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Sample records for metastatic bone cancer

  1. Metastatic Bone Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bone Disease cont. Page ( 4 ) MBD vs. Primary Bone Cancer The diagnosis of metastatic bone disease should not ... from an unknown primary carcinoma or a primary bone cancer (sarcoma). For example, if an area of bone ...

  2. Targeting Bone Metastases in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    El-Amm, Joelle; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal involvement in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is common and results in significant morbidity and mortality. The interaction of prostate cancer with the bone microenvironment contributes to progression of cancer in the bone leading to skeletal-related events (SREs). Studies aimed at targeting the bone have been carried out over the recent years. Bisphosphonates are synthetic pyrophosphate analogs first investigated for their role in SRE prevention with zoledronic acid as the main bisphosphonate that is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for retardation of skeletal events in men with metastatic prostate cancer. Denosumab is another bone-targeted agent against uncontrolled osteolysis and serves as a RANK ligand inhibitor, superior to zoledronic acid in delaying SREs. Radiopharmaceuticals have played a role in targeting the bone microenvironment mainly in pain palliation in mCRPC utilizing strontium or samarium in the remote past, but only radium-223 is the first radiopharmaceutical that has yielded improvement in overall survival. The combination and sequencing strategies of these agents is the subject of multiple ongoing trials to guide the best use of these emerging agents. PMID:27042152

  3. Targeting Bone Metastases in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    El-Amm, Joelle; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal involvement in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is common and results in significant morbidity and mortality. The interaction of prostate cancer with the bone microenvironment contributes to progression of cancer in the bone leading to skeletal-related events (SREs). Studies aimed at targeting the bone have been carried out over the recent years. Bisphosphonates are synthetic pyrophosphate analogs first investigated for their role in SRE prevention with zoledronic acid as the main bisphosphonate that is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for retardation of skeletal events in men with metastatic prostate cancer. Denosumab is another bone-targeted agent against uncontrolled osteolysis and serves as a RANK ligand inhibitor, superior to zoledronic acid in delaying SREs. Radiopharmaceuticals have played a role in targeting the bone microenvironment mainly in pain palliation in mCRPC utilizing strontium or samarium in the remote past, but only radium-223 is the first radiopharmaceutical that has yielded improvement in overall survival. The combination and sequencing strategies of these agents is the subject of multiple ongoing trials to guide the best use of these emerging agents. PMID:27042152

  4. Targeting bone metastatic cancer: Role of the mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Bertoldo, Francesco; Silvestris, Franco; Ibrahim, Toni; Cognetti, Francesco; Generali, Daniele; Ripamonti, Carla Ida; Amadori, Dino; Colleoni, Marco Angelo; Conte, Pierfranco; Del Mastro, Lucia; De Placido, Sabino; Ortega, Cinzia; Santini, Daniele

    2014-04-01

    One of the great challenges of cancer medicine is to develop effective treatments for bone metastatic cancer. Most patients with advanced solid tumors will develop bone metastasis and will suffer from skeletal related events associated with this disease. Although some therapies are available to manage symptoms derived from bone metastases, an effective treatment has not been developed yet. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway regulates cell growth and survival. Alterations in mTOR signaling have been associated with pathological malignancies, including bone metastatic cancer. Inhibition of mTOR signaling might therefore be a promising alternative for bone metastatic cancer management. This review summarizes the current knowledge on mTOR pathway signaling in bone tissue and provides an overview on the known effects of mTOR inhibition in bone cancer, both in in vitro and in vivo models. PMID:24508774

  5. Predictive computational modeling to define effective treatment strategies for bone metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Leah M.; Araujo, Arturo; Pow-Sang, Julio M.; Budzevich, Mikalai M.; Basanta, David; Lynch, Conor C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to rapidly assess the efficacy of therapeutic strategies for incurable bone metastatic prostate cancer is an urgent need. Pre-clinical in vivo models are limited in their ability to define the temporal effects of therapies on simultaneous multicellular interactions in the cancer-bone microenvironment. Integrating biological and computational modeling approaches can overcome this limitation. Here, we generated a biologically driven discrete hybrid cellular automaton (HCA) model of bone metastatic prostate cancer to identify the optimal therapeutic window for putative targeted therapies. As proof of principle, we focused on TGFβ because of its known pleiotropic cellular effects. HCA simulations predict an optimal effect for TGFβ inhibition in a pre-metastatic setting with quantitative outputs indicating a significant impact on prostate cancer cell viability, osteoclast formation and osteoblast differentiation. In silico predictions were validated in vivo with models of bone metastatic prostate cancer (PAIII and C4-2B). Analysis of human bone metastatic prostate cancer specimens reveals heterogeneous cancer cell use of TGFβ. Patient specific information was seeded into the HCA model to predict the effect of TGFβ inhibitor treatment on disease evolution. Collectively, we demonstrate how an integrated computational/biological approach can rapidly optimize the efficacy of potential targeted therapies on bone metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:27411810

  6. Predictive computational modeling to define effective treatment strategies for bone metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cook, Leah M; Araujo, Arturo; Pow-Sang, Julio M; Budzevich, Mikalai M; Basanta, David; Lynch, Conor C

    2016-01-01

    The ability to rapidly assess the efficacy of therapeutic strategies for incurable bone metastatic prostate cancer is an urgent need. Pre-clinical in vivo models are limited in their ability to define the temporal effects of therapies on simultaneous multicellular interactions in the cancer-bone microenvironment. Integrating biological and computational modeling approaches can overcome this limitation. Here, we generated a biologically driven discrete hybrid cellular automaton (HCA) model of bone metastatic prostate cancer to identify the optimal therapeutic window for putative targeted therapies. As proof of principle, we focused on TGFβ because of its known pleiotropic cellular effects. HCA simulations predict an optimal effect for TGFβ inhibition in a pre-metastatic setting with quantitative outputs indicating a significant impact on prostate cancer cell viability, osteoclast formation and osteoblast differentiation. In silico predictions were validated in vivo with models of bone metastatic prostate cancer (PAIII and C4-2B). Analysis of human bone metastatic prostate cancer specimens reveals heterogeneous cancer cell use of TGFβ. Patient specific information was seeded into the HCA model to predict the effect of TGFβ inhibitor treatment on disease evolution. Collectively, we demonstrate how an integrated computational/biological approach can rapidly optimize the efficacy of potential targeted therapies on bone metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:27411810

  7. Bone-Targeted Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer – All Well-Established Knowledge?

    PubMed Central

    Gampenrieder, Simon P.; Rinnerthaler, Gabriel; Greil, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bone-targeted therapies like bisphosphonates (zoledronic acid or pamidronate) or denosumab are recommended in all patients with metastatic breast cancer and bone metastases, whether they are symptomatic or not. The choice between these 2 different agents, however, remains open. In this review, we critically discuss the emerging evidence for direct anti-tumor activity of bone-targeting agents, the utility of bone turnover markers for treatment decision and efficacy prediction, as well as the safety and financial aspects of bisphosphonates and denosumab. Furthermore, we provide a possible therapeutic algorithm, and present new pharmacologic agents which are being investigated for the treatment of metastatic bone disease. PMID:25759612

  8. Metastatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers, including cancers of the blood and the lymphatic system ( leukemia , multiple myeloma , and lymphoma ), can form metastatic tumors. Although rare, the metastasis of blood and lymphatic system cancers to the lung, heart, central nervous system , ...

  9. In Vitro Co-Culture Models of Breast Cancer Metastatic Progression towards Bone.

    PubMed

    Arrigoni, Chiara; Bersini, Simone; Gilardi, Mara; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Advanced breast cancer frequently metastasizes to bone through a multistep process involving the detachment of cells from the primary tumor, their intravasation into the bloodstream, adhesion to the endothelium and extravasation into the bone, culminating with the establishment of a vicious cycle causing extensive bone lysis. In recent years, the crosstalk between tumor cells and secondary organs microenvironment is gaining much attention, being indicated as a crucial aspect in all metastatic steps. To investigate the complex interrelation between the tumor and the microenvironment, both in vitro and in vivo models have been exploited. In vitro models have some advantages over in vivo, mainly the possibility to thoroughly dissect in controlled conditions and with only human cells the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the metastatic progression. In this article we will review the main results deriving from in vitro co-culture models, describing mechanisms activated in the crosstalk between breast cancer and bone cells which drive the different metastatic steps. PMID:27571063

  10. Bone targeted therapy for preventing skeletal-related events in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Irelli, Azzurra; Cocciolone, Valentina; Cannita, Katia; Zugaro, Luigi; Di Staso, Mario; Lanfiuti Baldi, Paola; Paradisi, Stefania; Sidoni, Tina; Ricevuto, Enrico; Ficorella, Corrado

    2016-06-01

    Cancer cells can alter physiological mechanisms within bone resulting in high bone turnover, and consequently in skeletal-related events (SREs), causing severe morbidity in affected patients. The goals of bone targeted therapy, as bisphosphonates and denosumab, are the reduction of incidence and the delay in occurrence of the SREs, to improve quality of life and pain control. The toxicity profile is similar between bisphosphonates and denosumab, even if pyrexia, bone pain, arthralgia, renal failure and hypercalcemia are more common with bisphosphonates, while hypocalcemia and toothache are more frequently reported with denosumab. Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) occurred infrequently without statistically significant difference. The present review aims to provide an assessment on bone targeted therapies for preventing the occurrence of SREs in bone metastatic breast cancer patients, critically analyzing the evidence available so far on their effectiveness, in light of the different mechanisms of action. Thus, we try to provide tools for the most fitting treatment of bone metastatic breast cancer patients. We also provide an overview on the usefulness of bone turnover markers in clinical practice and new molecules currently under study for the treatment of bone metastatic disease. PMID:27091227

  11. Enhanced serine production by bone metastatic breast cancer cells stimulates osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pollari, Sirkku; Käkönen, Sanna-Maria; Edgren, Henrik; Wolf, Maija; Kohonen, Pekka; Sara, Henri; Guise, Theresa; Nees, Matthias; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2011-01-01

    Since bone metastatic breast cancer is an incurable disease, causing significant morbidity and mortality, an understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms would be highly valuable. Here, we describe in vitro and in vivo evidences for the importance of serine biosynthesis in the metastasis of breast cancer to bone. We first characterized the bone metastatic propensity of the MDA-MB-231(SA) cell line variant as compared to the parental MDA-MB-231 cells by radiographic and histological observations in the inoculated mice. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of this isogenic cell line pair revealed that all the three genes involved in the L: -serine biosynthesis pathway, phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH), phosphoserine aminotransferase 1 (PSAT1), and phosphoserine phosphatase (PSPH) were upregulated in the highly metastatic variant. This pathway is the primary endogenous source for L: -serine in mammalian tissues. Consistently, we observed that the proliferation of MDA-MB-231(SA) cells in serine-free conditions was dependent on PSAT1 expression. In addition, we observed that L: -serine is essential for the formation of bone resorbing human osteoclasts and may thus contribute to the vicious cycle of osteolytic bone metastasis. High expression of PHGDH and PSAT1 in primary breast cancer was significantly associated with decreased relapse-free and overall survival of patients and malignant phenotypic features of breast cancer. In conclusion, high expression of serine biosynthesis genes in metastatic breast cancer cells and the stimulating effect of L: -serine on osteoclastogenesis and cancer cell proliferation indicate a functionally critical role for serine biosynthesis in bone metastatic breast cancer and thereby an opportunity for targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID:20352489

  12. Metastatic colorectal cancer presenting with bone marrow metastasis: a case series and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Rita; Mukherji, Deborah; Haydar, Ali; Saroufim, Maya; Temraz, Sally

    2016-01-01

    With advances in treatment, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) are now living longer with an apparent increase in the incidence of bone and bone marrow metastases (BMM). Common sites of metastatic disease from CRC include the liver and lungs with bone metastasis rarely occurring in the absence of visceral metastatic disease. We report a series of three patients presenting with isolated bone and BMM leading to a diagnosis of primary CRC. We have reviewed the literature regarding diagnosis, potential mechanisms leading to the development of osseous metastasis and outcome. A high level of clinical suspicion and in-depth understanding of the natural history of these rare metastases may guide future management and treatment decisions. PMID:27034798

  13. Bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy for metastatic brain cancers.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuji; Tajiri, Naoki; Staples, Meaghan; Reyes, Stephanny; Lozano, Diego; Sanberg, Paul R; Freeman, Thomas B; van Loveren, Harry; Kim, Seung U; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-01-01

    We propose that stem cell therapy may be a potent treatment for metastatic melanoma in the brain. Here we discuss the key role of a leaky blood-brain barrier (BBB) that accompanies the development of brain metastases. We review the need to characterize the immunological and inflammatory responses associated with tumor-derived BBB damage in order to reveal the contribution of this brain pathological alteration to the formation and growth of brain metastatic cancers. Next, we discuss the potential repair of the BBB and attenuation of brain metastasis through transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with the endothelial progenitor cell phenotype. In particular, we review the need for evaluation of the efficacy of stem cell therapy in repairing a disrupted BBB in an effort to reduce neuroinflammation, eventually attenuating brain metastatic cancers. The demonstration of BBB repair through augmented angiogenesis and vasculogenesis will be critical to establishing the potential of stem cell therapy for the treatment/prevention of metastatic brain tumors. The overarching hypothesis we advanced here is that BBB breakdown is closely associated with brain metastatic cancers of melanoma, exacerbating the inflammatory response of the brain during metastasis, and ultimately worsening the outcome of metastatic brain cancers. Abrogating this leaky BBB-mediated inflammation via stem cell therapy represents a paradigm-shifting approach to treating brain cancer. This review article discusses the pros and cons of cell therapy for melanoma brain metastases. PMID:25310691

  14. 186Re-HEDP for metastatic bone pain in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lam, Marnix G E H; de Klerk, John M H; van Rijk, Peter P

    2004-06-01

    Two-thirds of patients with metastatic cancer suffer from pain. Pain originating from skeletal metastases is the most common form of cancer-related pain. Bone pain, often exacerbated by pressure or movement, limits the patient's autonomy and social life. Pain palliation with bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals has proven to be an effective treatment modality in patients with metastatic bone pain. These bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals are extremely powerful in treating scattered painful bone metastases, for which external beam radiotherapy is impossible because of the large field of irradiation. (186)Re-hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate (HEDP) is a potentially useful radiopharmaceutical for this purpose, having numerous advantageous characteristics. Bone marrow toxicity is limited and reversible, which makes repetitive treatment safe. Studies have shown encouraging clinical results of palliative therapy using (186)Re-HEDP, with an overall response rate of ca. 70% in painful bone metastases. It is effective for fast palliation of painful bone metastases from various tumours and the effect tends to last longer if patients are treated early in the course of their disease. (186)Re-HEDP is at least as effective in breast cancer patients with painful bone metastases as in patients with metastatic prostate cancer. It is to be preferred to radiopharmaceuticals with a long physical half-life in this group of patients, who tend to have more extensive haematological toxicity since they have frequently been pretreated with bone marrow suppressive chemotherapy. This systemic form of radionuclide therapy is simple to administer and complements other treatment options. It has been associated with marked pain reduction, improved mobility in many patients, reduced dependence on analgesics, and improved performance status and quality of life. PMID:15118846

  15. T Cells Induce Pre-Metastatic Osteolytic Disease and Help Bone Metastases Establishment in a Mouse Model of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Ana Carolina; Leal, Ana Carolina; Gonçalves-Silva, Triciana; Mercadante, Ana Carolina T.; Kestelman, Fabiola; Chaves, Sacha Braun; Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes; Monteiro, João P.; Bonomo, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Bone metastases, present in 70% of patients with metastatic breast cancer, lead to skeletal disease, fractures and intense pain, which are all believed to be mediated by tumor cells. Engraftment of tumor cells is supposed to be preceded by changes in the target tissue to create a permissive microenvironment, the pre-metastatic niche, for the establishment of the metastatic foci. In bone metastatic niche, metastatic cells stimulate bone consumption resulting in the release of growth factors that feed the tumor, establishing a vicious cycle between the bone remodeling system and the tumor itself. Yet, how the pre-metastatic niches arise in the bone tissue remains unclear. Here we show that tumor-specific T cells induce osteolytic bone disease before bone colonization. T cells pro-metastatic activity correlate with a pro-osteoclastogenic cytokine profile, including RANKL, a master regulator of osteoclastogenesis. In vivo inhibition of RANKL from tumor-specific T cells completely blocks bone loss and metastasis. Our results unveil an unexpected role for RANKL-derived from T cells in setting the pre-metastatic niche and promoting tumor spread. We believe this information can bring new possibilities for the development of prognostic and therapeutic tools based on modulation of T cell activity for prevention and treatment of bone metastasis. PMID:23935856

  16. Development of Raman spectral markers to assess metastatic bone in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hao; Nyman, Jeffry S.; Sterling, Julie A.; Perrien, Daniel S.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Bi, Xiaohong

    2014-11-01

    Bone is the most common site for breast cancer metastases. One of the major complications of bone metastasis is pathological bone fracture caused by chronic bone loss and degeneration. Current guidelines for the prediction of pathological fracture mainly rely on radiographs or computed tomography, which are limited in their ability to predict fracture risk. The present study explored the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy to estimate pathological fracture risk by characterizing the alterations in the compositional properties of metastatic bones. Tibiae with evident bone destruction were investigated using Raman spectroscopy. The carbonation level calculated by the ratio of carbonate/phosphate ν1 significantly increased in the tumor-bearing bone at all the sampling regions at the proximal metaphysis and diaphysis, while tumor-induced elevation in mineralization and crystallinity was more pronounced in the metaphysis. Furthermore, the increased carbonation level is positively correlated to bone lesion size, indicating that this parameter could serve as a unique spectral marker for tumor progression and bone loss. With the promising advances in the development of spatially offset Raman spectroscopy for deep tissue measurement, this spectral marker can potentially be used for future noninvasive evaluation of metastatic bone and prediction of pathological fracture risk.

  17. Recent Advances in Bone-Targeted Therapies of Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiyun; He, Guangchun; Liu, Junwen; Luo, Feijun; Peng, Xiaoning; Tang, Shigang; Gao, Zhiyong; Lin, Qinlu; Keller, Jill M.; Yang, Tao; Keller, Evan T.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting men worldwide, with bone being the most common site of metastasis in patients that progress beyond organ confinement. Bone metastases are virtually incurable and result in significant disease morbidity and mortality. Bone provides a unique microenvironment whose local interactions with tumor cells offer novel targets for therapeutic interventions. Several attractive molecules or pathways have been identified as new potential therapeutic targets for bone metastases caused by metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. In this review, we present the recent advances in molecular targeted therapies for prostate cancer bone metastasis focusing on therapies that target the bone cells and the bone microenvironment. The therapies covered in this review include agents that inhibit bone resorption, agents that stimulate bone formation, and agents that target the bone matrix. Suggestions to devise more effective molecular targeted therapies are proposed. Hopefully, with better understanding of the biology of the disease and the development of more robust targeted therapies, the survival and quality of life of the affected individuals could be significantly improved. PMID:24767837

  18. Integrated multimodal imaging of dynamic bone-tumor alterations associated with metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Brisset, Jean-Christophe; Hoff, Benjamin A; Chenevert, Thomas L; Jacobson, Jon A; Boes, Jennifer L; Galbán, Stefanie; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Johnson, Timothy D; Pienta, Kenneth J; Galbán, Craig J; Meyer, Charles R; Schakel, Timothy; Nicolay, Klaas; Alva, Ajjai S; Hussain, Maha; Ross, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastasis occurs for men with advanced prostate cancer which promotes osseous growth and destruction driven by alterations in osteoblast and osteoclast homeostasis. Patients can experience pain, spontaneous fractures and morbidity eroding overall quality of life. The complex and dynamic cellular interactions within the bone microenvironment limit current treatment options thus prostate to bone metastases remains incurable. This study uses voxel-based analysis of diffusion-weighted MRI and CT scans to simultaneously evaluate temporal changes in normal bone homeostasis along with prostate bone metatastsis to deliver an improved understanding of the spatiotemporal local microenvironment. Dynamic tumor-stromal interactions were assessed during treatment in mouse models along with a pilot prospective clinical trial with metastatic hormone sensitive and castration resistant prostate cancer patients with bone metastases. Longitudinal changes in tumor and bone imaging metrics during delivery of therapy were quantified. Studies revealed that voxel-based parametric response maps (PRM) of DW-MRI and CT scans could be used to quantify and spatially visualize dynamic changes during prostate tumor growth and in response to treatment thereby distinguishing patients with stable disease from those with progressive disease (p<0.05). These studies suggest that PRM imaging biomarkers are useful for detection of the impact of prostate tumor-stromal responses to therapies thus demonstrating the potential of multi-modal PRM image-based biomarkers as a novel means for assessing dynamic alterations associated with metastatic prostate cancer. These results establish an integrated and clinically translatable approach which can be readily implemented for improving the clinical management of patients with metastatic bone disease. PMID:25859981

  19. Integrated Multimodal Imaging of Dynamic Bone-Tumor Alterations Associated with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chenevert, Thomas L.; Jacobson, Jon A.; Boes, Jennifer L.; Galbán, Stefanie; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Johnson, Timothy D.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Galbán, Craig J.; Meyer, Charles R.; Schakel, Timothy; Nicolay, Klaas; Alva, Ajjai S.; Hussain, Maha; Ross, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastasis occurs for men with advanced prostate cancer which promotes osseous growth and destruction driven by alterations in osteoblast and osteoclast homeostasis. Patients can experience pain, spontaneous fractures and morbidity eroding overall quality of life. The complex and dynamic cellular interactions within the bone microenvironment limit current treatment options thus prostate to bone metastases remains incurable. This study uses voxel-based analysis of diffusion-weighted MRI and CT scans to simultaneously evaluate temporal changes in normal bone homeostasis along with prostate bone metatastsis to deliver an improved understanding of the spatiotemporal local microenvironment. Dynamic tumor-stromal interactions were assessed during treatment in mouse models along with a pilot prospective clinical trial with metastatic hormone sensitive and castration resistant prostate cancer patients with bone metastases. Longitudinal changes in tumor and bone imaging metrics during delivery of therapy were quantified. Studies revealed that voxel-based parametric response maps (PRM) of DW-MRI and CT scans could be used to quantify and spatially visualize dynamic changes during prostate tumor growth and in response to treatment thereby distinguishing patients with stable disease from those with progressive disease (p<0.05). These studies suggest that PRM imaging biomarkers are useful for detection of the impact of prostate tumor-stromal responses to therapies thus demonstrating the potential of multi-modal PRM image-based biomarkers as a novel means for assessing dynamic alterations associated with metastatic prostate cancer. These results establish an integrated and clinically translatable approach which can be readily implemented for improving the clinical management of patients with metastatic bone disease. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02064283 PMID:25859981

  20. Metastatic Prostate Cancer to the Left Temporal Bone: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Faucett, Erynne A.; Richins, Hal; Khan, Rihan; Jacob, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Breast, lung, and prostate cancers are the three most common malignancies to metastasize to the temporal bone. Still, metastatic prostate cancer of the temporal bone is a rare finding, with approximately 21 cases reported in the literature and only 2 cases discovered more than 10 years after initial treatment of the primary. This disease may be asymptomatic and discovered incidentally; however, hearing loss, otalgia, cranial nerve palsies, and visual changes can all be presenting symptoms. We present the case of a 95-year-old man with history of primary prostate cancer treated 12 years earlier that was seen for new-onset asymmetric hearing loss and otalgia. The tympanic membranes and middle ears were normal; however, based on radiologic findings and eventual biopsy, the patient was diagnosed with extensive metastatic prostate cancer to the left temporal bone. This case (1) demonstrates that a high index of suspicion for unusual etiologies of seemingly benign symptoms must be maintained in elderly patients having prior history of cancer and (2) substantiates the value of temporal bone imaging when diagnosis may be unclear from history and physical exam. PMID:26294996

  1. The hypoxic cancer secretome induces pre-metastatic bone lesions through lysyl oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Thomas R.; Rumney, Robin M.H.; Schoof, Erwin M.; Perryman, Lara; Høye, Anette M.; Agrawal, Ankita; Bird, Demelza; Latif, Norain Ab; Forrest, Hamish; Evans, Holly R.; Huggins, Iain D; Lang, Georgina; Linding, Rune

    2016-01-01

    Tumour metastasis is a complex process involving reciprocal interplay between cancer cells and host stroma at both primary and secondary sites, and is strongly influenced by microenvironmental factors such as hypoxia1. Tumour-secreted proteins play a crucial role in these interactions2–5 and present strategic therapeutic potential. Metastasis of breast cancer to the bone affects approximately 85% of patients with advanced disease and renders them largely untreatable6. Specifically, osteolytic bone lesions, where bone is destroyed, lead to debilitating skeletal complications and increased patient morbidity and mortality6,7. The molecular interactions governing the early events of osteolytic lesion formation are currently unclear. Here we show hypoxia to be specifically associated with bone relapse in ER-negative breast cancer patients. Global quantitative analysis of the hypoxic secretome identified Lysyl Oxidase (LOX) as significantly associated with bone-tropism and relapse. High expression of LOX in primary breast tumours or systemic delivery of LOX leads to osteolytic lesion formation whereas silencing or inhibition of LOX activity abrogates tumour-driven osteolytic lesion formation. We identify LOX as a novel regulator of NFATc1-driven osteoclastogenesis, independent of RANK Ligand, which disrupts normal bone homeostasis leading to the formation of focal pre-metastatic lesions. We show that these lesions subsequently provide a platform for circulating tumour cells to colonise and form bone metastases. Our study identifies a novel mechanism of regulation of bone homeostasis and metastasis, opening up opportunities for novel therapeutic intervention with important clinical implications. PMID:26017313

  2. Metastatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  3. CCR5 receptor antagonists block metastasis to bone of v-Src-oncogene-transformed metastatic prostate cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sicoli, Daniela; Jiao, Xuanmao; Ju, Xiaoming; Velasco-Velazquez, Marco; Ertel, Adam; Addya, Sankar; Li, Zhiping; Ando, Sebastiano; Fatatis, Alessandro; Paudyal, Bishnuhari; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Thakur, Mathew L.; Lisanti, Michael P; Pestell, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Src family kinases (SFKs) integrate signal transduction for multiple receptors, regulating cellular proliferation invasion and metastasis in human cancer. Although Src is rarely mutated in human prostate cancer, SFK activity is increased in the majority of human prostate cancers. In order to determine the molecular mechanisms governing prostate cancer bone metastasis, FVB murine prostate epithelium was transduced with oncogenic v-Src. The prostate cancer cell lines metastasized in FVB mice to brain and bone. Gene expression profiling of the tumors identified activation of a CCR5 signaling module when the prostate epithelial cells (PEC) lines were grown in vivo vs. tissue cultures. The whole body, bone and brain metastatic prostate cancer burden was reduced by oral CCR5 antagonist. Clinical trials of CCR5 inhibitors may warrant consideration in patients with CCR5 activation in their tumors. PMID:25452256

  4. Cyclin A1 and P450 Aromatase Promote Metastatic Homing and Growth of Stem-like Prostate Cancer Cells in the Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Miftakhova, Regina; Hedblom, Andreas; Semenas, Julius; Robinson, Brian; Simoulis, Athanasios; Malm, Johan; Rizvanov, Albert; Heery, David M; Mongan, Nigel P; Maitland, Norman J; Allegrucci, Cinzia; Persson, Jenny L

    2016-04-15

    Bone metastasis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in prostate cancer. While cancer stem-like cells have been implicated as a cell of origin for prostate cancer metastasis, the pathways that enable metastatic development at distal sites remain largely unknown. In this study, we illuminate pathways relevant to bone metastasis in this disease. We observed that cyclin A1 (CCNA1) protein expression was relatively higher in prostate cancer metastatic lesions in lymph node, lung, and bone/bone marrow. In both primary and metastatic tissues, cyclin A1 expression was also correlated with aromatase (CYP19A1), a key enzyme that directly regulates the local balance of androgens to estrogens. Cyclin A1 overexpression in the stem-like ALDH(high) subpopulation of PC3M cells, one model of prostate cancer, enabled bone marrow integration and metastatic growth. Further, cells obtained from bone marrow metastatic lesions displayed self-renewal capability in colony-forming assays. In the bone marrow, cyclin A1 and aromatase enhanced local bone marrow-releasing factors, including androgen receptor, estrogen and matrix metalloproteinase MMP9 and promoted the metastatic growth of prostate cancer cells. Moreover, ALDH(high) tumor cells expressing elevated levels of aromatase stimulated tumor/host estrogen production and acquired a growth advantage in the presence of host bone marrow cells. Overall, these findings suggest that local production of steroids and MMPs in the bone marrow may provide a suitable microenvironment for ALDH(high) prostate cancer cells to establish metastatic growths, offering new approaches to therapeutically target bone metastases. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2453-64. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26921336

  5. Analytic Validation of the Automated Bone Scan Index as an Imaging Biomarker to Standardize Quantitative Changes in Bone Scans of Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Aseem; Morris, Michael J.; Kaboteh, Reza; Båth, Lena; Sadik, May; Gjertsson, Peter; Lomsky, Milan; Edenbrandt, Lars; Minarik, David; Bjartell, Anders

    2016-01-01

    A reproducible and quantitative imaging biomarker is needed to standardize the evaluation of changes in bone scans of prostate cancer patients with skeletal metastasis. We performed a series of analytic validation studies to evaluate the performance of the automated bone scan index (BSI) as an imaging biomarker in patients with metastatic prostate cancer. Methods Three separate analytic studies were performed to evaluate the accuracy, precision, and reproducibility of the automated BSI. Simulation study: bone scan simulations with predefined tumor burdens were created to assess accuracy and precision. Fifty bone scans were simulated with a tumor burden ranging from low to high disease confluence (0.10–13.0 BSI). A second group of 50 scans was divided into 5 subgroups, each containing 10 simulated bone scans, corresponding to BSI values of 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0, and 10.0. Repeat bone scan study: to assess the reproducibility in a routine clinical setting, 2 repeat bone scans were obtained from metastatic prostate cancer patients after a single 600-MBq 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate injection. Follow-up bone scan study: 2 follow-up bone scans of metastatic prostate cancer patients were analyzed to determine the interobserver variability between the automated BSIs and the visual interpretations in assessing changes. The automated BSI was generated using the upgraded EXINI boneBSI software (version 2). The results were evaluated using linear regression, Pearson correlation, Cohen κ measurement, coefficient of variation, and SD. Results Linearity of the automated BSI interpretations in the range of 0.10–13.0 was confirmed, and Pearson correlation was observed at 0.995 (n = 50; 95% confidence interval, 0.99–0.99; P < 0.0001). The mean coefficient of variation was less than 20%. The mean BSI difference between the 2 repeat bone scans of 35 patients was 0.05 (SD = 0.15), with an upper confidence limit of 0.30. The interobserver agreement in the automated BSI

  6. SU-D-303-01: Spatial Distribution of Bone Metastases In Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Perk, T; Bradshaw, T; Harmon, S; Perlman, S; Liu, G; Jeraj, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Identification of metastatic bone lesions is critical in prostate cancer, where treatments may be more effective in patients with fewer lesions. This study aims characterize the distribution and spread of bone lesions and create a probability map of metastatic spread in bone. Methods: Fifty-five metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer patients received up to 3 whole-body [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans. Lesions were identified by physician on PET/CT and contoured using a threshold of SUV>15. An atlas-based segmentation method was used to create CT regions, which determined skeletal location of lesions. Patients were divided into 3 groups with low (N<40), medium (40100) numbers of lesions. A combination of articulated and deformable registrations was used to register the skeletal segments and lesions of each patient to a single skeleton. All the lesion data was then combined to make a probability map. Results: A total of 4038 metastatic lesions (mean 74, range 2–304) were identified. Skeletal regions with highest occurrence of lesions included ribs, thoracic spine, and pelvis with 21%, 19%, and 15% of the total number lesions and 8%, 18%, and 31 % of the total lesion volume, respectively. Interestingly, patients with fewer lesions were found to have a lower proportion of lesions in the ribs (9% in low vs. 27% in high number of lesions). Additionally, the probability map showed specific areas in the spine and pelvis where over 75% of patients had metastases, and other areas in the skeleton with a less than 2% of metastases. Conclusion: We identified skeletal regions with higher incidence of metastases and specific sub-regions in the skeleton that had high or low probability of occurrence of metastases. Additionally, we found that metastatic lesions in the ribs and skull occur more commonly in advanced disease. These results may have future applications in computer-aided diagnosis. Funding from the Prostate Cancer Foundation.

  7. Prostate cancer specific integrin αvβ3 modulates bone metastatic growth and tissue remodeling

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, NP; De, S; Vasanji, A; Brainard, J; Byzova, TV

    2009-01-01

    The management of pain and morbidity owing to the spreading and growth of cancer within bone remains to be a paramount problem in clinical care. Cancer cells actively transform bone, however, the molecular requirements and mechanisms of this process remain unclear. This study shows that functional modulation of the αvβ3 integrin receptor in prostate cancer cells is required for progression within bone and determines tumor-induced bone tissue transformation. Using histology and quantitative microCT analysis, we show that αvβ3 integrin is required not only for tumor growth within the bone but for tumor-induced bone gain, a response resembling bone lesions in prostate cancer patients. Expression of normal, fully functional αvβ3 enabled tumor growth in bone (incidence: 4/4), whereas αvβ3 (—), inactive or constitutively active mutants of αvβ3 did not (incidence: 0/4, 0/6 and 1/7, respectively) within a 35-day-period. This response appeared to be bone-specific in comparison to the subcutis where tumor incidence was greater than 60% for all groups. Interestingly, bone residing prostate cancer cells expressing normal or dis-regulated αvβ3 (either inactive of constitutively active), but not those lacking β3 promoted bone gain or afforded protection from bone loss in the presence or absence of histologically detectable tumor 35 days following implantation. As bone is replete with ligands for β3 integrin, we next demonstrated that αvβ3 integrin activation on tumor cells is essential for the recognition of key bone-specific matrix proteins. As a result, prostate cancer cells expressing fully functional but not dis-regulated αvβ3 integrin are able to control their own adherence and migration to bone matrix, functions that facilitate tumor growth and control bone lesion development. PMID:17369840

  8. Metastatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer.gov en español Multimedia Publications Site Map Digital Standards for NCI Websites POLICIES Accessibility Comment Policy Disclaimer FOIA Privacy & Security Reuse & Copyright Syndication Services Website Linking U.S. Department of Health ...

  9. Bone-Targeting Radiopharmaceuticals for the Treatment of Bone-Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Exploring the Implications of New Data

    PubMed Central

    Saylor, Philip J.; Everly, Jason J.; Sartor, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Background. Clinical features of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are characterized by a high incidence of bone metastases, which are associated with impairment of quality of life, pain, skeletal-related events (SREs), and a negative impact on prognosis. Advances in the understanding of cancer cell-bone stroma interactions and molecular mechanisms have recently permitted the development of new agents. Purpose. We review the merits, applications, and limitations of emerging data sets on bone-metastatic CRPC with a focus on radium-223, an α-emitting radiopharmaceutical, and its use in therapy for this disease. Methods. References for this review were identified through searches of PubMed and Medline databases, and only papers published in English were considered. Related links in the databases were reviewed, along with relevant published guidelines, recently published abstracts from major medical meetings, and transcripts from a recent round table of clinical investigators. Results. Prior to radium-223, available bone-targeted therapies demonstrated the ability to delay SREs and palliate bone pain in patients with metastatic CRPC but without evidence of improvement in overall survival (OS). In a randomized controlled phase III trial, radium-223 demonstrated the ability to improve OS and delay SREs in docetaxel-pretreated or docetaxel-unfit men with symptomatic bone-metastatic CRPC and was not associated with significantly more grade 3 or 4 adverse events than placebo. Conclusion. Radium-223 has a targeted effect on bone metastases in CRPC and has an important role in docetaxel-pretreated or docetaxel-unfit men with symptomatic bone-metastatic CRPC. PMID:25232039

  10. Identification of MicroRNAs Inhibiting TGF-β-Induced IL-11 Production in Bone Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pollari, Sirkku; Leivonen, Suvi-Katri; Perälä, Merja; Fey, Vidal; Käkönen, Sanna-Maria; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2012-01-01

    Development of bone metastases is dependent on the cancer cell-bone cell interactions in the bone microenvironment. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is released from bone during osteoclastic bone resorption and induces production of osteolytic factors, such as interleukin 11 (IL-11), in breast cancer cells. IL-11 in turn increases osteolysis by stimulating osteoclast function, launching a vicious cycle of cancer growth and bone destruction. We aimed to identify and functionally characterize microRNAs (miRNAs) that mediate the bone metastatic process, focusing on miRNAs that regulate the TGF-β induction of IL-11. First, we profiled the expression of 455 miRNAs in a highly bone metastatic MDA-MB-231(SA) variant as compared to the parental MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line and found 16 miRNAs (3.5%) having a >3-fold expression difference between the two cell types. We then applied a cell-based overexpression screen with Pre-miRNA constructs to functionally identify miRNAs regulating TGF-β-induced IL-11 production. This analysis pinpointed miR-204, miR-211, and miR-379 as such key regulators. These miRNAs were shown to directly target IL11 by binding to its 3′ UTR. MiR-379 also inhibited Smad2/3/4-mediated transcriptional activity. Gene expression analysis of miR-204 and miR-379-transfected cells indicated that these miRNAs downregulated the expression of several genes involved in TGF-β signaling, including prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2). In addition, there was a significant correlation between the genes downregulated by miR-379 and a set of genes upregulated in basal subtype of breast cancer. Taken together, the functional evidence and clinical correlations imply novel mechanistic links between miRNAs and the key steps in the bone metastatic process in breast cancer, with potential clinical relevance. PMID:22629385

  11. Metastatic tumors in the jaw bones: A retrospective clinicopathological study of 12 cases at Tertiary Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Nawale, Kundan Kisanrao; Vyas, Monika; Kane, Shubhada; Patil, Asawari

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The metastatic disease of the jaw bones is very uncommon and accounts for approximately 1% of all malignancies of jaw. The most common location is molar region of mandible. Metastasis may go undetected on a routine skeletal survey for assessment of metastasis and rarely includes jaw bones. Aims and Objective: The aim of the study is to analyze primary malignancies in metastatic jaw tumors. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively studied clinicopathological features of 12 patients of metastasis to jaw bones diagnosed at tertiary cancer center between 2003 and 2011. All H and E and immunohistochemical slides were reviewed by two pathologists and relevant details were noted. Results: There were eight female and four male patients, with age range 12–71 years with metastases to jaws. All of them involved mandible with one case also showing the involvement of frontal sinuses. The types of metastatic tumors include adenocarcinoma (six cases), papillary thyroid carcinoma (four cases), carcinoma with neuroendocrine differentiation (one case) and neuroblastoma (one case). The diagnosis was made on biopsies in eight cases and on hemimandibulectomy in four cases. The primary site was known at the time of presentation only in four cases, all of them being thyroid carcinomas. Primary site was determined in seven cases after immunohistochemical workup on metastatic tumor and further investigations, whereas the primary site of carcinoma with neuroendocrine differentiation was unknown. Conclusion: Metastasis to jaw bones is rare and may be the first manifestation of unknown primary. A lesion predominantly involving bone with unusual morphology should raise a possibility of metastasis. PMID:27601818

  12. Decreased autocrine EGFR signaling in metastatic breast cancer cells inhibits tumor growth in bone and mammary fat pad.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Nicole K; Mohammad, Khalid S; Gilmore, Jennifer L; Crismore, Erin; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Guise, Theresa A; Foley, John

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis to bone triggers a vicious cycle of tumor growth linked to osteolysis. Breast cancer cells and osteoblasts express the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and produce ErbB family ligands, suggesting participation of these growth factors in autocrine and paracrine signaling within the bone microenvironment. EGFR ligand expression was profiled in the bone metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells (MDA-231), and agonist-induced signaling was examined in both breast cancer and osteoblast-like cells. Both paracrine and autocrine EGFR signaling were inhibited with a neutralizing amphiregulin antibody, PAR34, whereas shRNA to the EGFR was used to specifically block autocrine signaling in MDA-231 cells. The impact of these was evaluated with proliferation, migration and gene expression assays. Breast cancer metastasis to bone was modeled in female athymic nude mice with intratibial inoculation of MDA-231 cells, and cancer cell-bone marrow co-cultures. EGFR knockdown, but not PAR34 treatment, decreased osteoclasts formed in vitro (p<0.01), reduced osteolytic lesion tumor volume (p<0.01), increased survivorship in vivo (p<0.001), and resulted in decreased MDA-231 growth in the fat pad (p<0.01). Fat pad shEGFR-MDA-231 tumors produced in nude mice had increased necrotic areas and decreased CD31-positive vasculature. shEGFR-MDA-231 cells also produced decreased levels of the proangiogenic molecules macrophage colony stimulating factor-1 (MCSF-1) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), both of which were decreased by EGFR inhibitors in a panel of EGFR-positive breast cancer cells. Thus, inhibiting autocrine EGFR signaling in breast cancer cells may provide a means for reducing paracrine factor production that facilitates microenvironment support in the bone and mammary gland. PMID:22276166

  13. Decreased Autocrine EGFR Signaling in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells Inhibits Tumor Growth in Bone and Mammary Fat Pad

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Nicole K.; Mohammad, Khalid S.; Gilmore, Jennifer L.; Crismore, Erin; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Guise, Theresa A.; Foley, John

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis to bone triggers a vicious cycle of tumor growth linked to osteolysis. Breast cancer cells and osteoblasts express the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and produce ErbB family ligands, suggesting participation of these growth factors in autocrine and paracrine signaling within the bone microenvironment. EGFR ligand expression was profiled in the bone metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells (MDA-231), and agonist-induced signaling was examined in both breast cancer and osteoblast-like cells. Both paracrine and autocrine EGFR signaling were inhibited with a neutralizing amphiregulin antibody, PAR34, whereas shRNA to the EGFR was used to specifically block autocrine signaling in MDA-231 cells. The impact of these was evaluated with proliferation, migration and gene expression assays. Breast cancer metastasis to bone was modeled in female athymic nude mice with intratibial inoculation of MDA-231 cells, and cancer cell-bone marrow co-cultures. EGFR knockdown, but not PAR34 treatment, decreased osteoclasts formed in vitro (p<0.01), reduced osteolytic lesion tumor volume (p<0.01), increased survivorship in vivo (p<0.001), and resulted in decreased MDA-231 growth in the fat pad (p<0.01). Fat pad shEGFR-MDA-231 tumors produced in nude mice had increased necrotic areas and decreased CD31-positive vasculature. shEGFR-MDA-231 cells also produced decreased levels of the proangiogenic molecules macrophage colony stimulating factor-1 (MCSF-1) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), both of which were decreased by EGFR inhibitors in a panel of EGFR-positive breast cancer cells. Thus, inhibiting autocrine EGFR signaling in breast cancer cells may provide a means for reducing paracrine factor production that facilitates microenvironment support in the bone and mammary gland. PMID:22276166

  14. [PSK decreased FOLFOX4-induced peripheral neuropathy and bone marrow suppression in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Shibata, Masahiko; Shimura, Tatsuo; Nishina, Yumiko; Gonda, Kenji; Matsuo, Sadanori; Abe, Hideo; Yajima, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Izumi; Ohki, Shinji; Takenoshita, Seiichi

    2011-05-01

    FOLFOX4 has been proven to be effective for metastatic colorectal cancer and is now used as a postoperative adjuvant therapy. However, adverse effects such as cold-sensitive paresthesia and bone marrow suppression are common, and this may necessitate a change of chemotherapy regimen even though FOLFOX is effective. PSK, a polysaccharide derived from mushrooms, has been developed in Japan as an immune-enhancing agent, and is widely used in patients with gastric, colorectal and pulmonary cancer. PSK has also been reported to decrease some adverse effects of chemotherapy. FOLFOX4 combined with PSK was administered to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and the results were evaluated. Eight cycles of FOLFOX4 and PSK (3.0 g/day, po) were given to 25 patients with metastatic (19 hepatic, 3 pulmonary and 3 peritoneal) colorectal cancer. There was no CR (0%), while PR, SD and PD were 48, 36 and 16%, respectively. The response rate was 48%, and the disease control rate was 84%. There were significantly lower frequencies of adverse effects in comparison with published data. Grades 1 and 3 neutropenia occurred in 48 and 24%, respectively, of the patients; grades 1 and 3 nausea in 48 and 4%; and grades 1, 2 and 3 sensory neurotoxicity in 52, 4 and 0%. No patient dropped out due to adverse effect in this study. PSK plus FOLFOX4 seemed to be as effective as FOLFOX4 monotherapy as has been published, and significantly less toxic. These results suggest that this combination therapy may be more effective than FOLFOX4 monotherapy when given over a longer period, with a lower incidence of adverse effects. PMID:21566440

  15. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  16. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another part of the body is more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 ...

  17. New 3D-Culture Approaches to Study Interactions of Bone Marrow Adipocytes with Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Herroon, Mackenzie Katheryn; Diedrich, Jonathan Driscoll; Podgorski, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    tumor cells with adipocytes. Our models underline the importance of using the appropriate culture conditions to mimic physiological interactions between marrow adipocytes and metastatic tumor cells. These systems have a potential to be utilized for analyses of various factors that may be regulated by the adipocytes in bone. Their application likely extends beyond metastatic prostate cancer to other tumors that colonize the bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:27458427

  18. Curing Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sledge, George W

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is generally considered incurable, and this colors doctor-patient interactions for patients with metastatic disease. Although true for most patients, there appear to be important exceptions, instances where long-term disease-free survival occurs. Although these instances are few in number, they suggest the possibility of cure. How will we move toward cure for a much larger population of patients with metastatic disease? This article outlines a potential research agenda that might move us toward that distant goal. PMID:26759458

  19. Metastatic breast cancer cells in the bone marrow microenvironment: novel insights into oncoprotection

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shyam A.; Dave, Meneka A.; Murthy, Raghav G.; Helmy, Karim Y.

    2011-01-01

    Among all cancers, malignancies of the breast are the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States after carcinoma of the lung. One of the major factors considered when assessing the prognosis of breast cancer patients is whether the tumor has metastasized to distant organs. Although the exact phenotype of the malignant cells responsible for metastasis and dormancy is still unknown, growing evidence has revealed that they may have stem cell-like properties that may account for resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. One process that has been attributed to primary tumor metastasis is the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. In this review, we specifically discuss breast cancer dissemination to the bone marrow and factors that ultimately serve to shelter and promote tumor growth, including the complex relationship between mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and various aspects of the immune system, carcinoma-associated fibroblasts, and the diverse components of the tumor microenvironment. A better understanding of the journey from the primary tumor site to the bone marrow and subsequently the oncoprotective role of MSCs and other factors within that microenvironment can potentially lead to development of novel therapeutic targets. PMID:21776337

  20. Vaccine Therapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Hormone-Resistant, Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-22

    Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  1. Radium-223 chloride: a potential new treatment for castration-resistant prostate cancer patients with metastatic bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Michael R; Wong, Terence Z; Armstrong, Andrew J; George, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Background Radium-223 chloride (223Ra; Alpharadin) is an alpha-emitting radioisotope that targets areas of osteoblastic metastasis and is excreted by the small intestine. When compared with beta-emitters (eg, strontium-89, samarium-153), 223Ra delivers a high quantity of energy per track length with short tissue penetration. Objective This review describes the mechanism, radiobiology, and preclinical development of 223Ra and discusses the clinical data currently available regarding its safety and efficacy profile. Methods Data from clinical trials including abstracts were collected and reviewed using the PubMed Database, as well as the American Society of Clinical Oncology abstract database. Conclusion Current bone-targeted therapies fall into two main categories: antiresorptive agents (eg, zoledronic acid, denosumab), which have been shown to delay skeletal-related events, and radiopharmaceuticals (eg, samarium-153), which may have a role in pain palliation. Historically, neither antiresorptive agents nor radiopharmaceuticals have shown definitive evidence of improved overall survival or other antitumor effects in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Radiopharmaceuticals are limited by myelosuppresion, thrombocytopenia, and renal excretion. In a recently reported randomized Phase III trial in men with symptomatic bone-metastatic CRPC who had received or were ineligible for docetaxel chemotherapy, 223Ra treatment resulted in improved overall survival and delayed skeletal-related events. Toxicity consisted of minor gastrointestinal side effects and mild neutropenia and thrombocytopenia that were rarely severe. Pending regulatory approval, 223Ra may represent a unique and distinct option for an important subgroup of patients with mCRPC; future trials should address its use in combination or in sequence with existing and novel agents. PMID:23326203

  2. Targeting of Runx2 by miRNA-135 and miRNA-203 Impairs Progression of Breast Cancer and Metastatic Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taipaleenmäki, Hanna; Browne, Gillian; Akech, Jacqueline; Zustin, Jozef; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.; Hesse, Eric; Stein, Gary S.; Lian, Jane B.

    2015-01-01

    Progression of breast cancer to metastatic bone disease is linked to deregulated expression of the transcription factor Runx2. Therefore, our goal was to evaluate the potential for clinical use of Runx2-targeting microRNAs (miRNAs) to reduce tumor growth and bone metastatic burden. Expression analysis of a panel of miRNAs regulating Runx2 revealed a reciprocal relationship between the abundance of Runx2 protein and two miRNAs, miR-135 and miR-203. These miRNAs are highly expressed in normal breast epithelial cells where Runx2 is not detected, and absent in metastatic breast cancer cells and tissue biopsies that express Runx2. Reconstituting metastatic MDA-MB-231-Luc cells with miR-135 and miR-203 reduced the abundance of Runx2 and expression of the metastasis-promoting Runx2 target genes IL-11, MMP-13, and PTHrP. Additionally, tumor cell viability was decreased and migration suppressed in vitro. Orthotopic implantation of MDA-MB-231-luc cells delivered with miR-135 or miR-203, followed by an intratumoral administration of the synthetic miRNAs reduced the tumor growth and spontaneous metastasis to bone. Furthermore, intratibial injection of these miRNA-delivered cells impaired tumor growth in the bone environment and inhibited bone resorption. Importantly, reconstitution of Runx2 in MDA-MB-231-luc cells delivered with miR-135 and miR-203 reversed the inhibitory effect of the miRNAs on tumor growth and metastasis. Thus, we have identified that aberrant expression of Runx2 in aggressive tumor cells is related to the loss of specific Runx2-targeting miRNAs and that a clinically relevant replacement strategy by delivery of synthetic miRNAs is a candidate therapeutic approach to prevent metastatic bone disease by this route. PMID:25634212

  3. Histomorphometric and microarchitectural analyses using the 2 mm bone marrow trephine in metastatic breast cancer patients–preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Fralick, M.; Bouganim, N.; Kremer, R.; Kekre, N.; Robertson, S.; Vandermeer, L.; Kuchuk, I.; Li, J.; Murshed, M.; Clemons, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bone-targeted agents are widely used for the treatment of osteoporosis, the prevention of cancer-therapy induced bone loss, and for reducing the risk of skeletal related events in patients with metastatic disease. Despite widespread use, relatively little is known about the in vivo effect of these agents on bone homeostasis, bone quality, and bone architecture in humans. Traditionally bone quality has been assessed using a transiliac bone biopsy with a 7 mm “Bordier” core needle. We examined the possibility of using a 2 mm “Jamshidi” core needle as a more practical and less invasive method to assess bone turnover and potentially other tumor effects. Methods A pilot study on the feasibility of assessing bone quality and microarchitecture and tumor invasion using a 2 mm bone marrow trephine was conducted. Patients underwent a posterior trans-iliac trephine biopsy and bone marrow aspirate. Samples were analyzed for bone microarchitecture, bone density, and histomorphometry. The study plan was to accrue three patients with advanced breast cancer to assess the feasibility of the study before enrolling more patients. Results The procedure was well tolerated. The sample quality was excellent to analyze bone trabecular microarchitecture using both microCT and histomorphometry. Intense osteoclastic activity was observed in a patient with extensive tumor burden in bone despite intravenous bisphosphonate therapy. Discussion Given the success of this study for assessing bone microarchitecture, bone density, and histomorphometry assessment using a 2 mm needle the study will be expanded beyond these initial three patients for longitudinal assessment of bone-targeted therapy. PMID:26909259

  4. Metastatic thymoma involving the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Wenceslao, Stella; Krause, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, thymomas can be involved in a considerable variety of clinical presentations. Clinicians should be mindful of the breadth of associations with other diseases, including autoimmune disorders and many secondary nonthymic malignancies. For the pathologist, knowledge of the extremely varied histopathologic presentation of thymoma is vital to formulate a proper differential, workup, and diagnosis. The presented case illustrates the finding of very rare metastatic thymoma involvement of bone marrow, identified during evaluation for pancytopenia. The history of prior prostate cancer and an uncharacterized pancreatic lesion, as well as the familial presentation, also suggests a possible underlying hereditary syndrome. PMID:26722174

  5. MK591, a second generation leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitor, prevents invasion and induces apoptosis in the bone-invading C4-2B human prostate cancer cells: implications for the treatment of castration-resistant, bone-metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sarveswaran, Sivalokanathan; Ghosh, Ritisha; Morisetty, Shravan; Ghosh, Jagadananda

    2015-01-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a major clinical challenge for which no cure is currently available primarily because of the lack of proper understanding about appropriate molecular target(s). Previously we observed that inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-Lox) activity induces apoptosis in some types of prostate cancer cells, suggesting an important role of 5-Lox in the viability of prostate cancer cells. However, nothing is known about the role of 5-Lox in the survival of castration-resistant, metastatic prostate cancer cells. Thus, we tested the effects of MK591, a second-generation, specific inhibitor of 5-Lox activity, on the viability and metastatic characteristics of CRPC cells. We observed that MK591 effectively kills the bone-invading C4-2B human prostate cancer cells (which bear characteristics of CRPC), but does not affect normal, non-cancer fibroblasts (which do not express 5-Lox) in the same experimental conditions. We also observed that MK591 dramatically inhibits the in vitro invasion and soft-agar colony formation of C4-2B cells. Interestingly, we found that treatment with MK591 dramatically down-regulates the expression of c-Myc and its targets at sub-lethal doses. In light of frequent over-activation of c-Myc in a spectrum of aggressive cancers (including CRPC), and the challenges associated with inhibition of c-Myc (because of its non-enzymatic nature), our novel findings of selective killing, and blockade of invasive and soft-agar colony-forming abilities of the castration-resistant, bone-metastatic C4-2B prostate cancer cells by MK591, open up a new avenue to attack CRPC cells for better management of advanced prostate cancer while sparing normal, non-cancer body cells. PMID:25875826

  6. Bone marrow as a metastatic niche for disseminated tumor cells from solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, Yusuke; Eber, Matthew R; Berry, Janice E; Taichman, Russell S

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow is a heterogeneous organ containing diverse cell types, and it is a preferred metastatic site for several solid tumors such as breast and prostate cancer. Recently, it has been shown that bone metastatic cancer cells interact with the bone marrow microenvironment to survive and grow, and thus this microenvironment is referred to as the ‘metastatic niche'. Once cancer cells spread to distant organs such as bone, the prognosis for the patient is generally poor. There is an urgent need to establish a greater understanding of the mechanisms whereby the bone marrow niche influences bone metastasis. Here we discuss insights into the contribution of the bone marrow ‘metastatic niche' to progression of bone metastatic disease, with a particular focus on cells of hematopoietic and mesenchymal origin. PMID:26029360

  7. Metastatic Sites Predict Prostate Cancer Survival.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    A new meta-analysis of clinical trial data from patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer indicates that overall survival is strongly influenced by where the disease spreads. Men with visceral disease-liver or lung metastases-fare worse than those with bone or lymph node involvement. PMID:27001152

  8. [Metastatic bone disease. Strategies for imaging].

    PubMed

    Scutellari, P N; Antinolfi, G; Galeotti, R; Giganti, M

    2003-04-01

    Skeletal metastases represent the most common malignant bone tumor. They occur mainly in adults and even more frequently in the elderly. The most common metastases in men are from prostate cancer (60%) and in women from breast cancer (70%). Other primitive tumors responsible for bone metastases are: lung, kidney, thyroid, alimentary tract, bladder, and skin. The spine and pelvis are the most common metastatic sites, due to the presence of red (haematopoietic active) bone marrow in a high amount. As a general rule, the radiographic pattern was lytic type; other aspects were osteosclerotic, mixed, lytic vs mixed and osteosclerotic vs lytic patterns. The main symptom is pain, although many bone metastases are asymptomatic. The most severe consequences are pathologic fractures and cord compression. Clinical evaluation of patients with skeletal metastases needs multimodal diagnostic imaging, able to detect lesions, to assess their extension and localization, and eventually drive the biopsy (for histo-morphological diagnosis). These techniques give different performances in terms of sensitivity and specificity; but none of the modalities alone seems to be adequate to yield a reliable diagnostic outcome. Therefore multidisciplinary cooperation is required to optimize the screening, clinical management and follow-up of the patients. In other terms, what is the efficacy of these new diagnostic tests compared to the "older" diagnostic tests? Frequently the new procedures do not replace the older one, but it is added to the diagnostic workup, thereby increasing costs without impacting the "patient's condition". The aim of the present work is to propose an "algorithm" for the detection and diagnosis of skeletal metastases, which may be applied differently in symptomatic and asymptomatic oncologic patients. Bone scintigraphy remains the first choice technique in the evaluation of asymptomatic patients, in whom skeletal metastases are supposed. Although it has a high sensitivity

  9. Colorectal Cancer with Uncommon Metastatic Spread

    PubMed Central

    Dellavedova, Luca; Calcagno, Anna; Roncoroni, Lucia; Maffioli, Lorenzo Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of bone metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) is quite low and the presence of isolated osseous metastases at the time of diagnosis or the onset of bone metastases without other organ involvement during follow-up is even lower. Here, we present an interesting case of diffuse skeletal metastases from CRC in which both the atypical presentation of the metastatic spread and the presence of infective comorbidities created some troubles in getting the final diagnosis. PMID:26420997

  10. Doxorubicin-poly (ethylene glycol)-alendronate self-assembled micelles for targeted therapy of bone metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Wei-liang; Zhao, Yi-pu; Li, Huai-qiu; Na, Ren; Li, Fei; Mei, Qi-bing; Zhao, Ming-gao; Zhou, Si-yuan

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the therapeutic effect of doxorubicin (DOX) on bone metastases, a multifunctional micelle was developed by combining pH-sensitive characteristics with bone active targeting capacity. The DOX loaded micelle was self-assembled by using doxorubicin-poly (ethylene glycol)-alendronate (DOX-hyd-PEG-ALN) as an amphiphilic material. The size and drug loading of DOX loaded DOX-hyd-PEG-ALN micelle was 114 nm and 24.3%. In pH 5.0 phosphate buffer solution (PBS), the micelle released DOX significantly faster than in pH 7.4 PBS. In addition, with the increase of incubation time, more red DOX fluorescence was observed in tumor cells and trafficked from cytoplasm to nucleus. The IC50 of DOX loaded DOX-hyd-PEG-ALN micelle on A549 cells was obviously lower than that of free DOX in 48 h. Furthermore, the in vivo image experimental results indicated that a larger amount of DOX was accumulated in the bone metastatic tumor tissue after DOX loaded DOX-hyd-PEG-ALN micelle was intravenously administered, which was confirmed by histological analysis. Finally, DOX loaded DOX-hyd-PEG-ALN micelle effectively delayed the tumor growth, decreased the bone loss and reduced the cardiac toxicity in tumor-bearing nude mice as compared with free DOX. In conclusion, DOX loaded DOX-hyd-PEG-ALN micelle had potential in treating bone metastatic tumor. PMID:26419507

  11. ACR appropriateness criteria on metastatic bone disease.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Catherine C; Daffner, Richard H; Weissman, Barbara N; Bancroft, Laura; Bennett, D Lee; Blebea, Judy S; Bruno, Michael A; Fries, Ian Blair; Germano, Isabelle M; Holly, Langston; Jacobson, Jon A; Luchs, Jonathan S; Morrison, William B; Olson, Jeffrey J; Payne, William K; Resnik, Charles S; Schweitzer, Mark E; Seeger, Leanne L; Taljanovic, Mihra; Wise, James N; Lutz, Stephen T

    2010-06-01

    Appropriate imaging modalities for screening, staging, and surveillance of patients with suspected and documented metastatic disease to bone include (99m)Tc bone scanning, MRI, CT, radiography, and 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose-PET. Clinical scenarios reviewed include asymptomatic stage 1 breast carcinoma, symptomatic stage 2 breast carcinoma, abnormal bone scan results with breast carcinoma, pathologic fracture with known metastatic breast carcinoma, asymptomatic well-differentiated and poorly differentiated prostate carcinoma, vertebral fracture with history of malignancy, non-small-cell lung carcinoma staging, symptomatic multiple myeloma, osteosarcoma staging and surveillance, and suspected bone metastasis in a pregnant patient. No single imaging modality is consistently best for the assessment of metastatic bone disease across all tumor types and clinical situations. In some cases, no imaging is indicated. The recommendations contained herein are the result of evidence-based consensus by the ACR Appropriateness Criteria((R)) Expert Panel on Musculoskeletal Radiology. PMID:20522392

  12. [Metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Gravis, Gwenaelle; Salem, Naji; Walz, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    The prostate cancer in its hormone-sensitive metastatic presentation is infrequent, it is either an initial presentation of the disease or an evolution after local treatment, without castration of the biological relapse. The surgical or biological castration remains the cornerstone of the treatment. The deadline of castration initiation and its modalities of administration, intermittent or continuous rest debated but consensual on the initiation is the appearance of the symptomatic disease. The chemotherapy by docetaxel in association with the castration increases significantly the survival of the patients having a high tumoral volume. The efficacy on the whole metastatic population requires additional analyses. Clinical prognostic factors as the bone localizations (axial or appendicular), the visceral involvement (liver, lung) are determining for the survival of these patients. Biological prognostic factors are in evaluation. Except the clodronate acid, which showed a survival improvement in the hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer (HSMPC), the other treatments targeting the bone (zoledronic acid, rank-ligand inhibitor) demonstrated a benefit only in castrate resistant metastatic prostate cancer (MCRPC). The management of local disease lets suggest a benefit to at least symptomatic disease, but it requires to be estimated prospectively in clinical trials. The new hormonal treatments targeting the androgen receptor in CPMRC are in evaluation in CPMHS. The objective is to increase the survival and the quality of life of the CPMHS and to delay the evolution towards the castration resistant metastatic disease. PMID:25609491

  13. 18F-FDG PET/CT and pain in metastatic bone cancer

    PubMed Central

    Struck, Aaron F; Muzahir, Saima; Hall, Lance T

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine if the pain intensity of patients with oncologic bone metastases (BM) correlates with metabolic activity measured by 18F-FDG PET/CT. Twenty-eight patients, ages: 21-89 years (mean: 58.8) with BM were included in the study between September 2011 to September 2013. All patients completed a detailed questionnaire regarding pain symptoms on the visual analog scale (VAS), analgesic use, and areas of chronic pain, prior to obtaining an 18F-FDG PET/CT. Pain symptoms were queried for 11 body regions including limbs, head, torso, etc. and the corresponding SUVmax of BMs within that region were modeled with the corresponding clinical data using a linear mixed effects model and a linear regression model. Overall 64 areas in the 28 subjects were found to have BM. SUVmax was found to be a significant predictor of pain intensity as measured by the VAS, with a P-value of 0.045, with a modest effect-size on linear regression of R2 of 0.11. PMID:26069862

  14. A preliminary study of pamidronic acid downregulation of angiogenic factors IGF-1/PECAM-1 expression in circulating level in bone metastatic breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zeng; Lei, Lei; Cai, Xin-jun; Chen, Ling Ya; Yuan, Meiqin; Yang, Guonong; Huang, Ping; Wang, Xiaojia

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the expressions of circulating angiogenic factors affected by pamidronic acid (PA) intravenous infusion in bone metastatic breast cancer patients and the impact on their prognosis. Methods Peripheral blood of ten bone metastatic breast cancer patients was collected for serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 expression detection just before and 2 days after PA infusion. Results Both IGF-1 and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 concentrations decreased after PA treatment for 48 hours (P<0.05). Modification was defined as >20% decrease recorded 2 days after PA administration. The decrease of IGF-1 was more significant in breast cancer patients who had received previous hormonotherapy. Moreover, the progression-free survival of first-line chemotherapy treatment of IGF-1 modified patients was longer than that of IGF-1 unmodified patients (P=0.009). Conclusion PA treatment could suppress circulating serum IGF-1 and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 concentrations; moreover, the prognosis of patients in IGF-1 unmodified group was relatively poor. PMID:27307756

  15. The Inhibitory Effects of Forsythia Koreana Extracts on the Metastatic Ability of Breast Cancer Cells and Bone Resorption by Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Li; Lee, Sun Kyoung; Park, Kwang-Kyun; Chung, Won-Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common malignant disease in women. The patients with advanced breast cancer develop metastasis to bone. Bone metastasis and skeletal-related events by breast cancer are frequently associated with the invasiveness of breast cancer cells and osteoclasts-mediated bone resorption. Forsythia koreana is used in oriental traditional medicine to treat asthma, atopy, and allergic diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effects of F. koreana extracts on the invasion of breast cancer cells and bone resorption by osteoclasts. Methods: Cell viability was measured by an MTT assay and the migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells were detected by a Boyden chamber assay. The formation of osteoclasts and pit was detected using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining and calcium phosphate-coated plates, respectively. The activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cathepsin K were evaluated by gelatin zymography and a cathepsin K detection kit. Results: The fruit and leaf extracts of F. koreana significantly inhibited the invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells at noncytotoxic concentrations. The fruit extract of F. koreana reduced the transforming growth factor β1-induced migration, invasion and MMPs activities of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, the fruit, branch, and leaf extracts of F. koreana also inhibited the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand-induced osteoclast formation and osteoclast-mediated bone-resorbing activity by reducing the activities of MMPs and cathepsin K. Conclusions: The extracts of F. koreana may possess the potential to inhibit the breast cancer-induced bone destruction through blocking invasion of breast cancer cells, osteoclastogenesis, and the activity of mature osteoclasts. PMID:27390737

  16. Sorafenib for Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared sorafenib (Nexavar®) and a placebo for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer that is no longer responding to treatment with radioactive iodine

  17. Orthotopic non-metastatic and metastatic oral cancer mouse models.

    PubMed

    Bais, Manish V; Kukuruzinska, Maria; Trackman, Philip C

    2015-05-01

    Oral cancer is characterized by high morbidity and mortality with a predisposition to metastasize to different tissues, including lung, liver, and bone. Despite progress in the understanding of mutational profiles and deregulated pathways in oral cancer, patient survival has not significantly improved over the past decades. Therefore, there is a need to establish in vivo models that recapitulate human oral cancer metastasis to evaluate therapeutic potential of novel drugs. Here we report orthotopic tongue cancer nude mouse models to study oral cancer growth and metastasis using human metastatic (UMSCC2) and non-metastatic (CAL27) cell lines, respectively. Transduction of these cell lines with lentivirus expressing red fluorescent protein (DsRed) followed by injection into tongues of immunodeficient mice generated orthotopic tongue tumors that could be monitored for growth and metastasis by fluorescence measurement with an in vivo Imaging System (IVIS 200). The growth rates of CAL27-DsRed induced tumors were higher than UMSCC2-DsRed tumors after day 15, while UMSCC2-DsRed tumors revealed metastasis beginning on day 21. Importantly, UMSCC2 tumors metastasized to a number of tissues including the submandibular gland, lung, kidney, liver, and bone. Further, immunohistochemical analyses of tongue tumors induced by CAL27 and UMSCC2 cells revealed elevated expression of components of protumorigenic pathways deregulated in human cancers, including Cyclin D1, PCNA, Ki-67, LSD1, LOXL2, MT-MMP1, DPAGT1, E-cadherin, OCT4A, and H3K4me1/2. These orthotopic mouse models are likely to be useful tools for gaining insights into the activity and mechanisms of novel oral cancer drug candidates. PMID:25682387

  18. Effects of letrozole on breast cancer micro-metastatic tumor growth in bone and lung in mice inoculated with murine 4T1 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendan; Belosay, Aashvini; Yang, Xujuan; Hartman, James A; Song, Huaxin; Iwaniec, Urszula T; Turner, Russell T; Churchwell, Mona I; Doerge, Daniel R; Helferich, William G

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the leading cancer in women worldwide. Metastasis occurs in stage IV BC with bone and lung being common metastatic sites. Here we evaluate the effects of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole on BC micro-metastatic tumor growth in bone and lung metastasis in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) mice with murine estrogen receptor negative (ER-) BC cells inoculated in tibia. Forty-eight BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to one of four groups: OVX, OVX + Letrozole, Intact, and Intact + Letrozole, and injected with 4T1 cells intra-tibially. Letrozole was subcutaneously injected daily for 23 days at a dose of 1.75 µg/g body weight. Tumor progression was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Following necropsy, inoculated tibiae were scanned via µCT and bone response to tumor was scored from 0 (no ectopic mineralization/osteolysis) to 5 (extensive ectopic mineralization/osteolysis). OVX mice had higher tibial pathology scores indicative of more extensive bone destruction than intact mice, irrespective of letrozole treatment. Letrozole decreased serum estradiol levels and reduced lung surface tumor numbers in intact animals. Furthermore, mice receiving letrozole had significantly fewer tumor colonies and fewer proliferative cells in the lung than OVX and intact controls based on H&E and Ki-67 staining, respectively. In conclusion, BC-inoculated OVX animals had higher tibia pathology scores than BC-inoculated intact animals and letrozole reduced BC metastases to lungs. These findings suggest that, by lowering systemic estrogen level and/or by interacting with the host organ, the aromatase inhibitor letrozole has the potential to reduce ER- BC metastasis to lung. PMID:27209469

  19. Type I Saikosaponins A and D Inhibit Osteoclastogenesis in Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages and Osteolytic Activity of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji-Eun; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Ki-Rim; Lee, Sun Kyoung; Park, Junhee; Kim, Hyungkeun; Park, Kwang-Kyun; Chung, Won-Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Many osteopenic disorders, including a postmenopausal osteoporosis and lytic bone metastasis in breast and prostate cancers, are linked with a hyperosteoclast activity due to increased receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) expression in osteoblastic/stromal cells. Therefore, inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast-induced bone resorption is an important approach in controlling pathophysiology of these skeletal diseases. We found that, of seven type I, II, and III saikosaponins isolated from Bupleurum falcatum, saikosaponins A and D, type I saikosaponins with an allyl oxide linkage between position 13 and 28 and two carbohydrate chains that are directly attached to the hydroxyl groups in position 3, exhibited the most potent inhibition on RANKL-induced osteoclast formation at noncytotoxic concentrations. The stereochemistry of the hydroxyl group at C16 did not affect their activity. Saikosaponins A and D inhibited the formation of resorptive pits by reducing the secreted levels of matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) 2, MMP-9, and cathepsin K in RANKL-induced osteoclasts. Additionally, saikosaponins A and D inhibited mRNA expression of parathyroid hormone-related protein as well as cell viability and invasion in metastatic human breast cancer cells. Thus, saikosaponins A and D can serve as a beneficial agent for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis and cancer-induced bone loss. PMID:25892999

  20. Intravenous pamidronate versus oral and intravenous clodronate in bone metastatic breast cancer: a randomized, open-label, non-inferiority Phase III trial

    PubMed Central

    von Au, Alexandra; Milloth, Eva; Diel, Ingo; Stefanovic, Stefan; Hennigs, Andre; Wallwiener, Markus; Heil, Joerg; Golatta, Michael; Rom, Joachim; Sohn, Christof; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Schuetz, Florian; Domschke, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with metastasized breast cancer often suffer from discomfort caused by metastatic bone disease. Thus, osteoprotection is an important part of therapy in breast cancer metastasized to bone, and bisphosphonates (BPs) are a major therapeutic option. In this study, our objectives were to compare the side effects of oral versus intravenous BP treatment and to assess their clinical effectiveness. Patients and methods In this prospective randomized, open-label, non-inferiority trial, we enrolled breast cancer patients with at least one bone metastasis and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0–2. Patients were randomly assigned to one of the three treatment groups: A, 60 mg pamidronate intravenously q3w; B-iv, 900 mg clodronate intravenously q3w; and B-o, 2,400 mg oral clodronate daily. Assessments were performed at baseline and every 3 months thereafter. Results Between 1995 and 1999, 321 patients with confirmed bone metastases from breast cancer were included in the study. At first follow-up, gastrointestinal (GI) tract side effects were most common, and adverse effects on the GI tract were more frequent in the oral treatment group (P=0.002 and P<0.001, respectively). There were no statistically significant differences among the treatment cohorts for other documented side effects (skin, serum electrolytes, urinary tract, immune system, and others). No significant differences in clinical effectiveness of BP treatment, as assessed by pain score, were detected among the groups; however, pathologic fractures were more effectively prevented by intravenous than oral BP administration (P=0.03). Noncompliance rates were similar among the study cohorts. Conclusion We conclude that oral BP treatment is significantly associated with higher rates of adverse GI side effects. Additionally, our data indicate that intravenous BP administration is more effective than oral treatment in prevention of pathologic fractures; hence, oral

  1. Harnessing the bone-seeking ability of Ca(ii)-like metal ions in the treatment of metastatic cancer and resorption disorders.

    PubMed

    Weekes, D M; Orvig, C

    2016-04-21

    Metal ions are naturally retained by skeletal tissues in living systems because of their high affinity for the hydroxyapatite-like mineral matrix that makes up cortical bone. This is particularly true for metal ions that bear a close resemblance to calcium(ii) (such as the lanthanides or alkaline earth metals), and in a few key cases this targeting ability has been exploited in order to develop medicinal agents that are intended to treat bones which have become diseased. In this review, we focus on two areas where this has been particularly effective: first is in the diagnosis and therapy of metastatic bone cancer, in which radioactive metal ions including (99m)Tc, (153)Sm, and (223)Ra are used to image, alleviate, and ablate harmful cancerous legions with good specificity versus healthy tissues; second is the use of trivalent lanthanides to treat osteoporosis, an emerging concept which has gathered significance over the last 15 years, and is now entering preclinical trials with carefully designed systems. PMID:26853513

  2. Non-specifically labelled cells that simulate bone marrow metastases in patients with non-metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Lagrange, M; Ferrero, J M; Lagrange, J L; Machiavello, J C; Monticelli, J; Bayle, C; Creisson, A; Namer, M; Thyss, A; Bourcier, C; Gioanni, J; Schneider, M

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To determine whether the presence of disseminated bone marrow tumour cells at diagnosis is a prognostic factor for breast cancer patients at high risk of recurrence or bone metastasis, and to assess their presence as a criterion for evaluation of the potential benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy. METHODS: Multiple bone marrow aspirates from 72 breast cancer patients free from metastasis were obtained during surgery at the time of diagnosis and were tested immunologically by alkaline phosphatase antialkaline phosphatase technique with a panel of three antiepithelial monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) KL1, EMA, and HMFG2. RESULTS: In nine of 72 patients, with each MoAb tested, numerous strongly positive cells always isolated were observed. However, it was demonstrated that these cells were non-specifically labelled and could be found in normal controls. CONCLUSIONS: There was no evidence of marrow tumour cells in 72 operable breast cancer patients. It is suggested that published results may be greatly overestimated and that non-specific labelling may be undetected. More specific MoAb should be found and a correlation with molecular biology should be performed if this criterion is to be considered as a prognostic factor. Images PMID:9155670

  3. Cancer-associated bone disease.

    PubMed

    Rizzoli, R; Body, J-J; Brandi, M-L; Cannata-Andia, J; Chappard, D; El Maghraoui, A; Glüer, C C; Kendler, D; Napoli, N; Papaioannou, A; Pierroz, D D; Rahme, M; Van Poznak, C H; de Villiers, T J; El Hajj Fuleihan, G

    2013-12-01

    Bone is commonly affected in cancer. Cancer-induced bone disease results from the primary disease, or from therapies against the primary condition, causing bone fragility. Bone-modifying agents, such as bisphosphonates and denosumab, are efficacious in preventing and delaying cancer-related bone disease. With evidence-based care pathways, guidelines assist physicians in clinical decision-making. Of the 57 million deaths in 2008 worldwide, almost two thirds were due to non-communicable diseases, led by cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Bone is a commonly affected organ in cancer, and although the incidence of metastatic bone disease is not well defined, it is estimated that around half of patients who die from cancer in the USA each year have bone involvement. Furthermore, cancer-induced bone disease can result from the primary disease itself, either due to circulating bone resorbing substances or metastatic bone disease, such as commonly occurs with breast, lung and prostate cancer, or from therapies administered to treat the primary condition thus causing bone loss and fractures. Treatment-induced osteoporosis may occur in the setting of glucocorticoid therapy or oestrogen deprivation therapy, chemotherapy-induced ovarian failure and androgen deprivation therapy. Tumour skeletal-related events include pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, surgery and radiotherapy to bone and may or may not include hypercalcaemia of malignancy while skeletal complication refers to pain and other symptoms. Some evidence demonstrates the efficacy of various interventions including bone-modifying agents, such as bisphosphonates and denosumab, in preventing or delaying cancer-related bone disease. The latter includes treatment of patients with metastatic skeletal lesions in general, adjuvant treatment of breast and prostate cancer in particular, and the prevention of cancer-associated bone disease. This has led to the development of guidelines by several societies and

  4. [Palliative radiotherapy for metastatic bone tumor].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kenji; Hiratsuka, Junichi

    2006-04-01

    Bone metastases are one of the most common conditions requiring radiation therapy today. Its main aim is relief of bone pain, prevention of pathological bone fractures as well as its healing, with anticipated effect upon improving mobility, function, and quality of life. For localized bone pain, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) will be successful in reducing pain in some 80% of patients. However, optimal fraction dose and total doses of EBRT required for pain relief have been unknown. According to the recent reports, carbon ion radiotherapy seems to be a safe and effective modality in the management of metastatic bone tumor not eligible for conventional EBRT. For scattered painful metastases, the systemic administration of radioisotopes is thought to be effective. PMID:16582516

  5. Bone resorption facilitates osteoblastic bone metastatic colonization by cooperation of insulin-like growth factor and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kuchimaru, Takahiro; Hoshino, Takuya; Aikawa, Tomoya; Yasuda, Hisataka; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Kadonosono, Tetsuya; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae

    2014-05-01

    Bone metastasis is a multistep process that includes cancer cell dissemination, colonization, and metastatic growth. Furthermore, this process involves complex, reciprocal interactions between cancer cells and the bone microenvironment. Bone resorption is known to be involved in both osteolytic and osteoblastic bone metastasis. However, the precise roles of the bone resorption in the multistep process of osteoblastic bone metastasis remain unidentified. In this study, we show that bone resorption plays important roles in cancer cell colonization during the initial stage of osteoblastic bone metastasis. We applied bioluminescence/X-ray computed tomography multimodal imaging that allows us to spatiotemporally analyze metastasized cancer cells and bone status in osteoblastic bone metastasis models. We found that treatment with receptor activator of factor-κB ligand (RANKL) increased osteoblastic bone metastasis when given at the same time as intracardiac injection of cancer cells, but failed to increase metastasis when given 4 days after cancer cell injection, suggesting that RANKL-induced bone resorption facilitates growth of cancer cells colonized in the bone. We show that insulin-like growth factor-1 released from the bone during bone resorption and hypoxia-inducible factor activity in cancer cells cooperatively promoted survival and proliferation of cancer cells in bone marrow. These results suggest a mechanism that bone resorption and hypoxic stress in the bone microenvironment cooperatively play an important role in establishing osteoblastic metastasis. PMID:24597654

  6. Immunotherapy for metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Charles G.

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy with docetaxel is the standard treatment for men with metastatic prostate cancer, and results in statistically significant improvements in survival, as well as in quality of life. However, the response rate to single-agent docetaxel is approximately 40% to 45%, emphasizing a need for alternative approaches. More significantly, with the onset of early, PSA-based detection of prostate cancer and closer follow-up, many men present with metastatic disease that remains asymptomatic. For such patients, the side effects of chemotherapy would compromise their current performance status and, thus, a nontoxic, early treatment option that could improve overall survival would be highly desirable. Immunotherapy represents one such approach; a number of clinical trials have suggested a survival benefit for immunotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer and confirmed that these agents are generally well-tolerated. As is the case for chemotherapy, it is doubtful that maximal survival benefit will be achieved with single-agent immunotherapy; experimental treatments in which mechanistically distinct immunotherapy approaches are combined, as well as approaches in which immunotherapy is combined with chemotherapy or hormonal therapy are currently under investigation. This review will discuss the mechanisms of action of several immunotherapy approaches for metastatic prostate cancer, focusing on active immunotherapy as opposed to administration of anti-tumor antibodies. The relative advantages and disadvantages of current approaches will be noted, and ongoing clinical trials will be highlighted. PMID:18593624

  7. Positive Influence of 177Lu PSMA-617 Therapy on Bone Marrow Depression Caused by Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schlenkhoff, Carl Diedrich; Gaertner, Florian; Essler, Markus; Schmidt, Matthias; Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat

    2016-06-01

    A 75-year-old man with castrate-resistant prostate cancer and increasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level developed severe bone marrow depression during Ra radionuclide therapy. Because of this, he was treated with Lu-PSMA in compassionate use for this not-yet-approved therapy. At the beginning of Lu-PSMA therapy, repeated blood transfusions (BT) were necessary. Six months after the last BT, after 3 cycles of Lu-PSMA, his blood count stabilized. He required no further BTs and his PSA level remained lowered. PMID:26909716

  8. Increased regucalcin gene expression extends survival in breast cancer patients: Overexpression of regucalcin suppresses the proliferation and metastatic bone activity in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi; Osuka, Satoru; Weitzmann, M Neale; Shoji, Mamoru; Murata, Tomiyasu

    2016-08-01

    Human breast cancer is highly metastatic to bone and drives bone turnover. Breast cancer metastases cause osteolytic lesions and skeletal damage that leads to bone fractures. Regucalcin, which plays a pivotal role as an inhibitor of signal transduction and transcription activity, has been suggested to act as a suppressor of human cancer. In the present study, we compared the clinical outcome between 44 breast cancer patients with higher regucalcin expression and 43 patients with lower regucalcin expression. Prolonged relapse-free survival was identified in the patients with increased regucalcin gene expression. We further demonstrated that overexpression of full length, but not alternatively spliced variants of regucalcin, induces G1 and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest, suppressing the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells, a commonly used in vitro model of human breast cancer that metastasize to bone causing osteolytic lesions. Overexpression of regucalcin was found to suppress multiple signaling pathways including Akt, MAP kinase and SAPK/JNK, and NF-κB p65 and β-catenin along with increased p53, a tumor suppressor, and decreased K-ras, c-fos and c-jun. Moreover, we found that co-culture of regucalcin-overexpressing MDA-MB-231 cells with mouse bone marrow cells prevented enhanced osteoclastogenesis and suppressed mineralization in mouse bone marrow cells in vitro. Taken together, the present study suggests that regucalcin may have important anticancer properties in human breast cancer patients. Mechanistically, these effects are likely mediated through suppression of multiple signaling pathways, upregulation of p53 and downregulation of oncogenes leading to anti-proliferative effects and reduced metastases to bone, a phenotype associated with poor clinical outcome. PMID:27221776

  9. Volume of Bone Metastasis Assessed with Whole-Body Diffusion-weighted Imaging Is Associated with Overall Survival in Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Perez-Lopez, Raquel; Lorente, David; Blackledge, Matthew D; Collins, David J; Mateo, Joaquin; Bianchini, Diletta; Omlin, Aurelius; Zivi, Andrea; Leach, Martin O; de Bono, Johann S; Koh, Dow-Mu; Tunariu, Nina

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To determine the correlation between the volume of bone metastasis as assessed with diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging and established prognostic factors in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) and the association with overall survival (OS). Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board; informed consent was obtained from all patients. The authors analyzed whole-body DW images obtained between June 2010 and February 2013 in 53 patients with mCRPC at the time of starting a new line of anticancer therapy. Bone metastases were identified and delineated on whole-body DW images in 43 eligible patients. Total tumor diffusion volume (tDV) was correlated with the bone scan index (BSI) and other prognostic factors by using the Pearson correlation coefficient (r). Survival analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression. Results The median tDV was 503.1 mL (range, 5.6-2242 mL), and the median OS was 12.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.7, 16.1 months). There was a significant correlation between tDV and established prognostic factors, including hemoglobin level (r = -0.521, P < .001), prostate-specific antigen level (r = 0.556, P < .001), lactate dehydrogenase level (r = 0.534, P < .001), alkaline phosphatase level (r = 0.572, P < .001), circulating tumor cell count (r = 0.613, P = .004), and BSI (r = 0.565, P = .001). A higher tDV also showed a significant association with poorer OS (hazard ratio, 1.74; 95% CI: 1.02, 2.96; P = .035). Conclusion Metastatic bone disease from mCRPC can be evaluated and quantified with whole-body DW imaging. Whole-body DW imaging-generated tDV showed correlation with established prognostic biomarkers and is associated with OS in mCRPC. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26807894

  10. Cilengitide inhibits metastatic bone colonization in a nude rat model.

    PubMed

    Bretschi, Maren; Merz, Maximilian; Komljenovic, Dorde; Berger, Martin R; Semmler, Wolfhard; Bäuerle, Tobias

    2011-10-01

    Integrins αvβ3 and αvβ5 are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer bone metastases. This study investigates the effects of the αvβ3/αvβ5 integrin-specific inhibitor cilengitide during early metastatic bone colonization. The impact of cilengitide on the migration, invasion and proliferation of MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells as well as on bone resorption by osteoclasts was investigated in vitro. For in vivo experiments, nude rats were treated with cilengitide for 30 days starting one day after site-specific tumor cell inoculation in the hind leg, and the course of metastatic changes in bone was followed using flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (VCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Vascular changes in bone metastases were investigated using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI-derived parameters amplitude A and exchange rate coefficient kep. In vitro, cilengitide treatment resulted in a decrease in proliferation, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells, as well as of osteoclast activity. In vivo, the development of bone metastasis in the hind leg of rats was not prevented by adjuvant cilengitide treatment, but cilengitide reduced the volumes of osteolytic lesions and respective soft tissue tumors of developing bone metastases as assessed with VCT and MRI, respectively. DCE-MRI revealed significant changes in the A and kep parameters including decreased relative blood volume and increased vessel permeability after cilengitide treatment indicating vessel remodeling. In conclusion, during early pathogenic processes of bone colonization, cilengitide treatment exerted effects on tumor cells, osteoclasts and vasculature reducing the skeletal lesion size of experimental skeletal metastases. PMID:21725616

  11. Metastatic carcinoma of the long bones.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Anthony I; Wodajo, Felasfa M; Malawer, Martin

    2007-11-15

    Breast, prostate, renal, thyroid, and lung carcinomas commonly metastasize to bone. Managing skeletal metastatic disease can be complex. Pain is the most common presenting symptom and requires thorough radiographic and laboratory evaluation. If plain-film radiography is not sufficient for diagnosis, a bone scan may detect occult lesions. Patients with lytic skeletal metastases may be at risk for impending fracture. Destructive lesions in the proximal femur and hip area are particularly worrisome. High-risk patients require immediate referral to an orthopedic surgeon. Patients who are not at risk for impending fracture can be treated with a combination of radiotherapy and adjuvant drug therapy. Bisphosphonates diminish pain and prolong the time to significant skeletal complications. PMID:18052014

  12. Metastatic potential of an aneurysmal bone cyst.

    PubMed

    van de Luijtgaarden, Addy C M; Veth, Rene P H; Slootweg, Piet J; Wijers-Koster, Pauline M; Schultze Kool, Leo J; Bovee, Judith V M G; van der Graaf, Winette T A

    2009-11-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are benign bone tumors consisting of blood-filled cavities lined by connective tissue septa. Recently, the hypothesis that ABCs are lesions reactive to local hemodynamics has been challenged after the discovery of specific recurrent chromosomal abnormalities. Multiple cases of malignant transformation of ABC into (osteo)sarcoma have been described, as well as a number of cases of telangiectatic osteosarcoma which had been misdiagnosed as ABC. We herewith document a case of a pelvic ABC metastatic to the lung, liver, and kidneys. Diagnosis was confirmed by the presence of a break in the USP6 gene, which is pathognomonic for ABC, in a pulmonary metastasis of our patient. Sarcomatous transformation as an explanation for this behavior was ruled out by demonstrating diploid DNA content in both the pulmonary lesion and the primary tumor. PMID:19838726

  13. Retrospective Audit: Does Prior Assessment by Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons Reduce the Risk of Osteonecrosis of The Jaw in Patients Receiving Bone-Targeted Therapies for Metastatic Cancers to the Skeleton?--Part II.

    PubMed

    Turner, Bruce; Ali, Sacha; Pati, Jhumur; Nargund, Vinod; Ali, Enamul; Cheng, Leo; Wells, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Men who receive bone-targeted therapy for metastatic prostate cancer are at increased risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). Development of ONJ has been associated with the administration of bone-targeted therapies in association with other risk factors. ONJ can be distressing for a patient because it can cause pain, risk of jaw fracture, body image disturbance, difficultly eating, and difficulty maintaining good oral hygiene. The aim of this article is to report results of an audit of prior assessment by oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMFS) before initiation of bone-targeted therapies and whether it may reduce the risk of ONJ in patients receiving bone-targeted therapies for advanced cancers. PMID:27501592

  14. Bone Marrow Recovery and Subsequent Chemotherapy Following Radiolabeled Anti-Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Monoclonal Antibody J591 in Men with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tagawa, Scott T.; Akhtar, Naveed H.; Nikolopoulou, Anastasia; Kaur, Gurveen; Robinson, Brian; Kahn, Renee; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Nanus, David M.; Bander, Neil H.

    2013-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has demonstrated efficacy with acceptable toxicity leading to approval in non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, but has been slower to develop for the treatment of advanced solid tumors. Prostate cancer (PC) represents a good candidate for RIT based upon high exposure to circulating antibodies at common disease sites with a specific, highly expressed cell-surface antigen of prostate-specific membrane antigen. Four phase I and II trials utilizing 177Lu- or 90Y-J591 have been reported. Long-term toxicity and chemotherapy administration was analyzed. As expected, the only serious toxicity observed was myelosuppression. Grade 4 thrombocytopenia occurred in 33.3% without significant hemorrhage and grade 4 neutropenia occurred in 17.3% with 0.07% febrile neutropenia. Nearly all subjects (97.3%) recovered to grade 0 or 1 platelets and all had complete neutrophil recovery. The majority (81.3%) received chemotherapy at any time, with 61.3% receiving chemotherapy following RIT. Ten subjects underwent bone marrow biopsies at some point in their disease course following RIT for low counts; all had diffuse PC infiltration without evidence of myelodysplasia or leukemia. As expected, myelosuppression occurs following therapeutic doses of RIT for men with metastatic castration-resistant PC. However, toxicity is predictable and self-limited, with the majority of patients who do not refuse able to receive cytotoxic chemotherapy following RIT. PMID:23986881

  15. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-21

    Breast Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Metastatic Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  16. Cold Atmospheric Plasma for Selectively Ablating Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atomospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy. PMID:24040051

  17. Inflammatory Breast Cancer from Metastatic Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Achariyapota, Vuthinun; Chuangsuwanich, Tuenjai

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from tumors other than breast carcinomas are extremely rare and represent only 0.2–1.3% of all diagnosed malignant breast tumors. Furthermore, while the most common sites for advanced ovarian cancer metastases are the liver, lung, and pleura, metastasis to the breast from a primary ovarian cancer is uncommon and has only been reported in 0.03–0.6% of all breast cancers. Here we describe a case report of a 50-year-old female patient with a rare case of breast metastases from an advanced ovarian cancer, presenting as inflammatory breast cancer. Our observations emphasize the clinical importance of distinguishing between primary and metastatic breast cancer during diagnosis for the purpose of appropriate prognosis and treatment. PMID:27047697

  18. Bone-targeting agents in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzman, Daniel L.; Boikos, Sosipatros A.; Carducci, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastases are present in the vast majority of men with advanced prostate cancer, representing the main cause for morbidity and mortality. Recurrent or metastatic disease is managed initially with androgen deprivation but the majority of the patients eventually will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer, with patients developing bone metastases in most of the cases. Survival and growth of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is dependent on a complex microenvironment (onco-niche) that includes the osteoblasts, the osteoclasts, the endothelium, and the stroma. This review summarizes agents that target the pathways involved in this complex interaction between prostate cancer and bone micro-environment and aim to transform lethal metastatic prostate cancer into a chronic disease. PMID:24398856

  19. Relationships between material properties and CT scan data of cortical bone with and without metastatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Tadashi S; Pejcic, Marina R; Tehranzadeh, Jamshid; Keyak, Joyce H

    2003-07-01

    Breast, prostate, lung, and other cancers can metastasize to bone and lead to pathological fracture. To lay the groundwork for new clinical techniques for assessing the risk of pathological fracture, we identified relationships between density measured using quantitative computed tomography (rhoQCT), longitudinal mechanical properties, and ash density (rhoAsh) of cortical bone from femoral diaphyses with and without metastatic lesions from breast, prostate, and lung cancer (bone with metastases from six donors; bone without metastases from one donor with cancer and two donors without cancer). Moderately strong linear relationships between rhoQCT and elastic modulus, strength, and rhoAsh were found for bone with metastases (0.73bone with metastatic lesions differed from those of bone from donors without cancer (P<0.01). However, differences in tensile strength or compressive yield strain, after controlling for rhoQCT, were not found. Thus, these cancers degrade the elastic modulus and compressive strength, but not the tensile strength, of cortical bone beyond the amount that would be expected from decreased density alone. The rhoQCT-mechanical property relationships reported may be useful for evaluating bone integrity and assessing the risk of fracture of bone with metastases. PMID:12787982

  20. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-06

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  1. Gemcitabine and AMG 479 in Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Advanced Solid Tumors; Cancer; Cancer of Pancreas; Cancer of the Pancreas; Metastases; Metastatic Cancer; Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Bone Metastases; Endocrine Cancer; Oncology; Oncology Patients; Solid Tumors; Advanced Malignancy

  2. Metastatic cancer to the lung

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bladder cancer Breast cancer Colon cancer Kidney cancer Neuroblastoma Prostate cancer Sarcoma Wilms tumor Symptoms Symptoms may ... Breast cancer Cancer Chemotherapy Colon cancer Lung cancer Neuroblastoma Prostate cancer Radiation therapy Wilms tumor Update Date ...

  3. Bone Targeted Therapies for Bone Metastasis in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Razaq, Wajeeha

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis to the bone develops commonly in patients with various malignancies, and is a major cause of morbidity and diminished quality of life in many affected patients. Emerging treatments for metastatic bone disease have arisen from advances in our understanding of the unique cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to the bone metastasis. The tendency of cancer cells to metastasize to bone is probably the end result of many factors including vascular pathways, the highly vascular nature of the bone marrow (which increases the probability that cancer cells will be deposited in bone marrow capillaries), and molecular characteristics of the cancer cells that allow them to adapt to the bone marrow microenvironment. The goals of treating osseous metastases are manifold. Proper treatment can lead to significant improvements in pain control and function, and maintain skeletal integrity. The treatment plan requires a multidisciplinary approach. Widespread metastatic disease necessitates systemic therapy, while a localized problem is best managed with surgery, external beam radiotherapy, or both. Patients with bone metastasis can have prolonged survival, and proper management can have a significant impact on their quality of life. We will review the factors in this article that are promising molecular bone-targeted therapies or will be likely targets for future therapeutic intervention to restore bone remodeling and suppress tumor growth. PMID:26237142

  4. How Is Bone Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic How is bone cancer staged? How is bone cancer diagnosed? A patient’s symptoms, physical exam, and results ... and other imaging tests. Imaging tests to detect bone cancer X-rays Most bone cancers show up on ...

  5. Detection of disseminated tumor cells in the bone marrow of breast cancer patients using multiplex gene expression measurements identifies new therapeutic targets in patients at high risk for the development of metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Siddappa, Chidananda M.; Watson, Mark A.; Pillai, Sreeraj; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Fleming, Timothy; Aft, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) detected in the bone marrow of breast cancer patients identifies women at high risk of recurrence. DTCs are traditionally detected by immunocytochemical staining for cytokeratins or single gene expression measurements, which limit both specificity and sensitivity. We evaluated the Nanostring nCounter™ (NC) platform for multi-marker, gene expression-based detection and classification of DTCs in the bone marrow of breast cancer patients. Experimental Design Candidate genes exhibiting tumor cell specific expression were identified from microarray data sets and validated by qRT-PCR analysis in non-malignant human BM and identical samples spiked with predefined numbers of molecularly diverse breast tumor cell lines. Thirty-eight validated transcripts were designed for the nCounter™ platform and a subset of these transcripts was technically validated against qRT-PCR measurements using identical spiked bone marrow controls. Bilateral iliac crest bone marrow aspirates were collected and analyzed from twenty breast cancer patients, prior to neoadjuvant therapy, using the full 38 gene nCounter™ code set. Results Tumor cell specific gene expression by nCounter™ was detected with a sensitivity of one cancer cell per 1×106 nucleated bone marrow cells after optimization. Measurements were quantitative, log linear over a twenty-fold range, and correlated with qRT-PCR measurements. Using the nCounter™ 38-gene panel, 6 of 8 patients (75%) who developed metastatic disease had detectable expression of at least one transcript. Notably, three of these patients had detectable expression of ERBB2 in their bone marrow, despite the fact that their corresponding primary tumors were HER2/ERBB2 negative and therefore did not receive trastuzumab therapy. Four of these patients also expressed the PTCH1 receptor, a newly recognized therapeutic target based on hedgehog signaling pathway inhibition. Conclusions The presumptive detection and

  6. Metastatic Prostate Cancer to the Duodenum: A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Kaswala, Dharmesh H.; Patel, Nitin; Jadallah, Sana; Wang, Weizheng

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the third most common cancer in man. About 1 in 6 males developed prostate cancer and 1 in 35 males die of this disease. Prostate cancer behavior ranges from microscopic tumors to aggressive cancer with metastatic potential. While metastasis to bone is relatively common, prostate cancer rarely metastasizes to the cecum, pituitary gland, small bowel, maxillary sinus and skin. Our case report presents a rare presentation of metastatic prostate cancer to the duodenum. Our search of the literature found only 2 cases of prostate metastases to duodenum published from 1966 to the present. To our knowledge this is the third case of metastatic prostate cancer presenting with duodenal metastasis. Although it is rare but in symptomatic patients small intestine metastasis should not be ignored with advanced prostate cancer. The case demonstrates a novel presentation of a common malignancy, and should raise awareness in clinicians and radiologists that prostate cancer can present with distant metastases in absence of any local lymphadenopathy. PMID:25161979

  7. TAS-102 for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared TAS-102 with placebo in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose disease progressed following prior treatments or who had health conditions that prevented the re-administrati

  8. Abiraterone Improves Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A multinational phase III trial found that the drug abiraterone acetate prolonged the median survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer by 4 months compared with patients who received a placebo.

  9. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases. PMID:27171673

  10. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoran; Wu, Xiaohua; Cheng, Xi

    2016-07-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases. PMID:27171673

  11. Metastatic breast cancer and its complications.

    PubMed

    Rubens, R D

    1992-12-01

    Tamoxifen is now established for use in premenopausal as well as postmenopausal patients. Recent reports have not shown its activity to be enhanced by the addition of either prednisolone, progestogens, or interferon. Reversible ocular toxicity from tamoxifen appears to be more common than had been previously realized. Different schedules giving the same dose intensity of doxorubicin give markedly different pharmacokinetic profiles. Although this does not lead to differences in responses or physical toxicity, it seems to have important implications for quality of life. Taxol is showing impressive activity in advanced breast cancer, and significant response rates have also been reported for carboplatin and podophyllotoxin derivatives. To achieve maximum effectiveness from the cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil combination, attention to schedule and dose intensity has been shown to be important. No new effective cytotoxic combinations have been described. High-dose chemotherapy requiring bone marrow support remains experimental. Further progress has been made in monitoring the response of metastatic bone disease to treatment. The precise significance for patients of the results in many of the papers reviewed is often uncertain because they lack quality-of-life measures; the importance of this approach is emphasized. PMID:1457519

  12. Protocadherin-7 induces bone metastasis of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ai-Min; Tian, Ai-Xian; Zhang, Rui-Xue; Ge, Jie; Sun, Xuan; Cao, Xu-Chen

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •PCDH7 is overexpression in high bone metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells. •PCDH7 is up-regulation in bone metastatic breast cancer tissues. •Suppression of PCDH7 inhibits cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro. •PCDH7 induces breast cancer bone metastasis in vivo. -- Abstract: Breast cancer had a propensity to metastasize to bone, resulting in serious skeletal complications associated with poor outcome. Previous study showed that Protocadherin-7 (PCDH7) play an important role in brain metastatic breast cancer, however, the role of PCDH7 in bone metastatic breast cancer has never been explored. In the present study, we found that PCDH7 expression was up-regulation in bone metastatic breast cancer tissues by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry assays. Furthermore, suppression of PCDH7 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro by MTT, scratch, and transwell assays. Most importantly, overexpression of PCDH7 promotes breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro, and formation of bone metastasis in vivo. These data provide an important insight into the role of PCDH7 in bone metastasis of breast cancer.

  13. The AURORA initiative for metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zardavas, D; Maetens, M; Irrthum, A; Goulioti, T; Engelen, K; Fumagalli, D; Salgado, R; Aftimos, P; Saini, K S; Sotiriou, C; Campbell, P; Dinh, P; von Minckwitz, G; Gelber, R D; Dowsett, M; Di Leo, A; Cameron, D; Baselga, J; Gnant, M; Goldhirsch, A; Norton, L; Piccart, M

    2014-11-11

    Metastatic breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality among women in the Western world. To date most research efforts have focused on the molecular analysis of the primary tumour to dissect the genotypes of the disease. However, accumulating evidence supports a molecular evolution of breast cancer during its life cycle, with metastatic lesions acquiring new molecular aberrations. Recognising this critical gap of knowledge, the Breast International Group is launching AURORA, a large, multinational, collaborative metastatic breast cancer molecular screening programme. Approximately 1300 patients with metastatic breast cancer who have received no more than one line of systemic treatment for advanced disease will, after giving informed consent, donate archived primary tumour tissue, as well as will donate tissue collected prospectively from the biopsy of metastatic lesions and blood. Both tumour tissue types, together with a blood sample, will then be subjected to next generation sequencing for a panel of cancer-related genes. The patients will be treated at the discretion of their treating physicians per standard local practice, and they will be followed for clinical outcome for 10 years. Alternatively, depending on the molecular profiles found, patients will be directed to innovative clinical trials assessing molecularly targeted agents. Samples of outlier patients considered as 'exceptional responders' or as 'rapid progressors' based on the clinical follow-up will be subjected to deeper molecular characterisation in order to identify new prognostic and predictive biomarkers. AURORA, through its innovative design, will shed light onto some of the unknown areas of metastatic breast cancer, helping to improve the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients. PMID:25225904

  14. The AURORA initiative for metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zardavas, D; Maetens, M; Irrthum, A; Goulioti, T; Engelen, K; Fumagalli, D; Salgado, R; Aftimos, P; Saini, K S; Sotiriou, C; Campbell, P; Dinh, P; von Minckwitz, G; Gelber, R D; Dowsett, M; Di Leo, A; Cameron, D; Baselga, J; Gnant, M; Goldhirsch, A; Norton, L; Piccart, M

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality among women in the Western world. To date most research efforts have focused on the molecular analysis of the primary tumour to dissect the genotypes of the disease. However, accumulating evidence supports a molecular evolution of breast cancer during its life cycle, with metastatic lesions acquiring new molecular aberrations. Recognising this critical gap of knowledge, the Breast International Group is launching AURORA, a large, multinational, collaborative metastatic breast cancer molecular screening programme. Approximately 1300 patients with metastatic breast cancer who have received no more than one line of systemic treatment for advanced disease will, after giving informed consent, donate archived primary tumour tissue, as well as will donate tissue collected prospectively from the biopsy of metastatic lesions and blood. Both tumour tissue types, together with a blood sample, will then be subjected to next generation sequencing for a panel of cancer-related genes. The patients will be treated at the discretion of their treating physicians per standard local practice, and they will be followed for clinical outcome for 10 years. Alternatively, depending on the molecular profiles found, patients will be directed to innovative clinical trials assessing molecularly targeted agents. Samples of outlier patients considered as ‘exceptional responders' or as ‘rapid progressors' based on the clinical follow-up will be subjected to deeper molecular characterisation in order to identify new prognostic and predictive biomarkers. AURORA, through its innovative design, will shed light onto some of the unknown areas of metastatic breast cancer, helping to improve the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients. PMID:25225904

  15. Inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 block breast cancer metastatic niche formation and lung metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Carmen Chak-Lui; Zhang, Huafeng; Gilkes, Daniele M; Chen, Jasper; Wei, Hong; Chaturvedi, Pallavi; Hubbi, Maimon E; Semenza, Gregg L

    2012-07-01

    Intratumoral hypoxia, a frequent finding in metastatic cancer, results in the activation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). HIFs are implicated in many steps of breast cancer metastasis, including metastatic niche formation through increased expression of lysyl oxidase (LOX) and lysyl oxidase-like (LOXL) proteins, enzymes that remodel collagen at the metastatic site and recruit bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) to the metastatic niche. We investigated the effect of two chemically and mechanistically distinct HIF inhibitors, digoxin and acriflavine, on breast cancer metastatic niche formation. Both drugs blocked the hypoxia-induced expression of LOX and LOXL proteins, collagen cross-linking, CD11b⁺ BMDC recruitment, and lung metastasis in an orthotopic breast cancer model. Patients with HIF-1 α-overexpressing breast cancers are at increased risk of metastasis and mortality and our results suggest that such patients may benefit from aggressive therapy that includes a HIF inhibitor. PMID:22231744

  16. Incidence and outcome of bone metastatic disease at University Malaya Medical Centre

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vivek Ajit; Haseeb, Amber; Alkubaisi, Alla Allden H Ali

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Morbidity and mortality from malignant diseases are usually the result of metastasis. The bone is the third most common site of metastasis. METHODS This is a retrospective study of patients with metastatic bone disease who were referred to the Orthopaedic Department of University Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia, between January 2004 and October 2009. RESULTS A total of 151 patients (51.0% men, 49.0% women) had metastatic bone disease, with the highest incidence at the age range of 50–59 years. The commonest primary cancer was breast (23.3%), followed by lung (21.2%), prostate (9.3%), thyroid (7.3%) and renal cell carcinoma (5.3%); unknown primary cancer was 6.6%. There was long bone involvement in 52.7% of cases, axial bone in 44.5%, and both long and axial bones in 2.8%. The majority (90.1%) were symptomatic, with pain as the commonest symptom. 106 (70.2%) patients had pathological fractures. Neurological deficit was reported in 90.7% of patients, with 41.1% having extraskeletal metastases. 67.8% of the lesions were osteolytic, 24.3% were sclerotic, and 7.9%, mixed. Palliative and therapeutic interventions were undertaken for 62.0% of patients. The mean survival times were breast 21.0; thyroid 20.7; prostate 20.3; lung 16.0; and unknown primary cancer 32.6 months. CONCLUSION In our study, breast and lung cancers were the commonest primary cancers in metastatic bone disease. Most patients had more than one site of involvement, pain at presentation and pathological fractures. Surgery is beneficial to relieve pain and improve function and neurology. Duration of survival depends on the type of primary cancer and whether systemic metastasis is present. PMID:25631896

  17. Treatment Options for Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  18. Stages of Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  20. Actomyosin tension as a determinant of metastatic cancer mechanical tropism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrail, Daniel J.; Kieu, Quang Minh N.; Iandoli, Jason A.; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2015-04-01

    Despite major advances in the characterization of molecular regulators of cancer growth and metastasis, patient survival rates have largely stagnated. Recent studies have shown that mechanical cues from the extracellular matrix can drive the transition to a malignant phenotype. Moreover, it is also known that the metastatic process, which results in over 90% of cancer-related deaths, is governed by intracellular mechanical forces. To better understand these processes, we identified metastatic tumor cells originating from different locations which undergo inverse responses to altered matrix elasticity: MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells that prefer rigid matrices and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells that prefer compliant matrices as characterized by parameters such as tumor cell proliferation, chemoresistance, and migration. Transcriptomic analysis revealed higher expression of genes associated with cytoskeletal tension and contractility in cells that prefer stiff environments, both when comparing MDA-MB-231 to SKOV-3 cells as well as when comparing bone-metastatic to lung-metastatic MDA-MB-231 subclones. Using small molecule inhibitors, we found that blocking the activity of these pathways mitigated rigidity-dependent behavior in both cell lines. Probing the physical forces exerted by cells on the underlying substrates revealed that though force magnitude may not directly correlate with functional outcomes, other parameters such as force polarization do correlate directly with cell motility. Finally, this biophysical analysis demonstrates that intrinsic levels of cell contractility determine the matrix rigidity for maximal cell function, possibly influencing tissue sites for metastatic cancer cell engraftment during dissemination. By increasing our understanding of the physical interactions of cancer cells with their microenvironment, these studies may help develop novel therapeutic strategies.

  1. Metastatic calcification of the stomach imaged on a bone scan

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.; Ryo, U.Y.; Pinsky, S.M.

    1984-10-01

    A whole body bone scan obtained on a 21-year-old woman with sickle cell disease and chronic renal failure showed localization of the radionuclide diffusely in the stomach. The localization of the radionuclide represented metastatic calcification of the stomach caused by secondary hyperparathyroidism.

  2. Orthotopic non-metastatic and metastatic oral cancer mouse models ⋆

    PubMed Central

    Bais, Manish V.; Kukuruzinska, Maria; Trackman, Philip C.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Oral cancer is characterized by high morbidity and mortality with a predisposition to metastasize to different tissues, including lung, liver, and bone. Despite progress in the understanding of mutational profiles and deregulated pathways in oral cancer, patient survival has not significantly improved over the past decades. Therefore, there is a need to establish in vivo models that recapitulate human oral cancer metastasis to evaluate therapeutic potential of novel drugs. Here we report orthotopic tongue cancer nude mouse models to study oral cancer growth and metastasis using human metastatic (UMSCC2) and non-metastatic (CAL27) cell lines, respectively. Transduction of these cell lines with lentivirus expressing red fluorescent protein (DsRed) followed by injection into tongues of immunodeficient mice generated orthotopic tongue tumors that could be monitored for growth and metastasis by fluorescence measurement with an in vivo Imaging System (IVIS 200). The growth rates of CAL27-DsRed induced tumors were higher than UMSCC2-DsRed tumors after day 15, while UMSCC2-DsRed tumors revealed metastasis beginning on day 21. Importantly, UMSCC2 tumors metastasized to a number of tissues including the submandibular gland, lung, kidney, liver, and bone. Further, immunohistochemical analyses of tongue tumors induced by CAL27 and UMSCC2 cells revealed elevated expression of components of protumorigenic pathways deregulated in human cancers, including Cyclin D1, PCNA, Ki-67, LSD1, LOXL2, MT-MMP1, DPAGT1, E-cadherin, OCT4A, and H3K4me1/2. These orthotopic mouse models are likely to be useful tools for gaining insights into the activity and mechanisms of novel oral cancer drug candidates. PMID:25682387

  3. Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Lessons Learned, Future Possibilities.

    PubMed

    Venook, Alan P

    2016-05-01

    Survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer has dramatically improved over the past 20 years, primarily because physicians have become adept at using the many regimens approved for this patient population. Future advances may come from understanding molecular subtypes, finding and treating new actionable mutations, and harnessing the immune system. PMID:27226509

  4. A Case of Disease Improvement after Treatment with Everolimus plus Exemestane in a Patient with Hormone Receptor-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer with Bone Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Beck, J. Thaddeus; Mantooth, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers and a leading cause of death in women worldwide. Despite significant advances in the treatment of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, tumor metastasis occurs frequently and is associated with poor long-term prognosis. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway plays a central role in cancer cell growth, proliferation, and resistance to endocrine therapies. Therefore, mTOR inhibitors such as everolimus in combination with nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors might reverse endocrine resistance and improve clinical outcomes in patients. Here, we report on a case of infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the breast with metastases to the bone. Histopathologic analysis showed that the patient was estrogen and progesterone receptor positive and human epidermal growth factor-2 negative. This case represents the clinical spectrum of complications caused by metastasis: the patient experienced a considerable amount of skeletal-related complications, had previously received chemotherapy, and experienced disease progression while taking nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors. After treatment with oral everolimus 10 mg daily plus oral exemestane 25 mg daily, the patient's disease was ameliorated. Combination therapy was well tolerated, with minimal adverse effects that were manageable with concomitant medications. Although further analyses in larger populations are necessary, the addition of everolimus to exemestane might provide an effective new treatment option for patients with bone metastasis. PMID:25848360

  5. Bone marrow invasion in multiple myeloma and metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, J C; Luna, A

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine is the imaging study of choice for the management of bone marrow disease. MRI sequences enable us to integrate structural and functional information for detecting, staging, and monitoring the response the treatment of multiple myeloma and bone metastases in the spine. Whole-body MRI has been incorporated into different guidelines as the technique of choice for managing multiple myeloma and metastatic bone disease. Normal physiological changes in the yellow and red bone marrow represent a challenge in analyses to differentiate clinically significant findings from those that are not clinically significant. This article describes the findings for normal bone marrow, variants, and invasive processes in multiple myeloma and bone metastases. PMID:26767542

  6. An Unusual Course of Metastatic Gastroesophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, William H.; Pintova, Sofya; DiMaio, Christopher J.; Manolas, Panagiotis; Lee, Dong-Seok; Hiotis, Spiros P.; Kartsonis, Maria; Holcombe, Randall F.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V.

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting on a case of a 41-year-old woman who presented with metastatic gastroesophageal junction cancer and who achieved prolonged survival with a multimodal treatment approach. After initially experiencing robust response to chemotherapy, she was treated for distant recurrence with palliative radiation to the gastrohepatic and supraclavicular lymph nodes and subsequently, given her unusual near-complete response, with reirradiation to the abdomen with curative intent for residual disease. The case presented is unique due to the patient's atypical treatment course, including technically difficult reirradiation to the abdomen, and the resulting prolonged survival despite metastatic presentation. PMID:26770853

  7. Measuring the metastatic potential of cancer cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Gratzner, Howard; Atassi, M. Z.

    1993-01-01

    Cancer cells must secrete proteolytic enzymes to invade adjacent tissues and migrate to a new metastatic site. Urokinase (uPA) is a key enzyme related to metastasis in cancers of the lung, colon, gastric, uterine, breast, brain, and malignant melanoma. A NASA technology utilization project has combined fluorescence microscopy, image analysis, and flow cytometry, using fluorescent dyes, and urokinase-specific antibodies to measure uPA and abnormal DNA levels (related to cancer cell proliferation) inside the cancer cells. The project is focused on developing quantitative measurements to determine if a patient's tumor cells are actively metastasizing. If a significant number of tumor cells contain large amounts of uPA (esp. membrane-bound) then the post-surgical chemotherapy or radiotherapy can be targeted for metastatic cells that have already left the primary tumor. These analytical methods have been applied to a retrospective study of biopsy tissues from 150 node negative, stage 1 breast cancer patients. Cytopathology and image analysis has shown that uPA is present in high levels in many breast cancer cells, but not found in normal breast. Significant amounts of uPA also have been measured in glioma cell lines cultured from brain tumors. Commercial applications include new diagnostic tests for metastatic cells, in different cancers, which are being developed with a company that provides a medical testing service using flow cytometry for DNA analysis and hormone receptors on tumor cells from patient biopsies. This research also may provide the basis for developing a new 'magic bullet' treatment against metastasis using chemotherapeutic drugs or radioisotopes attached to urokinase-specific monoclonal antibodies that will only bind to metastatic cells.

  8. Contemporary management of metastatic bone disease: tips and tools of the trade for general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Robert H; Randall, R Lor; Benevenia, Joseph; Berven, Sigurd H; Raskin, Kevin A

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic bone disease has a significant effect on a patient's mortality and health-related quality of life. An aging US population and improved survival rates of patients with cancer have led to an increase in the incidence of symptomatic bony metastatic lesions that may require orthopaedic care. Skeletal-related events in neoplastic disease include pain, pathologic fracture, hypercalcemia, and neural compression, including spinal cord compression. The clinical evaluation and diagnostic study of a patient with a skeletal lesion of unknown etiology should be approached carefully. In patients with widespread metastatic disease, the treatment of a skeletal-related event may be limited to stabilization of the pathologic fracture or local disease control. The treatment of metastatic bone disease is guided by the nature of the skeletal-related event, the responsiveness of the lesion to adjuvant care, and the overall condition and survival expectations of the patient. Impending pathologic fractures are often more easily treated, with less morbidity and easier recovery for patients, than completed fractures. Quality of life is the most important outcome measure in these patients. When surgery is indicated, the approach, choice of fixation, and use of adjuvant should allow for immediate and unrestricted weight bearing. Because metastatic lesions to the skeleton have a limited capacity for spontaneous healing, surgical fixation should be durable for the life expectancy of the patient. In the epiphyseal region of long bones, replacement arthroplasty is generally preferred over internal fixation. Metaphyseal and diaphyseal regions can generally be addressed with intramedullary nailing or plate fixation with adjuvant. The specific treatment of acetabular lesions is dictated by the anatomy and the degree of bone loss. Spinal stability and neural compromise are important considerations in choosing a strategy for managing spine tumors. Effective surgical approaches to metastatic

  9. Therapeutic strategy in unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tournigand, Christophe; André, Thierry; de Gramont, Aimery

    2012-01-01

    While surgery is the cornerstone treatment for early-stage colorectal cancer, chemotherapy is the first treatment option for metastatic disease when tumor lesions are frequently not fully resectable at presentation. Mortality from colon cancer has decreased over the past 30 years, but there is still a huge heterogeneity in survival rates that can be mainly explained by patient and tumor characteristics, host response factors, and treatment modalities. The management of unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer is a global treatment strategy, which applies several lines of therapy, salvage surgery, maintenance, and treatment-free intervals. The individualization of cancer treatment is based on the evaluation of prognostic factors for survival (serum lactate dehydrogenase level, performance status), and predictive factors for treatment efficacy [Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutation status]. The available treatment modalities for metastatic colorectal cancer are chemotherapy (fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, irinotecan), anti-angiogenic agents (e.g. bevacizumab), and anti-epidermal growth factor agents (cetuximab, panitumumab). The increasing number of active compounds dictates the strategy of trials evaluating these treatments either in combination or sequentially. Alternative outcomes that can be measured earlier than overall survival are needed to shorten the duration and reduce the size and cost of clinical trials. PMID:22423266

  10. New therapeutic targets for cancer bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Krzeszinski, Jing Y.; Wan, Yihong

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastases are dejected consequences of many types of tumors including breast, prostate, lung, kidney and thyroid cancers. This complicated process begins with the successful tumor cell epithelial–mesenchymal transition, escape from the original site, and penetration into circulation. The homing of tumor cells to the bone depends on both tumor-intrinsic traits and various molecules supplied by the bone metastatic niche. The colonization and growth of cancer cells in the osseous environment, which awaken their dormancy to form micro- and macro-metastasis, involve an intricate interaction between the circulating tumor cells and local bone cells including osteoclasts, osteoblasts, adipocytes and macrophages. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances in the identification of new molecules and novel mechanisms during each step of bone metastasis that may serve as promising therapeutic targets. PMID:25962679

  11. [Biotherapies in metastatic colorectal cancers in 2014].

    PubMed

    Jouinot, Anne; Coriat, Romain; Huillard, Olivier; Goldwasser, François

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer has been transformed during the last decade with biotherapies, two of them were marketed in 2013. Four agents are monoclonal antibodies, while the fifth agent is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Two agents are inhibitors of the EGF-receptor pathway, cetuximab and panitumumab, and have as class-toxicity, cutaneous toxicity. The other three agents are bevacizumab, aflibercept and regorafenib, and interact with angiogenesis, they are associated with a risk of vascular toxicity, mainly hypertension. These agents participate to an improvement of disease control at the metastatic stage, and in some cases, favour the curative surgical resection of metastases. Their use is discussed in multidisciplinary meetings dedicated to gastrointestinal cancers, in the presence of liver surgeons. PMID:25065664

  12. Ziv-aflibercept in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anuj; Sun, Weijing

    2014-01-01

    The combination of cytotoxic chemotherapy and antiangiogenic agents has become a conventional treatment option for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Ziv-aflibercept is a fusion protein which acts as a decoy receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, VEGF-B, and placental growth factor (PlGF); it was approved in combination with 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer that is resistant to or has progressed after an oxaliplatin-containing fluoropyrimidine-based regimen. Herein we review the role of tumor angiogenesis as the rationale for antiangiogenic therapy, the clinical data associated with ziv-aflibercept, and its current role as a treatment option compared to other antiangiogenic agents, such as bevacizumab and regorafenib. PMID:24368879

  13. Colon Cancer Metastatic to the Biliary Tree.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Alexandra T; Clayton, Steven B; Markow, Michael; Mamel, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Metastasis of colon adenocarcinoma is commonly found in the lung, liver, or peritoneum. Common bile duct (CBD) tumors related to adenomas from familial adenomatous polyposis metastasizing from outside of the gastrointestinal tract have been reported. We report a case of biliary colic due to metastatic colon adenocarcinoma to the CBD. Obstructive jaundice with signs of acalculous cholecystitis on imaging in a patient with a history of colon cancer should raise suspicion for metastasis to CBD. PMID:27144209

  14. Colon Cancer Metastatic to the Biliary Tree

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Steven B.; Markow, Michael; Mamel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis of colon adenocarcinoma is commonly found in the lung, liver, or peritoneum. Common bile duct (CBD) tumors related to adenomas from familial adenomatous polyposis metastasizing from outside of the gastrointestinal tract have been reported. We report a case of biliary colic due to metastatic colon adenocarcinoma to the CBD. Obstructive jaundice with signs of acalculous cholecystitis on imaging in a patient with a history of colon cancer should raise suspicion for metastasis to CBD. PMID:27144209

  15. Surgery for Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... heat. The heat helps kill any remaining tumor cells. This allows PMMA to be used without cryosurgery for some types of bone tumors. Surgical treatment of metastasis To be able to cure a bone cancer, it and any existing metastases must be removed ...

  16. Upfront Chemotherapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lam, Elaine T; Flaig, Thomas W

    2015-12-01

    Traditionally, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the standard initial treatment for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC), with chemotherapy utilized in the castration-resistant setting. Data reported from three recent clinical trials shed new light on the role of upfront docetaxel in advanced or mHSPC. Two of these studies-CHAARTED and STAMPEDE-showed significant improvement in overall survival, while the third study, GETUG-AFU 15, showed no statistical difference. The CHAARTED study showed a 13.6-month survival improvement and the STAMPEDE study showed a 10-month survival improvement with ADT plus docetaxel, compared with ADT alone, in the hormone-sensitive setting. These numbers are remarkable when compared with the 2.9-month survival benefit from docetaxel in the metastatic castration-resistant setting, which has been the standard setting for the use of docetaxel in advanced prostate cancer. In this review, we describe the historical data for chemotherapy in the perioperative and metastatic prostate cancer settings, and the recent trials that are changing the paradigm in support of docetaxel in the upfront setting. PMID:26676900

  17. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Cosmegen (Dactinomycin) Dactinomycin Denosumab Doxorubicin Hydrochloride ...

  18. Multiple bone lesions resembling a metastatic origin. An unexpected diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Molina-Garrido, M José; Mora, A; Andrada, Encarna; Guillén-Ponce, Carmen; Cánovas, Víctor; Guirado-Risueño, M; Pastor, Elisa; Molina, M Angeles; Molina, M Jesús; Martín Hidalgo, Alberto; Carrato, Alfredo

    2008-04-01

    Lytic and blastic lesions have been associated to malignant tumours, such as solid cancer (breast cancer, renal cancer, prostate cancer, malignant melanoma or thyroid tumours). Although a mixed pattern with lytic and blastic lesions is due to metastatic tumour, this is not the only possible origin. The following case shows a systematic. This case report shows the number of tests that were made in order to discover the origin of osteolytic and osteoblastic lesions and it is notable that there is not an occult neoplasia on every occasion. PMID:18411200

  19. The influence of the pre-metastatic niche on breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Siegel, Peter M

    2016-09-28

    The emergence of metastatic disease constitutes a significant life-threatening development during cancer progression. To date, intensive efforts have been focused on understanding the intrinsic properties that confer malignant potential to cancer cells, as well as the role of the primary tumour microenvironment in promoting cancer metastasis. Beyond events occurring at the primary site, the metastatic cascade is composed of numerous barriers that must be overcome in order for disseminating cancer cells to form distal metastases. The most formidable of these is the ability of cancer cells to seed and grow in a completely foreign microenvironment. Interestingly, solid malignancies often display a particular tropism for specific tissue sites. For example, breast patients with metastatic disease will often develop bone, lung, liver or brain metastases. This mini-review will explore aspects of pre-existing and induced metastatic niches and focus on how the unique composition and function of diverse niche components, within common sites of breast cancer metastasis, enable the survival and growth of disseminated cancer cells. These common supportive functions of the niche are provided by a complex array of stromal components and molecular mechanisms that are, in part, reflective of the tissue in which the metastases arise. Finally, the metastatic niche is a dynamic structure that is continually altered and sculpted by the cancer cells during progression of the metastatic lesion. PMID:26577808

  20. Aminoterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PINP) correlates to bone loss and predicts the efficacy of antiresorptive therapy in pre- and post-menopausal non-metastatic breast cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Saarto, T.; Blomqvist, C.; Risteli, J.; Risteli, L.; Sarna, S.; Elomaa, I.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between changes in collagen metabolites (ICTP, mature cross-linked carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen; PINP, the amino-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen) and bone mineral density (BMD) in 206 pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer patients with non-metastatic disease. All patients received adjuvant cancer treatment--premenopausal patients chemotherapy and post-menopausal patients anti-oestrogens. In addition, the patients were also randomized to receive oral clodronate 1600 mg daily for 3 years. BMD was measured at baseline and at 1 and 2 years, the collagen metabolites at baseline and at 1 year. There was a highly significant negative correlation between the changes in PINP and BMD in lumbar spine and femoral neck from baseline to 12 months in all patients (r(s) = -0.68, P < 0.0001, and -0.45, P < 0.0001, respectively), and in pre- and post-menopausal patients separately. The changes in PINP levels at 12 months predict further changes in BMD at 24 months (r = -0.70, P < 0.0001, and -0.51, P < 0.0001, respectively). ICTP and BMD changes correlated significantly only in lumbar spine of premenopausal patients who developed rapid bone loss due to chemotherapy-induced amenorrhoea (r(s) = -0.34, P = 0.0003). The PINP levels at 12 months were significantly lower in the clodronate group than in the control group (P < 0.0001). Our results indicate that PINP is a sensitive marker of bone turnover rate. Changes in PINP levels significantly predicted changes in BMD and correlated with the antiresorptive efficacy of clodronate treatment. PMID:9683300

  1. Optimizing initial chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Mantripragada, Kalyan C; Safran, Howard

    2016-05-01

    The two combination chemotherapy regimens FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel represent major breakthroughs in the management of metastatic pancreatic cancer. Both regimens showed unprecedented survival advantage in the setting of front-line therapy. However, their application for treatment of patients in the community is challenging because of significant toxicities, thus limiting potential benefits to a narrow population of patients. Modifications to the dose intensity or schedule of those regimens improve their tolerability, while likely retaining survival advantage over single-agent chemotherapy. Newer strategies to optimize these two active regimens in advanced pancreatic cancer are being explored that can help personalize treatment to individual patients. PMID:26939741

  2. Medical Management of Metastatic Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Jessica E.; Sherman, Scott K.; O’Dorisio, Thomas M.; Howe, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is an aggressive form of thyroid cancer, which occurs in both heritable and sporadic forms. Discovery that mutations in the RET protooncogene predispose to familial cases of this disease has allowed for presymptomatic identification of gene carriers and prophylactic surgery to improve the prognosis of these patients. A significant number of patients with the sporadic type of MTC and even with familial disease, still present with nodal or distant metastases, making surgical cure difficult. Over the past several decades, many different types of therapy for metastatic disease have been attempted, with limited success. Improved understanding of the molecular defects and pathways involved in both familial and sporadic MTC has resulted in new hope for these patients with the development of drugs targeting the specific alterations responsible. This new era of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors represents a significant step forward from previous trials of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy. Although much progress has been made, additional agents and strategies are needed to achieve durable, long-term responses in patients with metastatic MTC. This article reviews the history and results of medical management for metastatic MTC from the early 1970s up until the present day. PMID:24942936

  3. Mechanisms of cancer-induced bone pain

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Ondoua, AN; Symons-Liguori, AM; Vanderah, TW

    2013-01-01

    Cancerous cells can originate in a number of different tissues such as prostate, breast and lung, yet often go undetected and are non-painful. Many types of cancers will metastasize toward the bone microenvironment first. Tumor burden within the bone causes excruciating breakthrough pain with properties of continual pain inadequately managed with current analgesics. Part of this failure is due to the poor understanding of the etiology of cancer pain. Animal models of cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) have revealed that the neurochemistry of cancer has features distinctive from other chronic pain states. For example, preclinical models of metastatic cancer often result in the upregulation of neurotrophins, such as NGF and BDNF that can lead to nociceptive sensitization. Preclinical cancer models demonstrate nociceptive neuronal expression of acid sensing receptors, such as ASIC1 and TRPV1 that respond to a significant increase in an acidic cancer-induced environment within the bone. CIBP is correlated with a significant increase in pro-inflammatory mediators acting peripherally and centrally, contributing to neuronal hypersensitive states. And finally, cancer cells generate high levels of oxidative molecules that are thought to significantly increase extracellular glutamate, thus activating primary afferent neurons. Knowledge of the unique neuro-molecular profile of cancer pain will ultimately lead to the development of novel and superior therapeutics for CIBP. PMID:24076008

  4. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  5. Management of metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Brandon; Sweeney, Christopher J

    2015-03-01

    In 2014, prostate cancer will affect roughly 15 % of American men during their lifetimes with about 230,000 new cases and 29,000 deaths per year. If required, most can be treated with curative surgery or radiotherapy. Upon relapse, androgen deprivation therapy (intermittent or continuous) is the cornerstone of treatment for hormone-sensitive disease. Response is variable and treatment is associated with a significant risk of toxicity. Recently, significant advances in survival have been demonstrated with chemohormonal therapy in men with high-volume disease. In addition, new findings have informed the approach to preventing bone complications in patients on therapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Devising clinical prediction tools and biomarkers is needed to select patients most likely to benefit from certain therapies and allow for a personalized approach. PMID:25677237

  6. [Cancer cell plasticity and metastatic dissemination].

    PubMed

    Moyret-Lalle, Caroline; Pommier, Roxane; Bouard, Charlotte; Nouri, Ebticem; Richard, Geoffrey; Puisieux, Alain

    Metastatic dissemination consists of a sequence of events resulting in the invasion by cancer cells of tissues located away from the primary tumour. This process is highly inefficient, since each event represents an obstacle that only a limited number of cells can overcome. However, two biological phenomena intrinsically linked with tumour development facilitate the dissemination of cancer cells throughout the body and promote the formation of metastases, namely the genetic diversity of cancer cells within a given tumour, which arises from their genetic instability and from successive clonal expansions, and cellular plasticity conveyed to the cells by micro-environmental signals. Genetic diversity increases the probability of selecting cells that are intrinsically resistant to biological and physical constraints encountered during metastatic dissemination, whereas cellular plasticity provides cells with the capacity to adapt to stressful conditions and to changes in the microenvironment. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition, an embryonic trans-differentiation process frequently reactivated during tumour development, plays an important role in that context by endowing tumor cells with a unique capacity of motility, survival and adaptability to the novel environments and stresses encountered during the invasion-metastasis cascade. PMID:27615180

  7. Is metastatic pancreatic cancer an untargetable malignancy?

    PubMed Central

    Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Gharios, Joseph; Elkarak, Fadi; Antoun, Joelle; Ghosn, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC) is one of the most aggressive malignancies, known to be chemo-resistant and have been recently considered resistant to some targeted therapies (TT). Erlotinib combined to gemcitabine is the only targeted therapy that showed an overall survival benefit in MPC. New targets and therapeutic approaches, based on new-TT, are actually being evaluated in MPC going from immunotherapy, epigenetics, tumor suppressor gene and oncogenes to stromal matrix regulators. We aim in this paper to present the major causes rendering MPC an untargetable malignancy and to focus on the new therapeutic modalities based on TT in MPC. PMID:26989465

  8. Metastatic mimics on bone scan: "All that glitters is not metastatic".

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    In this pictorial review, cases where benign diseases caused a diagnostic dilemma on bone scan are illustrated. This review highlights the value of correlative imaging- single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (CT), CT, and magnetic resonance imaging in solving the diagnostic problem by exact localization and characterization of the lesions. All these eventually lead to increased diagnostic confidence, better and more accurate reporting and avoidance of delay in initiation of treatment due to equivocal results. The imaging features of these benign pathologies - which are "mimics of metastatic disease," are elaborated so that the reader can incorporate them while reporting so as to avoid mis-interpretations. PMID:27385887

  9. Metastatic breast cancer in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    MEYER, AARON A.; HWANG, M.; FARASATPOUR, M.; JANARDHAN, R.; MARGENTHALER, J.A.; VIRGO, K.S.; JOHNSON, FRANK E.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major health problem worldwide. The median survival duration for patients with metastatic breast cancer is two to three years. Approximately 1% of populations worldwide have schizophrenia. The manner in which schizophrenic patients fare when diagnosed with metastatic breast carcinoma (MBC) was evaluated. We queried the National Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) datasets using computer codes for a pre-existing diagnosis of schizophrenia and a later diagnosis of breast carcinoma. Chart-based data concerning the identified subjects were then requested. Previously determined inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to select evaluable patients from the medical records, prior to extracting demographic details and data concerning the treatment course in each subject. Ten patients had distant metastases at initial diagnosis, while seven developed MBC following prior curative-intent treatment. Two patients refused therapy. Ten did not comply with recommended management. Five harmed or threatened physicians, other caregivers or themselves. Schizophrenic patients with MBC often fail to understand the nature of their illnesses. Often they do not accept palliative treatment, while a number of them do not comply with therapy, once initiated. They often exhibit behaviors that are detrimental to themselves or others. Formal psychiatric consultation is therefore necessary in patients. Several detrimental behaviors may be predicted reliably by history alone. PMID:24649175

  10. Continuous infusion interleukin-2 and famotidine in metastatic kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Quan, Walter D Y; Vinogradov, Mikhail; Quan, Francine M; Khan, Nawazish; Liles, Darla K; Walker, Paul R

    2006-10-01

    Infusional interleukin-2 (IL-2) is able to elicit lymphokine-activated killer cell (LAK) cytotoxicity against kidney cancer in vitro and in vivo. Famotidine may be able to augment LAK cytotoxicity against neoplastic cells. Fifteen (15) patients were treated with continuous-infusion IL-2 (9-18 MIU/m2/24 hours) for 72 hours and famotidine 20 mg intravenously twice per day. Cycles were repeated every 3 weeks. These patients had a median age of 60 years (range, 29-72), had a median performance status of 1 (range, 0-1), and had metastatic sites, including lung, bone, lymph node, and liver. The most common toxicities of this regimen were hypophosphatemia, fever, nausea/emesis, rigors, elevated creatinine, and hypomagnesemia. One (1) complete and 6 partial responses have been seen (47% response rate). The median duration of response is 9 months. The median survival for all patients is 20 months. Five (5) patients are alive at a median of 36+ months. This combination of infusional IL-2 with famotidine is active in metastatic kidney cancer. PMID:17105423

  11. Bone-derived IGF mediates crosstalk between bone and breast cancer cells in bony metastases

    PubMed Central

    Hiraga, Toru; Myoui, Akira; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Sasaki, Akira; Hata, Kenji; Morita, Yoshihiro; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Rosen, Clifford J.; Mundy, Gregory R.; Yoneda, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    The continuous release of bone-stored growth factors following bone resorption promotes the colonization of circulating cancer cells. However, the precise role of each of the various growth factors remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of bone-derived insulin-like growth factor (IGF) in the development of bone metastases in an animal model of breast cancer. We found that local stimulation of calvarial bone resorption prior to cell inoculation stimulated subsequent bone metastases to that site in vivo, while inhibition of bone resorption inhibited bone metastases. Anchorage-independent growth of cancer cells was stimulated by the culture supernatants from resorbed bones, which contained elevated levels of IGF type I (IGF-1). This stimulation was blocked by IGF-1 receptor (IGF1R) neutralizing antibody, but not antibody targeting other bone-stored growth factors including TGFβ, fibroblast growth factors, and platelet derived growth factors. While recombinant human IGF-I caused IGFIR tyrosine autophosphorylation, followed by activation of Akt and NF-κB in cancer cells, dominant-negative inhibition of IGFIR, Akt, or NF-κB significantly reduced bone metastases with increased apoptosis and decreased mitosis in metastatic cells. Together, our findings suggest that bone-derived IGF-I bridges the crosstalk between bone and metastasized cancer cells via activation of the IGFIR/Akt/NF-κB pathway. Disruption of this pathway therefore may represent a promising therapeutic intervention for bone metastasis. PMID:22738911

  12. Metastatic prostate cancer initially presenting as chylothorax: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YANG, YU-JIN; SEO, MINJUNG; JEON, HEE-JEONG; NOH, JIN-HEE; PARK, SEOL HOON; CHOI, YUNSUK; JO, JAE-CHEOL; BAEK, JIN HO; KOH, SU-JIN; KIM, HAWK; MIN, YOUNG JOO

    2016-01-01

    Chylothorax is caused by disruption or obstruction of the thoracic duct, which results in leakage of chyle in the pleural space. The most common etiologies are malignancy and trauma. Among the causative malignancies, lymphoma is the most common, followed by primary lung cancer, mediastinal tumors, and other metastatic malignancies. Conversely, prostate cancer has rarely been reported as the cause of chylothorax. We herein report a case of metastatic prostate cancer initially presenting as chylothorax, with disappearance of the pleural effusion after the initiation of androgen deprivation therapy. Moreover, we also discuss the various rare manifestations of metastatic prostate cancer, including chylothorax. PMID:27313861

  13. [Panitumumab-treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Pikó, Béla

    2009-06-01

    In the molecular target treatment strategy of metastatic colorectal cancer patients panitumumab represents a new class of drugs due to its fully human nature, and no need for premedication and loading dose. Panitumumab binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) selectively. In registration pivotal studies the analysis of patient subgroups for KRAS status gives strong evidence for the important role of RAS oncogene: median progression-free survival was 16 weeks on panitumumab arm in KRAS wild-type patients (8 weeks in best supportive care), while in KRAS mutant patients panitumumab showed no efficacy, however adverse events were more frequent and severe. According to SmPC, panitumumab is indicated as monotherapy for the treatment of patients with EGFR expressing metastatic colorectal carcinoma with non-mutated (wild-type) KRAS after failure of fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin- , and irinotecan-containing chemotherapy regimens. Adverse events are similar as with other EGFR inhibitors: skin symptoms (rash), lung infiltrates, diarrhoea, ion abnormalities of renal origin. The drug was formerly available via named patient reimbursement, and now is financed by diagnosis-related group (DRG) system. PMID:19581179

  14. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bone cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  15. Metastatic cancer stem cells: new molecular targets for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Leirós, G J; Balañá, M E

    2011-11-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis, predicts that a small subpopulation of cancer cells that possess "stem-like" characteristics, are responsible for initiating and maintaining cancer growth. According to the CSC model the many cell populations found in a tumour might represent diverse stages of differentiation. From the cellular point of view metastasis is considered a highly inefficient process and only a subset of tumour cells is capable of successfully traversing the entire metastatic cascade and eventually re-initiates tumour growth at distant sites. Some similar features of both normal and malignant stem cells suggest that CSCs are not only responsible for tumorigenesis, but also for metastases. The CSC theory proposes that the ability of a tumour to metastasize is an inherent property of a subset of CSCs. The similar biological characteristics shared by normal stem cells (NSCs) and CSCs mainly implicate self-renewal and differentiation potential, survival ability, niche-specific microenvironment requirements and specific homing to metastatic sites and may have important implications in terms of new approaches to cancer therapy in the metastatic setting. There are several agents targeting many of these CSC features that have shown to be effective both in vitro and in vivo. Although clinical trials results are still preliminary and continue under investigation, these new therapies are very promising. The identification of new therapeutic targets and drugs based on CSC model constitutes a great challenge. PMID:21470128

  16. Symptom Management in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, William; Muss, Hyman B.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 40,000 women die as a result of breast cancer each year and many more live with advanced disease. When breast cancer recurs, the goals of treatment often shift from one of cure to controlling the disease for as long as possible while palliating symptoms interfering with the patient's functional status and quality of life. This requires ongoing discussions with the patient and family about the goals of care. Many symptoms depend on the site of metastasis, with bone being the most frequent, and commonly occur with fatigue, depression, insomnia, and pain. The purpose of this paper is to identify and provide an overview of the management of the most common symptoms in patients with breast cancer metastases. PMID:21880861

  17. Bone and cancer: the osteoncology

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Toni; Mercatali, Laura; Amadori, Dino

    2013-01-01

    Summary In recent years clinicians have witnessed a radical change in the relationship between bone and cancer, with in particular an increase in bone metastases incidence due to an improvement of patients survival. Bone metastases are responsible for the high morbidity in cancer patients with a strong clinical impact. For all these reasons, efforts have been directed to this important field with the foundation of the osteoncology, a new scientific and clinical branch involved in the management of patients with bone cancer disease, including primary bone tumors and bone metastases. Another innovative and important osteoncology topic is the Cancer Treatment Induced Bone Loss (CTIBL) that is mainly caused by antitumoral treatment with bone resorption induction. The diagnostic and therapeutic options are described briefly in order to highlight the importance of the multidisciplinary approach in this new field. PMID:24133529

  18. Denosumab Reduces Risk of Bone Side Effects in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The biological agent denosumab (Xgeva) is more effective than zoledronic acid at decreasing the risk of bone fractures and other skeletal-related events (SRE) in men with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer, according to results from a randomi

  19. Genomic landscape of metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haan, Josien C.; Labots, Mariette; Rausch, Christian; Koopman, Miriam; Tol, Jolien; Mekenkamp, Leonie J. M.; van de Wiel, Mark A.; Israeli, Danielle; van Essen, Hendrik F.; van Grieken, Nicole C. T.; Voorham, Quirinus J. M.; Bosch, Linda J. W.; Qu, Xueping; Kabbarah, Omar; Verheul, Henk M. W.; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Ylstra, Bauke; Meijer, Gerrit A.

    2014-01-01

    Response to drug therapy in individual colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is associated with tumour biology. Here we describe the genomic landscape of tumour samples of a homogeneous well-annotated series of patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) of two phase III clinical trials, CAIRO and CAIRO2. DNA copy number aberrations of 349 patients are determined. Within three treatment arms, 194 chromosomal subregions are associated with progression-free survival (PFS; uncorrected single-test P-values <0.005). These subregions are filtered for effect on messenger RNA expression, using an independent data set from The Cancer Genome Atlas which returned 171 genes. Three chromosomal regions are associated with a significant difference in PFS between treatment arms with or without irinotecan. One of these regions, 6q16.1–q21, correlates in vitro with sensitivity to SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan. This genomic landscape of mCRC reveals a number of DNA copy number aberrations associated with response to drug therapy. PMID:25394515

  20. Genomic landscape of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Haan, Josien C; Labots, Mariette; Rausch, Christian; Koopman, Miriam; Tol, Jolien; Mekenkamp, Leonie J M; van de Wiel, Mark A; Israeli, Danielle; van Essen, Hendrik F; van Grieken, Nicole C T; Voorham, Quirinus J M; Bosch, Linda J W; Qu, Xueping; Kabbarah, Omar; Verheul, Henk M W; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Punt, Cornelis J A; Ylstra, Bauke; Meijer, Gerrit A

    2014-01-01

    Response to drug therapy in individual colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is associated with tumour biology. Here we describe the genomic landscape of tumour samples of a homogeneous well-annotated series of patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) of two phase III clinical trials, CAIRO and CAIRO2. DNA copy number aberrations of 349 patients are determined. Within three treatment arms, 194 chromosomal subregions are associated with progression-free survival (PFS; uncorrected single-test P-values <0.005). These subregions are filtered for effect on messenger RNA expression, using an independent data set from The Cancer Genome Atlas which returned 171 genes. Three chromosomal regions are associated with a significant difference in PFS between treatment arms with or without irinotecan. One of these regions, 6q16.1-q21, correlates in vitro with sensitivity to SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan. This genomic landscape of mCRC reveals a number of DNA copy number aberrations associated with response to drug therapy. PMID:25394515

  1. Metastatic male ductal breast cancer mimicking obstructing primary colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Koleilat, Issam; Syal, Anil; Hena, Muhammad

    2010-03-01

    Male breast cancer comprises only about 1% of all breast cancers. Commonly, sites of metastases include the central nervous system, lungs, bones, and even liver. In females, extrahepatic gastrointestinal metastases are unusual but have been reported with various clinical presentations. We are reporting the first case of a male patient with a history of ductal breast carcinoma that developed colonic metastasis and presented with mechanical large bowel obstruction masquerading as primary colon cancer. PMID:23675178

  2. Metastatic Male Ductal Breast Cancer Mimicking Obstructing Primary Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koleilat, Issam; Syal, Anil; Hena, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Male breast cancer comprises only about 1% of all breast cancers. Commonly, sites of metastases include the central nervous system, lungs, bones, and even liver. In females, extrahepatic gastrointestinal metastases are unusual but have been reported with various clinical presentations. We are reporting the first case of a male patient with a history of ductal breast carcinoma that developed colonic metastasis and presented with mechanical large bowel obstruction masquerading as primary colon cancer. PMID:23675178

  3. General Information about Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Occult Primary Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  4. Simultaneous bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax in metastatic testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Gudbrandsdottir, Gigja; Sverrisdottir, Asgerdur; Thrainsson, Adolf; Einarsson, Gudmundur V; Gudbjartsson, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax (SBSP) is a very rare condition, mainly detected in patients with underlying pulmonary disease. This study reports a case of SBSP following chemotherapy for metastatic testicular cancer. PMID:19140040

  5. Enzalutamide Improves Survival in Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared enzalutamide (Xtandi®) and placebo for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer that had progressed during treatment with androgen deprivation therapy.

  6. Eribulin Improves Survival of Women with Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Treatment with eribulin (Halaven™) improved overall survival in women with metastatic breast cancer whose disease progressed despite multiple rounds of prior chemotherapy, according to the results of a phase III clinical trial called EMBRACE.

  7. Nab-Paclitaxel Plus Gemcitabine for Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from a phase III trial that compared the combination of albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel [Abraxane®]) and gemcitabine (Gemzar®) versus gemcitabine alone in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer.

  8. The BMP Inhibitor Coco Reactivates Breast Cancer Cells at Lung Metastatic sites

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hua; Chakraborty, Goutam; Lee-Lim, Ai Ping; Mo, Qianxing; Decker, Markus; Vonica, Alin; Shen, Ronglai; Brogi, Edi; Brivanlou, Ali H.; Giancotti, Filippo G.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The mechanistic underpinnings of metastatic dormancy and reactivation are poorly understood. A gain-of-function cDNA screen reveals that Coco, a secreted antagonist of TGF-β ligands, induces dormant breast cancer cells to undergo reactivation in the lung. Mechanistic studies indicate that Coco exerts this effect by blocking lung-derived BMP ligands. Whereas Coco enhances the manifestation of traits associated with cancer stem cells, BMP signaling suppresses it. Coco induces a discrete gene expression signature, which is strongly associated with metastatic relapse to the lung but not to the bone or brain in patients. Experiments in mouse models suggest that these latter organs contain niches devoid of bioactive BMP. These findings reveal that metastasis-initiating cells need to overcome organ-specific anti-metastatic signals in order to undergo reactivation. PMID:22901808

  9. Bone-derived soluble factors and laminin-511 cooperate to promote migration, invasion and survival of bone-metastatic breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Denoyer, Delphine; Kusuma, Nicole; Burrows, Allan; Ling, Xiawei; Jupp, Lara; Anderson, Robin L; Pouliot, Normand

    2014-04-01

    Tumor intrinsic and extrinsic factors are thought to contribute to bone metastasis but little is known about how they cooperate to promote breast cancer spread to bone. We used the bone-metastatic 4T1BM2 mammary carcinoma model to investigate the cooperative interactions between tumor LM-511 and bone-derived soluble factors in vitro. We show that bone conditioned medium cooperates with LM-511 to enhance 4T1BM2 cell migration and invasion and is sufficient alone to promote survival in the absence of serum. These responses were associated with increased secretion of MMP-9 and activation of ERK and AKT signaling pathways and were partially blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of MMP-9, AKT-1/2 or MEK. Importantly, pre-treatment of 4T1BM2 cells with an AKT-1/2 inhibitor significantly reduced experimental metastasis to bone in vivo. Promotion of survival and invasive responses by bone-derived soluble factors and tumor-derived LM-511 are likely to contribute to the metastatic spread of breast tumors to bone. PMID:24601751

  10. What Happens After Treatment for Bone Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer? Can I get another cancer after having bone cancer? Lifestyle changes after treatment for bone cancer How does having bone cancer affect your ... talk to your cancer care team about any changes or problems you notice and any ... extensive bone surgery, a program of rehabilitation and physical therapy ...

  11. BRAF-Directed Therapy in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Korphaisarn, Krittiya; Kopetz, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Activating BRAF (V-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B) mutations occur in approximately 5% to 10% of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, mostly V600E mutation, and it is associated with distinct clinical and pathological features. To date, there are no approved treatments to target this mutation. BRAF inhibitor monotherapy has limited efficacy, in contrast to metastatic melanoma. Combination strategies that block not only BRAF mutated kinase but other alternative pathways are ongoing and have demonstrated improved activity. This review aims to provide data about new strategies to target to BRAF gene mutation in metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:27341594

  12. Therapeutic potential of chemokine signal inhibition for metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Takanori; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is incurable by current therapies including chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that tumor-infiltrating macrophages promote establishment of the lethal metastatic foci and contribute to therapeutic resistance. Recent studies suggest that the accumulation of these macrophages is regulated by a chemokine network established in the tumor microenvironment. In this perspective paper, we elaborate on the chemokine signals that can attract monocytes/macrophages to the site of metastasis, and discuss whether inhibition of these chemokine signals can represent a new therapeutic strategy for metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26275794

  13. Bone imaging in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Dotan, Zohar A

    2008-08-01

    Bone metastases of solid tumors are common, and about 80% of them occur in patients with breast, lung or prostate cancer. Bone metastases can be suspected clinically and by laboratory tests; however, a final diagnosis relies on radiographic evidence. Bone metastases of prostate cancer usually have osteoblastic characteristics, manifested by pathological bone resorption and formation. Conventional bone scans (e.g. with (99m)Tc-labeled methylene diphosphonate) are preferred to plain-film radiography for surveillance of the entire skeleton. Radiologic diagnosis of bone metastases, particularly in patients with low burden of disease, is difficult because noncancerous bone lesions that mimic cancer are common. Conventional bone scans are limited by their low sensitivity and high false-negative rate (up to 40%) compared with advanced bone-imaging modalities such as PET, PET-CT and MRI, which might assist or replace conventional scanning methods. The correct diagnosis of bone involvement in prostate cancer is crucial to assess the effects of therapy on the primary tumor, the patient's prognosis, and the efficacy of bone-specific treatments that can reduce future bone-associated morbidity. In addition, predictive tools such as nomograms enable the identification of patients at risk of bone involvement during the course of their disease. Such tools may limit treatment costs by avoidance of unnecessary tests and might reduce both short-term and long-term complication rates. PMID:18682719

  14. (-)-Gossypol reduces invasiveness in metastatic prostate cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acquisition of metastatic ability by prostatic cancer cells is the most lethal aspect of prostatic cancer progression. (-)-Gossypol, a polyphenolic compound present in cottonseeds, possesses anti-proliferation and pro-apoptotic effects in various cancer cells. In this study, the differences betwee...

  15. Stratification and therapeutic potential of PML in metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Martín, Natalia; Piva, Marco; Urosevic, Jelena; Aldaz, Paula; Sutherland, James D.; Fernández-Ruiz, Sonia; Arreal, Leire; Torrano, Verónica; Cortazar, Ana R.; Planet, Evarist; Guiu, Marc; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Garcia, Stephane; Macías, Iratxe; Salvador, Fernando; Domenici, Giacomo; Rueda, Oscar M.; Zabala-Letona, Amaia; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Zúñiga-García, Patricia; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Valcárcel-Jiménez, Lorea; Sánchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Varela-Rey, Marta; Martínez-Chantar, Maria Luz; Anguita, Juan; Ibrahim, Yasir H.; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Lawrie, Charles H.; Aransay, Ana M.; Iovanna, Juan L.; Baselga, Jose; Caldas, Carlos; Barrio, Rosa; Serra, Violeta; dM Vivanco, Maria; Matheu, Ander; Gomis, Roger R.; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-01-01

    Patient stratification has been instrumental for the success of targeted therapies in breast cancer. However, the molecular basis of metastatic breast cancer and its therapeutic vulnerabilities remain poorly understood. Here we show that PML is a novel target in aggressive breast cancer. The acquisition of aggressiveness and metastatic features in breast tumours is accompanied by the elevated PML expression and enhanced sensitivity to its inhibition. Interestingly, we find that STAT3 is responsible, at least in part, for the transcriptional upregulation of PML in breast cancer. Moreover, PML targeting hampers breast cancer initiation and metastatic seeding. Mechanistically, this biological activity relies on the regulation of the stem cell gene SOX9 through interaction of PML with its promoter region. Altogether, we identify a novel pathway sustaining breast cancer aggressiveness that can be therapeutically exploited in combination with PML-based stratification. PMID:27553708

  16. Stratification and therapeutic potential of PML in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Martín-Martín, Natalia; Piva, Marco; Urosevic, Jelena; Aldaz, Paula; Sutherland, James D; Fernández-Ruiz, Sonia; Arreal, Leire; Torrano, Verónica; Cortazar, Ana R; Planet, Evarist; Guiu, Marc; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Garcia, Stephane; Macías, Iratxe; Salvador, Fernando; Domenici, Giacomo; Rueda, Oscar M; Zabala-Letona, Amaia; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Zúñiga-García, Patricia; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Valcárcel-Jiménez, Lorea; Sánchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Varela-Rey, Marta; Martínez-Chantar, Maria Luz; Anguita, Juan; Ibrahim, Yasir H; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Lawrie, Charles H; Aransay, Ana M; Iovanna, Juan L; Baselga, Jose; Caldas, Carlos; Barrio, Rosa; Serra, Violeta; Vivanco, Maria dM; Matheu, Ander; Gomis, Roger R; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-01-01

    Patient stratification has been instrumental for the success of targeted therapies in breast cancer. However, the molecular basis of metastatic breast cancer and its therapeutic vulnerabilities remain poorly understood. Here we show that PML is a novel target in aggressive breast cancer. The acquisition of aggressiveness and metastatic features in breast tumours is accompanied by the elevated PML expression and enhanced sensitivity to its inhibition. Interestingly, we find that STAT3 is responsible, at least in part, for the transcriptional upregulation of PML in breast cancer. Moreover, PML targeting hampers breast cancer initiation and metastatic seeding. Mechanistically, this biological activity relies on the regulation of the stem cell gene SOX9 through interaction of PML with its promoter region. Altogether, we identify a novel pathway sustaining breast cancer aggressiveness that can be therapeutically exploited in combination with PML-based stratification. PMID:27553708

  17. iTRAQ identification of candidate serum biomarkers associated with metastatic progression of human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Ishtiaq; Evans, Caroline A; Glen, Adam; Cross, Simon S; Eaton, Colby L; Down, Jenny; Pesce, Giancarlo; Phillips, Joshua T; Yen, Ow Saw; Thalmann, George N; Wright, Phillip C; Hamdy, Freddie C

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge in the management of patients with prostate cancer is identifying those individuals at risk of developing metastatic disease, as in most cases the disease will remain indolent. We analyzed pooled serum samples from 4 groups of patients (n = 5 samples/group), collected prospectively and actively monitored for a minimum of 5 yrs. Patients groups were (i) histological diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia with no evidence of cancer 'BPH', (ii) localised cancer with no evidence of progression, 'non-progressing' (iii) localised cancer with evidence of biochemical progression, 'progressing', and (iv) bone metastasis at presentation 'metastatic'. Pooled samples were immuno-depleted of the 14 most highly abundant proteins and analysed using a 4-plex iTRAQ approach. Overall 122 proteins were identified and relatively quantified. Comparisons of progressing versus non-progressing groups identified the significant differential expression of 25 proteins (p<0.001). Comparisons of metastatic versus progressing groups identified the significant differential expression of 23 proteins. Mapping the differentially expressed proteins onto the prostate cancer progression pathway revealed the dysregulated expression of individual proteins, pairs of proteins and 'panels' of proteins to be associated with particular stages of disease development and progression. The median immunostaining intensity of eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 alpha 1 (eEF1A1), one of the candidates identified, was significantly higher in osteoblasts in close proximity to metastatic tumour cells compared with osteoblasts in control bone (p = 0.0353, Mann Whitney U). Our proteomic approach has identified leads for potentially useful serum biomarkers associated with the metastatic progression of prostate cancer. The panels identified, including eEF1A1 warrant further investigation and validation. PMID:22355332

  18. To treat or not to treat, that is the question: the role of bone-targeted therapy in metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Higano, Celestia S

    2014-04-10

    The Oncology Grand Rounds series is designed to place original reports published in the Journal into clinical context. A case presentation is followed by a description of diagnostic and management challenges, a review of the relevant literature, and a summary of the authors' suggested management approaches. The goal of this series is to help readers better understand how to apply the results of key studies, including those published in Journal of Clinical Oncology, to patients seen in their own clinical practice. A 62-year-old construction site manager experienced 6 weeks of back pain that was not responsive to over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications. He visited his wife's primary care physician for evaluation. He denied neurologic symptoms or worsening of pain while lying down. He smoked (30 pack-years, quit 4 years ago), and drinks 3 beers each evening and more on weekends (up to a six-pack). He has had two lower extremity fractures from falls at construction sites. At the time of the physical examination, he was 5 feet 11 inches tall and weighed 194 pounds. He was alert, oriented, and in mild distress. He had no percussion tenderness of his spine, and a neurologic examination was negative. A digital rectal examination revealed an enlarged prostate with an area of induration of the left, normal rectal tone, and guaiac-negative stool. Laboratory studies included normal blood counts, electrolytes, and renal and liver function tests (including lactic acid dehydrogenase and total protein). The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was 114 ng/mL; he had no prior PSA test. A bone scan showed diffuse bony involvement including the T7 vertebral body and left pedicle, ribs, pelvis, and calvarium. Magnetic resonance imaging of his spine confirmed bone metastases but showed no evidence of extension into the epidural space or spinal cord compromise. A prostate biopsy revealed Gleason 4+4 adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Androgen deprivation therapy with

  19. How Is Bone Cancer Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors. This information about the tumor, lymph nodes, metastasis, and grade is combined in a process called ... the bone or nearby lymph nodes M1: Distant metastasis (the cancer has spread) M1a: The cancer has ...

  20. Metastatic Breast Cancer in Medication-Related Osteonecrosis Around Mandibular Implants

    PubMed Central

    Favia, Gianfranco; Tempesta, Angela; Limongelli, Luisa; Crincoli, Vito; Piattelli, Adriano; Maiorano, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 66 Final Diagnosis: Breast cancer metastasis in medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Clinical and radiological examination • surgical treatment Specialty: Dentistry Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Many authors have considered dental implants to be unrelated to increased risk of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ). Nevertheless, more recently, more cases of peri-implant MRONJ (PI-MRONJ) have been described, thus becoming a challenging health problem. Also, metastatic cancer deposits are not infrequently found at peri-implant sites and this may represent an additional complication for such treatments. We present the case of a breast cancer patient with PI-MRONJ, presenting a clinically and radiologically undetected metastasis within the necrotic bone, and highlight the necessity of an accurate histopathological analysis. Case Report: A 66-year-old female patient, who had received intravenous bisphosphonates for bone breast cancer metastases, came to our attention for a non-implant surgery-triggered PI-MRONJ. After surgical resection of the necrotic bone, conventional and immunohistochemical examinations were performed, which showed breast cancer deposits within the necrotic bone. Conclusions: Cancer patients with metastatic disease, who are undergoing bisphosphonate treatment, may develop unusual complications, including MRONJ, which is a site at risk for hosting additional metastatic deposits that may be clinically and radiologically overlooked. Such risk is increased by previous or concomitant implant procedures. Consequently, clinicians should be prudent when performing implant surgery in cancer patients with advanced-stage disease and consider the possible occurrence of peri-implant metastases while planning adequate treatments in such patients. PMID:26371774

  1. Computational analysis of gene expression space associated with metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Prostate carcinoma is among the most common types of cancer affecting hundreds of thousands people every year. Once the metastatic form of prostate carcinoma is documented, the majority of patients die from their tumors as opposed to other causes. The key to successful treatment is in the earliest possible diagnosis, as well as understanding the molecular mechanisms of metastatic progression. A number of recent studies have identified multiple biomarkers for metastatic progression. However, most of the studies consider only direct comparison between metastatic and non-metastatic classes of samples. Results We propose an alternative concept of analysis that considers the entire multidimensional space of gene expression and identifies the partition of this space in which metastatic development is possible. To apply this concept in cancer gene expression studies we utilize a modification of high-dimension natural taxonomy algorithm FOREL. Our analysis of microarray data containing primary and metastatic cancer samples has revealed not only differentially expressed genes, but also relations between different groups of primary and metastatic cancer. Metastatic samples tend to occupy a distinct partition of gene expression space. Further pathway analysis suggests that this partition is delineated by a specific pattern of gene expression in cytoskeleton remodeling, cell adhesion and apoptosis/cell survival pathways. We compare our findings with both report of original analysis and recent studies in molecular mechanism of metastasis. Conclusion Our analysis indicates a single molecular mechanism of metastasis. The new approach does not contradict previously reported findings, but reveals important details unattainable with traditional methodology. PMID:19811690

  2. Healing Sacral Fracture Masquerading as Metastatic Bone Disease on a 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Gykiere, Pieterjan; Goethals, Lode; Everaert, Hendrik

    2016-07-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a cell surface glycoprotein, which is frequently overexpressed on prostate cancer cells. A Ga-PSMA PET/CT can be used for early detection of lymph node or bone metastases after radical prostatectomy when there is biochemical recurrence. This report describes PSMA uptake in a healing fracture masquerading as metastatic bone disease in a patient with a history of prostate adenocarcinoma. Clinicians reporting Ga-PSMA PET/CT should be aware of this potential important pitfall. PMID:27055135

  3. Gene expression profiles of prostate cancer reveal involvement of multiple molecular pathways in the metastatic process

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Uma R; Ma, Changqing; Dhir, Rajiv; Bisceglia, Michelle; Lyons-Weiler, Maureen; Liang, Wenjing; Michalopoulos, George; Becich, Michael; Monzon, Federico A

    2007-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is characterized by heterogeneity in the clinical course that often does not correlate with morphologic features of the tumor. Metastasis reflects the most adverse outcome of prostate cancer, and to date there are no reliable morphologic features or serum biomarkers that can reliably predict which patients are at higher risk of developing metastatic disease. Understanding the differences in the biology of metastatic and organ confined primary tumors is essential for developing new prognostic markers and therapeutic targets. Methods Using Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays, we analyzed gene expression profiles of 24 androgen-ablation resistant metastatic samples obtained from 4 patients and a previously published dataset of 64 primary prostate tumor samples. Differential gene expression was analyzed after removing potentially uninformative stromal genes, addressing the differences in cellular content between primary and metastatic tumors. Results The metastatic samples are highly heterogenous in expression; however, differential expression analysis shows that 415 genes are upregulated and 364 genes are downregulated at least 2 fold in every patient with metastasis. The expression profile of metastatic samples reveals changes in expression of a unique set of genes representing both the androgen ablation related pathways and other metastasis related gene networks such as cell adhesion, bone remodelling and cell cycle. The differentially expressed genes include metabolic enzymes, transcription factors such as Forkhead Box M1 (FoxM1) and cell adhesion molecules such as Osteopontin (SPP1). Conclusion We hypothesize that these genes have a role in the biology of metastatic disease and that they represent potential therapeutic targets for prostate cancer. PMID:17430594

  4. Treatment of Metastatic Prostate Cancer in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Loh, Kah Poh; Mohile, Supriya G; Kessler, Elizabeth; Fung, Chunkit

    2016-10-01

    The aging of the population, along with rising life expectancy, means that increasing numbers of older men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, and a large proportion of these men will present with metastatic disease. In this paper, we discuss recent advances in prostate cancer treatment. In particular, we review management approaches for older patients with metastatic prostate cancer based on the decision tree developed by the International Society of Geriatric Oncology, which categorized older men as "fit," "vulnerable," and "frail" according to comprehensive geriatric assessment. PMID:27586377

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition in metastatic anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jane E; Ohinata, Aki; Silva, Ninoska N; Mehdizadeh, Amir; Eng, Cathy

    2016-09-01

    Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) anal cancer is relatively rare. With limited data, cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil has traditionally been utilized in the first-line setting. Treatment beyond front-line cisplatin progression is not well defined. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is highly overexpressed in SCCA anal cancer and EGFR inhibition may represent a potential treatment target for this population in need. Our case series evaluated metastatic SCCA anal cancer patients who received an EGFR monoclonal antibody as second-line or third-line therapy. Data collected consisted of demographics, previous treatment, metastatic disease sites, localized therapy received, regimen received, first radiographic result, progression-free survival, and overall survival. A total of 17 patients were included, with most (76%) patients receiving an EGFR monoclonal antibody in the second-line setting. Common regimens identified combined cetuximab or panitumumab with a fluoropyrimidine plus platinum (35%), carboplatin plus paclitaxel (29%), or cisplatin plus vinorelbine (18%). Thirty-five percent of patients achieved a response and 24% had stable disease. The overall median progression-free survival and overall survival were 7.3 and 24.7 months, respectively. Compared with our large retrospective study in the front-line metastatic anal cancer setting, our study suggests that anti-EGFR therapy in combination with certain chemotherapy derived additional benefit in the refractory setting. In the metastatic setting, there is a need to discover effective therapies. We present a diverse metastatic SCCA anal cancer patient population who received cetuximab or panitumumab with chemotherapy in the second-line or third-line setting. Our case series strengthens the concept of EGFR inhibition in metastatic SCCA anal cancer. PMID:27272412

  6. Comparative effectiveness of imaging modalities to determine metastatic breast cancer treatment response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christoph I; Gold, Laura S; Nelson, Heidi D; Chou, Roger; Ramsey, Scott D; Sullivan, Sean D

    2015-02-01

    We performed a systematic review to address the comparative effectiveness of different imaging modalities in evaluating treatment response among metastatic breast cancer patients. We searched seven multidisciplinary electronic databases for relevant publications (January 2003-December 2013) and performed dual abstraction of details and results for all clinical studies that involved stage IV breast cancer patients and evaluated imaging for detecting treatment response. Among 159 citations reviewed, 17 single-institution, non-randomized, observational studies met our inclusion criteria. Several studies demonstrate that changes in PET/CT standard uptake values are associated with changes in tumor volume as determined by bone scan, MRI, and/or CT. However, no studies evaluated comparative test performance between modalities or determined relationships between imaging findings and subsequent clinical decisions. Evidence for imaging's effectiveness in determining treatment response among metastatic breast cancer patients is limited. More rigorous research is needed to address imaging's value in this patient population. PMID:25479913

  7. Molecular pathogenesis of bone metastases in breast cancer: Proven and emerging therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Rucci, Nadia; Sanità, Patrizia; Delle Monache, Simona; Alesse, Edoardo; Angelucci, Adriano

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic occurrence is the principal cause of death in breast cancer patients. The high osteotropism makes breast cancer the most common primary tumor type associated with metastatic bone disease. The peculiar clinical aspects associated with metastases limited to the skeletal system suggest considering these cases as a distinctive subset of metastatic patients with a better prognosis. Because bone is frequently the first metastatic site in disease relapse, it is feasible that the next improvement in therapeutic options for bone metastatic disease could be associated with an improvement of survival expectation and quality of life in breast cancer patients. Study of the molecular basis of bone remodeling and breast cancer osteotropism has allowed identification of several therapeutic candidates involved in formation and progression of bone metastases. These targets are frequently the determinants of positive feedback between the tumor and bone cells whose clinical outcome is osteolytic lesions. In this review, we discuss the physiopathologic features underlying targeted therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with the aberrant bone remodeling associated with breast cancer metastases. PMID:25114849

  8. Detection of micrometastatic prostate cancer cells in the bone marrow of patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Deguchi, T.; Yang, M.; Ehara, H.; Ito, S.; Nishino, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Ito, Y.; Shimokawa, K.; Tanaka, T.; Imaeda, T.; Doi, T.; Kawada, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Thirty-five patients with prostate cancer were examined for micrometastases to the bone marrow using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with primers specific for the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) gene. Of nine patients with bone metastases detectable by bone scan imaging, five patients had PSA mRNA expression in the bone marrow detectable by RT-PCR. Of 26 patients with negative bone scan findings, seven patients had PSA mRNA expression detectable in the bone marrow. RT-PCR could detect micrometastatic prostate cancer cells in the bone marrow that were not detectable by bone scan imaging. Of 16 patients with a serum PSA concentration of 25 ng ml(-1) or greater, only nine (56.3%) had bone metastases detected by bone scans. Of the remaining seven patients, five had micrometastases to the bone marrow detected by RT-PCR. Overall, 14 of 16 patients (87.5%) with a serum PSA concentration of 25 ng ml(-1) or greater had metastatic bone diseases including bone marrow micrometastases. Of 19 patients with a serum PSA concentration of less than 25 ng ml(-1), two (10.5%) had only micrometastatic disease detected by RT-PCR. A significant correlation was observed between the incidence of bone involvement and the serum PSA concentration. This study suggests that RT-PCR will potentially develop into a relevant tool to assess bone involvement including bone marrow micrometastases and establish a precise correlation between serum PSA concentration and metastatic bone disease in patients with prostate cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:9043017

  9. Systemic therapy for metastatic bladder cancer in 2016 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Collazo-Lorduy, Ana; Galsky, Matthew D

    2016-05-01

    Metastatic urothelial cancer is generally associated with poor outcomes. In the first-line setting, platinum-based chemotherapy is the standard of care but resistance rapidly develops and the vast majority of patients ultimately experience disease progression. Despite several decades of clinical drug development focused on the treatment of platinum-resistant metastatic urothelial cancer, as of late 2015 there are no standard therapies approved by the US FDA in this setting. However, preliminary results from a series of recent trials exploring innovative approaches forecast a 'sea change' in the management of this difficult to treat malignancy. Herein, we review new approaches for the management of patients with metastatic urothelial cancer focused on three key therapeutic target areas: recurrent somatic alterations, the tumor neovasculature and tumor-associated immune escape. PMID:26922914

  10. Enhanced MAF Oncogene Expression and Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Milica; Arnal-Estapé, Anna; Rojo, Federico; Bellmunt, Anna; Tarragona, Maria; Guiu, Marc; Planet, Evarist; Garcia-Albéniz, Xabier; Morales, Mónica; Urosevic, Jelena; Gawrzak, Sylwia; Rovira, Ana; Prat, Aleix; Nonell, Lara; Lluch, Ana; Jean-Mairet, Joël; Coleman, Robert; Albanell, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are currently no biomarkers for early breast cancer patient populations at risk of bone metastasis. Identification of mediators of bone metastasis could be of clinical interest. Methods: A de novo unbiased screening approach based on selection of highly bone metastatic breast cancer cells in vivo was used to determine copy number aberrations (CNAs) associated with bone metastasis. The CNAs associated with bone metastasis were examined in independent primary breast cancer datasets with annotated clinical follow-up. The MAF gene encoded within the CNA associated with bone metastasis was subjected to gain and loss of function validation in breast cancer cells (MCF7, T47D, ZR-75, and 4T1), its downstream mechanism validated, and tested in clinical samples. A multivariable Cox cause-specific hazard model with competing events (death) was used to test the association between 16q23 or MAF and bone metastasis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: 16q23 gain CNA encoding the transcription factor MAF mediates breast cancer bone metastasis through the control of PTHrP. 16q23 gain (hazard ratio (HR) for bone metastasis = 14.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 6.4 to 32.9, P < .001) as well as MAF overexpression (HR for bone metastasis = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.7 to 3.8, P < .001) in primary breast tumors were specifically associated with risk of metastasis to bone but not to other organs. Conclusions: These results suggest that MAF is a mediator of breast cancer bone metastasis. 16q23 gain or MAF protein overexpression in tumors may help to select patients at risk of bone relapse. PMID:26376684

  11. What Is Bone Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... our document called Osteosarcoma . Chondrosarcoma: Chondrosarcoma (KON-droh-sar-KOH-muh) is a cancer of cartilage cells. ... AdditionalResources Other Resources and References Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & ...

  12. Retinal Targets ALDH Positive Cancer Stem Cell and Alters the Phenotype of Highly Metastatic Osteosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xiaodong; Patel, Stuti; Mektepbayeva, Damel; Mahjoub, Adel; Huard, Johnny; Weiss, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is a cancer stem cell marker. Retinoic acid has antitumor properties, including the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation. Retinal, the precursor of retinoic acid, can be oxidized to retinoic acid by dehydrogenases, including ALDH. We hypothesized that retinal could potentially be transformed to retinoic acid with higher efficiency by cancer stem cells, due to the higher ALDH activity. We previously observed that ALDH activity is greater in highly metastatic K7M2 osteosarcoma (OS) cells than in nonmetastatic K12 OS cells. We also demonstrated that ALDH activity correlates with clinical metastases in bone sarcoma patients, suggesting that ALDH may be a therapeutic target specific to cells with high metastatic potential. Our current results demonstrated that retinal preferentially affected the phenotypes of ALDH-high K7M2 cells in contrast to ALDH-low K12 cells, which could be mediated by the more efficient transformation of retinal to retinoic acid by ALDH in K7M2 cells. Retinal treatment of highly metastatic K7M2 cells decreased their proliferation, invasion capacity, and resistance to oxidative stress. Retinal altered the expression of metastasis-related genes. These observations indicate that retinal may be used to specifically target metastatic cancer stem cells in OS. PMID:26819566

  13. The evolutionary history of lethal metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gundem, Gunes; Van Loo, Peter; Kremeyer, Barbara; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Tubio, Jose M C; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Brewer, Daniel S; Kallio, Heini M L; Högnäs, Gunilla; Annala, Matti; Kivinummi, Kati; Goody, Victoria; Latimer, Calli; O'Meara, Sarah; Dawson, Kevin J; Isaacs, William; Emmert-Buck, Michael R; Nykter, Matti; Foster, Christopher; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Easton, Douglas; Whitaker, Hayley C; Neal, David E; Cooper, Colin S; Eeles, Rosalind A; Visakorpi, Tapio; Campbell, Peter J; McDermott, Ultan; Wedge, David C; Bova, G Steven

    2015-04-16

    Cancers emerge from an ongoing Darwinian evolutionary process, often leading to multiple competing subclones within a single primary tumour. This evolutionary process culminates in the formation of metastases, which is the cause of 90% of cancer-related deaths. However, despite its clinical importance, little is known about the principles governing the dissemination of cancer cells to distant organs. Although the hypothesis that each metastasis originates from a single tumour cell is generally supported, recent studies using mouse models of cancer demonstrated the existence of polyclonal seeding from and interclonal cooperation between multiple subclones. Here we sought definitive evidence for the existence of polyclonal seeding in human malignancy and to establish the clonal relationship among different metastases in the context of androgen-deprived metastatic prostate cancer. Using whole-genome sequencing, we characterized multiple metastases arising from prostate tumours in ten patients. Integrated analyses of subclonal architecture revealed the patterns of metastatic spread in unprecedented detail. Metastasis-to-metastasis spread was found to be common, either through de novo monoclonal seeding of daughter metastases or, in five cases, through the transfer of multiple tumour clones between metastatic sites. Lesions affecting tumour suppressor genes usually occur as single events, whereas mutations in genes involved in androgen receptor signalling commonly involve multiple, convergent events in different metastases. Our results elucidate in detail the complex patterns of metastatic spread and further our understanding of the development of resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy in prostate cancer. PMID:25830880

  14. Activity of outpatient intravenous interleukin-2 and famotidine in metastatic clear cell kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Quan, Walter D Y; Quan, Francine Marie

    2014-03-01

    Outpatient daily intravenous infusions of interleukin-2 (IL-2) have been developed to maintain anticancer activity and decrease toxicity of this agent against kidney cancer. Lymphokine activated killer cell (LAK) numbers are increased with these IL-2 schedules. Famotidine may enhance the LAK activity by increasing IL-2 internalization by the IL-2 receptor on lymphocytes. Fifteen patients with metastatic clear cell kidney cancer received IL-2 18 million IU/M² intravenously over 15-30 minutes preceded by famotidine 20 mg IV daily for 3 days for 6 consecutive weeks as outpatients. Cycles were repeated every 8 weeks. Patient characteristics were seven males/eight females, median age 59 (range: 28-70), median Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status-1; common metastatic sites were lungs (14), lymph nodes (9), liver (4), bone (4), and pancreas (4). Prior systemic therapies were oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (8), IL-2 (6), and mTor inhibitor (2). Most common toxicities were rigors, arthralgia/myalgia, nausea/emesis, fever, and hypotension. All episodes of hypotension were reversible with intravenous fluid. No patients required hospitalization due to toxicity. One complete response (7%) and four partial responses (26%) were seen (total response rate=33%; 95% confidence interval: 15%-59%). Responses occurred in the lungs, liver, lymph nodes, and bone. Outpatient intravenous IL-2 with famotidine has activity in metastatic clear cell kidney cancer. PMID:24251758

  15. Urothelial Cancer With Occult Bone Marrow Metastases and Isolated Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Alva, Ajjai; Davis, Elizabeth; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Dhanasekaran, Saravana; Mehra, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer rarely presents clinically with a myelophthisic picture from diffuse bone marrow infiltration especially in the absence of detectable skeletal metastases. A 75-year old man presented with newly diagnosed urothelial cell carcinoma of the bladder. Pathology from transurethral resection of bladder tumor demonstrated muscle-invasive disease. Pre-therapy imaging including CT abdomen/pelvis, CXR and bone scan demonstrated liver lesions concerning for metastatic disease but no skeletal metastases. Labs were notable for isolated thrombocytopenia, hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury prompting hospitalization. Hematologic work-up including bone marrow aspiration and biopsy revealed diffuse infiltration of the bone marrow by urothelial cancer. The case illustrates the importance of fully investigating otherwise unexplained clinical findings in patients with clinically localized urothelial cancer prior to curative intent surgery. PMID:26793516

  16. Evolving Role of Bone Biomarkers in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Janet E; Sim, Sheryl

    2010-01-01

    The preferential metastasis of prostate cancer cells to bone disrupts the process of bone remodeling and results in lesions that cause significant pain and patient morbidity. Although prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an established biomarker in prostate cancer, it provides only limited information relating to bone metastases and the treatment of metastatic bone disease with bisphosphonates or novel noncytotoxic targeted or biological agents that may provide clinical benefits without affecting PSA levels. As bone metastases develop, factors derived from bone metabolism are released into blood and urine, including N- and C-terminal peptide fragments of type 1 collagen and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, which represent potentially useful biomarkers for monitoring metastatic bone disease. A number of clinical trials have investigated these bone biomarkers with respect to their diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive values. Results suggest that higher levels of bone biomarkers are associated with an increased risk of skeletal-related events and/or death. As a result of these findings, bone biomarkers are now being increasingly used as study end points, particularly in studies investigating novel agents with putative bone effects. Data from prospective clinical trials are needed to validate the use of bone biomarkers and to confirm that marker levels provide additional information beyond traditional methods of response evaluation for patients with metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:20824045

  17. Phase II study of lonidamine in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Pronzato, P.; Amoroso, D.; Bertelli, G.; Conte, P. F.; Cusimano, M. P.; Ciottoli, G. B.; Gulisano, M.; Lionetto, R.; Rosso, R.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty patients with previously treated metastatic breast cancer were entered in a phase II study with oral lonidamine. Twenty-eight patients are evaluable for toxicity and 25 for response. A partial remission was obtained in four patients (16%) and disease stability in 11 (44%): 10 patients progressed (40%). Toxicity was acceptable, consisting mainly of myalgias (39% of patients) and asthenia (21.4%). No myelotoxicity was observed. The drug is active in previously treated metastatic breast cancer and, because of its peculiar pattern of action and toxicity, deserves to be evaluated in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. PMID:2930690

  18. Host JDP2 expression in the bone marrow contributes to metastatic spread

    PubMed Central

    Barbarov, Yelena; Timaner, Michael; Alishekevitz, Dror; Hai, Tsonwin; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.

    2015-01-01

    The c-Jun Dimerization Protein 2, JDP2, is a basic leucine zipper protein member of the activator protein-1 (AP-1) family of transcription factors. JDP2 typically suppresses gene transcription through multiple mechanisms and plays a dual role in multiple cellular processes, including cell differentiation and proliferation which is dependent on AP-1 function. Whereas the role of JDP2 expression within cancer cells has been studied, its role in stromal cells at the tumor microenvironment is largely unknown. Here we show that mice lacking JDP2 (JDP2−/−) display a reduced rate of metastasis in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and polyoma middle T-antigen (PyMT) breast carcinoma mouse models. The replacement of wild-type bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) with JDP2-deficient BMDCs recapitulates the metastatic phenotype of JDP2−/− tumor-bearing mice. In vitro, conditioned medium of wild-type BMDCs significantly potentiates the migration and invasion capacity of LLC cells as compared to that of JDP2−/− BMDCs. Furthermore, wild-type BMDCs secrete CCL5, a chemokine known to contribute to metastasis, to a greater extent than JDP2−/− BMDCs. The supplementation of CCL5 in JDP2−/− BMDC conditioned medium was sufficient to potentiate the invasion capacity of LLC. Overall, this study suggests that JDP2-expressing BMDCs within the tumor microenvironment contribute to metastatic spread. PMID:26497998

  19. Cancer of Unknown Primary Finally Revealed to Be a Metastatic Prostate Cancer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jung Yeon; Shim, Eun Jin; Kim, In Seon; Nam, Eun Mi; Choi, Moon Young; Lee, Kyung Eun; Mun, Yeung Chul; Seoung, Chu Myoung; Song, Dong Eun; Han, Woon Sup

    2009-01-01

    The vast majority of patients with metastatic prostate cancer present with bone metastases and high prostate specific antigen (PSA) level. Rarely, prostate cancer can develop in patients with normal PSA level. Here, we report a patient who presented with a periureteral tumor of unknown primary site that was confirmed as prostate adenocarcinoma after three years with using specific immunohistochemical examination. A 64-year old man was admitted to our hospital with left flank pain associated with masses on the left pelvic cavity with left hydronephrosis. All tumor markers including CEA, CA19-9, and PSA were within the normal range. After an exploratory mass excision and left nephrectomy, the pelvic mass was diagnosed as poorly differentiated carcinoma without specific positive immunohistochemical markers. At that time, we treated him as having a cancer of unknown primary site. After approximately three years later, he revisited the hospital with a complaint of right shoulder pain. A right scapular mass was newly detected with a high serum PSA level (101.7 ng/ml). Tissues from the scapular mass and prostate revealed prostate cancer with positive immunoreactivity for P504S, a new prostate cancer-specific gene. The histological findings were the same as the previous pelvic mass; however, positive staining for PSA was observed only in the prostate mass. This case demonstrates a patient with prostate cancer and negative serological test and tissue staining that turned out to be positive during progression. We suggest the usefulness of newly developed immunohistochemical markers such as P504S to determine the specific primary site of metastatic poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in men. PMID:19688071

  20. ABCC5 supports osteoclast formation and promotes breast cancer metastasis to bone

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Bone is the most common site of breast cancer metastasis, and complications associated with bone metastases can lead to a significantly decreased patient quality of life. Thus, it is essential to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the emergence and growth of breast cancer skeletal metastases. Methods To search for novel molecular mediators that influence breast cancer bone metastasis, we generated gene-expression profiles from laser-capture microdissected trephine biopsies of both breast cancer bone metastases and independent primary breast tumors that metastasized to bone. Bioinformatics analysis identified genes that are differentially expressed in breast cancer bone metastases compared with primary, bone-metastatic breast tumors. Results ABCC5, an ATP-dependent transporter, was found to be overexpressed in breast cancer osseous metastases relative to primary breast tumors. In addition, ABCC5 was significantly upregulated in human and mouse breast cancer cell lines with high bone-metastatic potential. Stable knockdown of ABCC5 substantially reduced bone metastatic burden and osteolytic bone destruction in mice. The decrease in osteolysis was further associated with diminished osteoclast numbers in vivo. Finally, conditioned media from breast cancer cells with reduced ABCC5 expression failed to induce in vitro osteoclastogenesis to the same extent as conditioned media from breast cancer cells expressing ABCC5. Conclusions Our data suggest that ABCC5 functions as a mediator of breast cancer skeletal metastasis. ABCC5 expression in breast cancer cells is important for efficient osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. Hence, ABCC5 may be a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer bone metastasis. PMID:23174366

  1. [Early diagnosis of metastatic spinal tumor is a key for effective palliative radiotherapy in patients with lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Isono, Hisayo; Kemmoku, Tomoko; Nakamura, Yusuke; Onose, Akira; Matsumoto, Yuka; Watanabe, Rinako; Haraguchi, Mizuha; Kasajima, Masashi; Takaya, Saho; Ishihara, Mikiko; Karigane, Daiki; Nagata, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    Patients with metastatic spinal tumor are the largest in number among the patients with bone tumor. It causes a severe bone pain, pathological fracture and spinal cord compression. Thus it harshly hampers patient's quality of life. We report 3 patients with lung cancer whose initial manifestation was metastatic spinal tumor. We treated the 3 patients with palliative radiotherapy and medication. Although the severe pain has improved on a numerical rating scale(NRS), but performance status(PS)and activity of daily living(ADL)of the 3 patients got worse because the disease was progressed and complicated. Generally, PS of cancer patients found by bone matastasis is low. However, it is difficult to take an effective treatment, which leads to ADL improvement. There are many choices for treating metastatic bone tumors including pain control, bisphosphonate administration, radiation therapy, strontium radiotherapy, bone cement, palliative surgery and orthotics. In addition, a development of molecular target drugs, such as Denosmab, is expected as future modality of palliative care. In conclusion, we should detect a bone metastasis in the patient with lung cancer as early as possible, and select an appropriate treatment in collaboration with each specialist for achieving the ADL and PS improvement. PMID:22189323

  2. [Clinical experience with rhenium-188 HEDP therapy for metastatic bone pain].

    PubMed

    Róka, R; Séra, T; Pajor, L; Thurzó, L; Láng, J; Csernay, L; Pávics, L

    2000-05-01

    Rhenium-188 hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate (Re-188 HEDP) is a new radiopharmaceutical for treatment of metastatic bone pain. Re-188 is a generator-produced radionuclide emitting high energy beta and gamma rays and having a relative short physical half-life makes it of especially interesting for therapeutic purpose. Seven patients (pts) with multiple painful bone metastases were treated with Re-188 HEDP. Five pts with prostate cancer and 2 pts with breast cancer received a fixed activity of 3000 MBq of Re-188 HEDP intravenously in two steps. Complete blood counts were determined, blood chemistry examinations and urine-analysis were performed before and 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12 weeks following the treatment. A visual analogue score, a verbal rating scale, the Spitzer index and the Karnofsky score were used to assess pain and performance status. Three hours after Re-188 HEDP administration at 1 m from the anterior mid-trunk of the pts gamma and at the patient body surface beta-radiation dose measurements were made, together with urine radioactivity measurements. Three pts become pain-free, 2 pts exhibited partial pain improvement and 1 patient gave no response to the Re-188 HEDP therapy. In 1 patient due to central nervous system metastasis the modification of the pain intensity could not be evaluated. Three pts displayed a flare reaction within 1 week after the treatment. Transient decreases in platelet and white blood cell counts were observed. There were no significant changes in the liver and renal functions. Radiation dose rate values of 6.3 +/- 1.0 microSv/h for gamma, and of 183 +/- 40 s-1 for beta-radiation were found. 25-32% of the administered dose was eliminated via the urinary tract in the first three hours. The preliminary data suggests that Re-188 HEDP is an effective radiopharmaceutical in treatment for metastatic bone pain. An administered activity of 3000 MBq can bring about a pain reduction without causing any clinically significant bone marrow toxicity

  3. Motility efficiency and spatiotemporal synchronization in non-metastatic vs. metastatic breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, Thomas M.; Pilans, Didzis; Huda, Sabil; Fuller, Patrick; Kandere-Grzybowska, Kristiana; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer cells move not only more rapidly and persistently than their non-metastatic variants but in doing so use the mechanical work of the cytoskeleton more efficiently. The efficiency of the cell motions is defined for entire cells (rather than parts of the cell membrane) and is related to the work expended in forming membrane protrusions and retractions. This work, in turn, is estimated by integrating the protruded and retracted areas along the entire cell perimeter and is standardized with respect to the net translocation of the cell. A combination of cross-correlation, Granger causality, and morphodynamic profiling analyses is then used to relate the efficiency to the cell membrane dynamics. In metastatic cells, the protrusions and retractions are highly “synchronized” both in space and in time and these cells move efficiently. In contrast, protrusions and retractions formed by non-metastatic cells are not “synchronized” corresponding to low motility efficiencies. Our work provides a link between the kinematics of cell motions and their energetics. It also suggests that spatiotemporal synchronization might be one of the hallmarks of invasiveness of cancerous cells. PMID:24136177

  4. Enzalutamide for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Wijdan H; Kabbara, Wissam K; Al Basiouni Al Masri, Hiba S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review and evaluate current literature on the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug enzalutamide (XTANDI®) in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Data sources Literature search was done through PubMed using the terms enzalutamide, MDV3100, abiraterone, and castration-resistant prostate cancer. Data from FDA product labels were also used. Study selection and data extraction Recent and relevant studies were included in the review. Collected clinical trials were screened and evaluated. Data synthesis Enzalutamide is an androgen receptor (AR) inhibitor with high selectivity and affinity to the AR. It was approved by the FDA to treat metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in patients previously treated with docetaxel, after a Phase III trial (AFFIRM) that showed a 4.8-month survival benefit in this population. Recently, the FDA expanded the approval of enzalutamide as first-line therapy for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who did not receive chemotherapy. Moreover, enzalutamide is shown to be associated with an acceptable safety profile. Conclusion Enzalutamide has been shown to be both safe and effective in improving overall survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer postchemotherapy with docetaxel and as a first line treatment before initiation of chemotherapy. However, additional studies and head-to-head trials are needed. PMID:25945058

  5. The molecular signature of breast cancer metastasis to bone.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Tayyeb; Mokmeli, Sharareh; Hossieni, Hossien; Pourpaknia, Reza; Makani, Zahra; Salmaninejad, Arash; Estiar, Mehrdad A; Hossieni, Ali; Farshbaf, Alieh

    2016-10-01

    Distant metastasis during the advanced stage of malignant tumor progression can cause considerable morbidity in cancer patients. Bone is known to be one of the most common sites of distant metastasis in patients with breast cancer (BC). BC metastases in bone are associated with excessive skeletal complications. These complications can be fatal and reduce quality of life of patients. It is important to understand the metastatic process of BC to bone to improve quality of life and design new therapeutic methods. At present, the molecular mechanisms leading to the BC metastasis to bone are not fully understood. Studying the molecular basis of BC metastasis to bone might improve our insight into this complex process. In addition, it can provide novel approaches for designing advanced and effective targeted therapies. The present article aimed to review the published papers on the molecular basis of the metastatic process of BC to bone, focusing on involved genes and signaling networks. Furthermore, we propose potential therapeutic targets that may be more effective for the inhibition and treatment of BC metastasis to bone. PMID:27384592

  6. Tissue engineering a surrogate niche for metastatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Seib, F Philipp; Berry, Janice E; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Taichman, Russell S; Kaplan, David L

    2015-05-01

    In breast and prostate cancer patients, the bone marrow is a preferred site of metastasis. We hypothesized that we could use tissue-engineering strategies to lure metastasizing cancer cells to tissue-engineered bone marrow. First, we generated highly porous 3D silk scaffolds that were biocompatible and amenable to bone morphogenetic protein 2 functionalization. Control and functionalized silk scaffolds were subcutaneously implanted in mice and bone marrow development was followed. Only functionalized scaffolds developed cancellous bone and red bone marrow, which appeared as early as two weeks post-implantation and further developed over the 16-week study period. This tissue-engineered bone marrow microenvironment could be readily manipulated in situ to understand the biology of bone metastasis. To test the ability of functionalized scaffolds to serve as a surrogate niche for metastasis, human breast cancer cells were injected into the mammary fat pads of mice. The treatment of animals with scaffolds had no significant effect on primary tumor growth. However, extensive metastasis was observed in functionalized scaffolds, and the highest levels for scaffolds that were in situ manipulated with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). We also applied this tissue-engineered bone marrow model in a prostate cancer and experimental metastasis setting. In summary, we were able to use tissue-engineered bone marrow to serve as a target or "trap" for metastasizing cancer cells. PMID:25771021

  7. Tissue engineering a surrogate niche for metastatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Seib, F. Philipp; Berry, Janice E.; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Taichman, Russell S.; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    In breast and prostate cancer patients, the bone marrow is a preferred site of metastasis. We hypothesized that we could use tissue-engineering strategies to lure metastasizing cancer cells to tissue-engineered bone marrow. First, we generated highly porous 3D silk scaffolds that were biocompatible and amenable to bone morphogenetic protein 2 functionalization. Control and functionalized silk scaffolds were subcutaneously implanted in mice and bone marrow development was followed. Only functionalized scaffolds developed cancellous bone and red bone marrow, which appeared as early as two weeks post-implantation and further developed over the 16-week study period. This tissue-engineered bone marrow microenvironment could be readily manipulated in situ to understand the biology of bone metastasis. To test the ability of functionalized scaffolds to serve as a surrogate niche for metastasis, human breast cancer cells were injected into the mammary fat pads of mice. The treatment of animals with scaffolds had no significant effect on primary tumor growth. However, extensive metastasis was observed in functionalized scaffolds, and the highest levels for scaffolds that were in situ manipulated with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). We also applied this tissue-engineered bone marrow model in a prostate cancer and experimental metastasis setting. In summary, we were able to use tissue-engineered bone marrow to serve as a target for metastasizing cancer cells. PMID:25771021

  8. Carbohydrate-to-carbohydrate interactions between α2,3-linked sialic acids on α2 integrin subunits and asialo-GM1 underlie the bone metastatic behaviour of LNCAP-derivative C4-2B prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Van Slambrouck, Séverine; Groux-Degroote, Sophie; Krzewinski-Recchi, Marie-Ange; Cazet, Aurélie; Delannoy, Philippe; Steelant, Wim F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Complex interplays among proteins, lipids and carbohydrates can alter the phenotype and are suggested to have a crucial role in tumour metastasis. Our previous studies indicated that a complex of the GSLs (glycosphingolipids), AsGM1 (asialo-GM1), which lacks α2,3-linked sialic acid, and α2β1 integrin receptors is responsible for the metastatic behaviour of C4-2B prostate cancer cells. Herein, we identified and addressed the functional significance of changes in sialylation during prostate cancer progression. We observed an increase in α2,3-linked sialic acid residues on α2 subunits of α2β1 integrin receptors, correlating with increased gene expression of α2,3-STs (sialyltransferases), particularly ST3GAL3. Cell surface α2,3-sialylation of α2 subunits was required for the integrin α2β1-dependent cell adhesion to collagen type I and the same α2,3-linked sialic acid residues on the integrin receptor were responsible for the interaction with the carbohydrate moiety of AsGM1, explaining the complex formation between AsGM1 and α2β1 integrin receptors. These results provide novel insights into the role of sialic acids in the organization and function of important membrane components in invasion and metastatic processes. PMID:25137483

  9. Gemcitabine, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin in Metastatic or Unresectable Bladder Cancer With Decreased Kidney Function

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-19

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  10. The role of 18F–NaF PET/CT in metastatic bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Araz, Mine; Aras, Gülseren; Küçük, Özlem N.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate the role of 18F–NaF PET/CT and compare it with 99m Tc-MDP whole body bone scintigraphy and 18F-FDG PET/CT in detecting the extent of metastatic bone disease and to present our first experience with 18F–NaF PET/CT in our country. Materials and methods A total of 37 histopathologically proven cancer patients (22 male, 15 female) with bone metastasis detected on Tc-99m MDP whole body bone scan were prospectively enrolled Cebeci, following ethics committee approval. 18F–NaF PET/CT was performed to the participants in Ankara University Medical Faculty Nuclear Medicine Department for evaluation of symptomatic skeletal sites which were negative on Tc-99m MDP whole body bone scan. A lesion based comparison was made between 18F–NaF PET/CT and Tc-99m MDP whole body bone scan for each patient and between 18F–NaF PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT in 12/37 patients. Results The number of lesions demonstrated by 99m Tc-MDP bone scan and 18F–NaF PET/CT was equal in 4/37 (%11) of the cases. 18F–NaF PET/CT showed a greater number of pathological foci in 89% of participants. 18F–NaF PET/CT was able to show both lytic and blastic lesions and small lesions were better visualized due to the advantage of sectional imaging with much better resolution and higher target/background ratio. 18F–NaF PET/CT demonstrated a greater number of metastases in 10/12 (83%) of the patients when compared to 18F-FDG PET/CT. In the other two patients, bone metastasis could be demonstrated only by 18F–NaF PET/CT. The uptake of 18F-FDG was variable in blastic lesions and cranial bone involvement was missed by 18F-FDG PET/CT in some cases due to physiological brain metabolism. Conclusion Although further prospective clinical studies in specific cancer populations are indicated to set the place of 18F–NaF PET/CT in diagnostic scheme, the results of this pilot study from our country support the superiority of 18F–NaF PET/CT in investigation of bone metastasis over 99m

  11. 3D printed nanocomposite matrix for the study of breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Holmes, Benjamin; Glazer, Robert I; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    Bone is one of the most common metastatic sites of breast cancer, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, in part due to an absence of advanced platforms for cancer culture and study that mimic the bone microenvironment. In the present study, we integrated a novel stereolithography-based 3D printer and a unique 3D printed nano-ink consisting of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles suspended in hydrogel to create a biomimetic bone-specific environment for evaluating breast cancer bone invasion. Breast cancer cells cultured in a geometrically optimized matrix exhibited spheroid morphology and migratory characteristics. Co-culture of tumor cells with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells increased the formation of spheroid clusters. The 3D matrix also allowed for higher drug resistance of breast cancer cells than 2D culture. These results validate that our 3D bone matrix can mimic tumor bone microenvironments, suggesting that it can serve as a tool for studying metastasis and assessing drug sensitivity. From the Clinical Editor: Cancer remains a major cause of mortality for patients in the clinical setting. For breast cancer, bone is one of the most common metastatic sites. In this intriguing article, the authors developed a bone-like environment using 3D printing technology to investigate the underlying biology of bone metastasis. Their results would also allow a new model for other researchers who work on cancer to use. PMID:26472048

  12. Surviving metastatic breast cancer for 18 years: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Soley; Garcia-Buitrago, Monica T; Hurley, Erin; Gluck, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a 93-year-old woman who was diagnosed with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, progesterone receptor-positive, T2N0M0 (stage I) breast cancer (BC) at the age of 45. Twenty-two years later, she was diagnosed with metastatic lesions to the lungs consistent with the breast primary. Her disease was stable on tamoxifen, anastrozole, and exemestane for 14 years. Subsequently, she was found to have metastatic lesions to thoracic spine as well as progressively increasing bilateral pleural effusions. At that time, she was deemed not to be a good candidate for chemotherapy and therapy was changed to fulvestrant. Two years later (38 years after initial diagnosis of BC), she was diagnosed with new metastatic liver lesions; although her pulmonary and bone metastases remained stable. Therefore, she was started on palliative chemotherapy with single-agent capecitabine. The treatment was discontinued after the second cycle upon the patient's request owing to grade 2 hand and foot syndrome. She expired 2 years later after fighting BC for four decades. She survived for 18 years after the diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer (MBC) while maintaining a good quality of life. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case in the literature with the longest overall survival in a patient with MBC. We provide a detailed clinical analysis in conjunction with a brief literature review. PMID:21726350

  13. Extent of Surgery Does Not Influence 30-Day Mortality in Surgery for Metastatic Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Michala Skovlund; Hindsø, Klaus; Hovgaard, Thea Bechmann; Petersen, Michael Mørk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Estimating patient survival has hitherto been the main focus when treating metastatic bone disease (MBD) in the appendicular skeleton. This has been done in an attempt to allocate the patient to a surgical procedure that outlives them. No questions have been addressed as to whether the extent of the surgery and thus the surgical trauma reduces survival in this patient group. We wanted to evaluate if perioperative parameters such as blood loss, extent of bone resection, and duration of surgery were risk factors for 30-day mortality in patients having surgery due to MBD in the appendicular skeleton. We retrospectively identified 270 consecutive patients who underwent joint replacement surgery or intercalary spacing for skeletal metastases in the appendicular skeleton from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2013. We collected intraoperative (duration of surgery, extent of bone resection, and blood loss), demographic (age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologist score [ASA score], and Karnofsky score), and disease-specific (primary cancer) variables. An association with 30-day mortality was addressed using univariate and multivariable analyses and calculation of odds ratio (OR). All patients were included in the analysis. ASA score 3 + 4 (OR 4.16 [95% confidence interval, CI, 1.80–10.85], P = 0.002) and Karnofsky performance status below 70 (OR 7.34 [95% CI 3.16–19.20], P < 0.001) were associated with increased 30-day mortality in univariate analysis. This did not change in multivariable analysis. No parameters describing the extent of the surgical trauma were found to be associated with 30-day mortality. The 30-day mortality in patients undergoing surgery for MBD is highly dependent on the general health status of the patients as measured by the ASA score and the Karnofsky performance status. The extent of surgery, measured as duration of surgery, blood loss, and degree of bone resection were not associated with 30-day mortality. PMID:27082592

  14. Emerging Therapeutic for the Treatment of Skeletal-related Events Associated With Metastatic Castrate-resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sieber, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer in US and European men and the second leading cause of cancer death in those populations. It is somewhat unique in that nearly all patients who succumb to the disease will ultimately develop bone metastasis. Morbidity from bone metastasis-referred to as skeletal-related events, which include fractures, cord compression, radiation to bone, and surgery to bone—leads to significant costs and impaired quality of life. This article reviews three agents and the roles they play in the ever-changing armamentarium of treatments for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The potential benefits of these agents are discussed, as well as the continuing use of these agents and their earlier introduction in the patient with progressive mCRPC with bone metastasis. PMID:24791151

  15. Palbociclib in Combination With Tamoxifen as First Line Therapy for Metastatic Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Hormone Receptor Positive Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  16. Disseminated metastatic disease of osteosarcoma of the femur in the abdomen: unusual metastatic pattern on Tc-99m MDP bone scan.

    PubMed

    Karacalioglu, Ozgur; Ilgan, Seyfettin; Kuzhan, Okan; Emer, Ozdes; Ozguven, Mehmet

    2006-07-01

    A 25-year-old patient with osteosarcoma of the right distal femur underwent a bone scintigraphy with Tc-99m methylene diphosphonate (MDP). Whole-body bone scan revealed extensive metastatic disease in the abdominal region. Abdominal computerized tomography confirmed the presence of ascites and calcified masses on the greater omentum and peritoneal surfaces. Here we describe a case of unusual metastatic pattern of an osteosarcoma showing extensive intraabdominal metastases without prominent lung involvement after intensive chemotherapy. PMID:16922473

  17. Management of hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Neeraj; Hussain, Maha

    2013-12-01

    Targeting gonadal androgen synthesis (often in conjunction with blockade of androgen receptor) is the cornerstone of treatment of hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer (HSPC). Despite the failure of androgen deprivation therapy, most tumors maintain some dependence on androgen or androgen receptor signaling for proliferation. This article reviews the current standard of care for metastatic HSPC, mechanisms of treatment resistance, novel drugs targeting the androgen signaling pathway, biomarkers predicting response to treatment and survival, future directions, and ongoing clinical trials in HSPC. PMID:24188260

  18. Quantitative mitochondrial redox imaging of breast cancer metastatic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He N.; Nioka, Shoko; Glickson, Jerry D.; Chance, Britton; Li, Lin Z.

    2010-05-01

    Predicting tumor metastatic potential remains a challenge in cancer research and clinical practice. Our goal was to identify novel biomarkers for differentiating human breast tumors with different metastatic potentials by imaging the in vivo mitochondrial redox states of tumor tissues. The more metastatic (aggressive) MDA-MB-231 and less metastatic (indolent) MCF-7 human breast cancer mouse xenografts were imaged with the low-temperature redox scanner to obtain multi-slice fluorescence images of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp). The nominal concentrations of NADH and Fp in tissue were measured using reference standards and used to calculate the Fp redox ratio, Fp/(NADH+Fp). We observed significant core-rim differences, with the core being more oxidized than the rim in all aggressive tumors but not in the indolent tumors. These results are consistent with our previous observations on human melanoma mouse xenografts, indicating that mitochondrial redox imaging potentially provides sensitive markers for distinguishing aggressive from indolent breast tumor xenografts. Mitochondrial redox imaging can be clinically implemented utilizing cryogenic biopsy specimens and is useful for drug development and for clinical diagnosis of breast cancer.

  19. Myeloid-specific TGF-β signaling in bone promotes basic-FGF and breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Meng, X; Vander Ark, A; Lee, P; Hostetter, G; Bhowmick, N A; Matrisian, L M; Williams, B O; Miranti, C K; Li, X

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) bone metastases cause osteolytic bone lesions, which result from the interactions of metastatic BCa cells with osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Osteoclasts differentiate from myeloid lineage cells. To understand the cell-specific role of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) in the myeloid lineage, in BCa bone metastases, MDA-MB-231 BCa cells were intra-tibially or intra-cardially injected into LysM(Cre)/Tgfbr2(floxE2/floxE2) knockout (LysM(Cre)/Tgfbr2 KO) or Tgfbr2(floxE2/floxE2) mice. Metastatic bone lesion development was compared by analysis of both lesion number and area. We found that LysM(Cre)/Tgfbr2 knockout significantly decreased MDA-MB-231 bone lesion development in both the cardiac and tibial injection models. LysM(Cre)/Tgfbr2 knockout inhibited the tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis and osteoclastogenesis of the metastatic bones. Cytokine array analysis showed that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was downregulated in MDA-MB-231-injected tibiae from the LysM(Cre)/Tgfbr2 KO group, and intravenous injection of the recombinant bFGF to LysM(Cre)/Tgfbr2 KO mice rescued the inhibited metastatic bone lesion development. The mechanism by which bFGF rescued the bone lesion development was by promotion of tumor cell proliferation through the downstream mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-cFos pathway after binding to the FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1). Consistent with animal studies, we found that in human BCa bone metastatic tissues, TGF-β type II receptor (TβRII) and p-Smad2 were expressed in osteoclasts and tumor cells, and were correlated with the expression of FGFR1. Our studies suggest that myeloid-specific TGF-β signaling-mediated bFGF in the bone promotes BCa bone metastasis. PMID:26279296

  20. Cervical Spine pain as a presenting complaint in metastatic pancreatic cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Emily; Buchtel, Lindsey

    2016-04-01

    A 48 year-old female presented to her primary care physician with a two-month history of neck pain with negative cervical spine x-rays. During that office visit, the patient was noted to be tachycardic with EKG revealing ST depressions, which led to hospital admission. Acute coronary syndrome was ruled out, however, persistent neck pain warranted inpatient MRI of the cervical spine, which revealed a cervical spine lesion. Extensive investigation and biopsy ultimately confirmed stage IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma with metastases to the bone, liver, and likely lung. In the literature, the findings of a primary metastatic site being bone is rare with only a few case reports showing vertebral or sternal metastasis as the first clinical manifestation of pancreatic cancer. The uniqueness of this case lies in the only presenting complaint being cervical spine pain in the setting of extensive metastases to the liver, bone, and likely lung. PMID:26890294

  1. Anti-metastatic treatment in colorectal cancer: targeting signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Clara; Sack, Ulrike; Schmid, Felicitas; Juneja, Manisha; Stein, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the Western world. Tumor progression towards metastasis affects a large number of patients with colorectal cancer and seriously affects their clinical outcome. Therefore, considerable effort has been made towards the development of therapeutic strategies that can decrease or prevent colorectal cancer metastasis. Standard treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer with chemotherapy has been improved in the last 10 years by the addition of new targeted agents. The currently used antibodies bevacizumab, cetuximab and panitumumab target the VEGF and EGFR signaling pathways, which are crucial for tumor progression and metastasis. These antibodies have shown relevant efficacy in both first- and second-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Additionally, other signaling pathways, including the Wnt and HGF/Met pathways, have a well-established role in colorectal cancer progression and metastasis and constitute, therefore, promising targets for new therapeutic approaches. Several new drugs targeting these pathways, including different antibodies and small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, are currently being developed and tested in clinical trials. In this review, we summarize the new developments in this field, focusing on the inhibitors that show more promising results for use in colorectal cancer patients. PMID:22973955

  2. Practical experiences with eribulin in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tesch, Hans; Schneeweiss, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    There is currently no standard therapy for women with metastatic or locally recurrent breast cancer. The microtubule polymerization inhibitor eribulin, approved in March 2011, is the first monochemotherapy with a proven survival benefit and tolerable toxicity in this patient group. Using a retrospective analysis of 27 mostly heavily pretreated patients in two large German breast cancer centers, the efficacy and tolerability of eribulin in daily practice were compared with the results of the pivotal EMBRACE and 301 studies. Despite the patients being older and having more advanced disease, the retrospective analysis showed a comparable progression-free survival of 3.7 months. When eribulin was used in an early-line treatment, the progression-free survival observed was 7 weeks longer compared with use in a late-line therapy. The differences in tolerability were not significant. Overall, the results confirm that eribulin represents an effective and tolerable therapeutic option for metastatic breast cancer in daily practice. PMID:26488444

  3. Curcumin Inhibits Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis by Up-Regulating Bone Morphogenic Protein-7 in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dorai, Thambi; Diouri, Janane; O'Shea, Orla; Doty, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies have focused on the beneficial properties of Curcumin (diferuloyl methane, used in South Asian cuisine and traditional medicine) such as the chemoprevention of cancer. Recent studies have also indicated that this material has significant benefits for the treatment of cancer and is currently undergoing several clinical trials. We have been interested in the application of this compound as a therapeutic agent for advanced prostate cancer, particularly the skeletal complications in this malignancy. Our earlier work indicated that this compound could inhibit the osteomimetic properties which occur in castration resistant prostate cancer cells, by interfering with the common denominators between these cancer cells and the bone cells in the metastatic tumor microenvironment, namely the osteoblasts and the osteoclast. We predicted that curcumin could break the vicious cycle of reciprocal stimulation that results in uncontrolled osteolysis in the bony matrix. In this work, we have evaluated the potential of this compound in inhibiting the bone metastasis of hormone refractory prostate cancer cells in an established animal model. Our results strongly suggest that curcumin modulates the TGF-β signaling that occurs due to bone matrix degradation by up-regulating the metastasis inhibitory bone morphogenic protein-7 (BMP- 7). This enhancement of BMP-7 in the context of TGF-βin the tumor microenvironment is shown to enhance the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. Most importantly, we show that as a result of BMP-7 up-regulation, a novel brown/beige adipogenic differentiation program is also up-regu- lated which plays a role in the inhibition of bone metastasis. Our results suggest that curcumin may subvert the TGF-βsignaling to an alternative adipogenic differentiation program in addition to the previously established interference with the osteomimetic properties, thus inhibiting the bone metastatic processes in a chemopreventive as well as therapeutic

  4. Curcumin Inhibits Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis by Up-Regulating Bone Morphogenic Protein-7 in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Dorai, Thambi; Diouri, Janane; O'Shea, Orla; Doty, Stephen B

    2014-04-01

    A number of studies have focused on the beneficial properties of Curcumin (diferuloyl methane, used in South Asian cuisine and traditional medicine) such as the chemoprevention of cancer. Recent studies have also indicated that this material has significant benefits for the treatment of cancer and is currently undergoing several clinical trials. We have been interested in the application of this compound as a therapeutic agent for advanced prostate cancer, particularly the skeletal complications in this malignancy. Our earlier work indicated that this compound could inhibit the osteomimetic properties which occur in castration resistant prostate cancer cells, by interfering with the common denominators between these cancer cells and the bone cells in the metastatic tumor microenvironment, namely the osteoblasts and the osteoclast. We predicted that curcumin could break the vicious cycle of reciprocal stimulation that results in uncontrolled osteolysis in the bony matrix. In this work, we have evaluated the potential of this compound in inhibiting the bone metastasis of hormone refractory prostate cancer cells in an established animal model. Our results strongly suggest that curcumin modulates the TGF-β signaling that occurs due to bone matrix degradation by up-regulating the metastasis inhibitory bone morphogenic protein-7 (BMP- 7). This enhancement of BMP-7 in the context of TGF-βin the tumor microenvironment is shown to enhance the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. Most importantly, we show that as a result of BMP-7 up-regulation, a novel brown/beige adipogenic differentiation program is also up-regu- lated which plays a role in the inhibition of bone metastasis. Our results suggest that curcumin may subvert the TGF-βsignaling to an alternative adipogenic differentiation program in addition to the previously established interference with the osteomimetic properties, thus inhibiting the bone metastatic processes in a chemopreventive as well as therapeutic

  5. Promising oncolytic agents for metastatic breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cody, James J; Hurst, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    New therapies for metastatic breast cancer patients are urgently needed. The long-term survival rates remain unacceptably low for patients with recurrent disease or disseminated metastases. In addition, existing therapies often cause a variety of debilitating side effects that severely impact quality of life. Oncolytic viruses constitute a developing therapeutic modality in which interest continues to build due to their ability to spare normal tissue while selectively destroying tumor cells. A number of different viruses have been used to develop oncolytic agents for breast cancer, including herpes simplex virus, adenovirus, vaccinia virus, measles virus, reovirus, and others. In general, clinical trials for several cancers have demonstrated excellent safety records and evidence of efficacy. However, the impressive tumor responses often observed in preclinical studies have yet to be realized in the clinic. In order for the promise of oncolytic virotherapy to be fully realized for breast cancer patients, effectiveness must be demonstrated in metastatic disease. This review provides a summary of oncolytic virotherapy strategies being developed to target metastatic breast cancer.

  6. Methods for Culturing Human Femur Tissue Explants to Study Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Metastatic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Zachary S.; Bachmann, Michael H.; Alluri, Rajiv V.; Maloney, William J.; Contag, Christopher H.; King, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    Bone is the most common site of breast cancer metastasis. Although it is widely accepted that the microenvironment influences cancer cell behavior, little is known about breast cancer cell properties and behaviors within the native microenvironment of human bone tissue.We have developed approaches to track, quantify and modulate human breast cancer cells within the microenvironment of cultured human bone tissue fragments isolated from discarded femoral heads following total hip replacement surgeries. Using breast cancer cells engineered for luciferase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression, we are able to reproducibly quantitate migration and proliferation patterns using bioluminescence imaging (BLI), track cell interactions within the bone fragments using fluorescence microscopy, and evaluate breast cells after colonization with flow cytometry. The key advantages of this model include: 1) a native, architecturally intact tissue microenvironment that includes relevant human cell types, and 2) direct access to the microenvironment, which facilitates rapid quantitative and qualitative monitoring and perturbation of breast and bone cell properties, behaviors and interactions. A primary limitation, at present, is the finite viability of the tissue fragments, which confines the window of study to short-term culture. Applications of the model system include studying the basic biology of breast cancer and other bone-seeking malignancies within the metastatic niche, and developing therapeutic strategies to effectively target breast cancer cells in bone tissues. PMID:25867136

  7. Trastuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Urinary Tract Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

  8. Use of articulated registration for response assessment of individual metastatic bone lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Stephen; Jeraj, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Accurate skeleton registration is necessary to match corresponding metastatic bone lesions for response assessment over multiple scans. In articulated registration (ART), whole-body skeletons are registered by auto-segmenting individual bones, then rigidly aligning them. Performance and robustness of the ART in lesion matching were evaluated and compared to other commonly used registration techniques. Sixteen prostate cancer patients were treated either with molecular targeted therapy or chemotherapy. Ten out of the 16 patients underwent the double baseline whole-body [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans for test-retest (TRT) evaluation. Twelve of the 16 patients underwent pre- and mid-treatment [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans. Skeletons at different time points were registered using ART, rigid, and deformable (DR) registration algorithms. The corresponding lesions were contoured and identified on successive PET images based on including the voxels with the standardized uptake value over 15. Each algorithm was evaluated for its ability to accurately align corresponding lesions via skeleton registration. A lesion matching score (MS) was measured for each lesion, which quantified the per cent overlap between the lesion's two corresponding contours. Three separate sensitivity studies were conducted to investigate the robustness of ART in matching: sensitivity of lesion matching to various contouring threshold levels, effects of imperfections in the bone auto-segmentation and sensitivity of mis-registration. The performance of ART (MS = 82% for both datasets, p ≪ 0.001) in lesion matching was significantly better than rigid (MSTRT = 53%, MSResponse = 46%) and DR (MSTRT = 46%, MSResponse = 45%) algorithms. Neither varying threshold levels for lesion contouring nor imperfect bone segmentation had significant (p∼0.10) impact on the ART matching performance as the MS remained unchanged. Despite the mis-registration reduced MS for ART, as low as 67% (p ≪ 0.001), the performance remained to

  9. Hopes Dashed for Rare Bone Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_160652.html Hopes Dashed for Rare Bone Cancer Treatment Extra chemo drugs failed to change course ... t benefit patients with a rare type of bone cancer, according to a new study. Osteosarcoma is diagnosed ...

  10. Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  11. Molecular biology of breast cancer metastasis: Clinical implications of experimental studies on metastatic inefficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Ann F; Naumov, George N; Vantyghem , Sharon A; Tuck, Alan B

    2000-01-01

    Recent technological advances have led to an increasing ability to detect isolated tumour cells and groups of tumour cells in patients' blood, lymph nodes or bone marrow. However, the clinical significance of these cells is unclear. Should they be considered as evidence of metastasis, necessitating aggressive treatment, or are they in some cases unrelated to clinical outcome? Quantitative experimental studies on the basic biology of metastatic inefficiency are providing clues that may help in understanding the significance of these cells. This understanding will be of use in guiding clinical studies to assess the significance of isolated tumour cells and micrometastases in cancer patients. PMID:11250733

  12. Aberrant metastatic behavior and particular features of early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Gurzu, Simona; Jung, Ioan; Kadar, Zoltan

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we have focused on the metastatic behavior of EGC and its particularities. The main factors that are currently considered as predictors of the metastatic behavior and that are used in the therapeutic decision (endoscopic resection vs surgical removal) are the tumor size (upper or bellow 2 cm), depth of infiltration, angiolymphatic invasion, the presence or absence of ulceration, and histologic type (undifferentiated vs differentiated carcinomas). However, most of the metastatic cases were published as case reports or case series. This is the reason why a proper estimation of metastatic risk in EGC is not well known. To date, 79 cases presenting bone metastases, three reports of brain metastases, and one EGC that was associated with skin metastasis were published. However, occult metastasis, lymph node micrometastasis, and skip metastasis can also occur and should be identified. Making a synthesis of the literature data that is correlated with our experience, we finally proposed the inclusion of the six Japanese subgrouping system, tumor size, angiolymphatic invasion, and micrometastasis as components of the pTNM staging system, which should be particularly adapted for EGC. PMID:26547366

  13. Novel therapeutic agents in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Sachin Gopalkrishna; Fuloria, Jyotsna

    2016-01-01

    Over the past couple of decades considerable progress has been made in the management of metastatic colorectal cancers (mCRC) leading to a significant improvement in five-year survival. Although part of this success has been rightly attributed to aggressive surgical management and advances in other adjunct treatments, our understanding of the pathogenesis of cancer and emergence of newer molecular targets for colon cancer has created a powerful impact. In this review article we will discuss various targeted therapies in the management of mCRC. Newer agents on the horizon soon to be incorporated in clinical practice will be briefly reviewed as well. PMID:26798440

  14. [Prostate cancer and Cancer Treatment-Induced Bone Loss(CTIBL)].

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Hisashi

    2016-07-01

    Osteopenia and osteoporosis often become the long term complications in cancer treatment and is defined as cancer treatment-induced bone loss(CTIBL). Hormonal therapy is the main factor for CTIBL in both men and women. Androgen deprivation therapy(ADT)is a mainstay in the systemic therapy for prostate cancer(PC)and often persists for a long term. ADT induces bone loss and increases the risk of osteoporosis and bone fractures, which reduces QOL of the patients, results in the need of nursing care state and a serious adverse event to be connected for shortening of the overall survival. It is important that we prevent a fracture above all in the bone management of patients with PC. According to the results of overseas large-scale clinical trials, denosumab is a drug having the highest evidence level. And it is necessary to set a clear treatment objective depending on the clinical condition of the PC patients, and to use it. In the non-bone metastatic, castration-sensitive PC patients, we do it with a dose for the purpose of the prevention of osteoporosis and bone fractures, and it is demanded what a dose for the purpose of prevention and in bone metastatic, castration resistant PC patients, the reduction of symptomatic skeletal events. However, There is no benefit in prolongation of overall survival by addition of denosumab or zoledronic acid. Care for oral hygiene should be considered to avoid osteonecrosis of the jaw, oral infection and hypocalcemia. PMID:27346316

  15. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  16. Role of the neural niche in brain metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Termini, John; Neman, Josh; Jandial, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the relenteless pursuit of cancer to escape its primary site and colonize distant organs. This malignant evolutionary process is biologically heterogeneous, yet one unifying element is the critical role of the microenvironment for arriving metastatic cells. Historically brain metastases were rarely investigated since patients with advanced cancer were considered terminal. Fortunately, advances in molecular therapies have led to patients living longer with metastatic cancer. However, one site remains recalcitrant to our treatment efforts – the brain. The central nervous system is the most complex biological system, which poses unique obstacles but also harbors opportunities for discovery. Much of what we know about the brain microenvironment comes from neuroscience. We suggest that the interrelated cellular responses in traumatic brain injury may guide us towards new perspectives in understanding brain metastases. In this view, brain metastases may be conceptualized as progressive oncologic injury to the nervous system. This review discusses our evolving understanding of the bidirectional interactions between the brain milieu and metastatic cancer. PMID:25035392

  17. Inhibition of metastatic tumor growth and metastasis via targeting metastatic breast cancer by chlorotoxin-modified liposomes.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chao; He, Bing; Dai, Wenbing; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Guangji; Yin, Lifang; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    A liposome system modified with chlorotoxin (ClTx), a scorpion venom peptide previously utilized for targeting brain tumors, was established. Its targeting efficiency and antimetastasis behavior against metastatic breast cancer highly expressed MMP-2, the receptor of ClTx, were investigated. 4T1, a metastatic breast cancer cell line derived from a murine breast tumor, was selected as the cell model. As results, the ClTx-modified liposomes displayed specific binding to 4T1 as determined by flow cytometry and confocal imaging. The cytotoxicity assay revealed that the ClTx modification increased the toxicity compared with nonmodified liposomes. In addition, the modified liposomes also exhibited high in vivo targeting efficiency in the BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 tumors. Importantly, this system inhibited the growth of metastatic tumor and prevented the incidence of lung metastasis in mice bearing 4T1 tumors with only low systemic toxicity. The data obtained from the in vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that the ClTx-modified liposomes increased the drug delivery to metastatic breast cancers. This study proved that the ClTx-modified liposomes had targeting ability to metastatic breast cancer in addition to brain cancer, and displayed an obvious antimetastasis effect. Generally, it may provide a promising strategy for metastatic breast cancer therapy. PMID:24559485

  18. Metastatic breast cancer with right ventricular erosion.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wei-Han; Chi, Nai-Hsin; Wang, Yi-Chia; Huang, Chi-Hsiang

    2016-03-01

    Cancer that has metastasized to the heart and pericardium has a dismal outcome. Individualized treatment to preserve the quality of life and reduce surgical mortality is important. We describe a 57-year old woman who had a recurrence of breast cancer 23 years after the initial complete treatment. Cardiac metastasis with poor anterior chest wall healing led to right ventricular rupture, which caused hypovolaemic shock. The right ventricular wall defect was repaired with a percutaneous patch and a myocutaneous flap without cardiopulmonary bypass. The patient was discharged home after intensive wound care. Our patient shows that even with complete initial treatment, clinicians should be alert for the recurrence of breast cancer. PMID:25890934

  19. Serum-derived exosomes from mice with highly metastatic breast cancer transfer increased metastatic capacity to a poorly metastatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Gorczynski, Reginald M; Erin, Nuray; Zhu, Fang

    2016-02-01

    Altered interaction between CD200 and CD200R represents an example of "checkpoint blockade" disrupting an effective, tumor-directed, host response in murine breast cancer cells. In CD200R1KO mice, long-term cure of EMT6 breast cancer, including metastatic spread to lung and liver, was achieved in BALB/c mice. The reverse was observed with 4THM tumors, an aggressive, inflammatory breast cancer, with increased tumor metastasis in CD200R1KO. We explored possible explanations for this difference. We measured the frequency of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood of tumor bearers, as well as lung/liver and draining lymph nodes. In some cases mice received infusions of exosomes from nontumor controls, or tumor bearers, with/without additional infusions of anticytokine antibodies. The measured frequency of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood was equivalent in the two models in WT and CD200R1KO mice. Increased metastasis in EMT6 tumor bearers was seen in vivo following adoptive transfer of serum, or serum-derived exosomes, from 4THM tumor bearers, an effect which was attenuated by anti-IL-6, and anti-IL-17, but not anti-TNFα, antibody. Anti-IL-6 also attenuated enhanced migration of EMT6 cells in vitro induced by 4THM serum or exosomes, or recombinant IL-6. Exosome cytokine proteomic profiles responses in 4THM and EMT6 tumor-bearing mice were regulated by CD200:CD200R interactions, with attenuation of both IL-6 and IL-17 in 4THM CD200(tg) mice, and enhanced levels in 4THM CD200R1KO mice. We suggest these cytokines act on the microenvironment at sites within the host, and/or directly on tumor cells themselves, to increase metastatic potential. PMID:26725371

  20. Clinical significance of interleukin (IL)-6 in cancer metastasis to bone: potential of anti-IL-6 therapies

    PubMed Central

    Tawara, Ken; Oxford, Julia T; Jorcyk, Cheryl L

    2011-01-01

    Metastatic events to the bone occur frequently in numerous cancer types such as breast, prostate, lung, and renal carcinomas, melanoma, neuroblastoma, and multiple myeloma. Accumulating evidence suggests that the inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-6 is frequently upregulated and is implicated in the ability of cancer cells to metastasize to bone. IL-6 is able to activate various cell signaling cascades that include the STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) pathway, the PI3K (phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase) pathway, and the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway. Activation of these pathways may explain the ability of IL-6 to mediate various aspects of normal and pathogenic bone remodeling, inflammation, cell survival, proliferation, and pro-tumorigenic effects. This review article will discuss the role of IL-6: 1) in bone metabolism, 2) in cancer metastasis to bone, 3) in cancer prognosis, and 4) as potential therapies for metastatic bone cancer. PMID:21625400

  1. Combination Drug Delivery Approaches in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun H.; Nan, Anjan

    2012-01-01

    Disseminated metastatic breast cancer needs aggressive treatment due to its reduced response to anticancer treatment and hence low survival and quality of life. Although in theory a combination drug therapy has advantages over single-agent therapy, no appreciable survival enhancement is generally reported whereas increased toxicity is frequently seen in combination treatment especially in chemotherapy. Currently used combination treatments in metastatic breast cancer will be discussed with their challenges leading to the introduction of novel combination anticancer drug delivery systems that aim to overcome these challenges. Widely studied drug delivery systems such as liposomes, dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles, and water-soluble polymers can concurrently carry multiple anticancer drugs in one platform. These carriers can provide improved target specificity achieved by passive and/or active targeting mechanisms. PMID:22619725

  2. Skeletal metastases from breast cancer: pathogenesis of bone tropism and treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Fontanella, Caterina; Fanotto, Valentina; Rihawi, Karim; Aprile, Giuseppe; Puglisi, Fabio

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common female cancer worldwide with approximately 10 % of new cases metastatic at diagnosis and 20-50 % of patients with early BC who will eventually develop metastatic disease. Bone is the most frequent site of colonisation and the development of skeletal metastases depends on a complex multistep process, from dissemination and survival of malignant cells into circulation to the actual homing and metastases formation inside bone. Disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) can be detected in bone marrow in approximately 30 % of BC patients, likely reflecting the presence of minimal residual disease that would eventually account for subsequent metastatic disease. Patients with bone marrow DTCs have poorer overall survival compared with patients without them. Although bone-only metastatic disease seems to have a rather indolent behavior compared to visceral disease, bone metastases can cause severe and debilitating effects, including pain, spinal cord compression, hypercalcemia and pathologic fractures. Delivering an appropriate treatment is therefore paramount and ideally it should require interdisciplinary care. Multiple options are currently available, from bisphosphonates to new drugs targeting RANK ligand and radiotherapy. In this review we describe the mechanisms underlying bone colonization and provide an update on existing systemic and locoregional treatments for bone metastases. PMID:26343511

  3. cAMP-response-element-binding protein positively regulates breast cancer metastasis and subsequent bone destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Jieun; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Ha-Neui; Ha, Hyunil Lee, Zang Hee

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} CREB is highly expressed in advanced breast cancer cells. {yields} Tumor-related factors such as TGF-{beta} further elevate CREB expression. {yields} CREB upregulation stimulates metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. {yields} CREB signaling is required for breast cancer-induced bone destruction. -- Abstract: cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) signaling has been reported to be associated with cancer development and poor clinical outcome in various types of cancer. However, it remains to be elucidated whether CREB is involved in breast cancer development and osteotropism. Here, we found that metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibited higher CREB expression than did non-metastatic MCF-7 cells and that CREB expression was further increased by several soluble factors linked to cancer progression, such as IL-1, IGF-1, and TGF-{beta}. Using wild-type CREB and a dominant-negative form (K-CREB), we found that CREB signaling positively regulated the proliferation, migration, and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, K-CREB prevented MDA-MB-231 cell-induced osteolytic lesions in a mouse model of cancer metastasis. Furthermore, CREB signaling in cancer cells regulated the gene expression of PTHrP, MMPs, and OPG, which are closely involved in cancer metastasis and bone destruction. These results indicate that breast cancer cells acquire CREB overexpression during their development and that this CREB upregulation plays an important role in multiple steps of breast cancer bone metastasis.

  4. Evaluation and management of the pregnant patient with suspected primary musculoskeletal tumor or metastatic carcinoma to bone.

    PubMed

    Puvanesarajah, Varun; Spiker, Andrea M; Shannon, Brett A; Grundy, Maureen; Levin, Adam S; Morris, Carol D

    2016-09-01

    Primary musculoskeletal cancer and metastatic disease to bone in pregnant patients presents major treatment challenges. Although uncommon, musculoskeletal malignancies in pregnant women have been reported. When diagnosing and treating these patients, the mother's health must be managed appropriately while ensuring that fetal development is not deleteriously affected. Extensive radiographic imaging and more advanced techniques are often necessary to fully characterize the extent of disease. When possible, magnetic resonance imaging should be used instead of computed tomography to limit exposure of the conceptus to radiation. If treatment is needed, therapeutic radiation, chemotherapy, and surgery should be considered. Surgical resection is the foundation of treatment of early-stage primary bone tumors and soft-tissue sarcomas during pregnancy. With surgery, anesthesia and thromboprophylaxis are important considerations. If chemotherapy is required, administration should be avoided in the first trimester to limit harm to the fetus. Therapeutic radiation should similarly be avoided during the first trimester and often can be postponed until after delivery. PMID:27566025

  5. Metastatic progression of breast cancer: insights from 50 years of autopsies.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Margaret C; Simpson, Peter T; Reid, Lynne E; Jayanthan, Janani; Skerman, Joanna; Song, Sarah; McCart Reed, Amy E; Kutasovic, Jamie R; Morey, Adrienne L; Marquart, Louise; O'Rourke, Peter; Lakhani, Sunil R

    2014-01-01

    There remain no clear guidelines for the optimal management of patients with metastatic breast cancer. To better understand its natural history, we undertook a detailed examination of 197 autopsies performed on women who died of breast cancer. We reviewed clinical, treatment and pathological aspects of all cases and, additionally, pathological features and biomarker expression (ER, PgR, HER2, EGFR, p53, Ki67, c-Kit, CK AE1/AE3) were assessed in detail for the primary tumour and matched metastases for 55 of the cases. Genomes of the primary tumour and multiple metastases were analysed by array-based comparative genomic hybridization for six cases(##) . 945 metastatic deposits were identified, with a median of four/patient. The most common organs involved were lung/pleura (80%), bone (74%), liver (71%) and non-axillary lymph nodes (55%). Major findings included: (a) patients with CNS metastases were more likely to have bone metastases (p < 0.013); (b) younger age was associated with metastasis to the liver (≤ 49 years; p < 0.001) and to gynaecological organs (≤ 49 years; p = 0.001); (c) surgical excision of the primary tumour was associated with metastasis to the liver (p = 0.002); and (d) ER and PgR showed down-regulation during progression in a non-random manner, particularly in lung/pleura (ER; p < 0.001), liver and bone metastases. Genomic analysis revealed DNA copy number variation between the primary tumour and metastases (e.g. amplification of 2q11.2-q12.1 and 10q22.2-q22.3) but little variation between metastases from the same patient. In summary, the association of CNS and bone metastases, liver and gynaecological metastases in young women and the risk of liver metastases following surgery have important implications for the management of patients with breast cancer. Clonal heterogeneity of the primary tumour is important in developing metastatic propensity and the change in tumour phenotype during progression/colonization highlights the importance

  6. Distinct organ-specific metastatic potential of individual breast cancer cells and primary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Minn, Andy J.; Kang, Yibin; Serganova, Inna; Gupta, Gaorav P.; Giri, Dilip D.; Doubrovin, Mikhail; Ponomarev, Vladimir; Gerald, William L.; Blasberg, Ronald; Massagué, Joan

    2005-01-01

    We used bioluminescence imaging to reveal patterns of metastasis formation by human breast cancer cells in immunodeficient mice. Individual cells from a population established in culture from the pleural effusion of a breast cancer patient showed distinct patterns of organ-specific metastasis. Single-cell progenies derived from this population exhibited markedly different abilities to metastasize to the bone, lung, or adrenal medulla, which suggests that metastases to different organs have different requirements. Transcriptomic profiling revealed that these different single-cell progenies similarly express a previously described “poor-prognosis” gene expression signature. Unsupervised classification using the transcriptomic data set supported the hypothesis that organ-specific metastasis by breast cancer cells is controlled by metastasis-specific genes that are separate from a general poor-prognosis gene expression signature. Furthermore, by using a gene expression signature associated with the ability of these cells to metastasize to bone, we were able to distinguish primary breast carcinomas that preferentially metastasized to bone from those that preferentially metastasized elsewhere. These results suggest that the bone-specific metastatic phenotypes and gene expression signature identified in a mouse model may be clinically relevant. PMID:15630443

  7. [Efficacy of Radiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer with Bone Metastases].

    PubMed

    Katayanagi, So; Watanabe, Takafumi; Makuuchi, Yosuke; Shigoka, Masatoshi; Sumi, Tetsuo; Takagaki, Shinichi; Okubo, Mitsuru; Tachibana, Shingo; Oosaka, Yoshiaki; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Kawachi, Shigeyuki

    2015-11-01

    We retrospectively considered the validity of radiotherapy for patients with bone metastases from esophageal cancer. Eight patients have received radiotherapy in our hospital since 2007. The median age of the patients was 63 years, with 5 men and 3 women. Bone metastatic sites were 4 to the vertebrae, 3 to the ribs, 3 to the femur and 1 each to the humerus, ulna, and radius, respectively. All of the patients had other unresectable sites of metastasis. Radiotherapy reduced pain of 3 patients of PS 1 clearly. Median survival time from the start of radiation therapy was 50 days. When PS was relatively good, the possibility of easing pain and improving QOL was suggested by our data. There is a possibility that radiation therapy for patients with bone metastases from esophageal cancer can improve the QOL and alleviate pain. PMID:26805091

  8. Transforming growth factor-β signaling: emerging stem cell target in metastatic breast cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Antoinette R.; Alexe, Gabriela; Reiss, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In most human breast cancers, lowering of TGFβ receptor- or Smad gene expression combined with increased levels of TGFβs in the tumor microenvironment is sufficient to abrogate TGFβs tumor suppressive effects and to induce a mesenchymal, motile and invasive phenotype. In genetic mouse models, TGFβ signaling suppresses de novo mammary cancer formation but promotes metastasis of tumors that have broken through TGFβ tumor suppression. In mouse models of “triple-negative” or basal-like breast cancer, treatment with TGFβ neutralizing anti-bodies or receptor kinase inhibitors strongly inhibits development of lung- and bone metastases. These TGFβ antagonists do not significantly affect tumor cell proliferation or apoptosis. Rather, they de-repress anti-tumor immunity, inhibit angiogenesis and reverse the mesenchymal, motile, invasive phenotype characteristic of basal-like and HER2-positive breast cancer cells. Patterns of TGFβ target genes upregulation in human breast cancers suggest that TGFβ may drive tumor progression in estrogen-independent cancer, while it mediates a suppressive host cell response in estrogen-dependent luminal cancers. In addition, TGFβ appears to play a key role in maintaining the mammary epithelial (cancer) stem cell pool, in part by inducing a mesenchymal phenotype, while differentiated, estrogen receptor-positive, luminal cells are unresponsive to TGFβ because the TGFBR2 receptor gene is transcriptionally silent. These same cells respond to estrogen by downregulating TGFβ, while antiestrogens act by upregulating TGFβ. This model predicts that inhibiting TGFβ signaling should drive the differentiation of mammary stem cells into ductal cells. Consequently, TGFβ antagonists may convert basal-like or HER2-positive cancers to a more epithelioid, non-proliferating (and, perhaps, non-metastatic) phenotype. Conversely, these agents might antagonize the therapeutic effects of anti-estrogens in estrogen-dependent luminal cancers. These

  9. CCN3 Impairs Osteoblast and Stimulates Osteoclast Differentiation to Favor Breast Cancer Metastasis to Bone

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Véronique; Tiedemann, Kerstin; Mourskaia, Anna; Fong, Jenna E.; Tran-Thanh, Danh; Amir, Eitan; Clemons, Mark; Perbal, Bernard; Komarova, Svetlana V.; Siegel, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Bone is a preferred site for breast cancer metastasis, causing pain, fractures, spinal cord compressions, and hypercalcemia, all of which can significantly diminish the patient's quality of life. We identified CCN3 as a novel factor that is highly expressed in bone metastatic breast cancer cells from a xenograft mouse model and in bone metastatic lesions from patients with breast cancer. We demonstrate that CCN3 overexpression enhances the ability of weakly bone metastatic breast cancer cells to colonize and grow in the bone without altering their growth in the mammary fat pad. We further demonstrated that human recombinant CCN3 inhibits osteoblast differentiation from primary bone marrow cultures, leading to a higher receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin (OPG) ratio. In conjunction with its ability to impair osteoblast differentiation, we uncovered a novel role for CCN3 in promoting osteoclast differentiation from RANKL-primed monocyte precursors. CCN3 exerts its pro-osteoclastogenic effects by promoting calcium oscillations and nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1) nuclear translocation. Together, these results demonstrate that CCN3 regulates the differentiation of bone resident cells to create a resorptive environment that promotes the formation of osteolytic breast cancer metastases. PMID:21514448

  10. Acidic microenvironment and bone pain in cancer-colonized bone

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Hiasa, Masahiro; Nagata, Yuki; Okui, Tatsuo; White, Fletcher A

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancers and hematologic cancers frequently colonize bone and induce skeletal-related complications. Bone pain is one of the most common complications associated with cancer colonization in bone and a major cause of increased morbidity and diminished quality of life, leading to poor survival in cancer patients. Although the mechanisms responsible for cancer-associated bone pain (CABP) are poorly understood, it is likely that complex interactions among cancer cells, bone cells and peripheral nerve cells contribute to the pathophysiology of CABP. Clinical observations that specific inhibitors of osteoclasts reduce CABP indicate a critical role of osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are proton-secreting cells and acidify extracellular bone microenvironment. Cancer cell-colonized bone also releases proton/lactate to avoid intracellular acidification resulting from increased aerobic glycolysis known as the Warburg effect. Thus, extracellular microenvironment of cancer-colonized bone is acidic. Acidosis is algogenic for nociceptive sensory neurons. The bone is densely innervated by the sensory neurons that express acid-sensing nociceptors. Collectively, CABP is evoked by the activation of these nociceptors on the sensory neurons innervating bone by the acidic extracellular microenvironment created by bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-colonizing cancer cells. As current treatments do not satisfactorily control CABP and can elicit serious side effects, new therapeutic interventions are needed to manage CABP. Understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism by which the acidic extracellular microenvironment is created in cancer-colonized bone and by which the expression and function of the acid-sensing nociceptors on the sensory neurons are regulated would facilitate to develop novel therapeutic approaches for the management of CABP. PMID:25987988

  11. [Testosterone in the management of metastatic prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Wolff, J M; Schmid, H P

    2015-11-01

    Background Among all cancer types, prostate cancer (PCa) is the most prevalent cancer and is the third-leading cause of cancer-related death in men. The biologic function of the prostate is decisively influenced by testosterone and its metabolic product dihydrotestosterone. However, there is general uncertainty about the role of testosterone in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). For many years, the androgen hypothesis had been accepted to explain the correlation between testosterone levels and the development or progression of PCa. However, extensive study analyses revealed contradictory results, leading to a reconsideration of the androgen hypothesis. High serum testosterone levels do not predispose to PCa development and low serum testosterone levels are not protective. The importance of testosterone levels in patients with mCRPC has been shown in several registration studies with new drugs, such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide. There is growing evidence suggesting a prognostic role of testosterone levels in mCRPC. PMID:26113300

  12. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for a patient with metastatic lung cancer--a case report.

    PubMed

    Crevenna, Richard; Marosi, Christine; Schmidinger, Manuela; Fialka-Moser, Veronika

    2006-09-01

    A 47-year-old female patient suffering from advanced lung cancer with metastatic bone and brain disease participated in a passive exercise program, consisting of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) five times a week, carried out for 4 weeks. After the training period, the results of the 6-min walk (420 m before and 603 m after the training period) have improved by 44%, which demonstrates the increase of physical performance (mobility, endurance capacity). The results of the "Timed up and go" indicate an improvement of mobility and functional health of skeletal muscles. Furthermore, the quality of life (QOL)-scales (assessed by using the SF-36 health survey) "Physical functioning", "Role-physical", "Mental health", "Role-emotional", "Vitality", "Bodily pain", and "General health" showed improvements after the intervention period. Feasibility, safety, and beneficial effects of the NMES program were proven for the patient in this case study. These findings indicate that NMES, initiated and executed with appropriate care, may serve as a useful supportive means of palliative treatment in some patients with advanced cancer and metastatic disease, especially in cases of metastatic involvement of the brain and of the skeletal system with the risk of seizures and pathological fractures where volitional training is not allowed. PMID:16523264

  13. Metastatic phenotype in CWR22 prostate cancer xenograft following castration

    PubMed Central

    Seedhouse, Steven J.; Affronti, Hayley C.; Karasik, Ellen; Gillard, Bryan M.; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2015-01-01

    Background CWR22 is a human xenograft model of primary prostate cancer (PCa) that is often utilized to study castration recurrent (CR) PCa. CWR22 recapitulates clinical response to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), in that tumors regress in response to castration, but can recur after a period of time. Methods Two cohorts of mice, totaling 117 mice were implanted with CWR22, allowed to develop tumors, castrated by pellet removal and followed for a period of 32 and 50 weeks. Mice presenting with tumors >2.0 cm3 at the primary site, moribund appearance, or palpable masses other than the primary tumor were sacrificed prior to the endpoint of the study. Tumor tissue, serum, and abnormal lesions were collected upon necropsy and analyzed by IHC, H&E, and PCR for presence of metastatic lesions arising from CWR22. Results Herein, we report that CWR22 progresses after castration from a primary, hormonal therapy‐naïve tumor to metastatic disease in 20% of castrated nude mice. Histological examination of CWR22 primary tumors revealed distinct pathologies that correlated with metastatic outcome after castration. Conclusion This is the first report and characterization of spontaneous metastasis in the CWR22 model, thus, CWR22 is a bona‐fide model of clinical PCa representing the full progression from androgen‐sensitive, primary PCa to metastatic CR‐PCa. Prostate 76:359–368, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. The Prostate published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26642837

  14. Incidentally Solitary, Synchronous, Metastatic Left Adrenal Mass From Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alvandipour, Mina; Khalvati, Mehdi; Khodabakhsh, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 63-year-old man who underwent an open adrenalectomy for a synchronous, malignant, metastatic left adrenal tumor and a total colectomy for T3N0M1 (stage 4) primary, malignant colon cancer. Two polypoid lesions, one measuring 40 mm × 30 mm × 30 mm and the other measuring 20 mm × 10 mm × 10 mm, were found in the ascending colon and rectosigmoid (RS) junction, respectively, and a synchronous, malignant, left adrenal gland lesion measuring 70 mm × 50 mm × 30 mm was incidentally found on abdominal computed tomography scan. Histological examination revealed a metastatic, necrotic adenocarcinoma of the left adrenal mass, an adenocarcinoma of the cecal mass, and an adenomatous polyp (tubulovillous type) of the smallest polypoid lesion in RS junction that had invaded deeply into the submucosal layer. The patient recovered uneventfully, and his condition is now stable, with no evidence of local recurrence or metastatic disease, 2 years after the surgery. To the best of our knowledge, only 25 cases of an adrenalectomy for treating metastatic adrenal gland tumors have been reported to date; physicians should be aware of the possibility of this event. PMID:27218099

  15. [Multidisciplinary tailoring of therapy of metastatic colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Österlund, Pia; Isoniemi, Helena; Scheinin, Tom; Ristimäki, Ari; Lantto, Eila

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of colon cancer requires multidisciplinary team work. The multitude of therapies in metastatic colon cancer have led to longer overall survival with fewer symptoms. Median survival has increased from 5 months with the best supportive care to 30-40 months in randomized studies, even with curative treatment in some patients. Tailoring of the treatment is best done by a multidisciplinary team considering radiotherapy and operation of the primary tumor, resection of liver, lung and peritoneal metastases, medical treatment alternatives, palliative care, ablative methods etc. Without skillful surgeons, oncologists, pathologists, geneticists, radiologists etc. the best treatment opportunities may be missed. PMID:27483635

  16. Neural Cell Adhesion Protein CNTN1 Promotes the Metastatic Progression of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Judy; Ojo, Diane; Kapoor, Anil; Lin, Xiaozeng; Pinthus, Jehonathan H; Aziz, Tariq; Bismar, Tarek A; Wei, Fengxiang; Wong, Nicholas; De Melo, Jason; Cutz, Jean-Claude; Major, Pierre; Wood, Geoffrey; Peng, Hao; Tang, Damu

    2016-03-15

    Prostate cancer metastasis is the main cause of disease-related mortality. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying prostate cancer metastasis is critical for effective therapeutic intervention. In this study, we performed gene-expression profiling of prostate cancer stem-like cells (PCSC) derived from DU145 human prostate cancer cells to identify factors involved in metastatic progression. Our studies revealed contactin 1 (CNTN1), a neural cell adhesion protein, to be a prostate cancer-promoting factor. CNTN1 knockdown reduced PCSC-mediated tumor initiation, whereas CNTN1 overexpression enhanced prostate cancer cell invasion in vitro and promoted xenograft tumor formation and lung metastasis in vivo. In addition, CNTN1 overexpression in DU145 cells and corresponding xenograft tumors resulted in elevated AKT activation and reduced E-cadherin (CDH1) expression. CNTN1 expression was not readily detected in normal prostate glands, but was clearly evident on prostate cancer cells in primary tumors and lymph node and bone metastases. Tumors from 637 patients expressing CNTN1 were associated with prostate cancer progression and worse biochemical recurrence-free survival following radical prostatectomy (P < 0.05). Collectively, our findings demonstrate that CNTN1 promotes prostate cancer progression and metastasis, prompting further investigation into the mechanisms that enable neural proteins to become aberrantly expressed in non-neural malignancies. PMID:26795349

  17. Prevention and treatment of bone fragility in cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Ottanelli, Silva

    2015-01-01

    vitamin D. Bisphosphonates and denosumab are used for the management of bone remodeling and bone loss induced by cancer treatments. Bisphosphonates also have anti-tumor effects per se, which are expressed in potentially prevent the development of bone metastases. In men with metastatic prostate cancer and which is induced androgen deprivation, it is usefully used denosumab 120 mg monthly or zoledronic acid 4 mg monthly. PMID:26604936

  18. Continuous infusion interleukin-2 and antihistamines in metastatic kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Walker, Paul R; Khuder, Sadik A; Quan, Walter D Y

    2005-10-01

    A prior randomized trial suggested a possible survival advantage favoring the combination of histamine and subcutaneous interleukin-2 (IL-2), compared to IL-2 alone in patients with metastatic melanoma. It has been postulated previously that antihistamines may, therefore, actually be antagonistic to IL-2 and thus interfere with its antitumor activity. We have previously shown no such antagonistic effect in patients with melanoma receiving IL-2 and antihistamines when reviewing the known literature. We sought to determine whether there was any negative effect of the combination in patients with metastatic kidney cancer. A PubMed literature search between 1985 and 2005 was done. High-dose continuous (or constant) infusion (CIV) interleukin-2 was used as the reference therapy because of the relatively constant IL-2 levels generated by this approach. Studies in which cimetidine, ranitidine, or famotidine were regularly scheduled and administered concurrently with IL-2 were included. Thirteen studies were identified. A total of 47 patients responded to therapy. Total response rate = 22%; 95%; Confidence Interval: 17%-28%. Eleven complete responses were noted. Complete response rate = 5%; 95% Confidence Interval: 3%-9%. These response rates are consistent with previously noted IL-2 response rates. In this study of CIV IL-2 and antihistamines, this combination appears to be active in metastatic kidney cancer. There appears to be no negative effect of antihistamine on the CIV IL-2 response rate in this disease. PMID:16248764

  19. Photo-nano immunotherapy for metastatic cancers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feifan

    2016-03-01

    We constructed a multifunction nano system SWNT-GC and investigated the synergize photothermal and immunological effects. Here, we improve the SWNT-GC nano system and design a new synergistic nano-particle, both have the photothermal effects and immunological effects. We investigate the therapeutic effects and detect the immune response with metastatic mouse tumor models. We also study the therapeutic mechanism after treatment in vitro and in vivo. With the enhancement of nano-materials on photothermal effects, laser treatment could destroy primary tumor and protect normal tissue with low dose laser irradiation. With the immunological effects of nano-materials, the treatment could trigger specific antitumor immune response, to eliminate the metastasis tumor. It is providing a promising treatment modality for the metastatic cancers.

  20. Metastatic pancreatic cancer presenting as linitis plastica of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Garg, Shivani; Mulki, Ramzi; Sher, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic disease from pancreatic carcinoma involving the stomach is an unusual event, and the pattern of spread in the form of linitis plastica, to our knowledge, has not been reported previously. Local recurrence after curative resection for pancreatic cancer is the most common pattern of disease. We report a case of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma presenting as linitis plastica of the stomach 4 years after curative resection. A 52-year-old man presented with epigastric pain and melaena 4 years after undergoing a Whipple's procedure for a poorly-differentiated pancreatic adenocarcinoma, stage IB; T2N0M0. CT imaging of the abdomen revealed thickening of the gastric wall, and subsequent oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) revealed diffuse friable erythaematous tissue. The biopsy specimen obtained during the OGD revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, with similar appearance to the prior specimen obtained from the pancreas. PMID:26957034

  1. Generation of Organ-conditioned Media and Applications for Studying Organ-specific Influences on Breast Cancer Metastatic Behavior.

    PubMed

    Piaseczny, Matthew M; Pio, Graciella M; Chu, Jenny E; Xia, Ying; Nguyen, Kim; Goodale, David; Allan, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer preferentially metastasizes to the lymph node, bone, lung, brain and liver in breast cancer patients. Previous research efforts have focused on identifying factors inherent to breast cancer cells that are responsible for this observed metastatic pattern (termed organ tropism), however much less is known about factors present within specific organs that contribute to this process. This is in part because of a lack of in vitro model systems that accurately recapitulate the organ microenvironment. To address this, an ex vivo model system has been established that allows for the study of soluble factors present within different organ microenvironments. This model consists of generating conditioned media from organs (lymph node, bone, lung, and brain) isolated from normal athymic nude mice. The model system has been validated by demonstrating that different breast cancer cell lines display cell-line specific and organ-specific malignant behavior in response to organ-conditioned media that corresponds to their in vivo metastatic potential. This model system can be used to identify and evaluate specific organ-derived soluble factors that may play a role in the metastatic behavior of breast and other types of cancer cells, including influences on growth, migration, stem-like behavior, and gene expression, as well as the identification of potential new therapeutic targets for cancer. This is the first ex vivo model system that can be used to study organ-specific metastatic behavior in detail and evaluate the role of specific organ-derived soluble factors in driving the process of cancer metastasis. PMID:27341354

  2. Integrating bone targeting radiopharmaceuticals into the management of patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer with symptomatic bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Blacksburg, Seth R; Witten, Matthew R; Haas, Jonathan A

    2015-03-01

    Metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) refers to the disease state in which metastatic prostate cancer fails to respond to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). This can be manifest as a rising PSA, increase in radiographically measurable disease, or progression of clinical disease. Roughly 90 % of men with metastatic prostate cancer have bone metastases, which is a predictor of both morbidity and mortality. Historically, treatment has been palliative, consisting of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and pharmacological analgesics for pain control and osteoclast inhibitors, such as bisphosphonates and denosumab to mitigate skeletal-related events. Older radiopharmaceuticals, such as Strontium-89 and Samarium-153, are Beta-emitting agents that were found to provide palliation but were without survival benefit and carried high risks of myelosuppression. Radium-223 is an Alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical that has demonstrated a significant overall survival benefit in men with metastatic CRPC, delay to symptomatic skeletal events (SSEs), and improvement in pain control, with a favorable toxicity profile compared with placebo. Unlike EBRT, Radium-223 has systemic uptake, with the potential to address several bone metastases concurrently and provides overall survival benefit. It is a simple administration with minimal complexity and shielding requirements in experienced hands. EBRT appears to provide a more rapid and dramatic palliative benefit to any given lesion. Because Radium-223 has limited myelosuppression, the two can be thoughtfully integrated, along with multiple agents, for the treatment of men with CRPC with symptomatic bone metastases. Given its excellent safety profile, there is interest and anecdotal safety combining Radium-223 with therapies, such as abiraterone and enzalutamide. Formal recommendations regarding combination therapies will require clinical trials. The use of Alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals in castrate-sensitive disease

  3. A Distributed Network for Intensive Longitudinal Monitoring in Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blau, C. Anthony; Ramirez, Arturo B.; Blau, Sibel; Pritchard, Colin C.; Dorschner, Michael O.; Schmechel, Stephen C.; Martins, Timothy J.; Mahen, Elisabeth M.; Burton, Kimberly A.; Komashko, Vitalina M.; Radenbaugh, Amie J.; Dougherty, Katy; Thomas, Anju; Miller, Christopher P.; Annis, James; Fromm, Jonathan R.; Song, Chaozhong; Chang, Elizabeth; Howard, Kellie; Austin, Sharon; Schmidt, Rodney A.; Linenberger, Michael L.; Becker, Pamela S.; Senecal, Francis M.; Mecham, Brigham H.; Lee, Su-In; Madan, Anup; Ronen, Roy; Dutkowski, Janusz; Heimfeld, Shelly; Wood, Brent L.; Stilwell, Jackie L.; Kaldjian, Eric P.; Haussler, David; Zhu, Jingchun

    2016-01-01

    Accelerating cancer research is expected to require new types of clinical trials. This report describes the Intensive Trial of OMics in Cancer (ITOMIC) and a participant with triple-negative breast cancer metastatic to bone, who had markedly elevated circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that were monitored 48 times over 9 months. A total of 32 researchers from 14 institutions were engaged in the patient’s evaluation; 20 researchers had no prior involvement in patient care and 18 were recruited specifically for this patient. Whole-exome sequencing of 3 bone marrow samples demonstrated a novel ROS1 variant that was estimated to be present in most or all tumor cells. After an initial response to cisplatin, a hypothesis of crizotinib sensitivity was disproven. Leukapheresis followed by partial CTC enrichment allowed for the development of a differential high-throughput drug screen and demonstrated sensitivity to investigational BH3-mimetic inhibitors of BCL-2 that could not be tested in the patient because requests to the pharmaceutical sponsors were denied. The number and size of CTC clusters correlated with clinical status and eventually death. Focusing the expertise of a distributed network of investigators on an intensively monitored patient with cancer can generate high-resolution views of the natural history of cancer and suggest new opportunities for therapy. Optimization requires access to investigational drugs. PMID:26733551

  4. A Distributed Network for Intensive Longitudinal Monitoring in Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Blau, C Anthony; Ramirez, Arturo B; Blau, Sibel; Pritchard, Colin C; Dorschner, Michael O; Schmechel, Stephen C; Martins, Timothy J; Mahen, Elisabeth M; Burton, Kimberly A; Komashko, Vitalina M; Radenbaugh, Amie J; Dougherty, Katy; Thomas, Anju; Miller, Christopher P; Annis, James; Fromm, Jonathan R; Song, Chaozhong; Chang, Elizabeth; Howard, Kellie; Austin, Sharon; Schmidt, Rodney A; Linenberger, Michael L; Becker, Pamela S; Senecal, Francis M; Mecham, Brigham H; Lee, Su-In; Madan, Anup; Ronen, Roy; Dutkowski, Janusz; Heimfeld, Shelly; Wood, Brent L; Stilwell, Jackie L; Kaldjian, Eric P; Haussler, David; Zhu, Jingchun

    2016-01-01

    Accelerating cancer research is expected to require new types of clinical trials. This report describes the Intensive Trial of OMics in Cancer (ITOMIC) and a participant with triple-negative breast cancer metastatic to bone, who had markedly elevated circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that were monitored 48 times over 9 months. A total of 32 researchers from 14 institutions were engaged in the patient's evaluation; 20 researchers had no prior involvement in patient care and 18 were recruited specifically for this patient. Whole-exome sequencing of 3 bone marrow samples demonstrated a novel ROS1 variant that was estimated to be present in most or all tumor cells. After an initial response to cisplatin, a hypothesis of crizotinib sensitivity was disproven. Leukapheresis followed by partial CTC enrichment allowed for the development of a differential high-throughput drug screen and demonstrated sensitivity to investigational BH3-mimetic inhibitors of BCL-2 that could not be tested in the patient because requests to the pharmaceutical sponsors were denied. The number and size of CTC clusters correlated with clinical status and eventually death. Focusing the expertise of a distributed network of investigators on an intensively monitored patient with cancer can generate high-resolution views of the natural history of cancer and suggest new opportunities for therapy. Optimization requires access to investigational drugs. PMID:26733551

  5. Metastatic prostatic pulmonary nodules with normal bone image

    SciTech Connect

    Petras, A.F.; Wollett, F.C.

    1983-11-01

    Asymptomatic prostatic caricnoma presented as multiple bilateral pulmonary modules in a patient without any evidence of skeletal involvement by normal bone image. Percutaneous biopsy provided the initial clue to diagnosis. The authors recommend that asymptomatic prostatic carcinoma be included in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary nodules, even when there is no evidence of skeletal metastasis.

  6. Multiple brown tumors in parathyroid carcinoma mimicking metastatic bone disease.

    PubMed

    Pai, M; Park, C H; Kim, B S; Chung, Y S; Park, H B

    1997-10-01

    An unusual case of multiple brown tumors due to parathyroid carcinoma is reported. The patient presented with lower leg pain. Plain radiographs demonstrated multiple lytic lesions of the lower legs and a Tc-99m MDP bone scan depicted multiple areas of increased uptake suggesting skeletal metastases. Tc-99m sestamibi tumor scintigraphy showed multiple sites of tumor uptake in bones and a large area of increased uptake with a cystic component in the right lower pole of the thyroid gland. An open biopsy from the right tibial lesion revealed a brown tumor. A large parathyroid carcinoma with a necrotic cyst was removed. After parathyroidectomy and right thyroid lobectomy, the patient became free of bone pain and serum PTH levels normalized. A 9-month follow-up Tc-99m MDP bone scan demonstrated less intense uptake in the pelvis, tibia, and fibulae. Nine-month follow-up tumor imaging with Tc-99m MIBI revealed disappearance of the preoperative uptake of multiple brown tumor. PMID:9343725

  7. Phase II Trial of Capecitabine and Weekly Docetaxel for Metastatic Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vaishampayan, Ulka N.; Marur, Shanthi; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Cher, Michael L.; Dickow, Brenda; Smith, Daryn W.; Al Hasan, Samir A.; Eliason, James

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Synergy is observed with the combination of capecitabine and docetaxel due to docetaxel mediated up-regulation of thymidine phosphorylase. A phase II trial was performed with the combination for metastatic, castrate resistant prostate cancer. Materials and Methods Eligible patients had metastatic, castrate resistant prostate cancer, no prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease and normal organ function. Docetaxel (36 mg/m2 per week intravenously) on days 1, 8 and 15, and capecitabine (1,250 mg/m2 per day in 2 divided doses) on days 5 to 18 were administered in 28-day cycles. The response was assessed every 2 cycles. Biomarker correlative studies were performed on blood dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, and the thymidine phosphorylase-to-dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase and thymidine synthase-to-dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase ratios in available prostate tumor tissue. Results A total of 30 patients with a median age of 69 years were enrolled in the study. We noted bone pain in 21 patients (70%), Gleason score 8 or higher in 18 (60%), measurable disease progression in 9, bone scan progression in 18 and prostate specific antigen progression in 22. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia was seen in 3 patients and grade 3 hand-foot syndrome was found in 2. No treatment related deaths occurred. A prostate specific antigen response of 50% or greater decrease was observed in 22 patients (73%), of whom 9 (30%) had 90% or greater decrease. A partial response was noted in 5 of 9 patients (56%) with measurable disease. Median time to progression was 6.7 months (90% CI 4.2–7.7) and median overall survival was 22.0 months (90% CI 18.4–25.3). Conclusions The combination was well tolerated and it demonstrated favorable response rates with durable remission and survival outcomes. PMID:19447430

  8. Genomic analysis of a spontaneous model of breast cancer metastasis to bone reveals a role for the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Eckhardt, Bedrich L; Parker, Belinda S; van Laar, Ryan K; Restall, Christina M; Natoli, Anthony L; Tavaria, Michael D; Stanley, Kym L; Sloan, Erica K; Moseley, Jane M; Anderson, Robin L

    2005-01-01

    A clinically relevant model of spontaneous breast cancer metastasis to multiple sites, including bone, was characterized and used to identify genes involved in metastatic progression. The metastatic potential of several genetically related tumor lines was assayed using a novel real-time quantitative RT-PCR assay of tumor burden. Based on this assay, the tumor lines were categorized as nonmetastatic (67NR), weakly metastatic to lymph node (168FARN) or lung (66cl4), or highly metastatic to lymph node, lung, and bone (4T1.2 and 4T1.13). In vitro assays that mimic stages of metastasis showed that highly metastatic tumors lines were more adhesive, invasive, and migratory than the less metastatic lines. To identify metastasis-related genes in this model, each metastatic tumor was array profiled against the nonmetastatic 67NR using 15,000 mouse cDNA arrays. A significant proportion of genes relating to the extracellular matrix had elevated expression in highly metastatic tumors. The role of one of these genes, POEM, was further investigated in the model. In situ hybridization showed that POEM expression was specific to the tumor epithelium of highly metastatic tumors. Decreased POEM expression in 4T1.2 tumors significantly inhibited spontaneous metastasis to the lung, bone, and kidney. Taken together, our data support a role for the extracellular matrix in metastatic progression and describe, for the first time, a role for POEM in this process. PMID:15671244

  9. A rare avascolar osteonecrosis of the knee related to biphosphonate treatment in a patient with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Lorenzo; Lascio, Simona Di; Kouros, Michail; Pagani, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely used both in the multidisciplinary management of bone metastases, especially osteolytic lesions from solid tumors or multiple myeloma, and of osteoporosis.Aseptic osteonecrosis, especially of the jaw, is among the well-known, although uncommon, side effects of bisphosphonates. Osteonecrosis of other bones has been very rarely reported with the use of bisphosphonates.We describe a rare case of osteonecrosis of the distal femur associated with the use of bisphosphonates in a 74 years old female patient with metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26406544

  10. Radioembolization for primary and metastatic liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Khairuddin; Lewandowski, Robert J; Kulik, Laura; Riaz, Ahsun; Mulcahy, Mary F; Salem, Riad

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma is increasing. Most patients present beyond potentially curative options and are usually affected by underlying cirrhosis. In this scenario, trans-arterial therapies, such as radioembolization, are rapidly gaining acceptance as a potential therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma and liver metastases. Radioembolization is a catheter-based liver-directed therapy that involves injection of micron-sized embolic particles loaded with a radioisotope by use of percutaneous transarterial techniques. Cancer cells are preferentially supplied by arterial blood and normal hepatocytes by portal venous blood; radioembolization therefore specifically targets tumor cells with a high dose of lethal radiation and spares healthy hepatocytes. The antitumor effect mostly comes from radiation rather than embolization. The most commonly used radioisotope is Yttrium-90. The commercially available devices are TheraSphere® (glass-based) and SIR-Sphere® (resin-based). The procedure is performed on outpatient basis. The incidence of complications is generally less than other locoregional therapies and may include nausea, fatigue, abdominal pain, hepatic dysfunction, biliary injury, fibrosis, radiation pneumonitis, gastrointestinal ulcers and vascular injury. However, these can be avoided by meticulous pretreatment assessment, careful patient selection and adequate dosimetry. This article focuses on both the technical and clinical aspects of radioembolization with emphasis on patient selection, uses and complications. PMID:21939859

  11. Genomic Sequencing in Determining Treatment in Patients With Metastatic Cancer or Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Metastatic Neoplasm; Recurrent Neoplasm; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Unresectable Malignant Neoplasm

  12. A metastatic glomus jugulare tumor. A temporal bone report

    SciTech Connect

    El Fiky, F.M.; Paparella, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    The clinicopathologic findings in the temporal bone of a patient with a highly malignant metastasizing glomus jugulare tumor are reported. The patient exhibited all the symptoms of primary malignant tumors of the ear, including facial paralysis, otorrhea, pain, hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness, and vertigo. He was treated with cobalt irradiation followed by radium implant in the ear canal for a residual tumor; then a left-sided radical mastoidectomy was performed.

  13. [Therapy of Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Reinmuth, N; Gröschel, A; Schumann, C; Sebastian, M; Wiewrodt, R; Reck, M

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer accounts for the leading cause of cancer deaths in Germany and is characterized by early metastasis formation. The majority of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) will receive systemic therapy for treatment of their disease. Importantly together with the identification of targetable oncogenic alterations, systemic treatment of NSCLC has dramatically changed in recent years with the implementation of various new agents such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors, anti angiogenic agents, and immune modulating drugs. However, these new therapeutic options also challenge the treating physician since molecular, histologic, and clinical factors need to be considered for the clinical decision-making. Moreover, supportive therapy including bronchoscopic therapy has evolved. The following therapy recommendations will summarize the up-to date treatment strategies for metastatic NSCLC. PMID:27603945

  14. High-dose continuous infusion plus pulse interleukin-2 and famotidine in metastatic kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Quan, Walter; Ramirez, Maria; Taylor, Chris; Vinogradov, Mikhail; Quan, Francine; Khan, Nawazish

    2005-02-01

    High-dose continuous infusion interleukin-2 (IL-2) regimens generate a higher degree of lymphokine activated killer cell (LAK) cytotoxicity when tested against tumor cells in vitro and a higher rebound lymphocytosis in vivo than do bolus IL-2 regimens. Lymphocytes initially activated by continuous infusion IL-2 have increased cytotoxicity against cancer cells when they are subsequently pulsed with additional IL-2. Famotidine may enhance LAK cytolytic ability. Six patients with kidney cancer have been treated with a combination of famotidine 20 mg intravenous bid and continuous infusion IL-2 (18 MIU/sq m/24 hours) for 72 hours, followed by a 24-hour rest, then IL-2 18 MIU/sq m over 15-30 minutes. The most common metastatic sites were the lung, lymph node, and bone. Median number of cycles received = 5 (range, 3-8). The most common toxicities were fever, rigors, nausea/emesis, hypophosphatemia, hypotension, elevated creatinine, and metabolic acidosis. There were no treatment-related deaths, and no patients required intensive care admission. Two partial responses (33% response rate) have been seen. Median survival has not been reached at greater than 8 months. The combination of high-dose continuous infusion plus pulse IL-2 and famotidine is active in metastatic kidney cancer. An accrual of additional patients is needed to better assess the response rate. PMID:15778577

  15. [Current diagnosis and the multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of bone metastases in patients with prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Satoh, Takefumi; Ishiyama, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is now the most commonly diagnosed cancer in Japanese men. In 2015, it is estimated 98,400 new cases are diagnosed. In addition, bone is the most common site for metastasis in prostate cancer, and many patients will develop bone metastases during the natural course of their disease. However, current advances in the diagnosis/treatment of metastatic prostate cancer, lead to change treatment strategy dramatically. In fact, bone metastasis has been changed 'palliative' to 'targeted organ', aimed to extend overall survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). We review the multiple issues involved in current diagnosis and the multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of bone metastases in patients with prostate cancer, and future directions. PMID:26793893

  16. Differential secretome analysis reveals CST6 as a suppressor of breast cancer bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lei; Zhang, Yan; Li, Hui; Yao, Ling; Fu, Da; Yao, Xuebiao; Xu, Lisa X; Hu, Xiaofang; Hu, Guohong

    2012-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a frequent complication of breast cancer and a common cause of morbidity and mortality from the disease. During metastasis secreted proteins play crucial roles in the interactions between cancer cells and host stroma. To characterize the secreted proteins that are associated with breast cancer bone metastasis, we preformed a label-free proteomic analysis to compare the secretomes of four MDA-MB-231 (MDA231) derivative cell lines with varied capacities of bone metastasis. A total of 128 proteins were found to be consistently up-/down-regulated in the conditioned medium of bone-tropic cancer cells. The enriched molecular functions of the altered proteins included receptor binding and peptidase inhibition. Through additional transcriptomic analyses of breast cancer cells, we selected cystatin E/M (CST6), a cysteine protease inhibitor down-regulated in bone-metastatic cells, for further functional studies. Our results showed that CST6 suppressed the proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. The suppressive function against cancer cell motility was carried out by cancer cell-derived soluble CST6. More importantly, ectopic expression of CST6 in cancer cells rescued mice from overt osteolytic metastasis and deaths in the animal study, while CST6 knockdown markedly enhanced cancer cell bone metastasis and shortened animal survival. Overall, our study provided a systemic secretome analysis of breast cancer bone tropism and established secreted CST6 as a bona fide suppressor of breast cancer osteolytic metastasis. PMID:22688893

  17. Anti-angiogenic agents in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Konda, Bhavana; Shum, Helen; Rajdev, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major public health concern being the third leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States. The availability of better therapeutic options has led to a decline in cancer mortality in these patients. Surgical resection should be considered in all stages of the disease. The use of conversion therapy has made surgery a potentially curative option even in patients with initially unresectable metastatic disease. In this review we discuss the role of various anti-angiogenic agents in patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC). We describe the mechanism of action of these agents, and the rationale for their use in combination with chemotherapy. We also review important clinical studies that have evaluated the safety and efficacy of these agents in mCRC patients. Despite the discovery of several promising anti-angiogenic agents, mCRC remains an incurable disease with a median overall survival of just over 2 years in patients exposed to all available treatment regimens. Further insights into tumor biology and tumor microenvironment may help improve outcomes in these patients. PMID:26191351

  18. Tumor-induced pressure in the bone microenvironment causes osteocytes to promote the growth of prostate cancer bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Sottnik, Joseph L; Dai, Jinlu; Zhang, Honglai; Campbell, Brittany; Keller, Evan T

    2015-06-01

    Cross-talk between tumor cells and their microenvironment is critical for malignant progression. Cross-talk mediators, including soluble factors and direct cell contact, have been identified, but roles for the interaction of physical forces between tumor cells and the bone microenvironment have not been described. Here, we report preclinical evidence that tumor-generated pressure acts to modify the bone microenvironment to promote the growth of prostate cancer bone metastases. Tumors growing in mouse tibiae increased intraosseous pressure. Application of pressure to osteocytes, the main mechanotransducing cells in bone, induced prostate cancer growth and invasion. Mechanistic investigations revealed that this process was mediated in part by upregulation of CCL5 and matrix metalloproteinases in osteocytes. Our results defined the critical contribution of physical forces to tumor cell growth in the tumor microenvironment, and they identified osteocytes as a critical mediator in the bone metastatic niche. PMID:25855383

  19. Anti-Transforming Growth Factor ß Antibody Treatment Rescues Bone Loss and Prevents Breast Cancer Metastasis to Bone

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Swati; Nyman, Jeffry S.; Alvarez, JoAnn; Chakrabarti, Anwesa; Ayres, Austin; Sterling, Julie; Edwards, James; Rana, Tapasi; Johnson, Rachelle; Perrien, Daniel S.; Lonning, Scott; Shyr, Yu; Matrisian, Lynn M.; Mundy, Gregory R.

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer often metastasizes to bone causing osteolytic bone resorption which releases active TGFβ. Because TGFβ favors progression of breast cancer metastasis to bone, we hypothesized that treatment using anti-TGFβ antibody may reduce tumor burden and rescue tumor-associated bone loss in metastatic breast cancer. In this study we have tested the efficacy of an anti-TGFβ antibody 1D11 preventing breast cancer bone metastasis. We have used two preclinical breast cancer bone metastasis models, in which either human breast cancer cells or murine mammary tumor cells were injected in host mice via left cardiac ventricle. Using several in vivo, in vitro and ex vivo assays, we have demonstrated that anti-TGFβ antibody treatment have significantly reduced tumor burden in the bone along with a statistically significant threefold reduction in osteolytic lesion number and tenfold reduction in osteolytic lesion area. A decrease in osteoclast numbers (p = 0.027) in vivo and osteoclastogenesis ex vivo were also observed. Most importantly, in tumor-bearing mice, anti-TGFβ treatment resulted in a twofold increase in bone volume (p<0.01). In addition, treatment with anti-TGFβ antibody increased the mineral-to-collagen ratio in vivo, a reflection of improved tissue level properties. Moreover, anti-TGFβ antibody directly increased mineralized matrix formation in calverial osteoblast (p = 0.005), suggesting a direct beneficial role of anti-TGFβ antibody treatment on osteoblasts. Data presented here demonstrate that anti-TGFβ treatment may offer a novel therapeutic option for tumor-induced bone disease and has the dual potential for simultaneously decreasing tumor burden and rescue bone loss in breast cancer to bone metastases. This approach of intervention has the potential to reduce skeletal related events (SREs) in breast cancer survivors. PMID:22096521

  20. [Recent Advances in Systemic Chemotherapy for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuji; Oki, Eiji; Saeki, Hiroshi; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Baba, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of chemotherapeutic agents and biomarkers have remarkably improved treatment outcomes of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, decision making regarding the choice of therapy for mCRC has been complicated by the availability of many different treatment options. In this review, we will discuss the clinical evidence for current systemic treatment, including the key roles of 3 cytotoxic drugs and oral fluoropyrimidines, the appropriate use of anti-VEGF and anti-EGFR therapy, the significance of RAS mutation status as a predictive marker for anti-EGFR therapy, and new agents for salvage therapy (regorafenib and TAS-102 [TFTD]). PMID:26809522

  1. Modelling Circulating Tumour Cells for Personalised Survival Prediction in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers among women, and the main cause of death is the formation of metastases. The development of metastases is caused by cancer cells that migrate from the primary tumour site (the mammary duct) through the blood vessels and extravasating they initiate metastasis. Here, we propose a multi-compartment model which mimics the dynamics of tumoural cells in the mammary duct, in the circulatory system and in the bone. Through a branching process model, we describe the relation between the survival times and the four markers mainly involved in metastatic breast cancer (EPCAM, CD47, CD44 and MET). In particular, the model takes into account the gene expression profile of circulating tumour cells to predict personalised survival probability. We also include the administration of drugs as bisphosphonates, which reduce the formation of circulating tumour cells and their survival in the blood vessels, in order to analyse the dynamic changes induced by the therapy. We analyse the effects of circulating tumour cells on the progression of the disease providing a quantitative measure of the cell driver mutations needed for invading the bone tissue. Our model allows to design intervention scenarios that alter the patient-specific survival probability by modifying the populations of circulating tumour cells and it could be extended to other cancer metastasis dynamics. PMID:25978366

  2. Registered report: Melanoma exosomes educate bone marrow progenitor cells toward a pro-metastatic phenotype through MET

    PubMed Central

    Lesnik, Jake; Antes, Travis; Kim, Jeewon; Griner, Erin; Pedro, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from “Melanoma exosomes educate bone marrow progenitor cells toward a pro-metastatic phenotype through MET” by Peinado and colleagues, published in Nature Medicine in 2012 (Peinado et al., 2012). The key experiments being replicated are from Figures 4E, as well as Supplementary Figures 1C and 5A. In these experiments, Peinado and colleagues show tumor exosomes enhance metastasis to bones and lungs, which is diminished by reducing Met expression in exosomes (Peinado et al., 2012). The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange and the results of the replications will be published in eLife. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07383.001 PMID:26826285

  3. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-04

    Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  4. Autoantibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens in metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, Martin; Taylor, Samuel; Shaffer, James

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the well-established effector functions of IgGs, including direct cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, some populations of IgGs may exert anti-inflammatory effects. Here, we describe a population of antibodies that form in the natural course of metastatic cancer and contain glycans that terminate with sialic acid. We demonstrate that both the titer of these antibodies and their level of sialylation are relatively stable throughout the progression of metastatic melanoma. The sialylation pattern of these antibodies somehow correlates with their specificity for tumor-associated antigens, as IgGs targeting several antigens associated with infectious agents are relatively poor of sialic acid. We also show that some antibodies targeting the melanoma-associated antigen NY-ESO-1 bind to the human C-type lectin CD209 (DC-SIGN). We propose that these antibodies are candidate anti-inflammatory antibodies. The presence of anti-inflammatory antibodies in cancer patients may explain, at least in part, why tumors persist and spread in the host despite strong tumor-specific humoral responses. The elucidation of the cellular and molecular pathways involved in the induction of anti-inflammatory antibodies specific for tumor-associated antigens and their function may yield important insights into how tumors evade immune detection and progress. PMID:23894724

  5. Identification of Lectins from Metastatic Cancer Cells through Magnetic Glyconanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kavunja, Herbert W.; Voss, Patricia G.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells can have characteristic carbohydrate binding properties. Previously, it was shown that a highly metastatic melanoma cell line B16F10 bound to galacto-side-functionalized nanoparticles much stronger than the corresponding less metastatic B16F1 cells. To better understand the carbohydrate binding properties of cancer cells, herein, we report the isolation and characterization of endogenous galactose binding proteins from B16F10 cells using magnetic glyconanoparticles. The galactose-coated magnetic glyconanoparticles could bind with lectins present in the cells and be isolated through magnet-mediated separation. Through Western blot and mass spectrometry, the arginine/serine rich splicing factor Sfrs1 was identified as a galactose-selective endogenous lectin, overexpressed in B16F10 cells, compared with B16F1 cells. In addition, galactin-3 was found in higher amounts in B16F10 cells. Finally, the glyconanoparticles exhibited a superior efficiency in lectin isolation, from both protein mixtures and live cells, than the corresponding more traditional microparticles functionalized with carbohydrates. Thus, the magnetic glyconanoparticles present a useful tool for discovery of endogenous lectins, as well as binding partners of lectins, without prior knowledge of protein identities. PMID:27110035

  6. Use of Bone Scan During Initial Prostate Cancer Workup, Downstream Procedures, and Associated Medicare Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Falchook, Aaron D.; Salloum, Ramzi G.; Hendrix, Laura H.; Chen, Ronald C.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: For patients with a high likelihood of having metastatic disease (high-risk prostate cancer), bone scan is the standard, guideline-recommended test to look for bony metastasis. We quantified the use of bone scans and downstream procedures, along with associated costs, in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, and their use in low- and intermediate-risk patients for whom these tests are not recommended. Methods and Materials: Patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database diagnosed with prostate cancer from 2004 to 2007 were included. Prostate specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score, and clinical T stage were used to define D'Amico risk categories. We report use of bone scans from the date of diagnosis to the earlier of treatment or 6 months. In patients who underwent bone scans, we report use of bone-specific x-ray, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and bone biopsy within 3 months after bone scan. Costs were estimated using 2012 Medicare reimbursement rates. Results: In all, 31% and 48% of patients with apparent low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer underwent a bone scan; of these patients, 21% underwent subsequent x-rays, 7% CT, and 3% MRI scans. Bone biopsies were uncommon. Overall, <1% of low- and intermediate-risk patients were found to have metastatic disease. The annual estimated Medicare cost for bone scans and downstream procedures was $11,300,000 for low- and intermediate-risk patients. For patients with apparent high-risk disease, only 62% received a bone scan, of whom 14% were found to have metastasis. Conclusions: There is overuse of bone scans in patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancers, which is unlikely to yield clinically actionable information and results in a potential Medicare waste. However, there is underuse of bone scans in high-risk patients for whom metastasis is likely.

  7. A novel antimetabolite: TAS-102 for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuji; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Baba, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    TAS-102 is a new oral anti-tumor drug, composed of a thymidine-based nucleoside analog (trifluridine: FTD) and a thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor (tipiracil hydrochloride: TPI). TAS-102 has been shown to significantly improve overall survival and progression-free survival in patients with refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in placebo-controlled randomized phase II and III trials. The current review summarizes mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics/dynamics and preclinical and clinical data of TAS-102 in colorectal cancer. TAS-102 is a new salvage-line treatment option for patients with mCRC. TAS-102 is well tolerated and has great potential in future clinical drug combination therapies. PMID:26677869

  8. Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: changing landscape with cabazitaxel.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ovidio; Afonso, Javier; Vázquez, Sergio; Campos, Begoña; Lázaro, Matín; León, Luis; Antón Aparicio, Luis M

    2014-03-01

    Docetaxel is the standard first-line chemotherapy for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Until recently, there was no standard therapy after failure of docetaxel treatment. Cabazitaxel has been shown to improve overall survival in this setting. As a result, the treatment paradigm for mCRPC is changing rapidly. The improved survival shown with cabazitaxel provides an important new opportunity to treat men with mCRPC after docetaxel treatment. Despite the toxicity recorded in the pivotal study, subsequent trials have shown that cabazitaxel is a safe drug. Patient selection and the optimal interval between prior docetaxel treatment and cabazitaxel remain the critical issues. According to a subanalysis of the various studies discussed in this review, there is a patient profile that will probably benefit from use of cabazitaxel after docetaxel failure. Cabazitaxel represents a new treatment option for patients with prostate cancer. PMID:24217332

  9. Management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2011-01-01

    The management of men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has taken several leaps forward in the last 2 years, with the demonstration of improved overall survival with three novel agents (sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, and abiraterone acetate), and a significant delay in skeletal-related events observed with denosumab. The pipeline of systemic therapies in prostate cancer remains strong, as multiple agents with a diverse array of mechanisms of action are demonstrating preliminary signs of clinical benefit, leading to more definitive phase III confirmatory trials. In this review, we will discuss the evolving landscape of treatment options for men with CRPC, with a particular focus on currently approved and emerging treatment options for these patients. Knowledge of these evolving standards will help to optimize delivery of care and long term outcomes in men with advanced CRPC. PMID:23789039

  10. Profile of palbociclib in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ehab, Moataz; Elbaz, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in women. Each year, thousands die either because of disease progression or failure of treatment. Breast cancer is classified into different subtypes based on the molecular expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, and/or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). These receptors represent important therapeutic targets either through monoclonal antibodies or through small-molecule inhibitors directed toward them. However, up to 40% of patients develop either a primary or a secondary resistance to the current treatments. Therefore, there is an urgent need for investigating new targets in order to overcome the resistance and/or enhance the current therapies. Cell cycle is altered in many human cancers, especially in breast cancer. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), especially CDK4 and CDK6, play a pivotal role in cell cycle progression that makes them potential targets for new promising therapies. CDK inhibition has shown strong antitumor activities, ranging from cytostatic antiproliferative effects to synergistic effects in combination with other antitumor drugs. In order to overcome the drawbacks of the first-generation CDK inhibitors, recently, new CDK inhibitors have emerged that are more selective to CDK4 and CDK6 such as palbociclib, which is the most advanced CDK4/6 inhibitor in trials. In preclinical studies, palbociclib has shown a very promising antitumor activity, especially against ERα+ breast cancer subtype. Palbociclib has gained world attention, and US the Food and Drug Administration has accelerated its approval for first-line treatment in combination with letrozole for the first-line systematic treatment of postmenopausal women with ERα+/HER2− locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. In this review, we discuss the potential role of CDK inhibition in breast cancer treatment, and focus on palbociclib progress from preclinical studies to clinical trials with mentioning the

  11. A novel framework for the temporal analysis of bone mineral density in metastatic lesions using CT images of the femur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoop, Tom H.; Derikx, Loes C.; Verdonschot, Nico; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2015-03-01

    In the progressive stages of cancer, metastatic lesions in often develop in the femur. The accompanying pain and risk of fracture dramatically affect the quality of life of the patient. Radiotherapy is often administered as palliative treatment to relieve pain and restore the bone around the lesion. It is thought to affect the bone mineralization of the treated region, but the quantitative relation between radiation dose and femur remineralization remains unclear. A new framework for the longitudinal analysis of CT-scans of patients receiving radiotherapy is presented to investigate this relationship. The implemented framework is capable of automatic calibration of Hounsfield Units to calcium equivalent values and the estimation of a prediction interval per scan. Other features of the framework are temporal registration of femurs using elastix, transformation of arbitrary Regions Of Interests (ROI), and extraction of metrics for analysis. Build in Matlab, the modular approach aids easy adaptation to the pertinent questions in the explorative phase of the research. For validation purposes, an in-vitro model consisting of a human cadaver femur with a milled hole in the intertrochanteric region was used, representing a femur with a metastatic lesion. The hole was incrementally stacked with plates of PMMA bone cement with variable radiopaqueness. Using a Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test, changes in density distribution due to an increase of the calcium concentration could be discriminated. In a 21 cm3 ROI, changes in 8% of the volume from 888 ± 57mg • ml-1 to 1000 ± 80mg • ml-1 could be statistically proven using the proposed framework. In conclusion, the newly developed framework proved to be a useful and flexible tool for the analysis of longitudinal CT data.

  12. Pan FGFR Kinase Inhibitor BGJ398 and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-19

    Colon Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  13. Bone scanning.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, L D; Bennett, L R

    1975-03-01

    Scanning is based on the uptake of a nuclide by the crystal lattice of bone and is related to bone blood flow. Cancer cells do not take up the tracer. Normally, the scan visualizes the highly vascular bones. Scans are useful and are indicated in metastatic bone disease, primary bone tumors, hematologic malignancies and some non-neoplastic diseases. The scan is more sensitive than x-ray in the detection of malignant diseases of the skeleton. PMID:1054210

  14. Chemohormonal Therapy in Metastatic Hormone-Sensitive Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Christopher J.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Carducci, Michael; Liu, Glenn; Jarrard, David F.; Eisenberger, Mario; Wong, Yu-Ning; Hahn, Noah; Kohli, Manish; Cooney, Matthew M.; Dreicer, Robert; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Picus, Joel; Shevrin, Daniel; Hussain, Maha; Garcia, Jorge A.; DiPaola, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the backbone of treatment for metastatic prostate cancer since the 1940s. We assessed whether concomitant treatment with ADT plus docetaxel would result in longer overall survival than that with ADT alone. METHODS We assigned men with metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer to receive either ADT plus docetaxel (at a dose of 75 mg per square meter of body-surface area every 3 weeks for six cycles) or ADT alone. The primary objective was to test the hypothesis that the median overall survival would be 33.3% longer among patients receiving docetaxel added to ADT early during therapy than among patients receiving ADT alone. RESULTS A total of 790 patients (median age, 63 years) underwent randomization. After a median follow-up of 28.9 months, the median overall survival was 13.6 months longer with ADT plus docetaxel (combination therapy) than with ADT alone (57.6 months vs. 44.0 months; hazard ratio for death in the combination group, 0.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47 to 0.80; P<0.001). The median time to biochemical, symptomatic, or radiographic progression was 20.2 months in the combination group, as compared with 11.7 months in the ADT-alone group (hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.51 to 0.72; P<0.001). The rate of a prostate-specific antigen level of less than 0.2 ng per milliliter at 12 months was 27.7% in the combination group versus 16.8% in the ADT-alone group (P<0.001). In the combination group, the rate of grade 3 or 4 febrile neutropenia was 6.2%, the rate of grade 3 or 4 infection with neutropenia was 2.3%, and the rate of grade 3 sensory neuropathy and of grade 3 motor neuropathy was 0.5%. CONCLUSIONS Six cycles of docetaxel at the beginning of ADT for metastatic prostate cancer resulted in significantly longer overall survival than that with ADT alone. (Funded by the National Cancer Institute and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00309985.) PMID:26244877

  15. TH-E-BRF-08: Subpopulations of Similarly-Responding Lesions in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C; Harmon, S; Perk, T; Jeraj, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In patients with multiple lesions, resistance to cancer treatments and subsequent disease recurrence may be due to heterogeneity of response across lesions. This study aims to identify subpopulations of similarly-responding metastatic prostate cancer lesions in bone using quantitative PET metrics. Methods: Seven metastatic prostate cancer patients treated with AR-directed therapy received pre-treatment and mid-treatment [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans. Images were registered using an articulated CT registration algorithm and transformations were applied to PET segmentations. Midtreatment response was calculated on PET-based texture features. Hierarchical agglomerative clustering was used to form groups of similarly-responding lesions, with the number of natural clusters (K) determined by the inconsistency coefficient. Lesion clustering was performed within each patient, and for the pooled population. The cophenetic coefficient (C) quantified how well the data was clustered. The Jaccard Index (JI) assessed similarity of cluster assignments from patient clustering and from population clustering. Results: 188 lesions in seven patients were identified for analysis (between 6 to 53 lesions per patient). Lesion response was defined as percent change relative to pre-treatment for 23 uncorrelated PET-based feature identifiers. . High response heterogeneity was found across all lesions (i.e. range ΔSUVmax =−95.98% to 775.00%). For intra-patient clustering, K ranged from 1–20. Population-based clustering resulted in 75 clusters, of 1-6 lesions each. Intra-patient clustering resulted in higher quality clusters than population clustering (mean C=0.95, range=0.89 to 1.00). For all patients, cluster assignments from population clustering showed good agreement to intra-patient clustering (mean JI=0.87, range=0.68 to 1.00). Conclusion: Subpopulations of similarly-responding lesions were identified in patients with multiple metastatic lesions. Good agreement was found between

  16. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche1

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Zach S.; Lie, Wen-Rong; Wang, Weiqi; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Alluri, Rajiv V.; Tamaresis, John S.; Bachmann, Michael H.; Lee, Kitty; Maloney, William J.; Contag, Christopher H.; King, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. METHODS: Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein) and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014) and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006) and IL-1β (P = .001) in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche. PMID:26696367

  17. Cancer therapy using bone-seeking isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewington, V. J.

    1996-10-01

    Bone pain is a common symptom in disseminated malignancy and may be difficult to manage effectively. Radiation is of proven benefit for pain palliation and there is growing interest in the therapeutic potential of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals. Clinical data relating to the use of phosphorus-32, strontium-89, samarium-153 EDTMP, rhenium-186 HEDP and tin-117m DTPA are reviewed in the context of the pathophysiology of metastatic bone pain. Possible mechanisms of action of palliative radiotherapy and, in particular, the theoretical role of early response genes are discussed. The application of Monte Carlo simulation to targeted radiotherapy for bone metastases may provide the basis for a clearer understanding of the microdosimetry and radiobiology of bone pain palliation and for reliable prediction of clinical response and toxicity.

  18. The sensory and coping intervention for women newly diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Margaret; Donovan, Heidi; Slavish, Kathleen

    2010-09-01

    Preparatory information at the time of metastatic breast cancer diagnosis can be used to enhance patients' coping ability. Women with metastatic breast cancer evaluated a multimedia educational intervention designed to provide sensory and coping information regarding illness. Twenty women with metastatic breast cancer evaluated the materials. The intervention was evaluated very favorably and women identified the materials as needed information. However, they expressed dislike of content outlining possible concerns suggesting future iterations include only positive content. Findings confirm the acceptability and usability of these materials for further testing and ultimately for integration into cancer care practice. PMID:20186518

  19. Docetaxel-related toxicity in metastatic hormone-sensitive and metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Michael T; Gulati, Roman; Mostaghel, Elahe A; Nelson, Peter S; Montgomery, R Bruce; Yu, Evan Y; Cheng, Heather H

    2016-07-01

    Docetaxel plus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) offers a survival benefit in metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC). However, one trial evaluating docetaxel in mHSPC (GETUG-AFU15) showed unexpected toxicity; raising concerns that docetaxel may carry increased toxicity when used to treat mHSPC compared to metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). We conducted a retrospective analysis evaluating differences in toxicity based on the clinical state (i.e., mHSPC vs. mCRPC) that docetaxel was used. Patients initiating docetaxel between 1/1/2014 and 7/15/2015 were included, with the former date chosen to coincide with the press release for the first mHSPC study that showed a survival benefit with early docetaxel; ensuring contemporary docetaxel-treated cohorts. Thirty-nine mCRPC and 22 mHSPC patients were included. Compared to mCRPC, mHSPC patients were younger (median years: 66.3 vs. 71.8, P = 0.007); had better performance status (ECOG 0-1: 100 vs. 62 %, P < 0.0001); and used opiates less frequently (29 vs. 66 %, P = 0.04). Neutropenic fevers occurred in 9 and 5 % (P = 0.95) of men with mHSPC and mCRPC, respectively. Other toxicities also occurred at similar rates between cohorts. The incidence of any toxic event was 73 and 67 % (P = 0.84) for men with mHSPC and mCRPC, respectively. Within the mHSPC cohort, neutropenic fevers occurred at a similar rate regardless of the time interval between initiating ADT and the start of docetaxel. We did not observe a significant difference in toxicity between mHSPC and mCRPC patients receiving docetaxel. However, the small sample size and retrospective nature of this study limit our ability to draw definitive conclusions. PMID:27300548

  20. Bone metastases in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Portales, Fabienne; Thézenas, Simon; Samalin, Emmanuelle; Assenat, Eric; Mazard, Thibault; Ychou, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal (CRC) and gastroesophageal (GEC) cancers unusually spread to the bone. However, bone metastases (BM) are responsible for skeletal-related events (SREs) associated with an altered quality of life. Aiming to describe the characteristics and prognostic influence of BM from gastro-intestinal cancers, we performed a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data in patients treated in our institution (1996-2006). 189 patients (5.5 %) developed BM: 79 with GEC and 110 with CRC. 57 patients had bone-exclusive metastases. In univariate analyses, the median time to BM occurrence was correlated with the primary tumour (PT) localisation, surgery, histology and TNM staging. However, in multivariate analyses, the occurrence delay was significantly shorter only for patients with GEC (HR 2.1), N1-2 status (HR 1.9), M1 status (HR 2.4), and epidermoid carcinoma (HR 6.0). Pain was the most frequent clinical sign leading to BM diagnosis (77.2 %). SRE occurred in 55 % of patients. Median overall survivals (OSs) of patients with CRC and GEC were 9.4 months [95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) 6.4-11.1] and 3.4 months (95 % CI 2.5-9.0), respectively. In univariate analyses, OS was correlated with PT surgery and NM staging, and the number of BM. In multivariate analyses, only the PT surgery and the number of BM remained correlated with OS. Our results suggest that there may be a subset of patients associated with a quicker development of BM. Given their higher risk of SRE, they could benefit from an early screening, calling for further prospective studies encompassing patients with and without BM. PMID:25381591

  1. At the crossroads: EGFR and PTHrP signaling in cancer-mediated diseases of bone

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Nicole; Riese, David J.; Hollenhorst, Peter C.; Lorch, Gwendolen; Foley, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor is a well-established cancer therapeutic target due to its stimulation of proliferation, motility, and resistance to apoptosis. Recently, additional roles for the receptor have been identified in growth of metastases. Similar to development, metastatic spread requires signaling interactions between epithelial-derived tumor cells and mesenchymal derivatives of the microenvironment. This necessitates reactivation of developmental signaling molecules, including the hypercalcemia factor parathyroid hormone-related protein. This review covers the variations of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in cancers that produce bone metastases, regulation of parathyroid hormone-related protein, and evidence that the two molecules drive cancer-mediated diseases of bone. PMID:22684584

  2. Local tumour hyperthermia as immunotherapy for metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Fiering, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Local tumour hyperthermia for cancer treatment is currently used either for ablation purposes as an alternative to surgery or less frequently, in combination with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy to enhance the effects of those traditional therapies. As it has become apparent that activating the immune system is crucial to successfully treat metastatic cancer, the potential of boosting anti-tumour immunity by heating tumours has become a growing area of cancer research. After reviewing the history of hyperthermia therapy for cancer and introducing methods for inducing local hyperthermia, this review describes different mechanisms by which heating tumours can elicit anti-tumour immune responses, including tumour cell damage, tumour surface molecule changes, heat shock proteins, exosomes, direct effects on immune cells, and changes in the tumour vasculature. We then go over in vivo studies that provide promising results showing that local hyperthermia therapy indeed activates various systemic anti-tumour immune responses that slow growth of untreated tumours. Finally, future research questions that will help bring the use of local hyperthermia as systemic immunotherapy closer to clinical application are discussed. PMID:25430985

  3. [Nab-Paclitaxel plus Gemcitabine for Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer].

    PubMed

    Katsura, Yoshiteru; Takeda, Yutaka; Ohmura, Yoshiaki; Motoyama, Yurina; Ishida, Tomo; Morimoto, Yoshihiro; Matsushita, Katsunori; Naito, Atsushi; Murakami, Kohei; Kagawa, Yoshinori; Okishiro, Masatsugu; Takeno, Atsushi; Egawa, Chiyomi; Kato, Takeshi; Tamura, Shigeyuki

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic ductal carcinoma is a highly aggressive cancer, with one of the highest mortality rates among gastrointestinal cancers. Nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine (GEM) significantly improved overall survival, progression-free survival, and response rate in a phase Ⅲ trial in 151 community and academic centers in 11 countries. As a result, nab-paclitaxel plus GEM was approved for use in December 2014 in Japan. We report a case of a patient with pancreatic cancer who underwent this chemotherapy. A 47-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for evaluation of pancreatic lesions. Computed tomography revealed a hypoattenuating tumor in the body of the pancreas. After the patient underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy under the diagnosis of cStage Ⅳa cancer, we planned to perform distal pancreatectomy. However, this case was inoperable because we found 3 liver metastases during surgery. On postoperative day 14, we treated the patient with nab-paclitaxel plus GEM. Grade 2 toxicities included neutropenia, diarrhea, and peripheral neuropathy, but serious adverse events did not occur. The progression-free survival was 5 months. He remained alive for 7 months after the chemotherapy. In patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma, nab-paclitaxel plus GEM can be considered as the standard treatment. PMID:26805366

  4. Higher survival of refractory metastatizing breast cancer after thermotherapy and autologous specific antitumoral immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pontiggia, P; Rizzo, S; Cuppone-Curto, F; Sabato, A; Rotella, G; Silvotti, M G; Martano, F

    1996-01-01

    46 women (average 54.3 yrs) with refractory metastatizing breast cancer were treated with thermotherapy and autologous specific immunotherapy (rhIL-2 ex vivo activated cells). Metastases involved one organ in 69%; in particular, bone, lung, liver. The PS after treatment was satisfactory in 41%; the outcome was better in those cases with metastases to one site. The women remaining alive were 31/46; 67% of thermoimmunotherapy treated patients were alive after a maximum survival time of 85 months (median 24 months). The 36 months of control showed a 5-fold higher survival rate in our series when challenged with that of compared women undergoing only chemotherapy (p < .001). PMID:8920769

  5. Irinotecan, a key chemotherapeutic drug for metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Ken-ichi; Kubota, Yutaro; Ishida, Hiroo; Sasaki, Yasutsuna

    2015-01-01

    Irinotecan hydrochloride is a camptothecin derivative that exerts antitumor activity against a variety of tumors. SN-38 produced in the body by carboxylesterase is the active metabolite of irinotecan. After irinotecan was introduced for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) at the end of the last century, survival has improved dramatically. Irinotecan is now combined with 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin and several molecularly-targeted anticancer drugs, resulting in the extension of overall survival to longer than 30 mo. Severe, occasionally life-threatening toxicity occurs sporadically, even in patients in relatively good condition who have a low risk of chemotherapy-induced toxicity, often causing the failure of irinotecan-based chemotherapy. Clinical pharmacological studies have revealed that such severe toxicity is related to exposure to SN-38 and genetic polymorphisms in UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 gene. The large inter- and intra-patient variability in systemic exposure to SN-38 is determined not only by genetic factors but also by physiological and environmental factors. This review first summarizes the roles of irinotecan in chemotherapy for metastatic CRC and then discusses the optimal dosing of irinotecan based on the aforementioned factors affecting systemic exposure to SN-38, with the ultimate goal of achieving personalized irinotecan-based chemotherapy. PMID:26604633

  6. Irinotecan, a key chemotherapeutic drug for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Ken-ichi; Kubota, Yutaro; Ishida, Hiroo; Sasaki, Yasutsuna

    2015-11-21

    Irinotecan hydrochloride is a camptothecin derivative that exerts antitumor activity against a variety of tumors. SN-38 produced in the body by carboxylesterase is the active metabolite of irinotecan. After irinotecan was introduced for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) at the end of the last century, survival has improved dramatically. Irinotecan is now combined with 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin and several molecularly-targeted anticancer drugs, resulting in the extension of overall survival to longer than 30 mo. Severe, occasionally life-threatening toxicity occurs sporadically, even in patients in relatively good condition who have a low risk of chemotherapy-induced toxicity, often causing the failure of irinotecan-based chemotherapy. Clinical pharmacological studies have revealed that such severe toxicity is related to exposure to SN-38 and genetic polymorphisms in UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 gene. The large inter- and intra-patient variability in systemic exposure to SN-38 is determined not only by genetic factors but also by physiological and environmental factors. This review first summarizes the roles of irinotecan in chemotherapy for metastatic CRC and then discusses the optimal dosing of irinotecan based on the aforementioned factors affecting systemic exposure to SN-38, with the ultimate goal of achieving personalized irinotecan-based chemotherapy. PMID:26604633

  7. [Treatment strategy for advanced prostate cancer with bone metastases].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Mikio; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki

    2006-08-01

    The introduction of PSA screening has led to confirming a shift towards an earlier pathological stage in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Consequently, the proportion of detecting early stage prostate cancer has clearly been increasing. On the other hand, progressive cancers in the form of distant metastases and locally advanced ones that have been confirmed at the initial diagnosis exhibit a constant rate. In addition, there have been a lot of cases where hormonal resistance was acquired during hormonal therapy which resulted in advanced metastases of the prostate. Prostate cancer has a tendency to be metastatic to bones. Combining the fact that the survival period of patients undergoing treatment is prolonged after metastases, the length of suffering caused by complications, such as ostealgia, pathological fracture and myelopathy, becomes an issue in which QOL and ADL of the patient are sacrificed for a long time. As for treatment of prostate cancer with metastases, a palliative treatment is common in the clinical scene. However, we can extend a life prognosis with use of radiotherapy and surgical treatment in addition to the palliative treatment at an appropriate time. It appears that a combination of new chemotherapy and hormonal therapy will be promising. In the future, we believe that the appearance of new anticancer drugs, endocrine therapies, bisphosphonates and strontium treatment could be used as a part of the treatment strategy for prostate cancer with bone metastases. PMID:16912523

  8. A review of the efficacy of bone scanning in prostate and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, J M; Cook, G J R

    2002-06-01

    Bone scintigraphy has provided valuable data in the assessment and management of neoplastic disease since being first described in the early 1960s. There have been many developments in imaging techniques and radiopharmaceuticals over the years allowing more reliable detection of metastatic spread to bone. Other imaging modalities are also evolving roles in the detection of metastatic spread including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). Despite this, isotope bone scans continue to have a central role in detection and surveillance of bone metastases in breast and prostate cancer. Paralleling developments in imaging there have been enormous changes in the treatment options available for cancers of the breast and prostate that have metastasised to bone. Bone specific treatments including radionuclides and bisphosphonates as well as high dose chemotherapy provide potential improvement in disease control. There is also evidence that earlier treatment of bone metastases may prolong survival. This increases the need for efficient methods of detection and monitoring of disease. In this article we discuss the efficacy of bone scintigraphy in breast and prostate cancer from the point of view of staging, systematic follow-up of asymptomatic patients, evaluation of symptomatic patients and the assessment of response to therapy. PMID:12114879

  9. Changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology with metastatic ability in cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Mark F.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2013-12-01

    Metastatic outcome is impacted by the biophysical state of the primary tumor cell. To determine if changes in cancer cell biophysical properties facilitate metastasis, we quantified cytoskeletal biophysics in well-characterized human skin, bladder, prostate and kidney cell line pairs that differ in metastatic ability. Using magnetic twisting cytometry with optical detection, cytoskeletal dynamics was observed through spontaneous motion of surface bound marker beads and nonlinear rheology was characterized through large amplitude forced oscillations of probe beads. Measurements of cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology differed between strongly and weakly metastatic cells. However, no set of biophysical parameters changed systematically with metastatic ability across all cell lines. Compared to their weakly metastatic counterparts, the strongly metastatic kidney cancer cells exhibited both increased cytoskeletal dynamics and stiffness at large deformation which are thought to facilitate the process of vascular invasion.

  10. Organ-specific adaptive signaling pathway activation in metastatic breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Riesa M.; Craven, Kelly E.; Krishnamurthy, Purna; Goswami, Chirayu P.; Badve, Sunil; Crooks, Peter; Mathews, William P.; Bhat-Nakshatri, Poornima; Nakshatri, Harikrishna

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasizes to bone, visceral organs, and/or brain depending on the subtype, which may involve activation of a host organ-specific signaling network in metastatic cells. To test this possibility, we determined gene expression patterns in MDA-MB-231 cells and its mammary fat pad tumor (TMD-231), lung-metastasis (LMD-231), bone-metastasis (BMD-231), adrenal-metastasis (ADMD-231) and brain-metastasis (231-BR) variants. When gene expression between metastases was compared, 231-BR cells showed the highest gene expression difference followed by ADMD-231, LMD-231, and BMD-231 cells. Neuronal transmembrane proteins SLITRK2, TMEM47, and LYPD1 were specifically overexpressed in 231-BR cells. Pathway-analyses revealed activation of signaling networks that would enable cancer cells to adapt to organs of metastasis such as drug detoxification/oxidative stress response/semaphorin neuronal pathway in 231-BR, Notch/orphan nuclear receptor signals involved in steroidogenesis in ADMD-231, acute phase response in LMD-231, and cytokine/hematopoietic stem cell signaling in BMD-231 cells. Only NF-κB signaling pathway activation was common to all except BMD-231 cells. We confirmed NF-κB activation in 231-BR and in a brain metastatic variant of 4T1 cells (4T1-BR). Dimethylaminoparthenolide inhibited NF-κB activity, LYPD1 expression, and proliferation of 231-BR and 4T1-BR cells. Thus, transcriptome change enabling adaptation to host organs is likely one of the mechanisms associated with organ-specific metastasis and could potentially be targeted therapeutically. PMID:25926557

  11. Organ-specific adaptive signaling pathway activation in metastatic breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Riesa M; Craven, Kelly E; Krishnamurthy, Purna; Goswami, Chirayu P; Badve, Sunil; Crooks, Peter; Mathews, William P; Bhat-Nakshatri, Poornima; Nakshatri, Harikrishna

    2015-05-20

    Breast cancer metastasizes to bone, visceral organs, and/or brain depending on the subtype, which may involve activation of a host organ-specific signaling network in metastatic cells. To test this possibility, we determined gene expression patterns in MDA-MB-231 cells and its mammary fat pad tumor (TMD-231), lung-metastasis (LMD-231), bone-metastasis (BMD-231), adrenal-metastasis (ADMD-231) and brain-metastasis (231-BR) variants. When gene expression between metastases was compared, 231-BR cells showed the highest gene expression difference followed by ADMD-231, LMD-231, and BMD-231 cells. Neuronal transmembrane proteins SLITRK2, TMEM47, and LYPD1 were specifically overexpressed in 231-BR cells. Pathway-analyses revealed activation of signaling networks that would enable cancer cells to adapt to organs of metastasis such as drug detoxification/oxidative stress response/semaphorin neuronal pathway in 231-BR, Notch/orphan nuclear receptor signals involved in steroidogenesis in ADMD-231, acute phase response in LMD-231, and cytokine/hematopoietic stem cell signaling in BMD-231 cells. Only NF-κB signaling pathway activation was common to all except BMD-231 cells. We confirmed NF-κB activation in 231-BR and in a brain metastatic variant of 4T1 cells (4T1-BR). Dimethylaminoparthenolide inhibited NF-κB activity, LYPD1 expression, and proliferation of 231-BR and 4T1-BR cells. Thus, transcriptome change enabling adaptation to host organs is likely one of the mechanisms associated with organ-specific metastasis and could potentially be targeted therapeutically. PMID:25926557

  12. Tumor-induced pressure in the bone microenvironment causes osteocytes to promote the growth of prostate cancer bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Sottnik, Joseph L.; Dai, Jinlu; Zhang, Honglai; Campbell, Brittany; Keller, Evan T.

    2015-01-01

    Crosstalk between tumor cells and their microenvironment is critical for malignant progression. Crosstalk mediators including soluble factors and direct cell contact have been identified, but roles for the interaction of physical forces between tumor cells and the bone microenvironment have not been described. Here we report preclinical evidence that tumor-generated pressure acts to modify the bone microenvironment to promote the growth of prostate cancer bone metastases. Tumors growing in mouse tibiae increased intraosseous pressure. Application of pressure to osteocytes, the main mechanotransducing cells in bone, induced PCa growth and invasion. Mechanistic investigations revealed that this process was mediated in part by upregulation of CCL5 and matrix metalloproteinases in osteocytes. Our results defined the critical contribution of physical forces to tumor cell growth in the tumor microenvironment, and they identified osteocytes as a critical mediator in the bone metastatic niche. PMID:25855383

  13. Advances in cancer pain from bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Cui; Zhang, Jia-Li; Ge, Chen-Tao; Yu, Yuan-Yang; Wang, Pan; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Fu, Cai-Yun

    2015-01-01

    With the technological advances in cancer diagnosis and treatment, the survival rates for patients with cancer are prolonged. The issue of figuring out how to improve the life quality of patients with cancer has become increasingly prominent. Pain, especially bone pain, is the most common symptom in malignancy patients, which seriously affects the life quality of patients with cancer. The research of cancer pain has a breakthrough due to the development of the animal models of cancer pain in recent years, such as the animal models of mouse femur, humerus, calcaneus, and rat tibia. The establishment of several kinds of animal models related to cancer pain provides a new platform in vivo to investigate the molecular mechanisms of cancer pain. In this review, we focus on the advances of cancer pain from bone metastasis, the mechanisms involved in cancer pain, and the drug treatment of cancer pain in the animal models. PMID:26316696

  14. Curcumin deteriorates trabecular and cortical bone in mice bearing metastatic Lewis lung carcinoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone is a major target of metastasis for many malignancies; curcumin has been studied for its role in cancer prevention including early phase clinical trials for its efficacy and safe use with cancer patients. The present study investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with curcumin (2% a...

  15. Tracking metastatic breast cancer: the future of biology in biosensors.

    PubMed

    Lim, Y C; Wiegmans, A P

    2016-04-01

    Circulating tumour cells associated with breast cancer (brCTCs) represent cells that have the capability to establish aggressive secondary metastatic tumours. The isolation and characterization of CTCs from blood in a single device is the future of oncology diagnosis and treatment. The methods of enrichment of CTCs have primarily utilized simple biological interactions with bimodal reporting with biased high purity and low numbers or low purity and high background. In this review, we will discuss the advances in microfluidics that has allowed the use of more complex selection criteria and biological methods to identify CTC populations. We will also discuss a potential new method of selection based on the response of the oncogenic DNA repair pathways within brCTCs. This method would allow insight into not only the oncogenic signalling at play but the chemoresistance mechanisms that could guide future therapeutic intervention at any stage of disease progression. PMID:26995223

  16. Therapeutic strategy in unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Chibaudel, Benoist; Tournigand, Christophe; Bonnetain, Franck; Richa, Hubert; Benetkiewicz, Magdalena; André, Thierry; de Gramont, Aimery

    2015-05-01

    Systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with unresectable advanced colorectal cancer (CRC), but salvage surgery of metastatic disease should be considered in the case of adequate tumor shrinkage. Several drugs and combinations are now available for use in treating patients with advanced CRC, but the optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Moreover, the administration of antitumor therapy can be modulated by periods of maintenance or treatment breaks rather than delivered as full therapy until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity, followed by reintroduction of prior full therapy when required, before switching to other drugs. Consequently, randomized strategy trials are needed to define the optimal treatment sequences. Molecular testing for Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS) is mandatory but not sufficient to select appropriate patients for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (MoAb) therapy. PMID:26673925

  17. State of the art management of metastatic gastroesophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Adrian G.; Lynch, David

    2015-01-01

    The anatomical locations of upper gastrointestinal (GI) tumors have changed remarkably in the western world and reflect the increasing impact of obesity and gastroesophageal (GE) reflux rather than infectious etiologies. Incidence rates of GE tumors are rising rapidly and survival rates for patients with metastatic disease remain poor. Traditionally, cytotoxic chemotherapy has had some survival advantages but increasingly complex combination regimens are limited by toxicities. The advent of molecularly targeted therapy has provided additional options for patients with advanced disease including trastuzumab and ramucirumab. There has also been detailed molecular characterization of upper GI tumors which hopefully will result in improved tailoring of clinical trial design accounting for the heterogeneity inherent in GE tumors. While numerous targeted therapies are currently being studied in clinical trials, there is much excitement regarding the role of immunotherapy in GE cancers. Although further investigation is warranted, it represents a promising avenue for patients with advanced GE tumors. PMID:26539453

  18. State of the art management of metastatic gastroesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Adrian G; Lynch, David; Kelly, Ronan J

    2015-09-01

    The anatomical locations of upper gastrointestinal (GI) tumors have changed remarkably in the western world and reflect the increasing impact of obesity and gastroesophageal (GE) reflux rather than infectious etiologies. Incidence rates of GE tumors are rising rapidly and survival rates for patients with metastatic disease remain poor. Traditionally, cytotoxic chemotherapy has had some survival advantages but increasingly complex combination regimens are limited by toxicities. The advent of molecularly targeted therapy has provided additional options for patients with advanced disease including trastuzumab and ramucirumab. There has also been detailed molecular characterization of upper GI tumors which hopefully will result in improved tailoring of clinical trial design accounting for the heterogeneity inherent in GE tumors. While numerous targeted therapies are currently being studied in clinical trials, there is much excitement regarding the role of immunotherapy in GE cancers. Although further investigation is warranted, it represents a promising avenue for patients with advanced GE tumors. PMID:26539453

  19. Cetuximab in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Moosmann, Nicolas; Heinemann, Volker

    2007-02-01

    Cetuximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to the epidermal growth factor receptor and thereby inhibits cell proliferation, metastasis and angiogenesis. Preclinical studies indicate that cetuximab induces synergistic antitumor activity when combined with chemotherapy or radiation. This observation is supported by clinical trials demonstrating that cetuximab improves tumor response when used in conjunction with modern chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Improved treatment efficacy may help to increase the rate of hepatic metastasis resection after downsizing of initially unresectable lesions. In pretreated patients, cetuximab may restore the sensitivity to irinotecan and, therefore, has been registered in this setting. Ongoing studies are investigating the integration of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor strategies into new treatment regimens. Promising results have already been obtained in a trial combining irinotecan, bevacizumab and cetuximab. PMID:17250462

  20. HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer: a changing scenario.

    PubMed

    Mustacchi, G; Biganzoli, L; Pronzato, P; Montemurro, F; Dambrosio, M; Minelli, M; Molteni, L; Scaltriti, L

    2015-07-01

    Adjuvant trastuzumab (AT) dramatically improved HER2-positive breast cancer prognosis. Relapsed disease after AT has different patterns and information is available from observational studies. In this Review Chemotherapy regimens combined to anti-HER2 blockade are discussed, focusing in particular the role of anthracyclines, taxanes and capecitabine. The use of trastuzumab beyond progression and the role of other anti-HER2 agents like lapatinib, pertuzumab and T-DM1 are explored, as also dual blockade and in trastuzumab resistant Patients. Metastatic "de novo" HER2 Luminal (co-expression of HER2 and hormone receptors) Patients are eligible for anastrozole and trastuzumab but if pretreated with trastuzumab they are also eligible for lapatinib and letrozole. In any case endocrine treatment plays a complementary role to chemotherapy which remains pivotal. The last topic explored is treatment options for patients with brain metastases where both trastuzumab given concurrent with radiotherapy or lapatinib and capecitabine appear as potentially active. PMID:25748080

  1. ERBB2 increases metastatic potentials specifically in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tome-Garcia, Jessica; Li, Dan; Ghazaryan, Seda; Shu, Limin; Wu, Lizhao

    2014-01-01

    Despite all the blood-based biomarkers used to monitor prostate cancer patients, prostate cancer remains as the second common cause of cancer mortality in men in the United States. This is largely due to a lack of understanding of the molecular pathways that are responsible for the aggressive forms of prostate cancers, the castrate-resistant prostate cancer and the metastatic prostate cancer. Cell signaling pathways activated by the ERBB2 oncogene or the RAS oncogene are frequently found to be altered in metastatic prostate cancers. To evaluate and define the role of the ERBB2/RAS pathway in prostate cancer metastasis, we have evaluated the impact of ERBB2- or RAS-overexpression on the metastatic potentials for four prostate cancer cell lines derived from tumors with different androgen sensitivities. To do so, we transfected the human DU145, LnCaP, and PC3 prostate cancer cells and the murine Myc-CaP prostate cancer cells with the activated form of ERBB2 or H-RAS and assessed their metastatic potentials by three complementary assays, a wound healing assay, a transwell motility assay, and a transwell invasion assay. We showed that while overexpression of ERBB2 increased the metastatic potential of the androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells (i.e. PC3 and DU145), it did not affect metastatic potentials of the androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells (i.e. LnCaP and Myc-CaP). In contrast, overexpression of H-RAS only increased the cell motility of Myc-CaP cells, which overexpress the human c-MYC oncogene. Our data suggest that ERBB2 collaborates with androgen signaling to promote prostate cancer metastasis, and that although RAS is one of the critical downstream effectors of ERBB2, it does not phenocopy ERBB2 for its impact on the metastatic potentials of prostate cancer cell lines. PMID:24937171

  2. Living with Metastatic Breast Cancer: A Qualitative Analysis of Physical, Psychological, and Social Sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Mosher, Catherine E.; Johnson, Courtney; Dickler, Maura; Norton, Larry; Massie, Mary Jane; DuHamel, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Women with metastatic breast cancer face a wide range of medical, practical, and emotional challenges that impact their quality of life. Research to date, however, has not focused on the quality-of-life concerns of metastatic breast cancer patients with significant distress. The present study examined a range of concerns among distressed metastatic breast cancer patients, including physical and emotional distress, social functioning, and existential issues. Forty-four distressed women with metastatic breast cancer wrote their deepest thoughts and feelings regarding their illness. These essays were thematically analyzed for effects of the illness on quality of life. Three themes were identified in patients’ essays. First, metastatic breast cancer and its treatment may result in a number of quality-of-life concerns, including physical symptom burden, emotional distress, body image disturbance, and disrupted daily activities. Second, social constraints on disclosure of cancer-related concerns may exacerbate patients’ distress. Third, many women experience a heightened awareness of life’s brevity and search for meaning in their cancer experience. Results highlight a range of quality-of-life concerns following a metastatic breast cancer diagnosis and suggest that addressing social constraints on cancer-related disclosure and the search for meaning may improve patients’ psychological adjustment. PMID:23528206

  3. Integrating anti-EGFR therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer remains one of the most common causes of cancer diagnoses and mortality in the United States. The treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer has evolved significantly over the last decade with near-tripling of patient survival rate. A significant contribution to this outcome was the advent of novel targeted agents, such as the epidermal growth factor (EGFR) inhibitors. In an era of emphasis on refining therapy, the presence of KRAS mutation will predict for resistance and limit exposure to patients who are more likely to benefit. In contrast, the presence of BRAF mutations does not seem to have a predictive value. Agents that are thought to reverse resistance to EGFR inhibitors such as those targeting PI3K, c-MET or IGF-1R are currently under study. EGFR inhibitors have exhibited single agent activity, and seem to synergize very well with standard chemotherapy except for cetuximab and 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin (FOLFOX). Preliminary data suggests that EGFR inhibitors have similar effectiveness to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors in the first line setting. Skin toxicity remains the main limiting factor for the utilization of EGFR inhibitors, but strategies including the use of agents such as minocycline or doxycycline added to topical care seem to limit the severity of the rash. PMID:23997940

  4. Personalizing medicine for metastatic colorectal cancer: Current developments

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Andrea Marin; Turner, Alice; de Mello, Ramon Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is still one of the tumor types with the highest incidence and mortality. In 2012, colorectal cancer was the second most prevalence cancer among males (9%) and the third among females (8%). In this disease, early diagnosis is important to improve treatment outcomes. However, at the time of diagnosis, about one quarter of patients already have metastases, and overall survival of these patients at 5-years survival is very low. Because of these poor statistics, the development of new drugs against specific targets, including the pathway of angiogenesis, has witnessed a remarkable increase. So, targets therapies through epidermal growth factor and its receptor and also KRAS pathways modulation acquired a main role whether in association with standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy. With the current knowledge in the field of molecular biology, including genetic mutations and polymorphisms, we know better why patients respond so differently to the same treatments. So, in the future we can develop increasingly personalized treatments to the patient and not the disease. This review aims to summarize some molecular pathways and their relation to tumor growth, as well as novel targeted developing drugs and recently approved for mCRC. PMID:25132758

  5. Clinical effects of laser immunotherapy on metastatic cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, Mark F.; Lam, Anh K.; Bahavar, Cody F.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2016-03-01

    Clinical trials of late-stage breast cancer patients and late-stage melanoma patients treated by laser immunotherapy (LIT) have shown promising results. In a 2010 study of Li et al, eleven late-stage melanoma patients received LIT in one or multiple 6-week treatment cycles applied to a 200-cm2 treatment site, which usually contained multiple cutaneous metastases. Long-term, positive response was observed in six patients. All lesions in the treatment area of the patients responded to LIT, eight of which achieved complete local response (CLR). CLR was observed in the non-treatment site (regional) lesions in four patients. Five patients were still alive at the time of last follow-up. The probability of 12-month overall survival was 70%.2 In 2011, Li et al, treated ten late stage breast cancer patients with LIT.1 In 8 patients available for evaluation, the objective response rate was 62.5% and the clinical beneficial response rate was 75%.1 This review demonstrates that LIT is safe and well tolerated, so it can be easily applied on an outpatient basis and can be combined with other pharmaceutical modalities to improve the therapeutic response of metastatic cancers.

  6. Cushing's storm secondary to a rare case of ectopic ACTH secreting metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bucciarelli, Maura; Lee, Ya-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ectopic ACTH secretion from breast cancer is extremely rare. We report a case of a 30-year-old woman with a history of breast cancer, who presented with psychosis and paranoid behaviour. CT of the head showed white matter disease consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). Despite using mifepristone with multiple antihypertensives including lisinopril, spironolactone and metoprolol, she was hypertensive. Transaminitis did not allow mifepristone dose escalation and ketoconazole utilization. Etomidate infusion at a non-sedating dose in the intensive care unit controlled her hypertension and cortisol levels. She was transitioned to metyrapone and spironolactone. She was discharged from the hospital on metyrapone with spironolactone and underwent chemotherapy. She died 9 months later after she rapidly redeveloped Cushing's syndrome and had progressive metastatic breast cancer involving multiple bones, liver and lungs causing respiratory failure. Learning points Cushing's syndrome from ectopic ACTH secreting breast cancer is extremely rare.Cushing's syndrome causing psychosis could be multifactorial including hypercortisolism and PRES.Etomidate at non-sedating doses in intensive care setting can be effective to reduce cortisol production followed by transition to oral metyrapone. PMID:26525183

  7. Occult Breast Cancer Presenting as Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of Unknown Primary: Clinical Presentation, Immunohistochemistry, and Molecular Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jue; Talmon, Geoffrey; Hankins, Jordan H.; Enke, Charles

    2012-01-01

    We report a rare presentation of a 66-year-old female with diffuse metastatic adenocarcinoma of unknown primary involving liver, lymphatic system and bone metastases. The neoplastic cells were positive for CK7 and OC125, while negative for CK20, thyroid transcription factor 1, CDX2, BRST-2, chromogranin, synaptophysin, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu). Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed no amplification of the HER2/neu gene. Molecular profiling reported a breast cancer origin with a very high confidence score of 98%. The absence of immunohistochemistry staining for ER, PR, and HER2/neu further classified her cancer as triple-negative breast cancer. Additional studies revealed high expression levels of topoisomerase (Topo) I, androgen receptor, and ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase large subunit; the results were negative for thymidylate synthase, Topo II-a and O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase. The patient was initially treated with a combination regimen of cisplatin and etoposide, and she experienced a rapid resolution of cancer-related symptoms. Unfortunately, her therapy was complicated by a cerebrovascular accident (CVA), which was thought to be related to cisplatin and high serum mucin. After recovery from the CVA, the patient was successfully treated with second-line chemotherapy based on her tumor expression profile. We highlight the role of molecular profiling in the diagnosis and management of this patient and the implication of personalized chemotherapy in this challenging disease. PMID:22379471

  8. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-28

    Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

  9. Betulinic acid, a bioactive pentacyclic triterpenoid, inhibits skeletal-related events induced by breast cancer bone metastases and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Se Young; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Ki Rim; Lee, Sun Kyoung; Lee, Chang Ki; Park, Kwang-Kyun Chung, Won-Yoon

    2014-03-01

    Many breast cancer patients experience bone metastases and suffer skeletal complications. The present study provides evidence on the protective and therapeutic potential of betulinic acid on cancer-associated bone diseases. Betulinic acid is a naturally occurring triterpenoid with the beneficial activity to limit the progression and severity of cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, and obesity. We first investigated its effect on breast cancer cells, osteoblastic cells, and osteoclasts in the vicious cycle of osteolytic bone metastasis. Betulinic acid reduced cell viability and the production of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), a major osteolytic factor, in MDA-MB-231 human metastatic breast cancer cells stimulated with or without tumor growth factor-β. Betulinic acid blocked an increase in the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin ratio by downregulating RANKL protein expression in PTHrP-treated human osteoblastic cells. In addition, betulinic acid inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in murine bone marrow macrophages and decreased the production of resorbed area in plates with a bone biomimetic synthetic surface by suppressing the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and cathepsin K in RANKL-induced osteoclasts. Furthermore, oral administration of betulinic acid inhibited bone loss in mice intra-tibially inoculated with breast cancer cells and in ovariectomized mice causing estrogen deprivation, as supported by the restored bone morphometric parameters and serum bone turnover markers. Taken together, these findings suggest that betulinic acid may have the potential to prevent bone loss in patients with bone metastases and cancer treatment-induced estrogen deficiency. - Highlights: • Betulinic acid reduced PTHrP production in human metastatic breast cancer cells. • Betulinic acid blocked RANKL/OPG ratio in PTHrP-stimulated human osteoblastic cells. • Betulinic

  10. Cell stiffness is a biomarker of the metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenwei; Mezencev, Roman; Kim, Byungkyu; Wang, Lijuan; McDonald, John; Sulchek, Todd; Sulchek Team; McDonald Team

    2013-03-01

    The metastatic potential of cells is an important parameter in the design of optimal strategies for the personalized treatment of cancer. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we show that ovarian cancer cells are generally softer and display lower intrinsic variability in cell stiffness than non-malignant ovarian epithelial cells. A detailed study of highly invasive ovarian cancer cells (HEY A8) and their less invasive parental cells (HEY), demonstrates that deformability can serve as an accurate biomarker of metastatic potential. Comparative gene expression profiling indicate that the reduced stiffness of highly metastatic HEY A8 cells is associated with actin cytoskeleton remodeling, microscopic examination of actin fiber structure in these cell lines is consistent with this prediction. Our results indicate that cell stiffness not only distinguishes ovarian cancer cells from non-malignant cells, but may also be a useful biomarker to evaluate the relative metastatic potential of ovarian and perhaps other types of cancer cells.

  11. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells function as novel osteoclast progenitors enhancing bone loss in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Anandi; Deshane, Jessy; Jules, Joel; Lee, Carnella M.; Harris, Brittney A.; Feng, Xu; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced bone destruction is a hallmark of various carcinomas such as breast cancer, where osteolytic bone metastasis is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Immune cells contribute to osteolysis in cancer growth but the factors contributing to aggressive bone destruction are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate the importance of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in this process at bone metastatic sites. Since MDSC originate from the same myeloid lineage as macrophages, which are osteoclast precursors, we hypothesized that MDSC may undergo osteoclast differentiation and contribute to enhanced bone destruction and tumor growth. Using an immunocompetent mouse model of breast cancer bone metastasis, we confirmed that MDSC isolated from the tumor-bone microenvironment differentiated into functional osteoclasts both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic investigations revealed that nitric oxide signaling was critical for differentiation of MDSC into osteoclasts. Remarkably, osteoclast differentiation did not occur in MDSC isolated from control or tumor-bearing mice that lacked bone metastasis, signifying the essential cross-talk between tumor cells and myeloid progenitors in the bone microenvironment as a requirement for osteoclast differentiation of MDSC. Overall, our results identify a wholly new facet to the multifunctionality of MDSC in driving tumor progression, in this case as a novel osteoclast progenitor that specifically drives bone metastasis during cancer progression. PMID:23243021

  12. Clinical use of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibodies in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chase, Judy L

    2008-11-01

    Abstract Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is the most potent proangiogenic factor and has been identified as an important target of cancer therapy. Blocking endothelial cell VEGF activity inhibits tumor angiogenesis; normalizes tumor vasculature, facilitating improved chemotherapy delivery; and prevents the recruitment of progenitor cells from the bone marrow. Bevacizumab, the only United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved anti-VEGF agent, is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits the binding of VEGF to VEGF receptors. The addition of bevacizumab to standard first- and second-line chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer improves overall and progression-free survival times and increases the time to disease progression. Studies are evaluating bevacizumab as adjuvant therapy. The optimal bevacizumab dosage is unknown, but 5 mg/kg every 2 weeks is currently recommended for initial therapy. A surrogate efficacy marker is needed to optimize bevacizumab use, both for dose and patient selection; the clinical applicability of several surrogate efficacy markers is being evaluated. Generally, bevacizumab is well tolerated; however, several serious adverse effects that may occur (e.g., hypertensive crisis) can usually be appropriately prevented or managed. Although current recommendations suggest the administration of the first bevacizumab dose over 90 minutes to prevent infusion-related hypersensitivity reactions, recent study results show that 5 and 10 mg/kg can safely be administered over 10 and 20 minutes, respectively. Whether the addition of bevacizumab to metastatic colorectal cancer treatment regimens is a cost-effective treatment option is unknown; health economic studies are needed. When used for FDA-approved indications or for off-label indications being evaluated in select clinical trials, Medicare reimburses for bevacizumab therapy. PMID:18980549

  13. Radiation Therapy and MK-3475 for Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer, Renal Cell Cancer, Melanoma, and Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  14. Pretubulysin: a new option for the treatment of metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Braig, S; Wiedmann, R M; Liebl, J; Singer, M; Kubisch, R; Schreiner, L; Abhari, B A; Wagner, E; Kazmaier, U; Fulda, S; Vollmar, A M

    2014-01-01

    Tubulin-binding agents such as taxol, vincristine or vinblastine are well-established drugs in clinical treatment of metastatic cancer. However, because of their highly complex chemical structures, the synthesis and hence the supply issues are still quite challenging. Here we set on stage pretubulysin, a chemically accessible precursor of tubulysin that was identified as a potent microtubule-binding agent produced by myxobacteria. Although much simpler in chemical structure, pretubulysin abrogates proliferation and long-term survival as well as anchorage-independent growth, and also induces anoikis and apoptosis in invasive tumor cells equally potent to tubulysin. Moreover, pretubulysin posseses in vivo efficacy shown in a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model with T24 bladder tumor cells, in a mouse xenograft model using MDA-MB-231 mammary cancer cells and finally in a model of lung metastasis induced by 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells. Pretubulysin induces cell death via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by abrogating the expression of pivotal antiapoptotic proteins, namely Mcl-1 and Bcl-xL, and shows distinct chemosensitizing properties in combination with TRAIL in two- and three-dimensional cell culture models. Unraveling the underlying signaling pathways provides novel information: pretubulysin induces proteasomal degradation of Mcl-1 by activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (especially JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase)) and phosphorylation of Mcl-1, which is then targeted by the SCF(Fbw7) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex for ubiquitination and degradation. In sum, we designate the microtubule-destabilizing compound pretubulysin as a highly promising novel agent for mono treatment and combinatory treatment of invasive cancer. PMID:24434509

  15. Pretubulysin: a new option for the treatment of metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Braig, S; Wiedmann, R M; Liebl, J; Singer, M; Kubisch, R; Schreiner, L; Abhari, B A; Wagner, E; Kazmaier, U; Fulda, S; Vollmar, A M

    2014-01-01

    Tubulin-binding agents such as taxol, vincristine or vinblastine are well-established drugs in clinical treatment of metastatic cancer. However, because of their highly complex chemical structures, the synthesis and hence the supply issues are still quite challenging. Here we set on stage pretubulysin, a chemically accessible precursor of tubulysin that was identified as a potent microtubule-binding agent produced by myxobacteria. Although much simpler in chemical structure, pretubulysin abrogates proliferation and long-term survival as well as anchorage-independent growth, and also induces anoikis and apoptosis in invasive tumor cells equally potent to tubulysin. Moreover, pretubulysin posseses in vivo efficacy shown in a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model with T24 bladder tumor cells, in a mouse xenograft model using MDA-MB-231 mammary cancer cells and finally in a model of lung metastasis induced by 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells. Pretubulysin induces cell death via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by abrogating the expression of pivotal antiapoptotic proteins, namely Mcl-1 and Bcl-xL, and shows distinct chemosensitizing properties in combination with TRAIL in two- and three-dimensional cell culture models. Unraveling the underlying signaling pathways provides novel information: pretubulysin induces proteasomal degradation of Mcl-1 by activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (especially JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase)) and phosphorylation of Mcl-1, which is then targeted by the SCFFbw7 E3 ubiquitin ligase complex for ubiquitination and degradation. In sum, we designate the microtubule-destabilizing compound pretubulysin as a highly promising novel agent for mono treatment and combinatory treatment of invasive cancer. PMID:24434509

  16. Breast Cancer Cells Induce Osteolytic Bone Lesions In vivo through a Reduction in Osteoblast Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Laura S.; Choi, Wilson; Burke, Leslie; Clements, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    Bone metastases are severely debilitating and have a significant impact on the quality of life of women with metastatic breast cancer. Treatment options are limited and in order to develop more targeted therapies, improved understanding of the complex mechanisms that lead to bone lesion development are warranted. Interestingly, whilst prostate-derived bone metastases are characterised by mixed or osteoblastic lesions, breast-derived bone metastases are characterised by osteolytic lesions, suggesting unique regulatory patterns. This study aimed to measure the changes in bone formation and bone resorption activity at two time-points (18 and 36 days) during development of the bone lesion following intratibial injection of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells into the left tibiae of Severely Combined Immuno-Deficient (SCID) mice. The contralateral tibia was used as a control. Tibiae were extracted and processed for undecalcified histomorphometric analysis. We provide evidence that the early bone loss observed following exposure to MDA-MB-231 cells was due to a significant reduction in mineral apposition rate, rather than increased levels of bone resorption. This suggests that osteoblast activity was impaired in the presence of breast cancer cells, contrary to previous reports of osteoclast-dependent bone loss. Furthermore mRNA expression of Dickkopf Homolog 1 (DKK-1) and Noggin were confirmed in the MDA-MB-231 cell line, both of which antagonise osteoblast regulatory pathways. The observed bone loss following injection of cancer cells was due to an overall thinning of the trabecular bone struts rather than perforation of the bone tissue matrix (as measured by trabecular width and trabecular separation, respectively), suggesting an opportunity to reverse the cancer-induced bone changes. These novel insights into the mechanisms through which osteolytic bone lesions develop may be important in the development of new treatment strategies for metastatic breast cancer

  17. Metastatic colon cancer from extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma presenting as painless jaundice: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Vabi, Benjamin W.; Carter, Jeffrey; Rong, Rong; Wang, Minhua; Corasanti, James G.

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a rare cancer of the biliary epithelium comprising only about 3% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. It is a highly aggressive malignancy and confers a dismal prognosis with majority of patients presenting with metastatic disease. Metastatic CCA to the colon is extremely rare with only few cases reported in the literature. We present a 61-year-old patient with incidental synchronous metastatic colonic adenocarcinoma from extra-hepatic CCA. Laboratory data revealed significant indirect hyperbilirubinemia and transaminitis. Imaging study showed intrahepatic bile ducts prominence without mass lesions. Incidentally, there was diffuse colonic thickening without mass lesions or obstruction. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) showed a common bile duct stricture. Brushings were consistent with CCA. Screening colonoscopy identified nodularity and biopsy and immunostaining were consistent with CCA metastasis to colon. The patient elected for palliative and comfort care. Metastatic CCA to the colon is a rare pattern of distant spread that may pose a diagnostic challenge. Some salient characteristics may assist in the differentiation of primary colon cancer and metastatic colon cancer from CCA. Little remains known about the pathogenic behavior of metastatic secondary colorectal cancer. And more so, the management approach to such metastatic cancer still remains to be defined. Screening colonoscopy in patients presenting with resectable CCA may alter management. Furthermore, whether patients with history of resected CCA may benefit from a more frequent screening colonoscopy remains to be validated. PMID:27034804

  18. Metastatic colon cancer from extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma presenting as painless jaundice: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Vabi, Benjamin W; Carter, Jeffrey; Rong, Rong; Wang, Minhua; Corasanti, James G; Gibbs, John F

    2016-04-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a rare cancer of the biliary epithelium comprising only about 3% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. It is a highly aggressive malignancy and confers a dismal prognosis with majority of patients presenting with metastatic disease. Metastatic CCA to the colon is extremely rare with only few cases reported in the literature. We present a 61-year-old patient with incidental synchronous metastatic colonic adenocarcinoma from extra-hepatic CCA. Laboratory data revealed significant indirect hyperbilirubinemia and transaminitis. Imaging study showed intrahepatic bile ducts prominence without mass lesions. Incidentally, there was diffuse colonic thickening without mass lesions or obstruction. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) showed a common bile duct stricture. Brushings were consistent with CCA. Screening colonoscopy identified nodularity and biopsy and immunostaining were consistent with CCA metastasis to colon. The patient elected for palliative and comfort care. Metastatic CCA to the colon is a rare pattern of distant spread that may pose a diagnostic challenge. Some salient characteristics may assist in the differentiation of primary colon cancer and metastatic colon cancer from CCA. Little remains known about the pathogenic behavior of metastatic secondary colorectal cancer. And more so, the management approach to such metastatic cancer still remains to be defined. Screening colonoscopy in patients presenting with resectable CCA may alter management. Furthermore, whether patients with history of resected CCA may benefit from a more frequent screening colonoscopy remains to be validated. PMID:27034804

  19. Optical detection of metastatic cancer cells using a scanned laser pico-projection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Ling; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Lo, Yu-Lung; Chuang, Chin-Ho; Chen, Yu-Bin; Chang, Shu-Jing; Ke, Tung-Ting; Cheng, Hung-Chi; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2015-03-01

    Metastasis is responsible for 90% of all cancer-related deaths in humans. As a result, reliable techniques for detecting metastatic cells are urgently required. Although various techniques have been proposed for metastasis detection, they are generally capable of detecting metastatic cells only once migration has already occurred. Accordingly, the present study proposes an optical method for physical characterization of metastatic cancer cells using a scanned laser pico-projection system (SLPP). The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated using five pairs of cancer cell lines and two pairs of non-cancer cell lines treated by IPTG induction in order to mimic normal cells with an overexpression of oncogene. The results show that for all of the considered cell lines, the SLPP speckle contrast of the high-metastatic cells is significantly higher than that of the low-metastatic cells. As a result, the speckle contrast measurement provides a reliable means of distinguishing quantitatively between low- and high-metastatic cells of the same origin. Compared to existing metastasis detection methods, the proposed SLPP approach has many advantages, including a higher throughput, a lower cost, a larger sample size and a more reliable diagnostic performance. As a result, it provides a highly promising solution for physical characterization of metastatic cancer cells in vitro.

  20. Continuous versus intermittent docetaxel for metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, Bishal; Koomulli-Parambil, Sahadudheen; Iddawela, Mahesh

    2016-06-01

    Docetaxel (DTX) is a standard chemotherapeutic agent for metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). However, given a number of toxicities associated with DTX, considerable debate exists regarding the optimal number of DTX cycles to be administered in this setting. In clinic, it is a usual practice to continue DTX until toxicities or disease progression precludes its administration. Therefore, we undertook a comprehensive review of the literature on intermittent versus continuous chemotherapy administration in this setting. Although there is no head-to-head comparison of these two approaches, our review discovered many studies which show that intermittent approach is a very feasible and attractive option with lower toxicities and better quality of life. Because of the availability of many newer agents that can be used post-docetaxel, stopping DTX early seems to be more appropriate with introduction of docetaxel or newer agents upon progression. This review summarizes the data from available studies regarding the feasibility and controversies of intermittent docetaxel in prostate cancer. PMID:27157868

  1. Sleeping Beauty screen reveals Pparg activation in metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Imran; Mui, Ernest; Galbraith, Laura; Patel, Rachana; Tan, Ee Hong; Salji, Mark; Rust, Alistair G; Repiscak, Peter; Hedley, Ann; Markert, Elke; Loveridge, Carolyn; van der Weyden, Louise; Edwards, Joanne; Sansom, Owen J; Adams, David J; Leung, Hing Y

    2016-07-19

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most common adult male cancer in the developed world. The paucity of biomarkers to predict prostate tumor biology makes it important to identify key pathways that confer poor prognosis and guide potential targeted therapy. Using a murine forward mutagenesis screen in a Pten-null background, we identified peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparg), encoding a ligand-activated transcription factor, as a promoter of metastatic CaP through activation of lipid signaling pathways, including up-regulation of lipid synthesis enzymes [fatty acid synthase (FASN), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), ATP citrate lyase (ACLY)]. Importantly, inhibition of PPARG suppressed tumor growth in vivo, with down-regulation of the lipid synthesis program. We show that elevated levels of PPARG strongly correlate with elevation of FASN in human CaP and that high levels of PPARG/FASN and PI3K/pAKT pathway activation confer a poor prognosis. These data suggest that CaP patients could be stratified in terms of PPARG/FASN and PTEN levels to identify patients with aggressive CaP who may respond favorably to PPARG/FASN inhibition. PMID:27357679

  2. Sleeping Beauty screen reveals Pparg activation in metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Imran; Mui, Ernest; Galbraith, Laura; Patel, Rachana; Tan, Ee Hong; Salji, Mark; Rust, Alistair G.; Repiscak, Peter; Hedley, Ann; Markert, Elke; Loveridge, Carolyn; van der Weyden, Louise; Edwards, Joanne; Sansom, Owen J.; Adams, David J.; Leung, Hing Y.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most common adult male cancer in the developed world. The paucity of biomarkers to predict prostate tumor biology makes it important to identify key pathways that confer poor prognosis and guide potential targeted therapy. Using a murine forward mutagenesis screen in a Pten-null background, we identified peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparg), encoding a ligand-activated transcription factor, as a promoter of metastatic CaP through activation of lipid signaling pathways, including up-regulation of lipid synthesis enzymes [fatty acid synthase (FASN), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), ATP citrate lyase (ACLY)]. Importantly, inhibition of PPARG suppressed tumor growth in vivo, with down-regulation of the lipid synthesis program. We show that elevated levels of PPARG strongly correlate with elevation of FASN in human CaP and that high levels of PPARG/FASN and PI3K/pAKT pathway activation confer a poor prognosis. These data suggest that CaP patients could be stratified in terms of PPARG/FASN and PTEN levels to identify patients with aggressive CaP who may respond favorably to PPARG/FASN inhibition. PMID:27357679

  3. Hormonal Therapy in Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Current Perspectives and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Manish; Singh, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Manoj; Sankhwar, Satya Narayan

    2013-01-01

    Ever since the introduction of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in prostate cancer, various controversial aspects of hormonal therapy have come to light. There has been tremendous progress in this area, marked by several important developments in the availability of various new androgen-suppressing agents and refinements to the existing therapies. Parallel to these developments, various more debatable aspects have arisen in the use of these therapies with regards to their negative impact on quality of life parameters. Various modifications in these hormonal agents, their doses, and protocols have been tried in different scenarios in order to improve ADT tolerability. As a result, these controversies continue to evolve even with optimal use of the androgen ablation therapy. This review assesses the present status of hormonal therapy in metastatic prostate cancer and specifically deals with those aspects of androgen ablation therapy that are still a subject of debate. In spite of the fact that various trials have been conducted, some of which are still ongoing, the multitude of questions related to the best possible use of these hormonal agents have still not been answered. Treatment guidelines concerning these issues are continuing to evolve as progress continues to be made in this field. PMID:25992227

  4. Radionuclide Therapies in Prostate Cancer: Integrating Radium-223 in the Treatment of Patients With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Sten

    2016-02-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) frequently metastasizes to the bone, often resulting in painful skeletal events, reduced quality of life, and reduced survival. The beta-emitting radiopharmaceuticals strontium-89 and samarium-153 alleviated pain in mCRPC patients with widespread skeletal metastases and have been associated with myelotoxicity. Radium-223, a first-in-class alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical, prolonged overall survival, delayed symptomatic skeletal events, and improved quality of life, versus placebo, in patients with CRPC and symptomatic bone metastases and no visceral metastases. Radium-223 provided survival benefit to patients with CRPC and symptomatic bone metastases, regardless of prior docetaxel use. Importantly, prostate-specific antigen level and pain palliation were not a measure of radium-223 treatment response and should not alter the decision to administer all six radium-223 injections, the recommended regimen for survival benefit. Radium-223 was generally well tolerated, leading to ongoing clinical trials in combination with other therapeutics. Thus, radium-223 is a valuable addition to the mCRPC treatment armamentarium. PMID:26779616

  5. CD169(+) macrophages mediate pathological formation of woven bone in skeletal lesions of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Andy C; He, Yaowu; Broomfield, Amy; Paatan, Nicoll J; Harrington, Brittney S; Tseng, Hsu-Wen; Beaven, Elizabeth A; Kiernan, Deirdre M; Swindle, Peter; Clubb, Adrian B; Levesque, Jean-Pierre; Winkler, Ingrid G; Ling, Ming-Tat; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Hooper, John D; Pettit, Allison R

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal metastases present a major clinical challenge for prostate cancer patient care, inflicting distinctive mixed osteoblastic and osteolytic lesions that cause morbidity and refractory skeletal complications. Macrophages are abundant in bone and bone marrow and can influence both osteoblast and osteoclast function in physiology and pathology. Herein, we examined the role of macrophages in prostate cancer bone lesions, particularly the osteoblastic response. First, macrophage and lymphocyte distributions were qualitatively assessed in patient's prostate cancer skeletal lesions by immunohistochemistry. Second, macrophage functional contributions to prostate tumour growth in bone were explored using an immune-competent mouse model combined with two independent approaches to achieve in vivo macrophage depletion: liposome encapsulated clodronate that depletes phagocytic cells (including macrophages and osteoclasts); and targeted depletion of CD169(+) macrophages using a suicide gene knock-in model. Immunohistochemistry and histomorphometric analysis were performed to quantitatively assess cancer-induced bone changes. In human bone metastasis specimens, CD68(+) macrophages were consistently located within the tumour mass. Osteal macrophages (osteomacs) were associated with pathological woven bone within the metastatic lesions. In contrast, lymphocytes were inconsistently present in prostate cancer skeletal lesions and when detected, had varied distributions. In the immune-competent mouse model, CD169(+) macrophage ablation significantly inhibited prostate cancer-induced woven bone formation, suggesting that CD169(+) macrophages within pathological woven bone are integral to tumour-induced bone formation. In contrast, pan-phagocytic cell, but not targeted CD169(+) macrophage depletion resulted in increased tumour mass, indicating that CD169(-) macrophage subset(s) and/or osteoclasts influenced tumour growth. In summary, these observations indicate a prominent role

  6. Increased survival in men with metastatic prostate cancer receiving chemo and hormone therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Men with hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer who received the chemotherapy drug docetaxel given at the start of standard hormone therapy lived longer than patients who received hormone therapy alone, according to early results from a NIH-supporte

  7. Improvement of survival and prospect of cure in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yee Chung; Ueno, Naoto T

    2012-07-01

    Patients with metastatic breast cancer have traditionally been considered incurable with conventional treatment. However, 5-10% of those patients survive more than 5 years, and 2-5% survive more than 10 years. Recent studies suggest that the survival of patients with metastatic breast cancer has been slowly improving. In this review, we examine the possible curative approach for a certain group of patients with metastatic breast cancer. We identify that patients most likely to benefit from such an aggressive approach are young and have good performance status, adequate body functional reserve, long disease-free interval before recurrence, oligometastatic disease, and low systemic tumor load. An aggressive multidisciplinary approach including both local treatment of macroscopic disease and systemic treatment of microscopic disease can result in prolonged disease control in certain patients with metastatic breast cancer. Whether patients with prolonged disease control are "cured" remains controversial. PMID:21567170

  8. Metastatic brain tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumor - metastatic (secondary); Cancer - brain tumor (metastatic) ... For many people with metastatic brain tumors, the cancer is not curable. It will eventually spread to other areas of the body. Prognosis depends on the type of tumor ...

  9. Bone Cancer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Bone Cancer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bonecancer.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  10. Bone Cancer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Bone Cancer URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/bonecancer.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  11. Urinary Bladder Paraganglioma and Concomitant Metastatic Lung Cancer. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gkikas, Christos; Ram, Manisha; Tsafrakidis, Petros

    2016-03-01

    We present a case of an organ confined urinary bladder paraganglioma and concomitant metastatic lung cancer to the liver diagnosed on a 66 year old man initially though to be metastatic bladder cancer. The patient was referred to our hospital for frank hematuria and a single solid bladder tumor was identified at flexible cystoscopy. We are also reviewing the literature on the diagnostic and therapeutic approach of extra-adrenal phaeochromocytoma. PMID:26793591

  12. [A case of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer responding to trastuzumab plus gemcitabine combination therapy].

    PubMed

    Sugie, Tomoharu; Nagai, Toshihiro; Ohgaki, Kazuhisa

    2008-04-01

    A 60-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital with left thigh pain. She had undergone mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection for right breast cancer (T3N2M0) five years and two months earlier. The pathological diagnosis then was invasive ductal carcinoma with axillaryly mph node metastases. Hormone receptors and HER2 status were negative and positive (3+), respectively. The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy, but bone metastases appeared 18 months after surgery. Although trastuzumab-combination chemotherapy with taxane and/or capecitabine was given, bone metastases in thoracic vertebra resulted in incomplete paralysis in both legs. She underwent thoraco-lumbar vertebral fixation 10 months before admission. A PET/CT revealed multiple bone metastases in the left femur as well as vertebrae, and CEA rose markedly. She received radiotherapy and trastuzumab monotherapy in addition to bisphosphonate. Temporarily, CEA decreased, but because recurrence nests were recognized in the supraclavicle and mediastinum after the eight-month treatment, trastuzumab monotherapy was followed by trastuzumab plus vinorelbine combined therapy. This regimen markedly reduced CEA after three months, but it rose again over the following three months. As S-1-combined therapy was not effective, trastuzumab+gemcitabine (1 g/week and two weeks on/one week off) combined therapy was started. CEA decreased markedly after 4 cycles, and FDG accumulation in the recurrence region was markedly improved. The adverse event during this treatment was minor, and PS was sufficiently maintained. These results suggest that trastuzumab plus gemcitabine combination therapy is effective for HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. PMID:18408445

  13. A Comprehensive Review of Contemporary Role of Local Treatment of the Primary Tumor and/or the Metastases in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Fouad; Peltier, Alexandre; van Velthoven, Roland

    2014-01-01

    To provide an overview of the currently available literature regarding local control of primary tumor and oligometastases in metastatic prostate cancer and salvage lymph node dissection of clinical lymph node relapse after curative treatment of prostate cancer. Evidence Acquisition. A systematic literature search was conducted in 2014 to identify abstracts, original articles, review articles, research articles, and editorials relevant to the local control in metastatic prostate cancer. Evidence Synthesis. Local control of primary tumor in metastatic prostate cancer remains experimental with low level of evidence. The concept is supported by a growing body of genetic and molecular research as well as analogy with other cancers. There is only one retrospective observational population based study showing prolonged survival. To eradicate oligometastases, several options exist with excellent local control rates. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is safe, well tolerated, and efficacious treatment for lymph node and bone lesions. Both biochemical and clinical progression are slowed down with a median time to initiate ADT of 2 years. Salvage lymph node dissection is feasible in patients with clinical lymph node relapse after local curable treatment. Conclusion. Despite encouraging oncologic midterm results, a complete cure remains elusive in metastatic prostate cancer patients. Further advances in imaging are crucial in order to rapidly evolve beyond the proof of concept. PMID:25485280

  14. MicroRNA-708-5p acts as a therapeutic agent against metastatic lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoping; Liu, Tianchi; Fang, Ou; Dong, Wenhua; Zhang, Fengjun; Leach, Lindsey; Hu, Xiaohua; Luo, Zewei

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been recognized as targets for anti-metastatic therapy against cancer malignancy. Development of effective miRNA mediated therapies remains a challenge to both basic research and clinical practice. Here we presented the evidence for a miR-708-5p mediated replacement therapy against metastatic lung cancer. Expression of miR-708-5p was substantially reduced in metastatic lung cancer samples and cancer cell lines when compared to non-metastatic counterparts. Expression of the miRNA suppressed cell survival and metastasis in vitro through its direct target p21, and inhibited the PI3K/AKT pathway and stem cell-like characteristics of lung cancer cells. Systemic administration of this miRNA in a mouse model of NSCLC using polyethylenimine (PEI)-mediated delivery of unmodified miRNA mimics induced tumor specific apoptosis. It also effectively protected the tested animals from developing metastatic malignancy without causing any observed toxicity. The findings strongly support miR-708-5p as a novel and effective therapeutic agent against metastatic malignancy of non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:26678031

  15. Passive Entrapment of Tumor Cells Determines Metastatic Dissemination to Spinal Bone and Other Osseous Tissues.

    PubMed

    Broggini, Thomas; Piffko, Andras; Hoffmann, Christian J; Harms, Christoph; Vajkoczy, Peter; Czabanka, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    During the metastatic process tumor cells circulate in the blood stream and are carried to various organs. In order to spread to different organs tumor cell-endothelial cell interactions are crucial for extravasation mechanisms. It remains unclear if tumor cell dissemination to the spinal bone occurs by passive entrapment of circulating tumor cells or by active cellular mechanisms mediated by cell surface molecules or secreted factors. We investigated the seeding of three different tumor cell lines (melanoma, lung and prostate carcinoma) to the microvasculature of different organs. Their dissemination was compared to biologically passive microbeads. The spine and other organs were resected three hours after intraarterial injection of tumor cells or microbeads. Ex vivo homogenization and fluorescence analysis allowed quantification of tumor cells or microbeads in different organs. Interestingly, tumor cell distribution to the spinal bone was comparable to dissemination of microbeads independent of the tumor cell type (melanoma: 5.646% ± 7.614%, lung: 6.007% ± 1.785%, prostate: 3.469% ± 0.602%, 7 μm beads: 9.884% ± 7.379%, 16 μm beads: 7.23% ± 1.488%). Tumor cell seeding differed significantly between tumor cells and microbeads in all soft tissue organs. Moreover, there were significant differences between the different tumor cell lines in their dissemination behaviour to soft tissue organs only. These findings demonstrate that metastatic dissemination of tumor cells to spinal bone and other osseous organs is mediated by passive entrapment of tumor cells similar to passive plugging of microvasculature observed after intraarterial microbeads injection. PMID:27603673

  16. Disseminated prostate cancer cells can instruct hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells to regulate bone phenotype.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jeena; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Jung, Younghun; Kim, Jin Koo; Pedersen, Elisabeth; Mishra, Anjali; Zalucha, Janet Linn; Wang, Jingcheng; Keller, Evan T; Pienta, Kenneth J; Taichman, Russell S

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer metastases and hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) frequently home to the bone marrow, where they compete to occupy the same HSC niche. We have also shown that under conditions of hematopoietic stress, HSCs secrete the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP)-2 and BMP-6 that drives osteoblastic differentiation from mesenchymal precursors. As it is not known, we examined whether metastatic prostate cancer cells can alter regulation of normal bone formation by HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC). HSC/HPCs isolated from mice bearing nonmetastatic and metastatic tumor cells were isolated and their ability to influence osteoblastic and osteoclastic differentiation was evaluated. When the animals were inoculated with the LNCaP C4-2B cell line, which produces mixed osteoblastic and osteolytic lesions in bone, HPCs, but not HSCs, were able to induced stromal cells to differentiate down an osteoblastic phenotype. Part of the mechanism responsible for this activity was the production of BMP-2. On the other hand, when the animals were implanted with PC3 cells that exhibits predominantly osteolytic lesions in bone, HSCs derived from these animals were capable of directly differentiating into tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts through an interleukin-6-mediated pathway. These studies for the first time identify HSC/HPCs as novel targets for future therapy involved in the bone abnormalities of prostate cancer. PMID:22241219

  17. Dietary energy availability affects primary and metastatic breast cancer and metformin efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Phoenix, Kathryn N.; Vumbaca, Frank; Fox, Melissa M.; Evans, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Dietary energy restriction has been shown to repress both mammary tumorigenesis and aggressive mammary tumor growth in animal studies. Metformin, a caloric restriction mimetic, has a long history of safe use as an insulin sensitizer in diabetics and has been shown to reduce cancer incidence and cancer-related mortality in humans. To determine the potential impact of dietary energy availability and metformin therapy on aggressive breast tumor growth and metastasis, an orthotopic syngeneic model using triple negative 66cl4 tumor cells in Balb/c mice was employed. The effect of dietary restriction, a standard maintenance diet or a diet with high levels of free sugar, were tested for their effects on tumor growth and secondary metastases to the lung. Metformin therapy with the various diets indicated that metformin can be highly effective at suppressing systemic metabolic biomarkers such as IGF-1, insulin and glucose, especially in the high energy diet treated animals. Long-term metformin treatment demonstrated moderate yet significant effects on primary tumor growth, most significantly in conjunction with the high energy diet. When compared to the control diet, the high energy diet promoted tumor growth, expression of the inflammatory adipokines leptin and resistin, induced lung priming by bone marrow-derived myeloid cells and promoted metastatic potential. Metformin had no effect on adipokine expression or the development of lung metastases with the standard or the high energy diet. These data indicate that metformin may have tumor suppressing activity where a metabolic phenotype of high fuel intake, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes exist, but may have little or no effect on events controlling the metastatic niche driven by proinflammatory events. PMID:20204498

  18. Limb Salvage After Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Kidney/Wilms Tumor Liver Cancer Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Thyroid ... Tumor Liver Cancer Lymphoma (Non-Hodgkin) Lymphoma (Hodgkin) Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Retinoblastoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma ...

  19. Updated recommendations from the Spanish Oncology Genitourinary Group for the treatment of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Climent, Miguel Ángel; León-Mateos, Luis; González Del Alba, Aránzazu; Pérez-Valderrama, Begoña; Méndez-Vidal, M José; Mellado, Begoña; Arranz, José Ángel; Sánchez-Hernández, Alfredo; Cassinello, Javier; Olmos, David; Carles, Joan

    2015-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent male urogenital malignancy. Approximately 30% of patients with prostate cancer will develop advanced disease. Androgen deprivation therapy achieves disease control in about 90% of these patients, but the majority of them will eventually develop progressive disease, a status called castration-resistant prostate carcinoma (CRPC). However, in recent years, several new therapy strategies, such as immunotherapy, hormonal manipulations, chemotherapy agents and some bone-targeted therapies, have demonstrated an improvement in terms of overall survival in controlled trials. In 2012, the Spanish Oncology Genitourinary Group (SOGUG) published its recommendations for the treatment of patients with CRPC. Due to the recent appearance of important new data and the complexity of decision-making in this field, SOGUG herein provides updated recommendations for the treatment of patients with metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:26100652

  20. Management of bone metastases in refractory prostate cancer--role of denosumab.

    PubMed

    Paller, Channing J; Carducci, Michael A; Philips, George K

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the problem of bone disease in prostate cancer and the evolving role of the novel agent denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody that inhibits the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand, in suppressing bone resorption and offering bone protection in this disease. Prostate cancer frequently metastasizes to bone, and additionally its treatment with androgen deprivation leads to accelerated bone loss resulting in clinically relevant skeletal complications associated with disabling symptoms. Among the bone-targeting therapeutic strategies investigated for the prevention of bone complications, the potent bisphosphonate zoledronic acid has been the most widely used agent for bone protection in the past decade. Denosumab is the first among a new class of osteoclast-targeting agents to show superior efficacy in several clinical scenarios in both prostate and breast cancer, as well as in osteoporosis, but the focus of this review will be on its role in prostate cancer. The safety and efficacy of denosumab versus zoledronic acid was established in a randomized trial, demonstrating a delay in skeletal-related events in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. This study led to the approval of denosumab in the US. The chief risks of denosumab were hypocalcemia and osteonecrosis of the jaw. Denosumab was also approved for fracture risk reduction in patients on androgen-deprivation therapy for nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Although denosumab extended bone metastasis-free survival in a Phase III trial in men with castration-resistant nonmetastatic prostate cancer to a statistically significant degree, a Food and Drug Administration committee found that the effect was not sufficiently clinically meaningful for regulatory approval, and the Food and Drug Administration issued a letter concurring with the committee's recommendation. The role of denosumab in prostate cancer will continue to evolve either as monotherapy or in

  1. Evaluation of radioactive phosphorus in the palliation of metastatic bone lesions from carcinoma of the breast and prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, A.; Driedger, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive phosphorus effected substantial palliation of intractable bone pain in 17 of 33 (51.5%) women with metastatic carcinoma of the breast and in 14 of 15 (93.3%) men with metastatic carcinoma of the prostate. No significant difference in the overall response rate was found between androgen and paralthormone priming prior to radiophosphorus therapy. The degree of response was not dependent on total dose of /sup 32/P within the range of 9 to 18 mCi (333 to 666 MPq). Myelosuppression was a transient complication in 9 of 33 patients with metastatic breast carcinoma and in 7 of 15 patients with metastatic prostate carcinoma. Symptomatic hypercalcemia was an infrequent complication of radiophosphorus therapy irrespective of the priming regimen.

  2. Multifocal clonal evolution characterized using circulating tumour DNA in a case of metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murtaza, Muhammed; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Pogrebniak, Katherine; Rueda, Oscar M.; Provenzano, Elena; Grant, John; Chin, Suet-Feung; Tsui, Dana W. Y.; Marass, Francesco; Gale, Davina; Ali, H. Raza; Shah, Pankti; Contente-Cuomo, Tania; Farahani, Hossein; Shumansky, Karey; Kingsbury, Zoya; Humphray, Sean; Bentley, David; Shah, Sohrab P.; Wallis, Matthew; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Caldas, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumour DNA analysis can be used to track tumour burden and analyse cancer genomes non-invasively but the extent to which it represents metastatic heterogeneity is unknown. Here we follow a patient with metastatic ER-positive and HER2-positive breast cancer receiving two lines of targeted therapy over 3 years. We characterize genomic architecture and infer clonal evolution in eight tumour biopsies and nine plasma samples collected over 1,193 days of clinical follow-up using exome and targeted amplicon sequencing. Mutation levels in the plasma samples reflect the clonal hierarchy inferred from sequencing of tumour biopsies. Serial changes in circulating levels of sub-clonal private mutations correlate with different treatment responses between metastatic sites. This comparison of biopsy and plasma samples in a single patient with metastatic breast cancer shows that circulating tumour DNA can allow real-time sampling of multifocal clonal evolution. PMID:26530965

  3. Multifocal clonal evolution characterized using circulating tumour DNA in a case of metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, Muhammed; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Pogrebniak, Katherine; Rueda, Oscar M; Provenzano, Elena; Grant, John; Chin, Suet-Feung; Tsui, Dana W Y; Marass, Francesco; Gale, Davina; Ali, H Raza; Shah, Pankti; Contente-Cuomo, Tania; Farahani, Hossein; Shumansky, Karey; Kingsbury, Zoya; Humphray, Sean; Bentley, David; Shah, Sohrab P; Wallis, Matthew; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Caldas, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumour DNA analysis can be used to track tumour burden and analyse cancer genomes non-invasively but the extent to which it represents metastatic heterogeneity is unknown. Here we follow a patient with metastatic ER-positive and HER2-positive breast cancer receiving two lines of targeted therapy over 3 years. We characterize genomic architecture and infer clonal evolution in eight tumour biopsies and nine plasma samples collected over 1,193 days of clinical follow-up using exome and targeted amplicon sequencing. Mutation levels in the plasma samples reflect the clonal hierarchy inferred from sequencing of tumour biopsies. Serial changes in circulating levels of sub-clonal private mutations correlate with different treatment responses between metastatic sites. This comparison of biopsy and plasma samples in a single patient with metastatic breast cancer shows that circulating tumour DNA can allow real-time sampling of multifocal clonal evolution. PMID:26530965

  4. TAS-102 for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Lisa; Rossini, Daniele; Moretto, Roberto; Cremolini, Chiara; Schirripa, Marta; Antoniotti, Carlotta; Marmorino, Federica; Loupakis, Fotios; Falcone, Alfredo; Masi, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    The survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer has notably increased in the past 20 years, from 12 months to around 30 months. Nevertheless, the prognosis of patients pretreated with all available agents is poor and there is high unmet need for newer treatments. TAS-102 is an orally administered combination of the nucleoside analogue trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride, a thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor. In a randomized trial of 800 patients who had received at least two other treatments previously (most patients had received more than four treatments). TAS-102 demonstrated a significant prolongation of overall survival compared with placebo (median survival 7.1 vs. 5.3 months; hazard ratio 0 · 68, 95%CI: 0 · 58-0 · 81; p < 0 · 001). The toxicity was manageable, grade 3 or higher events occurred in 69% of patients in the TAS-102 group versus 52% in the placebo group, with neutropenia the most common event. PMID:26509228

  5. Trifluridine/Tipiracil: A Review in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Burness, Celeste B; Duggan, Sean T

    2016-09-01

    Trifluridine/tipiracil (Lonsurf(®)) is a novel, orally active, antimetabolite agent comprised of trifluridine, a thymidine-based nucleoside analogue, and tipiracil, a potent thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor. Trifluridine is incorporated into DNA via phosphorylation, ultimately inhibiting cell proliferation. Tipiracil increases systemic exposure of trifluridine when coadministered. Trifluridine/tipiracil has recently been approved for the treatment of adult patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) who are refractory to or are not considered candidates for, current standard chemotherapy and biological therapy in the EU and USA and in unresectable advanced or recurrent CRC in Japan. The approved regimen of oral twice-daily trifluridine/tipiracil (35 mg/m(2) twice daily on days 1-5 and 8-12 of each 28-day cycle) significantly improved overall survival and progression-free survival and was associated with a significantly higher disease control rate than placebo when added to best supportive care in the multinational, pivotal phase III trial (RECOURSE) and a phase II Japanese trial. Trifluridine/tipiracil was associated with an acceptable tolerability profile, with adverse events generally being managed with dose reductions, temporary interruptions in treatment or administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. The most common grade 3-4 adverse events (≥10 %) were anaemia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. In conclusion, trifluridine/tipiracil is a useful additional treatment option for the management of mCRC in patients who are refractory to, or are not considered candidates for, currently available therapies. PMID:27568360

  6. [Treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Caffo, Orazio

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) represents one of the oncological fields where the most impressive improvements has been observed in the last decades. At the beginning of this century, the expected survival of mCRPC patients was not more than 12 months. After the introduction of docetaxel in the clinical practice in 2004, and the recent availability of new drugs cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, and radium-223 the landscape is dramatically changed with an expected median survival of about three years. The possibility of administering docetaxel, abiraterone acetate, and enzalutamide as first line treatment, and cabazitaxel, abiretone acetate, and enzalutamide as second line, as well as the availability of radium-223 for the treatment of mCRPC patients regardless of chemotherapy administration, changed the natural history of the disease. At the same time, it is probable that also the biology of the disease is changing with the appearance of mechanisms of resistance which are common to all the drugs. This plays a central role in sequencing the available drugs not only in the first and second line setting but also beyond the second line. The future challenges for the oncologists will be to develop new drugs able to overcome the resistances, mainly when they are native, to find the optimal sequence to optimize the use of available drugs, to place at the best place other active drugs, such as vaccines and radiopharmaceuticals, to exploit the new drugs also in a hormone-sensitive phase. PMID:25621779

  7. [Chemotherapy of hormonorefractory and hormonoresistant metastatic prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Timsit, M-O; Lebret, T; Méjean, A

    2008-11-01

    Since 2004 and the first improvement in overall survival in hormone refractory prostate cancer patients (HRPC) brought about by docetaxel, numerous phase II and III studies have been initiated. Considering the lack of efficacy in terms of overall survival, hormonal manipulations such as antiandrogen withdrawal, di-ethylstilbesterol or dexamethason are only indicated in "rising PSA" patients without clinical or radiological evidence of metastases. As first line treatment, the optimal chemotherapy regimen is docetaxel (75 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks) in association with prednisone (5 mg twice daily). Second line chemotherapies (mitoxantron, ixabepilon, docetaxel as a re-treatment, vinorelbin, doxorubicin...) provide modest results only in terms of progression-free survival. A phase III study of Straplatin has been prematurely interrupted. Targeted anti-angiogenic therapies have shown encouraging results in patients with metastatic localizations, and underline the need to identify target patients early through cellular markers (mTOR or EGFR overexpression) as well as the uselessness of PSA dosage to monitor efficacy. An ongoing phase III study is evaluating bevacizumab in association with docetaxel to improve overall survival. Both the Provenge vaccine and DN 101 (calcitriol) showed a survival gain of a few months in phase III studies. An ongoing EORTC phase II trial is evaluating antisense oligonucleotids in HRPC. Early introduction of docetaxel raises the issue of when to start chemotherapy as it may be relevant to initiate this treatment before the onset of hormone independence. GETUG 15 trial will try to answer this question. PMID:19070817

  8. Current controversies in the management of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vera, Ruth; Alonso, Vicente; Gállego, Javier; González, Encarnación; Guillén-Ponce, Carmen; Pericay, Carles; Rivera, Fernando; Safont, M José; Valladares-Ayerbes, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    The factors affecting the decisions for the treatment for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) are related to the patient, the tumor, and the treatment itself. Both cetuximab and panitumumab are anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody options for patients with RAS wild-type tumors. Several trials comparing these agents with bevacizumab are analyzed in this paper. The liver is the most common site of metastases in patients with CRC, and perioperative chemotherapy has been shown to yield benefits in this setting. In the second-line treatment for mCRC, maintenance with bevacizumab after progression following first-line treatment is convenient in some groups of patients with mCRC. Also, aflibercept has demonstrated benefits in response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival in second-line treatment, whereas regorafenib provides benefits to patients progressing on all standard therapies. Several novel therapeutic options for patients with mCRC are under development, and these are discussed. PMID:26113053

  9. Immunotherapy of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Prevailing Challenges and New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Zumwalt, Timothy J; Goel, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Patients with recurring or metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) have strikingly low long-term survival, while conventional treatments such as chemotherapeutic intervention and radiation therapy marginally improve longevity. Although, many factors involving immunosurveillance and immunosuppression were recently validated as important for patient prognosis and care, a multitude of experimental immunotherapies designed to combat unresectable mCRC have, in few cases, successfully mobilized antitumor immune cells against malignancies, nor conclusively or consistently granted protection, complete remission, and/or stable disease from immunotherapy – of which benefit less than 10% of those receiving therapy. After decades of progress, however, new insights into the mechanisms of immunosuppression, tolerance, and mutation profiling established novel therapies that circumvent these immunological barriers. This review underlines the most exciting methods to date that manipulate immune cells to curb mCRC, including adoptive cell therapy, dendritic cell vaccines, and checkpoint inhibitor antibodies – of which hint at effective and enduring protection against disease progression and undetected micrometastases. PMID:26441489

  10. Vaccine Therapy and Sargramostim With or Without Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Metastatic Lung Cancer or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-28

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  11. Candidate Antimetastasis Drugs Suppress the Metastatic Capacity of Breast Cancer Cells by Reducing Membrane Fluidity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weina; Prijic, Sara; Urban, Bettina C; Tisza, Michael J; Zuo, Yan; Li, Lin; Tan, Zhi; Chen, Xiaoling; Mani, Sendurai A; Chang, Jeffrey T

    2016-04-01

    Despite the high mortality from metastatic cancer, therapeutic targets to prevent metastasis are limited. Efforts to identify genetic aberrations that predispose tumors to metastasis have been mostly unsuccessful. To understand the nature of candidate targets for metastatic disease, we performed an in silico screen to identify drugs that can inhibit a gene expression signature associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Compounds discovered through this method, including those previously identified, appeared to restrict metastatic capacity through a common mechanism, the ability to modulate the fluidity of cell membranes. Treatment of breast cancer cell lines with the putative antimetastasis agents reduced membrane fluidity, resulting in decreased cell motility, stem cell-like properties, and EMT in vitro, and the drugs also inhibited spontaneous metastasis in vivo When fluidity was unchanged, the antimetastasis compounds could no longer restrict metastasis, indicating a causal association between fluidity and metastasis. We further demonstrate that fluidity can be regulated by cellular cholesterol flux, as the cholesterol efflux channel ABCA1 potentiated metastatic behaviors in vitro and in vivo The requirement for fluidity was further supported by the finding in breast cancer patients that ABCA1 was overexpressed in 41% of metastatic tumors, reducing time to metastasis by 9 years. Collectively, our findings reveal increased membrane fluidity as a necessary cellular feature of metastatic potential that can be controlled by many currently available drugs, offering a viable therapeutic opportunity to prevent cancer metastasis. Cancer Res; 76(7); 2037-49. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26825169

  12. Metastatic Bone Pain Palliation using 177Lu-Ethylenediaminetetramethylene Phosphonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Mehrosadat; Omidvari, Shapour; Mehdizadeh, Alireza; Jalilian, Amir R.; Bahrami-Samani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    177Lu-ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP) is presently suggested as an excellent bone seeking radionuclide for developing metastatic bone pain (MBP) palliation agent owing to its suitable nuclear decay characteristics. To find the exact dosage and its efficiency, this clinical study was performed on the human being, using 177Lu-EDTMP for MBP palliation. 177Lu-EDTMP was prepared by Iran, atomic energy organization. Thirty consecutive patients with determined tumors, incontrollable MBP, and positive bone scan at 4 weeks before the beginning of the study participated in this study in the nuclear medicine ward. 177Lu-EDTMP in the form of sterile slow IV injection was administered with a dose of 29.6 MBq/kg. Short form of brief pain inventory questionnaire was used to evaluate the efficiency of the intervention. Questionnaires were filled out by an expert nuclear physician every 2 weeks while the cell blood count was also checked every 2 weeks up to 12 weeks for evaluation of bone marrow suppression and hematological toxicity. Furthermore, whole body scan was done at days 1, 3, and 7. Twenty-five patients showed a significant pain relief since 2 weeks after the injection, and continued until the end of the follow up period (12 weeks). There were no significant early complications such as bone marrow suppression, hematological toxicity, and no systemic adverse effects. No complication was observed in renal function. Twenty one patients showed flare phenomenon that was started after the 12.2 ± 1.78 h lasting for 38.4 ± 23.08. Sixteen patients (53%) were completely treated; nine patients (30%) showed a partial response, and five patients (17%) had no response to treatment. Total response to treatment was achieved in 25 patients (83%). At the end of the evaluation, no bone marrow suppression or hematologic toxicity was observed. 177Lu-EDTMP has shown suitable physical and biological properties with good results in long term bone pain relief for patients

  13. Lung cancer-derived Dickkopf1 is associated with bone metastasis and the mechanism involves the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Tianqing; Teng, Jiajun; Jiang, Liyan; Zhong, Hua; Han, Baohui

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •DKK1 level was associated with NSCLC bone metastases. •Lung tumor cells derived DKK1 inhibited osteoblast differentiation. •Lung tumor cells derived DKK1 modulates β-catenin and RUNX2. -- Abstract: Wnt/β-catenin signaling and Dickkopf1 (DKK1) play important roles in the progression of lung cancer, which preferably metastasizes to skeleton. But the role of them in bone dissemination is poorly understood. This study aims to define the role of DKK1 in lung cancer bone metastases and investigate the underlying mechanism. Our results demonstrated that DKK1 over-expression was a frequent event in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) blood samples, and serous DKK1 level was much higher in bone metastatic NSCLC compared to non-bone metastatic NSCLC. We also found that conditioned medium from DKK1 over-expressing lung cancer cells inhibited the differentiation of osteoblast, determined by alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin secretion, whereas the conditioned medium from DKK1 silencing lung cancer cells exhibited the opposite effects. Mechanistically, DKK1 reduced the level of β-catenin and RUNX2, as well as inhibiting the nuclear translocation of β-catenin. Taken together, these results suggested that lung cancer-produced DKK1 may be an important mechanistic link between NSCLC and bone metastases, and targeting DKK1 may be an effective method to treat bone metastase of NSCLC.

  14. 'Charting a new course for prostate cancer' - currying favor for docetaxel in hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Voskoboynik, Mark; Staffurth, John; Malik, Zafar; Sweeney, Christopher; Chowdhury, Simon

    2014-11-01

    Docetaxel has an established role in the treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. A number of recent treatments have been shown to improve the survival outcomes for this group of patients and many with improved toxicity profiles, bringing the role of docetaxel into question. We discuss the results and implications of the CHAARTED study that demonstrated a significant improvement in overall survival with docetaxel in metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. PMID:25353342

  15. TEGAFIRI is an effective alternative regimen for the management of recurrent or metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    HSU, TZU-CHI

    2015-01-01

    At present, the global incidence of colorectal cancer is increasing, with numerous individuals succumbing to the disease. The standard treatment strategy for colorectal cancer is curative resection. However, a cure is rarely achieved for metastatic colorectal cancer. Currently, chemotherapy is the main treatment for metastatic and recurrent colorectal cancer. The majority of metastases or recurrences have been found to respond well to chemotherapy. The present study evaluated the response rates of recurrent or metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with a combination chemotherapy of irinotecan and oral uracil-tegafur (UFUR). In the pilot study, 33 patients with metastatic or recurrent colorectal cancer were treated with different regimens of irinotecan and UFUR with or without leucovorin; however, irinotecan (150 mg/m2 every two weeks) with continuous UFUR and leucovorin without interruption resulted in improved survival compared with the other regimens evaluated and, thus, was employed for the present study of 113 patients. The patients that received irinotecan with UFUR and leucovorin without interruption exhibited similar efficacy in terms of overall survival and response rate to that of the pilot study. In addition, the incidences of diarrhea, alopecia and hematologic toxicity were acceptable, which was in agreement with the results of the pilot study. Therefore, combination chemotherapy with irinotecan, oral UFUR and leucovorin appears to be a satisfactory treatment strategy for recurrent or metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:25663857

  16. Management of Hormone-Sensitive and Hormone-Refractory Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rago

    1998-11-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer is a significant health problem in the United States and is the focus of increasing attention in our society. With the aging of the US population, it is likely that prostate cancer will continue to grow in importance. The options for systemic therapy of metastatic prostate cancer should be familiar to physicians, including nonspecialists, whose patients seek their advice and counsel. METHODS: Past and recent literature was surveyed to provide an understanding of the systemic treatment of advanced prostate cancer. The author presents a review of the systemic treatment of metastatic prostate cancer in different clinical circumstances and addresses the current status of chemotherapy in the management of advanced prostate cancer. RESULTS: Early androgen deprivation used over prolonged periods appears to be modestly superior to delayed androgen deprivation with a small potential survival advantage and an advantage in delaying disease progression in advanced prostate cancer. Patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer may benefit from secondary hormonal therapy (eg, adrenal enzyme inhibitors, antiandrogens, glucocorticoids) and chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: The choices of therapy for metastatic prostate cancer depend on individual patient preference. Patients and physicians should be aware of the possible side effects associated with the therapeutics options for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:10761100

  17. Association of Tartrate-Resistant Acid Phosphatase-Expressed Macrophages and Metastatic Breast Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Guang; Janckila, Anthony; Chao, Tsu-Yi; Yeh, Ren-Hua; Gao, Hong-Wei; Lee, Su-Huei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Liao, Guo-Shiou; Dai, Ming-Shen

    2015-12-01

    Infiltrating neutrophils, lymphocytes, macrophages, and cytokines constitute a state of chronic inflammation within the tumor microenvironment. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5a (TRACP5a) protein, a novel product of activated macrophage, is postulated to be a biomarker for systemic inflammatory burden in states of chronic inflammation. We aimed to investigate the clinical significance of TRACP5a expression in tumor-infiltrating macrophages and serum TRACP5a in patients with metastatic breast cancer (BC). We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data from 34 BC patients with confirmed skeletal/visceral metastasis upon or during first-line palliative treatment. Patients were stratified into 3 groups based on the therapeutic responses and follow-up disease course. The association of TRACP5a protein with other inflammatory and cancer biomarkers was assessed among the clinically distinct group of patients. Higher TRACP5a protein was significantly correlated with earlier disease progression and survival (P = 0.0045) in comparison to other inflammatory markers, CRP or IL-6. Patients with higher serum TRACP5a level and shorter survival and treatment refractoriness also had more TRACP+ tumor-infiltrating macrophages. Our data support a hypothesis that serum TRACP5a protein can potentially be a predictive and prognostic marker to evaluate disease progression and therapeutic response in BC patients with bone/visceral metastasis. The associations between overall survival and TRACP expression by macrophages require further prospective investigation. PMID:26632898

  18. Whole Transcriptome Sequencing Reveals Extensive Unspliced mRNA in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sowalsky, Adam G.; Xia, Zheng; Wang, Liguo; Zhao, Hao; Chen, Shaoyong; Bubley, Glenn J.; Balk, Steven P.; Li, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Men with metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) who are treated with androgen deprivation therapies (ADT) usually relapse within 2–3 years with disease that is termed castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). To identify the mechanism that drives these advanced tumors, paired-end RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) was performed on a panel of CRPC bone marrow biopsy specimens. From this genome-wide approach, mutations were found in a series of genes with PCa relevance including: AR, NCOR1, KDM3A, KDM4A, CHD1, SETD5, SETD7, INPP4B, RASGRP3, RASA1, TP53BP1 and CDH1, and a novel SND1:BRAF gene fusion. Amongst the most highly-expressed transcripts were ten non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), including MALAT1 and PABPC1, which are involved in RNA processing. Notably, a high percentage of sequence reads mapped to introns, which were determined to be the result of incomplete splicing at canonical splice junctions. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR) a series of genes (AR, KLK2, KLK3, STEAP2, CPSF6, and CDK19) were confirmed to have a greater proportion of unspliced RNA in CRPC specimens than in normal prostate epithelium, untreated primary PCa, and cultured PCa cells. This inefficient coupling of transcription and mRNA splicing suggests an overall increase in transcription or defect in splicing. PMID:25189356

  19. Metastatic mimics on bone scan: “All that glitters is not metastatic”

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    In this pictorial review, cases where benign diseases caused a diagnostic dilemma on bone scan are illustrated. This review highlights the value of correlative imaging- single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (CT), CT, and magnetic resonance imaging in solving the diagnostic problem by exact localization and characterization of the lesions. All these eventually lead to increased diagnostic confidence, better and more accurate reporting and avoidance of delay in initiation of treatment due to equivocal results. The imaging features of these benign pathologies – which are “mimics of metastatic disease,” are elaborated so that the reader can incorporate them while reporting so as to avoid mis-interpretations. PMID:27385887

  20. Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head After Palliative Radiotherapy in Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Absence of a Dose Threshold?

    PubMed

    Daoud, Alia M; Hudson, Mack; Magnus, Kenneth G; Huang, Fleur; Danielson, Brita L; Venner, Peter; Saluja, Ronak; LeGuerrier, Bronwen; Daly, Helene; Emmenegger, Urban; Fairchild, Alysa

    2016-01-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is the final common pathway resulting from insufficient blood supply to bone, commonly the femoral head. There are many postulated etiologies of non-traumatic AVN, including corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, and radiotherapy (RT). However, it is unclear whether there is a dose threshold for the development of RT-induced AVN. In this case report, we describe a patient with prostate cancer metastatic to bone diagnosed with AVN after receiving single-fraction palliative RT to the left femoral head. Potential contributing factors are discussed, along with a review of other reported cases. At present, the RT dose threshold below which there is no risk for AVN is unknown, and therefore detrimental impact from the RT cannot be excluded. Given the possibility that RT-induced AVN is a stochastic effect, it is important to be aware of the possibility of this diagnosis in any patient with a painful hip who has received RT to the femoral head. PMID:27081582

  1. Functional screen identifies kinases driving prostate cancer visceral and bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Faltermeier, Claire M.; Drake, Justin M.; Clark, Peter M.; Smith, Bryan A.; Zong, Yang; Volpe, Carmen; Mathis, Colleen; Morrissey, Colm; Castor, Brandon; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N.

    2016-01-01

    Mutationally activated kinases play an important role in the progression and metastasis of many cancers. Despite numerous oncogenic alterations implicated in metastatic prostate cancer, mutations of kinases are rare. Several lines of evidence suggest that nonmutated kinases and their pathways are involved in prostate cancer progression, but few kinases have been mechanistically linked to metastasis. Using a mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics dataset in concert with gene expression analysis, we selected over 100 kinases potentially implicated in human metastatic prostate cancer for functional evaluation. A primary in vivo screen based on overexpression of candidate kinases in murine prostate cells identified 20 wild-type kinases that promote metastasis. We queried these 20 kinases in a secondary in vivo screen using human prostate cells. Strikingly, all three RAF family members, MERTK, and NTRK2 drove the formation of bone and visceral metastasis confirmed by positron-emission tomography combined with computed tomography imaging and histology. Immunohistochemistry of tissue microarrays indicated that these kinases are highly expressed in human metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer tissues. Our functional studies reveal the strong capability of select wild-type protein kinases to drive critical steps of the metastatic cascade, and implicate these kinases in possible therapeutic intervention. PMID:26621741

  2. Functional screen identifies kinases driving prostate cancer visceral and bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Faltermeier, Claire M; Drake, Justin M; Clark, Peter M; Smith, Bryan A; Zong, Yang; Volpe, Carmen; Mathis, Colleen; Morrissey, Colm; Castor, Brandon; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-01-12

    Mutationally activated kinases play an important role in the progression and metastasis of many cancers. Despite numerous oncogenic alterations implicated in metastatic prostate cancer, mutations of kinases are rare. Several lines of evidence suggest that nonmutated kinases and their pathways are involved in prostate cancer progression, but few kinases have been mechanistically linked to metastasis. Using a mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics dataset in concert with gene expression analysis, we selected over 100 kinases potentially implicated in human metastatic prostate cancer for functional evaluation. A primary in vivo screen based on overexpression of candidate kinases in murine prostate cells identified 20 wild-type kinases that promote metastasis. We queried these 20 kinases in a secondary in vivo screen using human prostate cells. Strikingly, all three RAF family members, MERTK, and NTRK2 drove the formation of bone and visceral metastasis confirmed by positron-emission tomography combined with computed tomography imaging and histology. Immunohistochemistry of tissue microarrays indicated that these kinases are highly expressed in human metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer tissues. Our functional studies reveal the strong capability of select wild-type protein kinases to drive critical steps of the metastatic cascade, and implicate these kinases in possible therapeutic intervention. PMID:26621741

  3. Targeting bone metabolism in patients with advanced prostate cancer: current options and controversies.

    PubMed

    Todenhöfer, Tilman; Stenzl, Arnulf; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Rachner, Tilman D

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining bone health remains a clinical challenge in patients with prostate cancer (PC) who are at risk of developing metastatic bone disease and increased bone loss due to hormone ablation therapy. In patients with cancer-treatment induced bone loss (CTIBL), antiresorptive agents have been shown to improve bone mineral density (BMD) and to reduce the risk of fractures. For patients with bone metastases, both zoledronic acid and denosumab delay skeletal related events (SREs) in the castration resistant stage of disease. Novel agents targeting the Wnt inhibitors dickkopf-1 and sclerostin are currently under investigation for the treatment of osteoporosis and malignant bone disease. New antineoplastic drugs such as abiraterone, enzalutamide, and Radium-223 are capable of further delaying SREs in patients with advanced PC. The benefit of antiresorptive treatment for patients with castration sensitive PC appears to be limited. Recent trials on the use of zoledronic acid for the prevention of bone metastases failed to be successful, whereas denosumab delayed the occurrence of bone metastases by a median of 4.1 months. Currently, the use of antiresorptive drugs to prevent bone metastases still remains a field of controversies and further trials are needed to identify patient subgroups that may profit from early therapy. PMID:25802521

  4. STING ligand c-di-GMP improves cancer vaccination against metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Dinesh; Quispe-Tintaya, Wilber; Jahangir, Arthee; Asafu-Adjei, Denise; Ramos, Ilyssa; Sintim, Herman O.; Zhou, Jie; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Karaolis, David K.R.; Gravekamp, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Cancer vaccination may be our best and most benign option for preventing or treating metastatic cancer. However, breakthroughs are hampered by immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment (TME). In this study, we analyzed whether cyclic di-guanylate (c-di-GMP), a ligand for stimulator of interferon genes (STING), could overcome immune suppression and improve vaccination against metastatic breast cancer. Mice with metastatic breast cancer (4T1 model) were therapeutically immunized with an attenuated Listeria monocytogenes (LM)-based vaccine, expressing tumor-associated antigen Mage-b (LM-Mb), followed by multiple low doses of c-di-GMP (0.01 nmol). This resulted in a striking and near elimination of all metastases. Experiments revealed that c-di-GMP targets myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and tumor cells. Low doses of c-di-GMP significantly increased the production of IL-12 by MDSCs, in correlation with improved T-cell responses to Mage-b, while high dose of c-di-GMP (range 15–150 nmol) activated caspase-3 in the 4T1 tumor cells and killed the tumor cells directly. Based on these results we tested one administration of high dose c-di-GMP (150 nmol) followed by repeated administrations of low dose c-di-GMP (0.01 nmol) in the 4T1 model, and found equal efficacy compared to the combination of LM-Mb and c-di-GMP. This correlated with a mechanism of improved CD8 T-cell responses to tumor-associated antigens (TAA) Mage-b and Survivin, most likely through cross-presentation of these TAAs from c-di-GMP-killed 4T1 tumor cells, and through c-di-GMP-activated TAA-specific T cells. Our results demonstrate that activation of STING-dependent pathways by c-di-GMP is highly attractive for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24913717

  5. 89Zr-huJ591 immuno-PET imaging in patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    O’Donoghue, Joseph A.; Beylergil, Volkan; Lyashchenko, Serge; Ruan, Shutian; Solomon, Stephen B.; Durack, Jeremy C.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Lefkowitz, Robert A.; Gonen, Mithat; Lewis, Jason S.; Holland, Jason P.; Cheal, Sarah M.; Reuter, Victor E.; Osborne, Joseph R.; Loda, Massimo F.; Smith-Jones, Peter M.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Bander, Neil H.; Scher, Howard I.; Morris, Michael J.; Larson, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Given the bone tropism of prostate cancer, conventional imaging modalities poorly identify or quantify metastatic disease. 89Zr-huJ591 positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed in patients with metastatic prostate cancer to analyze and validate this as an imaging biomarker for metastatic disease. The purpose of this initial study was to assess safety, biodistribution, normal organ dosimetry, and optimal imaging time post-injection for lesion detection. Methods Ten patients with metastatic prostate cancer received 5 mCi of 89Zr-huJ591. Four whole-body scans with multiple whole-body count rate measurements and serum activity concentration measurements were obtained in all patients. Biodistribution, clearance, and lesion uptake by 89Zr-huJ591 immuno-PET imaging was analyzed and dosimetry was estimated using MIRD techniques. Initial assessment of lesion targeting of 89Zr-huJ591 was done. Optimal time for imaging post-injection was determined. Results The dose was well tolerated with mild chills and rigors seen in two patients. The clearance of 89Zr-huJ591 from serum was bi-exponential with biological half-lives of 7 ± 4.5 h (range 1.1–14 h) and 62 ± 13 h (range 51–89 h) for initial rapid and later slow phase. Whole-body biological clearance was 219 ± 48 h (range 153–317 h). The mean whole-body and liver residence time was 78.7 and 25.6 h, respectively. Dosimetric estimates to critical organs included liver 7.7 ± 1.5 cGy/mCi, renal cortex 3.5 ± 0.4 cGy/mCi, and bone marrow 1.2 ± 0.2 cGy/mCi. Optimal time for patient imaging after injection was 7 ± 1 days. Lesion targeting of bone or soft tissue was seen in all patients. Biopsies were performed in 8 patients for a total 12 lesions, all of which were histologically confirmed as metastatic prostate cancer. One biopsy-proven lesion was not positive on 89Zr-huJ591, while the remaining 11 lesions were 89Zr-huJ591 positive. Two biopsy-positive nodal lesions were noted only on 89Zr-huJ591

  6. The Ketogenic Diet and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Prolong Survival in Mice with Systemic Metastatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Poff, Angela M.; Ari, Csilla; Seyfried, Thomas N.; D’Agostino, Dominic P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Abnormal cancer metabolism creates a glycolytic-dependency which can be exploited by lowering glucose availability to the tumor. The ketogenic diet (KD) is a low carbohydrate, high fat diet which decreases blood glucose and elevates blood ketones and has been shown to slow cancer progression in animals and humans. Abnormal tumor vasculature creates hypoxic pockets which promote cancer progression and further increase the glycolytic-dependency of cancers. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO2T) saturates tumors with oxygen, reversing the cancer promoting effects of tumor hypoxia. Since these non-toxic therapies exploit overlapping metabolic deficiencies of cancer, we tested their combined effects on cancer progression in a natural model of metastatic disease. Methods We used the firefly luciferase-tagged VM-M3 mouse model of metastatic cancer to compare tumor progression and survival in mice fed standard or KD ad libitum with or without HBO2T (2.5 ATM absolute, 90 min, 3x/week). Tumor growth was monitored by in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Results KD alone significantly decreased blood glucose, slowed tumor growth, and increased mean survival time by 56.7% in mice with systemic metastatic cancer. While HBO2T alone did not influence cancer progression, combining the KD with HBO2T elicited a significant decrease in blood glucose, tumor growth rate, and 77.9% increase in mean survival time compared to controls. Conclusions KD and HBO2T produce significant anti-cancer effects when combined in a natural model of systemic metastatic cancer. Our evidence suggests that these therapies should be further investigated as potential non-toxic treatments or adjuvant therapies to standard care for patients with systemic metastatic disease. PMID:23755243

  7. Veliparib and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Cancer That Is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-27

    Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Breast Carcinoma; Colon Carcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Lung Carcinoma; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm; Ovarian Carcinoma; Pancreatic Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma; Unresectable Malignant Neoplasm

  8. A systematic review of treatment guidelines for metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, M S; Chadda, S D; Zhao, Z; Barber, B L; Sykes, D P

    2012-01-01

    Aim A systematic review of treatment guidelines for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) was performed to assess recommendations for monoclonal antibody therapy in these guidelines. Method Relevant papers were identified through electronic searches of MEDLINE, MEDLINE In Process, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library; through manual searches of reference lists; and by searching the Internet. Results A total of 57 relevant guidelines were identified, 32 through electronic database searches and 25 through the website searches. The majority of guidelines were published between 2004 and 2010. The country publishing the most guidelines was the USA (12), followed by the UK (10), Canada (eight), France (eight), Germany (three), Australia (two), Spain (two) and Italy (one). In addition, eight European and three international guidelines were identified. As monoclonal antibody therapy for mCRC was not introduced until 2004, no firm recommendations for monoclonal antibody therapy were made in guidelines published between 2004 and 2006. Recommendations for monoclonal antibody therapy first appeared in 2007 and evolved as more data became available. The most recent international, European and US guidelines recommend combination chemotherapy with the addition of a monoclonal antibody for the first-line treatment of mCRC. Second-line treatment depends on the first-line regimen used. For chemoresistant mCRC, cetuximab or panitumumab are recommended as monotherapy in patients with wild-type KRAS tumours. Conclusion The study indicates that recent treatment guidelines have recognized the role of monoclonal antibodies in the management of mCRC, and that treatment guidelines should be updated in a timely manner to reflect the most recently available data. PMID:21848897

  9. Clinical variables associated with PSA response to abiraterone acetate in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leibowitz-Amit, R.; Templeton, A. J.; Omlin, A.; Pezaro, C.; Atenafu, E. G.; Keizman, D.; Vera-Badillo, F.; Seah, J.-A.; Attard, G.; Knox, J. J.; Sridhar, S. S.; Tannock, I. F.; de Bono, J. S.; Joshua, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Abiraterone acetate (abiraterone) prolongs overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). This study's objective was to retrospectively identify factors associated with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response to abiraterone and validate them in an independent cohort. We hypothesized that the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), thought to be an indirect manifestation of tumor-promoting inflammation, may be associated with response to abiraterone. Patients and methods All patients receiving abiraterone at the Princess Margaret (PM) Cancer Centre up to March 2013 were reviewed. The primary end point was confirmed PSA response defined as PSA decline ≥50% below baseline maintained for ≥3 weeks. Potential factors associated with PSA response were analyzed using univariate and multivariable analyses to generate a score, which was then evaluated in an independent cohort from Royal Marsden (RM) NHS foundation. Results A confirmed PSA response was observed in 44 out of 108 assessable patients (41%, 95% confidence interval 31%–50%). In univariate analysis, lower pre-abiraterone baseline levels of lactate dehydrogenase, an NLR ≤ 5 and restricted metastatic spread to either bone or lymph nodes were each associated with PSA response. In multivariable analysis, only low NLR and restricted metastatic spread remained statistically significant. A score derived as the sum of these two categorical variables was associated with response to abiraterone (P = 0.007). Logistic regression analysis on an independent validation cohort of 245 patients verified that this score was associated with response to abiraterone (P = 0.003). It was also associated with OS in an exploratory analysis. Conclusions A composite score of baseline NLR and extent of metastatic spread is associated with PSA response to abiraterone and OS. Our data may help understand the role of systemic inflammation in mCRPC and warrant further research. PMID

  10. Metastatic colon cancer, version 3.2013: featured updates to the NCCN Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Benson, Al B; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Chan, Emily; Chen, Yi-Jen; Choti, Michael A; Cooper, Harry S; Engstrom, Paul F; Enzinger, Peter C; Fakih, Marwan G; Fenton, Moon J; Fuchs, Charles S; Grem, Jean L; Hunt, Steven; Kamel, Ahmed; Leong, Lucille A; Lin, Edward; May, Kilian Salerno; Mulcahy, Mary F; Murphy, Kate; Rohren, Eric; Ryan, David P; Saltz, Leonard; Sharma, Sunil; Shibata, David; Skibber, John M; Small, William; Sofocleous, Constantinos T; Venook, Alan P; Willett, Christopher G; Gregory, Kristina M; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A

    2013-02-01

    The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Colon Cancer begin with the clinical presentation of the patient to the primary care physician or gastroenterologist and address diagnosis, pathologic staging, surgical management, perioperative treatment, patient surveillance, management of recurrent and metastatic disease, and survivorship. The NCCN Colon Cancer Panel meets annually to review comments from reviewers within their institutions and to reevaluate and update their recommendations. In addition, the panel has interim conferences as new data necessitate. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the NCCN Colon Cancer Panel's discussions surrounding metastatic colorectal cancer for the 2013 update of the guidelines. Importantly, changes were made to the continuum of care for patients with advanced or metastatic disease, including new drugs and an additional line of therapy. PMID:23411381

  11. High-Resolution Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis of Metastatic Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountford, Carolyn E.; Wright, Lesley C.; Holmes, Kerry T.; MacKinnon, Wanda B.; Gregory, Patricia; Fox, Richard M.

    1984-12-01

    High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of intact cancer cells revealed differences between cells with the capacity to metastasize and those that produce locally invasive tumors. The NMR resonances that characterize the metastatic cells were associated with an increased ratio of cholesterol to phospholipid and an increased amount of plasma membrane--bound cholesterol ester. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy could therefore be used to assess the metastatic potential of primary tumors.

  12. Chronic Stress, Depression and Immunity in Spouses of Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortimer, Jane S. Blake; Sephton, Sandra E.; Kimerling, Rachel; Butler, Lisa; Bernstein, Aaron S.; Spiegel, David

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to examine how the chronicity of stress affects psychological stress-responses, depressive symptoms, and "in vivo" immunocompetence in spouses of women with metastatic breast cancer. Methods: Participants were 34 spouses of breast cancer patients. Their wives had been living with a diagnosis of recurrence…

  13. Bone Scan or 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography; Which Modality Better Shows Bone Metastases of Breast Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Tansel A.; Koc, Zehra P.; Komek, Halil

    2012-01-01

    Background In this multicenter study, we aimed to compare concurrent 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) and bone scan results of breast cancer patient. Patients and Methods 162 patients with breast cancer (158 female, 4 male; mean age 50.6 years) were included in the study. FDG PET/CT examination was performed in all patients, and concurrent bone scintigraphy in 68 patients. The results of FDG PET/CT and bone scan were compared. Results 132 of the 162 patients were operated on because of breast cancer. 89 patients had metastasis, and 4 had recurrent disease according to FDG PET/CT results. Metastatic sites in order of frequency were lymph nodes, bone, lung, liver, adrenal gland, local skin or muscle, brain, and peritoneum (peritonitis carcinomatosa). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and negative and positive predictive value of bone scintigraphy versus FDG PET/CT were 96 vs. 100%, 100 vs. 98%, 100 vs. 83%, 100 vs. 100%, and 90 vs. 100%, respectively. Conclusion Although the 2 modalities were in concordance with each other, in 5 (21%) cases, FDG PET/CT could not show bone metastasis which were detected on bone scintigraphy. Hence, bone scintigraphy was superior to FDG PET/CT in the determination of bone metastasis derived from breast cancer. However, FDG PET/CT should be considered for soft tissue metastasis. PMID:24647778

  14. Bone Cancer: Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... determine the level of an enzyme called alkaline phosphatase. A large amount of this enzyme is present ... abnormal bone tissue. Because high levels of alkaline phosphatase are normal in growing children and adolescents, this ...

  15. Prostate cancer is not breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Venniyoor, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Cancers of the prostate and breast are hormone dependent cancers. There is a tendency to equate them and apply same algorithms for treatment. It is pointed out that metastatic prostate cancer with bone-only disease is a potentially fatal condition with a much poorer prognosis than metastatic breast cancer and needs a more aggressive approach. PMID:27051149

  16. Identification of an aptamer through whole cell-SELEX for targeting high metastatic liver cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Yuan; Chen, Hao; Zhou, Xue-Feng; Yin, Chang-Qing; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Peng, Chun-Wei; Liu, Shao-Ping; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most deadly human cancers due to its ability of invasion and metastasis. Thus, the approaches to identify potential compounds that inhibit invasion and metastasis of HCC are critical for treatment of this disease. In the present study, we used HCCLM9 cells with high metastatic potential and MHCC97L with low metastatic potential as a model system to study the molecular mechanisms of HCC metastasis. By applying cell- Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (SELEX) against living cells, we used HCCLM9 as target cells and MHCC97L cells as control to screen a group of HCC metastasis- and cell-specific DNA aptamers. One of selected aptamers, LY-1, could specifically bind to metastatic HCC with a dissociation constant (Kd) in nanomolar range. In vitro studies demonstrated that LY-1 can recognize and bind to membrane protein of metastatic HCC cells. Furthermore, QD605 labeled LY-1 aptamer could recognize HCC cells in both local liver cancer tissues and pulmonary metastatic sites in a xenograft model of HCC with pulmonary metastasis. Further biochemical and immunostaining studies showed that LY-1 could selectively bind to a subpopulation of more metastatic cells in HCCLM9 cells, which express more CK19 and vimentin. Finally, treatment of highly metastatic cells with LY-1 led to reduced migration and invasiveness of HCCLM9 cells in vitro and suppression of xenograft growth in vivo. Taken together, the present study demonstrated the tumor targeting and tumor suppressive effects of LY-1, which could be a promising molecular probe for metastatic HCC and a potential candidate of chemotherapy for metastatic HCC. PMID:26882565

  17. What's New in Bone Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for bone cancer What’s new in bone cancer research and treatment? Research on ... from growing for a time. Some are testing new chemo drugs. Targeted therapy Targeted therapy drugs work ...

  18. What Are the Risk Factors for Bone Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone cancer? What are the risk factors for bone cancer? A risk factor is anything that affects your ... are caused by defects (mutations) in certain genes. Osteosarcomas Children with certain rare inherited syndromes have an ...

  19. Systemic metabolic radiopharmaceutical therapy in the treatment of metastatic bone pain.

    PubMed

    Paes, Fabio M; Serafini, Aldo N

    2010-03-01

    Bone pain due to skeletal metastases constitutes the most common type of chronic pain among patients with cancer. It significantly decreases the patient's quality of life and is associated with comorbidities, such as hypercalcemia, pathologic fractures and spinal cord compression. Approximately 65% of patients with prostate or breast cancer and 35% of those with advanced lung, thyroid, and kidney cancers will have symptomatic skeletal metastases. The management of bone pain is extremely difficult and involves a multidisciplinary approach, which usually includes analgesics, hormone therapies, bisphosphonates, external beam radiation, and systemic radiopharmaceuticals. In patients with extensive osseous metastases, systemic radiopharmaceuticals should be the preferred adjunctive therapy for pain palliation. In this article, we review the current approved radiopharmaceutical armamentarium for bone pain palliation, focusing on indications, patient selection, efficacy, and different biochemical characteristics and toxicity of strontium-89 chloride, samarium-153 lexidronam, and rhenium-186 etidronate. A brief discussion on the available data on rhenium-188 is presented focusing on its major advantages and disadvantages. We also perform a concise appraisal of the other available treatment options, including pharmacologic and hormonal treatment modalities, external beam radiation, and bisphosphonates. Finally, the available data on combination therapy of radiopharmaceuticals with bisphosphonates or chemotherapy are discussed. PMID:20113678

  20. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Ganitumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone Marrow; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Lung; Metastatic Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of Bone; Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of Soft Tissues

  1. CPI-613 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-28

    Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  2. Activity of Nanobins Loaded with Cisplatin and Arsenic Trioxide in Primary and Metastatic Breast Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindell, Elden Peter, III

    Despite recent advances in breast cancer screening and detection, the disease is still a leading cause of death for women of all ages. Young, African-American women are disproportionally affected with a type of breast cancer, triple-negative breast cancer, which is particularly difficult to treat and has the worst prognosis of any breast cancer subtype. These tumors often spread to the lungs, liver, bones and brains of patients, which is ultimately fatal. This dissertation presents results from a series of in vivo and in vitro experiments that investigate the clinical utility of a novel nanoparticulate formulation of cisplatin and arsenic trioxide, NB(Pt,As) for treating primary and metastatic triple-negative breast cancer. These nanobins consist of a solid, crystalline metal nanoparticle surrounded by a lipid bilayer with 80-90 nm diameter. This drug payload is extremely stable, and so NB(Pt,As) is extremely well tolerated in mice. Furthermore, NB(Pt,As) is effective in two different mouse models of breast cancer, one of primary tumor growth an another of lung metastases. A discovery presented here, that thiol containing compounds are required for drug release, may explain these seemingly incongruous results. The large amount of intracellular thiol can trigger drug release, while the low concentration of free thiols in blood is insufficient to cause drug release. To improve the treatment of brain tumors with this unique drug, we added transferrin to the surface of the nanobin using copper-catalyzed "click" chemistry, which preserves protein activity. The addition of transferrin to the nanobins enables 10 fold greater uptake in the brains of mice treated with the transferrin-targeted nanobins Tf-NB(Pt,A) compared to NB(Pt,As). By penetrating the blood brain barrier, the Tf-NB(Pt,As) was able to reduce breast cancer metastases in the brains of mice, whereas NB(Pt,As) had no effect. Taken together, these results demonstrate the intricate balance of drug release

  3. Effects of bone-targeted agents on cancer progression and mortality.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Robert; Gnant, Michael; Morgan, Gareth; Clezardin, Philippe

    2012-07-18

    Bone-targeted treatments with bisphosphonates and denosumab, which reduce bone resorption, are known to reduce the risk of skeletal complications and prevent treatment-induced bone loss in patients with malignant bone disease. Additionally, these drugs may modify the course of bone destruction via inhibitory effects on the "vicious cycle" of growth factor and cytokine signaling between tumor and bone cells within the bone marrow microenvironment. Effects of the drugs on the stem cell niche, direct effects on the cancer cells, and immune modulation may also contribute. In early-stage (stages I, II, and III) breast cancer, treatment with the bisphosphonate zoledronic acid has shown improvements in disease-free and overall survival. Improved survival was particularly notable in women with established menopause at diagnosis and in premenopausal women with endocrine-responsive disease who received treatment with goserelin, which suppresses ovarian function by inhibiting the production of ovarian hormones. Additionally, in castrate-resistant prostate cancer, treatment with denosumab delays the development of bone metastases. These results strongly support the adjuvant use of bone-targeted treatments but suggest that reproductive hormones are an important treatment modifier to take into account. In advanced-stage (stage IV, ie, metastatic) cancers, survival benefits have been observed in patients with multiple myeloma and in patients with other solid tumors with rapid rates of bone destruction who received treatment with zoledronic acid. Here, we have critically reviewed the increasing evidence to support a disease-modifying effect of bone-targeted treatment and discussed the impact on clinical management. PMID:22752060

  4. Highly variable cancer subpopulations that exhibit enhanced transcriptome variability and metastatic fitness.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Alexander; Yoshida, Mitsukuni; Goodarzi, Hani; Tavazoie, Sohail F

    2016-01-01

    Individual cells within a tumour can exhibit distinct genetic and molecular features. The impact of such diversification on metastatic potential is unknown. Here we identify clonal human breast cancer subpopulations that display different levels of morphological and molecular diversity. Highly variable subpopulations are more proficient at metastatic colonization and chemotherapeutic survival. Through single-cell RNA-sequencing, inter-cell transcript expression variability is identified as a defining feature of the highly variable subpopulations that leads to protein-level variation. Furthermore, we identify high variability in the spliceosomal machinery gene set. Engineered variable expression of the spliceosomal gene SNRNP40 promotes metastasis, attributable to cells with low expression. Clinically, low SNRNP40 expression is associated with metastatic relapse. Our findings reveal transcriptomic variability generation as a mechanism by which cancer subpopulations can diversify gene expression states, which may allow for enhanced fitness under changing environmental pressures encountered during cancer progression. PMID:27138336

  5. Muscleblind-like 1 suppresses breast cancer metastatic colonization and stabilizes metastasis suppressor transcripts.

    PubMed

    Fish, Lisa; Pencheva, Nora; Goodarzi, Hani; Tran, Hien; Yoshida, Mitsukuni; Tavazoie, Sohail F

    2016-02-15

    Post-transcriptional deregulation is a defining feature of metastatic cancer. While many microRNAs have been implicated as regulators of metastatic progression, less is known about the roles and mechanisms of RNA-binding proteins in this process. We identified muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1), a gene implicated in myotonic dystrophy, as a robust suppressor of multiorgan breast cancer metastasis. MBNL1 binds the 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) of DBNL (drebrin-like protein) and TACC1 (transforming acidic coiled-coil containing protein 1)-two genes that we implicate as metastasis suppressors. By enhancing the stability of these genes' transcripts, MBNL1 suppresses cell invasiveness. Consistent with these findings, elevated MBNL1 expression in human breast tumors is associated with reduced metastatic relapse likelihood. Our findings delineate a post-transcriptional network that governs breast cancer metastasis through RNA-binding protein-mediated transcript stabilization. PMID:26883358

  6. Highly variable cancer subpopulations that exhibit enhanced transcriptome variability and metastatic fitness

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Alexander; Yoshida, Mitsukuni; Goodarzi, Hani; Tavazoie, Sohail F.

    2016-01-01

    Individual cells within a tumour can exhibit distinct genetic and molecular features. The impact of such diversification on metastatic potential is unknown. Here we identify clonal human breast cancer subpopulations that display different levels of morphological and molecular diversity. Highly variable subpopulations are more proficient at metastatic colonization and chemotherapeutic survival. Through single-cell RNA-sequencing, inter-cell transcript expression variability is identified as a defining feature of the highly variable subpopulations that leads to protein-level variation. Furthermore, we identify high variability in the spliceosomal machinery gene set. Engineered variable expression of the spliceosomal gene SNRNP40 promotes metastasis, attributable to cells with low expression. Clinically, low SNRNP40 expression is associated with metastatic relapse. Our findings reveal transcriptomic variability generation as a mechanism by which cancer subpopulations can diversify gene expression states, which may allow for enhanced fitness under changing environmental pressures encountered during cancer progression. PMID:27138336

  7. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-06

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  8. Oncology nursing support for safe and effective use of eribulin in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Diana; Urquhart, Laura; Hopkins, Una; Knight, Sandra; Moore, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Nurse practitioners play important roles in breast cancer prevention, early detection, therapeutic efficacy, and surveillance. Assessment of a patient's health status is part of the nine nurse practitioner core competencies updated in 2012 by the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties. Although adverse events are common in treatment for metastatic breast cancer (MBC), proactive management strategies can limit the number and/or severity of adverse events. Additionally, knowledge of common metastatic sites and clinical signs/symptoms of recurrence provides one of the first-line strategies for successful treatment. We review five case studies of women with MBC who were managed successfully with eribulin mesylate in late lines of therapy after at least two chemotherapeutic regimens for advanced breast cancer that included both an anthracycline and a taxane in either the adjuvant or metastatic setting. PMID:24855406

  9. Cathepsin L inactivation leads to multimodal inhibition of prostate cancer cell dissemination in a preclinical bone metastasis model

    PubMed Central

    Sudhan, Dhivya R.; Pampo, Christine; Rice, Lori; Siemann, Dietmar W.

    2016-01-01

    It is estimated that approximately 90% of patients with advanced prostate cancer develop bone metastases; an occurrence that results in a substantial reduction in the quality of life and a drastic worsening of prognosis. The development of novel therapeutic strategies that impair the metastatic process and associated skeletal adversities is therefore critical to improving prostate cancer patient survival. Recognition of the importance of Cathepsin L (CTSL) to metastatic dissemination of cancer cells has led to the development of several CTSL inhibition strategies. The present investigation employed intra-cardiac injection of human PC-3ML prostate cancer cells into nude mice to examine tumor cell dissemination in a preclinical bone metastasis model. CTSL knockdown confirmed the validity of targeting this protease and subsequent intervention studies with the small molecule CTSL inhibitor KGP94 resulted in a significant reduction in metastatic tumor burden in the bone and an improvement in overall survival. CTSL inhibition by KGP94 also led to a significant impairment of tumor initiated angiogenesis. Furthermore, KGP94 treatment decreased osteoclast formation and bone resorptive function, thus, perturbing the reciprocal interactions between tumor cells and osteoclasts within the bone microenvironment which typically result in bone loss and aggressive growth of metastases. These functional effects were accompanied by a significant downregulation of NFκB signaling activity and expression of osteoclastogenesis related NFκB target genes. Collectively, these data indicate that the CTSL inhibitor KGP94 has the potential to alleviate metastatic disease progression and associated skeletal morbidities and hence may have utility in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer patients. PMID:26757413

  10. Cathepsin L inactivation leads to multimodal inhibition of prostate cancer cell dissemination in a preclinical bone metastasis model.

    PubMed

    Sudhan, Dhivya R; Pampo, Christine; Rice, Lori; Siemann, Dietmar W

    2016-06-01

    It is estimated that approximately 90% of patients with advanced prostate cancer develop bone metastases; an occurrence that results in a substantial reduction in the quality of life and a drastic worsening of prognosis. The development of novel therapeutic strategies that impair the metastatic process and associated skeletal adversities is therefore critical to improving prostate cancer patient survival. Recognition of the importance of Cathepsin L (CTSL) to metastatic dissemination of cancer cells has led to the development of several CTSL inhibition strategies. The present investigation employed intra-cardiac injection of human PC-3ML prostate cancer cells into nude mice to examine tumor cell dissemination in a preclinical bone metastasis model. CTSL knockdown confirmed the validity of targeting this protease and subsequent intervention studies with the small molecule CTSL inhibitor KGP94 resulted in a significant reduction in metastatic tumor burden in the bone and an improvement in overall survival. CTSL inhibition by KGP94 also led to a significant impairment of tumor initiated angiogenesis. Furthermore, KGP94 treatment decreased osteoclast formation and bone resorptive function, thus, perturbing the reciprocal interactions between tumor cells and osteoclasts within the bone microenvironment which typically result in bone loss and aggressive growth of metastases. These functional effects were accompanied by a significant downregulation of NFκB signaling activity and expression of osteoclastogenesis related NFκB target genes. Collectively, these data indicate that the CTSL inhibitor KGP94 has the potential to alleviate metastatic disease progression and associated skeletal morbidities and hence may have utility in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer patients. PMID:26757413

  11. Outcomes in Patients with Obstructive Jaundice from Metastatic Colorectal Cancer and Implications for Management

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Shawnn D.; Albert, Scott; Shirley, Lawrence; Schmidt, Carl; Abdel-Misih, Sherif; El-Dika, Samer; Groce, J. Royce; Wu, Christina; Goldberg, Richard M.; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Bloomston, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer can develop jaundice from intrahepatic or extrahepatic causes. Currently, there is little data on the underlying causes and overall survival after onset of jaundice. The purpose of this study was to characterize the causes of jaundice and determine outcomes. Methods Six hundred twenty-nine patients treated for metastatic colorectal cancer between 2004 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Those developing jaundice were grouped as having intrahepatic or extrahepatic obstruction. Demographics, clinicopathologic, and outcome data were analyzed. Results Sixty-two patients with metastatic colorectal cancer developed jaundice. Intrahepatic biliary obstruction was most common, occurring in younger patients. Time from metastatic diagnosis to presentation of jaundice was similar between groups, as was the mean number of prior lines of chemotherapy. Biliary decompression was successful 41.7 % of the time and was attempted more commonly for extrahepatic causes. Median overall survival after onset of jaundice was 1.5 months and it was similar between groups, but improved to 9.6 months in patients who were able to receive further chemotherapy. Conclusions Jaundice due to metastatic colorectal cancer is an ominous finding, representing aggressive tumor biology or exhaustion of therapies. Biliary decompression is often difficult and should only be pursued when additional treatment options are available. PMID:25300799

  12. Emerging therapeutic targets in metastatic progression: A focus on breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuo; Kang, Yibin

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is the underlying cause of death for the majority of breast cancer patients. Despite significant advances in recent years in basic research and clinical development, therapies that specifically target metastatic breast cancer remain inadequate, and represents the single greatest obstacle to reducing mortality of late-stage breast cancer. Recent efforts have leveraged genomic analysis of breast cancer and molecular dissection of tumor-stromal cross-talk to uncover a number of promising candidates for targeted treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Rational combinations of therapeutic agents targeting tumor-intrinsic properties and microenvironmental components provide a promising strategy to develop precision treatments with higher specificity and less toxicity. In this review, we discuss the emerging therapeutic targets in breast cancer metastasis, from tumor-intrinsic pathways to those that involve the host tissue components, including the immune system. PMID:27000769

  13. Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: new therapies, novel combination strategies and implications for immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Drake, CG; Sharma, P; Gerritsen, W

    2016-01-01

    For the past decade, docetaxel has remained the global standard of care for frontline treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Until recently, there were limited options for patients with mCRPC following docetaxel failure or resistance, but now the approved treatment choices for these patients have expanded to include abiraterone acetate, cabazitaxel and enzalutamide. Additionally, the radioactive therapeutic agent radium-223 dichloride has been recently approved in patients with CRPC with bone metastases. Although each of these agents has been shown to convey significant survival benefit as a monotherapy, preclinical findings suggest that combining such innovative strategies with traditional treatments may achieve additive or synergistic effects, further augmenting patient benefit. This review will discuss the transformation of the post-docetaxel space in mCRPC, highlighting the spectrum of newly approved agents in this setting in the USA and the European Union, as well as summarizing treatments with non-chemotherapeutic mechanisms of action that have demonstrated promising results in recent phase 3 trials. Lastly, this review will address the potential of combinatorial regimens in mCRPC, including the pairing of novel immunotherapeutic approaches with chemotherapy, radiotherapy or androgen ablation. PMID:24276248

  14. Metabolic Plasticity of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells: Adaptation to Changes in the Microenvironment1

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Rui V.; Serganova, Inna S.; Kruchevsky, Natalia; Leftin, Avigdor; Shestov, Alexander A.; Thaler, Howard T.; Sukenick, George; Locasale, Jason W.; Blasberg, Ronald G.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Ackerstaff, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells adapt their metabolism during tumorigenesis. We studied two isogenic breast cancer cells lines (highly metastatic 4T1; nonmetastatic 67NR) to identify differences in their glucose and glutamine metabolism in response to metabolic and environmental stress. Dynamic magnetic resonance spectroscopy of 13C-isotopomers showed that 4T1 cells have higher glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux than 67NR cells and readily switch between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in response to different extracellular environments. OXPHOS activity increased with metastatic potential in isogenic cell lines derived from the same primary breast cancer: 4T1 > 4T07 and 168FARN (local micrometastasis only) > 67NR. We observed a restricted TCA cycle flux at the succinate dehydrogenase step in 67NR cells (but not in 4T1 cells), leading to succinate accumulation and hindering OXPHOS. In the four isogenic cell lines, environmental stresses modulated succinate dehydrogenase subunit A expression according to metastatic potential. Moreover, glucose-derived lactate production was more glutamine dependent in cell lines with higher metastatic potential. These studies show clear differences in TCA cycle metabolism between 4T1 and 67NR breast cancer cells. They indicate that metastases-forming 4T1 cells are more adept at adjusting their metabolism in response to environmental stress than isogenic, nonmetastatic 67NR cells. We suggest that the metabolic plasticity and adaptability are more important to the metastatic breast cancer phenotype than rapid cell proliferation alone, which could 1) provide a new biomarker for early detection of this phenotype, possibly at the time of diagnosis, and 2) lead to new treatment strategies of metastatic breast cancer by targeting mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:26408259

  15. Metabolic plasticity of metastatic breast cancer cells: adaptation to changes in the microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Simões, Rui V; Serganova, Inna S; Kruchevsky, Natalia; Leftin, Avigdor; Shestov, Alexander A; Thaler, Howard T; Sukenick, George; Locasale, Jason W; Blasberg, Ronald G; Koutcher, Jason A; Ackerstaff, Ellen

    2015-08-01

    Cancer cells adapt their metabolism during tumorigenesis. We studied two isogenic breast cancer cells lines (highly metastatic 4T1; nonmetastatic 67NR) to identify differences in their glucose and glutamine metabolism in response to metabolic and environmental stress. Dynamic magnetic resonance spectroscopy of (13)C-isotopomers showed that 4T1 cells have higher glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux than 67NR cells and readily switch between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in response to different extracellular environments. OXPHOS activity increased with metastatic potential in isogenic cell lines derived from the same primary breast cancer: 4T1 > 4T07 and 168FARN (local micrometastasis only) > 67NR. We observed a restricted TCA cycle flux at the succinate dehydrogenase step in 67NR cells (but not in 4T1 cells), leading to succinate accumulation and hindering OXPHOS. In the four isogenic cell lines, environmental stresses modulated succinate dehydrogenase subunit A expression according to metastatic potential. Moreover, glucose-derived lactate production was more glutamine dependent in cell lines with higher metastatic potential. These studies show clear differences in TCA cycle metabolism between 4T1 and 67NR breast cancer cells. They indicate that metastases-forming 4T1 cells are more adept at adjusting their metabolism in response to environmental stress than isogenic, nonmetastatic 67NR cells. We suggest that the metabolic plasticity and adaptability are more important to the metastatic breast cancer phenotype than rapid cell proliferation alone, which could 1) provide a new biomarker for early detection of this phenotype, possibly at the time of diagnosis, and 2) lead to new treatment strategies of metastatic breast cancer by targeting mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:26408259

  16. Tracking the origins and drivers of subclonal metastatic expansion in prostate cancer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hong, Matthew K. H.; Macintyre, Geoff; Wedge, David C.; Van Loo, Peter; Patel, Keval; Lunke, Sebastian; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Sloggett, Clare; Cmero, Marek; Marass, Francesco; et al

    2015-04-01

    Tumour heterogeneity in primary prostate cancer is a well-established phenomenon. However, how the subclonal diversity of tumours changes during metastasis and progression to lethality is poorly understood. Here we reveal the precise direction of metastatic spread across four lethal prostate cancer patients using whole-genome and ultra-deep targeted sequencing of longitudinally collected primary and metastatic tumours. We find one case of metastatic spread to the surgical bed causing local recurrence, and another case of cross-metastatic site seeding combining with dynamic remoulding of subclonal mixtures in response to therapy. By ultra-deep sequencing end-stage blood, we detect both metastatic and primary tumour clones,more » even years after removal of the prostate. As a result, analysis of mutations associated with metastasis reveals an enrichment of TP53 mutations, and additional sequencing of metastases from 19 patients demonstrates that acquisition of TP53 mutations is linked with the expansion of subclones with metastatic potential which we can detect in the blood.« less

  17. Tracking the origins and drivers of subclonal metastatic expansion in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Matthew K. H.; Macintyre, Geoff; Wedge, David C.; Van Loo, Peter; Patel, Keval; Lunke, Sebastian; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Sloggett, Clare; Cmero, Marek; Marass, Francesco; Tsui, Dana; Mangiola, Stefano; Lonie, Andrew; Naeem, Haroon; Sapre, Nikhil; Phal, Pramit M.; Kurganovs, Natalie; Chin, Xiaowen; Kerger, Michael; Warren, Anne Y.; Neal, David; Gnanapragasam, Vincent; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Pedersen, John S.; Ryan, Andrew; Haviv, Izhak; Costello, Anthony J.; Corcoran, Niall M.; Hovens, Christopher M.

    2015-04-01

    Tumour heterogeneity in primary prostate cancer is a well-established phenomenon. However, how the subclonal diversity of tumours changes during metastasis and progression to lethality is poorly understood. Here we reveal the precise direction of metastatic spread across four lethal prostate cancer patients using whole-genome and ultra-deep targeted sequencing of longitudinally collected primary and metastatic tumours. We find one case of metastatic spread to the surgical bed causing local recurrence, and another case of cross-metastatic site seeding combining with dynamic remoulding of subclonal mixtures in response to therapy. By ultra-deep sequencing end-stage blood, we detect both metastatic and primary tumour clones, even years after removal of the prostate. As a result, analysis of mutations associated with metastasis reveals an enrichment of TP53 mutations, and additional sequencing of metastases from 19 patients demonstrates that acquisition of TP53 mutations is linked with the expansion of subclones with metastatic potential which we can detect in the blood.

  18. Advances of Targeted Therapy in Treatment of Unresectable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suk-young; Oh, Sang Cheul

    2016-01-01

    Despite being one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers worldwide, prognosis of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) was poor. Development and introduction of biologic agents in treatment of patients with metastatic CRC have brought improved outcomes. Monoclonal antibodies directing epidermal growth factor receptors and vascular endothelial growth factor are main biologic agents currently used in treatment of metastatic CRC. Encouraged by results from many clinical trials demonstrating efficacy of those monoclonal antibodies, the combination therapy with those targeted agents and conventional chemotherapeutic agents has been established as the standard therapy for patients with metastatic CRC. However, emergency of resistance to those target agents has limited the efficacy of treatment, and strategies to overcome the resistance are now being investigated by newly developed biological techniques clarifying how to acquire resistance. Here, we introduce mechanisms of action of the biologic agents currently used for treatment of metastatic CRC and several landmark historical clinical studies which have changed the main stream of treatment. The mechanism of resistance to those agents, one of serious problems in treatment metastatic CRC, and ongoing clinical trials to overcome the limitations and improve treatment outcomes will also be presented in this review. PMID:27127793

  19. Tracking the origins and drivers of subclonal metastatic expansion in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Matthew K.H.; Macintyre, Geoff; Wedge, David C.; Van Loo, Peter; Patel, Keval; Lunke, Sebastian; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Sloggett, Clare; Cmero, Marek; Marass, Francesco; Tsui, Dana; Mangiola, Stefano; Lonie, Andrew; Naeem, Haroon; Sapre, Nikhil; Phal, Pramit M.; Kurganovs, Natalie; Chin, Xiaowen; Kerger, Michael; Warren, Anne Y.; Neal, David; Gnanapragasam, Vincent; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Pedersen, John S.; Ryan, Andrew; Haviv, Izhak; Costello, Anthony J.; Corcoran, Niall M.; Hovens, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Tumour heterogeneity in primary prostate cancer is a well-established phenomenon. However, how the subclonal diversity of tumours changes during metastasis and progression to lethality is poorly understood. Here we reveal the precise direction of metastatic spread across four lethal prostate cancer patients using whole-genome and ultra-deep targeted sequencing of longitudinally collected primary and metastatic tumours. We find one case of metastatic spread to the surgical bed causing local recurrence, and another case of cross-metastatic site seeding combining with dynamic remoulding of subclonal mixtures in response to therapy. By ultra-deep sequencing end-stage blood, we detect both metastatic and primary tumour clones, even years after removal of the prostate. Analysis of mutations associated with metastasis reveals an enrichment of TP53 mutations, and additional sequencing of metastases from 19 patients demonstrates that acquisition of TP53 mutations is linked with the expansion of subclones with metastatic potential which we can detect in the blood. PMID:25827447

  20. Therapy decisions for the symptomatic patient with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Markowski, Mark C; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer continues to kill approximately 30,000 men per year. Since 2010, five new therapeutic agents have been Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved to treat metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). With the increasing number of therapies available to clinicians, the most effective sequence in which to implement these treatments remains unknown. The presence or absence of symptoms (i.e., bony pain, visceral crisis) is a key parameter that informs the decision-making process regarding therapy. Treatment algorithms based on: 1) asymptomatic/minimal symptoms, 2) moderate symptoms or chemotherapy ineligible or 3) symptomatic disease need to be developed. PMID:25865849

  1. [Regorafenib in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: a review and an update].

    PubMed

    Zaniboni, Alberto; Mansueto, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    Standard chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer is based on a combination of fluoropyrimidines, irinotecan and oxaliplatin. Regorafenib, an oral multikynase inhibitor blocking multiple disease progression-involved pathways, is a new therapeutic option in patients who already received standard therapy. In a phase III randomized, placebo-controlled study regorafenib, as compared to best supportive care, showed a statistically significant improvement in overall survival, irrespective of KRAS mutation status. Safety profile of regorafenib is acceptable, with few severe grade adverse events which can be adequately managed within few weeks after treatment beginning. Regorafenib is a new treatment standard in patients who already received chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:26780072

  2. [Our experience with panitumumab used for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kaname; Kanou, Shunsuke; Takei, Ryohei; Haba, Yusuke; Ohbatake, Yoshinao; Noto, Masahiro; Takeda, Toshiya; Tani, Takashi; Yagi, Masao

    2013-01-01

    We report having treated patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with panitumumab in our department. Ten patients were treated. The mean age was 65. 7 years-old with 7 males and 3 females. Seven patients were treated with only panitumumab, and three patients were treated with panitumumab and another drug. The median number of infusions was 8 times. In the 9 cases that could be evaluated, the disease control rate was 66. 6%. Skin toxicity was observed in all patients. A low serum magnesium value of grade 3 was observed in one patient. We consider that treatment with panitumumab for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer was a safe option. PMID:23306920

  3. Cisplatin and Fluorouracil Compared With Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Inoperable Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Anal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-22

    Anal Basaloid Carcinoma; Anal Canal Cloacogenic Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Anal Canal Carcinoma; Recurrent Anal Canal Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Anal Canal Cancer; Stage IV Anal Canal Cancer

  4. Multifunctional materials for bone cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Catarina; Ferreira, José MF; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Ficai, Denisa; Sonmez, Maria; Ficai, Anton

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to present the most recent findings in bone tissue engineering. Special attention is given to multifunctional materials based on collagen and collagen–hydroxyapatite composites used for skin and bone cancer treatments. The multi-functionality of these materials was obtained by adding to the base regenerative grafts proper components, such as ferrites (magnetite being the most important representative), cytostatics (cisplatin, carboplatin, vincristine, methotrexate, paclitaxel, doxorubicin), silver nanoparticles, antibiotics (anthracyclines, geldanamycin), and/or analgesics (ibuprofen, fentanyl). The suitability of complex systems for the intended applications was systematically analyzed. The developmental possibilities of multifunctional materials with regenerative and curative roles (antitumoral as well as pain management) in the field of skin and bone cancer treatment are discussed. It is worth mentioning that better materials are likely to be developed by combining conventional and unconventional experimental strategies. PMID:24920907

  5. Dormant breast cancer micrometastases reside in specific bone marrow niches that regulate their transit to and from bone.

    PubMed

    Price, Trevor T; Burness, Monika L; Sivan, Ayelet; Warner, Matthew J; Cheng, Renee; Lee, Clara H; Olivere, Lindsey; Comatas, Karrie; Magnani, John; Kim Lyerly, H; Cheng, Qing; McCall, Chad M; Sipkins, Dorothy A

    2016-05-25

    Breast cancer metastatic relapse can occur years after therapy, indicating that disseminated breast cancer cells (BCCs) have a prolonged dormant phase before becoming proliferative. A major site of disease dissemination and relapse is bone, although the critical signals that allow circulating BCCs to identify bone microvasculature, enter tissue, and tether to the microenvironment are poorly understood. Using real-time in vivo microscopy of bone marrow (BM) in a breast cancer xenograft model, we show that dormant and proliferating BCCs occupy distinct areas, with dormant BCCs predominantly found in E-selectin- and stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1)-rich perisinusoidal vascular regions. We use highly specific inhibitors of E-selectin and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) (SDF-1 receptor) to demonstrate that E-selectin and SDF-1 orchestrate opposing roles in BCC trafficking. Whereas E-selectin interactions are critical for allowing BCC entry into the BM, the SDF-1/CXCR4 interaction anchors BCCs to the microenvironment, and its inhibition induces mobilization of dormant micrometastases into circulation. Homing studies with primary BCCs also demonstrate that E-selectin regulates their entry into bone through the sinusoidal niche, and immunohistochemical staining of patient BMs shows dormant micrometastatic disease adjacent to SDF-1(+) vasculature. These findings shed light on how BCCs traffic within the host, and suggest that simultaneous blockade of CXCR4 and E-selectin in patients could molecularly excise dormant micrometastases from the protective BM environment, preventing their emergence as relapsed disease. PMID:27225183

  6. TNFRSF10C copy number variation is associated with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanenbaum, Daniel G.; Hall, William A.; Colbert, Lauren E.; Bastien, Amanda J.; Brat, Daniel J.; Kong, Jun; Kim, Sungjin; Dwivedi, Bhakti; Kowalski, Jeanne; Landry, Jerome C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Genetic markers for distant metastatic disease in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) are not well defined. Identification of genetic alterations associated with metastatic CRC could help to guide systemic and local treatment strategies. We evaluated the association of tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 10C (TNFRSF10C) copy number variation (CNV) with distant metastatic disease in patients with CRC using The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Methods Genetic sequencing data and clinical characteristics were obtained from TCGA for all available patients with CRC. There were 515 CRC patient samples with CNV and clinical outcome data, including a subset of 144 rectal adenocarcinoma patient samples. Using the TCGA CRC dataset, CNV of TNFRSF10C was evaluated for association with distant metastatic disease (M1 vs. M0). Multivariate logistic regression analysis with odds ratio (OR) using a 95% confidence interval (CI) was performed adjusting for age, T stage, N stage, adjuvant chemotherapy, gender, microsatellite instability (MSI), location, and surgical margin status. Results TNFRSF10C CNV in patients with CRC was associated with distant metastatic disease [OR 4.81 (95% CI, 2.13–10.85) P<0.001] and positive lymph nodes [OR 18.83 (95% CI, 8.42–42.09)]; P<0.001) but not MSI (OR P=0.799). On multivariate analysis, after adjusting for pathologic T stage, N stage, adjuvant chemotherapy, gender, and MSI, TNFRSF10C CNV remained significantly associated with distant metastatic disease (OR P=0.018). Subset analysis revealed that TNFRSF10C CNV was also significantly associated with distant metastatic disease in patients with rectal adenocarcinoma (OR P=0.016). Conclusions TNFRSF10C CNV in patients with CRC is associated with distant metastatic disease. With further validation, such genetic profiles could be used clinically to support optimal systemic treatment strategies versus more aggressive local therapies in patients with CRC, including radiation

  7. The Host Microenvironment Influences Prostate Cancer Invasion, Systemic Spread, Bone Colonization, and Osteoblastic Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Sourik S.; Li, Xiaohong; Miranti, Cindy K.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer death in men worldwide. Most PCa deaths are due to osteoblastic bone metastases. What triggers PCa metastasis to the bone and what causes osteoblastic lesions remain unanswered. A major contributor to PCa metastasis is the host microenvironment. Here, we address how the primary tumor microenvironment influences PCa metastasis via integrins, extracellular proteases, and transient epithelia-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to promote PCa progression, invasion, and metastasis. We discuss how the bone-microenvironment influences metastasis; where chemotactic cytokines favor bone homing, adhesion molecules promote colonization, and bone-derived signals induce osteoblastic lesions. Animal models that fully recapitulate human PCa progression from primary tumor to bone metastasis are needed to understand the PCa pathophysiology that leads to bone metastasis. Better delineation of the specific processes involved in PCa bone metastasize is needed to prevent or treat metastatic PCa. Therapeutic regimens that focus on the tumor microenvironment could add to the PCa pharmacopeia. PMID:25566502

  8. Subcutaneous preconditioning increases invasion and metastatic dissemination in mouse colorectal cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Alamo, Patricia; Gallardo, Alberto; Pavón, Miguel A.; Casanova, Isolda; Trias, Manuel; Mangues, Maria A.; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio; Mangues, Ramon; Céspedes, Maria V.

    2014-01-01

    Mouse colorectal cancer (CRC) models generated by orthotopic microinjection of human CRC cell lines reproduce the pattern of lymphatic, haematological and transcoelomic spread but generate low metastatic efficiency. Our aim was to develop a new strategy that could increase the metastatic efficiency of these models. We used subcutaneous implantation of the human CRC cell lines HCT116 or SW48 prior to their orthotopic microinjection in the cecum of nude mice (SC+ORT). This subcutaneous preconditioning significantly enhanced metastatic dissemination. In the HCT116 model it increased the number and size of metastatic foci in lymph nodes, lung, liver and peritoneum, whereas, in the SW48 model, it induced a shift from non-metastatic to metastatic. In both models the number of apoptotic bodies in the primary tumour in the SC+ORT group was significantly reduced compared with that in the direct orthotopic injection (ORT) group. Moreover, in HCT116 tumours the number of keratin-positive tumour buddings and single epithelial cells increased at the invasion front in SC+ORT mice. In the SW48 tumour model, we observed a trend towards a higher number of tumour buds and single cells in the SC+ORT group but this did not reach statistical significance. At a molecular level, the enhanced metastatic efficiency observed in the HCT116 SC+ORT model was associated with an increase in AKT activation, VEGF-A overexpression and downregulation of β1 integrin in primary tumour tissue, whereas, in SW48 SC+ORT mice, the level of expression of these proteins remained unchanged. In summary, subcutaneous preconditioning increased the metastatic dissemination of both orthotopic CRC models by increasing tumour cell survival and invasion at the tumour invasion front. This approach could be useful to simultaneously study the mechanisms of metastases and to evaluate anti-metastatic drugs against CRC. PMID:24487410

  9. Subcutaneous preconditioning increases invasion and metastatic dissemination in mouse colorectal cancer models.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Patricia; Gallardo, Alberto; Pavón, Miguel A; Casanova, Isolda; Trias, Manuel; Mangues, Maria A; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio; Mangues, Ramon; Céspedes, Maria V

    2014-03-01

    Mouse colorectal cancer (CRC) models generated by orthotopic microinjection of human CRC cell lines reproduce the pattern of lymphatic, haematological and transcoelomic spread but generate low metastatic efficiency. Our aim was to develop a new strategy that could increase the metastatic efficiency of these models. We used subcutaneous implantation of the human CRC cell lines HCT116 or SW48 prior to their orthotopic microinjection in the cecum of nude mice (SC+ORT). This subcutaneous preconditioning significantly enhanced metastatic dissemination. In the HCT116 model it increased the number and size of metastatic foci in lymph nodes, lung, liver and peritoneum, whereas, in the SW48 model, it induced a shift from non-metastatic to metastatic. In both models the number of apoptotic bodies in the primary tumour in the SC+ORT group was significantly reduced compared with that in the direct orthotopic injection (ORT) group. Moreover, in HCT116 tumours the number of keratin-positive tumour buddings and single epithelial cells increased at the invasion front in SC+ORT mice. In the SW48 tumour model, we observed a trend towards a higher number of tumour buds and single cells in the SC+ORT group but this did not reach statistical significance. At a molecular level, the enhanced metastatic efficiency observed in the HCT116 SC+ORT model was associated with an increase in AKT activation, VEGF-A overexpression and downregulation of β1 integrin in primary tumour tissue, whereas, in SW48 SC+ORT mice, the level of expression of these proteins remained unchanged. In summary, subcutaneous preconditioning increased the metastatic dissemination of both orthotopic CRC models by increasing tumour cell survival and invasion at the tumour invasion front. This approach could be useful to simultaneously study the mechanisms of metastases and to evaluate anti-metastatic drugs against CRC. PMID:24487410

  10. Cellular Plasticity in Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jadaan, Dima Y.; Jadaan, Mutaz M.; McCabe, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Experimental data suggest that tumour cells can reversibly transition between epithelial and mesenchymal states (EMT and MET), a phenomenon known as cellular plasticity. The aim of this review was to appraise the clinical evidence for the role of cellular plasticity in prostate cancer (PC) bone metastasis. Methods. An electronic search was performed using PubMed for studies that have examined the differential expression of epithelial, mesenchymal, and stem cell markers in human PC bone metastasis tissues. Results. The review included nineteen studies. More than 60% of the studies used ≤20 bone metastasis samples, and there were several sources of heterogeneity between studies. Overall, most stem cell markers analysed, except for CXCR4, were positively expressed in bone metastasis tissues, while the expression of EMT and MET markers was heterogeneous between and within samples. Several EMT and stemness markers that are involved in osteomimicry, such as Notch, Met receptor, and Wnt/β pathway, were highly expressed in bone metastases. Conclusions. Clinical findings support the role of cellular plasticity in PC bone metastasis and suggest that epithelial and mesenchymal states cannot be taken in isolation when targeting PC bone metastasis. The paper also highlights several challenges in the clinical detection of cellular plasticity. PMID:26146569

  11. Stereotactic body radiotherapy using CyberKnife for locally advanced unresectable and metastatic pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ting-Shi; Liang, Ping; Lu, Huan-Zhen; Liang, Jian-Ning; Liu, Jian-Min; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Ying-Chuan; Tang, Min-Yang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy using CyberKnife for locally advanced unresectable and metastatic pancreatic cancer. METHODS: From June 2010 to May 2014, 25 patients with locally advanced unresectable and metastatic pancreatic cancer underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy. Nine patients presented with unresectable locally advanced disease and 16 had metastatic disease. Primary end-points of this study were overall survival, relief of abdominal pain, and toxicity. RESULTS: Fourteen patients were treated with a total dose of 30-36 Gy in three fractions and the remainder with 40-48 Gy in four fractions. Median follow-up was 11 mo (range: 2-25 mo). The median survival duration calculated from the time of stereotactic body radiotherapy for the entire group, the locally advanced group, and the metastatic group was 9.0 mo, 13.5 mo, and 8.5 mo, respectively. Overall survival was 37% and 18% at one and two years, respectively. Abdominal pain relief was achieved within 2 wk of completing radiotherapy in the patients who received successful palliation (13 of 20 patients had significant pain). Five patients (20%) had grade 1 nausea, and one (4%) had grade 2 nausea. No acute grade 3+ toxicity was seen. CONCLUSION: Stereotactic body radiotherapy using the CyberKnife system is a promising, noninvasive, palliative treatment with acceptable toxicity for locally advanced unresectable and metastatic pancreatic cancer. PMID:26185389

  12. The bone marrow niche in support of breast cancer dormancy.

    PubMed

    Walker, Nykia D; Patel, Jimmy; Munoz, Jessian L; Hu, Madeleine; Guiro, Khadidiatou; Sinha, Garima; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2016-09-28

    Despite the success in detecting breast cancer (BC) early and, with aggressive therapeutic intervention, BC remains a clinical problem. The bone marrow (BM) is a favorable metastatic site for breast cancer cells (BCCs). In BM, the survival of BCCs is partly achieved by the supporting microenvironment, including the presence of immune suppressive cells such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The heterogeneity of BCCs brings up the question of how each subset interacts with the BM microenvironment. The cancer stem cells (CSCs) survive in the BM as cycling quiescence cells and, forming gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) with the hematopoietic supporting stromal cells and MSCs. This type of communication has been identified close to the endosteum. Additionally, dormancy can occur by soluble mediators such as cytokines and also by the exchange of exosomes. These latter mechanisms are reviewed in the context of metastasis of BC to the BM for transition as dormant cells. The article also discusses how immune cells such as macrophages and regulatory T-cells facilitate BC dormancy. The challenges of studying BC dormancy in 2-dimensional (2-D) system are also incorporated by proposing 3-D system by engineering methods to recapitulate the BM microenvironment. PMID:26546045

  13. Dickkopf-1 negatively regulates the expression of osteoprotegerin, a key osteoclastogenesis inhibitor, by sequestering Lrp6 in primary and metastatic lytic bone lesions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Hang; Zhang, Yuanjin; Li, Hong-Yan; Liu, Yun-Yan; Sun, Tao

    2016-06-01

    Recently, an inverse role for Wnt signaling in the development of osteoclasts in the bone was demonstrated. In the present study, we examined whether there is a commonality in the mechanism of bone resorption and lysis that occur in a diverse set of bone metastatic lesions, as well as in primary bone lesions. Compared with control bone tissue and bone biopsies from patients with nonmetastatic primary tumors (i.e., breast carcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma, and prostate carcinoma), patients with bone metastatic lesions from the three aforementioned primary tumors, as well as osteolytic lesions obtained from the bone biopsies of patients with multiple myeloma, demonstrated an upregulated expression of the glycoprotein Dickkopf-1 at both the mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, by coimmunoprecipitation, Dickkopf-1 pulled-down low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (Lrp6), which is a key downstream effector of the Wnt signaling pathway. The expression of Lrp6 was unaltered in the osteometastatic lesions. This negative regulation was associated with a lowered expression of osteoprotegerin in the osteometastatic lesions, an observation that was previously reported to promote osteoclastogenesis. These findings provide a common mechanism for the inverse relationship between the Wnt signaling pathway and the development of primary or metastatic bone lesions. Pharmacological modulation of the Wnt signaling pathway might benefit the clinical management of primary and metastatic bone lesions. PMID:27310953

  14. Therapeutic inhibition of breast cancer bone metastasis progression and lung colonization: breaking the vicious cycle by targeting α5β1 integrin.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hongren; Veine, Donna M; Livant, Donna L

    2016-06-01

    At diagnosis, 10 % of breast cancer patients already have locally advanced or metastatic disease; moreover, metastasis eventually develops in at least 40 % of early breast cancer patients. Osteolytic bone colonization occurs in 80-85 % of metastatic breast cancer patients and is thought to be an early step in metastatic progression. Thus, breast cancer displays a strong preference for metastasis to bone, and most metastatic breast cancer patients will experience its complications. Our prior research has shown that the α5β1 integrin fibronectin receptor mediates both metastatic and angiogenic invasion. We invented a targeted peptide inhibitor of activated α5β1, Ac-PHSCN-NH2 (PHSCN), as a validated lead compound to impede both metastatic invasion and neovascularization. Systemic PHSCN monotherapy prevented disease progression for up to 14 months in Phase I clinical trial. Here, we report that the next-generation construct, Ac-PhScN-NH2 (PhScN), which contains D-isomers of histidine (h) and cysteine (c), is greater than 100,000-fold more potent than PHSCN at blocking basement membrane invasion. Moreover, PhScN is also up to 10,000-fold more potent than PHSCN at inhibiting lung extravasation and colonization in athymic mice for both MDA-MB-231 metastatic and SUM149PT inflammatory breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we show that systemic treatment with 50 mg/kg PhScN monotherapy reduces established intratibial MDA-MB-231 bone colony progression by 80 %. Thus, PhScN is a highly potent, well-tolerated inhibitor of both lung colonization and bone colony progression. PMID:27255534

  15. Ramucirumab in metastatic colorectal cancer: evidence to date and place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Verdaguer, Helena; Tabernero, Josep; Macarulla, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequent cancer worldwide. Overall survival rates have improved greatly over the last few years due, at least in part, to the addition of targeted therapies to standard of care chemotherapy. Angiogenesis plays an important role in colorectal cancer, and therapies directed against the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) axis have contributed significantly to improving the outcome of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Over the past few years, several new targeted antiangiogenic agents have been approved for this patient population, confirming the value of inhibiting tumour angiogenesis. The most recent among them is ramucirumab, a fully humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the extracellular domain of VEGF receptor 2. It has proven valuable in multiple tumour types including colorectal cancer. Several phase I and II clinical trials showed a favourable toxicity profile and promising clinical antitumour efficacy in colorectal cancer patients. In the phase III RAISE clinical trial, the addition of ramucirumab to FOLFIRI-based chemotherapy resulted in an improvement of overall survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who had been previously treated with bevacizumab, oxaliplatin and a fluoropyrimidine. On the basis of these results, ramucirumab was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for this setting. We present an overview of the key preclinical and clinical studies in the development of ramucirumab in the context of metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:27239240

  16. HDAC6 activity is not required for basal autophagic flux in metastatic prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gregory W; Wickramasekara, Samanthi; Fang, Yufeng; Maier, Claudia S; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H; Perez, Viviana I; Ho, Emily

    2016-06-01

    Histone deacetylase 6 is a multifunctional lysine deacetylase that is recently emerging as a central facilitator of response to stress and may play an important role in cancer cell proliferation. The histone deacetylase 6-inhibitor tubacin has been shown to slow the growth of metastatic prostate cancer cells and sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. However, the proteins histone deacetylase 6 interacts with, and thus its role in cancer cells, remains poorly characterized. Histone deacetylase 6 deacetylase activity has recently been shown to be required for efficient basal autophagic flux. Autophagy is often dysregulated in cancer cells and may confer stress resistance and allow for cell maintenance and a high proliferation rate. Tubacin may therefore slow cancer cell proliferation by decreasing autophagic flux. We characterized the histone deacetylase 6-interacting proteins in LNCaP metastatic prostate cancer cells and found that histone deacetylase 6 interacts with proteins involved in several cellular processes, including autophagy. Based on our interaction screen, we assessed the impact of the histone deacetylase 6-inhibitor tubacin on autophagic flux in two metastatic prostate cancer cell lines and found that tubacin does not influence autophagic flux. Histone deacetylase 6 therefore influences cell proliferation through an autophagy-independent mechanism. PMID:26643866

  17. Long-term complete response of antiandrogen withdrawal syndrome in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Shinya; Uehara, Sho; Yuasa, Takeshi; Masuda, Hitoshi; Fukui, Iwao; Yonese, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Antiandrogen withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is a well-established phenomenon in prostate cancer treated with combined androgen blockade (CAB). AWS is generally defined as subjective and/or objective improvement following discontinuation of an antiandrogen. However, the duration of the AWS response is usually limited. In addition, a complete response is quite rare. We herein present the case of a patient who achieved complete response from AWS, with the duration of this response lasting for >6 years. A 72-year-old man with metastatic prostate cancer received CAB with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog and bicalutamide. In addition, for local cancer control, external beam radiation therapy (70 Gy) to the prostate was performed. Subsequently, the serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level reached a nadir (undetectable level). Four years later, the patient's serum PSA level started to rise, and bicalutamide was discontinued to confirm AWS at a serum PSA level of 0.34 ng/ml. The PSA level immediately decreased again to an undetectable level (0.00 ng/ml), where it has been remained for 6 years. Bone scintigraphy and computed tomography scans have shown no evidence of bone or other metastases since the introduction of AWS. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports of such a long duration of complete response from AWS. Therefore, this phenomenon should always be considered, even in patients with advanced disease. PMID:27588183

  18. Retrospective analysis of KRAS status in metastatic colorectal cancer patients: a single-center feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Montomoli, Jonathan; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen Jacques; Frøslev, Trine; Taylor, Aliki; Erichsen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    Background: The occurrence of KRAS mutations and their association with prognosis in metastatic colorectal cancer patients is not well documented in population-based studies. Objectives: To examine the feasibility of identifying archived colorectal cancer specimens, and through linkage with nationwide Danish population-based databases to investigate the prevalence of KRAS mutations and their association with colorectal cancer survival. Methods: We used the Danish Pathology Database to identify the physical location of primary (or in some cases secondary) tumor specimens from selected metastatic colorectal cancer patients referred to our hospital for palliative chemotherapy between November 1, 2008 and September 30, 2009. Routinely stored paraffin tissue blocks were obtained from the pathology archives of the originating hospital. KRAS mutation tumor status was assessed for each patient using the commercialized TheraScreen KRAS Mutation Kit. Using the unique identifier number, we linked the patients to the Danish National Registry of Patients and the Danish Civil Registration System to obtain data on date of first colorectal cancer diagnosis and follow-up status. We estimated prevalence of KRAS mutations and the 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival after colorectal cancer diagnosis using the Kaplan–Meier technique. Results: We identified 106 metastatic colorectal cancer patients (64% males). All were successfully linked to the registries, and archived tumor-tissue samples were obtained and analyzed in each case. The overall prevalence of KRAS mutations was 55%, and 1-, 2-, and 5-year overall survival after colorectal cancer diagnosis was 91%, 68%, and 25%, respectively. Conclusion: It is feasible to use Danish population-based registries to obtain archived tissue samples from metastatic colorectal cancer patients, and to estimate prevalence of KRAS mutation and subsequently evaluate the association with colorectal cancer survival. PMID:23028236

  19. Use of Prednisone With Abiraterone Acetate in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Margaret K.; Nguyen, Suzanne; Mundle, Suneel D.

    2014-01-01

    Abiraterone acetate, a prodrug of the CYP17A1 inhibitor abiraterone that blocks androgen biosynthesis, is approved for treatment of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in combination with prednisone or prednisolone 5 mg twice daily. This review evaluates the basis for the effects of prednisone on mineralocorticoid-related adverse events that arise because of CYP17A1 inhibition with abiraterone. Coadministration with the recommended dose of glucocorticoid compensates for abiraterone-induced reductions in serum cortisol and blocks the compensatory increase in adrenocorticotropic hormone seen with abiraterone. Consequently, 5 mg prednisone twice daily serves as a glucocorticoid replacement therapy when coadministered with abiraterone acetate, analogous to use of glucocorticoid replacement therapy for certain endocrine disorders. We searched PubMed to identify safety concerns regarding glucocorticoid use, placing a focus on longitudinal studies in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and cancer. In general, glucocorticoid-related adverse events, including bone loss, immunosuppression, hyperglycemia, mood and cognitive alterations, and myopathy, appear dose related and tend to occur at doses and/or treatment durations greater than the low dose of glucocorticoid approved in combination with abiraterone acetate for the treatment of mCRPC. Although glucocorticoids are often used to manage tumor-related symptoms or to prevent treatment-related toxicity, available evidence suggests that prednisone and dexamethasone might also offer modest therapeutic benefit in mCRPC. Given recent improvements in survival achieved for mCRPC with novel agents in combination with prednisone, the risks of these recommended glucocorticoid doses must be balanced with the benefits shown for these regimens. PMID:25361624

  20. Response to angiotensin blockade with irbesartan in a patient with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jones, M. R.; Schrader, K. A.; Shen, Y.; Pleasance, E.; Ch'ng, C.; Dar, N.; Yip, S.; Renouf, D. J.; Schein, J. E.; Mungall, A. J.; Zhao, Y.; Moore, R.; Ma, Y.; Sheffield, B. S.; Ng, T.; Jones, S. J. M.; Marra, M. A.; Laskin, J.; Lim, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background A patient suffering from metastatic colorectal cancer, treatment-related toxicity and resistance to standard chemotherapy and radiation was assessed as part of a personalized oncogenomics initiative to derive potential alternative therapeutic strategies. Patients and methods Whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing was used to interrogate a metastatic tumor refractory to standard treatments of a patient with mismatch repair-deficient metastatic colorectal cancer. Results Integrative genomic analysis indicated overexpression of the AP-1 transcriptional complex suggesting experimental therapeutic rationales, including blockade of the renin–angiotensin system. This led to the repurposing of the angiotensin II receptor antagonist, irbesartan, as an anticancer therapy, resulting in the patient experiencing a dramatic and durable response. Conclusions This case highlights the utility of comprehensive integrative genomic profiling and bioinformatics analysis to provide hypothetical rationales for personalized treatment options. PMID:27022066

  1. The evolving role of cytotoxic chemotherapy in the management of patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Elan; Garcias, María del Carmen; Karir, Beerinder; Tagawa, Scott T

    2015-02-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in men in the United States. Although outcomes are excellent for early-stage disease, survival for men with metastatic PC is limited. While older studies did not supported the use of chemotherapy in PC, the efficacy of taxane chemotherapy plus prednisone is now well established in men with metastatic castration resistant PC (CRPC). The results of CHAARTED trial have further expanded the use of chemotherapy to patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive disease. The clinical efficacy of taxanes over other chemotherapeutics may be a result of its ability to inhibit microtubule-dependent trafficking of proteins such as the androgen-receptor (AR). Ongoing research uses chemotherapy earlier in the disease course as well as explores the utility of combining cytotoxic chemotherapy with biologic agents. PMID:25762124

  2. Arctigenin Inhibits Lung Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer by Regulating Cell Viability and Metastatic Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yo-Han; Kee, Ji-Ye; Kim, Dae-Seung; Mun, Jeong-Geon; Jeong, Mi-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Byung-Min; Park, Sung-Joo; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Um, Jae-Young; Hong, Seung-Heon

    2016-01-01

    Arctigenin (ARC) has been shown to have an anti-cancer effect in various cell types and tissues. However, there have been no studies concerning metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we investigated the anti-metastatic properties of ARC on colorectal metastasis and present a potential candidate drug. ARC induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CT26 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via MAPKs signaling. In several metastatic phenotypes, ARC controlled epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through increasing the expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expressions of mesenchymal markers; N-cadherin, vimentin, β-catenin, and Snail. Moreover, ARC inhibited migration and invasion through reducing of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 expressions. In an experimental metastasis model, ARC significantly inhibited lung metastasis of CT26 cells. Taken together, our study demonstrates the inhibitory effects of ARC on colorectal metastasis. PMID:27618887

  3. Erythropoietin Supports the Survival of Prostate Cancer, But Not Growth and Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, Yusuke; McGee, Samantha; Pienta, Michael J.; McGregor, Natalie; Jung, Younghun; Yumoto, Kenji; Wang, Jingcheng; Berry, Janice E.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Taichman, Russell S.

    2014-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is used in clinical settings to enhance hematopoietic function and to improve the quality of life for patients undergoing chemotherapy by reducing fatigue and the need for transfusions. However, several meta-analyses have revealed that Epo treatments are associated with an increased risk of mortality in cancer patients. In this study, we examined the role of Epo in prostate cancer (PCa) progression, using in vitro cell culture systems and in vivo bone metastatic assays. We found that Epo did not stimulate the proliferation of PCa cell lines, but did protect PCa cells from apoptosis. In animal models of PCa metastasis, no evidence was found to support the hypothesis that Epo enhances metastasis. Together, these findings suggest that Epo may be useful for treating severe anemia in PCa patients without increasing metastatic risk. PMID:23696192

  4. Bevacizumab for metastatic colorectal cancer: a NICE single technology appraisal.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Sophie; Pandor, Abdullah; Stevenson, Matt

    2012-12-01

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of bevacizumab (Roche Products) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of this drug for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), as part of the Institute's Single Technology Appraisal (STA) process. The School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) at the University of Sheffield was commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). This paper provides a description of the company submission, the ERG review and NICE's subsequent decisions. The ERG produced a critical review of the evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of the technology provided within the manufacturer's submission to NICE. The ERG also independently searched for relevant evidence and modified the manufacturer's decision analytic model to examine the impact of altering some of the key assumptions. The main clinical effectiveness data were derived from a phase III, multicentre, multinational, two-arm, randomized, open-label study with the primary objective of confirming the non-inferiority of oxaliplatin plus capecitabine (XELOX) compared with oxaliplatin plus 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid (FOLFOX-4) in adult patients with histologically confirmed mCRC who had not previously been treated. The ERG considered that the NO16966 trial was of reasonable methodological quality and demonstrated a significant improvement in both progression-free and overall survival when bevacizumab is added to either XELOX or FOLFOX-4. The ERG considered that the size of the actual treatment effect of bevacizumab was uncertain due to trial design limitations, imbalance of a known prognostic factor, relatively short treatment duration compared with that allowed within the trial protocol, and interpretation of the statistical analyses. The manufacturer's submission included a de novo economic evaluation using a cost-effectiveness model built in Microsoft® Excel. The ERG

  5. Significance of Trask protein interactions in brain metastatic cohorts of lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hua; Shang, Li-Qun; Chen, Rui-Lin; Yang, Shu-Mei; Wang, Shui-Li; Wang, Jun; Sun, Gang

    2015-06-01

    A class of adhesion protein that occurs in the membrane with both extracellular and intracellular domain and play vital role in maintaining multicellularity is TRASK, also called CUB-domain containing protein1, CD318 (CDCP1). Specifically, in the current study, documented aggressive grades of lung cancers and distant metastatic tissues were examined for protein interactions of Trask and compared with lung cancer variants in situ. The intracellular domain of Trask has the ability to undergo tyrosine phosphorylation and thereafter undergo increased genomic expression, as well as interact with cytoskeletal proteins in the cell periphery and other local signal transduction machinery to induce invadopodia formation and distant metastasis. We incorporated proximity ligation assay to examine protein interactions of Trask in metastatic lung cancer tissues and compare with advanced and low-grade lung cancers restricted to the primary site of origins. Here, we provide direct evidence that activated Trask, which is a phosphorylated form, binds with cytoskeletal proteins actin and spectrin. These interactions were not seen in locally growing lung cancer and cancer in situ. These interactions may be responsible for invadopodia formation and breaking free from a multicellular environment. Functional studies demonstrated interaction between Trask and the STOCs Orai1 and Stim1. Calcium release from internal stores was highest in metastatic lung cancers, suggesting this mechanism as an initial stimulus for the cells to respond chaotically to external growth factor stimulation, especially in aggressive metastatic variants of lung cancers. Recently, inhibitors of STOCs have been identified, and preclinical evidence may be obtained whether these drugs may be of benefit in preventing the deadly consequences of lung cancer. PMID:25775948

  6. Covalent Targeting of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Inhibits Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Brown, Wells S; Tan, Li; Smith, Andrew; Gray, Nathanael S; Wendt, Michael K

    2016-09-01

    Therapeutic targeting of late-stage breast cancer is limited by an inadequate understanding of how tumor cell signaling evolves during metastatic progression and by the currently available small molecule inhibitors capable of targeting these processes. Herein, we demonstrate that both β3 integrin and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) are part of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program that is required to facilitate metastatic outgrowth in response to fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2). Mechanistically, β3 integrin physically disrupts an interaction between FGFR1 and E-cadherin, leading to a dramatic redistribution of FGFR1 subcellular localization, enhanced FGF2 signaling and increased three-dimensional (3D) outgrowth of metastatic breast cancer cells. This ability of β3 integrin to drive FGFR signaling requires the enzymatic activity of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Consistent with these mechanistic data, we demonstrate that FGFR, β3 integrin, and FAK constitute a molecular signature capable of predicting decreased survival of patients with the basal-like subtype of breast cancer. Importantly, covalent targeting of a conserved cysteine in the P-loop of FGFR1-4 with our newly developed small molecule, FIIN-4, more effectively blocks 3D metastatic outgrowth as compared with currently available FGFR inhibitors. In vivo application of FIIN-4 potently inhibited the growth of metastatic, patient-derived breast cancer xenografts and murine-derived metastases growing within the pulmonary microenvironment. Overall, the current studies demonstrate that FGFR1 works in concert with other EMT effector molecules to drive aberrant downstream signaling, and that these events can be effectively targeted using our novel therapeutics for the treatment of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(9); 2096-106. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27371729

  7. Quantitative method of measuring cancer cell urokinase and metastatic potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The metastatic potential of tumors can be evaluated by the quantitative detection of urokinase and DNA. The cell sample selected for examination is analyzed for the presence of high levels of urokinase and abnormal DNA using analytical flow cytometry and digital image analysis. Other factors such as membrane associated urokinase, increased DNA synthesis rates and certain receptors can be used in the method for detection of potentially invasive tumors.

  8. Imaging approach to hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, and metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Kathryn J; Saad, Nael E; Linehan, David

    2015-01-01

    Liver imaging is a highly evolving field with new imaging contrast agents and modalities. Knowledge of the different imaging options and what they have to offer in primary and metastatic liver disease is essential for appropriate diagnosis, staging, and prognosis in patients. This review summarizes the major imaging modalities in liver neoplasms and provides specific discussion of imaging hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, and colorectal liver metastases. The final sections provide an overview of presurgical imaging relevant to planning hepatectomies and ablative procedures. PMID:25444467

  9. Current status of primary pharmacotherapy and future perspectives toward upfront therapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Masaki; Eto, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    Since 1941, androgen deprivation therapy has been the primary treatment for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Androgen deprivation therapy consists of several regimens that vary according to therapeutic modality, as well as treatment schedule. Androgen deprivation therapy initially shows excellent antitumor effects, such as relief of cancer-related symptoms, tumor marker decline and tumor shrinking. However, most metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cases eventually develop castration resistance and become lethal. Taxanes, such as docetaxel and cabazitaxel, as well as novel androgen receptor-targeting agents, such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, have emerged for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. The concept and principle of primary therapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer has remained unchanged for decades. Recently, upfront docetaxel chemotherapy has been shown to prolong overall survival in men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer, and would lead to a paradigm shift in primary pharmacotherapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. This raises the possibility of upfront use of taxanes, as well as novel androgen receptor-targeting agents combined with androgen deprivation therapy. The present review summarizes the current status of primary pharmacotherapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer, and discusses future perspectives in this field. PMID:27062039

  10. Lessons Learned While Providing Group Counseling for Adult Patients with Metastatic Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Jack A.; Cumbia, Gilbert G.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a review of lessons learned in dealing with unique problems encountered while providing group counseling for adult patients with metastatic cancer. Discusses problems, institutional policies, personal biases, and logistics associated with forming, establishing, maintaining, conducting and assessing the outcomes of group counseling with…

  11. Estrium Whey induced hepatitis in a patient with metastatic breast cancer: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Maria Jose; Molina, Julian

    2012-01-01

    Estrium Whey is an alternative nutritional support therapy for women. It’s enhanced with specific nutrients including phytoestrogens, folate, antioxidants and fiber to support healthy estrogen detoxification and hormone balance. We describe the first case of hepatotoxicity due to Estrium Whey in a 51-year old female with metastatic breast cancer with clinical, laboratory and histopathological changes. PMID:23355919

  12. Pancreatic cancer exosomes initiate pre-metastatic niche formation in the liver.

    PubMed

    Costa-Silva, Bruno; Aiello, Nicole M; Ocean, Allyson J; Singh, Swarnima; Zhang, Haiying; Thakur, Basant Kumar; Becker, Annette; Hoshino, Ayuko; Mark, Milica Tešić; Molina, Henrik; Xiang, Jenny; Zhang, Tuo; Theilen, Till-Martin; García-Santos, Guillermo; Williams, Caitlin; Ararso, Yonathan; Huang, Yujie; Rodrigues, Gonçalo; Shen, Tang-Long; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Lothe, Inger Marie Bowitz; Kure, Elin H; Hernandez, Jonathan; Doussot, Alexandre; Ebbesen, Saya H; Grandgenett, Paul M; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Jain, Maneesh; Mallya, Kavita; Batra, Surinder K; Jarnagin, William R; Schwartz, Robert E; Matei, Irina; Peinado, Héctor; Stanger, Ben Z; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) are highly metastatic with poor prognosis, mainly due to delayed detection. We hypothesized that intercellular communication is critical for metastatic progression. Here, we show that PDAC-derived exosomes induce liver pre-metastatic niche formation in naive mice and consequently increase liver metastatic burden. Uptake of PDAC-derived exosomes by Kupffer cells caused transforming growth factor β secretion and upregulation of fibronectin production by hepatic stellate cells. This fibrotic microenvironment enhanced recruitment of bone marrow-derived macrophages. We found that macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was highly expressed in PDAC-derived exosomes, and its blockade prevented liver pre-metastatic niche formation and metastasis. Compared with patients whose pancreatic tumours did not progress, MIF was markedly higher in exosomes from stage I PDAC patients who later developed liver metastasis. These findings suggest that exosomal MIF primes the liver for metastasis and may be a prognostic marker for the development of PDAC liver metastasis. PMID:25985394

  13. Systemic therapy in muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder cancer: current trends and future promises.

    PubMed

    Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B; Trump, Donald L

    2016-09-01

    Bladder urothelial cancers remain an important urologic cancer with limited treatment options in the locally advanced and metastatic setting. While neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced muscle-invasive cancers has shown overall survival benefit, clinical uptake in practice have lagged behind. Controversies surrounding adjuvant chemotherapy use are also ongoing. Systemic therapies for metastatic bladder cancer have largely used platinum-based therapies without effective standard second-line therapy options for those who fail, although vinflunine is approved in Europe as a second-line therapy based on a Phase III trial, and most recently, atezolizumab, a checkpoint inhibitor, was approved by the US FDA. Given increasing recognition of mutational signatures expressed in urothelial carcinomas, several promising agents with use of VEGF-targeted therapies, HER2-directed agents and immunotherapies with PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies in various settings are discussed herein. PMID:27306417

  14. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin With or Without Veliparib or Veliparib Alone in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-04

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; PALB2 Gene Mutation; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  15. Combining capecitabine and bevacizumab in metastatic breast cancer: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Miles, David; Zielinski, Christoph; Martin, Miguel; Vrdoljak, Eduard; Robert, Nicholas

    2012-03-01

    Both capecitabine and bevacizumab are established agents in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer, but until recently clinical data supporting their use in combination were limited. We review available data on the capecitabine-bevacizumab combination in breast cancer, particularly results from the RIBBON-1 trial in the first-line setting, and we discuss these findings in light of previous studies. We also examine ongoing trials investigating capecitabine-bevacizumab combination therapy. PMID:22257791

  16. Therapeutic effect of taxanes on metastatic breast cancer of various immunohistochemical subtypes

    PubMed Central

    FUKADA, IPPEI; ARAKI, KAZUHIRO; KOBAYASHI, KOKORO; KOBAYASHI, TAKAYUKI; HORII, RIE; AKIYAMA, FUTOSHI; TAKAHASHI, SHUNJI; IWASE, TAKUJI; ITO, YOSHINORI

    2016-01-01

    Taxane drugs play a central role in chemotherapy for breast cancer. However, previous studies have reported that taxanes are relatively ineffective in patients with operable luminal breast cancer compared with other subtypes. Between January 2000 and August 2008, 293 patients with metastatic breast cancer were treated with taxanes in The Cancer Institute Hospital of The Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research and were included in the present study. The patients were divided into 4 subtypes based on the immunohistochemically evaluated estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status. The clinicopathological features, response rate (RR) and time to progression (TTP) were analyzed retrospectively. In total, 159 patient tissues were classified as luminal type (ER+ and/or PgR+ and HER2−), 28 patient tissues were classified as luminal-HER2 type (ER+ and/or PgR+ and HER2+), 57 patient tissues were classified as HER2 type (ER−, PgR− and HER2+), and 49 patient tissues were classified as triple-negative type (ER−, PgR− and HER2−). Among the 4 subtypes, the clinical benefit rate was 51.6, 78.6, 71.9 and 40.8%, respectively. There were significant differences in TTP between subtypes (median TTP, 8.3 months in luminal, 14.1 months in luminal-HER2, 10.6 months in HER2, and 4.2 months in triple-negative; P<0.001). Patients with luminal type tumors had a significantly longer TTP than patients with triple-negative type tumors. The present data suggested that the immunohistochemical subtypes were associated with the therapeutic effect of taxanes for metastatic breast cancer and that taxanes yielded an acceptable RR and TTP in luminal metastatic breast cancer. Additional investigations are required to elucidate the predictive markers of taxane therapy for patients with metastatic breast cancer in each immunohistochemical subtype. PMID:27347197

  17. Acid ceramidase as a therapeutic target in metastatic prostate cancer[S

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Luz; Meca-Cortés, Óscar; Abad, José Luis; García, Simón; Rubio, Nuria; Díaz, Alba; Celià-Terrassa, Toni; Cingolani, Francesca; Bermudo, Raquel; Fernández, Pedro L.; Blanco, Jerónimo; Delgado, Antonio; Casas, Josefina; Fabriàs, Gemma; Thomson, Timothy M.

    2013-01-01

    Acid ceramidase (AC) catalyzes the hydrolysis of ceramide into sphingosine, in turn a substrate of sphingosine kinases that catalyze its conversion into the mitogenic sphingosine-1-phosphate. AC is expressed at high levels in several tumor types and has been proposed as a cancer therapeutic target. Using a model derived from PC-3 prostate cancer cells, the highly tumorigenic, metastatic, and chemoresistant clone PC-3/Mc expressed higher levels of the AC ASAH1 than the nonmetastatic clone PC-3/S. Stable knockdown of ASAH1 in PC-3/Mc cells caused an accumulation of ceramides, inhibition of clonogenic potential, increased requirement for growth factors, and inhibition of tumorigenesis and lung metastases. We developed de novo ASAH1 inhibitors, which also caused a dose-dependent accumulation of ceramides in PC-3/Mc cells and inhibited their growth and clonogenicity. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis of primary prostate cancer samples showed that higher levels of ASAH1 were associated with more advanced stages of this neoplasia. These observations confirm ASAH1 as a therapeutic target in advanced and chemoresistant forms of prostate cancer and suggest that our new potent and specific AC inhibitors could act by counteracting critical growth properties of these highly aggressive tumor cells. PMID:23423838

  18. Role of Runx2 Phosphorylation in Prostate Cancer and Association with Metastatic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Chunxi; Zhao, Guisheng; Li, Yan; Li, Hui; Zhao, Xiang; Pannone, Giuseppe; Bufo, Pantaleo; Santoro, Angela; Sanguedolce, Francesca; Tortorella, Simona; Mattoni, Marilena; Papagerakis, Silvana; Keller, Evan T.; Franceschi, Renny T.

    2015-01-01

    The osteogenic transcription factor, Runx2, is abnormally expressed in prostate cancer (PCa) and associated with metastatic disease. During bone development, Runx2 is activated by signals known to be hyperactive in PCa including the RAS/MAP kinase pathway, which phosphorylates Runx2 on multiple serine residues including S301 and S319 (equivalent to S294 and S312 in human Runx2). This study examines the role of these phosphorylation sites in PCa. Runx2 was preferentially expressed in more invasive prostate cancer cell lines (PC3 > C4-2B > LNCaP). Furthermore, analysis using a P-S319-Runx2-specific antibody revealed that the ratio of P-S319-Runx2/total Runx2 as well as P-ERK/total ERK was highest in PC3 followed by C4-2B and LNCaP cells. These results were confirmed by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, which showed a higher percentage of PC3 cells staining positive for P-S319-Runx2 relative to C4-2B and LNCaP cells. Phosphorylated Runx2 had an exclusively nuclear localization. When expressed in prostate cell lines, wild type Runx2 increased metastasis-associated gene expression, in vitro migratory and invasive activity as well as in vivo growth of tumor cell xenografts. In contrast, S301A/S319A phosphorylation site mutations greatly attenuated these Runx2 responses. Analysis of tissue microarrays from 129 patients revealed strong nuclear staining with the P-S319-Runx2 antibody in primary prostate cancers and metastases. P-S319-Runx2 staining was positively correlated with Gleason score and occurrence of lymph node metastases while little or no Runx2 phosphorylation was seen in normal prostate, benign prostate hyperplasia or prostatitis indicating that Runx2 S319 phosphorylation is closely associated with prostate cancer induction and progression towards an aggressive phenotype. These studies establish the importance of Runx2 phosphorylation in prostate tumor growth and highlight its value as a potential diagnostic marker and therapeutic target. PMID:25867060

  19. Fluid biopsy in patients with metastatic prostate, pancreatic and breast cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrinucci, Dena; Bethel, Kelly; Kolatkar, Anand; Luttgen, Madelyn S.; Malchiodi, Michael; Baehring, Franziska; Voigt, Katharina; Lazar, Daniel; Nieva, Jorge; Bazhenova, Lyudmila; Ko, Andrew H.; Korn, W. Michael; Schram, Ethan; Coward, Michael; Yang, Xing; Metzner, Thomas; Lamy, Rachelle; Honnatti, Meghana; Yoshioka, Craig; Kunken, Joshua; Petrova, Yelena; Sok, Devin; Nelson, David; Kuhn, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Hematologic spread of carcinoma results in incurable metastasis; yet, the basic characteristics and travel mechanisms of cancer cells in the bloodstream are unknown. We have established a fluid phase biopsy approach that identifies circulating tumor cells (CTCs) without using surface protein-based enrichment and presents them in sufficiently high definition (HD) to satisfy diagnostic pathology image quality requirements. This 'HD-CTC' assay finds >5 HD-CTCs mL-1 of blood in 80% of patients with metastatic prostate cancer (n = 20), in 70% of patients with metastatic breast cancer (n = 30), in 50% of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer (n = 18), and in 0% of normal controls (n = 15). Additionally, it finds HD-CTC clusters ranging from 2 HD-CTCs to greater than 30 HD-CTCs in the majority of these cancer patients. This initial validation of an enrichment-free assay demonstrates our ability to identify significant numbers of HD-CTCs in a majority of patients with prostate, breast and pancreatic cancers.

  20. Review of systemic therapies for locally advanced and metastatic rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Osipov, Arsen; Tan, Carlyn; Tuli, Richard; Hendifar, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer, along with colon cancer, is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. Up to a quarter of patients have metastatic disease at diagnosis and 40% will develop metastatic disease. The past 10 years have been extremely exciting in the treatment of both locally advanced and metastatic rectal cancer (mRC). With the advent of neoadjuvant chemoradiation, increased numbers of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) are surviving longer and some are seeing their tumors shrink to sizes that allow for resection. The advent of biologics and monoclonal antibodies has propelled the treatment of mRC further than many could have hoped. Combined with regimens such as FOLFOX or FOLFIRI, median survival rates have been increased to an average of 23 months. However, the combinations of chemotherapy regimens seem endless for rectal cancer. We will review the major chemotherapies available for locally advanced and mRC as well as regimens currently under investigation such as FOLFOXIRI. We will also review vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors as single agents and in combination with traditional chemotherapy regimens. PMID:25830038

  1. Management of locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Kurniali, Peter C; Hrinczenko, Borys; Al-Janadi, Anas

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States with a median age at diagnosis of 69 years. Sixty percent are diagnosed over the age of 65 years and 36% are 75 years or older. At diagnosis, approximately 58% of patients will have locally advanced and metastatic disease, for which systemic chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival. Treatment of cancer in elderly patients is more challenging due to multiple factors, including disabling co-morbidities as well as a decline in organ function. Cancer treatment of elderly patients is often associated with more toxicities that may lead to frequent hospitalizations. In locally advanced disease, fewer older patients receive adjuvant chemotherapy despite survival benefit and similar toxicity when compared to their younger counterparts. A survival benefit is also observed in the palliative chemotherapy setting for elderly patients with metastatic disease. When treating elderly patients with colon cancer, one has to consider drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Since chronological age is a poor marker of a patient’s functional status, several methods of functional assessment including performance status and activities of daily living (ADL) or instrumental ADL, or even a comprehensive geriatric assessment, may be used. There is no ideal chemotherapy regimen that fits all elderly patients and so a regimen needs to be tailored for each individual. Important considerations when treating elderly patients include convenience and tolerability. This review will discuss approaches to the management of elderly patients with locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer. PMID:24616568

  2. Metastatic breast cancer cells in lymph nodes increase nodal collagen density

    PubMed Central

    Rizwan, Asif; Bulte, Camille; Kalaichelvan, Anusha; Cheng, Menglin; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Jiang, Lu; Glunde, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    The most life-threatening aspect of breast cancer is the occurrence of metastatic disease. The tumor draining lymph nodes typically are the first sites of metastasis in breast cancer. Collagen I fibers and the extracellular matrix have been implicated in breast cancer to form avenues for metastasis. In this study, we have investigated extracellular matrix molecules such as collagen I fibers in the lymph nodes of mice bearing orthotopic human breast cancer xenografts. The lymph nodes in mice with metastatic MDA-MB-231 and SUM159 tumor xenografts and tumor xenografts grown from circulating tumor cell lines displayed an increased collagen I density compared to mice with no tumor and mice with non-metastatic T-47D and MCF-7 tumor xenografts. These results suggest that cancer cells that have metastasized to the lymph nodes can modify the extracellular matrix components of these lymph nodes. Clinically, collagen density in the lymph nodes may be a good marker for identifying lymph nodes that have been invaded by breast cancer cells. PMID:25950608

  3. The Differentiation of Giant Right Atrial Myxoma from Metastatic Cancer with the Use of Multiple Imaging Modalities.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Keisuke; Murata, Satoru; Kato, Hiroko; Oka, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Whether a cardiac tumor is primary or metastatic strongly influences the therapeutic strategy. We herein present a case of a cardiac tumor that occupied most of the right atrium which required immediate treatment in a patient with breast cancer. Multiple imaging modalities, especially computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, provided a precise preoperative diagnosis. We performed cardiac surgery prior to breast cancer surgery because the cardiac tumor was thought to be a myxoma rather than a metastatic cancer. PMID:27086806

  4. Large scale systematic proteomic quantification from non-metastatic to metastatic colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xuefei; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Shaowen; Jin, Hong; Wang, Wenhai; Yang, Pengyuan

    2015-07-01

    A systematic proteomic quantification of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) colorectal cancer tissues from stage I to stage IIIC was performed in large scale. 1017 proteins were identified with 338 proteins in quantitative changes by label free method, while 341 proteins were quantified with significant expression changes among 6294 proteins by iTRAQ method. We found that proteins related to migration expression increased and those for binding and adherent decreased during the colorectal cancer development according to the gene ontology (GO) annotation and ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA). The integrin alpha 5 (ITA5) in integrin family was focused, which was consistent with the metastasis related pathway. The expression level of ITA5 decreased in metastasis tissues and the result has been further verified by Western blotting. Another two cell migration related proteins vitronectin (VTN) and actin-related protein (ARP3) were also proved to be up-regulated by both mass spectrometry (MS) based quantification results and Western blotting. Up to now, our result shows one of the largest dataset in colorectal cancer proteomics research. Our strategy reveals a disease driven omics-pattern for the metastasis colorectal cancer.

  5. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer presenting as metastatic kidney cancer at 18 years of age: implications for surveillance.

    PubMed

    van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Badeloe, Sadhanna; Oosting, Sjoukje F; Hovenga, Sjoerd; Semmelink, Harry J F; van Moorselaar, R Jeroen A; van Waesberghe, Jan Hein; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Menko, Fred H

    2012-03-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skin piloleiomyomas, uterine leiomyomas and papillary type 2 renal cancer caused by germline mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene. Previously, we proposed renal imaging for FH mutation carriers starting at the age of 20 years. However, recently an 18-year-old woman from a Dutch family with HLRCC presented with metastatic renal cancer. We describe the patient and family data, evaluate current evidence on renal cancer risk and surveillance in HLRCC and consider the advantages and disadvantages of starting surveillance for renal cancer in childhood. We also discuss the targeted therapies administered to our patient. PMID:22086304

  6. Bone marrow stromal cells enhance prostate cancer cell invasion through type I collagen in an MMP-12 dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Nabha, Sanaa M.; dos Santos, Emanuel Burck; Yamamoto, Hamilto A.; Belizi, Abdelfettah; Dong, Zhong; Meng, Hong; Saliganan, Allen; Sabbota, Aaron; Bonfil, R. Daniel; Cher, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    At the cellular level, the process of bone metastasis involves many steps. Circulating cancer cells enter the marrow, proliferate, induce neovascularization, and ultimately expand into a clinically detectable, often symptomatic, metastatic deposit. Although the initial establishment and later expansion of the metastatic deposit in bone require tumor cells to possess invasive capability, the exact proteases responsible for this phenotype are not well known. The objective of our study was to take an unbiased approach to determine which proteases were expressed and functional during the initial interactions between prostate cancer cells and bone marrow stromal (BMS) cells. We found that the combination of human prostate cancer PC3 and BMS cells stimulates the invasive ability of cancer cells through type I collagen. The use of inhibitors for each of the major protease families indicated that 1 or more MMPs was/were responsible for the BMS-induced invasion. Gene profiling and semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed an increased expression of several MMP genes because of PC3/BMS cell interaction. However, only MMP-12 showed an increase in protein expression. Downregulation of MMP-12 expression in PC3 cells by siRNA inhibited the enhanced invasion induced by PC3/BMS cell interaction. In vivo, MMP-12 was found to be primarily expressed by prostate cancer cells growing in bone. Our data suggest that BMS cells induce MMP-12 expression in prostate cancer cells, which results in invasive cells capable of degradation of type I collagen. PMID:18324629

  7. Adverse Health Events Following Intermittent and Continuous Androgen Deprivation in Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hershman, Dawn L.; Unger, Joseph M.; Wright, Jason D.; Ramsey, Scott; Till, Cathee; Tangen, Catherine M.; Barlow, William E.; Blanke, Charles; Thompson, Ian M; Hussain, Maha

    2016-01-01

    Importance Although intermittent androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has not been associated with better overall survival in prostate cancer (PC), it has the potential for lower side effects. The incidence of long-term adverse health events has not been reported. Objective Given that older patients are more likely to suffer long-term complications from ADT, we examined long-term late events in elderly patients randomized to intermittent or continuous ADT. Our hypothesis was that late cardiovascular and endocrine events would be lower in patients on intermittent ADT. Design Linkage between patient trial data and corresponding Medicare claims. Setting Multicenter clinical trial. Participants Patients from S9346, a randomized SWOG trial of intermittent vs. continuous ADT in men with metastatic PC. Main Outcomes and Measures The main outcome was to identify long-term adverse health events by treatment arm. Patients were classified as having an adverse health event if they had any hospital claim – or at least 2 physician or outpatient claims at least 30 days apart – for any of the following diagnoses: ischemic and thrombotic events; endocrine events; sexual dysfunction, dementia and depression. To incorporate time from beginning of observation through evidence of an event, we determined the cumulative incidence of each event. Competing risks Cox regression was used, adjusting for covariates. Results In total, n=1134 eligible U.S.-based patients with metastatic PC were randomized to continuous vs. intermittent ADT on S9346. A total of 636 (56%) of trial participants had ≥1 year of continuous Medicare parts A & B coverage and no HMO participation. The median age was 71.3 years. The most common long-term events were hypercholesterolemia (31%) and osteoporosis (19%). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ischemic and thrombotic events differed by arm; 24% for continuous and 33% for intermittent ADT (Hazard Ratio=0.69, p=.02). There were no statistically significant

  8. miR-129-3p controls centrosome number in metastatic prostate cancer cells by repressing CP110

    PubMed Central

    Bijnsdorp, Irene V.; Hodzic, Jasmina; Lagerweij, Tonny; Westerman, Bart; Krijgsman, Oscar; Broeke, Jurjen; Verweij, Frederik; Nilsson, R. Jonas A.; Rozendaal, Lawrence; van Beusechem, Victor W.; van Moorselaar, Jeroen A.

    2016-01-01

    The centrosome plays a key role in cancer invasion and metastasis. However, it is unclear how abnormal centrosome numbers are regulated when prostate cancer (PCa) cells become metastatic. CP110 was previously described for its contribution of centrosome amplification (CA) and early development of aggressive cell behaviour. However its regulation in metastatic cells remains unclear. Here we identified miR-129-3p as a novel metastatic microRNA. CP110 was identified as its target protein. In PCa cells that have metastatic capacity, CP110 expression was repressed by miR-129-3p. High miR-129-3p expression levels increased cell invasion, while increasing CP110 levels decreased cell invasion. Overexpression of CP110 in metastatic PCa cells resulted in a decrease in the number of metastasis. In tissues of PCa patients, low CP110 and high miR-129-3p expression levels correlated with metastasis, but not with the expression of genes related to EMT. Furthermore, overexpression of CP110 in metastatic PCa cells resulted in excessive-CA (E-CA), and a change in F-actin distribution which is in agreement with their reduced metastatic capacity. Our data demonstrate that miR-129-3p functions as a CA gatekeeper in metastatic PCa cells by maintaining pro-metastatic centrosome amplification (CA) and preventing anti-metastatic E-CA. PMID:26918338

  9. Nanoradiopharmaceuticals for Bone Cancer Metastasis Imaging.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Bianca Feliciano; de Souza Albernaz, Marta; Iscaife, Alexandre; Moreira Leite, Katia Ramos; de Souza Junqueira, Mara; Bernardes, Emerson Soares; da Silva, Emerson Oliveira; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Drug delivery systems are under intense investigation all around the world, especially in oncology research. Indeed, in some cases, like bone metastasis, nanodrugs may represent the last and best choice for both treatment and imaging of early cancer foci. Nuclear medicine has been using MDP labelled with 99mTc as radiopharmaceuticals for many years; however, their use as nanoradiopharmaceuticals is very innovative and creates a new way to establish radiopharmacy in this new scenario offered by nanotechnology. In this study we developed and tested nano-MDP-labelled with 99mTc in rats induced with bone cancer metastasis and the results showed that it may work in patients. However, some further experiments are required in order to initiate protocols in humans. PMID:25847010

  10. Combination of anti-angiogenic therapies reduces osteolysis and tumor burden in experimental breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Bachelier, Richard; Confavreux, Cyrille B; Peyruchaud, Olivier; Croset, Martine; Goehrig, Delphine; van der Pluijm, Gabri; Clézardin, Philippe

    2014-09-15

    The clinical efficacy of anti-angiogenic monotherapies in metastatic breast cancer is less than originally anticipated, and it is not clear what the response of bone metastasis to anti-angiogenic therapies is. Here, we examined the impact of neutralizing tumor-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in animal models of subcutaneous tumor growth and bone metastasis formation. Silencing of VEGF expression (Sh-VEGF) in osteotropic human MDA-MB-231/B02 breast cancer cells led to a substantial growth inhibition of subcutaneous Sh-VEGF B02 tumor xenografts, as a result of reduced angiogenesis, when compared to that observed with animals bearing mock-transfected (Sc-VEGF) B02 tumors. However, there was scant evidence that either the silencing of tumor-derived VEGF or the use of a VEGF-neutralizing antibody (bevacizumab) affected B02 breast cancer bone metastasis progression in animals. We also examined the effect of vatalanib (a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor) in this mouse model of bone metastasis. However, vatalanib failed to inhibit bone metastasis caused by B02 breast cancer cells. In sharp contrast, vatalanib in combination with bevacizumab reduced not only bone destruction but also skeletal tumor growth in animals bearing breast cancer bone metastases, when compared with either agent alone. Thus, our study highlights the importance of targeting both the tumor compartment and the host tissue (i.e., skeleton) to efficiently block the development of bone metastasis. We believe this is a crucially important observation as the clinical benefit of anti-angiogenic monotherapies in metastatic breast cancer is relatively modest. PMID:24615579

  11. A Case of Metastatic Bladder Cancer in Both Lungs Treated with Korean Medicine Therapy Alone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Su; Seong, Shin; Woo, Chang-Ryoul; Han, Jae-Bok

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This case report is aimed to investigate the effects of Korean medicine therapy (KMT) including oral herbal medicine and herb nebulizer therapy in treating metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with metastatic bladder cancer in both lungs in August 2013. He refused any chemotherapy and was admitted to our hospital in a much progressed state on January 11, 2014. Since then, he was treated with KMT until May 17, 2014. The main oral herbal medicines were Hyunamdan made of heat-processed ginseng, Hangamdan S made of Cordyceps militaris, Panax ginseng radix, Commiphora myrrha, calculus bovis, margarita, Boswellia carteri, Panax notoginseng radix and Cremastra appendiculata tuber, and nebulizer therapy with Soram nebulizer solution made of wild ginseng and Cordyceps sinensis distillate. Their effect was evaluated considering the change of the main symptoms and using serial chest X-ray. The size and number of multiple metastatic nodules in both lungs were markedly decreased and the symptoms had disappeared. These results suggest that KMT can be an effective method to treat metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. PMID:25232323

  12. Intravascular carcinomatosis of central nervous system due to metastatic inflammatory breast cancer: A case report.

    PubMed

    Takei, Hidehiro; Rouah, Emilie; Barrios, Roberto

    2015-10-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by metastatic cancer is well-recognized and typically presents with multifocal solid tumors within the brain parenchyma or leptomeningeal dissemination. We describe herein a histologically very rare case of CNS metastasis in a 52-year-old woman who presented with mental status changes. Post mortem examination revealed extensive CNS involvement by metastatic inflammatory breast carcinoma, characterized by the presence of single tumor cells diffusely present within capillaries without parenchymal or perivascular invasion, and acute ischemic changes/infarcts bilaterally involving multiple areas. The cancer cells were found predominantly in the cerebral cortices and deep gray matter structures. Pre-mortem magnetic resonance and CT imaging of the brain did not identify metastatic cancer; however, widespread ischemic changes (i.e. brain infarcts) were identified. Inflammatory breast carcinoma is well-known to have a predilection for spread through lymphovascular spaces. Post mortem examination revealed tumor involvement of bilateral lungs, heart and bladder, with sinusoidal spread in the liver and lymph nodes and prominent involvement of the splenic red pulp in addition to extensive vascular involvement of the brain and spinal cord without a discrete mass, despite the presence of widely metastatic disease. The tumor cells in the CNS were strongly immunoreactive for pancytokeratin, E-cadherin, cytokeratin-7, epithelial membrane antigen and CAM 5.2. This unique histologic pattern of tumor spread is considered to represent "intravascular carcinomatosis" in the CNS, and most likely the cause of the patient's widespread ischemic injuries. PMID:25923831

  13. A case of metastatic bladder cancer in both lungs treated with korean medicine therapy alone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Su; Seong, Shin; Woo, Chang-Ryoul; Han, Jae-Bok

    2014-05-01

    This case report is aimed to investigate the effects of Korean medicine therapy (KMT) including oral herbal medicine and herb nebulizer therapy in treating metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with metastatic bladder cancer in both lungs in August 2013. He refused any chemotherapy and was admitted to our hospital in a much progressed state on January 11, 2014. Since then, he was treated with KMT until May 17, 2014. The main oral herbal medicines were Hyunamdan made of heat-processed ginseng, Hangamdan S made of Cordyceps militaris, Panax ginseng radix, Commiphora myrrha, calculus bovis, margarita, Boswellia carteri, Panax notoginseng radix and Cremastra appendiculata tuber, and nebulizer therapy with Soram nebulizer solution made of wild ginseng and Cordyceps sinensis distillate. Their effect was evaluated considering the change of the main symptoms and using serial chest X-ray. The size and number of multiple metastatic nodules in both lungs were markedly decreased and the symptoms had disappeared. These results suggest that KMT can be an effective method to treat metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. PMID:25232323

  14. Aberrant NRP-1 expression serves as predicator of metastatic endometrial and lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    Okon, Imoh S.; Ding, Ye; Coughlan, Kathleen A.; Wang, Qiongxin; Song, Ping; Benbrook, Doris M.; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) has emerged as an important driver of tumor-promoting phenotypes of human malignancies. However, incomplete knowledge exists as to how this single-pass transmembrane receptor mediates pleiotropic tumor-promoting functions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate NRP-1 expression and metastatic properties in 94 endometrial cancer and matching serum specimens and in a lung cancer cell line. We found that NRP-1 expression significantly correlated with increased tumoral expression of vascular endothelial growth factor 2 (VEGFR2) and serum levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and cell growth-stimulating factor (C-GSF). Tumoral NRP-1 also was positively associated with expression of NEDD9, a pro-metastatic protein. In the highly metastatic lung cancer cell line (H1792), stable LKB1 depletion caused increased migration in vitro and accentuated NRP-1 and NEDD9 expression in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that perturbed expression of these targets correlate with metastatic potential of endometrial and lung tumors, providing clinically-relevant biomarker applications for diagnostic and therapeutic targeting. PMID:26701889

  15. A Review of Systemic Treatment in Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zeichner, Simon B.; Terawaki, Hiromi; Gogineni, Keerthi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with breast cancer along with metastatic estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER/PR)- and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative tumors are referred to as having metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (mTNBC) disease. Although there have been many new treatment options approved by the Food and Drug Administration for ER/PR-positive and Her2/neu-amplified metastatic breast cancer, relatively few new agents have been approved for patients with mTNBC. There have been several head-to-head chemotherapy trials performed within the metastatic setting, and much of what is applied in clinical practice is extrapolated from chemotherapy trials in the adjuvant setting, with taxanes and anthracyclines incorporated early on in the patient’s treatment course. Select synergistic combinations can produce faster and more significant response rates compared with monotherapy and are typically used in the setting of visceral threat or symptomatic disease. Preclinical studies have implicated other possible targets and mechanisms in mTNBC. Ongoing clinical trials are underway assessing new chemotherapeutic strategies and agents, including targeted therapy and immunotherapy. In this review, we evaluate the standard systemic and future treatment options in mTNBC. PMID:27042088

  16. A Cancer That Went Up in Smoke: Pulmonary Reaction to e-Cigarettes Imitating Metastatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ring Madsen, Lene; Vinther Krarup, Niels Henrik; Bergmann, Troels Korshøj; Bærentzen, Steen; Neghabat, Shadman; Duval, Lone; Knudsen, Søren Tang

    2016-03-01

    e-Cigarettes have gained worldwide popularity as a substitute for smoking, but concern has been raised regarding the long-term effects associated with their use. We report a case of a 45-year-old female consumer of e-cigarettes who presented with 4 months of abdominal pain and fever. Initial imaging discovered multiple pulmonary nodules and liver lesions suspicious of widespread metastases; however, an extensive evaluation found no evidence of malignancy. Results of a lung biopsy revealed an area with multinucleated giant cells suggestive of a foreign body reaction to a lipophilic material. Upon cessation of e-cigarette use (known as vaping), the lung nodules disappeared, and the liver lesions regressed. Our case report suggests that vaping can induce an inflammatory reaction mimicking metastatic cancer. PMID:26965975

  17. Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue: A New Player in Cancer Metastasis to Bone

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Emma V.; Edwards, Claire M.

    2016-01-01

    The bone marrow is a favored site for a number of cancers, including the hematological malignancy multiple myeloma, and metastasis of breast and prostate cancer. This specialized microenvironment is highly supportive, not only for tumor growth and survival but also for the development of an associated destructive cancer-induced bone disease. The interactions between tumor cells, osteoclasts and osteoblasts are well documented. By contrast, despite occupying a significant proportion of the bone marrow, the importance of bone marrow adipose tissue is only just emerging. The ability of bone marrow adipocytes to regulate skeletal biology and hematopoiesis, combined with their metabolic activity, endocrine functions, and proximity to tumor cells means that they are ideally placed to impact both tumor growth and bone disease. This review discusses the recent advances in our understanding of how marrow adipose tissue contributes to bone metastasis and cancer-induced bone disease. PMID:27471491

  18. Novel Methylated Biomarkers and a Robust Assay to Detect Circulating Tumor DNA in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fackler, Mary Jo; Bujanda, Zoila Lopez; Umbricht, Christopher; Teo, Wei Wen; Cho, Soonweng; Zhang, Zhe; Visvanathan, Kala; Jeter, Stacie; Argani, Pedram; Wang, Chenguang; Lyman, Jaclyn P.; de Brot, Marina; Ingle, James N.; Boughey, Judy; McGuire, Kandace; King, Tari A.; Carey, Lisa A.; Cope, Leslie; Wolff, Antonio C.; Sukumar, Saraswati

    2015-01-01

    The ability to consistently detect cell-free tumor-specific DNA in peripheral blood of patients with metastatic breast cancer provides the opportunity to detect changes in tumor burden and to monitor response to treatment. We developed cMethDNA, a quantitative multiplexed methylation-specific PCR assay for a panel of ten genes, consisting of novel and known breast cancer hypermethylated markers identified by mining our previously reported study of DNA methylation patterns in breast tissue (103 cancer, 21 normal on the Illumina HumanMethylation27 Beadchip) and then validating the 10-gene panel in a TCGA breast cancer methylome database. For cMethDNA, a fixed physiological level (50 copies) of artificially constructed, standard non-human reference DNA specific for each gene is introduced into in a constant volume of serum (300 μl) prior to purification of the DNA, facilitating a sensitive, specific, robust and quantitative assay of tumor DNA, with broad dynamic range. Cancer-specific methylated DNA was detected in Training (28 normal, 24 cancer) and Test (27 normal, 33 cancer) sets of recurrent Stage 4 patient sera with a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 96% in the test set. In a pilot study, cMethDNA assay faithfully reflected patient response to chemotherapy (N = 29). A core methylation signature present in the primary breast cancer was retained in serum and metastatic tissues collected at autopsy 2–11 years after diagnosis of the disease. Together, our data suggest that the cMethDNA assay can detect advanced breast cancer, and monitor tumor burden and treatment response in women with metastatic breast cancer. PMID:24737128

  19. Bendamustine in Metastatic Breast Cancer: An Old Drug in New Design

    PubMed Central

    Pirvulescu, Cristina; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Loibl, Sibylle

    2008-01-01

    The goal of treatment for patients with advanced breast cancer is to prolong survival, control symptoms, and reduce disease-related complications. Despite the introduction of many cytotoxic agents during the past decade, only modest improvement in survival in metastatic breast cancer has been achieved. In order to improve this situation, new cytotoxic drugs as well as molecule-targeted agents are now under investigation. Bendamustine is a bifunctional alkylating agent with cytotoxic activity against several types of solid tumors. In the search for new anthracycline-free combinations, taxanes and alkylating agents might be worth investigating, in order to reduce cardiac toxicity. In this article, we reviewed the latest information regarding antitumor activity, toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and clinical application of bendamustine as a cytotoxic agent in metastatic breast cancer. PMID:20824028

  20. Cetuximab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-26

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  1. Quality of Life and Utility in Patients with Metastatic Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma: The Sarcoma Treatment and Burden of Illness in North America and Europe (SABINE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Reichardt, Peter; Leahy, Michael; Garcia del Muro, Xavier; Ferrari, Stefano; Martin, Javier; Gelderblom, Hans; Wang, Jingshu; Krishna, Arun; Eriksson, Jennifer; Staddon, Arthur; Blay, Jean-Yves

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among metastatic soft tissue (mSTS) or bone sarcoma (mBS) patients who had attained a favourable response to chemotherapy. We employed the EORTC QLQ-C30, the 3-item Cancer-Related Symptoms Questionnaire, and the EQ-5D instrument. HRQoL was evaluated overall and by health state in 120 mSTS/mBS patients enrolled in the SABINE study across nine countries in Europe and North America. Utility was estimated from responses to the EQ-5D instrument using UK population-based weights. The mean EQ-5D utility score was 0.69 for the pooled patient sample with little variation across health states. However, patients with progressive disease reported a clinically significant lower utility (0.56). Among disease symptoms, pain and respiratory symptoms are common. This study showed that mSTS/mBS is associated with reduced HRQoL and utility among patients with metastatic disease. PMID:22550425

  2. Pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab and docetaxel for HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawajiri, Hidemi; Takashima, Tsutomu; Kashiwagi, Shinichiro; Noda, Satoru; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of HER2 - found in approximately 15-20% of all breast cancers - is a negative prognostic factor. Although trastuzumab significantly improves the prognosis of HER2-positive breast cancer, half of the patients with metastatic breast cancer experience disease progression within 1 year. Pertuzumab is a novel HER2-targeted humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the dimerization domain of HER2 and acts synergically with trastuzumab in inhibiting tumor progression. The CLEOPATRA trial demonstrated that adding pertuzumab to trastuzumab plus docetaxel significantly prolonged progression-free survival and overall survival without increasing severe adverse events. Conclusively, pertuzumab was approved by the US FDA in June 2012 for use in combination with trastuzumab and docetaxel for the treatment of patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. Furthermore, various clinical trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pertuzumab combined with other cytotoxic agents are ongoing at present. Thus, pertuzumab has been becoming important for the treatment of patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. PMID:25494663

  3. ZIP4 silencing improves bone loss in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingxuan; Ding, Hao; LeBrun, Drake; Ding, Kai; Houchen, Courtney W.; Postier, Russell G.; Ambrose, Catherine G.; Li, Zhaoshen; Bi, Xiaohong; Li, Min

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic bone disorders are associated with several types of human cancers. Pancreatic cancer patients usually suffer from severe nutrition deficiency, muscle wasting, and loss of bone mass. We have previously found that silencing of a zinc transporter ZIP4 prolongs the survival and reduces the severity of the cachexia in vivo. However, the role of ZIP4 in the pancreatic cancer related bone loss remains unknown. In this study we investigated the effect of ZIP4 knockdown on the bone structure, composition and mechanical properties of femurs in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model. Our data showed that silencing of ZIP4 resulted in increased bone tissue mineral density, decreased bone crystallinity and restoration of bone strength through the RANK/RANKL pathway. The results further support the impact of ZIP4 on the progression of pancreatic cancer, and suggest its potential significance as a therapeutic target for treating patients with such devastating disease and cancer related disorders. PMID:26305676

  4. Cabozantinib inhibits prostate cancer growth and prevents tumor-induced bone lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jinlu; Zhang, Honglai; Karatsinides, Andreas; Keller, Jill M.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Aftab, Dana T.; Schimmoller, Frauke; Keller, Evan T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Cabozantinib, an orally available multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor with activity against MET and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), induces resolution of bone scan lesions in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastases. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cabozantinib elicited a direct anti-tumor effect, an indirect effect through modulating bone, or both. Experimental Design Using human prostate cancer xenograft studies in mice we determined cabozantinib's impact on tumor growth in soft tissue and bone. In vitro studies with cabozantinib were performed using (1) prostate cancer cell lines to evaluate its impact on cell growth, invasive ability and MET and (2) osteoblast cell lines to evaluate its impact on viability and differentiation and VEGFR2. Results Cabozantinib inhibited progression of multiple prostate cancer cell lines (Ace-1,C4-2B, and LuCaP 35) in bone metastatic and soft tissue murine models of prostate cancer, except for PC-3 prostate cancer cells in which it inhibited only subcutaneous growth. Cabozantinib directly inhibited prostate cancer cell viability and induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo and inhibited cell invasion in vitro. Cabozantinib had a dose-dependent biphasic effect on osteoblast activity and inhibitory effect on osteoclast production in vitro, that was reflected in vivo. It blocked MET and VEGFR2 phosphorylation in prostate cancer cells and osteoblast-like cells, respectively. Conclusion These data indicate that cabozantinib has direct anti-tumor activity; and that its ability to modulate osteoblast activity may contribute to its anti-tumor efficacy. PMID:24097861

  5. Devil's Wake: Early-stage bone colonization by breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai; Yu, Cuijuan; Zhang, Xiang H. F.

    2016-01-01

    We recently discovered that bone micrometastases of breast cancer predominantly reside in the microenvironment termed the “osteogenic niche”. The heterotypic adherens junctions between cancer cells and osteogenic cells promote early-stage bone colonization by activating the mTOR pathway in cancer cells. Here, we discuss a few questions raised by these findings.

  6. Identification of genes regulating migration and invasion using a new model of metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the complex, multistep process of metastasis remains a major challenge in cancer research. Metastasis models can reveal insights in tumor development and progression and provide tools to test new intervention strategies. Methods To develop a new cancer metastasis model, we used DU145 human prostate cancer cells and performed repeated rounds of orthotopic prostate injection and selection of subsequent lymph node metastases. Tumor growth, metastasis, cell migration and invasion were analyzed. Microarray analysis was used to identify cell migration- and cancer-related genes correlating with metastasis. Selected genes were silenced using siRNA, and their roles in cell migration and invasion were determined in transwell migration and Matrigel invasion assays. Results Our in vivo cycling strategy created cell lines with dramatically increased tumorigenesis and increased ability to colonize lymph nodes (DU145LN1-LN4). Prostate tumor xenografts displayed increased vascularization, enlarged podoplanin-positive lymphatic vessels and invasive margins. Microarray analysis revealed gene expression profiles that correlated with metastatic potential. Using gene network analysis we selected 3 significantly upregulated cell movement and cancer related genes for further analysis: EPCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule), ITGB4 (integrin β4) and PLAU (urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)). These genes all showed increased protein expression in the more metastatic DU145-LN4 cells compared to the parental DU145. SiRNA knockdown of EpCAM, integrin-β4 or uPA all significantly reduced cell migration in DU145-LN4 cells. In contrast, only uPA siRNA inhibited cell invasion into Matrigel. This role of uPA in cell invasion was confirmed using the uPA inhibitors, amiloride and UK122. Conclusions Our approach has identified genes required for the migration and invasion of metastatic tumor cells, and we propose that our new in vivo model system will be a powerful

  7. Cranial computed tomographic findings in Nigerian women with metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Obajimi, Millicent O.; Ogbole, Godwin Inalegwu; Adeniji-Sofoluwe, Adenike T.; Adeleye, Amos O.; Elumelu, Theresa N.; Oluwasola, Abideen O.; Akute, O. O.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Brain metastases (BM) occur in up to one-fifth of patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Imaging plays a key role in diagnosis. The pattern and distribution of these changes are also crucial to their management. These patterns have not been fully studied in Nigerian women. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of the findings on the cranial Computed Tomography (CT) scans performed in 59 breast cancer patients with suspected BM treated at the University Teaching Hospital in Ibadan, between 2005 and 2010. The imaging features were evaluated in relation to their clinical characteristics. Results: In the 59 patients studied (mean age 50.9 years ± 11.75 SD), headache (40.7%) and hemiparesis/hemiplegia (16.9%) were the commonest clinical presentation. Lytic skull lesions were seen in 15 patients (25.4%), most commonly in the parietal bones. Thirty-nine patients (66.1%), had parenchymal brain lesions, and only 8 (20.5%) of these were single lesions. Most of the lesions were isodense (19/39; 51.4%) the parietal lobe was the most common site with 50.8% (30/59) occurrence and the leptomeninges the least with 13.6% (8/59). Orbital or sellar region involvement occurred in only two patients. The size of the lesions, was <2 cm in 17 (28.8%), 2-5 cm in 14 (23.7%) and >5 cm in 5 patients. Sixteen (27.1%) patients were free of any lesion either in the skull or brain. Patient presenting with multiple brain lesions were more likely to have skull lesions though this was not statistically significant (P = 0.584). Conclusion: The brain continues to be a sanctuary site for breast cancer metastases and CT imaging remains an invaluable tool in the clinical evaluation and therapeutic management of Nigerian women with BM from MBC. It also appears that the demographic and imaging findings in these patients are similar to other racial groups. PMID:23798799

  8. Mesenchymal Cancer Cell-Stroma Crosstalk Promotes Niche Activation, Epithelial Reversion, and Metastatic Colonization

    PubMed Central

    del Pozo Martin, Yaiza; Park, Danielle; Ramachandran, Anassuya; Ombrato, Luigi; Calvo, Fernando; Chakravarty, Probir; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Derzsi, Stefanie; Hill, Caroline S.; Sahai, Erik; Malanchi, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Summary During metastatic colonization, tumor cells must establish a favorable microenvironment or niche that will sustain their growth. However, both the temporal and molecular details of this process remain poorly understood. Here, we found that metastatic initiating cells (MICs) exhibit a high capacity for lung fibroblast activation as a result of Thrombospondin 2 (THBS2) expression. Importantly, inhibiting the mesenchymal phenotype of MICs by blocking the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated kinase AXL reduces THBS2 secretion, niche-activating ability, and, consequently, metastatic competence. Subsequently, disseminated metastatic cells revert to an AXL-negative, more epithelial phenotype to proliferate and decrease the phosphorylation levels of TGF-β-dependent SMAD2-3 in favor of BMP/SMAD1-5 signaling. Remarkably, newly activated fibroblasts promote this transition. In summary, our data reveal a crosstalk between cancer cells and their microenvironment whereby the EMT status initially triggers and then is regulated by niche activation during metastatic colonization. PMID:26670048

  9. RHOA and PRKCZ control different aspects of cell motility in pancreatic cancer metastatic clones

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Our understanding of the mechanism regulating pancreatic cancer metastatic phenotype is limited. We analyzed the role of RHOA and PRKCZ in the motility attitude of two subclones of the pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line SUIT-2 (S2), with different in vivo metastatic potential in nude mice: S2-m with a low metastatic potential and highly metastatic S2-CP9 using RHOA and PRKCZ cell-permeable inhibitory peptides. Methods Adhesion assays, cell permeable peptides, RHOA activity assay, western blotting Results When used in combination cell-permeable inhibitory peptides partially inhibited cell adhesion by about 50% in clone S2-CP9. In clone S2-m, the effect was limited to 15% inhibition. In a wound healing assay, S2-CP9 was sensitive only to treatment with the combination of both RHOA and PRKCZ inhibitory peptides. Conversely, S2-m was unable to migrate toward both ends of the wound in basal conditions. Migration of cells through a membrane with 8 μm pores was completely abolished in both clones by individual treatment with RHOA and PRKCZ inhibitory peptides. Conclusion Herein, we demonstrate a critical role for RHOA and PRKCZ in the regulation of different aspects of cell motility of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and demonstrate the need to inhibit both pathways to obtain a functionally relevant effect in most assays. These results indicate that RHOA and PRKCZ, and their downstream effectors, can represent important pharmacological targets that could potentially control the highly metastatic attitude of PDAC. PMID:20236512

  10. Prostate Cancer and Parasitism of the Bone Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chunyan; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Taichman, Russell S.; McCauley, Laurie K.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Keller, Evan T.

    2013-01-01

    A subpopulation of men that appear cured of prostate cancer (PCa) develop bone metastases many years after prostatectomy. This observation indicates that PCa cells were present outside of the prostate at the time of prostatectomy and remained dormant. Several lines of evidence indicate that there are disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in the bone marrow at the time of prostatectomy. DTCs parasitize the bone microenvironment, where they derive support and impact the microenvironment itself. These DTCs appear to be a heterogeneous population of PCa cells; however, some of them appear to have some aspects of a cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotype as they can develop into clinically detectable metastases. The concept of CSC is controversial; however, several markers of CSC have been identified for PCa, which may represent cells of either basal or luminal origin. These DTCs have now been shown to compete for the hematopoietic stem cell niche in bone, where they may be placed in a dormant state. Interaction with a variety of host factors, including cytokine and cells, may impact the metastatic development and progression, including the dormant state. For example, myeloid cells have been shown to impact both the premetastatic niche and established tumors. Understanding the concepts of how PCa successfully parasitizes the bone microenvironment is paramount toward identifying therapeutic candidates to prevent or diminish PCa bone metastases. PMID:22856431

  11. AR-regulated TWEAK-FN14 Pathway Promotes Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, JuanJuan; Liu, Yen-Nien; Tillman, Heather; Barrett, Ben; Hewitt, Stephen; Ylaya, Kris; Fang, Lei; Lake, Ross; Corey, Eva; Morrissey, Colm; Vessella, Robert; Kelly, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The recurrence of prostate cancer metastases to bone after androgen deprivation therapy is a major clinical challenge. We identified FN14 (TNFRSF12A), a TNF receptor family member, as a factor that promotes prostate cancer bone metastasis. In experimental models, depletion of FN14 inhibited bone metastasis, and FN14 could be functionally reconstituted with IKKβ-dependent, NFκB signaling activation. In human prostate cancer, upregulated FN14 expression was observed in greater than half of metastatic samples. In addition, FN14 expression was correlated inversely with AR signaling output in clinical samples. Consistent with this, AR binding to the FN14 enhancer decreased expression. We show here that FN14 may be a survival factor in low AR output prostate cancer cells. Our results define one upstream mechanism, via FN14 signaling, through which the NFκB pathway contributes to prostate cancer metastasis, and they suggest FN14 as a candidate therapeutic and imaging target for castrate resistant prostate cancers. PMID:24970477

  12. Complementary traditional Chinese medicine therapy improves survival in patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jui-Ming; Lin, Po-Hung; Hsu, Ren-Jun; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Cheng, Kuan-Chen; Pang, See-Tong; Lin, Shun-Ku

    2016-08-01

    More than 50% of prostate cancer patients have used traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in Taiwan. However, the long-term clinical efficacy of TCM in prostate cancer patients remains unclear. Here, we investigated the relationship between TCM use and the survival of prostate cancer patients.A retrospective nationwide cohort study of prostate cancer patients was conducted between 1998 and 2003 using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients were classified as TCM users or nonusers, and monitored from the day of prostate cancer diagnosis to death or end of 2012. The association between death risk and TCM use was determined using Cox proportional-hazards models and Kaplan-Meier curves.Of the 1132 selected prostate cancer patients, 730 (64.5%) and 402 (35.5%) were TCM users and nonusers, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 8.38 years, and 292 (25.8%) deaths were reported. TCM users had a decreased mortality rate (21.9%) compared with nonusers (32.8%). A lower death risk was observed with longer TCM use, especially in patients who used TCM for ≧200 days (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.44-0.84). TCM users with metastatic prostate cancer had a significant lower HR than nonusers (aHR 0.70, 95% CI 0.51-0.95). Chai-Hu-Jia-Long-Gu-Mu-Li-Tang was the most significant TCM formulae for improving survival in metastatic prostate cancer (aHR 0.18, 95% CI 0.04-0.94).The result suggested that complementary TCM therapy might be associated with a reduced risk of death in metastatic prostate cancer patients. PMID:27495088

  13. Complementary traditional Chinese medicine therapy improves survival in patients with metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jui-Ming; Lin, Po-Hung; Hsu, Ren-Jun; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Cheng, Kuan-Chen; Pang, See-Tong; Lin, Shun-Ku

    2016-01-01

    Abstract More than 50% of prostate cancer patients have used traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in Taiwan. However, the long-term clinical efficacy of TCM in prostate cancer patients remains unclear. Here, we investigated the relationship between TCM use and the survival of prostate cancer patients. A retrospective nationwide cohort study of prostate cancer patients was conducted between 1998 and 2003 using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients were classified as TCM users or nonusers, and monitored from the day of prostate cancer diagnosis to death or end of 2012. The association between death risk and TCM use was determined using Cox proportional-hazards models and Kaplan–Meier curves. Of the 1132 selected prostate cancer patients, 730 (64.5%) and 402 (35.5%) were TCM users and nonusers, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 8.38 years, and 292 (25.8%) deaths were reported. TCM users had a decreased mortality rate (21.9%) compared with nonusers (32.8%). A lower death risk was observed with longer TCM use, especially in patients who used TCM for ≧200 days (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.44–0.84). TCM users with metastatic prostate cancer had a significant lower HR than nonusers (aHR 0.70, 95% CI 0.51–0.95). Chai-Hu-Jia-Long-Gu-Mu-Li-Tang was the most significant TCM formulae for improving survival in metastatic prostate cancer (aHR 0.18, 95% CI 0.04–0.94). The result suggested that complementary TCM therapy might be associated with a reduced risk of death in metastatic prostate cancer patients. PMID:27495088

  14. When to perform positron emission tomography/computed tomography or radionuclide bone scan in patients with recently diagnosed prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Caldarella, Carmelo; Treglia, Giorgio; Giordano, Alessandro; Giovanella, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal metastases are very common in prostate cancer and represent the main metastatic site in about 80% of prostate cancer patients, with a significant impact in patients' prognosis. Early detection of bone metastases is critical in the management of patients with recently diagnosed high-risk prostate cancer: radical treatment is recommended in case of localized disease; systemic therapy should be preferred in patients with distant secondary disease. Bone scintigraphy using radiolabeled bisphosphonates is of great importance in the management of these patients; however, its main drawback is its low overall accuracy, due to the nonspecific uptake in sites of increased bone turnover. Positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, such as fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose, choline-derived drugs (fluorine-18-fluorocholine and carbon-11-choline) and sodium fluorine-18-fluoride, are increasingly used in clinical practice to detect metastatic spread, and particularly bone involvement, in patients with prostate cancer, to reinforce or substitute information provided by bone scan. Each radiopharmaceutical has a specific mechanism of uptake; therefore, diagnostic performances may differ from one radiopharmaceutical to another on the same lesions, as demonstrated in the literature, with variable sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy values in the same patients. Whether bone scintigraphy can be substituted by these new methods is a matter of debate. However, greater radiobiological burden, higher costs, and the necessity of an in-site cyclotron limit the use of these positron emission tomography methods as first-line investigations in patients with prostate cancer: bone scintigraphy remains the mainstay for the detection of bone metastases in current clinical practice. PMID:23861598

  15. Cytochrome P450 CYP1B1 over-expression in primary and metastatic ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    McFadyen, M C E; Cruickshank, M E; Miller, I D; McLeod, H L; Melvin, W T; Haites, N E; Parkin, D; Murray, G I

    2001-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most frequent cause of death from gynaecological malignancies world wide. Little improvement has been made in the long-term outcome of this disease, with the 5-year survival of patients only 30%. This poor prognosis is due to the late presentation of the disease and to the unpredictable response of ovarian cancer to chemotherapy. The cytochrome P450 enzymes are a superfamily of haemoproteins, known to be involved in the metabolic activation and/or detoxification of a number of anti-cancer drugs. CYP1B1 is a tumour-related form of cytochrome P450 which is over expressed in a wide variety of primary tumours of different histological type. The presence of CYP1B1 may be of importance in the modulation of these tumours to anti-cancer drugs. We have conducted a comprehensive immunohistochemical investigation, into the presence of cytochrome P450 CYP1B1 in primary and metastatic ovarian cancer. The key findings of this study are the increased expression of CYP1B1 in the majority of ovarian cancers investigated (92%), with a strong correlation demonstrated between CYP1B1 expression in both primary and metastatic ovarian cancer (P= 0.005 Spearman's rank correlation test). In contrast no detectable CYP1B1 was found in normal ovary. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11461084

  16. Locally ablative therapies for primary and metastatic liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, David; Kang, Josephine; Madoff, David C

    2014-08-01

    Locally ablative therapies have an increasing role in the effective multidisciplinary approach towards the treatment of both primary and metastatic liver tumors. In patients who are not considered surgical candidates and have low volume disease, these therapies have now become established into consensus practice guidelines. A large range of therapeutic options exist including percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), cryoablation, percutaneous laser ablation (PLA), irreversible electroporation (IRE), stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU); each having benefits and drawbacks. The greatest body of evidence supporting clinical utility in the liver currently exists for RFA, with PEI having fallen out of favor. MWA, IRE, SBRT and HIFU are relatively nascent technologies, and outcomes data supporting their use is promising. Future directions of ablative therapies include tandem approaches to improve efficacy in the treatment of liver tumors. PMID:24746315

  17. Down-regulation of epithelial cadherin is required to initiate metastatic outgrowth of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wendt, Michael K.; Taylor, Molly A.; Schiemann, Barbara J.; Schiemann, William P.

    2011-01-01

    Reduced epithelial cadherin (E-cad) is a hallmark of invasive carcinomas that have acquired epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotypes. Here we show that down-regulated E-cad expression induced by transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and EMT preceded breast cancer outgrowth in three-dimensional (3D) organotypic assays and in the lungs of mice. Pharmacological inhibitors against focal adhesion kinase prevented metastatic outgrowth of newly seeded organoids, but not that of their fully established counterparts. Interrogating the D2-HAN (hyperplastic alveolar nodule) model of breast cancer dormancy and metastasis showed that dormant D2.OR cells produced branched organoid morphologies in 3D-cultures, and expressed robust quantities of E-cad that was uncoupled from regulation by TGF-β. In contrast, metastatic D2.A1 organoids were spherical and wholly lacked E-cad expression. Interestingly, D2.A1 cells engineered to re-express E-cad formed branched organoids, down-regulated β1 integrin expression, and failed to undergo metastatic outgrowth. The tumor-suppressing function of E-cad was inactivated by increased microenvironmental rigidity, and was not recapitulated by expression of an E-cad mutant lacking its extracellular domain. Twist expression, but not that of Snail, reinitiated metastatic outgrowth in dormant D2.OR cells. Our findings show that EMT and its down-regulated expression of E-cad circumvent breast cancer dormancy in part by facilitating β1 integrin expression necessary for metastatic outgrowth. PMID:21613543

  18. Docetaxel-loaded polyglutamic acid-PEG nanocapsules for the treatment of metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Borrajo, Erea; Abellan-Pose, Raquel; Soto, Atenea; Garcia-Fuentes, Marcos; Csaba, Noemi; Alonso, Maria J; Vidal, Anxo

    2016-09-28

    The design of nanomedicines with suitable physicochemical characteristics for the lymphatic targeting of drugs is critical in order to reach the lymph nodes, where metastatic cells often accumulate. Based on the known effect of particle size and surface hydrophilicity on the capacity of nanocarriers to reach the lymph nodes, here we report the formation and characterization of 100nm polyglutamic acid-polyethylene glycol (PGA-PEG) nanocapsules together with the assessment of their potential for the treatment of cancer with lymphatic metastatic spread. To this purpose, we first studied the biodistribution of fluorescently labeled PGA-PEG nanocapsules (100nm), following, either intravenous or subcutaneous administration. The results confirmed the accumulation of nanocapsules in the lymphatic system, especially upon subcutaneous administration. Next, we evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of the docetaxel-loaded nanocapsules in an orthotopic lung cancer model that metastasizes to the lymph nodes. As expected from the rational design, DCX-loaded PGA-PEG nanocapsules exhibited a greatly enhanced antitumoral efficacy and a reduced toxicity when compared with the commercial formulation Taxotere®. Furthermore, the administration of DCX-loaded PGA-PEG nanocapsules resulted in the practical elimination of the metastatic load in the mediastinal lymph nodes, whereas the treatment with the commercial formulation had a minor effect. Overall, these findings underscore the potential of PGA-PEG nanocapsules for the delivery of anticancer drugs to both, the tumor tissue and the metastatic lymph nodes. Therefore, they represent a promising therapy for the treatment of lung metastatic cancer. PMID:27476608

  19. Detecting Metastatic Bladder Cancer Using 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron-Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to retrospectively investigate the contribution of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT) to detection of metastatic bladder cancer. Materials and Methods The present study included 79 patients (69 men and 10 women) undergoing 18F-FDG-PET/CT upon suspicion of metastatic bladder cancer between July 2007 and April 2013. The mean age was 66.1 years with a standard deviation of 10.7 years (range, 21 to 85 years). Patients were required to fast for 6 hours prior to scanning, and whole-body PET scanning from the skull base to the upper thighs was performed approximately 1 hour after intravenous injection of 555 MBq of 18F-FDG. Whole body CT scanning was performed in the cranio-caudal direction. FDG-PET images were reconstructed using CT data for attenuation correction. Suspicious recurrent or metastatic lesions were confirmed by histopathology or clinical follow-up. Results The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of 18F-FDG-PET/CT were 89%, 78%, 90%, 75%, and 86%, respectively. Conclusion 18F-FDG-PET/CT can detect metastases with high sensitivity and positive predictive values in patients with metastatic bladder carcinoma. PMID:25687863

  20. Exome sequencing of contralateral breast cancer identifies metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Klevebring, Daniel; Lindberg, Johan; Rockberg, Julia; Hilliges, Camilla; Hall, Per; Sandberg, Maria; Czene, Kamila

    2015-06-01

    Women with contralateral breast cancer (CBC) have significantly worse prognosis compared to women with unilateral cancer. A possible explanation of the poor prognosis of patients with CBC is that in a subset of patients, the second cancer is not a new primary tumor but a metastasis of the first cancer that has potentially obtained aggressive characteristics through selection of treatment. Exome and whole-genome sequencing of solid tumors has previously been used to investigate the clonal relationship between primary tumors and metastases in several diseases. In order to assess the relationship between the first and the second cancer, we performed exome sequencing to identify somatic mutations in both first and second cancers, and compared paired normal tissue of 25 patients with metachronous CBC. For three patients, we identified shared somatic mutations indicating a common clonal origin thereby demonstrating that the second tumor is a metastasis of the first cancer, rather than a new primary cancer. Accordingly, these patients all developed distant metastasis within 3 years of the second diagnosis, compared with 7 out of 22 patients with non-shared somatic profiles. Genomic profiling of both tumors help the clinicians distinguish between true CBCs and subsequent metastases. PMID:25922084

  1. CAPG and GIPC1: Breast Cancer Biomarkers for Bone Metastasis Development and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Westbrook, Jules A.; Cairns, David A.; Peng, Jianhe; Speirs, Valerie; Hanby, Andrew M.; Holen, Ingunn; Wood, Steven L.; Ottewell, Penelope D.; Marshall, Helen; Banks, Rosamonde E.; Selby, Peter J.; Coleman, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bone is the predominant site of metastasis from breast cancer, and recent trials have demonstrated that adjuvant bisphosphonate therapy can reduce bone metastasis development and improve survival. There is an unmet need for prognostic and predictive biomarkers so that therapy can be appropriately targeted. Methods: Potential biomarkers for bone metastasis were identified using proteomic comparison of bone-metastatic, lung-metastatic, and nonmetastatic variants of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Clinical validation was performed using immunohistochemical staining of tumor tissue microarrays from patients in a large randomized trial of adjuvant zoledronic acid (zoledronate) (AZURE-ISRCTN79831382). We used Cox proportional hazards regression, the Kaplan-Meier estimate of the survival function, and the log-rank test to investigate associations between protein expression, clinical variables, and time to distant recurrence events. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Two novel biomarker candidates, macrophage-capping protein (CAPG) and PDZ domain–containing protein GIPC1 (GIPC1), were identified for clinical validation. Cox regression analysis of AZURE training and validation sets showed that control patients (no zoledronate) were more likely to develop first distant recurrence in bone (hazard ratio [HR] = 4.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.1 to 9.8, P < .001) and die (H