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Sample records for metallurgy lectures chapter

  1. TRADITIONAL METALLURGY, NANOTECHNOLOGIES AND STRUCTURAL MATERIALS: A SORBY AWARD LECTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Louthan, M

    2007-07-17

    Traditional metallurgical processes are among the many ''old fashion'' practices that use nanoparticles to control the behavior of materials. Many of these practices were developed long before microscopy could resolve nanoscale features, yet the practitioners learned to manipulate and control microstructural elements that they could neither see nor identify. Furthermore, these early practitioners used that control to modify microstructures and develop desired material properties. Centuries old colored glass, ancient high strength steels and medieval organ pipes derived many of their desirable features through control of nanoparticles in their microstructures. Henry Sorby was among the first to recognize that the properties of rocks, minerals, metals and organic materials were controlled by microstructure. However, Mr. Sorby was accused of the folly of trying to study mountains with a microscope. Although he could not resolve nanoscale microstructural features, Mr. Sorby's observations revolutionized the study of materials. The importance of nanoscale microstructural elements should be emphasized, however, because the present foundation for structural materials was built by manipulating those features. That foundation currently supports several multibillion dollar industries but is not generally considered when the nanomaterials revolution is discussed. This lecture demonstrates that using nanotechnologies to control the behavior of metallic materials is almost as old as the practice of metallurgy and that many of the emergent nanomaterials technologists are walking along pathways previously paved by traditional metallurgists.

  2. Putting radiation in perspective. Appendix A. Savannah River Chapter, Health Physics Society, public lecture

    SciTech Connect

    Cofer, C.H.

    1981-06-01

    The Savannah River Chapter of the Health Physics Society has prepared and presented lectures to more than 20 civic groups in the Central Savannah River Area during the last half of 1980. The purpose of the lectures is to improve public understanding of the risks associated with ionizing radiation. Methods of preparation and presentation of the lectures are discussed along with methods used to obtain speaking invitations. Excerpts from the lectures, response to the lectures, and some typical questions from the question and answer sessions are also included.

  3. The Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaudhury, S. Raj

    2011-01-01

    Academic lectures for the purpose of instruction maintain an important presence in most colleges and universities worldwide. This chapter examines the current state of the lecture and how learning sciences research can inform the most effective use of this method. The author presents evidence that the lecture can be an effective element of…

  4. Plutonium Metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Freibert, Franz J.

    2012-08-09

    Due to its nuclear properties, Pu will remain a material of global interest well into the future. Processing, Structure, Properties and Performance remains a good framework for discussion of Pu materials science Self-irradiation and aging effects continue to be central in discussions of Pu metallurgy Pu in its elemental form is extremely unstable, but alloying helps to stabilize Pu; but, questions remain as to how and why this stabilization occurs. Which is true Pu-Ga binary phase diagram: US or Russian? Metallurgical issues such as solute coring, phase instability, crystallographic texture, etc. result in challenges to casting, processing, and properties modeling and experiments. For Ga alloyed FCC stabilized Pu, temperature and pressure remain as variables impacting phase stability.

  5. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (11th, New Brunswick, New Jersey, September 20-23, 1989), Volume 2: Plenary Lectures and Symposia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Carolyn A., Ed.; Goldin, Gerald A., Ed.; Davis, Robert B., Ed.

    This document reports on the 11th annual conference of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME-NA). Plenary and response lectures and speakers include: "The Description and Analysis of Mathematical Processes" (Nicolas Herscovics); "To Know Mathematics is to Go Beyond Thinking That…

  6. The Effects of Formative Assessment Pre-Lecture Online Chapter Quizzes and Student-Initiated Inquiries to the Instructor on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stull, Judith C.; Majerich, David M.; Bernacki, Matthew L.; Varnum, Susan Jansen; Ducette, Joseph P.

    2011-01-01

    This study's goal was to quantify the effects pre-lecture online quizzes and student-initiated inquiries to the instructor, either virtually or in person, had on students' achievement. Pre- and post-course tests were also implemented to an experimental and a comparison section of the same course. The number of electronic administrative contacts…

  7. Lecturing the lecturers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Jonathan

    2010-02-01

    João Magueijo's article "Cargo-cult training" about the failings of compulsory educational training for lecturers (December 2009 pp16-17) is an illustration of why some university lecturers do need to be educated about education. His argument that we should use lectures because students like them ignores the large body of educational research stating that this is the least effective form of education. It might, as the well-known aphorism states, be a successful means of transferring the notes of the lecturer to the notes of the students without going through the minds of either, but the evidence shows that only 10% of students learn material in this way. Rather, all the educational literature points to the fact that interactive, discursive methods are much more likely to produce learning with understanding.

  8. Metallurgy Beyond Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallino, Isabella; Busch, Ralf

    2009-08-01

    Metallurgy is one of the oldest sciences. Its history can be traced back to 6000 BCE with the discovery of Gold, and each new discovery - Copper, Silver, Lead, Tin, Iron and Mercury - marked the beginning of a new era of civilization. Currently there are 86 known metals, but until the end of the 17th century, only 12 of these were known. Steel (Fe-C alloy) was discovered in the 11th century BCE; however, it took until 1709 CE before we mastered the smelting of pig-iron by using coke instead of charcoal and started the industrial revolution. The metallurgy of nowadays is mainly about discovering better materials with superior properties to fulfil the increasing demand of the global market. Promising are the Glassy Metals or Bulk Metallic Glasses (BMGs) - discovered at first in the late 50s at the California Institute of Technology - which are several times stronger than the best industrial steels and 10-times springier. The unusual structure that lacks crystalline grains makes BMGs so promising. They have a liquid-like structure that means they melt at lower temperatures, can be moulded nearly as easily as plastics, and can be shaped into features just 10 nm across. The best BMG formers are based on Zr, Pd, Pt, Ca, Au and, recently discovered, also Fe. They have typically three to five components with large atomic size mismatch and a composition close to a deep eutectic. Packing in such liquids is very dense, with a low content of free volume, resulting in viscosities that are several orders of magnitude higher than in pure metal melts.

  9. Metallography of powder metallurgy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lawley, Alan; Murphy, Thomas F

    2003-12-15

    The primary distinction between the microstructure of an ingot metallurgy/wrought material and one fabricated by the powder metallurgy route of pressing followed by sintering is the presence of porosity in the latter. In its various morphologies, porosity affects the mechanical, physical, chemical, electrical and thermal properties of the material. Thus, it is important to be able to characterize quantitatively the microstructure of powder metallurgy parts and components. Metallographic procedures necessary for the reliable characterization of microstructures in powder metallurgy materials are reviewed, with emphasis on the intrinsic challenges presented by the presence of porosity. To illustrate the utility of these techniques, five case studies are presented involving powder metallurgy materials. These case studies demonstrate problem solving via metallography in diverse situations: failure of a tungsten carbide-coated precipitation hardening stainless steel, failure of a steel pump gear, quantification of the degree of sinter (DOS), simulation of performance of a porous filter using automated image analysis, and analysis of failure in a sinter brazed part assembly.

  10. Successful Lecturing

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, H Liesel; Longworth, David L; Hewson, Mariana G; Stoller, James K

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In a study conducted over 3 large symposia on intensive review of internal medicine, we previously assessed the features that were most important to course participants in evaluating the quality of a lecture. In this study, we attempt to validate these observations by assessing prospectively the extent to which ratings of specific lecture features would predict the overall evaluation of lectures. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS After each lecture, 143 to 355 course participants rated the overall lecture quality of 69 speakers involved in a large symposium on intensive review of internal medicine. In addition, 7 selected participants and the course directors rated specific lecture features and overall quality for each speaker. The relations among the variables were assessed through Pearson correlation coefficients and cluster analysis. Regression analysis was performed to determine which features would predict the overall lecture quality ratings. The features that most highly correlated with ratings of overall lecture quality were the speaker's abilities to identify key points (r = .797) and be engaging (r = .782), the lecture clarity (r = .754), and the slide comprehensibility (r = .691) and format (r = .660). The three lecture features of engaging the audience, lecture clarity, and using a case-based format were identified through regression as the strongest predictors of overall lecture quality ratings (R2= 0.67, P = 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS We have identified core lecture features that positively affect the success of the lecture. We believe our findings are useful for lecturers wanting to improve their effectiveness and for educators who design continuing medical education curricula. PMID:10886470

  11. The extractive metallurgy of gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongolo, K.; Mwema, M. D.

    1998-12-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy has been successfully used in investigation of the gold compounds present in ores and the gold species which occur during the process metallurgy of this metal. This paper is a survey of the basic recovery methods and techniques used in extractive metallurgy of gold. Process fundamentals on mineral processing, ore leaching, zinc dust cementation, adsorption on activated carbon, electrowinning and refining are examined. The recovery of gold as a by-product of the copper industry is also described. Alternative processing methods are indicated in order to shed light on new interesting research topics where Mössbauer spectroscopy could be applied.

  12. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flumerfelt, Joel Fredrick

    In recent years, the aluminum powder industry has expanded into non-aerospace applications. However, the alumina and aluminum hydroxide in the surface oxide film on aluminum powder require high cost powder processing routes. A driving force for this research is to broaden the knowledge base about aluminum powder metallurgy to provide ideas for fabricating low cost aluminum powder components. The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization commercial inert gas atomization and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). The commercial atomization methods are bench marks of current aluminum powder technology. The GARS process is a laboratory scale inert gas atomization facility. A benefit of using pure aluminum powders is an unambiguous interpretation of the results without considering the effects of alloy elements. A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a

  13. The Effectiveness of Programed Instruction Versus the Lecture-Discussion Method of Teaching Basic Metallurgical Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockman, David Carl

    The purpose of this study was to compare the conventional lecture-discussion method and an illustrated programed textbook method when teaching a unit of instruction on the basic concepts of metallurgy. The control group used a portion of a conventional textbook accompanied by lecture, chalkboard illustration, and class discussion. The experimental…

  14. Metals in Past Societies: A Global Perspective on Indigenous African Metallurgy Shadreck Chirikure

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram

    2015-10-01

    This slim book (166 pages) shines a spotlight on pre-industrial African metallurgy, its global connections, and anthropological implications. It integrates seemingly disparate disciplines, such as history, geology, ethnography, archeology, and metallurgy, to illustrate the diversity and innovation in metallurgy across Africa and the role of metals in the rise of socio-economic inequalities and political power. The book has 7 chapters and the focus on metals as enablers of human needs and wants is evident in each chapter. The first chapter presents the context of the work and data sources. The second chapter focuses on the origin and development of mining and metallurgy in pre-industrial Africa. Chapter 3 is dedicated to the interaction of nature and culture in the process of mining. Chapter 4 deals with the transformation of the ore into metal by smelting and the sociocultural aspects of this process. Chapter 5 explores the social and cultural roles acquired by metals as a result of fabrication into objects. Chapter 6 examines the social role of metals, trade in metals, cultural contact, proto-globalization, and technology transfer. Finally, Chapter 7 draws lessons for global anthropology from the African experience. The sources of information are adequately cited and the long list of references at the end of each chapter will be a boon to researchers in this field. The author highlights the cultural aspects and social context of the adoption of metallurgy in Africa while drawing parallels between practices in pre-industrial Africa and those in other parts of the world. The book is peppered with delightful vignettes that offer insights into the process of transforming nature into culturally significant objects. For instance, African miners, like their counterparts in Nepal and Latin America, called upon deities, spirits and ancestors to mediate between nature and humans. Women had distinct roles in this process, but there were variations in these roles and in the

  15. Recent trends in extractive metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Metallurgists and solution geochemists are joining forces to develop processes for extraction of metals from low-grade ores. The processes, which come under the name hydrometallurgy, include several new applications of solvent extraction techniques. Aqueous solutions are employed, leaching metals from ores, mine waste dumps, and even from deposits still in the ground. It was notable, for example, that Chemical and Engineering News (Feb. 8, 1982) recently featured the subject of hydrometallurgy in a special report. They noted that ‘recovering metals by use of aqueous solutions at relatively low temperatures increasingly is competing with dry, high-temperature pyrometallurgical methods.’ The relatively new techniques have caused a revolution, of sorts, in engineering programs of university metallurgy departments. The challenge of developing selective metal dissolution processes is drawing upon the best national talent in the fields of solution geochemistry and metallurgy.

  16. The role of chemical metallurgy in the emerging field of materials science and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y. Austin

    1994-12-01

    Materials science and engineering has been emerging as a unique academic discipline during the last decade and a half. The role of chemical metallurgy in this emerging field is not well defined, yet it has played an important historical role in the intellectual development of the discipline of metallurgical engineering in terms of teaching, research, and technological appli-cations. In this lecture, I have attempted to define the role of chemical metallurgy in this emerg-ing field and, moreover, to propose using the broader term “chemical processing of material” instead of chemical metallurgy. The role is to educate materials scientists and engineers at the baccalaureate degree level as well as the graduate degree level. I believe that if materials sci-entists and engineers have a good grasp of the principles of chemical processing of materials, they will be in an excellent position to tackle many of the challenging and important problems facing us in the materials field. I have also given in this lecture three diverse examples of materials problems that have been studied using the basic principles of chemical processing of materials. These examples are used to demonstrate that the tools of chemical metallurgy can be used effectively to study many contemporary materials science and engineering problems.

  17. Silicon solar cells: Physical metallurgy principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, Michael G.

    2003-05-01

    This article reviews the physical metallurgy aspects of silicon solar cells. The production of silicon solar cells relies on principles of thermochemical extractive metallurgy, phase equilibria, solidification, and kinetics. The issues related to these processes and their impact on solar cell performance and cost are discussed.

  18. The Rules of Ferrous Metallurgy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The ways in which the sciences have been delineated and categorized throughout history provide insights into the formation, stabilization, and establishment of scientific systems of knowledge. The Dresdener school’s approach for explaining and categorizing the genesis of the engineering disciplines is still valid, but needs to be complemented by further-reaching methodological and theoretical reflections. Pierre Bourdieu’s theory of social practice is applied to the question of how individual agents succeed in influencing decisively a discipline’s changing object orientation, institutionalisation and self-reproduction. Through the accumulation of social, cultural and economic capital, they succeed in realising their own organisational ideas and scientific programs. Key concepts for the analysis include the struggle for power and resources, monopolies of interpretation, and the degree of autonomy. A case study from the Aachener Technische Hochschule shows that the consolidation of ferrous metallurgy can be conceived as a symbolical struggle between Fritz Wüst, professor for ferrous metallurgy, and the German Iron and Steel Institute, leading to a construction of a system of differences in which scientists accepted being scientists rather than entrepreneurs, and entrepreneurs accepted becoming entrepreneurs and renounced science.

  19. Podcasting Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brittain, Sarah; Glowacki, Pietrek; Van Ittersum, Jared; Johnson, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    At some point in their educations, students must learn copious amounts of information. To do this, they use a variety of well-known strategies such as study groups, note-taking services, and videotapes of lectures. In fall 2004, a group of first-year dental students at the University of Michigan (U-M) School of Dentistry asked to have all dental…

  20. Improving Your Lecturing. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Nancy A.; And Others

    A guide for faculty who want to improve their lecturing skills is presented. After identifying advantages and disadvantages of the lecture method, suggestions are offered for effective lecture preparation, with attention to organizing the body of the lecture, and beginning and closing the lecture. Vocal aspects of lecture delivery are addressed,…

  1. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  2. Fifth Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montessori, Maria

    2013-01-01

    We include the ninth chapter of "Education and Peace" by Maria Montessori (1949) to draw attention to the relationship between peace and sustainability. Nature is an integral part of peace studies. [Reprinted from "Education and Peace," pages 66-70, copyright © 1972 by Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company.

  3. Flipped Statistics Class Results: Better Performance than Lecture over One Year Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winquist, Jennifer R.; Carlson, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we compare an introductory statistics course taught using a flipped classroom approach to the same course taught using a traditional lecture based approach. In the lecture course, students listened to lecture, took notes, and completed homework assignments. In the flipped course, students read relatively simple chapters and answered…

  4. Powder-Metallurgy Process And Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, Henry G.

    1988-01-01

    Rapid-solidification processing yields alloys with improved properties. Study undertaken to extend favorable property combinations of I/M 2XXX alloys through recently developed technique of rapid-solidification processing using powder metallurgy(P/M). Rapid-solidification processing involves impingement of molten metal stream onto rapidly-spinning chill block or through gas medium using gas atomization technique.

  5. Powder metallurgy bearings for advanced rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleck, J. N.; Killman, B. J.; Munson, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    Traditional ingot metallurgy was pushed to the limit for many demanding applications including antifriction bearings. New systems require corrosion resistance, better fatigue resistance, and higher toughness. With conventional processing, increasing the alloying level to achieve corrosion resistance results in a decrease in other properties such as toughness. Advanced powder metallurgy affords a viable solution to this problem. During powder manufacture, the individual particle solidifies very rapidly; as a consequence, the primary carbides are very small and uniformly distributed. When properly consolidated, this uniform structure is preserved while generating a fully dense product. Element tests including rolling contact fatigue, hot hardness, wear, fracture toughness, and corrosion resistance are underway on eleven candidate P/M bearing alloys and results are compared with those for wrought 440C steel, the current SSME bearing material. Several materials which offer the promise of a significant improvement in performance were identified.

  6. The EDM surface: Topography, chemistry, and metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    The surface created by the electric discharge machining (EDM) process is of special interest because it has been shown to have a negative effect on the fatigue properties of many alloys. An understanding of the surface metallurgy and chemistry is important in predicting those alloys which are most susceptible to failure. Remedial actions, including thickness minimization, alteration, or removal of the surface layer are addressed.

  7. Physical Metallurgy of High-Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Jien-Wei

    2015-08-01

    Two definitions of high-entropy alloys (HEAs), based on composition and entropy, are reviewed. Four core effects, i.e., high entropy, sluggish diffusion, severe lattice distortion, and cocktail effects, are mentioned to show the uniqueness of HEAs. The current state of physical metallurgy is discussed. As the compositions of HEAs are entirely different from that of conventional alloys, physical metallurgy principles might need to be modified for HEAs. The thermodynamics, kinetics, structure, and properties of HEAs are briefly discussed relating with the four core effects of HEAs. Among these, a severe lattice distortion effect is particularly emphasized because it exerts direct and indirect influences on many aspects of microstructure and properties. Because a constituent phase in HEAs can be regarded as a whole-solute matrix, every lattice site in the matrix has atomic-scale lattice distortion. In such a distorted lattice, point defects, line defects, and planar defects are different from those in conventional matrices in terms of atomic configuration, defect energy, and dynamic behavior. As a result, mechanical and physical properties are significantly influenced by such a distortion. Suitable mechanisms and theories correlating composition, microstructure, and properties for HEAs are required to be built in the future. Only these understandings make it possible to complete the physical metallurgy of the alloy world.

  8. 431st Brookhaven Lecture

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Crease

    2007-12-12

    Crease presents "Recombinant Science: The Birth of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider," a lecture that follows on the 429th Brookhaven Lecture, in which Crease talked about the early history of BNL. Both lectures are part of the ongoing celebration of BNL's 60th anniversary year.

  9. Manual for CLE Lecturers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shellaberger, Donna J.

    This manual is designed to help lawyers develop the skills needed to present effective, stimulating continuing legal education (CLE) lectures. It focuses on the particular purpose and nature of CLE lecturing, relationships and interplay of personalities in CLE, commitments and constraints which lecturers should observe, program structure and…

  10. 431st Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Robert Crease

    2010-09-01

    Crease presents "Recombinant Science: The Birth of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider," a lecture that follows on the 429th Brookhaven Lecture, in which Crease talked about the early history of BNL. Both lectures are part of the ongoing celebration of BNL's 60th anniversary year.

  11. Low-Cobalt Powder-Metallurgy Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    Highly-stressed jet-engine parts made with less cobalt. Udimet 700* (or equivalent) is common nickel-based superalloy used in hot sections of jet engines for many years. This alloy, while normally used in wrought condition, also gas-atomized into prealloyed powder-metallurgy (PM) product. Product can be consolidated by hot isostatically pressing (HIPPM condition) and formed into parts such as turbine disk. Such jet-engine disks "see" both high stresses and temperatures to 1,400 degrees F (760 degrees C).

  12. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-19

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  13. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goval, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-06-07

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  14. Biaxially textured articles formed by power metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-26

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  15. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-07-29

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  16. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-14

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  17. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-05

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of ternary mixtures consisting of: Ni powder, Cu powder, and Al powder, Ni powder, Cr powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, W powder and Al powder; Ni powder, V powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, Mo powder, and Al powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  18. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-05-10

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  19. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-26

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  20. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-28

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  1. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-01-25

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  2. Densification of powder metallurgy billets by a roll consolidation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellman, W. H.; Weinberger, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    Container design is used to convert partially densified powder metallurgy compacts into fully densified slabs in one processing step. Technique improves product yield, lowers costs and yields great flexibility in process scale-up. Technique is applicable to all types of fabricable metallic materials that are produced from powder metallurgy process.

  3. Metallurgy and Heat Treating. Welding Module 7. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in metallurgy and heat treating. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles of metallurgy and heat treatment and techniques for…

  4. Evaluation of powder metallurgy superalloy disk materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop nickel-base superalloy disk material using prealloyed powder metallurgy techniques. The program included fabrication of test specimens and subscale turbine disks from four different prealloyed powders (NASA-TRW-VIA, AF2-1DA, Mar-M-432 and MERL 80). Based on evaluation of these specimens and disks, two alloys (AF2-1DA and Mar-M-432) were selected for scale-up evaluation. Using fabricating experience gained in the subscale turbine disk effort, test specimens and full scale turbine disks were formed from the selected alloys. These specimens and disks were then subjected to a rigorous test program to evaluate their physical properties and determine their suitability for use in advanced performance turbine engines. A major objective of the program was to develop processes which would yield alloy properties that would be repeatable in producing jet engine disks from the same powder metallurgy alloys. The feasibility of manufacturing full scale gas turbine engine disks by thermomechanical processing of pre-alloyed metal powders was demonstrated. AF2-1DA was shown to possess tensile and creep-rupture properties in excess of those of Astroloy, one of the highest temperature capability disk alloys now in production. It was determined that metallographic evaluation after post-HIP elevated temperature exposure should be used to verify the effectiveness of consolidation of hot isostatically pressed billets.

  5. Lectures on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samelson, Roger M.

    The fluid kaleidoscope of the Earth's ocean and atmosphere churns and sparkles with jets, gyres, eddies, waves, streams, and cyclones. These vast circulations, essential elements of the physical environment that support human life, are given a special character by the Earth's rotation and by their confinement to a shallow surficial layer, thin relative to the solid Earth in roughly the same proportion as an apple skin is to an apple. Geophysical fluid dynamics exploits this special character to develop a unified theoretical approach to the physics of the ocean and atmosphere.With Lectures on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Rick Salmon has added an insightful and provocative volume to the handful of authoritative texts currently available on the subject. The book is intended for first-year graduate students, but advanced students and researchers also will find it useful. It is divided into seven chapters, the first four of these adapted from course lectures. The book is well written and presents a fresh and stimulating perspective that complements existing texts. It would serve equally well either as the main text for a core graduate curriculum or as a supplementary resource for students and teachers seeking new approaches to both classical and contemporary problems. A lively set of footnotes contains many references to very recent work. The printing is attractive, the binding is of high quality, and typographical errors are few.

  6. The Art of Lecturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Charles

    If teaching is the effective communication of knowledge, the teacher first must be knowledgeable about the subject being taught. Communicating that knowledge to students is just as important. One standard teaching method is the lecture. A lecture is prepared before class by the teacher and should include not only the facts to be learned by the…

  7. Lectures on Law Enforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nettleship, Lois

    Three lectures on law enforcement are presented that were prepared for study purposes at Johnson County Community College. The first lecture examines the fundamental ideas of the Age of Enlightenment and discusses their influence on the American Revolution, the United States Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. Major provisions of the Bill of…

  8. Lecturing: Case Studies, Experience and Practice. Case Studies of Teaching in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Helen, Ed.; Smith, Brenda, Ed.; Webb, Graham, Ed.

    The essays in this collection explore how different lecturing situations can be handled and how lecturing confidence and techniques can be improved. The book covers a wide range of scenarios in these chapters: (1) "Learning from Objectives" (Stanley Yeo); (2) "New at This" (Sally Brown); (3) "The Smart Student" (Marilyn Baird); (4) "The Mobile…

  9. Ancient metallurgy and nuclear waste containment

    SciTech Connect

    Goodway, M.

    1993-12-31

    Archaeological artifacts of glass, ceramic, and metal provide examples of long term durability and as such have been surveyed by the nuclear agencies of several countries as a possible guide to choices of materials for the containment of nuclear waste. In the case of metals evaluation is difficult because of the loss of many artifacts to recycling and corrosion processes, as well as by uncertainty as to the environmental history under which the remainder survived. More recently the study of ancient metallurgy has expanded to included other materials associated with metals processing. It is suggested that an impermeable ceramic composite used in ancient metals processing installations should be reproduced and tested for its resistance to radiation damage. This material was synthesized more than two millennia ago and has a proven record of durability. These installations have had no maintenance but are intact, some still holding water.

  10. Electrodeposition in extractive metallurgy: An emerging technology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keefe, Thomas J.

    1992-04-01

    The electrowinning and electrorefining of metals from aqueous solutions continues to be one of the essential unit processes employed in nonferrous extractive metallurgy. Current processes effectively address both ohmic and mass transport of the primary metal ion in their design. Some deficiencies exist, however, in the basic understanding of the other two critical elements essential in cathodic deposition: activation kinetics and electrocrystallization. The understanding of the latter two must be elevated to the level of understanding of ohmic and mass transport if truly new and innovative advances are to occur. Because of the increasingly demanding standards for electrometallurgy processes and products, technical progress must be made if a competitive edge is to be maintained in the future.

  11. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-10-21

    A strengthened, biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed, compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: Ni, Ag, Ag--Cu, Ag--Pd, Ni--Cu, Ni--V, Ni--Mo, Ni--Al, Ni--Cr--Al, Ni--W--Al, Ni--V--Al, Ni--Mo--Al, Ni--Cu--Al; and at least one fine metal oxide powder; the article having a grain size which is fine and homogeneous; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  12. Looking North into Lab Metallurgy Testing Area and Enrichment Motor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking North into Lab Metallurgy Testing Area and Enrichment Motor within Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  13. 1. Photocopy from J. L. Bray, The Principles of Metallurgy, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy from J. L. Bray, The Principles of Metallurgy, Ginn & Company, New York, 1929 - International Smelting & Refining Company, Tooele Smelter, Sinter Plant, State Route 178, Tooele, Tooele County, UT

  14. 10 Suggestions for Enhancing Lecturing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzmann, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Criticism of the lecture method remains a staple of discussion and writing in academia--and most of the time it's deserved! Those interested in improving this aspect of their teaching might wish to consider some or all of the following suggestions for enhancing lectures. These include: (1) Lectures must start with a "grabber"; (2) Lectures must be…

  15. Learning from Online Video Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brecht, H. David

    2012-01-01

    This study empirically examines the instructional value of online video lectures--videos that a course's instructor prepares to supplement classroom or online-broadcast lectures. The study examines data from a classroom course, where the videos have a slower, more step-by-step lecture style than the classroom lectures; student use of videos is…

  16. Lectures on Dispersion Theory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Salam, A.

    1956-04-01

    Lectures with mathematical analysis are given on Dispersion Theory and Causality and Dispersion Relations for Pion-nucleon Scattering. The appendix includes the S-matrix in terms of Heisenberg Operators. (F. S.)

  17. 433rd Brookhaven Lecture

    SciTech Connect

    Jason Graetz

    2008-02-20

    Learn about the pioneering work being done at BNL in the field of hydrogen storage as Jason Graetz of the Energy Sciences & Technology Department presents the 433rd Brookhaven Lecture, "Fueling Up With Hydrogen: New Approaches to Hydrogen Storage."

  18. Lectures series in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Kevin W.

    1987-01-01

    The lecture notes cover the basic principles of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). They are oriented more toward practical applications than theory, and are intended to serve as a unified source for basic material in the CFD field as well as an introduction to more specialized topics in artificial viscosity and boundary conditions. Each chapter in the test is associated with a videotaped lecture. The basic properties of conservation laws, wave equations, and shock waves are described. The duality of the conservation law and wave representations is investigated, and shock waves are examined in some detail. Finite difference techniques are introduced for the solution of wave equations and conservation laws. Stability analysis for finite difference approximations are presented. A consistent description of artificial viscosity methods are provided. Finally, the problem of nonreflecting boundary conditions are treated.

  19. Powder metallurgy process for manufacturing core projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Taufik; Setyowati, Vuri Ayu; Widyastuti

    2013-09-01

    Bullets are part of the defense equipment which the development is very rapid. There are a variety of forms but the bullet Lead is a metal that has always been used for applications projectiles. Lead core constituent materials are combined with antimony. In this research will be conducted by making the material for the core projectile with Tin Lead. The addition of Tin will increase the stiffness of Lead which is soft in nature. The Lead Tin composition variation was given in 10% weight of Sn. The manufacturing process using powder metallurgy using temperature and holding time variations of sintering at 100, 150, and 200°C for 1,2, and 3 hours. XRD samples will be tested to determine the form and phase morphology was observed using SEM-EDX. These results revealed that Pb-10%wtSn Composite which is sintered in temperature 200°C for 3 hours has the greatest density, 10.695 g/cm3 as well as the smallest porosity, 2.2%. In agreement with theoretical analysis that increasing higher temperature and longer holding time give decrease in porosity level due to activation energy which further promotes grain growth. Moreover, there is no intermetallic phase formation as well as no oxide found on composites.

  20. Electrothermal Defect Detection in Powder Metallurgy Compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzerrouk, Souheil; Ludwig, Reinhold; Apelian, Diran

    2006-03-01

    Faced with increasing market pressures, metal part manufacturers have turned to new processes and fabrication technologies. One of these processes is powder metallurgy (P/M), which is employed for low-cost, high-volume precision part manufacturing. Despite many advantages, the P/M process has created a number of challenges, including the need for high-speed quality assessment and control, ideally for each compact. Consequently, sophisticated quality assurance is needed to rapidly detect flaws early in the manufacturing cycle and at minimal cost. In this paper we will discuss our progress made in designing and refining an active infrared (IR) detection system for P/M compacts. After discussing the theoretical background in terms of underlying equations and boundary conditions, analytical and numerical solutions are presented that are capable of predicting temperature responses for various defect sizes and orientations of a dynamic IR testing system. Preliminary measurements with controlled and industrial samples have shown that this active IR methodology can successfully be employed to test both green-state and sintered P/M compacts. The developed system can overcome many limitations observed with a standard IR testing methodology such as emissivity, background calibration, and contact resistance.

  1. Ti Multicomponent Alloy Bulks by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kuibao; Wen, Guanjun; Dai, Hongchuan; Teng, Yuancheng; Li, Yuxiang

    2014-10-01

    In this study, CrCuFeMnMo0.5Ti multicomponent alloy bulks were prepared by powder metallurgy of mechanical alloying and sintering. A simple body-centered cubic (bcc) solid solution was prepared after 40 h ball milling of the raw CrCuFeMnMo0.5Ti metallic powder. Particles of the alloyed powder are in microsized structures, which are actually a soft agglomeration of lamellar grains with thicknesses less than 1 μm. Meanwhile, the lamellar granules are consisted of nanosized grains under rigid cold welding. The 80-h ball-milled powder was consolidated by cold pressing and subsequent sintering at 800°C. The observed main phase in the consolidated sample after milling for 80 h is still a bcc solid solution. The solidified sample of 80-h ball-milled powder exhibits a Vickers hardness of 468 HV, which is much higher than 171 HV of the counterpart prepared from the raw metallic powder.

  2. A major advance in powder metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; Stiglich, Jacob J., Jr.; Kaplan, Richard B.; Tuffias, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    Ultramet has developed a process which promises to significantly increase the mechanical properties of powder metallurgy (PM) parts. Current PM technology uses mixed powders of various constituents prior to compaction. The homogeneity and flaw distribution in PM parts depends on the uniformity of mixing and the maintenance of uniformity during compaction. Conventional PM fabrication processes typically result in non-uniform distribution of the matrix, flaw generation due to particle-particle contact when one of the constituents is a brittle material, and grain growth caused by high temperature, long duration compaction processes. Additionally, a significant amount of matrix material is usually necessary to fill voids and create 100 percent dense parts. In Ultramet's process, each individual particle is coated with the matrix material, and compaction is performed by solid state processing. In this program, Ultramet coated 12-micron tungsten particles with approximately 5 wt percent nickel/iron. After compaction, flexure strengths were measured 50 percent higher than those achieved in conventional liquid phase sintered parts (10 wt percent Ni/Fe). Further results and other material combinations are discussed.

  3. Centenary Chronicle Chapter 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Robyn

    2013-01-01

    This article offers the transcript of Robyn Archer's address at the Australian Society for Music Education (ASME) Conference in Canberra in September 2013. Archer is a singer, writer, director, artistic director, and public advocate of the arts, mainly in Australia though her reach is global. This lecture is the second of six addresses Archer gave…

  4. Chapter 9: Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris A.

    2006-12-19

    Sophisticated front-end electronics are a key part of practically all modern radiation detector systems. This chapter introduces the basic principles and their implementation. Topics include signal acquisition, electronic noise, pulse shaping (analog and digital), and data readout techniques.

  5. Pressurized metallurgy for high performance special steels and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z. H.; Zhu, H. C.; Li, H. B.; L1, Y.; Liu, F. B.

    2016-07-01

    The pressure is one of the basic parameters which greatly influences the metallurgical reaction process and solidification of steels and alloys. In this paper the history and present situation of research and application of pressurized metallurgy, especially pressurized metallurgy for special steels and alloys have been briefly reviewed. In the following part the physical chemistry of pressurized metallurgy is summarized. It is shown that pressurizing may change the conditions of chemical reaction in thermodynamics and kinetics due to the pressure effect on gas volume, solubility of gas and volatile element in metal melt, activity or activity coefficient of components, and change the physical and chemical properties of metal melt, heat transfer coefficient between mould and ingot, thus greatly influencing phase transformation during the solidification process and the solidification structure, such as increasing the solidification nucleation rate, reducing the critical nucleation radius, accelerating the solidification speed and significant macro/micro-structure refinement, and eliminating shrinkage, porosity and segregation and other casting defects. In the third part the research works of pressured metallurgy performed by the Northeastern University including establishment of pressurized induction melting (PIM) and pressurized electroslag remelting (PESR) equipments and development of high nitrogen steels under pressure are described in detail. Finally, it is considered in the paper that application of pressurized metallurgy in manufacture of high performance special steels and alloys is a relatively new research area, and its application prospects will be very broad and bright.

  6. Lectures in accelerator theory

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M

    1980-01-01

    Lecture I deals with the behavior of particles in the nonlinear field arising from the electromagnetic interaction of colliding beams. The case treated, that of counter-rotating proton beams crossing each other at a non-zero angle, has the simple feature that the force between the beam is one dimensional. In lecture II, an analysis of the development of traveling waves on particle beams is presented. The situation studied is that of a uniform beam current in a circular accelerator and the excitation for the coherent motion is induced by the resistivity of the vacuum chamber wall. Finally, in lecture III, a description of the current accumulation process used at the proton storage rings at CERN (The ISR) is given. Particle pulses of rather low average current are injected and stored along the length and width of the vacuum chamber. The efficiency is very high and large currents (over 40 amperes) have been achieved.

  7. Memory for Lectures: How Lecture Format Impacts the Learning Experience

    PubMed Central

    Varao-Sousa, Trish L.; Kingstone, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated what impact the presentation style of a classroom lecture has on memory, mind wandering, and the subjective factors of interest and motivation. We examined if having a professor lecturing live versus on video alters the learning experience of the students in the classroom. During the lectures, students were asked to report mind wandering and later complete a memory test. The lecture format was manipulated such that all the students received two lectures, one live and one a pre-recorded video. Results indicate that lecture format affected memory performance but not mind wandering, with enhanced memory in the live lectures. Additionally, students reported greater interest and motivation in the live lectures. Given that a single change to the classroom environment, professor presence, impacted memory performance, as well as motivation and interest, the present results have several key implications for technology-based integrations into higher education classrooms. PMID:26561235

  8. Memory for Lectures: How Lecture Format Impacts the Learning Experience.

    PubMed

    Varao-Sousa, Trish L; Kingstone, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated what impact the presentation style of a classroom lecture has on memory, mind wandering, and the subjective factors of interest and motivation. We examined if having a professor lecturing live versus on video alters the learning experience of the students in the classroom. During the lectures, students were asked to report mind wandering and later complete a memory test. The lecture format was manipulated such that all the students received two lectures, one live and one a pre-recorded video. Results indicate that lecture format affected memory performance but not mind wandering, with enhanced memory in the live lectures. Additionally, students reported greater interest and motivation in the live lectures. Given that a single change to the classroom environment, professor presence, impacted memory performance, as well as motivation and interest, the present results have several key implications for technology-based integrations into higher education classrooms. PMID:26561235

  9. Engineering hydraulics lecturers' guide

    SciTech Connect

    Dake, J.M.K.

    1983-01-01

    This is a guide to the problems set out in the second edition of the student edition of the student textbook, and is available from the publisher. It contains worked solutions to coincide chapter by chapter with the problems set in the second edition of the student textbook.

  10. The Lecture Is Dead Long Live the e-Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folley, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    This research paper investigates if the traditional lecture is no longer appropriate for Neomillennial Learning Styles and whether an alternative blended approach could/should be used? Over the past decade the lecture as we know it, has gradually been under attack from constructivists, Twigg (1999) for example argues that the lecture is in the…

  11. Metallurgy and properties of plasma spray formed materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckechnie, T. N.; Liaw, Y. K.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Poorman, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the fundamental metallurgy of vacuum plasma spray formed materials is the key to enhancing and developing full material properties. Investigations have shown that the microstructure of plasma sprayed materials must evolve from a powder splat morphology to a recrystallized grain structure to assure high strength and ductility. A fully, or near fully, dense material that exhibits a powder splat morphology will perform as a brittle material compared to a recrystallized grain structure for the same amount of porosity. Metallurgy and material properties of nickel, iron, and copper base alloys will be presented and correlated to microstructure.

  12. Why materials science and engineering is good for metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemings, Merton C.

    2001-04-01

    Metallurgy/materials education will continue to evolve to encompass, in an intellectually unified way, the full range of structural and functional materials. Computation, information, and other advanced sciences and technologies will assume increasing roles in materials education, as will distance and continuing education. The advantages of the changes will be many … to the graduates, to emerging industries, and to the traditional metallurgical industries seeking productive, creative young engineers as employees. The need for continuing change in our metallurgy/materials departments is now no less if we are to attract the best young people into our field in the numbers needed and to best serve the needs of industry.

  13. Why materials science and engineering is good for metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemings, Merton C.

    2001-04-01

    Metallurgy/materials education will continue to evolve to encompass, in an intellectually unified way, the full range of structural and functional materials. Computation, information, and other advanced sciences and technologies will assume increasing roles in materials education, as will distance and continuing education. The advantages of the changes will be many ... to the graduates, to emerging industries, and to the traditional metallurgical industries seeking productive, creative young engineers as employees. The need for continuing change in our metallurgy/materials departments is now no less if we are to attract the best young people into our field in the numbers and to best serve the needs of industry.

  14. Abstract of Lectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, Lucien

    1993-01-01

    Three lectures will be given. The first one will draw from the general literature on microwave sounding from space. The next two will focus on a description of the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and results obtained from its measurements relating to atmospheric chemistry and dynamics; this will draw from material recently published (or soon-to-be published) by the MLS team.

  15. Justice and Lecturer Professionalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macfarlane, Bruce

    2001-01-01

    Presents a conceptual framework for debating the ethics of pedagogy. The concepts of procedural, retributive, remedial, and distributive justice are presented as a means of incorporating many of the key ethical challenges that confront lecturers new to higher education. Recommends this justice framework as a means of encouraging practitioners to…

  16. 453rd Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Richard Ferrieri

    2010-09-01

    In this lecture titled "Striving Towards Energy Sustainability: How Will Plants Play a Role in Our Future?" Richard Ferrieri discusses how radiotracers and positron emission tomography (PET imaging) are providing a new look into plant processes that could lead to more renewable biofuels.

  17. 412th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Peter Vanier

    2010-09-01

    With new radiation detectors, finding smuggled nuclear materials in a huge container among thousands of others in a busy port becomes possible. To learn about these new detectors from a specialist who has spent several years developing these technologies, watch the 412th Brookhaven Lecture, "Advanced Neutron Detection Methods: New Tools for Countering Nuclear Terrorism."

  18. 426th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    David Jaffe

    2010-09-01

    "The Pesky Neutrino". In this lecture, Jaffe describes the past, present and possible future of the "pesky" neutrino, the existence of which was first hypothesized in 1930 to rescue energy conservation in the radioactive beta decay of nuclei. Recent evidence that neutrinos are massive is the only experimental evidence in particle physics that is inconsistent with the Standard Model.

  19. 423rd Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Mei Bai

    2010-09-01

    Among other things, scientists at BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are studying a fundamental question of particle physics: What is responsible for proton "spin"? Physicist Mei Bai discusses this topic at the 423rd Brookhaven Lecture, "RHIC: The Worlds First High-Energy, Polarized-Proton Collider."

  20. 410th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Peter Steinberg

    2010-09-01

    In a lecture titled "Hotter, Denser, Faster, Smaller...and Nearly Perfect: What's the Matter at RHIC?", Steinberg discusses the basic physics of the quark-gluon plasma and BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, with a focus on several intriguing results from RHIC's recently ended PHOBOS experiment.

  1. 453rd Brookhaven Lecture

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Ferrieri

    2009-10-28

    In this lecture titled "Striving Towards Energy Sustainability: How Will Plants Play a Role in Our Future?" Richard Ferrieri discusses how radiotracers and positron emission tomography (PET imaging) are providing a new look into plant processes that could lead to more renewable biofuels.

  2. 416th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Dax Fu

    2010-09-01

    "Molecular Design of a Metal Transporter." Metal transporters are proteins residing in cell membranes that keep the amount of zinc and other metals in the body in check by selecting a nutritional metal ion against a similar and much moreabundant toxic one. How transporter proteins achieve this remarkable sensitivity is one of the questions addressed by Fu in this lecture.

  3. Computer Augmented Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seitz, W. A.; Matsen, F. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the use of a central computer linked to a CRT console, with display projected onto a large screen, to operate computer augmentation of lectures in large group instruction. Indicates that both introductory tutorial and computer modes are feasible in subject matter presentation. (CC)

  4. Organic Lecture Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silversmith, Ernest F.

    1988-01-01

    Provides a listing of 35 demonstrations designed to generate interest in organic chemistry and help put points across. Topics include opening lecture; molecular structure and properties; halogenation; nucleophilic substitution, alkenes and dienes, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, alcohols and phenols, aldehydes and ketones; carboxylic acids, amines,…

  5. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs.

  6. Participatory Lecture Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battino, Rubin

    1979-01-01

    The use of participatory lecture demonstrations in the classroom is described. Examples are given for the following topics: chromatography, chemical kinetics, balancing equations, the gas laws, kinetic molecular theory, Henry's law of gas solubility, electronic energy levels in atoms, and translational, vibrational, and rotational energies of…

  7. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs.

  8. 412th Brookhaven Lecture

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Vanier

    2006-02-15

    With new radiation detectors, finding smuggled nuclear materials in a huge container among thousands of others in a busy port becomes possible. To learn about these new detectors from a specialist who has spent several years developing these technologies, watch the 412th Brookhaven Lecture, "Advanced Neutron Detection Methods: New Tools for Countering Nuclear Terrorism."

  9. In Defence of the Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    In response to the lecture format coming under "attack" and being replaced by online materials and smaller tutorials, this paper attempts to offer not only a defence but also to assert that the potential value of the lecture is difficult to replicate through other learning formats. Some of the criticisms against lectures will be…

  10. Curricular Orientations. Chapter Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, James R.; Polloway, Edward A.

    The purpose of this chapter is to review the major curricular orientations which can be found in special education settings for students with mental disabilities. Program orientations differ along two primary dimensions: the amount of time students spend in special settings or with special education personnel, and the extent to which the…

  11. Chapter 2. Genetic Resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this chapter, four categories of plant genetic resources (PGR) are identified as important for breeding: Wild relatives, ecotypes, landraces, and cultivars. Fodder crops and amenity grasses differ from field crops in the relative importance of these categories, as well as in the relative importan...

  12. Chapter 3: Energy Security

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, Thomas D.; Arent, Doug; de Carvalho Macedo, Isaias; Goldemberg, Jose; Hoysala, Chanakya; Filho, Rubens Maciel; Nigro, Francisco E. B.; Richard, Tom L.; Saddler, Jack; Samseth, Jon; Somerville, Chris R.

    2015-04-01

    This chapter considers the energy security implications and impacts of bioenergy. We provide an assessment to answer the following questions: What are the implications for bioenergy and energy security within the broader policy environment that includes food and water security, development, economic productivity, and multiple foreign policy aspects? What are the conditions under which bioenergy contributes positively to energy security?

  13. Chemical and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Sample Tracking System Design Document

    SciTech Connect

    Bargelski, C. J.; Berrett, D. E.

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the system architecture of the Chemical and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Sample Tracking System at Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the course of the document observations are made concerning the objectives, constraints and limitations, technical approaches, and the technical deliverables.

  14. Powder metallurgy of vanadium and its alloys (review)

    SciTech Connect

    Radomysel'skii, I.D.; Solntsev, V.P.; Evtushenko, O.V.

    1987-10-01

    This article reviews the current powder metallurgy technology of vanadium and its alloys. Data are given on sintering, compacting, electrowinning and other current production techniques, as well as on the corrosion behavior and mechanical and physical properties of alloys produced by these different methods. The use of vanadium alloys as reactor and jet engine materials is also briefly discussed.

  15. One step HIP canning of powder metallurgy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhas, John J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A single step is relied on in the canning process for hot isostatic pressing (HIP) powder metallurgy composites. The binders are totally removed while the HIP can of compatible refractory metal is sealed at high vacuum and temperature. This eliminates outgassing during hot isostatic pressing.

  16. 39. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING BUILDING NO. 318, METALLURGY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING BUILDING NO. 318, METALLURGY LAB, ON RIGHT, BUILDING NO. 319, GENERAL PURPOSE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, ON LEFT AND BUILDING NO. 355, ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT, IN BACKGROUND LEFT. - Picatinny Arsenal, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  17. Iron Metallurgy: Technical Terminology Bulletin. Terminotech, Vol. 2, No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Electric Co. of Canada, Ltd., Montreal, Quebec.

    This issue of a bulletin of technological terminology is devoted to iron metallurgy. Various aspects of iron production are described in both French and English. An English-French dictionary of terms comprises the bulk of the document. Explanatory illustrations are appended. (JB)

  18. NSF: A "Populist" Pattern in Metallurgy, Materials Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapley, Deborah

    1975-01-01

    Describes the testimony of a University of Virginia professor of applied science, who charged that the National Science Foundation grants disproportionately small funds to the best university departments in the field of metallurgy and materials, while preferentially funding middle-ranked departments. (MLH)

  19. The Computer-based Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Wofford, Marcia M; Spickard, Anderson W; Wofford, James L

    2001-01-01

    Advancing computer technology, cost-containment pressures, and desire to make innovative improvements in medical education argue for moving learning resources to the computer. A reasonable target for such a strategy is the traditional clinical lecture. The purpose of the lecture, the advantages and disadvantages of “live” versus computer-based lectures, and the technical options in computerizing the lecture deserve attention in developing a cost-effective, complementary learning strategy that preserves the teacher-learner relationship. Based on a literature review of the traditional clinical lecture, we build on the strengths of the lecture format and discuss strategies for converting the lecture to a computer-based learning presentation. PMID:11520384

  20. Exploring Tablet PC Lectures: Lecturer Experiences and Student Perceptions in Biomedicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choate, Julia; Kotsanas, George; Dawson, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Lecturers using tablet PCs with specialised pens can utilise real-time changes in lecture delivery via digital inking. We investigated student perceptions and lecturer experiences of tablet PC lectures in large-enrolment biomedicine subjects. Lecturers used PowerPoint or Classroom Presenter software for lecture preparation and in-lecture pen-based…

  1. Birdsall Lecturer selected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, Bill

    Leonard F. Konikow (U.S. Geological Survey), Hydrology Program Chairman for the 1986 AGU Spring Meeting, has been selected to be the 1985-1986 Birdsall Distinguished Lecturer for the Geological Society of America. Papers that will be presented on the distinguished tour include “Modeling Solute Transport and Dispersion in Groundwater,” “Groundwater Contamination and Aquifer Reclamation at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Colorado,” and “Predictive Accuracy of Groundwater Models: Lessons from Postaudits.” If you wish to have the Birdsall Distinguished Lecturer visit your institution either this or next year, please contact William Back, Chairman of the Hydrogeology Division, 431 National Center, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA 22092.

  2. B.Gregory Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    Troisième série de "Gregory lectures" en mémoire de B.Gregory (1919-1977),DG de 1965 à 1970. La première conférence B.Gregory a été donné par le Prof.V.Weisskopf, son prédécesseur. Chris Greeg (?)de Berkley prend aussi la parole

  3. The family lecture.

    PubMed

    Rose, Nancy E

    2002-10-01

    SUMMARY This paper describes a lecture about my extended family, in which I discuss a variety of configurations consisting of lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults, and our children. It raises an array of issues, including alternative insemination, biological and nonbiological parentage, donors and birthmothers, adoption, co-parenting and blended families, significant others, and gay marriage and domestic partnership. It helps many students obtain both a more expansive sense of family and adeeper understanding of homophobia. PMID:24804601

  4. Diagnostic and vaccine chapter.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, J H; Kokanov, S K; Verkhovsky, O A

    2010-10-01

    The first report in this chapter describes the development of a killed composite vaccine. This killed vaccine is non-infectious to humans, other animals, and the environment. The vaccine has low reactivity, is non-abortive, and does not induce pathomorphological alterations to the organs of vaccinated animals. The second report of this chapter describes the diagnostic value of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting Brucella-specific antibodies and its ability to discriminate vaccinated cattle from infected cattle. The results indicated that the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is more sensitive than traditional tests for detecting antibodies to Brucella abortus in naturally and experimentally infected cattle. PMID:20850688

  5. Chapter 1: Chapter 1/Migrant, 1992-93. Evaluation Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catterson, Shirin; And Others

    Chapter 1, a federally funded compensatory education program, provided funding to 29 elementary schools with high concentrations of low-income students in the Austin (Texas) Independent School District (AISD). Sixteen of the schools had so many disadvantaged students that they qualified to be Chapter 1 schoolwide projects (SWPs). Chapter 1…

  6. Phillips funds AWG lectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Association for Women Geoscientists Foundation has received a $9000 grant from Phillips Petroleum Company to fund the Phillips-AWG Distinguished Lectures. The money will pay travel expenses for the women geoscientists listed with the AWG Speakers Bureau.More than 100 women geoscientists are available through the AWG Speakers Bureau. Their topics cover all the Earth sciences including geology, geophysics, geochemistry, paleobotany, planetary geology and mineral exploration. Their areas of study range from the U.S., Europe and South America to Mars. They come from academia, government and industry in 33 states and the District of Columbia.

  7. Nutrient dynamics: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Likens, Gene E.; LaBaugh, James W.; Buso, Donald C.; Bade, Darren

    2009-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the variability and trends in chemical concentrations and fluxes at Mirror Lake during the period 1981–2000. It examines the water and chemical budgets of Mirror Lake to identify and understand better long-term trends in the chemical characteristics of the lake. It also identifies the causes of changes in nutrient concentrations and examines the contribution of hydrologic pathways to the contamination of Mirror Lake by road salt. The role of groundwater and precipitation on water and chemical budgets of the lake are also examined.

  8. Milling and Drilling Evaluation of Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, L.J.

    2001-12-10

    Near-net-shape components can be made with powder metallurgy (PM) processes. Only secondary operations such as milling and drilling are required to complete these components. In the past and currently production components are made from powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steel alloys. process engineers are unfamiliar with the difference in machining properties of wrought versus PM alloys and have had to make parts to develop the machining parameters. Design engineers are not generally aware that some PM alloy variations can be furnished with machining additives that greatly increase tool life. Specimens from a MANTEC PM alloy property study were made available. This study was undertaken to determine the machining properties of a number of stainless steel wrought and PM alloys under the same conditions so that comparisons of their machining properties could be made and relative tool life determined.

  9. Powder Metallurgy Fabrication of Molybdenum Accelerator Target Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Lowden, Richard Andrew; Kiggans Jr., James O.; Nunn, Stephen D.; Parten, Randy J.

    2015-12-01

    Powder metallurgy approaches for the fabrication of accelerator target disks are being examined to support the development of Mo-99 production by NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC. An advantage of powder metallurgy is that very little material is wasted and at present, dense, quality parts are routinely produced from molybdenum powder. The proposed targets, however, are thin wafers, 29 mm in diameter with a thickness of 0.5 mm, with very stringent dimensional tolerances. Although tooling can be machined to very high tolerance levels, the operations of powder feed, pressing and sintering involve complicated mechanisms, each of which affects green density and shrinkage, and therefore the dimensions and shape of the final product. Combinations of powder morphology, lubricants and pressing technique have been explored to produce target disks with minimal variations in thickness and little or no distortion. In addition, sintering conditions that produce densities for optimum target dissolvability are being determined.

  10. Near-Net Shape Powder Metallurgy Rhenium Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonhardt, Todd; Hamister, Mark; Carlen, Jan C.; Biaglow, James; Reed, Brian

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a method to produce a near-net shape (NNS) powder metallurgy (PM) rhenium combustion chamber of the size 445 N (100 lbf) used in a high performance liquid apogee engine. These engines are used in low earth Orbit and geostationary orbit for satellite positioning systems. The developments in near-net shape powder metallurgy rhenium combustion chambers reported in this paper will reduce manufacturing cost of the rhenium chambers by 25 percent, and reduce the manufacturing time by 30 to 40 percent. The quantity of rhenium metal powder used to produce a rhenium chamber is reduced by approximately 70 percent and the subsequent reduction in machining schedule and costs is nearly 50 percent.

  11. Modulus Dependence on Large Scale Porosity of Powder Metallurgy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, P. G.; Horstemeyer, M. F.; Brown, H. R.

    2012-07-01

    This article compares the existing theoretical expressions for the porosity dependence on elastic constants to experimental data for a commercially available material, FC-0205 powder metallurgy (PM) steel. The modulus of compression, tension, effective torsion, and ultrasound-based data at varying porosity levels are plotted graphically against the theoretical expressions. An equation by McAdam ( J. Iron Steel Inst. Lond., 1950, 168, p 346) was able to most accurately predict the experimental data with the adjustment of only one material constant.

  12. Microstructure and Aging of Powder-Metallurgy Al Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L. B.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of thermal responses and aging behaviors of three new aluminum alloys. Alloys produced from rapidly solidified powders and contain 3.20 to 5.15 percent copper, 0.24 to 1.73 percent magnesium, 0.08 to 0.92 percent iron, and smaller amounts of manganese, nickel, titanium, silicon, and zinc. Peak hardness achieved at lower aging temperatures than with standard ingot-metallurgy alloys. Alloys of interest for automobile, aircraft, and aerospace applications.

  13. Powder-metallurgy superalloy strengthened by a secondary gamma phase.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotval, P. S.

    1971-01-01

    Description of experiments in which prealloyed powders of superalloy compositions were consolidated by extrusion after the strengthening by precipitation of a body-centered tetragonal gamma secondary Ni3 Ta phase. Thin foil electron microscopy showed that the mechanical properties of the resultant powder-metallurgy product were correlated with its microstructure. The product exhibited high strength at 1200 F without loss of ductility, after thermomechanical treatment and aging.

  14. Lectures on Yangian symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebbert, Florian

    2016-08-01

    In these introductory lectures we discuss the topic of Yangian symmetry from various perspectives. Forming the classical counterpart of the Yangian and an extension of ordinary Noether symmetries, first the concept of nonlocal charges in classical, two-dimensional field theory is reviewed. We then define the Yangian algebra following Drinfel’d's original motivation to construct solutions to the quantum Yang–Baxter equation. Different realizations of the Yangian and its mathematical role as a Hopf algebra and quantum group are discussed. We demonstrate how the Yangian algebra is implemented in quantum, two-dimensional field theories and how its generators are renormalized. Implications of Yangian symmetry on the two-dimensional scattering matrix are investigated. We furthermore consider the important case of discrete Yangian symmetry realized on integrable spin chains. Finally we give a brief introduction to Yangian symmetry in planar, four-dimensional super Yang–Mills theory and indicate its impact on the dilatation operator and tree-level scattering amplitudes. These lectures are illustrated by several examples, in particular the two-dimensional chiral Gross–Neveu model, the Heisenberg spin chain and { N }=4 superconformal Yang–Mills theory in four dimensions.

  15. Technology Lecturer Turned Technology Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    This case study outlines a program developed by a group of 6 teachers' college lecturers who volunteered to provide a technology program to year 7 & 8 children (11- and 12-year-olds) for a year. This involved teaching technology once a week. As technology education was a new curriculum area when first introduced to the college, few lecturers had…

  16. Surviving Lecture: A Pedagogical Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Whitney

    2008-01-01

    Lecture is the approach traditionally used to teach music theory courses. Although efficient in the delivery of large amounts of information in a short period of time, lecture lacks the effectiveness of an active learning approach. "Theory Survivor" is a unique cooperative-learning method based on the Student Teams-Achievement Divisions technique…

  17. Co-ordinated Classroom Lectures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Darell Boyd

    From a series of lectures, a selection of eight are oriented principally toward the biologically developing child, and the physiological operations in visual process. The numbered lectures are--(1) The Coordinated Classroom, its Philosophy and Principles, (2) An Outline of a Biological Point of View, (3) The Evolution of Structure--despite man's…

  18. Melt inclusions: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Audétat A.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Melt inclusions are small droplets of silicate melt that are trapped in minerals during their growth in a magma. Once formed, they commonly retain much of their initial composition (with some exceptions) unless they are re-opened at some later stage. Melt inclusions thus offer several key advantages over whole rock samples: (i) they record pristine concentrations of volatiles and metals that are usually lost during magma solidification and degassing, (ii) they are snapshots in time whereas whole rocks are the time-integrated end products, thus allowing a more detailed, time-resolved view into magmatic processes (iii) they are largely unaffected by subsolidus alteration. Due to these characteristics, melt inclusions are an ideal tool to study the evolution of mineralized magma systems. This chapter first discusses general aspects of melt inclusions formation and methods for their investigation, before reviewing studies performed on mineralized magma systems.

  19. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  20. Lecture on Thermal Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.

    2006-01-01

    This lecture will cover solar thermal radiation, particularly as it relates to the high energy solar processes that are the subject of this summer school. After a general review of thermal radiation from the Sun and a discussion of basic definitions, the various emission and absorption mechanisms will be described including black-body emission, bremsstrahlung, free-bound, and atomic line emissions of all kinds. The bulk of the time will be spent discussing the observational characteristics of thermal flare plasma and what can be learned about the flare energy release process from observations of the thermal radiation at all wavelengths. Information that has been learned about the morphology, temperature distribution, and composition of the flare plasma will be presented. The energetics of the thermal flare plasma will be discussed in relation to the nonthermal energy of the particles accelerated during the flare. This includes the total energy, the radiated and conductive cooling processes, and the total irradiated energy.

  1. Lecturing with a Virtual Whiteboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanovic, Zoran

    2006-09-01

    Recent advances in computer technology, word processing software, and projection systems have made traditional whiteboard lecturing obsolete. Tablet personal computers connected to display projectors and running handwriting software have replaced the marker-on-whiteboard method of delivering a lecture. Since the notes can be saved into an electronic file, they can be uploaded to a class website to be perused by the students later. This paper will describe the author's experiences in using this new technology to deliver physics lectures at an engineering school. The benefits and problems discovered will be reviewed and results from a survey of student opinions will be discussed.

  2. Chapter 20: Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    Graphite is truly a unique material. Its structure, from the nano- to the millimeter scale give it remarkable properties that lead to numerous and diverse applications. Graphite bond anisotropy, with strong in-plane covalent bonds and weak van der Waals type bonding between the planes, gives graphite its unique combination of properties. Easy shear of the crystal, facilitated by weak interplaner bonds allows graphite to be used as a dry lubricant, and is responsible for the substances name! The word graphite is derived from the Greek to write because of graphites ability to mark writing surfaces. Moreover, synthetic graphite contains within its structure, porosity spanning many orders of magnitude in size. The thermal closure of these pores profoundly affects the properties for example, graphite strength increases with temperature to temperatures in excess of 2200 C. Consequently, graphite is utilized in many high temperature applications. The basic physical properties of graphite are reviewed here. Graphite applications include metallurgical; (aluminum and steel production), single crystal silicon production, and metal casting; electrical (motor brushes and commutators); mechanical (seals, bearings and bushings); and nuclear applications, (see Chapter 91, Nuclear Graphite). Here we discuss the structure, manufacture, properties, and applications of Graphite.

  3. Welding Metallurgy and Processing Issues for Joining of Power Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lienert, Thomas J.; Reardon, Patrick T.

    2012-08-14

    Weldability issues with the pertinent alloys have been reviewed and preliminary results of our work on Haynes 25 have been presented. Further results on the mechanical properties and metallography on the EB welds are imminent. Hot-ductility experiments will commence within a few weeks. Aging studies on the effects of heat treatment using the Gleeble are also planned. MST-6 has extensive background in the welding metallurgy of the pertinent alloys. We also have considerable experience with the various welding processes to be used.

  4. Chloride metallurgy: PGM recovery and titanium dioxide production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puvvada, G. V. K.; Sridhar, R.; Lakshmanan, V. I.

    2003-08-01

    This paper examines in detail the thermodynamics and application of chloride metallurgy for the extraction of precious metals, such as gold and silver, and platinum-group metals. The advantages with regard to the solubilities of metal ion species and their reduction potentials in chloride media are discussed with examples. The use of chloride media for the extraction of platinum-group metals from spent autocatalysts and for the production of high-purity pigment-grade TiO2 and titanium metal from ilmenite feed stocks is discussed in the case studies provided.

  5. Introductory Lectures on Collider Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Tim M. P.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2013-12-01

    These are elementary lectures about collider physics. They are aimed at graduate students who have some background in computing Feynman diagrams and the Standard Model, but assume no particular sophistication with the physics of high energy colliders.

  6. Collective Intelligence. Chapter 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.

    2003-01-01

    Many systems of self-interested agents have an associated performance criterion that rates the dynamic behavior of the overall system. This chapter presents an introduction to the science of such systems. Formally, collectives are defined as any system having the following two characteristics: First, the system must contain one or more agents each of which we view as trying to maximize an associated private utility; second, the system must have an associated world utility function that rates the possible behaviors of that overall system. In practice, collectives are often very large, distributed, and support little, if any, centralized communication and control, although those characteristics are not part of their formal definition. A naturally occurring example of a collective is a human economy. One can identify the agents and their private utilities as the human individuals in the economy and the associated personal rewards they are each trying to maximize. One could then identify the world utility as the time average of the gross domestic product. ("World utility" per se is not a construction internal to a human economy, but rather something defined from the outside.) To achieve high world utility it is necessary to avoid having the agents work at cross-purposes lest phenomena like liquidity traps or the Tragedy of the Commons (TOC) occur, in which agents' individually pursuing their private utilities lowers world utility. The obvious way to avoid such phenomena is by modifying the agents utility functions to be "aligned" with the world utility. This can be done via punitive legislation. A real-world example of an attempt to do this was the creation of antitrust regulations designed to prevent monopolistic practices.

  7. 78 FR 8202 - Meeting of the Joint ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... ACRS meetings were published in the Federal Register on October 18, 2012, (77 FR 64146- 64147... Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy and Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The Joint ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy and Reactor Fuels will hold a meeting...

  8. Introductory lecture: nanoplasmonics.

    PubMed

    Brongersma, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Nanoplasmonics or nanoscale metal-based optics is a field of science and technology with a tremendously rich and colourful history. Starting with the early works of Michael Faraday on gold nanocolloids and optically-thin gold leaf, researchers have been fascinated by the unusual optical properties displayed by metallic nanostructures. We now can enjoy selecting from over 10 000 publications every year on the topic of plasmonics and the number of publications has been doubling about every three years since 1990. This impressive productivity can be attributed to the significant growth of the scientific community as plasmonics has spread into a myriad of new directions. With 2015 being the International Year of Light, it seems like a perfect moment to review some of the most notable accomplishments in plasmonics to date and to project where the field may be moving next. After discussing some of the major historical developments in the field, this article will analyse how the most successful plasmonics applications are capitalizing on five key strengths of metallic nanostructures. This Introductory Lecture will conclude with a brief look into the future. PMID:25968246

  9. AMUM LECTURE: Therapeutic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence A.

    2004-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in medicine is now quite commonplace, especially with the recent introduction of small, portable and relatively inexpensive, hand-held diagnostic imaging devices. Moreover, ultrasound has expanded beyond the imaging realm, with methods and applications extending to novel therapeutic and surgical uses. These applications broadly include: tissue ablation, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, site-specific and ultrasound mediated drug activity, extracorporeal lithotripsy, and the enhancement of natural physiological functions such as wound healing and tissue regeneration. A particularly attractive aspect of this technology is that diagnostic and therapeutic systems can be combined to produce totally non-invasive, imageguided therapy. This general lecture will review a number of these exciting new applications of ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors as well as the introduction of acoustic hemostasis, especially in organs which are difficult to treat using conventional medical and surgical techniques.

  10. Advanced Concepts. Chapter 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Mulqueen, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Before there is a funded space mission, there must be a present need for the mission. Space science and exploration are expensive, and without a well-defined and justifiable need, no one is going to commit significant funding for any space endeavor. However, as discussed in Chapter 1, applications of space technology and many and broad, hence there are many ways to determine and establish a mission need. Robotic science missions are justified by their science return. To be selected for flight, questions like these must be addressed: What is the science question that needs answering, and will the proposed mission be the most cost-effective way to answer it? Why does answering the question require an expensive space flight, instead of some ground-based alternative? If the question can only be answered by flying in space, then why is this approach better than other potential approaches? How much will it cost? And is the technology required to answer the question in hand and ready to use? If not, then how much will it cost and how long will it take to mature the technology to a usable level? There are also many ways to justify human exploration missions, including science return, technology advancement, as well as intangible reasons, such as national pride. Nonetheless, many of the questions that need answering, are similar to those for robotic science missions: Where are the people going, why, and will the proposed mission be the most cost-effective way to get there? What is the safest method to achieve the goal? How much will it cost? And is the technology required to get there and keep the crew alive in hand and ready to use? If not, then how much will it cost and how long will it take to mature the technology to a usable level? Another reason for some groups sending spacecraft into space is for profit. Telecommunications, geospatial imaging, and tourism are examples of proven, market-driven space missions and applications. For this specific set of users, the

  11. Alan F. Guttmacher Lecture.

    PubMed

    Morgentaler, H

    1989-01-01

    In this lecture, Dr. Henry Morgentaler describes how he led the fight to make abortion sage and legal in Canada. In 1967, the Canadian government began exploring possible changes in the abortion law, which at that made abortion a major crime. As president of the Humanist Fellowship of Montreal, Morgentaler presented a brief to House of Commons calling for abortion on request. His appeal attracted great media attention, and soon women started coming to Morgentaler's office seeking abortions. Risking prosecution, Morgentaler agreed to perform the operations (in the process becoming the first doctor in North America to use the vacuum suction technique). His abortion practice grew rapidly. In 1969, the Canadian government made abortion legal if approved by a committee of 3 doctors and if performed in a hospital. Though an improvement over the previous law, the new abortion law still had many deficiencies, most notably: it discriminated against women in rural areas (where the only available hospitals were Catholic), and it made getting an abortion a lengthy process, making the procedure more dangerous. Still campaigning vigorously performing abortions in his Montreal clinic, Morgentaler on charges of illegal abortion by the Quebec government. For the next 6 years, Morgentaler rode a legal roller coaster -- 3 jury acquittals were overturned or disregarded -- serving 10 months in prison throughout the ordeal (the legal battle produced the so-called Morgentaler Amendment, which stipulates that court cannot substitute its own verdict for a jury verdict of not guilty). In 1976, Quebec ended its battle with Morgentaler, who in turn launched his campaign to the rest of Canada. And in 1988, the Canadian Supreme Court rescinded the abortion low, thus affirming the dignity and equality of women. PMID:12284999

  12. Practical strategies for effective lectures.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Peter H; McCallister, Jennifer W; Luks, Andrew M; Le, Tao T; Fessler, Henry E

    2015-04-01

    Lecturing is an essential teaching skill for scientists and health care professionals in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. However, few medical or scientific educators have received training in contemporary techniques or technology for large audience presentation. Interactive lecturing outperforms traditional, passive-style lecturing in educational outcomes, and is being increasingly incorporated into large group presentations. Evidence-based techniques range from the very simple, such as inserting pauses for audience discussion, to more technologically advanced approaches such as electronic audience response systems. Alternative software platforms such as Prezi can overcome some of the visual limits that the ubiquitous PowerPoint imposes on complex scientific narratives, and newer technology formats can help foster the interactive learning environment. Regardless of the technology, adherence to good principles of instructional design, multimedia learning, visualization of quantitative data, and informational public speaking can improve any lecture. The storyline must be clear, logical, and simplified compared with how it might be prepared for scientific publication. Succinct outline and summary slides can provide a roadmap for the audience. Changes of pace, and summaries or other cognitive breaks inserted every 15-20 minutes can renew attention. Graphics that emphasize clear, digestible data graphs or images over tables, and simple, focused tables over text slides, are more readily absorbed. Text slides should minimize words, using simple fonts in colors that contrast to a plain background. Adherence to these well-established principles and addition of some new approaches and technologies will yield an engaging lecture worth attending. PMID:25746051

  13. Nobel Lecture. Aquaporin water channels.

    PubMed

    Agre, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Thank you very much. I am humbled, I am delighted; I am honored. This is every scientist's dream: to give the Nobel Lecture in Stockholm. But I would not be honest if I did not tell you that I am having a little anxiety being on this platform. I have lectured a number of times in Sweden, and I thought I would share with you some events preceding a special lecture that I gave here a few years ago. Arriving at Arlanda Airport, I waited in line at the Pass Control behind a group of businessmen in suits with briefcases. I heard the first in line asked by the control officer to state the purpose of his visit to Sweden. When the man replied "business," the officer approved and stamped his passport. One at a time, each stepped forward and was asked the same thing; each answered "business" and was approved. Eventually it was my turn, and I was dressed in rumpled clothes after spending the night in the Economy Minus section of an SAS jetliner. The officer asked me the purpose of my visit, and I said "I am here to give the von Euler Lecture at Karolinska Institute." The officer immediately looked up, stared at me, and asked, "Are you nervous?" At that point I became intensely nervous and said "Yes, I am a little nervous." The officer looked up again and stated "Well, you should be!" So if the lecturers look a little nervous, the problem is at Arlanda. PMID:16209125

  14. Ceramic Inclusions in Powder Metallurgy Disk Alloys: Characterization and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    Powder metallurgy alloys are increasingly used in gas turbine engines, especially in turbine disk applications. Although powder metallurgy materials have many advantages over conventionally cast and wrought alloys (higher strength, higher temperature capability, etc.), they suffer from the rare occurrence of ceramic defects (inclusions) that are inherent to the powder atomization process. These inclusions can have a potentially large detrimental effect on the durability of individual components. An inclusion in a high stress location can act as a site for premature crack initiation and thereby considerably reduce the fatigue life. Because these inclusions are exceedingly rare, they typically do not reveal themselves in the process of characterizing the material for a particular application (the cumulative volume of the test bars in a fatigue life characterization is typically on the order of a single actual component). Ceramic inclusions have, however, been found to be the root cause of a number of catastrophic engine failures. To investigate the effect of these inclusions in detail, we have undertaken a study where known populations of ceramic particles, whose composition and morphology are designed to mimic the "natural" inclusions, are added to the precursor powder. Surface-connected inclusions have been found to have a particularly large detrimental effect on fatigue life; therefore, the quantity of ceramic "seeds" added is calculated to ensure that a minimum number will intersect the surface of the fatigue test bars. Because the ceramic inclusions are irregularly shaped and have a tendency to break up in the process of extrusion and forging, a method of calculating the probability of occurrence and expected intercepted surface area was needed. We have developed a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the distributions of these parameters and have verified the simulated results with observations of ceramic inclusions found in macroscopic slices from extrusions

  15. Chapter II. Taxonomy and Phylogeny

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The book chapter presents a review of the taxonomic distribution of ornamental geophytic plants (bulbs, tubers, corms, rhizomes) and the modern classification of the families within which they belong....

  16. "Don't Lecture Me"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-11-01

    Often I will listen to public radio on long drives when I am alone. Recently I happened to catch a program called "Don't Lecture Me" and it really caught my attention for several reasons. First, the speakers were all notable leaders in Physics Education Research such as Joe Redish, David Hestenes, and Eric Mazur. (See this month's WebSights column.) These folks are among many who have devoted their energies to understanding how students learn physics and how teachers can design classroom instruction and interactions to best meet the needs of learners. Second, on this particular trip, I had just observed a teacher whose class was very teacher-centered as the teacher lectured most of the class period. As we discussed this later, she expressed concern that she had to cover the material and didn't feel that she could do it without lecturing.

  17. ``Don't Lecture Me''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, Patricia

    2011-11-01

    Often I will listen to public radio on long drives when I am alone. Recently I happened to catch a program called ``Don't Lecture Me'' and it really caught my attention for several reasons. First, the speakers were all notable leaders in Physics Education Research such as Joe Redish, David Hestenes, and Eric Mazur. (See this month's WebSights column.) These folks are among many who have devoted their energies to understanding how students learn physics and how teachers can design classroom instruction and interactions to best meet the needs of learners. Second, on this particular trip, I had just observed a teacher whose class was very teacher-centered as the teacher lectured most of the class period. As we discussed this later, she expressed concern that she had to cover the material and didn't feel that she could do it without lecturing.

  18. Powder metallurgy titanium 6A1-4V plate

    SciTech Connect

    Geisendorfer, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    A powder metallurgical approach has been combined with controlled mill processing to produce a highly uniform plate material suitable for structural applications. Prealloyed ELI Titanium 6A1-4V powder produced by the rotating electrode process was consolidated into billet by hot isostatic pressing. The resulting billet of uniform composition and random texture was then hot cross-rolled to 3 cm thick plate. Following rolling, the plate was given a beta annealing heat treatment to maximize damage tolerance. The plate was characterized with respect to metallurgical structure, composition, texture, and room temperature mechanical properties. The results of the study show that a powder metallurgy titanium mill product possessing uniform macro- and microstructure is technically feasible and exhibits tensile and fatigue properties equivalent to those of conventionally produced ingot-source wrought plate.

  19. The metallurgy and processing science of metal additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sames, William J.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Pannala, Sreekanth; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-03-07

    Here, additive Manufacturing (AM), widely known as 3D printing, is a method of manufacturing that forms parts from powder, wire, or sheets in a process that proceeds layer-by-layer.Many techniques (using many different names) have been developed to accomplish this via melting or solid - state joining. In this review, these techniques for producing metal parts are explored, with a focus on the science of metal AM: processing defects, heat transfer, solidification, solid- state precipitation, mechanical properties, and post-processing metallurgy. The various metal AM techniques are compared, with analysis of the strengths and limitations of each. Few alloys have been developedmore » for commercial production, but recent development efforts are presented as a path for the ongoing development of new materials for AM processes.« less

  20. Physical and mechanical metallurgy of high purity Nb accelerator cavities.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, N. T.; Bieler, T. R.; Pourgoghart , F.; Compton, C.; Hartwig, K. T.; Baars, D.; Zamiri, A.; Chandrasekaran, S.; Darbandi, P.; Jiang, H.; Skoug, E.; Balachandran, S.; Ice, G. E.; Liu, W.; Michigan State Univ.; Texas A & M Univ.; ORNL

    2010-01-01

    In the past decade, high Q values have been achieved in high purity Nb superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Fundamental understanding of the physical metallurgy of Nb that enables these achievements is beginning to reveal what challenges remain to establish reproducible and cost-effective production of high performance SRF cavities. Recent studies of dislocation substructure development and effects of recrystallization arising from welding and heat treatments and their correlations with cavity performance are considered. With better fundamental understanding of the effects of dislocation substructure evolution and recrystallization on electron and phonon conduction, as well as the interior and surface states, it will be possible to design optimal processing paths for cost-effective performance using approaches such as hydroforming, which minimizes or eliminates welds in a cavity.

  1. The metallurgy and processing science of metal additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Sames, William J.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Pannala, Sreekanth; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Here, additive Manufacturing (AM), widely known as 3D printing, is a method of manufacturing that forms parts from powder, wire, or sheets in a process that proceeds layer-by-layer.Many techniques (using many different names) have been developed to accomplish this via melting or solid - state joining. In this review, these techniques for producing metal parts are explored, with a focus on the science of metal AM: processing defects, heat transfer, solidification, solid- state precipitation, mechanical properties, and post-processing metallurgy. The various metal AM techniques are compared, with analysis of the strengths and limitations of each. Few alloys have been developed for commercial production, but recent development efforts are presented as a path for the ongoing development of new materials for AM processes.

  2. N18, powder metallurgy superalloy for disks: Development and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Guedou, J.Y.; Lautridou, J.C.; Honnorat, Y. . Materials and Processes Dept.)

    1993-08-01

    The preliminary industrial development of a powder metallurgy (PM) superalloy, designated N18, for disk applications has been completed. This alloy exhibits good overall mechanical properties after appropriate processing of the material. These properties have been measured on both isothermally forged and extruded billets, as well as on specimens cut from actual parts. The temperature capability of the alloy is about 700 C for long-term applications and approximately 750 C for short-term use because of microstructural instability. Further improvements in creep and crack propagation properties, without significant reduction in tensile strength, are possible through appropriate thermomechanical processing, which results in a large controlled grain size. Spin pit tests on subscale disks have confirmed that the N18 alloy has a higher resistance than PM Astrology and is therefore an excellent alloy for modern turbine disk applications.

  3. N18, Powder metallurgy superalloy for disks: Development and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedou, J. Y.; Lautridou, J. C.; Honnorat, Y.

    1993-08-01

    The preliminary industrial development of a powder metallurgy (PM) superalloy, designated N18, for disk applications has been completed. This alloy exhibits good overall mechanical properties after appro-priate processing of the material. These properties have been measured on both isothermally forged and extruded billets, as well as on specimens cut from actual parts. The temperature capability of the alloy is about 700 °C for long-term applications and approximately 750 °C for short-term use because of micro-structural instability. Further improvements in creep and crack propagation properties, without signifi-cant reduction in tensile strength, are possible through appropriate thermomechanical processing, which results in a large controlled grain size. Spin pit tests on subscale disks have confirmed that the N18 alloy has a higher resistance than PM Astroloy and is therefore an excellent alloy for modern turbine disk ap-plications.

  4. Powder metallurgy: Solid and liquid phase sintering of copper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, Rex; Weiser, Martin W.

    1993-01-01

    Basic powder metallurgy (P/M) principles and techniques are presented in this laboratory experiment. A copper based system is used since it is relatively easy to work with and is commercially important. In addition to standard solid state sintering, small quantities of low melting metals such as tin, zinc, lead, and aluminum can be added to demonstrate liquid phase sintering and alloy formation. The Taguchi Method of experimental design was used to study the effect of particle size, pressing force, sintering temperature, and sintering time. These parameters can be easily changed to incorporate liquid phase sintering effects and some guidelines for such substitutions are presented. The experiment is typically carried out over a period of three weeks.

  5. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum alloys containing 10 to 11.5 wt. pct. of iron and 1.5 to 3 wt. pct. of chromium using the technique of rapid solidification powder metallurgy were studied. Alloys were prepared as thin ribbons (.002 inch thick) rapidly solidified at uniform rate of 10(6) C/second by the melt spinning process. The melt spun ribbons were pulverized into powders (-60 to 400 mesh) by a rotating hammer mill. The powders were consolidated by hot extrusion at a high reduction ratio of 50:1. The powder extrusion temperature was varied to determine the range of desirable processing conditions necessary to yield useful properties. Powders and consolidated alloys were characterized by SEM and optical metallography. The consolidated alloys were evaluated for (1) thermal stability, (2) tensile properties in the range, room temperature to 450 F, and (3) notch toughness in the range, room temperature to 450 F.

  6. Application of superalloy powder metallurgy for aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    In the last decade, Government/Industry programs have advanced powder metallurgy-near-net-shape technology to permit the use of hot isostatic pressed (HIP) turbine disks in the commercial aircraft fleet. These disks offer a 30% savings of input weight and an 8% savings in cost compared in cast-and-wrought disks. Similar savings were demonstrated for other rotating engine components. A compressor rotor fabricated from hot-die-forged-HIP superalloy billets revealed input weight savings of 54% and cost savings of 35% compared to cast-and-wrought parts. Engine components can be produced from compositions such as Rene 95 and Astroloy by conventional casting and forging, by forging of HIP powder billets, or by direct consolidation of powder by HIP. However, each process produces differences in microstructure or introduces different defects in the parts. As a result, their mechanical properties are not necessarily identical. Acceptance methods should be developed which recognize and account for the differences.

  7. Phase Stability of a Powder Metallurgy Disk Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, John; Kantzos, P.; Telesman, Jack; Gang, Anita

    2006-01-01

    Advanced powder metallurgy superalloy disks in aerospace turbine engines now entering service can be exposed to temperatures approaching 700 C, higher than those previously encountered. They also have higher levels of refractory elements, which can increase mechanical properties at these temperatures but can also encourage phase instabilities during service. Microstructural changes including precipitation of topological close pack phase precipitation and coarsening of existing gamma' precipitates can be slow at these temperatures, yet potentially significant for anticipated disk service times exceeding 1,000 h. The ability to quantify and predict such potential phase instabilities and degradation of capabilities is needed to insure structural integrity and air worthiness of propulsion systems over the full life cycle. A prototypical advanced disk superalloy was subjected to high temperature exposures, and then evaluated. Microstructural changes and corresponding changes in mechanical properties were quantified. The results will be compared to predictions of microstructure modeling software.

  8. Ceramic Inclusions In Powder Metallurgy Disk Alloys: Characterization and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Pete; Kantzos, Pete; Telesman, Jack

    2002-01-01

    Powder metallurgy alloys are increasingly used in gas turbine engines, especially as the material chosen for turbine disks. Although powder metallurgy materials have many advantages over conventionally cast and wrought alloys (higher strength, higher temperature capability, etc.), they suffer from the rare occurrence of ceramic defects (inclusions) that arise from the powder atomization process. These inclusions can have potentially large detrimental effect on the durability of individual components. An inclusion in a high stress location can act as a site for premature crack initiation and thereby considerably reduce the fatigue life. Because these inclusions are exceedingly rare, they usually don't reveal themselves in the process of characterizing the material for a particular application (the cumulative volume of the test bars in a fatigue life characterization is typically on the order of a single actual component). Ceramic inclusions have, however, been found to be the root cause of a number of catastrophic engine failures. To investigate the effect of these inclusions in detail, we have undertaken a study where a known population of ceramic particles, whose composition and morphology are designed to mimic the 'natural' inclusions, are added to the precursor powder. Surface connected inclusions have been found to have a particularly large detrimental effect on fatigue life, therefore the volume of ceramic 'seeds' added is calculated to ensure that a minimum number will occur on the surface of the fatigue test bars. Because the ceramic inclusions are irregularly shaped and have a tendency to break up in the process of extrusion and forging, a method of calculating the probability of occurrence and expected intercepted surface and embedded cross-sectional areas were needed. We have developed a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the distributions of these parameters and have verified the simulated results with observations of ceramic inclusions found in macro

  9. Teaching More by Lecturing Less

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jennifer K.; Wood, William B.

    2005-01-01

    We carried out an experiment to determine whether student learning gains in a large, traditionally taught, upper-division lecture course in developmental biology could be increased by partially changing to a more interactive classroom format. In two successive semesters, we presented the same course syllabus using different teaching styles: in…

  10. Interacting binaries. Lecture notes 1992.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaumer, H.; Orr, A.

    These lecture notes represent a unique collection of information and references on current research on interacting binaries: S. N. Shore puts the emphasis on observations and their connection to relevant physics. He also discusses symbiotic stars. Cataclysmic variables are the subject of M. Livio's course, whereas E. P. J. van den Heuvel concentrates on more massive binaries and X-ray binaries.

  11. Revisiting Mathematics Education: China Lectures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freudenthal, Hans

    This book represents a compilation of the views and ideas of the late Hans Freudenthal, representing his last major contribution to the field of mathematics education. Rather than a presentation of new views, Freudenthal selected and streamlined old ideas, many gathered from his lectures in China, and formed a review of questions and issues in…

  12. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Lecture Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Newton D.

    This set of lecture notes is used as a supplemental text for the teaching of fluid dynamics, as one component of a thermodynamics course for engineering technologists. The major text for the course covered basic fluids concepts such as pressure, mass flow, and specific weight. The objective of this document was to present additional fluids…

  13. Teaching More by Lecturing Less

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    We carried out an experiment to determine whether student learning gains in a large, traditionally taught, upper-division lecture course in developmental biology could be increased by partially changing to a more interactive classroom format. In two successive semesters, we presented the same course syllabus using different teaching styles: in fall 2003, the traditional lecture format; and in spring 2004, decreased lecturing and addition of student participation and cooperative problem solving during class time, including frequent in-class assessment of understanding. We used performance on pretests and posttests, and on homework problems to estimate and compare student learning gains between the two semesters. Our results indicated significantly higher learning gains and better conceptual understanding in the more interactive course. To assess reproducibility of these effects, we repeated the interactive course in spring 2005 with similar results. Our findings parallel results of similar teaching-style comparisons made in other disciplines. On the basis of this evidence, we propose a general model for teaching large biology courses that incorporates interactive engagement and cooperative work in place of some lecturing, while retaining course content by demanding greater student responsibility for learning outside of class. PMID:16341257

  14. How to Podcast Campus Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, Brock

    2007-01-01

    Many college classrooms these days may as well have lighted signs over their doors that read "On Air" or "Recording in Progress." A growing number of professors are recording their lectures and making them available as podcasts--regularly updated sets of audio files that students can download to their computers or MP3 players. Some campus…

  15. Lectures of Fermi liquid theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, K.S.

    1993-01-01

    The Fermi liquid theory was first introduced by Landau in 1956 to provide a theoretical basis for the properties of strongly correlated Fermi systems. This theory has proven to be crucial for our understanding of a broad range of materials. These include liquid [sup 3]He, [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He mixtures, simple metals, heavy-fermions, and nuclear matter to name a few. In the high temperature superconductors questions have been raised regarding the applicability of Fermi liquid theory to the normal state behavior of these materials. I will not address this issue in these lectures. My focus will be to summarize the foundations of this theory and to explore the consequences. These lectures are in part a summary of the excellent review article by Baym and Pethick and the books by Pines and Nozieres and Baym and Pethick. They include as well a summary of some articles that I have authored and co-authored. In the main body of the lectures I will not make any additional references to the books or articles. In the absence of reading the original materials, my lectures should provide the essentials of a mini-course in Fermi liquid theory.

  16. Lectures of Fermi liquid theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, K.S.

    1993-07-01

    The Fermi liquid theory was first introduced by Landau in 1956 to provide a theoretical basis for the properties of strongly correlated Fermi systems. This theory has proven to be crucial for our understanding of a broad range of materials. These include liquid {sup 3}He, {sup 3}He-{sup 4}He mixtures, simple metals, heavy-fermions, and nuclear matter to name a few. In the high temperature superconductors questions have been raised regarding the applicability of Fermi liquid theory to the normal state behavior of these materials. I will not address this issue in these lectures. My focus will be to summarize the foundations of this theory and to explore the consequences. These lectures are in part a summary of the excellent review article by Baym and Pethick and the books by Pines and Nozieres and Baym and Pethick. They include as well a summary of some articles that I have authored and co-authored. In the main body of the lectures I will not make any additional references to the books or articles. In the absence of reading the original materials, my lectures should provide the essentials of a mini-course in Fermi liquid theory.

  17. Experiences in Personal Lecture Video Capture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandra, Surendar

    2011-01-01

    The ability of lecture videos to capture the different modalities of a class interaction make them a good review tool. Multimedia capable devices are ubiquitous among contemporary students. Many lecturers are leveraging this popularity by distributing videos of lectures. They depend on the university to provide the video capture infrastructure.…

  18. A Lecturer's Optimal Time Allocation Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Gil S.; Spiegel, Uriel

    1996-01-01

    Lecturers are responsible for guiding their students outside the classroom. However, many students who can solve their problems independently often still seek lecturers' guidance, resulting in negative externalities. This paper examines the lecturer's attempts to minimize the negative effects of unnecessary guidance, focusing on the optimal time…

  19. Interactive Lecture Discourse for University EFL Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morell, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    Interactive lectures play an important role in improving comprehension and in enhancing communicative competence in the English language for EFL university students taking content lecture courses. This article considers the interactive discourse in lectures of the English Studies Department at the University of Alicante, Spain. It describes an…

  20. Investigating Quality of Undergraduate Mathematics Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergsten, Christer

    2007-01-01

    The notion of quality in undergraduate mathematics lectures is examined by using theoretical notions and research results from the literature and empirical data from a case study on lecturing on limits of functions. A systemic triangular model is found to catch critical quality aspects of a mathematics lecture, consisting of mathematical…

  1. Chapter A6. Field Measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D., (Edited By); Radtke, Dean B.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) provides guidelines and standard procedures for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. Chapter A6 presents procedures and guidelines for the collection of data on air and water temperature, and on dissolved-oxygen concentrations, specific electrical conductance, pH, reduction-oxidation potential, alkalinity, and turbidity in water. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters are posted on the World Wide Web on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A (accessed August 6, 2005).

  2. Chapter A7. Biological Indicators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, Donna N.; Wilde, Franceska D.

    2003-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) provides guidelines and standard procedures for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter of the manual includes procedures for the (1) determination of biochemical oxygen demand using a 5-day bioassay test; (2) collection, identification, and enumeration of fecal indicator bacteria; (3) collection of samples and information on two laboratory methods for fecal indicator viruses (coliphages); and (4) collection of samples for protozoan pathogens. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters are posted on the World Wide Web on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/ (accessed November 25, 2003).

  3. Chapter 1: Chapter 1/Migrant, 1993-94. Evaluation Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catterson, Shirin; And Others

    Chapter 1, a federally funded compensatory education program, provided funding to 31 elementary schools with high concentrations of low-income students in the Austin (Texas) Independent School District (AISD) through the following components: (1) nonschoolwide projects of supplementary instruction; (2) schoolwide projects (SWP) in the most…

  4. POLLUTION PREVENTION AND LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT (CHAPTER 15): BOOK CHAPTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    BOOK NRMRL-CIN-1088 Curran*, M.A., and Schenck, R.C. "Pollution Prevention and Life Cycle Assessment (Chapter 15)." Published in: Handbook of Pollution Control and Waste Minimization, A. Ghassemi (Ed.),New York, NY: Marcel Dekker, Inc., 2001, p. 289-320. /2000 Much has been ac...

  5. The pacific chapter annual meeting of the undersea & hyperbaric medical society

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The following is the summary report on the UHMS Pacific Chapter Annual Meeting held in Long Beach in October 2010. The conference provided the latest updates on scientific, technical and organizational aspects of Hyperbaric and Diving Medicine. Invited speakers gave series of lectures dealing with current standards of clinical practice and presenting the results of laboratory investigations with particular emphasis on mechanisms of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Scientific sessions were accompanied by vendor exhibits and social events. PMID:22146426

  6. Chapter 17 Berries and Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The major objective of this book is to review in detail health problems occurring with significant frequency in aging adults which are proposed to be treated or ameliorated using nutriceuticals as foods and dietary supplements as well as other complementary and alternative therapies. Chapters primar...

  7. Chapter 2: Official Programmatic Descriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roholt, Ross VeLure; Hildreth, R. W.; Baizerman, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Youth civic engagement is a diverse field of practice, with each initiative claiming it has a unique approach. This chapter describes three initiatives, Youth-in-Government, Youth Science Center, and Public Achievement from the point-of-view of program staff. Their view is often privileged; it is the one used for official communication and public…

  8. Device for preparing combinatorial libraries in powder metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shoufeng; Evans, Julian R G

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a powder-metering, -mixing, and -dispensing mechanism that can be used as a method for producing large numbers of samples for metallurgical evaluation or electrical or mechanical testing from multicomponent metal and cermet powder systems. It is designed to make use of the same commercial powders that are used in powder metallurgy and, therefore, to produce samples that are faithful to the microstructure of finished products. The particle assemblies produced by the device could be consolidated by die pressing, isostatic pressing, laser sintering, or direct melting. The powder metering valve provides both on/off and flow rate control of dry powders in open capillaries using acoustic vibration. The valve is simple and involves no relative movement, avoiding seizure with fine powders. An orchestra of such valves can be arranged on a building platform to prepare multicomponent combinatorial libraries. As with many combinatorial devices, identification and evaluation of sources of mixing error as a function of sample size is mandatory. Such an analysis is presented. PMID:15244416

  9. Powder metallurgy technology of NiTi shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, J. M.; Maziarz, W.; Czeppe, T.; Lityńska, L.; Nowacki, W. K.; Gadaj, S. P.; Luckner, J.; Pieczyska, E. A.

    2008-05-01

    Powder metallurgy technology was elaborated for consolidation of shape memory NiTi powders. The shape memory alloy was compacted from the prealloyed powder delivered by Memry SA. The powder shows Ms = 10°C and As = -34°C as results from DSC measurements. The samples were hot pressed in the as delivered spherical particle's state. The hot compaction was performed in a specially constructed vacuum press, at temperature of 680°C and pressure of 400 MPa. The alloy powder was encapsulated in copper capsules prior to hot pressing to avoid oxidation or carbides formation. The alloy after hot vacuum compaction at 680°C (i.e. within the B2 NiTi stability range) has shown similar transformation range as the powder. The porosity of samples compacted in the as delivered state was only 1%. The samples tested in compression up to ɛ = 0.06 have shown partial superelastic effect due to martensitic reversible transform- ation which started at the stress above 300 MPa and returned back to ɛ = 0.015 after unloading. They have shown also a high ultimate compression strength of 1600 MPa. Measurements of the samples temperature changes during the process allowed to detect the temperature increase above 12°C for the strain rate 10-2 s-1 accompanied the exothermic martensite transformation during loading and the temperature decrease related to the reverse endothermic transformation during unloading.

  10. [Possible health effects associated with Pre-Columbian metallurgy].

    PubMed

    Idrovo, Alvaro Javier

    2005-09-01

    In the Old World, several researchers have indicated that adverse health effects were associated with exposure to arsenic, and that this influenced a change in the use of copper-arsenic alloys to others less toxic. This hypothesis was evaluated for three Pre-Columbian metallurgy traditions: Central Andes, Intermediate Area, and West Mexico. The metal artifacts from the Central Andes showed arsenic concentrations similar to those in the Old World (0.5%-1.0%). In the Intermediate Area the values were smallest; however, in West Mexico the arsenic content was very high (7%-25%). In Central Andes arsenical bronze was used initially, but copper-tin alloys when introduced were preferred and distributed throughout the Inca Empire. Osteological and artistic evidences of foot amputations among Moche individuals from Central Andes support the presence of "black foot disease" (a condition associated with arsenic poisoning) among Pre-Columbian populations. In conclusion, the adverse effects of arsenic have been observed in the New World, and that these effects promoted a change toward the use of less toxic alloys. PMID:16276677

  11. Welding metallurgy of nickel alloys in gas turbine components

    SciTech Connect

    Lingenfelter, A. C., LLNL

    1997-05-21

    Materials for gas turbine engines are required to meet a wide range of temperature and stress application requirements. These alloys exhibit a combination of creep resistance, creep rupture strength, yield and tensile strength over a wide temperature range, resistance to environmental attack (including oxidation, nitridation, sulphidation and carburization), fatigue and thermal fatigue resistance, metallurgical stability and useful thermal expansion characteristics. These properties are exhibited by a series of solid-solution-strengthened and precipitation-hardened nickel, iron and cobalt alloys. The properties needed to meet the turbine engine requirements have been achieved by specific alloy additions, by heat treatment and by thermal mechanical processing. A thorough understanding of the metallurgy and metallurgical processing of these materials is imperative in order to successfully fusion weld them. This same basic understanding is required for repair of a component with the added dimension of the potential effects of thermal cycling and environmental exposure the component will have endured in service. This article will explore the potential problems in joining and repair welding these materials.

  12. TASI 2006 Lectures on Leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mu-Chun; /Fermilab /UC, Irvine

    2007-03-01

    The origin of the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter of the Universe has been one of the great challenges in particle physics and cosmology. Leptogenesis as a mechanism for generating the cosmological baryon asymmetry of the Universe has gained significant interests ever since the advent of the evidence of non-zero neutrino masses. In these lectures presented at TASI 2006, I review various realizations of leptogenesis and allude to recent developments in this subject.

  13. Three Lectures on Hadron Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Craig D.

    2016-04-01

    These lectures explain that comparisons between experiment and theory can expose the impact of running couplings and masses on hadron observables and thereby aid materially in charting the momentum dependence of the interaction that underlies strong-interaction dynamics. The series begins with a primer on continuum QCD, which introduces some of the basic ideas necessary in order to understand the use of Schwinger functions as a nonperturbative tool in hadron physics. It continues with a discussion of confinement and dynamical symmetry breaking (DCSB) in the Standard Model, and the impact of these phenomena on our understanding of condensates, the parton structure of hadrons, and the pion electromagnetic form factor. The final lecture treats the problem of grand unification; namely, the contemporary use of Schwinger functions as a symmetry-preserving tool for the unified explanation and prediction of the properties of both mesons and baryons. It reveals that DCSB drives the formation of diquark clusters in baryons and sketches a picture of baryons as bound-states with Borromean character. Planned experiments are capable of validating the perspectives outlined in these lectures.

  14. Indexation Rules for Metallurgy in PASCAL. Original Title: Regles d'Indexation de la Metallurgie'--Technical Note Issued by Informascience--January 1980. Translated by Marie Wallin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Library.

    The indexing rules presented are designed for use with a new French-German database on metallurgy being developed under an agreement by CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris) and BAM (Bundesanstalt fur Materialprufung, Berlin). The new database, which will feature multilingual titles and index terms (French-German-English-) and…

  15. 15th Chapter of Surgeons Lecture: Surgeon of the new millennium--surgeon, scientist and scholar.

    PubMed

    Tan, S K

    2004-11-01

    The surgeon of the new millennium has come a long way from his humble beginnings in the Middle Ages as the lowly barber-surgeon. The skills and techniques developed by outstanding surgeons like Astley Cooper of the 19th century have withstood the test of time and have been refined by subsequent generations of surgical masters. The scientific basis of modern surgery was put on a firm footing in the early 19th century through the discovery of anaesthesia and microorganisms as a cause of many diseases and surgical complications. The 20th century brought about rapid progress in medicine, information technology (IT) and the life sciences, and closed with a big bang with the completion of the sequencing of the human genome. For the surgeon of the 21st century to remain relevant, he must embrace the concept of the Total Surgeon. Not doing so will render him irrelevant in the course of time, for having good surgical technique alone is insufficient. He must also lead in scientific endeavours to push the frontiers of the life sciences in attempts to solve the insoluble, and be scholarly in thought, attitude and behaviour. In other words, he must be a Surgeon-Scientist-Scholar. PMID:15608825

  16. POWDER METALLURGY TiAl ALLOYS: MICROSTRUCTURES AND PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L

    2006-12-11

    The microstructures and properties of powder metallurgy TiAl alloys fabricated by hot extrusion of gas-atomized powder at different elevated temperatures were investigated. Microstructure of the alloy fabricated at 1150 C consisted of a mixture of fine ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) equiaxed grains and coarse ordered B2 grains. Particles of ordered hexagonal {omega} phase were also observed in some B2 grains. The alloy containing B2 grains displayed a low-temperature superplastic behavior: a tensile elongation of 310% was measured when the alloy was tested at 800 C under a strain rate of 2 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}. Microstructure of the alloy fabricated at 1250 C consisted of a mixture of fine ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) equiaxed grains, coarse {alpha}{sub 2} grains, and lamellar ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) colonies. An observation of stacking faults associated with fine {gamma} lamellae in {alpha}{sub 2} grains reveals that the stacking fault of {alpha}{sub 2} phase plays an important role in the formation of lamellar ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) colonies. Unlike the alloy fabricated at 1150{sup o}, the alloy fabricated at 1250{sup o} displayed no low-temperature superplasticity, but a tensile elongation of 260% at 1000 C was measured. Microstructure of the alloy fabricated at 1400 C consisted of fully lamellar ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) colonies with the colony size ranging between 50 {micro}m and 100 {micro}m, in which the width of {gamma} lamella is in a range between 100 nm and 350 nm, and the width of {alpha}{sub 2} lamella is in a range between 10 nm and 50 nm. Creep behavior of the ultrafine lamellar alloy and the effects of alloying addition on the creep resistance of the fully lamellar alloy are also investigated.

  17. [Atmospheric emission of PCDD/Fs from secondary aluminum metallurgy industry in the southwest area, China].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Guo, Zhi-Shun; Jian, Chuan; Zhu, Ming-Ji; Deng, Li; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Five secondary aluminum metallurgy enterprises in the southwest area of China were measured for emissions of PCDD/Fs. The results indicated that the emission levels of PCDD/Fs (as TEQ) were 0.015-0.16 ng x m(-3), and the average was 0.093 ng x m(-3) from secondary aluminum metallurgy enterprises. Emission factors of PCDD/Fs (as TEQ) from the five secondary aluminum metallurgy enterprises varied between 0.041 and 4.68 microg x t(-1) aluminum, and the average was 2.01 microg x t(-1) aluminum; among them, PCDD/Fs emission factors from the crucible smelting furnace was the highest. Congener distribution of PCDD/F in stack gas from the five secondary aluminum metallurgies was very different from each other. Moreover, the R(PCDF/PCDD) was the lowest in the enterprise which was installed only with bag filters; the R(PCDF/PCDD) were 3.8-12.6 (the average, 7.7) in the others which were installed with water scrubbers. The results above indicated that the mechanism of PCDD/Fs formation was related to the types of exhaust gas treatment device. The results of this study can provide technical support for the formulation of PCDD/Fs emission standards and the best available techniques in the secondary aluminum metallurgy industry. PMID:24720181

  18. Experiences gained by establishing the IAMG Student Chapter Freiberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Sebastian M.; Liesenberg, Veraldo; Shahzad, Faisal

    2013-04-01

    The International Association for Mathematical Geosciences (IAMG) Student Chapter Freiberg was founded in 2007 at the Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg (TUBAF) in Germany by national and international graduate and undergraduate students of various geoscientific as well as natural science disciplines. The major aim of the IAMG is to promote international cooperation in the application and use of Mathematics in Geosciences research and technology. The IAMG encourages all types of students and young scientists to found and maintain student chapters, which can even receive limited financial support by the IAMG. Following this encouragement, generations of students at TUBAF have build up and established a prosperous range of activities. These might be an example and an invitation for other young scientists and institutions worldwide to run similar activities. We, some of the current and former students behind the student chapter, have organised talks, membership drives, student seminars, guest lectures, several short courses and even international workshops. Some notable short courses were held by invited IAMG distinguished lecturers. The topics included "Statistical analysis in the Earth Sciences using R - a language and environment for statistical computing and graphics", "Geomathematical Natural Resource Modeling" and "Introduction to Geostatistics for Environmental Applications and Natural Resources Evaluation: Basic Concepts and Examples". Furthermore, we conducted short courses by ourselves. Here, the topics included basic introductions into MATLAB, object oriented programming concepts for geoscientists using MATLAB and an introduction to the Keyhole Markup Language (KML). Most of those short courses lasted several days and provided an excellent and unprecedented teaching experience for us. We were given credit by attending students for filling gaps in our university's curriculum by providing in-depth and hands-on tutorials on topics, which were merely

  19. Improving Lecture Quality through Training in Public Speaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowbray, Robert; Perry, Laura B.

    2015-01-01

    Lecturing is a common instructional format but poor lecturing skills can detract from students' learning experiences and outcomes. As lecturing is essentially a form of public communication, training in public speaking may improve lecture quality. Twelve university lecturers in Malaysia participated in a six-week public speaking skills…

  20. The Nobel Prize Economics Lectures as a Teaching Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahka, William J.

    1990-01-01

    Proposes using some of the 26 Nobel Prize lectures as teaching tools in economics courses. Notes lectures are reprinted in economic journals. Lists titles of lectures from 1969 to 1988; identifies level of difficulty; and categorizes the lectures by subject field. Outlines George Stigler's 1982 Nobel lecture and gives suggestions for teaching. (NL)

  1. Lecture Notes on Multigrid Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilevski, P S

    2010-06-28

    The Lecture Notes are primarily based on a sequence of lectures given by the author while been a Fulbright scholar at 'St. Kliment Ohridski' University of Sofia, Sofia, Bulgaria during the winter semester of 2009-2010 academic year. The notes are somewhat expanded version of the actual one semester class he taught there. The material covered is slightly modified and adapted version of similar topics covered in the author's monograph 'Multilevel Block-Factorization Preconditioners' published in 2008 by Springer. The author tried to keep the notes as self-contained as possible. That is why the lecture notes begin with some basic introductory matrix-vector linear algebra, numerical PDEs (finite element) facts emphasizing the relations between functions in finite dimensional spaces and their coefficient vectors and respective norms. Then, some additional facts on the implementation of finite elements based on relation tables using the popular compressed sparse row (CSR) format are given. Also, typical condition number estimates of stiffness and mass matrices, the global matrix assembly from local element matrices are given as well. Finally, some basic introductory facts about stationary iterative methods, such as Gauss-Seidel and its symmetrized version are presented. The introductory material ends up with the smoothing property of the classical iterative methods and the main definition of two-grid iterative methods. From here on, the second part of the notes begins which deals with the various aspects of the principal TG and the numerous versions of the MG cycles. At the end, in part III, we briefly introduce algebraic versions of MG referred to as AMG, focusing on classes of AMG specialized for finite element matrices.

  2. Henry Norris Russell's Toronto Lectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devorkin, D. H.

    1996-12-01

    In February 1924, at the invitation of C. A. Chant, Russell presented a set of 14 public lectures on the state of astronomy and astrophysics. Designed to be inspirational, they also reveal Russell's contemporary views on the state of astrophysics as well as his sense of proper practice in astronomy. During his visit, Russell was interviewed by local reporters who asked his opinion about building a large observatory, one of Chant's major projects. What Russell had to say about such ventures did not please Chant one bit.

  3. Lecture Is Not a Dirty Word: How to Use Active Lecture to Increase Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Jess L.

    2013-01-01

    Lecture is a much maligned classroom method of instruction. Like any other technique employed by educators, there are both effective and ineffective ways to deliver content through a lecture format. Respecting that the college learner has changed, active lecturing strategies maximize student learning of course content, engaging both modern…

  4. Issues in Lecturing in a Second Language: Lecturer's Behaviour and Students' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lindsay

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how Hong Kong Chinese engineering students with low English language proficiency manage to cope with their lectures given in English. An ethnographic case study approach was used with multiple sources of data triangulated to provide a picture of the lecture event from both the students' and the lecturer's perspectives. One of…

  5. The Relative Effects of Traditional Lectures and Guided Notes Lectures on University Student Test Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, W. Larry; Weil, Timothy M.; Porter, James C. K.

    2012-01-01

    Guided notes were employed in two undergraduate Psychology courses involving 71 students. The study design utilized an alternating treatments format to compare Traditional Lectures with Guided Notes lectures. In one of the two courses, tests were administered after each class lecture, whereas the same type of test was administered at the beginning…

  6. Why do students miss lectures? A study of lecture attendance amongst students of health science.

    PubMed

    Bati, A Hilal; Mandiracioglu, Aliye; Orgun, Fatma; Govsa, Figen

    2013-06-01

    In the domain of health sciences, attendance by students at lectures is more critical. Lecture attendance is an issue which has been widely neglected. This study aims to determine those factors which affect the lecture attendance. The research data was collected by means of a questionnaire during the second semester of the academic year 2010-2011 from second-year students of the Faculties of Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentistry and Nursing. Together with demographic data, the questionnaire includes a Likert-type scale aiming to determine the factors influencing attendance at lectures. 663 participated in this study on a voluntary basis from Medical, Dentistry, Pharmacy and Nursing Faculties. Raising attainment levels, being able to take their own lecture notes, learning which aspects of the lecture content were being emphasized, and the opportunity to ask questions were amongst the chief reasons for attending lectures. It appears that the factors preventing students from attending lectures are mainly individual. Amongst the most frequently cited causes of non-attendance, sleeplessness, ill health and the inefficiency of lectures in overcrowded halls are emphasized. In the totals and sub-dimensions of the Lecture Attendance Scale, Medical Faculty students have average scores higher than those of students at other faculties. The vital nature of professional expertise and its applications, health sciences students' attendance at lectures carries greater importance. It is important to strengthen the mentoring system with regard to individual and external factors, which have been implicated as having a substantial influence on lecture attendance by students. PMID:22863210

  7. Industry group assails climate chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, P.

    1996-06-21

    the scientific debate about whether human activity is warming global climate subsided late last year when the world`s leading climate researchers agreed that the answer is probably yes. But recently the political debate heated up by several degrees when an industry group charged that revisions to a crucial chapter in a UN report on climate change violated peer review and amounted to scientific cleansing of doubts about human influences on climate. This article describes the controversy from both points of view - the business group and the scientists involved.

  8. 31 CFR Appendixes to Chapter V - Note

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Note Appendixes to Chapter V Money... CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Ch. V, Nt. Appendixes to Chapter V—Note Notes: The alphabetical lists.... References to regulatory parts in chapter V or other authorities: : Western Balkans Stabilization...

  9. Elevated temperature crack growth in advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porr, William C., Jr.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    Rapidly solidified Al-Fe-V-Si powder metallurgy alloy FVS0812 is among the most promising of the elevated temperature aluminum alloys developed in recent years. The ultra fine grain size and high volume fraction of thermally stable dispersoids enable the alloy to maintain tensile properties at elevated temperatures. In contrast, this alloy displays complex and potentially deleterious damage tolerant and time dependent fracture behavior that varies with temperature. J-Integral fracture mechanics were used to determine fracture toughness (K sub IC) and crack growth resistance (tearing modulus, T) of extruded FVS0812 as a function of temperature. The alloy exhibits high fracture properties at room temperature when tested in the LT orientation, due to extensive delamination of prior ribbon particle boundaries perpendicular to the crack front. Delamination results in a loss of through thickness constraint along the crack front, raising the critical stress intensity necessary for precrack initiation. The fracture toughness and tensile ductility of this alloy decrease with increasing temperature, with minima observed at 200 C. This behavior results from minima in the intrinsic toughness of the material, due to dynamic strain aging, and in the extent of prior particle boundary delaminations. At 200 C FVS0812 fails at K levels that are insufficient to cause through thickness delamination. As temperature increases beyond the minimum, strain aging is reduced and delamination returns. For the TL orientation, K (sub IC) decreased and T increased slightly with increasing temperature from 25 to 316 C. Fracture in the TL orientation is governed by prior particle boundary toughness; increased strain localization at these boundaries may result in lower toughness with increasing temperature. Preliminary results demonstrate a complex effect of loading rate on K (sub IC) and T at 175 C, and indicate that the combined effects of time dependent deformation, environment, and strain aging

  10. Testing of electroformed deposited iridium/powder metallurgy rhenium rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.; Dickerson, Robert

    1996-01-01

    High-temperature, oxidation-resistant chamber materials offer the thermal margin for high performance and extended lifetimes for radiation-cooled rockets. Rhenium (Re) coated with iridium (Ir) allow hours of operation at 2200 C on Earth-storable propellants. One process for manufacturing Ir/Re rocket chambers is the fabrication of Re substrates by powder metallurgy (PM) and the application of Ir coatings by using electroformed deposition (ED). ED Ir coatings, however, have been found to be porous and poorly adherent. The integrity of ED Ir coatings could be improved by densification after the electroforming process. This report summarizes the testing of two 22-N, ED Ir/PM Re rocket chambers that were subjected to post-deposition treatments in an effort to densify the Ir coating. One chamber was vacuum annealed, while the other chamber was subjected to hot isostatic pressure (HIP). The chambers were tested on gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen propellants, at mixture ratios that simulated the oxidizing environments of Earth-storable propellants. ne annealed ED Ir/PM Re chamber was tested for a total of 24 firings and 4.58 hr at a mixture ratio of 4.2. After only 9 firings, the annealed ED Ir coating began to blister and spall upstream of the throat. The blistering and spalling were similar to what had been experienced with unannealed, as-deposited ED Ir coatings. The HIP ED Ir/PM Re chamber was tested for a total of 91 firings and 11.45 hr at mixture ratios of 3.2 and 4.2. The HIP ED Ir coating remained adherent to the Re substrate throughout testing; there were no visible signs of coating degradation. Metallography revealed, however, thinning of the HIP Ir coating and occasional pores in the Re layer upstream of the throat. Pinholes in the Ir coating may have provided a path for oxidation of the Re substrate at these locations. The HIP ED Ir coating proved to be more effective than vacuum annealed and as-deposited ED Ir. Further densification is still required to

  11. Investigation of the Environmental Durability of a Powder Metallurgy Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, LaNita D.

    2004-01-01

    PM304 is a NASA-developed composite powder metallurgy material that is being developed for high temperature applications such as bushings in high temperature industrial furnace conveyor systems. My goal this summer was to analyze and evaluate the effects that heat exposure had on the PM304 material at 500 C and 650 C. The material is composed of Ni-Cr, Ag, Cr2O3, and eutectic BaF2-CaF2. PM304 is designed to eliminate the need for oil based lubricants in high temperature applications, while reducing friction and wear. However, further investigation was needed to thoroughly examine the properties of PM304. The effects of heat exposure on PM304 bushings were investigated. This investigation was necessary due to the high temperatures that the material would be exposed to in a typical application. Each bushing was cut into eight sections. The specimens were heated to 500 C or 650 C for time intervals from 1 hr to 5,000 hrs. Control specimens were kept at room temperature. Weight and thickness measurements were taken before and after the bushing sections were exposed to heat. Then the heat treated specimens were mounted and polished side by side with the control specimens. This enabled optical examination of the material's microstructure using a metallograph. The specimens were also examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The microstructures were compared to observe the effects of the heat exposure. Chemical analysis was done to investigate the interactions between Ni-Cr and BaF2-CaF2 and between Cr2O3 and BaF2-CaF2 at high temperature. To observe this, the two compounds that were being analyzed were mixed in a crucible in varied weight percentages and heated to 1100 C in a furnace for approximately two hours. Then the product was allowed to cool and was then analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Interpretation of the results is in progress.

  12. Large Lecture Format: Some Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kryder, LeeAnne G.

    2002-01-01

    Shares some surprising results from a business communication program's recent experiment in using a large lecture format to teach an upper-division business communication course: approximately 90-95% of the students liked the large lecture format, and the quality of their communication deliverables was as good as that produced by students who took…

  13. Team Teaching: An Alternative to Lecture Fatigue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Sandra L.; Kanter, Sanford B.

    1984-01-01

    More than an interdisciplinary format employing lecturers from different disciplines, team teaching is an approach which involves true team work between two qualified instructors who, together, make presentations to an audience. The instructional advantages of team teaching include: (1) the elimination of lecture-style instruction in favor of a…

  14. The Humanity of English. 1972 Distinguished Lectures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of Teachers of English, Urbana, IL.

    This is a collection of lectures by distinguished members of the English profession who were invited to lecture to schools located far from large urban and cultural centers. Included are papers by: John H. Fisher, "Truth Versus Beauty: An Inquiry into the Function of Language and Literature in an Articulate Society"; Walter Loban, "The Green…

  15. Parker Lecturers Gather at Joint Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooker, Nancy

    2008-08-01

    Present and past Parker Lecturers, who are Bowie Lecturers of AGU's Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA) section, gathered at the Joint Assembly in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Eugene Parker's famous paper predicting the existence of the supersonic solar wind (see Figure 1).

  16. THE OVERHEAD PROJECTOR IN THE PHYSICS LECTURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EPPENSTEIN, WALTER

    SOME SUCCESSFUL APPLICATIONS OF OVERHEAD PROJECTORS IN THE PHYSICS LECTURE HALL AT RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE ARE DESCRIBED--(1) PRODUCTION AND USE OF TRANSPARENCIES, (2) THE OVERHEAD PROJECTOR IN THE DEMONSTRATION LECTURE, (3) BREAD-BOARD FOR ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS, AND (4) AN X-Y PLOTTER FOR THE OVERHEAD PROJECTOR. (MS)

  17. Digital lecture recording: a cautionary tale.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Amy N B; Massa, Helen; Burne, Thomas H J

    2013-01-01

    Increasing application of information technology including web-based lectures and live-lecture recording appears to have many advantages for undergraduate nursing education. These include greater flexibility, opportunity for students to review content on demand and the improved academic management of increasing class sizes without significant increase in physical infrastructure. This study performed a quasi-experimental comparison between two groups of nursing students undertaking their first anatomy and physiology course, where one group was also provided access to streaming of recorded copies of the live lectures and the other did not. For the course in which recorded lectures were available student feedback indicated overwhelming support for such provision with 96% of students having accessed recorded lectures. There was only a weak relationship between access of recorded lectures and overall performance in the course. Interestingly, the nursing students who had access to the recorded lectures demonstrated significantly poorer overall academic performance (P < 0.001). Although this study did not specifically control for student demographics or other academic input, the data suggests that provision of recorded lectures requires improved and applied time management practices by students and caution on the part of the academic staff involved. PMID:22889680

  18. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Wayne Hu

    ScienceCinema

    Wayne Hu

    2010-01-08

    Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  19. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Wayne Hu

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Hu

    2009-03-02

    Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  20. Man and His Environment. Octagon Lectures 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleyard, R. T., Ed.

    Utilizing the theme "Man and His Environment," the Octagon Lectures of 1969 were presented at the University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia. Problems arising from the imbalance between the ancient forces of nature and the new forces of human culture were dealt with by the lecturers. They revealed that the most important…

  1. The Art of the Lecture Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Lecturing hints, periodic table, mechanistic approach to predicting inorganic reaction products for substitution reactions, reaction rates, spectroscopy, and entropy role change in establishing position of equilibrium for vaporization of water and synthesis of ammonia were topics of lectures presented at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical…

  2. Advances in powder metallurgy - 1991. Vol. 5 - P/M materials; Proceedings of the Powder Metallurgy Conference and Exhibition, Chicago, IL, June 9-12, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, L.F. III; Sansoucy, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The present volume powder metallurgy materials discusses the state of the PM industry, a metallurgical evaluation of new steel powders, design criteria for the manufacturing of low-alloy steel powders, and homogenization processing of a PM maraging steel. Attention is given to the corrosion resistance of full density sintered 316 SS, the performance characteristics of a new sinter-hardening low-alloy steel, wear performance of compositions made by low alloy iron/high alloy powder mixtures, and the strengthening of an AISI 1020 steel by aluminum-microalloying during liquid dynamic compaction. Topics addressed include the influence of alloying on the properties of water-atomized copper powders, fundamentals of high pressure gas atomization process control, advanced sensors and process control of gas atomization, and bimetallic tubulars via spray forming. Also discussed are factors affecting the delamination of PM molybdenum during stamping, applications of powder metallurgy molybdenum in the 1990s, and powder processing of high-temperature oxides.

  3. Richard Feynman's popular lectures on quantum electrodynamics: The 1979 Robb lectures at Auckland University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, J. M.; Kwan, A. M.

    1996-06-01

    The subject of quantum electrodynamics (QED) was the subject of QED—The Strange Theory of Light and Matter, the popular book by Richard Feynman which was published by Princeton University Press in 1985. On p. 1, Feynman makes passing reference to the fact that the book is based on a series of general lectures on QED which were, however, first delivered in New Zealand. At Auckland University, these lectures were delivered in 1979, as the Sir Douglas Robb lectures, and videotapes of the lectures are held by the Auckland University Physics Department. We have carried out a detailed examination of these videotapes, and we discuss here the major differences between the original Auckland lectures and the published version. We use selected quotations from the lectures to show that the original lectures provide additional insight into Feynman's character, and have great educational value.

  4. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 21, Rigid Motions and Vectors, Chapter 22, Computer and Programs. Teacher's Commentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    The teacher's guide for the eleventh unit in this SMSG series covers the chapter on rigid motions and vectors and the chapter on computers and programs. The overall purpose for each of the chapters is described, the prerequisite knowledge needed by students is specified, the mathematical development of each chapter is detailed, behavioral…

  5. 26 CFR 31.3503-1 - Tax under chapter 21 or 22 paid under wrong chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax under chapter 21 or 22 paid under wrong... 1954) § 31.3503-1 Tax under chapter 21 or 22 paid under wrong chapter. If, for any period, an amount is paid as tax— (a) Under chapter 21 or corresponding provisions of prior law by a person who is...

  6. Chapter 1 and Chapter 1 Migrant. Evaluation Findings, 1990-91. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christner, Catherine; And Others

    This report describes an evaluation of the Austin (Texas) Independent School District's (AISD) Chapter 1 and Chapter 1 Migrant programs. Chapter 1 is a federally funded compensatory educational program that provided funding in 1990-91 to 25 AISD elementary schools with high concentrations of low-income students. Chapter 1 Migrant is also a…

  7. Beyond Chapter 4.7.

    PubMed

    Bandler, Lilon Gretl

    2015-12-01

    Chapter 4.7 of the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research refers specifically to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. It lays out the points at which researchers working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders must consider their approach, and the engagement with individuals, communities or groups who are involved in or affected by their research. History, of Australia and of research involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, has informed this approach. The response to that history has been a rational, institutionalised, systematic demand for a different perception of what should direct research and research processes to ensure engagement with and service to the community with whom the researchers wish to do the work. This paper considers whether these principles could inform the approach to other research work. PMID:27135116

  8. THE LINDA CRANE MEMORIAL LECTUR

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    At 90 years of age, the APTA may be facing some of the greatest national and global challenges of its history. Membership has grown from 238 in 1921 to over 70,000 in 2011, but the expansion of the APTA may be restrictive to individual participation. A leadership gap appears imminent in practice and education. Fostering every member to understand the APTA and its great work is essential to ensuring a profession that lives its core values and meets societal needs. The Linda Crane Memorial Lecture in 2011 celebrated a vision of the APTA's 100th birthday with every member serving as a “professional centenarian” who stewards the organization to continued greatness. PMID:21637394

  9. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    SciTech Connect

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  10. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    SciTech Connect

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein`s mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  11. The Application of Thermal Plasma to Extraction Metallurgy and Related Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akashi, K.

    1980-01-01

    Various applications of thermal plasma to extraction metallurgy and related fields are surveyed, chiefly on the basis of documents published during the past two or three years. Applications to melting and smelting, to thermal decomposition, to reduction, to manufacturing of inorganic compounds, and to other fields are considered.

  12. Mechanical properties of modified low cobalt powder metallurgy Udimet 700 type alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, Fredric H.

    1989-01-01

    Eight superalloys derived from Udimet 700 were prepared by powder metallurgy, hot isostatically pressed, heat treated and their tensile and creep rupture properties determined. Several of these alloys displayed properties superior to those of Udimet 700 similarly prepared, in one case exceeding the creep rupture life tenfold. Filter clogging by extracted gamma prime, its measurement and significance are discussed in an appendix.

  13. Powder metallurgy approaches to high temperature components for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, H. B.

    1974-01-01

    Research is reported for the tensile strength, ductility, and heat performance characterisitics of powder metallurgy (p/m) superalloys. Oxide dispersion strengthened alloys were also evaluated for their strength during thermal processing. The mechanical attributes evident in both p/m supperalloys and dispersion strengthened alloys are discussed in terms of research into their possible combination.

  14. Power metallurgy approaches to high temperature components for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, H. B.

    1974-01-01

    Work conducted by NASA and NASA contractors on prealloyed superalloy powders and materials strengthened by oxide dispersion is reviewed. Fabrication, tensile strength, superplasticity, grain growth control, stress rupture life, and grain-size and dispersion-level effects are covered. Distinct strength advantages of powder metallurgy superalloys over conventional wrought alloys are noted.

  15. A Guide for Planning Facilities for Occupational Preparation Programs in Metallurgy Technology. Interim Report. Research 28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    German, Carl, Jr.

    The major purpose of this guide is to elicit the information necessary for writing educational specifications for facilities to house technical education programs in metallurgy. It is organized in these parts: (1) Part I discusses the major purpose, underlying assumptions, recent instructional trends, and guiding principles utilized in the…

  16. Solvent Extraction of Copper: An Extractive Metallurgy Exercise for Undergraduate Teaching Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smellie, Iain A.; Forgan, Ross S.; Brodie, Claire; Gavine, Jack S.; Harris, Leanne; Houston, Daniel; Hoyland, Andrew D.; McCaughan, Rory P.; Miller, Andrew J.; Wilson, Liam; Woodhall, Fiona M.

    2016-01-01

    A multidisciplinary experiment for advanced undergraduate students has been developed in the context of extractive metallurgy. The experiment serves as a model of an important modern industrial process that combines aspects of organic/inorganic synthesis and analysis. Students are tasked to prepare a salicylaldoxime ligand and samples of the…

  17. Iron's Role in Aluminum: A Powder Metallurgy and Sustainability Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saller, Brandon Dale

    cryomilling. With respect to the powder, a differential scanning calorimetry and activation energy analysis elucidated the formation and phase transformation temperatures of the relevant intermetallic phases, and the microstructural factors that influenced them. With an understanding of the fundamental science behind the intermetallic formation in the Al-Fe system, the composition of helium atomized Al-2at.% Fe was chosen combined with high-pressure torsion processing to yield a bulk alloy that demonstrated an ultimate tensile strength of 488 MPa. This strength was achieved via a combination of two mechanisms: grain refinement (Hall-Petch) and dislocation-Al6Fe interactions (Orowan strengthening), with notable thermal stability present up until 450°C. Finally, the potential for Al-Fe as a sustainable alloy was studied and a link established between current environmental literature and metallurgy literature on the potential for incorporation of Fe into Al to create a structural alloy.

  18. [THE DISCUSSION CONCERNING THE PLACE OF LECTURES AND COMPULSORY LECTURE ATTENDANCE IN MEDICAL EDUCATION].

    PubMed

    Reis, Shmuel

    2016-04-01

    Luder shows that there is a lack of correlation between lecture attendance in medical school and examination performance, and thus draws attention to a discourse concerning the place of lectures and lecture attendance enforcement in 2015 and beyond. The paper addresses 4 questions: First, what is the current place of the traditional lecture in the education of medical students? Second, are there alternatives to this format of teaching? Third, what are the educational consequences of mandating lecture attendance; and fourth, should there be such enforcement? The author discusses these questions and concludes that lectures should be used sparingly, after a careful evaluation that they have an added value over learning away from the classroom. Furthermore, that there are clear guidelines on how to make the traditional lecture enhanced and educationally effective, as well as alternatives such as the "flipped classroom", e-learning and more to lectures. In addition, that lectures frequently drive learning negatively and enforcing attendance in Israel entails serious unintended consequences such as a need to monitor attendance, and a host of disciplinary adverse reactions. Finally, that besides lecture efficiency and economy (when having added value) one reason to consider compulsory attendance, may be when poor attendance negatively influences teachers morale. PMID:27323539

  19. Engagement of students with lectures in biochemistry and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Davis, Elizabeth Ann; Hodgson, Yvonne; Macaulay, Janet Olwyn

    2012-01-01

    Academic staff at universities have become concerned about the decrease in student attendance at lectures and the implication of this on student achievement and learning. Few studies have measured actual lecture attendance in a coherent or comprehensive way. The aim of this study was to measure actual lecture attendance of students over two year levels enrolled in two separate science disciplines, biochemistry and pharmacology. The study further sought to determine the factors that influence lecture attendance. Attendance at lectures in four units of study was monitored over a 12-week semester. Attendance at lectures decreased over the semester and was lower at early morning lectures (8 A.M.; 9 A.M.). A questionnaire surveying students about their preparation for lectures, their compensation for missed lectures and the factors influencing their nonattendance was administered at the end of the semester. Students reported that the major factors influencing their attendance at lectures related to timetable issues and the quality of lecturing. If students missed lectures, the majority read the lecture notes and listened to the online recordings. The availability of online recordings of lectures was not a major influence on attendance at lectures. In three of the four units studied there was no correlation between self-reported lecture attendance and exam performance. The results of the study indicate that universities should dedicate more resources to timetabling and to supporting staff to improve the quality of their lectures. PMID:22987551

  20. Chapter 4: Geological Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, J; Herzog, H

    2006-06-14

    Carbon sequestration is the long term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. The largest potential reservoirs for storing carbon are the deep oceans and geological reservoirs in the earth's upper crust. This chapter focuses on geological sequestration because it appears to be the most promising large-scale approach for the 2050 timeframe. It does not discuss ocean or terrestrial sequestration. In order to achieve substantial GHG reductions, geological storage needs to be deployed at a large scale. For example, 1 Gt C/yr (3.6 Gt CO{sub 2}/yr) abatement, requires carbon capture and storage (CCS) from 600 large pulverized coal plants ({approx}1000 MW each) or 3600 injection projects at the scale of Statoil's Sleipner project. At present, global carbon emissions from coal approximate 2.5 Gt C. However, given reasonable economic and demand growth projections in a business-as-usual context, global coal emissions could account for 9 Gt C. These volumes highlight the need to develop rapidly an understanding of typical crustal response to such large projects, and the magnitude of the effort prompts certain concerns regarding implementation, efficiency, and risk of the enterprise. The key questions of subsurface engineering and surface safety associated with carbon sequestration are: (1) Subsurface issues: (a) Is there enough capacity to store CO{sub 2} where needed? (b) Do we understand storage mechanisms well enough? (c) Could we establish a process to certify injection sites with our current level of understanding? (d) Once injected, can we monitor and verify the movement of subsurface CO{sub 2}? (2) Near surface issues: (a) How might the siting of new coal plants be influenced by the distribution of storage sites? (b) What is the probability of CO{sub 2} escaping from injection sites? What are the attendant risks? Can we detect leakage if it occurs? (3) Will surface leakage negate or reduce the

  1. Lecture Notes and Essays in Astrophysics I. I Astrophysics Symposium of the GEA-RSEF.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulla, Ana; Manteiga, Minia

    2004-12-01

    This volume entittled "Lecture Notes and Essays in Astrophysics" is the first of a series containing the invited reviews and lectures presented during the biannual meetings of the Astrophysics Group of the spanish RSEF ("Real Sociedad Española de Física"). In particular, it includes the conferences and reviews presented during the meeting held at Madrid (Spain) on July 2003 during the First Centennial of the Spanish RSEF. The book is aimed to offer the specialized public, and particularly the astrophysics postgraduate students, selected comprehensive reviews on hot topics lectured by relevant speakers on the subject ("Lecture Notes"). The issue is complemented by a set of chapters on more specific topics ("Essays"). The turn of century has been rich with new discoveries, from the detections of extrasolar planets to the discovery of the the farthest galaxies ever seen or the detection of acceleration in the expansion of the Universe. Spain is leaving her imprint in the telescope making revolution and is promoting the construction of a 10.4 metre telescope in the ``Roque de Los Muchachos" observatory, in the Island of La Palma, Spain. This book provides an interesting insight on selected topics of modern Astrophysics as developped by Spanish astronomers.

  2. High field performance of superconducting magnets using powder metallurgy processed Cu-Nb-Sn and Nb-Al

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, A.J.; Foner, S.

    1984-06-01

    Small superconducting magnets were fabricated with powder metallurgy processed Nb-Al wire and with powder metallurgy processed multistrand Cu-Nb--Sn wire with 19 tin cores. Tests in a background field of up to 15 T showed that short sample characteristics were achieved for three coils. Upper limits of resistivity were established for both powder metallurgy processed wires. The reacted wires in the magnets gave upper limits of resistivity at 10 T of less than 1.4 x 10/sup -14/ ..cap omega.. cm for the Nb/sub 3/Sn wire, and less than 9 x 10/sup -13/ ..cap omega.. cm for the Nb-Al wire.

  3. Sediment transport measurements: Chapter 5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diplas, P.; Kuhnle, R.; Gray, J.; Glysson, D.; Edwards, T.

    2008-01-01

    Sediment erosion, transport, and deposition in fluvial systems are complex processes that are treated in detail in other sections of this book. Development of methods suitable for the collection of data that contribute to understanding these processes is a still-evolving science. Sediment and ancillary data are fundamental requirements for the proper management of river systems, including the design of structures, the determination of aspects of stream behavior, ascertaining the probable effect of removing an existing structure, estimation of bulk erosion, transport, and sediment delivery to the oceans, ascertaining the long-term usefulness of reservoirs and other public works, tracking movement of solid-phase contaminants, restoration of degraded or otherwise modified streams, and assistance in the calibration and validation of numerical models. This chapter presents techniques for measuring bed-material properties and suspended and bed-load discharges. Well-established and relatively recent, yet adequately tested, sampling equipment and methodologies, with designs that are guided by sound physical and statistical principles, are described. Where appropriate, the theory behind the development of the equipment and guidelines for its use are presented.

  4. Chapter 12: Human Microbiome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Xochitl C.; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2012-01-01

    Humans are essentially sterile during gestation, but during and after birth, every body surface, including the skin, mouth, and gut, becomes host to an enormous variety of microbes, bacterial, archaeal, fungal, and viral. Under normal circumstances, these microbes help us to digest our food and to maintain our immune systems, but dysfunction of the human microbiota has been linked to conditions ranging from inflammatory bowel disease to antibiotic-resistant infections. Modern high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatic tools provide a powerful means of understanding the contribution of the human microbiome to health and its potential as a target for therapeutic interventions. This chapter will first discuss the historical origins of microbiome studies and methods for determining the ecological diversity of a microbial community. Next, it will introduce shotgun sequencing technologies such as metagenomics and metatranscriptomics, the computational challenges and methods associated with these data, and how they enable microbiome analysis. Finally, it will conclude with examples of the functional genomics of the human microbiome and its influences upon health and disease. PMID:23300406

  5. VUV thin films, chapter 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zukic, Muamer; Torr, Douglas G.

    1993-01-01

    The application of thin film technology to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelength region from 120 nm to 230 nm has not been fully exploited in the past because of absorption effects which complicate the accurate determination of the optical functions of dielectric materials. The problem therefore reduces to that of determining the real and imaginary parts of a complex optical function, namely the frequency dependent refractive index n and extinction coefficient k. We discuss techniques for the inverse retrieval of n and k for dielectric materials at VUV wavelengths from measurements of their reflectance and transmittance. Suitable substrate and film materials are identified for application in the VUV. Such applications include coatings for the fabrication of narrow and broadband filters and beamsplitters. The availability of such devices open the VUV regime to high resolution photometry, interferometry and polarimetry both for space based and laboratory applications. This chapter deals with the optics of absorbing multilayers, the determination of the optical functions for several useful materials, and the design of VUV multilayer stacks as applied to the design of narrow and broadband reflection and transmission filters and beamsplitters. Experimental techniques are discussed briefly, and several examples of the optical functions derived for selected materials are presented.

  6. Educational Effect of Online Lecture using Streaming Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Hidenori; Teramoto, Akemi; Kozono, Kazutake

    A conventional lecture on Laser Engineering had been done in a lecture room till 1999. A content using on-demand streaming method was made for an online lecture of Laser Engineering in 2000. The figures and equations used on the conventional lecture and the voice recorded for the online lecture were converted to the real media. Then an online lecture has been provided to students by using a Helix Universal Server. The trial of the online lecture was done only for the students who wanted to take the online lecture course in 2000. The online lectures have been recognized as the credits for graduation by the change of a law since 2001. About 100 students have registered the online lecture of Laser Engineering every year since 2001. Here, three years' questionnaire surveys of the online lecture are summarized, and results of examinations on the conventional lecture for two years and on the online lecture for three years are compared. It is recognized for the lecture of Laser Engineering that the educational effect of the online lecture is comparable to or better than that of the conventional lecture.

  7. Factors Shaping Mathematics Lecturers' Service Teaching in Different Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingolbali, E.; Ozmantar, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we focus on university lecturers' approaches to the service teaching and factors that influence their approaches. We present data obtained from the interviews with 19 mathematics and three physics lecturers along with the observations of two mathematics lecturers' calculus courses. The findings show that lecturers' approaches to…

  8. The Impact of Online Lecture Recordings on Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Andrew; Birch, Elisa; Hancock, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The use of online lecture recordings as a supplement to physical lectures is an increasingly popular tool at many universities. This paper combines survey data with student record data for students in a "Microeconomics Principles" class to examine the relative effects of lecture attendance and online lecture recordings. The main finding is that…

  9. Michael Faraday: Prince of lecturers in Victorian England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Boon Leong; Lim, Jeanette B. S.

    2001-01-01

    In this note, we focus on Faraday as a lecturer/teacher. We trace his development as a lecturer/teacher and highlight his approaches in popular-science lecturing and in teaching chemistry to military cadets. We appraise his success and conclude with an account of his poignant last lecture.

  10. The Feasibility of Using Taped Lectures to Replace Class Attendance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menne, John W.; And Others

    The students in an introductory college psychology course were given the option of attending live lectures (control group) or listening to audio-taped lectures (experimental group). Each experimental subject was issued a tape recorder, a set of lecture tapes, and a schedule of lecture topics as presented to the control group. Conducted in the fall…

  11. Secondary School Mathematics Special Edition, Chapter 1. Flow Charts, Chapter 2. Structuring Space, Chapter 3. Functions, Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVenney, William S.; And Others

    Chapters 1-3 of the special materials written for low achieving students in grades 7-8 by SMSG include flow charting, elementary coordinate geometry, and functions. Included for student use are many tables which are to be used to shorten computational processes. Each chapter also includes pretest exercises, instructional lessons and exercises, and…

  12. Promoting Interactivity in Physics Lecture Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meltzer, David E.; Manivannan, Kandiah

    1996-01-01

    Presents techniques aimed at promoting a higher level of student-faculty interaction and active student participation in the learning process in introductory physics lecture classes. Discusses group problem solving, the use of flash cards, and assessment. (JRH)

  13. Charles Ichoku Maniac Lecture, July 25, 2016

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA climate scientist Charles Ichoku presented a Maniac lecture entitled, "Reminiscences of a scientist's journey from Nawfia to NASA." Born in a small town in Nigeria, Charles traced his captivat...

  14. Making lectures memorable: A cognitive perspective.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Azam; Babar, Shazia

    2016-08-01

    Lectures have been a cornerstone of medical education since the introduction of a discipline based curricular model more than two hundred years ago. Recently this instructional strategy has come under criticism because of its reliance on passive learning. There are still many medical schools that cover content predominantly through lectures due to its feasibility. With the introduction of the flipped classrooms, lectures have been given a new lease of life. Improving cognitive imprinting during lectures would enhance retrieval and promote long term storage. Simplifying the content reduces the cognitive load of the information being received and makes it more meaningful hence more memorable. To make learning memorable, rehearsal should be built into the sessions. With the exponential increase in online learning, the need for online learning technologies will require a generation of a large amount of asynchronous video content which should ideally be truly meaningful and memorable, and inspirational to our students. PMID:27524541

  15. Teaching Principles of Economics Without Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Campbell R.; Lamphear, Charles

    1969-01-01

    Presents important evidence thatstudents taking principles of economics with lectures, and those taking the course on a lectureless basis performed equally well on an intensive battery of objective examinations." (Editor)

  16. Lectures on probability and statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, G.P.

    1984-09-01

    These notes are based on a set of statistics lectures delivered at Imperial College to the first-year postgraduate students in High Energy Physics. They are designed for the professional experimental scientist. We begin with the fundamentals of probability theory, in which one makes statements about the set of possible outcomes of an experiment, based upon a complete a priori understanding of the experiment. For example, in a roll of a set of (fair) dice, one understands a priori that any given side of each die is equally likely to turn up. From that, we can calculate the probability of any specified outcome. We finish with the inverse problem, statistics. Here, one begins with a set of actual data (e.g., the outcomes of a number of rolls of the dice), and attempts to make inferences about the state of nature which gave those data (e.g., the likelihood of seeing any given side of any given die turn up). This is a much more difficult problem, of course, and one's solutions often turn out to be unsatisfactory in one respect or another.

  17. Authoring Software to Make Online Lecture Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozono, Kazutake; Teramoto, Akemi; Akiyama, Hidenori

    An authoring software for online lecture contents has been developed. Various multimedia such as HTML, SMIL and Real System are integrated in this software, which is named EzClassMaker. Professors who are not familiar to the information technology can make the online lecture content including the sound and movies, and place the content on Leaning Management System by using this software. Only the microcomputer with this software and a microphone (or a movie camera) is requested to make the content.

  18. A peculiar lecture by Ettore Majorana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, S.

    2006-09-01

    We give, for the first time, the English translation of a manuscript by Ettore Majorana, which probably corresponds to the text for a seminar lecture delivered at the University of Naples in 1938, where he lectured on theoretical physics. Some passages reveal a physical interpretation of quantum mechanics which anticipates for several years the Feynman approach in terms of path integrals, independent of the underlying mathematical formulation.

  19. Chapter 1: Biomedical knowledge integration.

    PubMed

    Payne, Philip R O

    2012-01-01

    The modern biomedical research and healthcare delivery domains have seen an unparalleled increase in the rate of innovation and novel technologies over the past several decades. Catalyzed by paradigm-shifting public and private programs focusing upon the formation and delivery of genomic and personalized medicine, the need for high-throughput and integrative approaches to the collection, management, and analysis of heterogeneous data sets has become imperative. This need is particularly pressing in the translational bioinformatics domain, where many fundamental research questions require the integration of large scale, multi-dimensional clinical phenotype and bio-molecular data sets. Modern biomedical informatics theory and practice has demonstrated the distinct benefits associated with the use of knowledge-based systems in such contexts. A knowledge-based system can be defined as an intelligent agent that employs a computationally tractable knowledge base or repository in order to reason upon data in a targeted domain and reproduce expert performance relative to such reasoning operations. The ultimate goal of the design and use of such agents is to increase the reproducibility, scalability, and accessibility of complex reasoning tasks. Examples of the application of knowledge-based systems in biomedicine span a broad spectrum, from the execution of clinical decision support, to epidemiologic surveillance of public data sets for the purposes of detecting emerging infectious diseases, to the discovery of novel hypotheses in large-scale research data sets. In this chapter, we will review the basic theoretical frameworks that define core knowledge types and reasoning operations with particular emphasis on the applicability of such conceptual models within the biomedical domain, and then go on to introduce a number of prototypical data integration requirements and patterns relevant to the conduct of translational bioinformatics that can be addressed via the design and

  20. Chapter 1: Biomedical Knowledge Integration

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Philip R. O.

    2012-01-01

    The modern biomedical research and healthcare delivery domains have seen an unparalleled increase in the rate of innovation and novel technologies over the past several decades. Catalyzed by paradigm-shifting public and private programs focusing upon the formation and delivery of genomic and personalized medicine, the need for high-throughput and integrative approaches to the collection, management, and analysis of heterogeneous data sets has become imperative. This need is particularly pressing in the translational bioinformatics domain, where many fundamental research questions require the integration of large scale, multi-dimensional clinical phenotype and bio-molecular data sets. Modern biomedical informatics theory and practice has demonstrated the distinct benefits associated with the use of knowledge-based systems in such contexts. A knowledge-based system can be defined as an intelligent agent that employs a computationally tractable knowledge base or repository in order to reason upon data in a targeted domain and reproduce expert performance relative to such reasoning operations. The ultimate goal of the design and use of such agents is to increase the reproducibility, scalability, and accessibility of complex reasoning tasks. Examples of the application of knowledge-based systems in biomedicine span a broad spectrum, from the execution of clinical decision support, to epidemiologic surveillance of public data sets for the purposes of detecting emerging infectious diseases, to the discovery of novel hypotheses in large-scale research data sets. In this chapter, we will review the basic theoretical frameworks that define core knowledge types and reasoning operations with particular emphasis on the applicability of such conceptual models within the biomedical domain, and then go on to introduce a number of prototypical data integration requirements and patterns relevant to the conduct of translational bioinformatics that can be addressed via the design and

  1. Volcanism on Mars. Chapter 41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Garry, W. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Crown, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration has revealed abundant evidence that Mars possesses some of the most dramatic volcanic landforms found anywhere within the solar system. How did a planet half the size of Earth produce volcanoes like Olympus Mons, which is several times the size of the largest volcanoes on Earth? This question is an example of the kinds of issues currently being investigated as part of the space-age scientific endeavor called "comparative planetology." This chapter summarizes the basic information currently known about volcanism on Mars. The volcanoes on Mars appear to be broadly similar in overall morphology (although, often quite different in scale) to volcanic features on Earth, which suggests that Martian eruptive processes are not significantly different from the volcanic styles and processes on Earth. Martian volcanoes are found on terrains of different age, and Martian volcanic rocks are estimated to comprise more than 50% of the Martian surface. This is in contrast to volcanism on smaller bodies such as Earth's Moon, where volcanic activity was mainly confined to the first half of lunar history (see "Volcanism on the Moon"). Comparative planetology supports the concept that volcanism is the primary mechanism for a planetary body to get rid of its internal heat; smaller bodies tend to lose their internal heat more rapidly than larger bodies (although, Jupiter's moon Io appears to contradict this trend; Io's intense volcanic activity is powered by unique gravitational tidal forces within the Jovian system; see "Volcanism on Io"), so that volcanic activity on Mars would be expected to differ considerably from that found on Earth and the Moon.

  2. Chapter 16. Fine-root Growth Response

    SciTech Connect

    J. Devereux Joslin; Mark H. Wolfe

    2002-07-31

    As part of a multiyear study to evaluate the affects of altered water inputs to an upland forest many aspects of tree growth physiology were studied. Chapter 16 of this book deals with fine root growth as studied over a 7 year period using a variety of methods. This chapter summarizes the results and conclusions from those efforts.

  3. National ESEA Chapter 1 Schoolwide Projects Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland Public Schools, OH.

    This document is a collection of schoolwide compensatory education project plans for 22 elementary schools in the Cleveland (Ohio) Public Schools system, with funding provided by Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. Chapter 1 project plans are included for the following schools: (1) Alfred A. Benesch; (2) Andrew J.…

  4. Chapter 622: A Guide for Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Dept. of Education, Boston.

    Massachusetts's Chapter 622 and U.S. Title IX regulations both prohibit discrimination by educational institutions. This guide is designed to assist administrators, particularly in Massachusetts, in complying fully with the spirit and letter of these regulations. The guide is divided into thirteen chapters, seven of which use parallel format to…

  5. Chapter 6: Selenium Toxicity to Aquatic Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter addresses the characteristics and nature of organic selenium (Se) toxicity to aquatic organisms, based on the most current state of scientific knowledge. As such, the information contained in this chapter relates to the 'toxicity assessment' phase of aquatic ecologi...

  6. Chapter 1 Commission Issues Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Chapter 1, Baltimore, MD.

    This report presents an interim analysis by an independent commission of current moves to reform Chapter 1 of the Hawkins/Stafford Elementary and Secondary School Improvement Amendments of 1988. Chapter 1 is the largest federal assistance program to elementary school and secondary school education. The report responds to questions on strengthening…

  7. Summer school in Kabardino-Balkaria by BMSTU SPIE Student Chapter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernomyrdin, Nikita V.; Zaytsev, Kirill I.; Gavdush, Arsenii A.; Fokina, Irina N.; Karasik, Valeriy E.; Yurchenko, Stanislav O.

    2014-09-01

    This summer BMSTU SPIE Student Chapter have decided to visit Kabardino-Balkaria Republic of Caucasus (Russia) and spent there a week with children in a camp. It was called Summer school. We decided to organize it in order to engage talented and curious children in Optics and to show them how science could be funny. Education and entertainment program included such activities as lectures, optical demonstrations, laser games, hiking in the forest, and others. As a result children had a good time outdoors, learned interesting facts about optics and lasers, and of course found new friends who are keen to know more too. Four Chapter members and about 70 children of age 10-16 took part in this event.

  8. Apprendre a Lire; Actes du Symposium International sur L'Apprentissage de la Lecture (Chaumont sur Neuchatel, Suisse, 21-24 Septembre 1971. [Teaching Reading; Proceedings of the International Symposium on the Teaching of Reading (Chaumont outside Neuchatel, Switzerland, Sept. 21-24, 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institut Romand de Recherches et de Documentation Pedagogiques, Neuchatel (Switzerland).

    Focusing on the teaching of reading, chapters in this book (written in French, but with brief English and German translations of chapter resumes) consist of lectures delivered at an international symposium on the teaching of reading held in Switzerland in September of 1971. The contents include: an introduction: opening statements delivered at the…

  9. Chapter 17: Estimating Net Savings: Common Practices

    SciTech Connect

    Violette, D. M.; Rathbun, P.

    2014-09-01

    This chapter focuses on the methods used to estimate net energy savings in evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) studies for energy efficiency (EE) programs. The chapter provides a definition of net savings, which remains an unsettled topic both within the EE evaluation community and across the broader public policy evaluation community, particularly in the context of attribution of savings to particular program. The chapter differs from the measure-specific Uniform Methods Project (UMP) chapters in both its approach and work product. Unlike other UMP resources that provide recommended protocols for determining gross energy savings, this chapter describes and compares the current industry practices for determining net energy savings, but does not prescribe particular methods.

  10. Chapter I, Chapter II, And State Compensatory Education Program Evaluations, 1983-84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Sherry; And Others

    This report contains administrative summaries for program evaluations of these 11 1983-84 Chapter I, Chapter II, and state compensatory education programs in the Fort Worth Independent School District, Texas. The programs evaluated are the Elementary Resource Teacher/Aide Program; the Chapter I Parochial Reading and Mathematics Program; the…