely s-SWNTs with low-cost experimental setups.

  19. Single-walled carbon nanotube/metalloporphyrin composites for the chemiresistive detection of amines and meat spoilage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sophie F; Petty, Alexander R; Sazama, Graham T; Swager, Timothy M

    2015-05-26

    Chemiresistive detectors for amine vapors were made from single-walled carbon nanotubes by noncovalent modification with cobalt meso-arylporphyrin complexes. We show that through changes in the oxidation state of the metal, the electron-withdrawing character of the porphyrinato ligand, and the counteranion, the magnitude of the chemiresistive response to ammonia could be improved. The devices exhibited sub-ppm sensitivity and high selectivity toward amines as well as good stability to air, moisture, and time. The application of these chemiresistors in the detection of various biogenic amines (i.e. putrescine, cadaverine) and in the monitoring of spoilage in raw meat and fish samples (chicken, pork, salmon, cod) over several days was also demonstrated. PMID:25867821

  20. Interaction of [FeFe]-hydrogenases with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svedruzic Chang, Drazenka; McDonald, Timothy J.; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Heben, Michael J.; King, Paul W.

    2007-09-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are promising candidates for use in energy conversion devices as an active photo-collecting elements, for dissociation of bound excitons and charge-transfer from photo-excited chromophores, or as molecular wires to transport charge. Hydrogenases are enzymes that efficiently catalyze the reduction of protons from a variety of electron donors to produce molecular hydrogen. Hydrogenases together with SWNT suggest a novel biohybrid material for direct conversion of sunlight into H II. Here, we report changes in SWNT optical properties upon addition of recombinant [FeFe] hydrogenases from Clostridium acetobutylicum and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We find evidence that novel and stable charge-transfer complexes are formed under conditions of the hydrogenase catalytic turnover, providing spectroscopic handles for further study and application of this hybrid system.

  1. Crystallization of Polymers at liquid/liquid interface templated by single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenda; Li, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    Nanosized single-walled carbon nanotube rings were fabricated by using a Pickering emulsion-based method. By tuning a water/oil/SWNT miniemulsion system, SWNT rings with a diameter of ˜200 nm can be readily achieved. The formation mechanism is attributed to the bending force induced by the curved liquid/liquid interface. Crystallization of polyethylene homo- and copolymers using this unique SWNT rings as the nucleation agent was conducted at the curved liquid/liquid interface. Crystal structure, hybrid morphology and crystallization kinetics were systematically studied. The structure of controlled alternating patterns on SWNT rings has great potential in various applications in large-scale integrated circuits and single-electron devices.

  2. Improved field emission stability from single-walled carbon nanotubes chemically attached to silicon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate the simple fabrication of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field emission electrode which shows excellent field emission characteristics and remarkable field emission stability without requiring posttreatment. Chemically functionalized SWCNTs were chemically attached to a silicon substrate. The chemical attachment led to vertical alignment of SWCNTs on the surface. Field emission sweeps and Fowler-Nordheim plots showed that the Si-SWCNT electrodes field emit with a low turn-on electric field of 1.5 V μm−1 and high electric field enhancement factor of 3,965. The Si-SWCNT electrodes were shown to maintain a current density of >740 μA cm−2 for 15 h with negligible change in applied voltage. The results indicate that adhesion strength between the SWCNTs and substrate is a much greater factor in field emission stability than previously reported. PMID:22853557

  3. Periodic alignment of Si quantum dots on hafnium oxide coated single wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Olmedo, Mario; Martinez-Morales, Alfredo A.; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Liu Jianlin; Liu Gang; Lau, C.N.; Yengel, Emre; Ozkan, Cengiz S.

    2009-03-23

    We demonstrate a bottom up approach for the aligned epitaxial growth of Si quantum dots (QDs) on one-dimensional (1D) hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) ridges created by the growth of HfO{sub 2} thin film on single wall carbon nanotubes. This growth process creates a high strain 1D ridge on the HfO{sub 2} film, which favors the formation of Si seeds over the surrounding flat HfO{sub 2} area. Periodic alignment of Si QDs on the 1D HfO{sub 2} ridge was observed, which can be controlled by varying different growth conditions, such as growth temperature, growth time, and disilane flow rate.

  4. Electrochemical Redox Switchable Dispersion of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Water.

    PubMed

    Feng, Anchao; Peng, Liao; Liu, Bowen; Liu, Senyang; Wang, Shanfeng; Yuan, Jinying

    2016-05-01

    We present a new, efficient approach to achieve superior dispersibility of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water by integrating reversible host-guest interaction and π-π stacking. In this approach, β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was first modified with a pyrene group to be adsorbed onto the wall of pristine SWNTs via π-π stacking, followed by further functionalization with ferrocene (Fc)-terminated water-soluble poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) through supramolecular host-guest interaction between β-CD and Fc. Upon alternate electrochemical oxidative/reductive stimuli, the reversible host-guest pair enabled the PEG-Fc@Py-CD@SWNTs to exhibit switchable conversion between dispersion and aggregation states. Electric field controllable PEG-Fc@Py-CD@SWNTs with good reversibility and intact nanotube structure may find potential applications in selective screening of SWNTs, biosensors, and targeted drug delivery. PMID:27025460

  5. Fabrication of single-walled carbon nanohorns containing iodine and cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, J. H.; Lim, S. T.; Huh, S. R.; Kim, G. H.

    2012-02-15

    Iodine and cesium atoms were encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs). Atom encapsulation was carried out with sequential plasma aided procedures which consisted of opening SWCNH tips with an oxygen plasma, atom insertion in an iodine-mixed or cesium-mixed argon plasma, and closing the open tip in an argon plasma. Results reveal that oxidation plays a role in the tip opening procedure, and capillary forces are the driving force for the permeation of the atoms through the open tip of the SWCNHs. The open tip of the atom inserted SWCNH can be closed under the ion irradiation. It demonstrated the fabrication process of encapsulating atoms in SWCNH by using the sequential plasma assisted processes.

  6. Characterization of ester- or thioamide-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube-azithromycin conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darabi, Hossein Reza; Roozkhosh, Atefeh; Jafar Tehrani, Mohammad; Aghapoor, Kioumars; Sayahi, Hani; Balavar, Yadollah; Mohsenzadeh, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with nitrile groups, followed by further reactions allowed direct attachment of azithromycin and its N-demethyl derivative to the side-walls of SWCNTs for the first time. With these approaches, the cleavable ester or thioamide bonds are formed to connect azithromycin to SWCNTs resulting in azithromycin-SWCNT conjugates. These cleavable bonds are able to control molecular release from nanotube surfaces which are generally applicable to a variety of hybrid materials based on SWCNTs. A non-covalent azithromycin-SWCNT has also been compared with azithromycin-SWCNTs conjugates. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier-transformed infrared (FT-IR), UV-vis, and Raman spectroscopies give hints on the characterization of azithromycin-SWCNT. Both drug release and antimicrobial activity of azithromycin-SWCNT conjugates were also tested.

  7. The adsorption of L-phenylalanine on oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Piao, Lingyu; Liu, Quanrun; Li, Yongdan; Wang, Chen

    2009-02-01

    A simple and green approach was proceeded to obtain a stable single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)/L-phenylalanine (Phe) solution. The oxidized SWNTs (OSWNT) were used in this work. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectrometer, Fourier transform-infrared resonance (FT-IR), Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were joined together to investigate the interaction between OSWNT and Phe. The OSWNT became soluble in the water and formed a stable solution since the Phe was adsorbed. The absorbed amount of Phe on the OSWNT is around 33 wt%. Adsorption of the Phe was mainly carried out on the OSWNT with smaller diameters. The Phe molecules were absorbed on the OSWNT by conjunct interaction of the pi-pi stacking, hydrogen bond and part of covalent bond. PMID:19441532

  8. Biomolecular recognition ability of RecA proteins for DNA on single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Oura, Shusuke; Ito, Masahiro; Nii, Daisuke; Homma, Yoshikazu; Umemura, Kazuo

    2015-02-01

    We examined the biomolecular recognition ability of RecA proteins using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) wrapped with a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecule as a mimic for the usual ssDNA molecules. The ssDNA-SWNT hybrids showed larger diameters compared to those of the usual ssDNA molecules. As a result, RecA molecules bound to the ssDNA-SWNTs, as observed using atomic force microscopy and agarose gel electrophoresis. On the other hand, when carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) was used rather than ssDNA, the RecA molecules did not bind to the CMC-SWNT hybrids. Our results indicate that RecA molecules recognize ssDNA on SWNT surfaces as DNA molecules through their biomolecular recognition ability. PMID:25612818

  9. Molecular interactions on single-walled carbon nanotubes revealed by high-resolution transmission microscopy.

    PubMed

    Umeyama, Tomokazu; Baek, Jinseok; Sato, Yuta; Suenaga, Kazu; Abou-Chahine, Fawzi; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The close solid-state structure-property relationships of organic π-aromatic molecules have attracted interest due to their implications for the design of organic functional materials. In particular, a dimeric structure, that is, a unit consisting of two molecules, is required for precisely evaluating intermolecular interactions. Here, we show that the sidewall of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) represents a unique molecular dimer platform that can be directly visualized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Pyrene is chosen as the π-aromatic molecule; its dimer is covalently linked to the SWNT sidewalls by aryl addition. Reflecting the orientation and separation of the two molecules, the pyrene dimer on the SWNT exhibits characteristic optical and photophysical properties. The methodology discussed here—form and probe molecular dimers—is highly promising for the creation of unique models and provides indispensable and fundamental information regarding molecular interactions. PMID:26173983

  10. Bright Fraction of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes through Correlated Fluorescence and Topography Measurements.

    PubMed

    Nogaj, Lisa J; Smyder, Julie A; Leach, Kathryn E; Tu, Xiaomin; Zheng, Ming; Krauss, Todd D

    2015-07-16

    Correlated measurements of fluorescence and topography were performed for individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on quartz using epifluorescence confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Surprisingly, only ~11% of all SWNTs in DNA-wrapped samples were found to be highly emissive on quartz, suggesting that the ensemble fluorescence quantum yield is low because only a small population of SWNTs fluoresces strongly. Qualitatively similar conclusions were obtained from control studies using a sodium cholate surfactant system. To accommodate AFM measurements, excess surfactant was removed from the substrate. Though individual SWNTs on nonrinsed and rinsed surfaces displayed differences in fluorescence intensities and line widths, arising from the influence of the local environment on individual SWNT optical measurements, photoluminescence data from both samples displayed consistent trends. PMID:26266867

  11. Multiple helical configuration and quantity threshold of graphene nanoribbons inside a single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yifan; Chen, Wei; Ren, Hongru; Zhou, Xuyan; Li, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out to explore the configuration and quantity threshold of multiple graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) in single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT). The simulation results showed that several GNRs tangled together to form a perfect spiral structure to maximize the π-π stacking area when filling inside SWCNT. The formation of multiple helical configuration is influenced by the combined effect of structure stability, initial arrangement and tube space, meanwhile its forming time is related to helical angle. The simulated threshold of GNRs in SWCNT decreases with GNR width but increases with SWCNT diameter, and two formulas have come up in this study to estimate the quantity threshold for GNRs. It has been found that multilayered graphite is hard to be stripped in SWCNT because the special helical configuration with incompletely separated GNRs is metastable. This work provides a possibility to control the configuration of GNR@SWCNT.

  12. A new designed π conjugated molecule for stable single walled carbon nanotube dispersion in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, S L; Sahoo, S K; Jarrosson, T; Serein-Spirau, F; Lère-Porte, J-P; Moujaes, E A; Marletta, A; Santos, A P; Fantini, C; Furtado, C A; Silva, R A

    2016-02-15

    A molecule with a π conjugated backbone built from aromatic thiophene and dialkoxyphenylene units and substituted imidazolium groups (TPO) is designed to obtain ultra-stable single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dispersion in aqueous medium. The proposed mechanism of non-covalent interaction is accompanied by individualization of SWCNT and comprises of dominant nondisruptive π-π and cation-π interaction between them and the TPO conjugated oligomer. The individualization of SWCNT and dispersibility and stability of the ultra-stable suspensions were estimated using high resolution transmission electron microscopy, UV-Visible-NIR absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence and zeta potential measurement. Nuclear magnetic resonance data provides direct evidence toward possible cation-π interaction. PMID:26609931

  13. Coupling between flexural modes in free vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rumeng; Wang, Lifeng

    2015-12-01

    The nonlinear thermal vibration behavior of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation and a nonlinear, nonplanar beam model. Whirling motion with energy transfer between flexural motions is found in the free vibration of the SWCNT excited by the thermal motion of atoms where the geometric nonlinearity is significant. A nonlinear, nonplanar beam model considering the coupling in two vertical vibrational directions is presented to explain the whirling motion of the SWCNT. Energy in different vibrational modes is not equal even over a time scale of tens of nanoseconds, which is much larger than the period of fundamental natural vibration of the SWCNT at equilibrium state. The energy of different modes becomes equal when the time scale increases to the microsecond range.

  14. Molecular interactions on single-walled carbon nanotubes revealed by high-resolution transmission microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Umeyama, Tomokazu; Baek, Jinseok; Sato, Yuta; Suenaga, Kazu; Abou-Chahine, Fawzi; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The close solid-state structure–property relationships of organic π−aromatic molecules have attracted interest due to their implications for the design of organic functional materials. In particular, a dimeric structure, that is, a unit consisting of two molecules, is required for precisely evaluating intermolecular interactions. Here, we show that the sidewall of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) represents a unique molecular dimer platform that can be directly visualized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Pyrene is chosen as the π−aromatic molecule; its dimer is covalently linked to the SWNT sidewalls by aryl addition. Reflecting the orientation and separation of the two molecules, the pyrene dimer on the SWNT exhibits characteristic optical and photophysical properties. The methodology discussed here—form and probe molecular dimers—is highly promising for the creation of unique models and provides indispensable and fundamental information regarding molecular interactions. PMID:26173983

  15. Passively Q-switching induced by the smallest single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X. T.; Zhai, J. P.; Wang, J. S.; Chen, Y. P.; Yu, Y. Q.; Zhang, M.; Li, I. L.; Ruan, S. C.; Tang, Z. K.

    2014-04-28

    We report a passively Q-switched erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) by using the smallest single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a diameter of 0.3 nm as the saturable absorber. These small SWNTs are fabricated in the nanochannels of a ZnAPO-11 (AEL) single crystal. By inserting one of the AEL crystal into an EDFL cavity pumped by a 980 nm laser diode, stable passive Q-switching is achieved for a threshold pump power of 206.2 mW, and 4.73 μs pulses with a repetition rate of 41.78 kHz and an average output power of 3.75 mW are obtained for a pump power of 406 mW.

  16. Ultrafast switching time and third order nonlinear coefficients of microwave treated single walled carbon nanotube suspensions.

    PubMed

    Kamaraju, N; Kumar, Sunil; Karthikeyan, B; Kakade, Bhalchandra; Pillai, Vijayamohanan K; Sood, A K

    2009-09-01

    Microwave treated water soluble and amide functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes have been investigated using femtosecond degenerate pump-probe and nonlinear transmission experiments. The time resolved differential transmission using 75 femtosecond pulse with the central wavelength of 790 nm shows a bi-exponential ultrafast photo-bleaching with time constants of 160 fs (130 fs) and 920 fs (300 fs) for water soluble (amide functionalized) nanotubes. Open and closed aperture z-scans show saturation absorption and positive (negative) nonlinear refraction for water soluble (amide functionalized) nanotubes. Two photon absorption coefficient, beta0 approximately 250 cm/GW (650 cm/GW) and nonlinear index, gamma approximately 15 cm2/pW (-30 cm2/pW) are obtained from the theoretical fit in the saturation limit to the data for two types of nanotubes. PMID:19928262

  17. Multiple helical configuration and quantity threshold of graphene nanoribbons inside a single-walled carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Li, Yifan; Chen, Wei; Ren, Hongru; Zhou, Xuyan; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out to explore the configuration and quantity threshold of multiple graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) in single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT). The simulation results showed that several GNRs tangled together to form a perfect spiral structure to maximize the π-π stacking area when filling inside SWCNT. The formation of multiple helical configuration is influenced by the combined effect of structure stability, initial arrangement and tube space, meanwhile its forming time is related to helical angle. The simulated threshold of GNRs in SWCNT decreases with GNR width but increases with SWCNT diameter, and two formulas have come up in this study to estimate the quantity threshold for GNRs. It has been found that multilayered graphite is hard to be stripped in SWCNT because the special helical configuration with incompletely separated GNRs is metastable. This work provides a possibility to control the configuration of GNR@SWCNT. PMID:26374276

  18. Gas sensors based on deposited single-walled carbon nanotube networks for DMMP detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanyan; Zhou, Zhihua; Yang, Zhi; Chen, Xiaohang; Xu, Dong; Zhang, Yafei

    2009-08-01

    Sensors based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks were fabricated and their sensitive properties for the nerve agent stimulant dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) vapor were investigated at room temperature. The SWNT networks were deposited on oxidized silicon surface functionalized with 3-aminopropyltrimethysilane (APS). Combining with a traditional silicon process, SWNT-based gas sensors were made at a wafer scale. The effects of the density of deposited SWNTs on the sensor response were studied. The excellent response is obtained under a density of 30-40 tubes µm-2. The sensors exhibit high resistance response, fast response time, rapid recovery and good reproducibility for DMMP vapor. The deposited SWNT sensors will be potentially extended to large-scale fabrication.

  19. Transparent and flexible supercapacitors with single walled carbon nanotube thin film electrodes.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Recep; Sarioba, Zeynep; Cirpan, Ali; Hiralal, Pritesh; Unalan, Husnu Emrah

    2014-09-10

    We describe a simple process for the fabrication of transparent and flexible, solid-state supercapacitors. Symmetric electrodes made up of binder-free single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin films were deposited onto polydimethylsiloxane substrates by vacuum filtration followed by a stamping method, and solid-state supercapacitor devices were assembled using a gel electrolyte. An optical transmittance of 82% was found for 0.02 mg of SWCNTs, and a specific capacitance of 22.2 F/g was obtained. The power density can reach to 41.5 kW · kg(-1) and shows good capacity retention (94%) upon cycling over 500 times. Fabricated supercapacitors will be relevant for the realization of transparent and flexible devices with energy storage capabilities, displays and touch screens in particular. PMID:25127070

  20. Induced hydroelectric energy generated by compressing a single-walled carbon nanotube hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Zhenquan; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Qiu, Nan; Hashishin, Takeshi; Ohara, Satoshi

    2014-07-01

    Using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) for energy harvesting and storage have attracted much attention recently because SWCNTs have supercapacity performance. In this paper, we report a simple electromechanical approach for the generation of induced electrical potential by the compression of a SWCNT-triggered sodium deoxycholate hydrogel. This hydrogel enhances the electrical potential generated under compression, and this is mainly because of the generation of hydroelectric power by the flow of water over the SWCNTs. The induced voltage was 63.1 mV upon the compression of a 4% SWCNT hydrogel to a compression ratio of 50%, which is superior to values reported previously. The enhancement in hydroelectric potential increased with SWCNT loading in the hydrogel and with the compression ratio because of an enhancement of the impact frequency between water molecules and the SWCNTs.

  1. Electrochemical lithium-ion storage properties of quinone molecules encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Yosuke; Tashiro, Kosuke; Hosoe, Kento; Al-Zubaidi, Ayar; Kawasaki, Shinji

    2016-04-21

    We investigated the electrochemical lithium-ion storage properties of 9,10-anthraquinone (AQ) and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PhQ) molecules encapsulated in the inner hollow core of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The structural properties of the obtained encapsulated systems were characterized by electron microscopy, synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. We found that almost all quinone molecules encapsulated in the SWCNTs can store Li-ions reversibly. Interestingly, the undesired capacity fading, which comes from the dissolution of quinone molecules into the electrolyte, was suppressed by the encapsulation. It was also found that the overpotential of AQ was decreased by the encapsulation, probably due to the high-electric conductivity of SWCNTs. PMID:27030581

  2. Acute toxicity of a mixture of copper and single-walled carbon nanotubes to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki T; Klaine, Stephen J; Lin, Sijie; Ke, Pu C; Kim, Sang D

    2010-01-01

    Nanomaterials released into the environment will interact with many materials including other contaminants. This may influence bioavailability and fate of both the nanoparticles and the other contaminants. The present study examined the effect of a combination of soluble copper and surface-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on Daphnia magna. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) was used to modify the surface of SWNTs, reducing the surface hydrophobicity of the tubes and thereby producing a stable aqueous nanoparticle suspension. The toxicity of the nanoparticle-copper (Cu) mixture was determined to be additive. The addition of nontoxic concentration of LPC-SWNTs enhanced the uptake and toxicity of copper. Greater amounts of Cu were shown to accumulate in D. magna upon addition of 0.5 and 1.0 mg/L LPC-SWNTs. PMID:20821426

  3. Improved field emission stability from single-walled carbon nanotubes chemically attached to silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Fahy, Adam; Barr, Matthew; Dastoor, Paul C.; Shapter, Joseph G.

    2012-08-01

    Here, we demonstrate the simple fabrication of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field emission electrode which shows excellent field emission characteristics and remarkable field emission stability without requiring posttreatment. Chemically functionalized SWCNTs were chemically attached to a silicon substrate. The chemical attachment led to vertical alignment of SWCNTs on the surface. Field emission sweeps and Fowler-Nordheim plots showed that the Si-SWCNT electrodes field emit with a low turn-on electric field of 1.5 V μm-1 and high electric field enhancement factor of 3,965. The Si-SWCNT electrodes were shown to maintain a current density of >740 μA cm-2 for 15 h with negligible change in applied voltage. The results indicate that adhesion strength between the SWCNTs and substrate is a much greater factor in field emission stability than previously reported.

  4. Mechanical characterization of suspended strips of meshed single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Bo; Hao, Ji; Jung, Yung Joon; Wan, Kai-tak

    2016-01-01

    A thin film of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) mesh has good potential to integrate the existing electromechanical functions with flexible devices. In this paper, SWCNT mats are transferred to a patterned polymer SU-8 substrate using a wet contact print method, forming a suspended bridge over a groove in the substrate. The front edge of a tipless AFM cantilever loads the suspension at the centerline, causing it to deform into a V-shape by mixed bending and stretching. The mechanical response of load versus AFM displacement is fitted to a linear elastic model to extract the average elastic modulus. Reversible loading-unloading shows little or no permanent damage due to mechanical loads.

  5. Chirality Separation of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes using Aqueous Two-Phase Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, Jeffrey

    2014-03-01

    Aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) was recently demonstrated to enable the separation of individual species of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) across the separated phases. In this presentation I will describe the use of a dextran - polyethylene glycol aqueous two-phase system along with a separation scheme of varying surfactant concentrations to enable isolation at high purity of specific small diameter SWCNT species. Separation by ATPE is rapid and robust, with a remarkable tunability that allows isolation of most single nanotube chiralities at high purity. Choice of surfactant(s), temperature, polymer concentrations, and the addition of small molecule salts can all be used to tune the exact partitioning of single SWCNT species between the two phases.

  6. Single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized by a series of dichlorocarbenes: DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrushenko, Igor K.; Petrushenko, Konstantin B.

    2016-02-01

    The structural and elastic properties of neutral and ionized dichlorocarbene (CCl2) functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were studied using density functional theory (DFT). The Young’s modulus of ionized pristine SWCNTs is found to decrease in comparison to that of neutral models. The interesting effect of increase in Young’s modulus values of ionized functionalized SWCNTs is observed. We ascribe this feature to the concurrent processes of the bond elongation on ionization and the local deformation on cycloaddition. The strong dependence of the elasticity modulus on the number of addends is also observed. However, the CCl2-attached SWCNTs in their neutral and ionized forms remain strong enough to be suitable for the reinforcement of composites. In contrast to the elastic properties, the binding energies do not change significantly, irrespective of CCl2 coverage.

  7. Structural and mechanical properties of single-wall carbon nanotube fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Pichot, V.; Albouy, P. A.; Launois, P.; Badaire, S.; Zakri, C.; Poulin, P.

    2006-12-15

    We report quantitative experimental study correlating the structure and mechanical properties of fibers made from single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). A post-synthesis solvent drawing treatment is used to vary nanotube alignment, whose detailed understanding is a prerequisite for fiber development. Quantitative analysis of nanotube alignment within the fibers with different draw ratios is performed using x-ray scattering. The method is described in detail, and we also show that the improvement of nanotube alignment with draw ratio can be understood within a model of induced orientation at constant volume. Young's modulus and tensile strength increase with nanotube alignment. This is modeled using continuum mechanics in qualitative agreement with experiment, however quantitative differences show that nanotube alignment is not the only parameter controlling the fiber mechanical properties. We suggest that interaction between the SWNTs and PVA chains should also play a significant role.

  8. On the Interfacial Properties of Polymers/Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Rouhi, S.; Ajori, S.

    2016-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is used to study the adsorption of polyethylene (PE) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) on the functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The effects of functionalization factor weight percent on the interaction energies of polymer chains with nanotubes are studied. Besides, the influences of different functionalization factors on the SWCNT/polymer interactions are investigated. It is shown that for both types of polymer chains, the largest interaction energies associates with the random O functionalized nanotubes. Besides, increasing temperature results in increasing the nanotube/polymer interaction energy. Considering the final shapes of adsorbed polymer chains on the SWCNTs, it is observed that the adsorbed conformations of PE chains are more contracted than those of PEO chains.

  9. 0.8 nm single wall carbon nanotubes for wideband ultrafast pulse generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Z.; Xu, Y.; Jia, Z. X.; Qin, G. S.; Qin, W. P.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate wideband ultrafast optical pulse generation at 1, 1.56 and 2 μm by using single polymer composite saturable absorber (SA) based on 0.8 nm single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The SWCNTs were mixed with sodium carboxymethylcellulose (NaCMC) to form SWCNT SA films. The film then integrated into ytterbium-(Yb-), erbium-(Er-) and thulium-(Tm-) doped ring fiber laser cavities. Using this film, we achieve 380 ps, 830 fs, and 1.24 ps mode-locked pulses at 1035, 1560, and 1933 nm, respectively. These results suggest that 0.8 nm SWCNTs are potentially useful as optical elements in wideband fiber lasers.

  10. Non-radiative Exciton Decay in Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrah, Mark; Swan, Anna

    2010-03-01

    Experiments have shown step-wise changes in the fluorescence intensity from single-walled carbon nanotubes [1,2]. It has been proposed that the underlying mechanism for the step-wise changes is diffusion-limited quenching of excitons at defects [1]. This property has been used to demonstrate single-molecule detection for biological applications [3]. We perform a Monte-Carlo simulation of nanotube fluorescence with a diffusion-limited quenching model. The fluorescence intensity is seen to depend on the mean-square distance between defects, implying a nonlinear dependence on the number of defects. The intensity for consecutive defect counts can overlap depending on the positions of the defects. [4pt] [1] Cognet, L. et al. Science 316, 1465-1468 (2007).[0pt] [2] Jin, H. et al. Nano Lett. 8, 4299-4304 (2008).[0pt] [3] Heller, D. A. et al. Nature Nanotech. 4, 114-120 (2009).

  11. Predicting excitonic gaps of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from a field theoretic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konik, Robert M.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Misewich, James A.

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that a nonperturbative framework for the treatment of the excitations of single-walled carbon nanotubes based upon a field theoretic reduction is able to accurately describe experiment observations of the absolute values of excitonic energies. This theoretical framework yields a simple scaling function from which the excitonic energies can be read off. This scaling function is primarily determined by a single parameter, the charge Luttinger parameter of the tube, which is in turn a function of the tube chirality, dielectric environment, and the tube's dimensions, thus expressing disparate influences on the excitonic energies in a unified fashion. We test this theory explicitly on the data reported by Dukovic et al. [Nano Lett. 5, 2314 (2005), 10.1021/nl0518122] and Sfeir et al. [Phys. Rev. B 82, 195424 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.82.195424] and so demonstrate the method works over a wide range of reported excitonic spectra.

  12. Photoluminescence Imaging of Oxygen Doped Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalcin, Sibel Ebru; Yamaguchi, Hisato; Galande, Charudatta; Crochet, Jared J.; Mohite, Aditya D.; Gupta, Gautam; Ma, Xuedan; Htoon, Han; Doorn, Stephen K.; Los Alamos National Laboratory Collaboration; Rice University Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are attractive candidates for near-IR optoelectronic applications. But they show low fluorescence quantum yield. Recent oxygen doping studies have shown that the quantum yield of the excitons can be enhanced by an order of magnitude due to the formation of local 0D sites on the SWNT surface. However, these studies have been limited to ensemble measurements. Understanding the dopant site, exciton migration and trapping dynamics on individual SWNTs is critical for controllably tuning the photo-physical behavior. We have studied ozonated individual (6,5) nanotubes as a function of progressive ozonation. We spatially resolved the pristine and doped state using visible and NIR sensitive cameras. We demonstrate PL imaging as a probe of the emission dynamics as a function of dopant concentration. The spectral studies show the red-shifted emission in the PL of the NTs due to the ozonated site.

  13. Extinction properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes: Two-fluid model

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin

    2014-03-15

    The extinction spectra of a single-walled carbon nanotube are investigated, within the framework of the vector wave function method in conjunction with the hydrodynamic model. Both polarizations of the incident plane wave (TE and TM with respect to the x-z plane) are treated. Electronic excitations on the nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of a two-dimensional electron gas represented by two interacting fluids, which takes into account the different nature of the σ and π electrons. Numerical results show that strong interaction between the fluids gives rise to the splitting of the extinction spectra into two peaks in quantitative agreement with the π and σ + π plasmon energies.

  14. Thermal vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes with quantum effects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lifeng; Hu, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    The thermal vibration of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is investigated by using the models of Euler beam and Timoshenko beam with quantum effects taken into consideration when the law of energy equipartition is unreliable. The relation between temperature and the root of mean-squared (RMS) amplitude of thermal vibration at any cross section of the SWCNT is derived via the beam models in simply supported case and cantilevered case. The RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of SWCNT predicted by using Timoshenko beam is higher than that predicted by using Euler beam. The RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of an SWCNT predicted by the quantum theory is lower than that predicted by the law of energy equipartition. The quantum effect is more important for the thermal vibration of an SWCNT in the cases of higher-order modes, short length and low temperature. PMID:25104907

  15. Tailored distribution of single-wall carbon nanotubes from arc plasma synthesis using magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Volotskova, Olga; Fagan, Jeffrey A; Huh, Ji Yeon; Phelan, Frederick R; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael

    2010-09-28

    We report a method for tuning the distribution of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) produced by the anodic arc production method via the application of nonuniform magnetic fields to the gap region during synthesis. Raman, ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared absorbance and near-infrared fluorescence spectroscopies were used to characterize samples together with scanning electron microscopy. Application of the nonuniform magnetic field 0.2-2 kG results in a broadening of the diameter range of SWCNTs produced toward decreased diameters, with substantial fractions of produced SWCNTs being of small diameter, less than ∼1.3 nm, at the highest field. The ability to tune production of the arc production method may allow for improvement in achievable SWCNT properties. PMID:20707323

  16. Structural and mechanical properties of single-wall carbon nanotube fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichot, V.; Badaire, S.; Albouy, P. A.; Zakri, C.; Poulin, P.; Launois, P.

    2006-12-01

    We report quantitative experimental study correlating the structure and mechanical properties of fibers made from single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). A post-synthesis solvent drawing treatment is used to vary nanotube alignment, whose detailed understanding is a prerequisite for fiber development. Quantitative analysis of nanotube alignment within the fibers with different draw ratios is performed using x-ray scattering. The method is described in detail, and we also show that the improvement of nanotube alignment with draw ratio can be understood within a model of induced orientation at constant volume. Young’s modulus and tensile strength increase with nanotube alignment. This is modeled using continuum mechanics in qualitative agreement with experiment, however quantitative differences show that nanotube alignment is not the only parameter controlling the fiber mechanical properties. We suggest that interaction between the SWNTs and PVA chains should also play a significant role.

  17. Hierarchical morphology of carbon single-walled nanotubes during sonication in an aliphatic diamine

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Janis M.; Anderson, David P.; Justice, Ryan S.; Lafdi, Khalid; Belfor, Max; Strong, Karla L.; Schaefer, Dale W.

    2010-07-13

    Dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by sonication into diamine curing agents is studied as a means to improve the dispersion of SWNTs in cured epoxy. Cured and uncured specimens are analyzed by light microscopy, electron microscopy, light scattering (LS), ultra small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS), electrical conductivity and Raman spectroscopy. A flexible diamine (D2000) forms a stable SWNT suspension leading to good homogeneity in both the diamine and the cured epoxy. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows that small ropes of SWNTs (mostly under 15 nm) are present despite the sample's visual homogeneity. Further morphological investigation of cured and uncured D2000 resins using light and small-angle X-ray scattering indicates that the SWNTs are networked into fractal clusters that electrically percolate at low SWNTs loadings (0.05 wt%).

  18. Predicting excitonic gaps of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from a field theoretic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Konik, Robert M.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Misewich, James A.

    2015-02-17

    We demonstrate that a non-perturbative framework for the treatment of the excitations of single walled carbon nanotubes based upon a field theoretic reduction is able to accurately describe experiment observations of the absolute values of excitonic energies. This theoretical framework yields a simple scaling function from which the excitonic energies can be read off. This scaling function is primarily determined by a single parameter, the charge Luttinger parameter of the tube, which is in turn a function of the tube chirality, dielectric environment, and the tube's dimensions, thus expressing disparate influences on the excitonic energies in a unified fashion. As a result, we test this theory explicitly on the data reported in [NanoLetters 5, 2314 (2005)] and [Phys. Rev. B 82, 195424 (2010)] and so demonstrate the method works over a wide range of reported excitonic spectra.

  19. Novel Materials Containing Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Wrapped in Polymer Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Richard E.; O'Connell, Michael J.; Smith, Kenneth; Colbert, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    In this design, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been coated in polymer molecules to create a new type of material that has low electrical conductivity, but still contains individual nanotubes, and small ropes of individual nanotubes, which are themselves good electrical conductors and serve as small conducting rods immersed in an electrically insulating matrix. The polymer is attached through weak chemical forces that are primarily non-covalent in nature, caused primarily through polarization rather than the sharing of valence electrons. Therefore, the electronic structure of the SWNT involved is substantially the same as that of free, individual (and small ropes of) SWNT. Their high conductivity makes the individual nanotubes extremely electrically polarizable, and materials containing these individual, highly polarizable molecules exhibit novel electrical properties including a high dielectric constant.

  20. Preparation and Properties of Nanocomposites Prepared From Shortened, Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. G., Jr.; Delozier, D. M.; Watson, K. A.; Connell, J. W.; Yu, Aiping; Haddon, R. C.; Bekyarova, E.

    2006-01-01

    As part of a continuing materials development activity, low color space environmentally stable polymeric materials that possess sufficient electrical conductivity for electrostatic charge dissipation (ESD) have been investigated. One method of incorporating sufficient electrical conductivity for ESD without detrimental effects on other polymer properties of interest (i.e., optical and thermo-optical) is through the incorporation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). However, SWNTs are difficult to fully disperse in the polymer matrix. One means of improving dispersion is by shortening and functionalizing SWNTs. While this improves dispersion, other properties (i.e., electrical) of the SWNTs can be affected which can in turn alter the final nanocomposite properties. Additionally, functionalization of the polymer matrix can also influence nanocomposite properties obtained from shortened, functionalized SWNTs. The preparation and characterization of nanocomposites fabricated from a polyimide, both functionalized and unfunctionalized, and shortened, functionalized SWNTs will be presented.