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Sample records for metastatic lung tumor

  1. Capnocytophaga Lung Abscess in a Patient with Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Thirumala, Raghu; Babady, N. Esther; Kamboj, Mini; Chawla, Mohit

    2012-01-01

    Capnocytophaga species are known commensals of the oral cavity of humans and animals (mainly dogs and cats) and are a rare cause of respiratory tract infections. We report a case of cavitary lung abscess caused by a Capnocytophaga species in a patient with a metastatic neuroendocrine tumor. PMID:22075586

  2. Tumor Exosomal RNAs Promote Lung Pre-metastatic Niche Formation by Activating Alveolar Epithelial TLR3 to Recruit Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanfang; Gu, Yan; Han, Yanmei; Zhang, Qian; Jiang, Zhengping; Zhang, Xiang; Huang, Bo; Xu, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Jianming; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-08-01

    The pre-metastatic niche educated by primary tumor-derived elements contributes to cancer metastasis. However, the role of host stromal cells in metastatic niche formation and organ-specific metastatic tropism is not clearly defined. Here, we demonstrate that lung epithelial cells are critical for initiating neutrophil recruitment and lung metastatic niche formation by sensing tumor exosomal RNAs via Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). TLR3-deficient mice show reduced lung metastasis in the spontaneous metastatic models. Mechanistically, primary tumor-derived exosomal RNAs, which are enriched in small nuclear RNAs, activate TLR3 in lung epithelial cells, consequently inducing chemokine secretion in the lung and promoting neutrophil recruitment. Identification of metastatic axis of tumor exosomal RNAs and host lung epithelial cell TLR3 activation provides potential targets to control cancer metastasis to the lung. PMID:27505671

  3. Metastatic brain tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumor - metastatic (secondary); Cancer - brain tumor (metastatic) ... For many people with metastatic brain tumors, the cancer is not curable. It will eventually spread to other areas of the body. Prognosis depends on the type of tumor ...

  4. Effects of dimethyltriazenes on in vitro Lewis lung carcinoma tumor lines with different metastatic capacity.

    PubMed

    Zupi, G; Corsi, A; Sacchi, A; Lassiani, L; Giraldi, T

    1984-01-01

    The effects of a selective antimetastatic agent: the aryldimethyltriazene derivative 1-p-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)benzoic acid potassium salt (DM-COOK) have been examined on two in vitro tumor cell lines derived from lung metastases of Lewis lung carcinoma. These stabilized in vitro tumor cell lines named C108 and BC215 have been reported to differ in their metastatic potential evaluated as lung colony forming ability and as the number of spontaneous metastases produced after intramuscular implant of tumor cells. The cytotoxic effect of DM-COOK in vitro was also compared with the one demonstrated by the structure-related compound 4-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-5- carboxamide (DTIC) on the same variant lines. Survival curves show a different chemosensitivity of the two in vitro lines to the DM-COOK treatment, whereas no differences were detected between C108 and BC215 after exposure to DTIC. Moreover, DM-COOK and DTIC exhibit different trends of cell killing, implying different mechanisms of action for the two drugs. Results are discussed in view of the selective in vitro action of the aryldimethyltriazene derivative DM-COOK on cells which express a high metastatic potential. PMID:6480290

  5. High concordance of ALK rearrangement between primary tumor and paired metastatic lymph node in patients with lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Likun; Ren, Shengxiang; Su, Bo; Zhang, Liping; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Dong, Zhengwei; Huang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer has heterogeneous features. It remains unclear whether ALK rearrangement was distributed heterogeneously in tumor from different anatomic sites. To address this issue, we investigate the concordance of ALK rearrangement between primary tumors and paired metastatic lymph nodes in pulmonary adenocarcinoma patients. Methods From Sep 2013 to May 2014, resectable lung adenocarcinoma patients with EGFR wildtype and paired metastatic lymph nodes from Tongji University affiliated Shanghai pulmonary hospital were selected into this study. An auto-mated Ventana ALK with clone D5F3 antibody immunohistochemistry (IHC) and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used to detected ALK rearrangement. Discordant cases between IHC and RT-PCR were further validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Results A total of 101 patients were enrolled into this study with a median age of 60 years old (range, 35–78 years). ALK rearrangement was found in 20 primary lesions, while in 18 paired metastatic lymph nodes. ALK rearrangement was more frequently happened in younger (P<0.001), Nonsmokers (P=0.012), high-stage disease (P=0.021) and predominantly solid growth pattern (P=0.024). The concordance rate between primary tumor and paired metastatic lymph nodes was 98%. Two patients with ALK rearrangement on primary tumor didn’t show ALK gene fusion on paired metastatic lymph nodes. Sixty-eight cases had more than two stations of metastatic lymph nodes. ALK rearrangement in the different station of metastatic lymph nodes of the same patient was consistent. Conclusions High concordant rate of ALK rearrangement between primary tumors and paired metastatic lymph nodes were found in this study. The authors concluded that specimens from metastatic lesions and primary tumors are equally suitable for detection ALK rearrangement. PMID:27293826

  6. Metastatic brain tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain from an unknown location. This is called cancer of unknown primary (CUP) origin. Growing brain tumors can place pressure ... not know the original location. This is called cancer of unknown primary (CUP) origin. Metastatic brain tumors occur in about ...

  7. Metastatic pleural tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... persons. Alternative Names Tumor - metastatic pleural Images Pleural space References Arenberg D, Pickens A. Metastatic malignant tumors. In: Mason RJ, Murray JF, Broaddus VC, et al., eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:chap ...

  8. [Early diagnosis of metastatic spinal tumor is a key for effective palliative radiotherapy in patients with lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Isono, Hisayo; Kemmoku, Tomoko; Nakamura, Yusuke; Onose, Akira; Matsumoto, Yuka; Watanabe, Rinako; Haraguchi, Mizuha; Kasajima, Masashi; Takaya, Saho; Ishihara, Mikiko; Karigane, Daiki; Nagata, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    Patients with metastatic spinal tumor are the largest in number among the patients with bone tumor. It causes a severe bone pain, pathological fracture and spinal cord compression. Thus it harshly hampers patient's quality of life. We report 3 patients with lung cancer whose initial manifestation was metastatic spinal tumor. We treated the 3 patients with palliative radiotherapy and medication. Although the severe pain has improved on a numerical rating scale(NRS), but performance status(PS)and activity of daily living(ADL)of the 3 patients got worse because the disease was progressed and complicated. Generally, PS of cancer patients found by bone matastasis is low. However, it is difficult to take an effective treatment, which leads to ADL improvement. There are many choices for treating metastatic bone tumors including pain control, bisphosphonate administration, radiation therapy, strontium radiotherapy, bone cement, palliative surgery and orthotics. In addition, a development of molecular target drugs, such as Denosmab, is expected as future modality of palliative care. In conclusion, we should detect a bone metastasis in the patient with lung cancer as early as possible, and select an appropriate treatment in collaboration with each specialist for achieving the ADL and PS improvement. PMID:22189323

  9. Chinese expert consensus workshop report: Guidelines for thermal ablation of primary and metastatic lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xin; Fan, Weijun; Chen, Jun-Hui; Feng, Wei-Jian; Gu, Shan-Zhi; Han, Yue; Huang, Guang-Hui; Lei, Guang-Yan; Li, Xiao-Guang; Li, Yu-Liang; Li, Zhen-Jia; Lin, Zheng-Yu; Liu, Bao-Dong; Liu, Ying; Peng, Zhong-Min; Wang, Hui; Yang, Wu-Wei; Yang, Xia; Zhai, Bo; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is the primary means of curing both primary and metastatic lung cancers, about 80% of lung cancers cannot be removed by surgery. As most patients with unresectable lung cancer receive only limited benefits from traditional radiotherapy and chemotherapy, many new local treatment methods have emerged, including local ablation therapy. The Minimally Invasive and Comprehensive Treatment of Lung Cancer Branch, Professional Committee of Minimally Invasive Treatment of Cancer of the Chinese Anti-Cancer Association has organized multidisciplinary experts to develop guidelines for this treatment modality. These guidelines aim at standardizing thermal ablation procedures and criteria for selecting treatment candidates and assessing outcomes; and for preventing and managing post-ablation complications. PMID:26273346

  10. Chinese expert consensus workshop report: Guidelines for thermal ablation of primary and metastatic lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xin; Fan, Weijun; Chen, Jun-hui; Feng, Wei-jian; Gu, Shan-zhi; Han, Yue; Huang, Guang-hui; Lei, Guang-yan; Li, Xiao-guang; Li, Yu-liang; Li, Zhen-jia; Lin, Zheng-yu; Liu, Bao-dong; Liu, Ying; Peng, Zhong-min; Wang, Hui; Yang, Wu-wei; Yang, Xia; Zhai, Bo; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is the primary means of curing both primary and metastatic lung cancers, about 80% of lung cancers cannot be removed by surgery. As most patients with unresectable lung cancer receive only limited benefits from traditional radiotherapy and chemotherapy, many new local treatment methods have emerged, including local ablation therapy. The Minimally Invasive and Comprehensive Treatment of Lung Cancer Branch, Professional Committee of Minimally Invasive Treatment of Cancer of the Chinese Anti-Cancer Association has organized multidisciplinary experts to develop guidelines for this treatment modality. These guidelines aim at standardizing thermal ablation procedures and criteria for selecting treatment candidates and assessing outcomes; and for preventing and managing post-ablation complications. PMID:26273346

  11. Papillary thyroid carcinoma with extensive squamous dedifferentiation metastatic to the lung: BRAF mutational analysis as a useful tool to rule out tumor to tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Andres M; Pins, Michael R

    2016-02-01

    Tumors containing elements of both papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are rare but well documented. When they present initially as metastatic disease in an organ that can harbor a primary SCC, the possibility of a tumor to tumor metastasis (TTM) must be considered. The aim of this case study is to illustrate how BRAF mutational analysis can be used to help differentiate between these two diagnoses. We report a 63-year-old male with a longstanding history of PTC metastatic to the brain and lymph nodes who presented to our institution with a right lower lobe lung mass after a 2-year recurrence-free interval. Histopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis revealed a composite neoplasm with distinct elements of both PTC and SCC. We performed BRAF (V600E) (c.1799 T > A) mutational analysis to help elucidate the origin of each component. This is the first time that BRAF sequencing has been used to discriminate between dedifferentiated PTC and TTM, to the best of our knowledge. In the context of metastatic PTC with SCC dedifferentiation, the presence of the identical BRAF (V600E) (c.1799 T > A) mutation in both components might help rule out tumor to tumor metastasis. PMID:26521063

  12. Metastatic Lung Carcinoma Involving the Maxillary Gingiva.

    PubMed

    Sawheny, Eva; Khawar, Muhammad Umair; Ahmad, Shoaib; Jones, Kellie

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic spread of malignant tumors to the oral soft tissue is rare and account for 0.1% of all oral malignancies. Metastatic spread to the oral soft tissue can present as dental infections, which in turn can create a diagnostic challenge. Metastasis to the oral soft tissue from lung cancer is a rare situation. Here we describe a 52 year-old male patient treated initially with antibiotics for presumed oral abscess, who later was found to have metastatic lung cancer involving the maxillary gingiva. PMID:27027144

  13. Metastatic spread in patients with non-small cell lung cancer is associated with a reduced density of tumor-infiltrating T cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Philipp; Rothschild, Sacha I; Arnold, Walter; Hirschmann, Petra; Horvath, Lukas; Bubendorf, Lukas; Savic, Spasenija; Zippelius, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes play an important role in cell-mediated immune destruction of cancer cells and tumor growth control. We investigated the heterogeneity of immune cell infiltrates between primary non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) and corresponding metastases. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded primary tumors and corresponding metastases from 34 NSCLC patients were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for CD4, CD8, CD11c, CD68, CD163 and PD-L1. The percentage of positively stained cells within the stroma and tumor cell clusters was recorded and compared between primary tumors and metastases. We found significantly fewer CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells within tumor cell clusters as compared with the stromal compartment, both in primary tumors and corresponding metastases. CD8(+) T cell counts were significantly lower in metastatic lesions than in the corresponding primary tumors, both in the stroma and the tumor cell islets. Of note, the CD8/CD4 ratio was significantly reduced in metastatic lesions compared with the corresponding primary tumors in tumor cell islets, but not in the stroma. We noted significantly fewer CD11c(+) cells and CD68(+) as well as CD163(+) macrophages in tumor cell islets compared with the tumor stroma, but no difference between primary and metastatic lesions. Furthermore, the CD8/CD68 ratio was higher in primary tumors than in the corresponding metastases. We demonstrate a differential pattern of immune cell infiltration in matched primary and metastatic NSCLC lesions, with a significantly lower density of CD8(+) T cells in metastatic lesions compared with the primary tumors. The lower CD8/CD4 and CD8/CD68 ratios observed in metastases indicate a rather tolerogenic and tumor-promoting microenvironment at the metastatic site. PMID:26541588

  14. Microenvironment-Modulated Metastatic CD133+/CXCR4+/EpCAM- Lung Cancer-Initiating Cells Sustain Tumor Dissemination and Correlate with Poor Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Giulia; D'Amico, Lucia; Moro, Massimo; Landoni, Elena; Perego, Paola; Miceli, Rosalba; Gatti, Laura; Andriani, Francesca; Wong, Donald; Caserini, Roberto; Tortoreto, Monica; Milione, Massimo; Ferracini, Riccardo; Mariani, Luigi; Pastorino, Ugo; Roato, Ilaria; Sozzi, Gabriella; Roz, Luca

    2015-09-01

    Metastasis is the main reason for lung cancer-related mortality, but little is known about specific determinants of successful dissemination from primary tumors and metastasis initiation. Here, we show that CD133(+)/CXCR4(+) cancer-initiating cells (CIC) directly isolated from patient-derived xenografts (PDX) of non-small cell lung cancer are endowed with superior ability to seed and initiate metastasis at distant organs. We additionally report that CXCR4 inhibition successfully prevents the increase of cisplatin-resistant CD133(+)/CXCR4(+) cells in residual tumors and their metastatization. Immunophenotypic analysis of lung tumor cells intravenously injected or spontaneously disseminated to murine lungs demonstrated the survival advantage and increased colonization ability of a specific subset of CD133(+)/CXCR4(+) with reduced expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM(-)), which also shows the greatest in vitro invasive potential. We next prove that recovered disseminated cells from lungs of PDX-bearing mice enriched for CD133(+)/CXCR4(+)/EpCAM(-) CICs are highly tumorigenic and metastatic. Importantly, microenvironment stimuli eliciting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, including signals from cancer-associated fibroblasts, are able to increase the dissemination potential of lung cancer cells through the generation of the CD133(+)/CXCR4(+)/EpCAM(-) subset. These findings also have correlates in patient samples where disseminating CICs are enriched in metastatic lymph nodes (20-fold, P = 0.006) and their detection in primary tumors is correlated with poor clinical outcome (disease-free survival: P = 0.03; overall survival: P = 0.05). Overall, these results highlight the importance of specific cellular subsets in the metastatic process, the need for in-depth characterization of disseminating tumor cells, and the potential of therapeutic strategies targeting both primary tumor and tumor-microenvironment interactions. PMID:26141860

  15. Adrenalectomy for metastatic adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Kita, Masafumi; Tamaki, Gaku; Okuyama, Mitsuhiko; Saga, Yuji; Kakizaki, Hidehiro

    2007-11-01

    The indications for adrenalectomy in cases of metastatic adrenal tumor remain controversial. To clarify indications and outcomes of adrenalectomy for adrenal metastasis, we performed a retrospective review of all 8 patients who underwent adrenalectomy for adrenal metastasis between 1990 and 2006 in Asahikawa Medical College Hospital. The Primary tumor was renal cell carcinoma in 2 cases, and eccrine poro carcinoma, rectal cancer, lung cancer, melanoma, bladder cancer and cancer of unknown origin in 1 case each. Open adrenalectomy was performed in all cases, including 1 case that was converted from laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Of the 4 patients with solitary adrenal metastasis, 3 were considered tumor-free after adrenalectomy, while the remaining patient was not due to unresectable primary tumor. Of the 3 patients with complete resection, one remained alive as of 88 months after adrenalectomy but was then lost to follow-up, and the other 2 patients remain alive 12 and 7 months after adrenalectomy. Of the 2 patients with other resectable metastasis who were tumor-free after removal of all metastases, one was alive 31 months postoperatively and the other died 23 months after operation. The remaining 2 cases with other unresectable metastasis died within 6 months after adrenalectomy. At least in cases of solitary adrenal metastasis, adrenalectomy can be effective if other valid methods are unavailable. PMID:18051798

  16. Effects of letrozole on breast cancer micro-metastatic tumor growth in bone and lung in mice inoculated with murine 4T1 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendan; Belosay, Aashvini; Yang, Xujuan; Hartman, James A; Song, Huaxin; Iwaniec, Urszula T; Turner, Russell T; Churchwell, Mona I; Doerge, Daniel R; Helferich, William G

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the leading cancer in women worldwide. Metastasis occurs in stage IV BC with bone and lung being common metastatic sites. Here we evaluate the effects of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole on BC micro-metastatic tumor growth in bone and lung metastasis in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) mice with murine estrogen receptor negative (ER-) BC cells inoculated in tibia. Forty-eight BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to one of four groups: OVX, OVX + Letrozole, Intact, and Intact + Letrozole, and injected with 4T1 cells intra-tibially. Letrozole was subcutaneously injected daily for 23 days at a dose of 1.75 µg/g body weight. Tumor progression was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Following necropsy, inoculated tibiae were scanned via µCT and bone response to tumor was scored from 0 (no ectopic mineralization/osteolysis) to 5 (extensive ectopic mineralization/osteolysis). OVX mice had higher tibial pathology scores indicative of more extensive bone destruction than intact mice, irrespective of letrozole treatment. Letrozole decreased serum estradiol levels and reduced lung surface tumor numbers in intact animals. Furthermore, mice receiving letrozole had significantly fewer tumor colonies and fewer proliferative cells in the lung than OVX and intact controls based on H&E and Ki-67 staining, respectively. In conclusion, BC-inoculated OVX animals had higher tibia pathology scores than BC-inoculated intact animals and letrozole reduced BC metastases to lungs. These findings suggest that, by lowering systemic estrogen level and/or by interacting with the host organ, the aromatase inhibitor letrozole has the potential to reduce ER- BC metastasis to lung. PMID:27209469

  17. Metastatic cancer to the lung

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bladder cancer Breast cancer Colon cancer Kidney cancer Neuroblastoma Prostate cancer Sarcoma Wilms tumor Symptoms Symptoms may ... Breast cancer Cancer Chemotherapy Colon cancer Lung cancer Neuroblastoma Prostate cancer Radiation therapy Wilms tumor Update Date ...

  18. Regulatory T cells actively infiltrate metastatic brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Adam Quasar; Rolle, Cleo E; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2009-06-01

    Regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+FoxP3+, Treg) have been shown to play a major role in suppression of the immune response to malignant gliomas. In this study, we investigated the kinetics of Treg infiltration in metastatic brain tumor models, including melanoma, breast and colon cancers. Our data indicate that both CD4+ and Treg infiltration are significantly increased throughout the time of metastatic tumor progression. These findings were recapitulated in human CNS tumor samples of metastatic melanoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma. Collectively, these data support investigating immunotherapeutic strategies targeting Treg in metastatic CNS tumors. PMID:19424570

  19. Detection of metastatic tumors after γ-irradiation using longitudinal molecular imaging and gene expression profiling of metastatic tumor nodules.

    PubMed

    Jang, Su Jin; Kang, Joo Hyun; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Tae Sup; Choe, Jae Gol; Lim, Sang Moo

    2016-04-01

    A few recent reports have indicated that metastatic growth of several human cancer cells could be promoted by radiotherapy. C6-L cells expressing the firefly luciferase (fLuc) gene were implanted subcutaneously into the right thigh of BALB/c nu/nu mice. C6-L xenograft mice were treated locally with 50-Gy γ-irradiation (γ-IR) in five 10-Gy fractions. Metastatic tumors were evaluated after γ-IR by imaging techniques. Total RNA from non-irradiated primary tumor (NRPT), γ-irradiated primary tumor (RPT), and three metastatic lung nodule was isolated and analyzed by microarray. Metastatic lung nodules were detected by BLI and PET/CT after 6-9 weeks of γ-IR in 6 (17.1%) of the 35 mice. The images clearly demonstrated high [18F]FLT and [18F]FDG uptake into metastatic lung nodules. Whole mRNA expression patterns were analyzed by microarray to elucidate the changes among NRPT, RPT and metastatic lung nodules after γ-IR. In particular, expression changes in the cancer stem cell markers were highly significant in RPT. We observed the metastatic tumors after γ-IR in a tumor-bearing animal model using molecular imaging methods and analyzed the gene expression profile to elucidate genetic changes after γ-IR. PMID:26892334

  20. Detection of metastatic tumors after γ-irradiation using longitudinal molecular imaging and gene expression profiling of metastatic tumor nodules

    PubMed Central

    JANG, SU JIN; KANG, JOO HYUN; LEE, YONG JIN; KIM, KWANG IL; LEE, TAE SUP; CHOE, JAE GOL; LIM, SANG MOO

    2016-01-01

    A few recent reports have indicated that metastatic growth of several human cancer cells could be promoted by radiotherapy. C6-L cells expressing the firefly luciferase (fLuc) gene were implanted subcutaneously into the right thigh of BALB/c nu/nu mice. C6-L xenograft mice were treated locally with 50-Gy γ-irradiation (γ-IR) in five 10-Gy fractions. Metastatic tumors were evaluated after γ-IR by imaging techniques. Total RNA from non-irradiated primary tumor (NRPT), γ-irradiated primary tumor (RPT), and three metastatic lung nodule was isolated and analyzed by microarray. Metastatic lung nodules were detected by BLI and PET/CT after 6–9 weeks of γ-IR in 6 (17.1%) of the 35 mice. The images clearly demonstrated high [18F]FLT and [18F]FDG uptake into metastatic lung nodules. Whole mRNA expression patterns were analyzed by microarray to elucidate the changes among NRPT, RPT and metastatic lung nodules after γ-IR. In particular, expression changes in the cancer stem cell markers were highly significant in RPT. We observed the metastatic tumors after γ-IR in a tumor-bearing animal model using molecular imaging methods and analyzed the gene expression profile to elucidate genetic changes after γ-IR. PMID:26892334

  1. Laser immunotherapy in treatment of metastatic prostate tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Bartles, Kenneth E.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2002-07-01

    Laser immunotherapy is a special cancer treatment modality using an intratumor injection of a special formulation consisting of a novel immunoadjuvant and a laser-absorbing dye, followed by a non-invasive near-IR laser irradiation. Our early experiments using a metastatic mammary rat tumor model showed that laser immunotherapy could cause acute selective photothermal tumor destruction and induce a systemic, long-term specific anti-tumor immunity. In the current study, laser immunotherapy was used to treat metastatic prostate tumors in Copenhagen male rats. The transplantable tumors metastasize mainly to the lung and the lung cancer is usually the cause of death. Two experimental were performed in our study. The first was to study the effect of laser immunotherapy on the tumor burdens, both the primary and the metastasis in the lung. The second was to study the effect of laser immunotherapy on the long-term survival of the tumor-bearing rats. For comparison, some rat tumors were also treated by the laser-dye combination to study the photothermal effect. Tour results showed that both the photothermal effect and the laser immunotherapy could slow the growth of primary tumors and the metastatic tumors. The laser-dye-immunoadjuvant treatment resulted in more than 20 percent long-term survival rate in tumor-bearing rats. Our experimental results indicate that the laser immunotherapy has a great potential in treating metastatic tumors.

  2. FDA Approval Summary: Pembrolizumab for the Treatment of Patients With Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Whose Tumors Express Programmed Death-Ligand 1

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Gideon M.; Jiang, Xiaoping; He, Kun; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2016-01-01

    On October 2, 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted accelerated approval for pembrolizumab, a breakthrough therapy-designated drug, for the treatment of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors express programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), as determined by an FDA-approved test, and who have disease progression on or after platinum-containing chemotherapy or targeted therapy against anaplastic lymphoma kinase or epidermal growth factor receptor, if appropriate. This indication was approved concurrently with the PD-L1 immunohistochemistry 22C3 pharmDx, a companion diagnostic test for patient selection based on PD-L1 tumor expression. The accelerated approval was granted based on durable objective response rate (ORR) and an acceptable toxicity profile demonstrated in a multicenter, open-label trial enrolling 550 patients with metastatic NSCLC. The efficacy population comprised 61 patients with tumors identified as strongly positive for PD-L1, and the confirmed ORR as determined by blinded independent central review was 41% (95% confidence interval: 28.6%, 54.3%); all were partial responses. At the time of the analysis, responses were ongoing in 21 of 25 patients (84%), with 11 patients (44%) having response duration of ≥6 months. The most commonly occurring (≥20%) adverse reactions included fatigue, decreased appetite, dyspnea, and cough. The most frequent (≥2%) serious adverse drug reactions were pleural effusion, pneumonia, dyspnea, pulmonary embolism, and pneumonitis. Immune-mediated adverse reactions occurred in 13% of patients and included pneumonitis, colitis, hypophysitis, and thyroid disorders. The accelerated approval regulations describe approval of drugs and biologic products for serious and life-threatening illnesses based on a surrogate endpoint likely to predict clinical benefit. Under these regulations, a confirmatory trial or trials is required to verify and describe the benefit of pembrolizumab

  3. Metastatic tumors of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Rao, Roopa S; Patil, Shankargouda; Sanketh, Ds; Amrutha, N

    2014-01-01

    The pivotal reason for morbidity and mortality of any type of cancer is due to metastasis that occurs as a result of adaptation of genetically unstable cancer cells, in an ectopic conducive environment. Oral metastasis in spite of being unusual or rare represents around 25% of the first signs of metastatic spread. Literature says there are more number of cases of jaw bone metastasis reported than in the oral soft tissues. The most common primary organs metastasizing to the jaw bones and the oral soft tissues are the breast and the lungs respectively. The issue in diagnosing a metastatic tumor arises either when the patient does not reveal the history of the primary illness he or she may be suffering from or when he or she is unaware of it. Diagnosis in such situations is a challenge to the clinician or pathologist. Diagnosing any lymph node or distant metastasis from oral cancer is very important for the prognosis of the patient. In this review we have made an attempt, to explain some recent concepts of pathophysiology of the metastatic process, the clinical manifestations of metastatic tumors to the oral region and to discuss their diagnostic workup. PMID:25095855

  4. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... for lung carcinoid tumor symptoms Surgery to treat lung carcinoid tumors Surgery is the main treatment for ... often be cured by surgery alone. Types of lung surgery Different operations can be used to treat ( ...

  5. Metastatic lung adenocarcinoma to the bladder: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YE, HAI-JUN; MA, JIAN; LIU, YING-JIE; YE, XIAO-FEI; ZHANG, LI-WANG; LI, JIN-GE

    2015-01-01

    Urothelial cancer is the most frequently diagnosed type of malignant tumor in the bladder, of which primary adenocarcinoma accounts for a small percentage. Secondary malignancies, in particular metastatic adenocarcinoma from the lung, are exceedingly rare, with only six cases previously reported in the literature. The present study describes the case of a 71-year-old Chinese male patient with known lung cancer for >2 years, who was diagnosed with metastatic adenocarcinoma to the bladder. The histopathological characteristics and immunohistochemical features of the patient are reported. It was proposed that pathologists should consider the possibility of metastatic adenocarcinoma from the lung, rather than assume a diagnosis of primary adenocarcinoma of the bladder or direct invasion of adenocarcinoma from the surrounding organs. Furthermore, it is essential to determine the medical history of each patient and observe the immunohistochemical features of all tumors prior to diagnosis. PMID:26622730

  6. GTI-2040 and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Metastatic, or Unresectable Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  7. Suppression of proliferation and migration in highly-metastatic lung cancer cells as well as tumor growth by a new synthesized compound TBrC and its molecular mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Ji, Dexin; Wang, Yishan; Zhang, Huarong; Chen, Linlin; Liu, Xin; Sun, Fujia; Liu, Kun; Yao, Jianwen; Zhang, Guoying

    2014-12-01

    To develop new anticancer agents has been considered as a useful and necessary strategy to suppress highly-metastatic lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. In this study, we synthesized a new compound ethyl 6-bromocoumarin-3-carboxylyl L-theanine (TBrC) and studied the anticancer activity of TBrC and its molecular mechanisms of action. Our results show that TBrC remarkably inhibits the proliferation and migration in highly-metastatic lung cancer cells by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest as well as regulating related protein expressions. Further study indicated that TBrC not only enhances the protein levels of Bax, cytosolic cytochrome c, caspase-3 and PARP-1 but also reduces the protein expressions of Bcl-2, cyclin D1, VEGFR1 and NF-κB as well as inhibits the phosphorylation and expressions of VEGFR2 and Akt in the cancer cells. More importantly, TBrC displays strong suppression of highly-metastatic tumor growth and reduces the tumor weight by 61.6 % in tumor-bearing mice without toxicity to the mice. Our results suggest that TBrC suppresses the proliferation and migration of lung cancer cells via VEGFR-Akt-NF-κB signaling pathways; TBrC may have a wide therapeutic and/or adjuvant therapeutic application in the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:24132498

  8. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-14

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  9. Regorafenib in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-29

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma

  10. Hemangioblastoma in the Lung: Metastatic or Primary Lesions?

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Li; Drew, Peter A.; Yachnis, Anthony T.

    2014-01-01

    Hemangioblastoma primarily occurs in the CNS, most commonly in the posterior fossa. Extracranial locations are less common, and metastatic tumor involving the lung is exceedingly rare with only three cases previously reported. Two were autopsy studies in patients who died of complications of the CNS hemangioblastomas in 1943 and 1981, and the third was mentioned in a case report addendum providing follow-up information on hepatic hemangioblastoma in 1991. We report a case of a 48-year-old man who presented with multiple lung nodules treated by surgical excision. Pathological study revealed features classic for hemangioblastoma. The patient had a remote history of hemangioblastomas having been excised from the posterior fossa 7 and 20 years previously. This report details a fourth case of metastatic pulmonary hemangioblastoma. It is the first report on surgically resected hemangioblastomas from the lung of a living patient with histological and immunohistochemical characterization. PMID:25574414

  11. Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  12. Thermal Ablation of Lung Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sonntag, P. David; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Lee, Fred T.

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 29% of cancer deaths in 2009.1 Pneumonectomy or lobectomy with hilar and mediastinal lymph node sampling is the gold standard treatment and offers the best option for cure of stage 1/2 nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC).2 Unfortunately, only 15% of patients present with stage 1/2 disease, and many of these patients do not meet the pulmonary physiologic guidelines for lobar resection.3 In addition to lung cancer, pulmonary metastases are present in 25% to 30% of patients dying from all types of cancer.4 For some patients with oligometastatic pulmonary disease, metastectomy is associated with an improvement in survival.5 External beam radiation traditionally has been offered as the alternative to surgical resection for NSCLC or pulmonary metastatic disease. Unfortunately, the 5-year survival following radiation for stage 1 and 2 NSCLC remains low at 15% to 20%, with local recurrence being the most common mode of failure.6,7 Thermal ablation offers an intriguing therapeutic option to increase local tumor control and survival in patients with early stage NSCLC or with limited metastatic disease from nonlung primaries who are not surgical candidates because of poor cardiopulmonary reserve, anatomic constraints limiting resection, failure of traditional therapies, or refusal of operative approaches. Thermal ablation has been shown to be effective in treating tumors in bone, kidney, and liver.8–11 Most preclinical and clinical trials have focused on demonstrating the feasibility of three modalities for pulmonary thermal ablation, namely radiofrequency (RF) ablation, microwave (MW) ablation, and cryoablation. This article discusses the unique challenges of performing thermal ablation in lung tissue and reviews the current literature regarding RF, MW, and cryoablation in the lung. PMID:21377589

  13. Serum-derived exosomes from mice with highly metastatic breast cancer transfer increased metastatic capacity to a poorly metastatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Gorczynski, Reginald M; Erin, Nuray; Zhu, Fang

    2016-02-01

    Altered interaction between CD200 and CD200R represents an example of "checkpoint blockade" disrupting an effective, tumor-directed, host response in murine breast cancer cells. In CD200R1KO mice, long-term cure of EMT6 breast cancer, including metastatic spread to lung and liver, was achieved in BALB/c mice. The reverse was observed with 4THM tumors, an aggressive, inflammatory breast cancer, with increased tumor metastasis in CD200R1KO. We explored possible explanations for this difference. We measured the frequency of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood of tumor bearers, as well as lung/liver and draining lymph nodes. In some cases mice received infusions of exosomes from nontumor controls, or tumor bearers, with/without additional infusions of anticytokine antibodies. The measured frequency of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood was equivalent in the two models in WT and CD200R1KO mice. Increased metastasis in EMT6 tumor bearers was seen in vivo following adoptive transfer of serum, or serum-derived exosomes, from 4THM tumor bearers, an effect which was attenuated by anti-IL-6, and anti-IL-17, but not anti-TNFα, antibody. Anti-IL-6 also attenuated enhanced migration of EMT6 cells in vitro induced by 4THM serum or exosomes, or recombinant IL-6. Exosome cytokine proteomic profiles responses in 4THM and EMT6 tumor-bearing mice were regulated by CD200:CD200R interactions, with attenuation of both IL-6 and IL-17 in 4THM CD200(tg) mice, and enhanced levels in 4THM CD200R1KO mice. We suggest these cytokines act on the microenvironment at sites within the host, and/or directly on tumor cells themselves, to increase metastatic potential. PMID:26725371

  14. Pulmonary Metastatic Choriocarcinoma from a Burned-out Testicular Tumor.

    PubMed

    Nakazaki, Hirofumi; Tokuyasu, Hirokazu; Takemoto, Yu; Miura, Hiroshi; Yanai, Masaaki; Fukushima, Takehito; Shimizu, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    A 54-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of progressive dyspnea. Chest computed tomography showed multiple nodular shadows with a peripheral ground-glass halo. His clinical condition continued to deteriorate with the development of progressive respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. A histological examination of a transbronchial lung biopsy revealed choriocarcinoma. The patient died within nine days of admission. A histological examination of the right testis during an autopsy revealed a burned-out testicular tumor consisting of a teratoma and a fibrous scar. We herein report a rare case of pulmonary multiple metastatic choriocarcinoma originating from a burned-out testicular tumor. PMID:27250057

  15. Lung metastases

    MedlinePlus

    Metastases to the lung; Metastatic cancer to the lung ... Metastatic tumors in the lungs are cancers that developed at other places in the body (or other parts of the lungs) and spread through the ...

  16. Malignant metastatic carcinoid presenting as brain tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, I. Vijay; Jain, S. K.; Kurmi, Dhrubajyoti; Sharma, Rakesh; Chopra, Sanjeev; Singhvi, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rarely known to metastasise to the brain. It is even more rare for such patients to present with symptoms related to metastases as the initial and only symptom. We present a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with hemiparesis and imaging features suggestive of brain tumor. He underwent surgery and the histopathology revealed metastatic malignant lesion of neuroendocrine origin. A subsequent work up for the primary was negative. Patient was treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. We present this case to highlight the pathophysiological features, workup and treatment options of this rare disease and discuss the methods of differentiating it from more common brain tumors. PMID:27366273

  17. Malignant metastatic carcinoid presenting as brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Sundar, I Vijay; Jain, S K; Kurmi, Dhrubajyoti; Sharma, Rakesh; Chopra, Sanjeev; Singhvi, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rarely known to metastasise to the brain. It is even more rare for such patients to present with symptoms related to metastases as the initial and only symptom. We present a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with hemiparesis and imaging features suggestive of brain tumor. He underwent surgery and the histopathology revealed metastatic malignant lesion of neuroendocrine origin. A subsequent work up for the primary was negative. Patient was treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. We present this case to highlight the pathophysiological features, workup and treatment options of this rare disease and discuss the methods of differentiating it from more common brain tumors. PMID:27366273

  18. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Ganitumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone Marrow; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Lung; Metastatic Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of Bone; Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of Soft Tissues

  19. Therapy for metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Massironi, Sara; Conte, Dario; Peracchi, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are frequently malignant (50-80%, except for insulinoma) and may show an aggressive course with metastases to the liver as well as more distant sites. These heterogeneous neoplasms include functioning tumors, which secrete a variety of peptide hormones, and non-functioning tumors (up to 90% of pNETs), which often show metastases at the time of diagnosis. Methods A PubMed search was performed for English-language publications from 1995 through December 2012. Reference lists from studies selected were manually searched to identify further relevant reports. Manuscripts comparing different therapeutic options and advances for metastatic pNETs were selected. Results The therapeutic options for metastatic pNETs are expanding and include surgery, which remains the only curative approach, liver-directed therapies, and medical therapy. In selected cases also liver transplantation (OLT) may be considered. The option of OLT for metastatic disease is unique to neuroendocrine tumors. Recently, novel promising targeted therapies have been proposed for progressive well-differentiated pNETs. Conclusions The best therapeutic approach for pNETs is still matter of debating. However, since pNETs often show a more indolent behavior compared to other malignancies, the preservation of the quality of life of the patient and the personalization of the therapy according to tumor’s and patient’s features are mandatory. PMID:25332984

  20. Inhibition of metastatic tumor growth and metastasis via targeting metastatic breast cancer by chlorotoxin-modified liposomes.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chao; He, Bing; Dai, Wenbing; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Guangji; Yin, Lifang; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    A liposome system modified with chlorotoxin (ClTx), a scorpion venom peptide previously utilized for targeting brain tumors, was established. Its targeting efficiency and antimetastasis behavior against metastatic breast cancer highly expressed MMP-2, the receptor of ClTx, were investigated. 4T1, a metastatic breast cancer cell line derived from a murine breast tumor, was selected as the cell model. As results, the ClTx-modified liposomes displayed specific binding to 4T1 as determined by flow cytometry and confocal imaging. The cytotoxicity assay revealed that the ClTx modification increased the toxicity compared with nonmodified liposomes. In addition, the modified liposomes also exhibited high in vivo targeting efficiency in the BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 tumors. Importantly, this system inhibited the growth of metastatic tumor and prevented the incidence of lung metastasis in mice bearing 4T1 tumors with only low systemic toxicity. The data obtained from the in vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that the ClTx-modified liposomes increased the drug delivery to metastatic breast cancers. This study proved that the ClTx-modified liposomes had targeting ability to metastatic breast cancer in addition to brain cancer, and displayed an obvious antimetastasis effect. Generally, it may provide a promising strategy for metastatic breast cancer therapy. PMID:24559485

  1. Metastatic tumors in the duodenum: A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Iwamuro, Masaya; Uetsuka, Hirokazu; Makihata, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    Two cases are presented involving a 71-year-old male with adenocarcinoma of the lung and a 57-year-old male with adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon, each with metastatic lesions located in the duodenal bulb. Each lesion appeared as a submucosal tumor with an ulcer at the center. Lymph node swelling in the hepatoduodenal ligament was also found to precede the emergence of each duodenal metastasis. These cases indicate that involvement of the lymph node in the hepatoduodenal ligament may be a forerunner of duodenal metastasis. PMID:26458611

  2. Metastatic tumors to the stomach: Clinical and endoscopic features

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Giovanni D De; Masone, Stefania; Rega, Maria; Simeoli, Immacolata; Donisi, Mario; Addeo, Pietro; Iannone, Loredana; Pilone, Vincenzo; Persico, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical and endoscopic patterns in a large series of patients with metastatic tumors in the stomach. METHODS: A total of 64 patients with gastric meta-stases from solid malignant tumors were retros-pectively examined between 1990 and 2005. The clinicopathological findings were reviewed along with tumor characteristics such as endoscopic pattern, location, size and origin of the primary sites. RESULTS: Common indications for endoscopy were anemia, bleeding and epigastric pain. Metastases presented as solitary (62.5%) or multiple (37.5%) tumors were mainly located in the middle or upper third of stomach. The main primary metastatic tumors were from breast and lung cancer and malignant melanoma. CONCLUSION: As the prognosis of cancer patients has been improving gradually, gastrointestinal (GI) metastases will be encountered more often. Endoscopic examinations should be conducted carefully in patients with malignancies, and endoscopic biopsies and information on the patient’s clinical history are useful for correct diagnosis of gastric metastases. PMID:17143949

  3. Is the Blood-Brain Barrier Relevant in Metastatic Germ Cell Tumor?

    SciTech Connect

    Azar, Jose M. Schneider, Bryan P.; Einhorn, Lawrence H.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: Germ cell tumors are uniquely chemosensitive and curable, even with advanced metastatic disease. Central nervous system recurrence can terminate a complete remission in other chemosensitive tumors, such as small cell lung cancer, because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We propose to document that the BBB is also relevant in germ cell tumors despite their dramatic chemosensitivity. Methods and Materials: We present five cases illustrating the concept of the BBB in patients with metastatic testicular cancer treated with chemotherapy. Results: In our large series of patients with metastatic testicular cancer treated with chemotherapy, we identified 5 unique patients. These patients were rendered free of disease only to experience relapse in the brain alone. This included 1 patient who initially had good-risk metastatic disease by means of the International Germ Cell Collaborative Group staging system at the onset of chemotherapy. Conclusions: The BBB is relevant in patients with metastatic testicular cancer.

  4. iTRAQ Quantitative Proteomic Comparison of Metastatic and Non-Metastatic Uveal Melanoma Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Crabb, John W.; Hu, Bo; Crabb, John S.; Triozzi, Pierre; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Singh, Arun D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Uveal melanoma is the most common malignancy of the adult eye. The overall mortality rate is high because this aggressive cancer often metastasizes before ophthalmic diagnosis. Quantitative proteomic analysis of primary metastasizing and non-metastasizing tumors was pursued for insights into mechanisms and biomarkers of uveal melanoma metastasis. Methods Eight metastatic and 7 non-metastatic human primary uveal melanoma tumors were analyzed by LC MS/MS iTRAQ technology with Bruch’s membrane/choroid complex from normal postmortem eyes as control tissue. Tryptic peptides from tumor and control proteins were labeled with iTRAQ tags, fractionated by cation exchange chromatography, and analyzed by LC MS/MS. Protein identification utilized the Mascot search engine and the human Uni-Prot/Swiss-Protein database with false discovery ≤ 1%; protein quantitation utilized the Mascot weighted average method. Proteins designated differentially expressed exhibited quantitative differences (p ≤ 0.05, t-test) in a training set of five metastatic and five non-metastatic tumors. Logistic regression models developed from the training set were used to classify the metastatic status of five independent tumors. Results Of 1644 proteins identified and quantified in 5 metastatic and 5 non-metastatic tumors, 12 proteins were found uniquely in ≥ 3 metastatic tumors, 28 were found significantly elevated and 30 significantly decreased only in metastatic tumors, and 31 were designated differentially expressed between metastatic and non-metastatic tumors. Logistic regression modeling of differentially expressed collagen alpha-3(VI) and heat shock protein beta-1 allowed correct prediction of metastasis status for each of five independent tumor specimens. Conclusions The present data provide new clues to molecular differences in metastatic and non-metastatic uveal melanoma tumors. While sample size is limited and validation required, the results support collagen alpha-3(VI) and

  5. Tumor-to-tumor metastasis: an unusual case of breast cancer metastatic to a solitary fibrous tumor

    PubMed Central

    Velez-Cubian, Frank O.; Gabordi, Robert C.; Smith, Prudence V.

    2016-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm that most commonly involves the visceral or parietal pleura, but that has also been described arising from virtually all organs. This neoplasm exhibits rich vascularity, a characteristic it shares with renal cell carcinoma, making these tumors especially suitable for harboring metastases. We present a case of a 64-year-old woman with history of right breast cancer treated six years previously and who presents with a left pulmonary SFT containing metastatic invasive ductal breast carcinoma as well as a synchronous contralateral primary adenocarcinoma of the lung. The literature on tumor-to-tumor metastasis is then reviewed. PMID:27293861

  6. Tumor-to-tumor metastasis: an unusual case of breast cancer metastatic to a solitary fibrous tumor.

    PubMed

    Velez-Cubian, Frank O; Gabordi, Robert C; Smith, Prudence V; Toloza, Eric M

    2016-06-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm that most commonly involves the visceral or parietal pleura, but that has also been described arising from virtually all organs. This neoplasm exhibits rich vascularity, a characteristic it shares with renal cell carcinoma, making these tumors especially suitable for harboring metastases. We present a case of a 64-year-old woman with history of right breast cancer treated six years previously and who presents with a left pulmonary SFT containing metastatic invasive ductal breast carcinoma as well as a synchronous contralateral primary adenocarcinoma of the lung. The literature on tumor-to-tumor metastasis is then reviewed. PMID:27293861

  7. Suppressive effects of a proton beam on tumor growth and lung metastasis through the inhibition of metastatic gene expression in 4T1 orthotopic breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yun-Suk; Lee, Kyu-Shik; Chun, So-Young; Jang, Tae Jung; Nam, Kyung-Soo

    2016-07-01

    A proton beam is a next generation tool to treat intractable cancer. Although the therapeutic effects of a proton beam are well known, the effect on tumor metastasis is not fully described. Here, we investigated the effects of a proton beam on metastasis in highly invasive 4T1 murine breast cancer cells and their orthotopic breast cancer model. Cells were irradiated with 2, 4, 8 or 16 Gy proton beam, and changes in cell proliferation, survival, and migration were observed by MTT, colony forming and wound healing assays. 4T1 breast cancer cell-implanted BALB/c mice were established and the animals were randomly divided into 4 groups when tumor size reached 200 mm3. Breast tumors were selectively irradiated with 10, 20 or 30 Gy proton beam. Breast tumor sizes were measured twice a week, and breast tumor and lung tissues were pathologically observed. Metastasis-regulating gene expression was assessed with quantitative RT-PCR. A proton beam dose-dependently decreased cell proliferation, survival and migration in 4T1 murine breast cancer cells. Also, growth of breast tumors in the 4T1 orthotopic breast cancer model was significantly suppressed by proton beam irradiation without significant change of body weight. Furthermore, fewer tumor nodules metastasized from breast tumor into lung in mice irradiated with 30 Gy proton beam, but not with 10 and 20 Gy, than in control. We observed correspondingly lower expression levels of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA receptor, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which are important factors in cancer metastasis, in breast tumor irradiated with 30 Gy proton beam. Proton beam irradiation did not affect expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-2. Taken together, the data suggest that, although proton beam therapy is an effective tool for breast cancer treatment, a suitable dose is necessary to prevent metastasis-linked relapse and poor prognosis. PMID:27176787

  8. Urinary Bladder Paraganglioma and Concomitant Metastatic Lung Cancer. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gkikas, Christos; Ram, Manisha; Tsafrakidis, Petros

    2016-03-01

    We present a case of an organ confined urinary bladder paraganglioma and concomitant metastatic lung cancer to the liver diagnosed on a 66 year old man initially though to be metastatic bladder cancer. The patient was referred to our hospital for frank hematuria and a single solid bladder tumor was identified at flexible cystoscopy. We are also reviewing the literature on the diagnostic and therapeutic approach of extra-adrenal phaeochromocytoma. PMID:26793591

  9. A nanoparticle formulation that selectively transfects metastatic tumors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Hendricks, William; Liu, Guosheng; McCaffery, J. Michael; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Huso, David L.; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle gene therapy holds great promise for the treatment of malignant disease in light of the large number of potent, tumor-specific therapeutic payloads potentially available for delivery. To be effective, gene therapy vehicles must be able to deliver their therapeutic payloads to metastatic lesions after systemic administration. Here we describe nanoparticles comprised of a core of high molecular weight linear polyethylenimine (LPEI) complexed with DNA and surrounded by a shell of polyethyleneglycol-modified (PEGylated) low molecular weight LPEI. Compared with a state-of-the-art commercially available in vivo gene delivery formulation, i.v. delivery of the core/PEGylated shell (CPS) nanoparticles provided more than a 16,000-fold increase in the ratio of tumor to nontumor transfection. The vast majority of examined liver and lung metastases derived from a colorectal cancer cell line showed transgene expression after i.v. CPS injection in an animal model of metastasis. Histological examination of tissues from transfected mice revealed that the CPS nanoparticles selectively transfected neoplastic cells rather than stromal cells within primary and metastatic tumors. However, only a small fraction of neoplastic cells (<1%) expressed the transgene, and the extent of delivery varied with the tumor cell line, tumor site, and host mouse strain used. Our results demonstrate that these CPS nanoparticles offer substantial advantages over previously described formulations for in vivo nanoparticle gene therapeutics. At the same time, they illustrate that major increases in the effectiveness of such approaches are needed for utility in patients with metastatic cancer. PMID:23959886

  10. Patrolling Monocytes Control Tumor Metastasis to the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Richard N.; Cekic, Caglar; Sag, Duygu; Tacke, Robert; Thomas, Graham D.; Nowyhed, Heba; Herrley, Erica; Rasquinha, Nicole; McArdle, Sara; Wu, Runpei; Peluso, Esther; Metzger, Daniel; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Shaked, Iftach; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Biswas, Subhra K.; Hedrick, Catherine C.

    2016-01-01

    The immune system plays an important role in regulating tumor growth and metastasis. For example, classical monocytes promote tumorigenesis and cancer metastasis; however, how nonclassical “patrolling” monocytes interact with tumors is unknown. Here we show that patrolling monocytes are enriched in the microvasculature of the lung and reduce tumor metastasis to lung in multiple mouse metastatic tumor models. Nr4a1-deficient mice, which specifically lack patrolling monocytes, showed increased lung metastasis in vivo. Transfer of Nr4a1-proficient patrolling monocytes into Nr4a1-deficient mice prevented tumor invasion in lung. Patrolling monocytes established early interactions with metastasizing tumor cells, scavenged tumor material from the lung vasculature and promoted natural killer cell recruitment and activation. Thus, patrolling monocytes contribute to cancer immunosurveillance and may be targets for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26494174

  11. Patrolling monocytes control tumor metastasis to the lung.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Richard N; Cekic, Caglar; Sag, Duygu; Tacke, Robert; Thomas, Graham D; Nowyhed, Heba; Herrley, Erica; Rasquinha, Nicole; McArdle, Sara; Wu, Runpei; Peluso, Esther; Metzger, Daniel; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Shaked, Iftach; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Biswas, Subhra K; Hedrick, Catherine C

    2015-11-20

    The immune system plays an important role in regulating tumor growth and metastasis. Classical monocytes promote tumorigenesis and cancer metastasis, but how nonclassical "patrolling" monocytes (PMo) interact with tumors is unknown. Here we show that PMo are enriched in the microvasculature of the lung and reduce tumor metastasis to lung in multiple mouse metastatic tumor models. Nr4a1-deficient mice, which specifically lack PMo, showed increased lung metastasis in vivo. Transfer of Nr4a1-proficient PMo into Nr4a1-deficient mice prevented tumor invasion in the lung. PMo established early interactions with metastasizing tumor cells, scavenged tumor material from the lung vasculature, and promoted natural killer cell recruitment and activation. Thus, PMo contribute to cancer immunosurveillance and may be targets for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26494174

  12. Outcomes of Adolescent and Adult Patients with Lung Metastatic Osteosarcoma and Comparison of Synchronous and Metachronous Lung Metastatic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Gok Durnali, Ayse; Paksoy Turkoz, Fatma; Ardic Yukruk, Fisun; Tokluoglu, Saadet; Yazici, Omer Kamil; Demirci, Ayse; Bal, Oznur; Gundogdu Buyukbas, Selay; Esbah, Onur; Oksuzoglu, Berna; Alkis, Necati

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcomas with lung metastases are rather heterogenous group. We aimed to evaluate the clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes of osteosarcoma patients with lung metastases and to compare the synchronous and metachronous lung metastatic groups. A total of 93 adolescent and adult patients with lung metastatic osteosarcoma, from March 1995 to July 2011, in a single center, were included. Sixty-five patients (69.9%) were male. The median age was 19 years (range, 14–74). Thirty-nine patients (41.9%) had synchronous lung metastases (Group A) and 54 patients (58.1%) had metachronous lung metastases (Group B). The 5-year and 10-year post-lung metastases overall survival (PLM-OS) was 17% and 15%, respectively. In multivariate analysis for PLM-OS, time to lung metastases (p = 0.010), number of metastatic pulmonary nodules (p = 0.020), presence of pulmonary metastasectomy (p = 0.007) and presence of chemotherapy for lung metastases (p< 0.001) were found to be independent prognostic factors. The median PLM-OS of Group A and Group B was 16 months and 9 months, respectively. In Group B, the median PLM-OS of the patients who developed lung metastases within 12 months was 6 months, whereas that of the patients who developed lung metastases later was 16 months. Time to lung metastases, number and laterality of metastatic pulmonary nodules, chemotherapy for lung metastatic disease and pulmonary metastasectomy were independent prognostic factors for patients with lung metastatic osteosarcoma. The best PLM-OS was in the subgroup of patients treated both surgery and chemotherapy. The prognosis of the patients who developed lung metastases within 12 months after diagnosis was worst. PMID:27167624

  13. In vivo subcellular resolution optical imaging in the lung reveals early metastatic proliferation and motility

    PubMed Central

    Entenberg, David; Rodriguez-Tirado, Carolina; Kato, Yu; Kitamura, Takanori; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Condeelis, John

    2016-01-01

    To better understand breast cancer metastatic cell seeding, we have employed multiphoton microscopy and a vacuum stabilized window which eliminates the need for complex registration software, video rate microscopy or specialized gating electronics to observe the initial steps of tumor cell seeding within the living, breathing lung. We observe that upon arrival to the lung, tumor cells are found exclusively in capillary vessels, completely fill their volume and display an initial high level of protrusive activity that dramatically reduces over time. Further, we observe a concomitant increase in positional stability during this same period. We employ several techniques accessible to most imaging labs for optimizing signal to noise and resolution which enable us to report the first direct observation, with subcellular resolution, of the arrival, proliferation, and motility of metastatic tumor cells within the lung. PMID:26855844

  14. Aberrant NRP-1 expression serves as predicator of metastatic endometrial and lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    Okon, Imoh S.; Ding, Ye; Coughlan, Kathleen A.; Wang, Qiongxin; Song, Ping; Benbrook, Doris M.; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) has emerged as an important driver of tumor-promoting phenotypes of human malignancies. However, incomplete knowledge exists as to how this single-pass transmembrane receptor mediates pleiotropic tumor-promoting functions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate NRP-1 expression and metastatic properties in 94 endometrial cancer and matching serum specimens and in a lung cancer cell line. We found that NRP-1 expression significantly correlated with increased tumoral expression of vascular endothelial growth factor 2 (VEGFR2) and serum levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and cell growth-stimulating factor (C-GSF). Tumoral NRP-1 also was positively associated with expression of NEDD9, a pro-metastatic protein. In the highly metastatic lung cancer cell line (H1792), stable LKB1 depletion caused increased migration in vitro and accentuated NRP-1 and NEDD9 expression in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that perturbed expression of these targets correlate with metastatic potential of endometrial and lung tumors, providing clinically-relevant biomarker applications for diagnostic and therapeutic targeting. PMID:26701889

  15. MicroRNA-708-5p acts as a therapeutic agent against metastatic lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoping; Liu, Tianchi; Fang, Ou; Dong, Wenhua; Zhang, Fengjun; Leach, Lindsey; Hu, Xiaohua; Luo, Zewei

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been recognized as targets for anti-metastatic therapy against cancer malignancy. Development of effective miRNA mediated therapies remains a challenge to both basic research and clinical practice. Here we presented the evidence for a miR-708-5p mediated replacement therapy against metastatic lung cancer. Expression of miR-708-5p was substantially reduced in metastatic lung cancer samples and cancer cell lines when compared to non-metastatic counterparts. Expression of the miRNA suppressed cell survival and metastasis in vitro through its direct target p21, and inhibited the PI3K/AKT pathway and stem cell-like characteristics of lung cancer cells. Systemic administration of this miRNA in a mouse model of NSCLC using polyethylenimine (PEI)-mediated delivery of unmodified miRNA mimics induced tumor specific apoptosis. It also effectively protected the tested animals from developing metastatic malignancy without causing any observed toxicity. The findings strongly support miR-708-5p as a novel and effective therapeutic agent against metastatic malignancy of non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:26678031

  16. An Arntl2-Driven Secretome Enables Lung Adenocarcinoma Metastatic Self-Sufficiency.

    PubMed

    Brady, Jennifer J; Chuang, Chen-Hua; Greenside, Peyton G; Rogers, Zoë N; Murray, Christopher W; Caswell, Deborah R; Hartmann, Ursula; Connolly, Andrew J; Sweet-Cordero, E Alejandro; Kundaje, Anshul; Winslow, Monte M

    2016-05-01

    The ability of cancer cells to establish lethal metastatic lesions requires the survival and expansion of single cancer cells at distant sites. The factors controlling the clonal growth ability of individual cancer cells remain poorly understood. Here, we show that high expression of the transcription factor ARNTL2 predicts poor lung adenocarcinoma patient outcome. Arntl2 is required for metastatic ability in vivo and clonal growth in cell culture. Arntl2 drives metastatic self-sufficiency by orchestrating the expression of a complex pro-metastatic secretome. We identify Clock as an Arntl2 partner and functionally validate the matricellular protein Smoc2 as a pro-metastatic secreted factor. These findings shed light on the molecular mechanisms that enable single cancer cells to form allochthonous tumors in foreign tissue environments. PMID:27150038

  17. Tumor-propagating cells and Yap/Taz activity contribute to lung tumor progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Allison N; Curtis, Stephen J; Fillmore, Christine M; Rowbotham, Samuel P; Mohseni, Morvarid; Wagner, Darcy E; Beede, Alexander M; Montoro, Daniel T; Sinkevicius, Kerstin W; Walton, Zandra E; Barrios, Juliana; Weiss, Daniel J; Camargo, Fernando D; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Kim, Carla F

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of morbidity for lung cancer patients. Here we demonstrate that murine tumor propagating cells (TPCs) with the markers Sca1 and CD24 are enriched for metastatic potential in orthotopic transplantation assays. CD24 knockdown decreased the metastatic potential of lung cancer cell lines resembling TPCs. In lung cancer patient data sets, metastatic spread and patient survival could be stratified with a murine lung TPC gene signature. The TPC signature was enriched for genes in the Hippo signaling pathway. Knockdown of the Hippo mediators Yap1 or Taz decreased in vitro cellular migration and transplantation of metastatic disease. Furthermore, constitutively active Yap was sufficient to drive lung tumor progression in vivo. These results demonstrate functional roles for two different pathways, CD24-dependent and Yap/Taz-dependent pathways, in lung tumor propagation and metastasis. This study demonstrates the utility of TPCs for identifying molecules contributing to metastatic lung cancer, potentially enabling the therapeutic targeting of this devastating disease. PMID:24497554

  18. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Progressive Carcinoid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Atypical Carcinoid Tumor; Foregut Carcinoid Tumor; Hindgut Carcinoid Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Midgut Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1

  19. Cystic Meningioma Masquerading as a Metastatic Tumor: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Nithya; Kamaruddin, Khairul Azmi; Othman, Aizzat; Mustafa, Fadhli; Awang, Mohamed Saufi

    2016-05-01

    Cystic meningioma is a rare form of intracranial meningioma. Meningiomas are typically solid tumors but may rarely have cystic components. The diagnosis of cystic meningioma is clinically challenging as the finding of multiple intra-axial tumors, including metastatic tumors, is relatively common. We report a case of cystic meningioma initially diagnosed as a metastatic tumor from a recurrence of acute lymphoid leukemia. However, postoperative histopathological examination demonstrated an atypical meningioma. PMID:27418876

  20. Cystic Meningioma Masquerading as a Metastatic Tumor: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Nithya; Kamaruddin, Khairul Azmi; Othman, Aizzat; Mustafa, Fadhli; Awang, Mohamed Saufi

    2016-01-01

    Cystic meningioma is a rare form of intracranial meningioma. Meningiomas are typically solid tumors but may rarely have cystic components. The diagnosis of cystic meningioma is clinically challenging as the finding of multiple intra-axial tumors, including metastatic tumors, is relatively common. We report a case of cystic meningioma initially diagnosed as a metastatic tumor from a recurrence of acute lymphoid leukemia. However, postoperative histopathological examination demonstrated an atypical meningioma.

  1. Temsirolimus and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Hereditary Paraganglioma; Male Breast Cancer; Malignant Paraganglioma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Pheochromocytoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Regional Pheochromocytoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  2. Ex vivo Raman spectroscopic study of breast metastatic lesions in lungs in animal models.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Tanmoy; Tawde, Sneha; Hudlikar, Rasika; Mahimkar, Manoj; Maru, Girish; Ingle, Arvind; Murali Krishna, C

    2015-08-01

    The lung is one of the most common sites of metastases, with approximately 50% of patients with extrathoracic cancer exhibiting pulmonary metastases. Correct identification of the metastatic status of a lung lesion is vital to therapeutic planning and better prognosis. However, currently available diagnostic techniques, such as conventional radiography and low dose computed tomography (LDCT), may fail to identify metastatic lesions. Alternative techniques such as Raman spectroscopy (RS) are hence being extensively explored for correct diagnosis of metastasis. The current ex vivo study aims to evaluate the ability of a fiber optic-based Raman system to distinguish breast cancer metastasis in lung from primary breast and lung tumor in animal models. In this study, spectra were acquired from normal breast, primary breast tumor, normal lung, primary lung tumor, and breast cancer metastasis in lung tissues and analyzed using principal component analysis and principal component-linear discriminant analysis. Breast cancer metastasis in lung could be classified with 71% classification efficiency. Approximately 6% breast metastasis spectra were misclassified with breast tumor, probably due to the presence of breast cancer cells in metastasized lungs. Test prediction results show 64% correct prediction of breast metastasis, while 13% breast metastasis spectra were wrongly predicted as breast tumor, suggesting the possible influence of breast cancer cells. Thus, findings of this study, the first of such explorations, demonstrate the potential of RS in classifying breast metastasis in lungs from primary lung and primary breast tumor. Prospective evaluation on a larger cohort with better multivariate analysis, combined with LDCT and recently developed real-time in vivo probes, RS can play a significant role in nonsurgical screening of lesions, which can lead to individualized therapeutic regimes and improved prognoses. PMID:26295177

  3. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Somatostatinoma

  4. [Palliative radiotherapy for metastatic bone tumor].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kenji; Hiratsuka, Junichi

    2006-04-01

    Bone metastases are one of the most common conditions requiring radiation therapy today. Its main aim is relief of bone pain, prevention of pathological bone fractures as well as its healing, with anticipated effect upon improving mobility, function, and quality of life. For localized bone pain, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) will be successful in reducing pain in some 80% of patients. However, optimal fraction dose and total doses of EBRT required for pain relief have been unknown. According to the recent reports, carbon ion radiotherapy seems to be a safe and effective modality in the management of metastatic bone tumor not eligible for conventional EBRT. For scattered painful metastases, the systemic administration of radioisotopes is thought to be effective. PMID:16582516

  5. Inhibition of metastatic tumor growth by targeted delivery of antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Makiya; Hyoudou, Kenji; Kobayashi, Yuki; Umeyama, Yukari; Takakura, Yoshinobu; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2005-12-01

    To develop effective anti-metastatic therapy, targeted or sustained delivery of catalase was examined in mice. We found that mouse lung with metastatic colonies of adenocarcinoma colon26 cells exhibited reduced catalase activity. The interaction of the tumor cells with macrophages or hepatocytes generated detectable amounts of ROS, and increased the activity of matrix metalloproteinases. Hepatocyte-targeted delivery of catalase was successfully achieved by galactosylation, which was highly effective in inhibiting the hepatic metastasis of colon26 cells. PEGylation, which increased the retention of catalase in the circulation, effectively inhibited the pulmonary metastasis of the cells. To examine which processes in tumor metastasis are inhibited by catalase derivatives, the tissue distribution and proliferation of tumor cells in mice was quantitatively analyzed using firefly luciferase-expressing tumor cells. An injection of PEG-catalase just before the inoculation of melanoma B16-BL6/Luc cells significantly reduced the number of the tumor cells in the lung at 24 h. Daily dosing of PEG-catalase greatly inhibited the proliferation of the tumor cells, and increased the survival rate of the tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that targeted or sustained delivery of catalase to sites where tumor cells metastasize is a promising approach for inhibiting metastatic tumor growth. PMID:16256238

  6. Clinical Outcomes of Biological Effective Dose-Based Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Brain Tumors From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Tomohiko; Kogo, Kasei; Oya, Natsuo

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) based on biological effective dose (BED), a novel approach to deliver a fixed BED irrespective of dose fractionation, for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 and March 2009 we treated 299 patients with 1 to 5 lesions from NSCLC (573 total brain metastases) with FSRT using Novalis. The dose fractionation schedules were individually determined to deliver a peripheral BED10 (α/β ratio = 10) of approximately 80 Gy{sub 10}. The median number of fractions was 3 (range, 2-10), the median peripheral BED10 was 83.2 Gy (range, 19.1-89.6 Gy). Patients were followed up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies performed at 1- to 2-month intervals. The local tumor control rate and overall local progression-free and intracranial relapse-free survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Local control rates for all 573 lesions at 6 and 12 months were 96.3% and 94.5%, respectively. By multivariate analysis the tumor diameter was the only factor predictive of the local control rate (P=.001). The median overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival were 17.1, 14.9, and 4.4 months, respectively. The overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 78.5% and 63.3%, 74.3% and 57.8%, and 41.0% and 21.8%, respectively. Six patients (2%) manifested progressive radiation injury to the brain even during therapy with corticosteroids; they underwent hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and follow-up MRI showed improvement. Conclusions: This study showed that BED-based FSRT for brain metastases from NSCLC is a promising strategy that may yield excellent outcomes with acceptable toxicity. Criteria must be established to determine the optimal dose fractionation for individual patients.

  7. Metastatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers, including cancers of the blood and the lymphatic system ( leukemia , multiple myeloma , and lymphoma ), can form metastatic tumors. Although rare, the metastasis of blood and lymphatic system cancers to the lung, heart, central nervous system , ...

  8. Mesotheliomas show higher hyaluronan positivity around tumor cells than metastatic pulmonary adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Törrönen, Kari; Soini, Ylermi; Pääkkö, Paavo; Parkkinen, Jyrki; Sironen, Reijo; Rilla, Kirsi

    2016-10-01

    Hyaluronan is a unique glycosaminoglycan of the extracellular matrix, abundant in normal connective tissues but highly increased in many pathological conditions like cancer. Mesothelioma, one of the most malignant cancer types, is associated with high content of hyaluronan, with elevated levels of hyaluronan in pleural effusions and serum of the patients. Metastatic lung adenocarcinomas are typically less aggressive and have a better prognosis as compared to mesotheliomas, a reason why it is highly important to find reliable tools to differentiate these cancer types. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the amount of hyaluronan, hyaluronan producing synthases (HAS's) and hyaluronan receptor CD44, in mesothelioma and metastatic lung adenocarcinomas. Furthermore, we wanted to clarify the role of hyaluronan, CD44 and HAS's as putative markers for differentiating malignant mesothelioma from metastatic lung adenocarcinomas. The main finding of this study was that mesotheliomas are significantly more positive for hyaluronan staining than metastatic adenocarcinomas. Unexceptionally, a trend of CD44 positivity of stromal cells was higher in adenocarcinomas as compared to mesotheliomas. However, no statistically significant differences were found between the staining of any of the HAS isoenzymes either in tumor cells or stromal cells of different groups of cases. The results show that there are significant differences in hyaluronan content between metastatic lung adenocarcinomas and mesotheliomas. However, as previous studies have suggested, hyaluronan alone is not a sufficient independent marker for diagnostic differentiation of these cancer types, but could be utilized as a combination together with other specific markers. PMID:26912058

  9. Hepatic metastatic disease in pediatric and adolescent solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Pineda, Israel; Sandoval, John A; Davidoff, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    The management of hepatic metastatic disease from solid tumors in adults has been extensively described and resection of metastatic liver lesions from colorectal adenocarcinoma, renal adenocarcinoma, breast cancer, testicular cancer, and neuroendocrine tumors (NET) have demonstrated therapeutic benefits in select patients. However, there are few reports in the literature on the management of hepatic metastatic disease in the pediatric and adolescent populations and the effectiveness of hepatic metastasectomy. This may be due to the much lower incidence of pediatric malignancies and the higher chemosensitivity of childhood tumors which make hepatic metastasectomy less likely to be required. We review liver involvement with metastatic disease from the main pediatric solid tumors, including neuroblastoma and Wilms tumor focusing on the management and treatment options. We also review other solid malignant tumors which may have liver metastases including germ cell tumors, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, osteosarcoma, desmoplastic small round cell tumors and NET. However, these histological subtypes are so rare in the pediatric and adolescent populations that the exact incidence and best management of hepatic metastatic disease are unknown and can only be extrapolated from adult series. PMID:26207162

  10. Tumor cells disseminate early, but immunosurveillance limits metastatic outgrowth, in a mouse model of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Eyles, Jo; Puaux, Anne-Laure; Wang, Xiaojie; Toh, Benjamin; Prakash, Celine; Hong, Michelle; Tan, Tze Guan; Zheng, Lin; Ong, Lai Chun; Jin, Yi; Kato, Masashi; Prévost-Blondel, Armelle; Chow, Pierce; Yang, Henry; Abastado, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Although metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related death, it is not clear why some patients with localized cancer develop metastatic disease after complete resection of their primary tumor. Such relapses have been attributed to tumor cells that disseminate early and remain dormant for prolonged periods of time; however, little is known about the control of these disseminated tumor cells. Here, we have used a spontaneous mouse model of melanoma to investigate tumor cell dissemination and immune control of metastatic outgrowth. Tumor cells were found to disseminate throughout the body early in development of the primary tumor, even before it became clinically detectable. The disseminated tumor cells remained dormant for varying periods of time depending on the tissue, resulting in staggered metastatic outgrowth. Dormancy in the lung was associated with reduced proliferation of the disseminated tumor cells relative to the primary tumor. This was mediated, at least in part, by cytostatic CD8+ T cells, since depletion of these cells resulted in faster outgrowth of visceral metastases. Our findings predict that immune responses favoring dormancy of disseminated tumor cells, which we propose to be the seed of subsequent macroscopic metastases, are essential for prolonging the survival of early stage cancer patients and suggest that therapeutic strategies designed to reinforce such immune responses may produce marked benefits in these patients. PMID:20501944

  11. Obstructive Jaundice from Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung.

    PubMed

    Seth, Abhishek; Palmer, Thomas R; Campbell, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive jaundice from metastatic lung cancer is extremely rare. Most reported cases have had small cell cancer of lung or adenocarcinoma of lung as primary malignancy metastasizing to the biliary system. We report the case of a patient presenting with symptoms of obstructive jaundice found to have metastatic involvement of hepatobiliary system from squamous cell cancer (SCC) of lung. ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) with biliary stenting is the procedure of choice in such patients. Our case is made unique by the fact that technical difficulties made it difficult for the anesthesiologists to intubate the patient for an ERCP. As a result percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram (PTC) with internal-external biliary drainage was performed. PMID:27389381

  12. Head and Neck Metastatic Tumors: a Retrospective Survey of Iranian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sadri, Donia; Azizi, Arash; Farhadi, Sareh; Shokrgozar, Hojjat; Entezari, Navid

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The head and neck region is an uncommon site for metastatic involvement, but it can be the first and only symptom of primary cancer. The incidence of these tumors and their primary origins are limited in Iranian patients. Purpose Therefore, this retrospective study aimed to investigate the frequency and the common related clinical manifestations, as well as, the most common types of cancers and the prevalent sites of the primary tumor. Materials and Method All medical records related to patients with history of head and neck tumors between 1991 and 2011 at Iran Cancer Institute were evaluated and the essential information was statistically analyzed. Results Sixty cases of cervical lymph node metastasis (0.36%) and 26 cases of head and neck metastatic tumors (0.16%) including 17 cases of distant cancer (0.10%) were recorded among all 16232 registered cancers. Out of all distant head and neck metastatic tumors, 4 cases were related to oral and maxillofacial area. Pain, swelling of neck, oral mucosa ulcer and dryness were the chief complaints. Squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma were the most frequent types of cancers. The most common metastatic sites were cervical musculature, scalp and parotid gland, and the most prevalent sites of primary tumor in females were breast and lung in males. Conclusion According to these cases, the incidence rate of head and neck metastatic tumors seems to be low. However, feasible similarity of clinical presentation of oral metastatic lesions to benign lesions might result in misdiagnosis. Hence, biopsy is mandatory in any case with unusual clinical presentation, especially in patients with a known malignant disease. PMID:25759853

  13. Heparan Sulfate Degradation: Relation to Tumor Invasive and Metastatic Properties of Mouse B16 Melanoma Sublines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Motowo; Irimura, Tatsuro; di Ferrante, Daniela; di Ferrante, Nicola; Nicolson, Garth L.

    1983-05-01

    After transport in the blood and implantation in the microcirculation, metastatic tumor cells must invade the vascular endothelium and underlying basal lamina. Mouse B16 melanoma sublines were used to determine the relation between metastatic properties and the ability of the sublines to degrade enzymatically the sulfated glycosaminoglycans present in the extracellular matrix of cultured vascular endothelial cells. Highly invasive and metastatic B16 sublines degraded matrix glycosaminoglycans faster than did sublines of lower metastatic potential. The main products of this matrix degradation were heparan sulfate fragments. Intact B16 cells (or their cell-free homogenates) with a high potential for lung colonization degraded purified heparan sulfate from bovine lung at higher rates than did B16 cells with a poor potential for lung colonization. Analysis of the degradation fragments indicated that B16 cells have a heparan sulfate endoglycosidase. Thus the abilities of B16 melanoma cells to extravasate and successfully colonize the lung may be related to their capacities to degrade heparan sulfate in the walls of pulmonary blood vessels.

  14. Tumor cells as cellular vehicles to deliver gene therapies to metastatic tumors.

    PubMed

    García-Castro, Javier; Martínez-Palacio, Jesús; Lillo, Rosa; García-Sánchez, Félix; Alemany, Ramón; Madero, Luis; Bueren, Juan A; Ramírez, Manuel

    2005-04-01

    A long-pursued goal in cancer treatment is to deliver a therapy specifically to metastases. As a result of the disseminated nature of the metastatic disease, carrying the therapeutic agent to the sites of tumor growth represents a major step for success. We hypothesized that tumor cells injected intravenously (i.v.) into an animal with metastases would respond to many of the factors driving the metastatic process, and would target metastases. Using a model of spontaneous metastases, we report here that i.v. injected tumor cells localized on metastatic lesions. Based on this fact, we used genetically transduced tumor cells for tumor targeting of anticancer agents such as a suicide gene or an oncolytic virus, with evident antitumoral effect and negligible systemic toxicity. Therefore, autologous tumor cells may be used as cellular vehicles for systemic delivery of anticancer therapies to metastatic tumors. PMID:15650763

  15. Passive Entrapment of Tumor Cells Determines Metastatic Dissemination to Spinal Bone and Other Osseous Tissues.

    PubMed

    Broggini, Thomas; Piffko, Andras; Hoffmann, Christian J; Harms, Christoph; Vajkoczy, Peter; Czabanka, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    During the metastatic process tumor cells circulate in the blood stream and are carried to various organs. In order to spread to different organs tumor cell-endothelial cell interactions are crucial for extravasation mechanisms. It remains unclear if tumor cell dissemination to the spinal bone occurs by passive entrapment of circulating tumor cells or by active cellular mechanisms mediated by cell surface molecules or secreted factors. We investigated the seeding of three different tumor cell lines (melanoma, lung and prostate carcinoma) to the microvasculature of different organs. Their dissemination was compared to biologically passive microbeads. The spine and other organs were resected three hours after intraarterial injection of tumor cells or microbeads. Ex vivo homogenization and fluorescence analysis allowed quantification of tumor cells or microbeads in different organs. Interestingly, tumor cell distribution to the spinal bone was comparable to dissemination of microbeads independent of the tumor cell type (melanoma: 5.646% ± 7.614%, lung: 6.007% ± 1.785%, prostate: 3.469% ± 0.602%, 7 μm beads: 9.884% ± 7.379%, 16 μm beads: 7.23% ± 1.488%). Tumor cell seeding differed significantly between tumor cells and microbeads in all soft tissue organs. Moreover, there were significant differences between the different tumor cell lines in their dissemination behaviour to soft tissue organs only. These findings demonstrate that metastatic dissemination of tumor cells to spinal bone and other osseous organs is mediated by passive entrapment of tumor cells similar to passive plugging of microvasculature observed after intraarterial microbeads injection. PMID:27603673

  16. Transcription Factor NFIB Is a Driver of Small Cell Lung Cancer Progression in Mice and Marks Metastatic Disease in Patients.

    PubMed

    Semenova, Ekaterina A; Kwon, Min-Chul; Monkhorst, Kim; Song, Ji-Ying; Bhaskaran, Rajith; Krijgsman, Oscar; Kuilman, Thomas; Peters, Dennis; Buikhuisen, Wieneke A; Smit, Egbert F; Pritchard, Colin; Cozijnsen, Miranda; van der Vliet, Jan; Zevenhoven, John; Lambooij, Jan-Paul; Proost, Natalie; van Montfort, Erwin; Velds, Arno; Huijbers, Ivo J; Berns, Anton

    2016-07-19

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine tumor, and no effective treatment is available to date. Mouse models of SCLC based on the inactivation of Rb1 and Trp53 show frequent amplifications of the Nfib and Mycl genes. Here, we report that, although overexpression of either transcription factor accelerates tumor growth, NFIB specifically promotes metastatic spread. High NFIB levels are associated with expansive growth of a poorly differentiated and almost exclusively E-cadherin (CDH1)-negative invasive tumor cell population. Consistent with the mouse data, we find that NFIB is overexpressed in almost all tested human metastatic high-grade neuroendocrine lung tumors, warranting further assessment of NFIB as a tumor progression marker in a clinical setting. PMID:27373156

  17. FRIZZLED7 Is Required for Tumor Inititation and Metastatic Growth of Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Shweta; Xu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Metastases are thought to arise from cancer stem cells and their tumor initiating abilities are required for the establishment of metastases. Nevertheless, in metastatic melanoma, the nature of cancer stem cells is under debate and their contribution to metastasis formation remains unknown. Using an experimental metastasis model, we discovered that high levels of the WNT receptor, FZD7, correlated with enhanced metastatic potentials of melanoma cell lines. Knocking down of FZD7 in a panel of four melanoma cell lines led to a significant reduction in lung metastases in animal models, arguing that FZD7 plays a causal role during metastasis formation. Notably, limiting dilution analyses revealed that FZD7 is essential for the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and FZD7 knockdown impeded the early expansion of metastatic melanoma cells shortly after seeding, in accordance with the view that tumor initiating ability of cancer cells is required for metastasis formation. FZD7 activated JNK in melanoma cell lines in vitro and the expression of a dominant negative JNK suppressed metastasis formation in vivo, suggesting that FZD7 may promote metastatic growth of melanoma cells via activation of JNK. Taken together, our findings uncovered a signaling pathway that regulates the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and contributes to metastasis formation in melanoma. PMID:26808375

  18. How Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » How are lung carcinoid tumors diagnosed? Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  19. Protective effects of dendrosomal curcumin on an animal metastatic breast tumor.

    PubMed

    Farhangi, Baharak; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Khodayari, Hamid; Khodayari, Saeed; Dehghan, Mohammad Javad; Khori, Vahid; Heidarzadeh, Alemeh; Khaniki, Mahmood; Sadeghiezadeh, Majid; Najafi, Farhood

    2015-07-01

    Curcumin has been shown to inhibit migration and invasion of cancer angiogenesis via interacting with key regulatory molecules like NF-κB. Rapidly metabolized and conjugated in the liver, curcumin has the limited systemic bioavailability. Previous results have shown a new light of potential biocompatibility, biodegradability, as well as anti-cancer effects of dendrosomal curcumin (DNC) in biological systems. The present study aims to deliberate the protective effects of DNC on metastatic breast tumor in vitro and in vivo. After the dosing procedure, twenty-seven female mice were divided into 40 and 80mg/kg groups of DNC, along with a control group to investigate the anti-metastatic effects of DNC on mammary tumor-bearing mice. In vitro results showed that the different concentrations of DNC reduced the migration and the adhesion of 4T1 cells after 24h (P<0.05). Under the dosing procedure, DNC was safe at 80mg/kg and lower doses. The treated DNC animals had a higher survival rate and lower metastatic signs (14%) compared to control (100%) (P<0.05). The metastatic tumors were more common in control mice than the treated groups in the lung, the liver and the sternum tissues. Animals treated with DNC had smaller tumor volume in comparison with control group (P<0.05). Final mean tumor volume reached to approximately 1.11, 0.31 and 0.27cm(3) in the control, and 40 and 80mg/kg DNC groups, respectively (P<0.05). Furthermore, suppression of NF-κB expression by DNC led to down-regulation of VEGF, COX-2, and MMP-9 expressions in the breast tumor, the lung, the brain, the spleen and the liver tissues (P<0.05). These outcomes indicate that dendrosomal curcumin has a chemoprotective effect on the breast cancer metastasis through suppression of NF-κB and its regulated gene products. PMID:25863259

  20. Metastatic large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung arising from the uterus: A pitfall in lung cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ono, Kyoko; Yokota, Naho Ruiz; Yoshioka, Emi; Noguchi, Akira; Washimi, Kota; Kawachi, Kae; Miyagi, Yohei; Kato, Hisamori; Yokose, Tomoyuki

    2016-07-01

    A 41-year-old female smoker presented with a vaginal mass. Gynecological examination showed a mass filling the uterine corpus, cervix, and vagina. A total abdominal hysterectomy was performed. Macroscopic findings included a large fragile mass involving the uterine cavity, cervix, and vagina. Histology revealed atypical ducts admixed with solid components consisting of large atypical cells. The initial pathological diagnosis was grade 3 endometrioid adenocarcinoma. The patient was designated as stage II according to the 2008 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging. Two years later, two nodules were found in the upper lobe of the left lung, and the patient underwent an upper lobectomy. The masses, which exhibited solid and organoid growth patterns of large atypical cells, had histological characteristics of large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) of the lung. However, the tumor was immunohistochemically positive for neuroendocrine markers, such as synaptophysin in addition to estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, and the tumor was negative for thyroid transcription factor-1. These immunohistochemical results were almost identical to those of the solid portions of the uterine carcinoma. The final diagnosis was LCNEC combined with endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the uterine corpus and lung metastasis of the LCNEC component of the endometrial carcinoma. LCNEC often arises in the lung, but it rarely arises in other organs. Some patients with metastatic components exhibited only a LCNEC pattern although the primary tumor was a mixed carcinoma consisting of LCNEC and other histology, like the present case. LCNEC is often poorly differentiated, especially in extrapulmonary primary organ LCNEC. Therefore, pathologists should consider metastatic carcinoma when they encounter lung LCNEC in a patient with a preceding extrapulmonary carcinoma composed of a poorly differentiated component or LCNEC component, and they should clarify tumor

  1. Characterization of the MDSC proteome associated with metastatic murine mammary tumors using label-free mass spectrometry and shotgun proteomics.

    PubMed

    Boutté, Angela M; McDonald, W Hayes; Shyr, Yu; Yang, Li; Lin, P Charles

    2011-01-01

    Expansion of Gr-1+/CD11b+ myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) is governed by the presence of increasingly metastatic, malignant primary tumors. Metastasis, not the primary tumor, is often the cause of mortality. This study sought to fully characterize the MDSC proteome in response to metastatic and non-metastatic mammary tumors using label-free mass spectrometry shotgun proteomics in a mouse model with tumor cell lines, 67NR and 4T1, derived from the same tumor. 67NR cells form only primary mammary tumors, whereas 4T1 cells readily metastasize to the lungs, lymph nodes, and blood. Overall analysis identified a total of 2825 protein groups with a 0.78% false discovery rate. Of the 2814 true identifications, 43 proteins were exclusive to the 67NR group, 153 were exclusive to the 4T1 group, and 2618 were shared. Among the shared cohort, 26 proteins were increased and 31 were decreased in the metastatic 4T1 cohort compared to non-metastatic 67NR controls after filtering. MDSCs selectively express proteins involved in the γ-glutamyl transferase, glutathione synthase pathways, CREB transcription factor signaling, and other pathways involved in platelet aggregation, as well as lipid and amino acid metabolism, in response to highly metastatic 4T1 tumors. Cell cycle regulation dominated protein pathways and ontological groups of the 67NR non-metastatic group. Not only does this study provide a starting point to identify potential biomarkers of metastasis expressed by MDSCs; it identifies critical pathways that are unique to non-metastatic and metastatic conditions. Therapeutic interventions aimed at these pathways in MDSC may offer a new route to control malignancy and metastasis. PMID:21853032

  2. The preclinical therapeutic response of residual metastatic disease is distinct from its primary tumor of origin

    PubMed Central

    Day, Chi-Ping; Carter, John; Bonomi, Carrie; Hollingshead, Melinda; Merlino, Glenn

    2011-01-01

    Cancer-related deaths are caused principally by recurrence and metastasis arising from residual disease, whose therapeutic responses has been suggested to be substantially different from primary tumors. However, experimental animal models designed for evaluating the therapeutic responses of residual disease are mostly lacking. To overcome this deficiency, we have developed a preclinical model that recapitulates the progression for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). An archived Lewis Lung Carcinoma mouse tumor, propagated only through serial in vivo transplantation and never adapted to cell culture, was stably labeled using lentivirus-encoded biomarkers, consistently expressed through an RNA polymerase II promoter. Labeled tumors were inoculated into syngeneic immunocompetent mice to ensure superior tumor-host interactions. Primary tumors were resected upon reaching a predetermined size, following by treatment in a setting akin to post-surgical first-line adjuvant chemotherapy and routine imaging to monitor the progression of pulmonary metastasis. We discovered that efficacious treatment, instead of reducing disease growth rates, significantly prolonged disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). As in the clinic, cisplatin-based regimes were more effective in this model. However, the response of metastases to specific agents could not be predicted from, and often opposed, their effects on subcutaneous “primary” tumors, possibly due to their distinct growth kinetics and host interactions. We here introduce a clinically relevant model of residual metastatic disease that may more accurately predict the therapeutic response of recurrent, metastatic disease. PMID:21312195

  3. Circulating tumor cells in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, Rachel; Pailler, Emma; Billiot, Fanny; Drusch, Françoise; Barthelemy, Amélie; Oulhen, Marianne; Besse, Benjamin; Soria, Jean-Charles; Farace, Françoise; Vielh, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as potential biomarkers in several cancers such as colon, prostate, and breast carcinomas, with a correlation between CTC number and patient prognosis being established by independent research groups. The detection and enumeration of CTCs, however, is still a developing field, with no universal method of detection suitable for all types of cancer. CTC detection in lung cancer in particular has proven difficult to perform, as CTCs in this type of cancer often present with nonepithelial characteristics. Moreover, as many detection methods rely on the use of epithelial markers to identify CTCs, the loss of these markers during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in certain metastatic cancers can render these methods ineffective. The development of personalized medicine has led to an increase in the advancement of molecular characterization of CTCs. The application of techniques such as FISH and RT-PCR to detect EGFR, HER2, and KRAS abnormalities in lung, breast, and colon cancer, for example, could be used to characterize CTCs in real time. The use of CTCs as a 'liquid biopsy' is therefore an exciting possibility providing information on patient prognosis and treatment efficacy. This review summarizes the state of CTC detection today, with particular emphasis on lung cancer, and discusses the future applications of CTCs in helping the clinician to develop new strategies in patient treatment. PMID:23207444

  4. Selective events in the metastatic process defined by analysis of the sequential dissemination of subpopulations of a mouse mammary tumor.

    PubMed

    Aslakson, C J; Miller, F R

    1992-03-15

    To identify selective steps in metastasis, those that eliminate nonmetastatic tumor cells more efficiently than metastatic cells, we have evaluated the sequential dissemination of tumor cells from a mammary fatpad, using both metastatic (4T1 and 66cl4) and nonmetastatic (67NR, 168FARN, and 4TO7) subpopulations of a single mouse mammary tumor. Each of these variant subpopulations is resistant to one or more selective drugs so they could be quantitatively identified by colony formation in selective media. We found that the 2 metastatic cell lines metastasized by different routes and that the nonmetastatic tumor cell lines failed at different points in dissemination. Line 67NR did not leave the primary site; clonogenic tumor cells were not detected in the nodes, blood, or lungs during the experiment (7 weeks). Tumor line 168FARN disseminated from the primary tumor because clonogenic cells were cultured from the draining lymph nodes throughout the experiment. However, dissemination essentially stopped in the node as cells were rarely isolated from blood, lungs, or lives. Whether 168FARN cells failed to reach these tissues or were killed very rapidly after traversing the lymph node is unknown. Line 4TO7 cells disseminated via the blood and were consistently recovered from lungs by day 19 but failed to proliferate. This panel of 5 subpopulations thus identifies different points of selective failure in tumor cell dissemination and should be valuable in the assessment of antimetastatic therapies. PMID:1540948

  5. Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Hägglöf, Christina; Thysell, Elin; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Lundholm, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:27550147

  6. Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Hägglöf, Christina; Thysell, Elin; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Lundholm, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:27550147

  7. Tumor metastatic promoter ABCE1 interacts with the cytoskeleton protein actin and increases cell motility.

    PubMed

    Han, Xu; Tian, Ye; Tian, Dali

    2016-06-01

    ABCE1, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family, is a candidate tumor metastatic promoter in lung cancer. Overexpression of ABCE1 is correlated with aggressive growth and metastasis in lung cancer cells. However, the exact mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, GST pull-down assay provided evidence of the possible interaction between ABCE1 and β-actin using GST-ABCE1 as a bait protein. Co-immunoprecipitation manifested ABCE1 formed complexes with β-actin in vivo. ABCE1 overexpression significantly increased the migration of lung cancer cells which may be attributed to the promotion of F-actin rearrangements. Taken together, these data suggest that overexpression of ABCE1 produces an obvious effect on the motility of lung cancer cells through cytoskeleton rearrangement. PMID:27109616

  8. Metastatic Periampullary Tumor from Hepatocellular Carcinoma Presenting as Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Nicholas N.; Guindi, Maha; Jamil, Laith H.

    2015-01-01

    Periampullary tumors constitute a number of diverse neoplastic lesions located within 2 cm of the major duodenal papilla; among these, metastatic lesions account for only a small proportion of the periampullary tumors. To our knowledge, a metastatic periampullary tumor from hepatocellular carcinoma has never been reported. A 62-year-old male reported to our institute for fatigue and low hemoglobin. His medical history was remarkable for multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with selective transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was performed which revealed a periampullary mass. Histopathology was consistent with metastatic moderately differentiated HCC. Two endoloops were deployed around the base of the mass one month apart. The mass eventually sloughed off and patient's hemoglobin level stabilized. We postulated that periampullary metastasis in this patient was the result of tumor fragments migration through the biliary tracts and that TACE which increases tumor fragments burden might have played a contributory role. Metastasis of HCC to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract should be considered as a cause of GI bleeding. PMID:26064707

  9. Metastatic tumors to the jaws and oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gs; Manjunatha, Bs

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a disease involving complex multiple sequential irreversible dysregulated processes showing metastasis that results in morbidity and mortality. Metastasis is a complex biological course that begins with detachment of tumor cells from the primary tumor, spreading into the distant tissues and/or organs, invading through the lymphovascular structures followed by their survival in the circulation. Metastatic tumors to the oro-facial region are uncommon and may occur in the oral soft tissues or jawbones. The clinical presentation of metastatic tumors can be variable, which may lead to erroneous diagnosis or may create diagnostic dilemma. Therefore, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of inflammatory and reactive lesions that are common to the oral region. Most of the literature on oral metastases involves either single case reports or reviews of these reported cases from scattered geographical areas. Hence this present article is an attempt to provide a detailed review of pathogenesis, epidemiological details including clinical and radiographic presentations, microscopic features and treatment of metastatic tumors to the jaws and oral cavity. PMID:23798834

  10. Metastatic brain tumor from urothelial carcinoma of the prostatic urethra

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Kohei; Oda, Masashi; Koyanagi, Masaomi; Saiki, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Urothelial carcinoma occurs in the bladder, upper urinary tract, and lower urinary tract, including prostatic urethra. A majority of the reported cases of intracranial metastasis from urothelial carcinoma originates from the bladder and upper urinary tract. Brain metastasis from urothelial carcinoma of the prostatic urethra has not yet been reported in the literature. Case Description: A 72-year-old male presented with a metastatic brain tumor and a 3-year history of urothelial carcinoma of the prostatic urethra treated with cystourethrectomy and chemotherapy with gemcitabine-cisplatin. Pathological diagnosis for tumor removal was compatible with metastatic brain tumor from urothelial carcinoma. Conclusion: Brain metastasis from urothelial carcinoma of the prostatic urethra has not yet been reported in the literature. It is an extremely rare case, however, we should be careful of brain metastasis during follow-up for urothelial carcinoma in the lower urinary tract. PMID:27512612

  11. Early and multiple origins of metastatic lineages within primary tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zi-Ming; Zhao, Bixiao; Bai, Yalai; Iamarino, Atila; Gaffney, Stephen G; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lifton, Richard P; Rimm, David L; Townsend, Jeffrey P

    2016-02-23

    Many aspects of the evolutionary process of tumorigenesis that are fundamental to cancer biology and targeted treatment have been challenging to reveal, such as the divergence times and genetic clonality of metastatic lineages. To address these challenges, we performed tumor phylogenetics using molecular evolutionary models, reconstructed ancestral states of somatic mutations, and inferred cancer chronograms to yield three conclusions. First, in contrast to a linear model of cancer progression, metastases can originate from divergent lineages within primary tumors. Evolved genetic changes in cancer lineages likely affect only the proclivity toward metastasis. Single genetic changes are unlikely to be necessary or sufficient for metastasis. Second, metastatic lineages can arise early in tumor development, sometimes long before diagnosis. The early genetic divergence of some metastatic lineages directs attention toward research on driver genes that are mutated early in cancer evolution. Last, the temporal order of occurrence of driver mutations can be inferred from phylogenetic analysis of cancer chronograms, guiding development of targeted therapeutics effective against primary tumors and metastases. PMID:26858460

  12. Endoprosthetic proximal femur replacement: metastatic versus primary tumors.

    PubMed

    Potter, Benjamin K; Chow, Vincent E; Adams, Sheila C; Letson, G Douglas; Temple, H Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Few studies have examined the impact of underlying diagnosis on the functional and oncologic outcomes following endoprosthetic proximal femur replacement (PFR). We performed a retrospective review of 61 consecutive cemented bipolar PFR in 59 patients for treatment neoplastic lesions with a minimum follow-up of 24 months. Twenty-two patients had primary bone tumors and 39 had metastatic disease. Average follow-up for the 30 surviving patients was 55.4 months and the mean postoperative survival for the 29 patients who died was 12.2 months. Patients with primary tumors demonstrated significantly better functional outcomes than those with metastatic disease, with mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society functional scores of 80.2 and 66.8%, respectively (p=0.0002). Age correlated inversely with functional scores (r=-0.48; p=0.0002), while femoral resection length did not. Preoperative pathologic fracture did not appear to adversely impact final functional outcomes. The Kaplan-Meier 5-year implant survival estimate was 92.5%, with aseptic loosening as the endpoint. Both functional results and survival are increased for primary tumors versus metastatic disease following PFR. However, PFR results in excellent local disease control, reliable pain relief and good functional results in both groups, with prosthesis survival exceeding that of the patient in many cases. PMID:18835153

  13. Nav1.5 regulates breast tumor growth and metastatic dissemination in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michaela; Yang, Ming; Millican-Slater, Rebecca; Brackenbury, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) mediate action potential firing and regulate adhesion and migration in excitable cells. VGSCs are also expressed in cancer cells. In metastatic breast cancer (BCa) cells, the Nav1.5 α subunit potentiates migration and invasion. In addition, the VGSC-inhibiting antiepileptic drug phenytoin inhibits tumor growth and metastasis. However, the functional activity of Nav1.5 and its specific contribution to tumor progression in vivo has not been delineated. Here, we found that Nav1.5 is up-regulated at the protein level in BCa compared with matched normal breast tissue. Na+ current, reversibly blocked by tetrodotoxin, was retained in cancer cells in tumor tissue slices, thus directly confirming functional VGSC activity in vivo. Stable down-regulation of Nav1.5 expression significantly reduced tumor growth, local invasion into surrounding tissue, and metastasis to liver, lungs and spleen in an orthotopic BCa model. Nav1.5 down-regulation had no effect on cell proliferation or angiogenesis within the in tumors, but increased apoptosis. In vitro, Nav1.5 down-regulation altered cell morphology and reduced CD44 expression, suggesting that VGSC activity may regulate cellular invasion via the CD44-src-cortactin signaling axis. We conclude that Nav1.5 is functionally active in cancer cells in breast tumors, enhancing growth and metastatic dissemination. These findings support the notion that compounds targeting Nav1.5 may be useful for reducing metastasis. PMID:26452220

  14. Tracking sub-clonal TP53 mutated tumor cells in human metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Guilhem; Bouchtaoui, Morad El; Leboeuf, Christophe; Battistella, Maxime; Varna, Mariana; Ferreira, Irmine; Plassa, Louis-François; Hamdan, Diaddin; Bertheau, Philippe; Feugeas, Jean-Paul; Damotte, Diane; Janin, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Renal Cell Carcinomas (RCCs) are heterogeneous tumors with late acquisition of TP53 abnormalities during their evolution. They harbor TP53 abnormalities in their metastases. We aimed to study TP53 gene alterations in tissue samples from primary and metastatic RCCs in 36 patients followed up over a median of 4.2 years, and in xenografted issued from primary RCCs. In 36 primary RCCs systematically xenografted in mice, and in biopsies of metastases performed whenever possible during patient follow-up, we studied p53-expressing tumor cells and TP53 gene abnormalities. We identified TP53 gene alterations in primary tumors, metastases and xenografts. Quantification of tumors cells with TP53 gene alterations showed a significant increase in the metastases compared to the primary RCCs, and, strikingly, the xenografts were similar to the metastases and not to the primary RCCs from which they were derived. Using laser-microdissection of p53-expressing tumor cells, we identified TP53-mutated tumor cells in the xenografts derived from the primary RCC, and in a lung metastasis later developed in one patient. The mutation enabled us to track back their origin to a minority sub-clone in the primary heterogeneous RCC. Combining in situ and molecular analyses, we demonstrated a clonal expansion in a living patient with metastatic RCC. PMID:26002555

  15. How Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the abdomen (diaphragm), the membranes surrounding the space between the lungs (mediastinal pleura), or membranes of ... tumor of any size has grown into the space between the lungs (mediastinum), the heart, the large ...

  16. Injection of Syngeneic Murine Melanoma Cells to Determine Their Metastatic Potential in the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, Joshua J.; Cohessy, Sean; Wong, Eric T.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 90% of human cancer deaths are linked to metastasis. Despite the prevalence and relative harm of metastasis, therapeutics for treatment or prevention are lacking. We report a method for the establishment of pulmonary metastases in mice, useful for the study of this phenomenon. Tail vein injection of B57BL/6J mice with B16-BL6 is among the most used models for melanoma metastases. Some of the circulating tumor cells establish themselves in the lungs of the mouse, creating "experimental" metastatic foci. With this model it is possible to measure the relative effects of therapeutic agents on the development of cancer metastasis. The difference in enumerated lung foci between treated and untreated mice indicates the efficacy of metastases neutralization. However, prior to the investigation of a therapeutic agent, it is necessary to determine an optimal number of injected B16-BL6 cells for the quantitative analysis of metastatic foci. Injection of too many cells may result in an overabundance of metastatic foci, impairing proper quantification and overwhelming the effects of anti-cancer therapies, while injection of too few cells will hinder the comparison between treated and controls. PMID:27285567

  17. [Therapy of Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Reinmuth, N; Gröschel, A; Schumann, C; Sebastian, M; Wiewrodt, R; Reck, M

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer accounts for the leading cause of cancer deaths in Germany and is characterized by early metastasis formation. The majority of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) will receive systemic therapy for treatment of their disease. Importantly together with the identification of targetable oncogenic alterations, systemic treatment of NSCLC has dramatically changed in recent years with the implementation of various new agents such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors, anti angiogenic agents, and immune modulating drugs. However, these new therapeutic options also challenge the treating physician since molecular, histologic, and clinical factors need to be considered for the clinical decision-making. Moreover, supportive therapy including bronchoscopic therapy has evolved. The following therapy recommendations will summarize the up-to date treatment strategies for metastatic NSCLC. PMID:27603945

  18. SKAP2 Promotes Podosome Formation to Facilitate Tumor-Associated Macrophage Infiltration and Metastatic Progression.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masamitsu; Shimamura, Shintaro; Kuriyama, Sei; Maeda, Daichi; Goto, Akiteru; Aiba, Namiko

    2016-01-15

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) play complex and pivotal roles during cancer progression. A subset of metastasis-associated macrophages accumulates within metastatic sites to promote the invasion and growth of tumor cells. Src kinase-associated phosphoprotein 2 (SKAP2), a substrate of Src family kinases, is highly expressed in macrophages from various tumors, but its contribution to the tumor-promoting behavior of TAMs is unknown. Here, we report that SKAP2 regulates podosome formation in macrophages to promote tumor invasion and metastasis. SKAP2 physically interacted with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) and localized to podosomes, which were rarely observed in SKAP2-null macrophages. The invasion of peritoneal macrophages derived from SKAP2-null mice was significantly reduced compared with wild-type macrophages, but could be rescued by the restoration of functional SKAP2 containing an intact tyrosine phosphorylation site and the ability to interact with WASP. Furthermore, SKAP2-null mice inoculated with lung cancer cells exhibited markedly decreased lung metastases characterized by reduced macrophage infiltration compared with wild-type mice. Moreover, intravenously injected SKAP2-null macrophages failed to efficiently infiltrate established tumors and promote their growth. Taken together, these findings reveal a novel mechanism by which macrophages assemble the appropriate motile machinery to infiltrate tumors and promote disease progression, and implicate SKAP2 as an attractive candidate for therapeutically targeting TAMs. PMID:26577701

  19. Curculigoside augments cell-mediated immune responses in metastatic tumor-bearing animals.

    PubMed

    Murali, Vishnu Priya; Kuttan, Girija

    2016-08-01

    A positive modulation of immune system is necessary for preparing the body to fight against malignant tumor cells. In the present study, the stimulatory effect of Curculigoside on cell-mediated immune response against the metastasis of B16F10 melanoma cells was analyzed in C57BL/6 mice. Curculigoside is a phenolic glucoside present in the plant Curculigo orchioides Gaertn. (Family - Amaryllidaceae). Administration of Curculigoside enhanced the natural killer (NK) cell activity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-mediated cytotoxicity in metastatic tumor-bearing animals, when compared to the untreated control animals. The compound was also found to be effective in reducing the levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and GM-CSF during metastasis. Besides these, levels of TH1 cytokines, such as IL-2 and IFN-γ, were significantly enhanced (p < 0.001) by Curculigoside administration and thereby reduces the metastatic lung colony formation along with an increased lifespan of the experimental animals. These studies provide an evidence for the stimulation of cell-mediated immune responses by Curculigoside against B16F10-induced metastatic tumor progression in experimental animals. PMID:27228189

  20. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy; Chapman, Christopher; Rao, Aarti; Shen, John; Quinlan-Davidson, Sean; Filion, Edith J.; Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Whyte, Richard I.; and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  1. Bone marrow as a metastatic niche for disseminated tumor cells from solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, Yusuke; Eber, Matthew R; Berry, Janice E; Taichman, Russell S

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow is a heterogeneous organ containing diverse cell types, and it is a preferred metastatic site for several solid tumors such as breast and prostate cancer. Recently, it has been shown that bone metastatic cancer cells interact with the bone marrow microenvironment to survive and grow, and thus this microenvironment is referred to as the ‘metastatic niche'. Once cancer cells spread to distant organs such as bone, the prognosis for the patient is generally poor. There is an urgent need to establish a greater understanding of the mechanisms whereby the bone marrow niche influences bone metastasis. Here we discuss insights into the contribution of the bone marrow ‘metastatic niche' to progression of bone metastatic disease, with a particular focus on cells of hematopoietic and mesenchymal origin. PMID:26029360

  2. Autoantibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens in metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, Martin; Taylor, Samuel; Shaffer, James

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the well-established effector functions of IgGs, including direct cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, some populations of IgGs may exert anti-inflammatory effects. Here, we describe a population of antibodies that form in the natural course of metastatic cancer and contain glycans that terminate with sialic acid. We demonstrate that both the titer of these antibodies and their level of sialylation are relatively stable throughout the progression of metastatic melanoma. The sialylation pattern of these antibodies somehow correlates with their specificity for tumor-associated antigens, as IgGs targeting several antigens associated with infectious agents are relatively poor of sialic acid. We also show that some antibodies targeting the melanoma-associated antigen NY-ESO-1 bind to the human C-type lectin CD209 (DC-SIGN). We propose that these antibodies are candidate anti-inflammatory antibodies. The presence of anti-inflammatory antibodies in cancer patients may explain, at least in part, why tumors persist and spread in the host despite strong tumor-specific humoral responses. The elucidation of the cellular and molecular pathways involved in the induction of anti-inflammatory antibodies specific for tumor-associated antigens and their function may yield important insights into how tumors evade immune detection and progress. PMID:23894724

  3. Recovery from Choriocarcinoma Syndrome Associated with a Metastatic Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Koji; Takahari, Daisuke; Kimura, Kenya; Kinoshita, Takashi; Ito, Seiji; Abe, Tetsuya; Senda, Yoshiki; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Yuichi; Uemura, Norihisa; Natsume, Seiji; Kawakami, Jiro; Iwata, Yoshinori; Tsutsuyama, Masayuki; Shigeyoshi, Itaru; Akazawa, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Daisuke; Ouchi, Akira; Shimizu, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    A germ cell tumor is the most common form of malignancy in early male life, and can be classified as either seminomatous or nonseminomatous. Choriocarcinoma, comprised of nonseminomatous germ cells, is the most aggressive type of germ cell tumor and characteristically metastasizes to the retroperitoneal lymph nodes and less frequently to the lungs, liver, bone or brain [Shibuya et al., 2009;48: 551–554]. A 56-year-old man was admitted to another hospital complaining of abdominal distension. Symptoms included anorexia, vomiting, and diarrhea. The patient was diagnosed with an extragonadal germ cell tumor and referred to our hospital to receive chemotherapy. The day after admission, the patient's abdominal distension gradually worsened. An emergency operation revealed venous hemorrhage from the surface of a metastatic extragonadal germ cell tumor between the ligament of Treitz and the inferior mesenteric vein in a horizontal position. Hemostatic treatment was performed with 4-0 proline thread attached to a medicated cotton sponge, rather than using a simple proline thread, and the closure area was manually compressed. Chemotherapy was initiated on postoperative day 10. A metastatic extragonadal germ cell tumor that causes massive hemorrhage and gastrointestinal hemorrhage is very rare, and represents a life-threatening emergency. If the patient's condition carries a substantial risk of bleeding to death, it may be worthwhile to attempt abdominal operations.

  4. Recovery from Choriocarcinoma Syndrome Associated with a Metastatic Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Komori, Koji; Takahari, Daisuke; Kimura, Kenya; Kinoshita, Takashi; Ito, Seiji; Abe, Tetsuya; Senda, Yoshiki; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Yuichi; Uemura, Norihisa; Natsume, Seiji; Kawakami, Jiro; Iwata, Yoshinori; Tsutsuyama, Masayuki; Shigeyoshi, Itaru; Akazawa, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Daisuke; Ouchi, Akira; Shimizu, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    A germ cell tumor is the most common form of malignancy in early male life, and can be classified as either seminomatous or nonseminomatous. Choriocarcinoma, comprised of nonseminomatous germ cells, is the most aggressive type of germ cell tumor and characteristically metastasizes to the retroperitoneal lymph nodes and less frequently to the lungs, liver, bone or brain [Shibuya et al., 2009;48: 551-554]. A 56-year-old man was admitted to another hospital complaining of abdominal distension. Symptoms included anorexia, vomiting, and diarrhea. The patient was diagnosed with an extragonadal germ cell tumor and referred to our hospital to receive chemotherapy. The day after admission, the patient's abdominal distension gradually worsened. An emergency operation revealed venous hemorrhage from the surface of a metastatic extragonadal germ cell tumor between the ligament of Treitz and the inferior mesenteric vein in a horizontal position. Hemostatic treatment was performed with 4-0 proline thread attached to a medicated cotton sponge, rather than using a simple proline thread, and the closure area was manually compressed. Chemotherapy was initiated on postoperative day 10. A metastatic extragonadal germ cell tumor that causes massive hemorrhage and gastrointestinal hemorrhage is very rare, and represents a life-threatening emergency. If the patient's condition carries a substantial risk of bleeding to death, it may be worthwhile to attempt abdominal operations. PMID:27403124

  5. [Metastatic tumors in the ovary, difficulties of histologic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Tamás, Judit; Vereczkey, Ildikó; Tóth, Erika

    2015-09-01

    The ovary is a common site of metastases. Secondary tumors account for 3-40% of all ovarian malignancies. Most ovarian metastases arise from the colon, although tumors of the breast, stomach and endometrium are also common places of origin. Clinical and histological features of metastatic tumors frequently mimic primary ovarian malignancies, causing serious diagnostic problems for the surgical pathologist. However, differentiation between primary ovarian cancer and ovarian metastasis is important in order to prevent inappropriate management and suboptimal treatment. The distinction between primary and secondary ovarian malignancies is especially difficult in cases when the metastasis is diagnosed before the primary tumor. Frozen section is widely used in the intra-operative assessment of patients with ovarian tumors but it can be very difficult to distinguish certain types of primary ovarian tumors and metastases from other sites. We examined 152 cases of secondary ovarian neoplasm diagnosed at the National Institute of Oncology, Hungary from 2000 to 2014. Colorectal cancer was the most common primary tumor (58 cases), followed by breast (33 cases), endometrium (30 cases) and stomach cancer (13 cases). The differential diagnosis proved the most difficult in cases when endometrioid and mucinous tumors were present in the ovaries. Metastases of colorectal and gastric adenocarcinomas may simulate benign or borderline cystadenomas too. In these cases the knowledge of the patient's history and immunohistochemical stains were helpful. In our study we discuss the diagnostic challenge of distinguishing these secondary ovarian tumors from primary ovarian neoplasms and the limits of the intraoperative frozen sections. PMID:26339910

  6. Evaluation of androgen receptor and GATA binding protein 3 as immunohistochemical markers in the diagnosis of metastatic breast carcinoma to the lung.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yukinori; Yoshida, Akihiko; Yoshida, Masayuki; Takahashi, Masahide; Tsuta, Koji

    2015-06-01

    Differentiating metastatic breast carcinoma in the lungs from primary lung tumors and mesotheliomas is important for determining prognosis and treatment. We evaluated novel breast specific markers, androgen receptor (AR) and GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3) immunohistostaining, for this differential, and compare to other traditional markers. The specimens comprised 33 metastatic breast carcinomas to the lung, 566 primary lung tumors (170 adenocarcinomas, 157 squamous cell carcinomas, 31 pleomorphic carcinomas, 115 large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, 43 small cell carcinomas, and 49 typical carcinoids) and 42 malignant mesotheliomas. They were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using antibodies to AR, GATA3, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), mammaglobin, gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 (GCDFP-15). Of the metastatic breast carcinomas, immunohistostaining of AR, GATA3, ER, PgR, mammaglobin, GCDFP-15 were positive in 27 cases (81.8%), 24 cases (72.7%), 26 cases (78.8%), 13 cases (39.4%), 12 cases (36.4%), 9 cases (27.3%), respectively. Of primary lung tumors and mesotheliomas, staining of AR, GATA3, ER, PgR, mammaglobin, GCDFP-15 were positive in 18 cases (3%), 3 cases (0.5%), 4 cases (0.7%), 2 cases (0.3%), 0 case (0%), 2 cases (0.3%), respectively. Immunohistochemistry of AR and GATA3 are reliable for differentiating metastatic breast carcinoma from primary lung tumors and mesotheliomas. PMID:25727644

  7. Primary adrenal sarcomatoid carcinoma metastatic to the lung: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, CHUANGZHI; ZHENG, AIPING; MAO, XIANGMING; SHI, BENTAO; LI, XIANXIN

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal sarcomatoid carcinoma is a rare adrenal carcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, only 11 cases have been reported since 1987. Adrenal sarcomatoid carcinoma presents a diagnostic challenge due to its atypical symptoms and histological patterns. At the time of diagnosis, a large percentage of patients are already at the metastatic stage and succumb within a few months. The present study reports a case of a 59-year-old man presenting with asthenia and weight loss with adrenal sarcomatoid carcinoma metastatic to the lung. A computed tomography (CT) scan and ultrasonography of the patient's abdomen suggested a large homogeneous mass in the right adrenal gland, and a CT scan of his chest suggested lung metastasis. Right adrenalectomy was performed. Histological examination revealed that the tumor was composed of sarcomatous and carcinomatous differentiation elements. Immunohistochemical examination revealed tumor cell positivity for vimentin and cytokeratin. At the 6-month follow-up the patient exhibited no disease progression and refused further proposed treatment. The patient was alive at the time of writing the current report. The present case report additionally reviews the literature, for the purpose of raising awareness of these rare lesions and assisting in achieving accurate diagnoses and effective treatment. PMID:27123074

  8. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage due to metastatic angiosarcoma of the lung: A case report

    PubMed Central

    PAN, ZHIJIE; AN, ZHOU; LI, YANYUAN; ZHOU, JIANYING

    2015-01-01

    Angiosarcoma is a rare, heterogeneous malignant tumor that derives from endothelial cells, and it has aggressive characteristics with a marked tendency for distant metastasis. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a catastrophic clinical syndrome, however, it is rare as the presentation of pulmonary angiosarcoma. To increase awareness with regard to angiosarcoma and DAH, the current study presents a case of angiosarcoma that originated from the subcutaneous soft tissue of the mastoid process, but was subject to a delayed diagnosis and rapid invasion into the brain and lung. The metastatic angiosarcoma of the lung presented with DAH as the initial manifestation. The pathological examination of a biopsy of the subcutaneous mass and pulmonary lesions confirmed the diagnosis of angiosarcoma. The patient succumbed to respiratory failure at 1 month post-diagnosis. PMID:26788222

  9. [Mutation of P53 gene in a highly metastatic human lung cancer cell line].

    PubMed

    Zhang, B; Cui, W; Gao, Y

    1995-07-01

    PG cell line, derived from a lung giant cell carcinoma, has the characteristics of rapid growth and high tumorigenicity. When transplanted to nude mice, spontanious metastasis to lung and lymphnode is high in frequency and stable. To understand the molecular basis of PG's biological behaviors, expression of tumor suppressor gene p53 was studied. It was found that expression of p53 protein was increased as demonstrated by immunohistochemical stainning. A change in polymorphsim in exon 7 of p53 gene was detected by nonisotopic PCR-SSCP, suggesting a change in base composition. Thermal cycling sequencing of both strands of exon 7 demonstrated a transversion of CGG to CTT at codon 248. Similar study with the same methods on Ki-ras oncogene was done, but no mutation was found. The relationship between p53 gene mutation and the metastatic potential of PG cells needs further exploration. PMID:7587895

  10. Cannibalism: a way to feed on metastatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Fais, Stefano

    2007-12-18

    Cannibalism of tumors is an old story for pathologists, but it remained a mystery for at least one century. Recent data highlighted tumor cannibalism as a key advantage in tumor malignancy, possibly involved in resistance of tumors to the specific immune reaction. However, new data suggests also that metastatic tumor cells may use this peculiar function to feed in conditions of low nutrient supply. This makes malignant cancer cells more similar to microorganisms, rather than to normal cells undergoing malignant transformation. In cytological or histological samples of human tumors it is common to detect cells with one or many vacuoles, possibly containing cells under degradation, that push the nucleus to the periphery giving it the shape of a crescent moon. The cannibal cells may feed on sibling tumor cells, but also of the lymphocytes that should kill them. Cannibal cells eat everything without distinguishing between the feeding materials, with a mechanism that mostly differ from typical phagocytosis. Despite such phenomenon is considered mainly non-selective, a molecular framework of factors that contribute to cannibalism has been described. This machinery includes the presence of an acidic environment that allows a continuous activation of specific lytic enzymes, such as cathepsin B. Cannibalism occurs in apparently well defined structures whose main actors are big caveolar-like vacuoles and a connection between caveolin-1 and the actin cytoskeleton through the actin-linker molecule ezrin. Each of the components of the cannibal framework may represent specific tumor targets for future new strategies against cancer. PMID:17977647

  11. [In vitro chemosensitivity of lung cancer and other chest tumors evaluated by human tumor colony assay].

    PubMed

    Lee, K; Kuze, F; Hashimura, T; Tanigawa, N

    1984-12-01

    In vitro chemosensitivity of lung cancer and other chest tumors was evaluated by human tumor colony assay (HTCA). From 61 specimens 33 (54%) grew more than 30 colonies from which evaluation of chemosensitivity could be performed. Of 41 specimens of lung cancer, 26 (63%) yielded adequate growth for drug testing. Nine out of 26 specimens of non-small cell lung cancer showed more than 50% reduction in colony formation, and in 4 of the 26 specimens, more than 70% reduction was obtained with more than one of the drugs tested. Specimens obtained from metastatic lesions of lung cancer showed higher plating efficiency and drug sensitivity than those from primary lesions. Plating efficiency of non-epithelial tumors was lower than that of epithelial tumors. HTCA has a potential value for screening anticancer agents against lung cancer and other chest tumors. However, the assay still has many problems to be resolved, such as difficulty in obtaining single-cell suspensions and poor plating efficiency. PMID:6095761

  12. Radiofrequency ablation for lung tumors: outcomes, effects on survival, and prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Akhan, Okan; Güler, Ezgi; Akıncı, Devrim; Çiftçi, Türkmen; Köse, Ilgaz Çağatay

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the survival benefit achieved with radiofrequency (RF) ablation of primary and metastatic lung tumors and determine significant prognostic factors for recurrence-free survival. METHODS Forty-nine patients with lung cancer (10 primary and 39 metastatic) underwent computed tomography-guided percutaneous RF ablation between June 2005 and October 2013. A total of 112 tumors (101 metastatic and 11 primary non-small cell lung cancer) were treated with RF ablation. Tumor diameter ranged from 0.6 to 4 cm (median 1.5 cm). Effectiveness of treatment, complications, and survival were analyzed. RESULTS Primary success rate was 79.5% and local tumor progression occurred in 23 tumors. Among tumors showing progression, 10 were re-treated with RF ablation and secondary success rate was 87.5%. One-, two-, and three-year overall survival rates of 10 patients with primary lung cancer were 100%, 86%, and 43%, respectively. One-, two-, three-, four-, and five-year overall survival rates for 39 patients with metastatic lung tumors were 90%, 73%, 59%, 55%, and 38%, respectively. One-, two-, three-, and four-year overall survival rates for 16 patients with colorectal pulmonary metastases were 94%, 80%, 68%, and 23%, respectively. Complications occurred in 30 sessions (24.6%). Pneumothorax occurred in 19 sessions with seven requiring image-guided percutaneous chest tube drainage. Tumor status (solitary or multiple) and presence of extrapulmonary metastasis at initial RF ablation were significant prognostic factors in terms of recurrence-free survival. CONCLUSION RF ablation is a safe and effective treatment with a survival benefit for selected patients with primary and secondary lung tumors. PMID:26611111

  13. Von Hippel Lindau disease with metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor causing ectopic Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hatipoglu, Esra; Kepicoglu, Hasan; Rusen, Elif; Kabasakal, Levent; Gundogdu, Sadi; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2013-01-01

    We present a 39-year-old woman who was previously diagnosed with Von Hippel Lindau Disease (VHLD). She had surgery and radiotherapy for cranial hemangioblastoma (HA) 11 years ago and had unilateral adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma in another hospital 6 month prior to her admission to our center. Moon face, buffalo hump, central obesity, progressive weight gain and menstrual irregularities persisted after adrenalectomy. Her laboratory results were consistent with ectopic Cushing's syndrome (ECS). A pancreatic solid mass with a nodule on the left lung were revealed upon computed tomography. In addition, Gallium-68 Somatostatin Receptor PET confirmed the pancreatic involvement and demonstrated additional lesions on the left lung and in the aortocaval lymphatic system on the right side, suggesting metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET). Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with [177Lutetium-DOTA0,Tyr3] octreotate was performed on the patient, with no side effects observed. She was discharged from the hospital 10 days after the first cycle. PMID:23524618

  14. Self-targeting of TNF-releasing cancer cells in preclinical models of primary and metastatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dondossola, Eleonora; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Marchiò, Serena; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Hosoya, Hitomi; Libutti, Steven K.; Corti, Angelo; Sidman, Richard L.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Circulating cancer cells can putatively colonize distant organs to form metastases or to reinfiltrate primary tumors themselves through a process termed “tumor self-seeding.” Here we exploit this biological attribute to deliver tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF), a potent antitumor cytokine, directly to primary and metastatic tumors in a mechanism that we have defined as “tumor self-targeting.” For this purpose, we genetically engineered mouse mammary adenocarcinoma (TSA), melanoma (B16-F10), and Lewis lung carcinoma cells to produce and release murine TNF. In a series of intervention trials, systemic administration of TNF-expressing tumor cells was associated with reduced growth of both primary tumors and metastatic colonies in immunocompetent mice. We show that these malignant cells home to tumors, locally release TNF, damage neovascular endothelium, and induce massive cancer cell apoptosis. We also demonstrate that such tumor-cell–mediated delivery avoids or minimizes common side effects often associated with TNF-based therapy, such as acute inflammation and weight loss. Our study provides proof of concept that genetically modified circulating tumor cells may serve as targeted vectors to deliver anticancer agents. In a clinical context, this unique paradigm represents a personalized approach to be translated into applications potentially using patient-derived circulating tumor cells as self-targeted vectors for drug delivery. PMID:26858439

  15. Protease activated receptor-1 inhibits the Maspin tumor-suppressor gene to determine the melanoma metastatic phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Villares, Gabriel J.; Zigler, Maya; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Wang, Hua; Song, Renduo; Melnikova, Vladislava O.; Huang, Li; Braeuer, Russell R.; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2011-01-01

    The thrombin receptor protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) is overexpressed in metastatic melanoma cell lines and tumor specimens. Previously, we demonstrated a significant reduction in tumor growth and experimental lung metastasis after PAR-1 silencing via systemic delivery of siRNA encapsulated into nanoliposomes. Gene expression profiling identified a 40-fold increase in expression of Maspin in PAR-1–silenced metastatic melanoma cell lines. Maspin promoter activity was significantly increased after PAR-1 silencing, suggesting that PAR1 negatively regulates Maspin at the transcriptional level. ChIP analyses revealed that PAR-1 decreases binding of Ets-1 and c-Jun transcription factors to the Maspin promoter, both known to activate Maspin transcription. PAR-1 silencing did not affect Ets-1 or c-Jun expression; rather it resulted in increased expression of the chromatin remodeling complex CBP/p300, as well as decreased activity of the CBP/p300 inhibitor p38, resulting in increased binding of Ets-1 and c-Jun to the Maspin promoter and higher Maspin expression. Functionally, Maspin expression reduced the invasive capability of melanoma cells after PAR-1 silencing, which was abrogated after rescuing with PAR-1. Furthermore, tumor growth and experimental lung metastasis was significantly decreased after expressing Maspin in a metastatic melanoma cell line. Moreover, silencing Maspin in PAR-1–silenced cells reverted the inhibition of tumor growth and experimental lung metastasis. Herein, we demonstrate a mechanism by which PAR-1 negatively regulates the expression of the Maspin tumor-suppressor gene in the acquisition of the metastatic melanoma phenotype, thus attributing an alternative function to PAR-1 other than coagulation. PMID:21187389

  16. Protease activated receptor-1 inhibits the Maspin tumor-suppressor gene to determine the melanoma metastatic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Villares, Gabriel J; Zigler, Maya; Dobroff, Andrey S; Wang, Hua; Song, Renduo; Melnikova, Vladislava O; Huang, Li; Braeuer, Russell R; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2011-01-11

    The thrombin receptor protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) is overexpressed in metastatic melanoma cell lines and tumor specimens. Previously, we demonstrated a significant reduction in tumor growth and experimental lung metastasis after PAR-1 silencing via systemic delivery of siRNA encapsulated into nanoliposomes. Gene expression profiling identified a 40-fold increase in expression of Maspin in PAR-1-silenced metastatic melanoma cell lines. Maspin promoter activity was significantly increased after PAR-1 silencing, suggesting that PAR1 negatively regulates Maspin at the transcriptional level. ChIP analyses revealed that PAR-1 decreases binding of Ets-1 and c-Jun transcription factors to the Maspin promoter, both known to activate Maspin transcription. PAR-1 silencing did not affect Ets-1 or c-Jun expression; rather it resulted in increased expression of the chromatin remodeling complex CBP/p300, as well as decreased activity of the CBP/p300 inhibitor p38, resulting in increased binding of Ets-1 and c-Jun to the Maspin promoter and higher Maspin expression. Functionally, Maspin expression reduced the invasive capability of melanoma cells after PAR-1 silencing, which was abrogated after rescuing with PAR-1. Furthermore, tumor growth and experimental lung metastasis was significantly decreased after expressing Maspin in a metastatic melanoma cell line. Moreover, silencing Maspin in PAR-1-silenced cells reverted the inhibition of tumor growth and experimental lung metastasis. Herein, we demonstrate a mechanism by which PAR-1 negatively regulates the expression of the Maspin tumor-suppressor gene in the acquisition of the metastatic melanoma phenotype, thus attributing an alternative function to PAR-1 other than coagulation. PMID:21187389

  17. Differentiating Metastatic and Non-metastatic Tumor Cells from Their Translocation Profile through Solid-State Micropores.

    PubMed

    Ali, Waqas; Ilyas, Azhar; Bui, Loan; Sayles, Bailey; Hur, Yeun; Kim, Young-Tae; Iqbal, Samir M

    2016-05-17

    Cancer treatment, care, and outcomes are much more effective if started at early stages of the disease. The presence of malignant cancer cells in human samples such as blood or biopsied tissue can be used to reduce overtreatment and underdiagnosis as well as for prognosis monitoring. Reliable quantification of metastatic tumor cells (MTCs) and non-metastatic tumor cells (NMTCs) from human samples can help in cancer staging as well. We report a simple, fast, and reliable approach to identify and quantify metastatic and non-metastatic cancer cells from whole biological samples in a point-of-care manner. The metastatic (MDA MB-231) and non-metastatic (MCF7) breast cancer cells were pushed through a solid-state micropore made in a 200 nm thin SiO2 membrane while measuring current across the micropore. The cells generated very distinctive translocation profiles. The translocation differences stemmed from their peculiar mechanophysical properties. The detection efficiency of the device for each type of tumor cells was ∼75%. MTCs showed faster translocation (36%) and 34% less pore blockage than NMTCs. The micropore approach is simple, exact, and quantitative for metastatic cell detection in a lab-on-a chip setting, without the need for any preprocessing of the sample. PMID:27035212

  18. Lung Tumor Radiofrequency Ablation: Where Do We Stand?

    SciTech Connect

    Baere, Thierry de

    2011-04-15

    Today, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of primary and metastatic lung tumor is increasingly used. Because RFA is most often used with curative intent, preablation workup must be a preoperative workup. General anesthesia provides higher feasibility than conscious sedation. The electrode positioning must be performed under computed tomography for sake of accuracy. The delivery of RFA must be adapted to tumor location, with different impedances used when treating tumors with or without pleural contact. The estimated rate of incomplete local treatment at 18 months was 7% (95% confidence interval, 3-14) per tumor, with incomplete treatment depicted at 4 months (n = 1), 6 months (n = 2), 9 months (n = 2), and 12 months (n = 2). Overall survival and lung disease-free survival at 18 months were, respectively, 71 and 34%. Size is a key point for tumor selection because large size is predictive of incomplete local treatment and poor survival. The ratio of ablation volume relative to tumor volume is predictive of complete ablation. Follow-up computed tomography that relies on the size of the ablation zone demonstrates the presence of incomplete ablation. Positron emission tomography might be an interesting option. Chest tube placement for pneumothorax is reported in 8 to 12%. Alveolar hemorrhage and postprocedure hemoptysis occurred in approximately 10% of procedures and rarely required specific treatment. Death was mostly related to single-lung patients and hilar tumors. No modification of forced expiratory volume in the first second between pre- and post-RFA at 2 months was found. RFA in the lung provides a high local efficacy rate. The use of RFA as a palliative tool in combination with chemotherapy remains to be explored.

  19. SHIP represses lung inflammation and inhibits mammary tumor metastasis in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Melisa J.; Halvorsen, Elizabeth C.; LePard, Nancy E.; Bosiljcic, Momir; Ho, Victor W.; Lam, Vivian; Banáth, Judit

    2016-01-01

    SH2-containing-inositol-5′-phosphatase (SHIP) is a negative regulator of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase pathway in hematopoietic cells and limits the development of leukemias and lymphomas. The potential role of SHIP in solid tumor development and metastasis remains unknown. While SHIP restricts the aberrant development of myeloid cells in C57BL/6 mice, there are conflicting reports regarding the effect of SHIP deletion in BALB/c mice with important consequences for determining the influence of SHIP in different model tumor systems. We generated SHIP−/− BALB/c mice and challenged them with syngeneic non-metastatic 67NR or metastatic 4T1 mammary tumors. We demonstrate that SHIP restricts the development, alternative-activation, and immunosuppressive function of myeloid cells in tumor-free and tumor-bearing BALB/c mice. Tumor-free SHIP−/− BALB/c mice exhibited pulmonary inflammation, myeloid hyperplasia, and M2-polarized macrophages and this phenotype was greatly exacerbated by 4T1, but not 67NR, tumors. 4T1-bearing SHIP−/− mice rapidly lost weight and died from necrohemorrhagic inflammatory pulmonary disease, characterized by massive infiltration of pulmonary macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells that were more M2-polarized and immunosuppressive than wild-type cells. Importantly, while SHIP loss did not affect primary tumor growth, 4T1-bearing SHIP−/− mice had 7.5-fold more metastatic tumor cells in their lungs than wild-type mice, consistent with the influence of immunosuppressive myeloid cells on metastatic growth. Our findings identify the hematopoietic cell-restricted protein SHIP as an intriguing target to influence the development of solid tumor metastases, and support development of SHIP agonists to prevent the accumulation of immunosuppressive myeloid cells and tumor metastases in the lungs to improve treatment of metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26683227

  20. Primary Endometrial Yolk Sac Tumor With Endodermal-Intestinal Differentiation Masquerading as Metastatic Colorectal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Damato, Stephen; Haldar, Krishnayan; McCluggage, W Glenn

    2016-07-01

    Yolk sac tumors (YSTs) with a somatic glandular pattern can be difficult to recognize histologically because they reproduce developing intestinal, hepatic, or lung tissue and can express markers such as CDX2 and TTF1. We report an unusual case of a primary endometrial YST showing florid endodermal-intestinal differentiation in a 63-yr-old woman with a history of colorectal adenocarcinoma. Histologically, the tumor exhibited a glandular and papillary architecture and showed widespread immunoreactivity for CDX2 and focal staining for CK20 and CEA, mimicking metastatic colorectal carcinoma on biopsy. The presence of subnuclear cytoplasmic clearing and positive staining for germ cell markers, however, pointed toward a diagnosis of primary endometrial YST, and this was supported by the radiologic and the subsequent pathologic finding of a primary endometrial-based lesion. YSTs in this age group usually arise in association with somatic tumors and in this case a small focus of coexistent endometrioid adenocarcinoma was identified within the uterus. Despite surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy, the patient showed disease progression with liver and lung metastases 6 mo postoperatively. PMID:26598980

  1. Changes in lung tumor shape during respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriakou, E.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2012-02-01

    Evidence that some lung tumors change shape during respiration is derived from respiratory gated CT data by statistical shape modeling and image manipulation. Some tumors behave as rigid objects while others show systematic shape changes. Two views of lung motion are presented to allow analysis of the results. In the first, lung motion is viewed as a wave motion in which inertial effects arising from mass are present and in the second it is a quasistatic motion in which the mass of the lung tissues is neglected. In the first scenario, the extremes of tumor compression and expansion are expected to correlate with maximum upward and downward velocity of the tumor, respectively. In the second, they should occur at end exhale and end inhale, respectively. An observed correlation between tumor strain and tumor velocity provides more support for the first view of lung motion and may explain why previous attempts at observing tumor shape changes during respiration have largely failed. The implications for the optimum gating of radiation therapy are discussed.

  2. Dietary Selenium Supplementation Modulates Growth of Brain Metastatic Tumors and Changes the Expression of Adhesion Molecules in Brain Microvessels.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Jagoda K; Wolff, Gretchen; Xiao, Rijin; Power, Ronan F; Toborek, Michal

    2016-08-01

    Various dietary agents can modulate tumor invasiveness. The current study explored whether selenoglycoproteins (SeGPs) extracted from selenium-enriched yeast affect tumor cell homing and growth in the brain. Mice were fed diets enriched with specific SeGPs (SeGP40 or SeGP65, 1 mg/kg Se each), glycoproteins (GP40 or GP65, 0.2-0.3 mg/kg Se each) or a control diet (0.2-0.3 mg/kg Se) for 12 weeks. Then, murine Lewis lung carcinoma cells were infused into the brain circulation. Analyses were performed at early (48 h) and late stages (3 weeks) post tumor cell infusion. Imaging of tumor progression in the brain revealed that mice fed SeGP65-enriched diet displayed diminished metastatic tumor growth, fewer extravasating tumor cells and smaller metastatic lesions. While administration of tumor cells resulted in a significant upregulation of adhesion molecules in the early stage of tumor progression, overexpression of VCAM-1 (vascular call adhesion molecule-1) and ALCAM (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule) messenger RNA (mRNA) was diminished in SeGP65 supplemented mice. Additionally, mice fed SeGP65 showed decreased expression of acetylated NF-κB p65, 48 h post tumor cell infusion. The results indicate that tumor progression in the brain can be modulated by specific SeGPs. Selenium-containing compounds were more effective than their glycoprotein controls, implicating selenium as a potential negative regulator of metastatic process. PMID:26706037

  3. Vaccine Therapy Plus Biological Therapy in Treating Adults With Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-19

    Colorectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Melanoma (Skin); Pancreatic Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  4. Immune cells in primary and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Silke; Gieselmann, Marieke; Blaschke, Martina; Ramadori, Giuliano; Füzesi, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described immune cells in untreated primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Here we compare immune cells in metastatic and primary GIST, and describe their chemoattractants. For this purpose, tissue microarrays from 196 patients, 188 primary and 51 metastasized GIST were constructed for paraffin staining. Quantitative analysis was performed for cells of macrophage lineage (Ki-M1P, CD68), T-cells (CD3, CD56) and B-cells (CD20). Chemokine gene-expression was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Immuno-localisation was verified by immunofluorescence. Ki-M1P+ cells were the predominant immune cells in both primary and metastatic GIST (2 8.8% ± 7.1, vs. 26.7% ± 6.3). CD68+ macrophages were significantly fewer, with no significant difference between primary GIST (3.6% ± 2.1) and metastases (4.6% ± 1.5). CD3+ T-cells were the most dominant lymphocytes with a significant increase in metastases (7.3% ± 2.3 vs. 2.2% ± 1.8 in primary GIST, P < 0.01). The percentage of CD56+ NK-cells was 1.1% ± 0.9 in the primary, and 2.4 ± 0.7 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. The number of CD20+ B-cells was generally low with 0.6% ± 0.7 in the primary and 1.8% ± 0.3 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. Analysis of the metastases showed significantly more Ki-M1P+ cells in peritoneal metastases (31.8% ± 7.4 vs. 18.2% ± 3.7, P < 0.01), whilst CD3+ T-cells were more common in liver metastases (11.7% ± 1.8 vs. 4.4% ± 2.6, P < 0.01). The highest transcript expression was seen for monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1/CCL2), macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α/CCL3) and the pro-angiogenic growth-related oncoprotein 1 (Gro-α/CXCL-1). Whilst the ligands were predominantly expressed in tumor cells, their receptors were mostly present in immune cells. This locally specific microenvironment might influence neoplastic progression of GIST at the different metastatic sites. PMID:25120735

  5. Metastatic alveolar soft part sarcoma of the lung: Metastatic alveolar soft part sarcoma of the lung-a morphologic pitfall on cytology and aberrant CD10 expression on histology.

    PubMed

    Nambirajan, Aruna; Jain, Deepali; Malik, Prabhat; Arava, Sudheer; Mathur, Sandeep R

    2016-03-01

    Alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) is a rare aggressive soft tissue sarcoma of young adults, typically arising in the deep soft tissue of lower extremities. Although cytomorphology is characteristic enough for an accurate diagnosis in typical clinical scenarios, problems arise when it occurs in older patients, atypical sites, or in primary evaluation at metastatic sites. A 48-year-old smoker presented with breathlessness and headache for 2 months. Imaging showed a heterogeneous enhancing lesion of 6 cm × 6 cm in right middle lobe of lung, smaller miliary nodules in bilateral lungs, multiple bilateral cerebral lesions, and a mass of 3 cm × 3 cm in the left thigh. Primary lung carcinoma with brain and thigh metastases was the clinical diagnosis. Fine-needle aspiration smears of the lung lesion showed cohesive fragments of large cells with a prominent traversing branching capillary network and discohesion at periphery resulting in a pseudo-papillary appearance. Tumor cells had fine granular to vacuolated cytoplasm, frayed borders, and prominent nucleoli. Trucut biopsy from the same showed a tumor arranged in nests composed of large polygonal cells, immunopositive for CD10. Possibility of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) was offered. Abdominal imaging was, however, normal. Core biopsy from thigh showed a similar tumor, immunonegative for epithelial markers, with cytoplasmic periodic-acid-schiff positive rhomboid crystals, clinching the final diagnosis of ASPS with lung and brain metastases. There is considerable morphological and immunohistochemical overlap between ASPS and RCC. Bare nuclei on air dried smears, binucleation, metachromatic basement membrane material are subtle pointers toward ASPS. PMID:26693959

  6. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Norihisa, Yoshiki; Nagata, Yasushi Takayama, Kenji; Matsuo, Yukinori; Sakamoto, Takashi; Sakamoto, Masato; Mizowaki, Takashi; Yano, Shinsuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: Since 1998, we have treated primary and oligometastatic lung tumors with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The term 'oligometastasis' is used to indicate a small number of metastases limited to an organ. We evaluated our clinical experience of SBRT for oligometastatic lung tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 34 patients with oligometastatic lung tumors were included in this study. The primary involved organs were the lung (n = 15), colorectum (n = 9), head and neck (n = 5), kidney (n = 3), breast (n = 1), and bone (n = 1). Five to seven, noncoplanar, static 6-MV photon beams were used to deliver 48 Gy (n = 18) or 60 Gy (n = 16) at the isocenter, with 12 Gy/fraction within 4-18 days (median, 12 days). Results: The overall survival rate, local relapse-free rate, and progression-free rate at 2 years was 84.3%, 90.0%, and 34.8%, respectively. No local progression was observed in tumors irradiated with 60 Gy. SBRT-related pulmonary toxicities were observed in 4 (12%) Grade 2 cases and 1 (3%) Grade 3 case. Patients with a longer disease-free interval had a greater overall survival rate. Conclusion: The clinical result of SBRT for oligometastatic lung tumors in our institute was comparable to that after surgical metastasectomy; thus, SBRT could be an effective treatment of pulmonary oligometastases.

  7. Frequent alterations in cytoskeleton remodelling genes in primary and metastatic lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kui; Zhang, Xin; Li, Fuqiang; Xiao, Dakai; Hou, Yong; Zhu, Shida; Liu, Dongbing; Ye, Xiaofei; Ye, Mingzhi; Yang, Jie; Shao, Libin; Pan, Hui; Lu, Na; Yu, Yuan; Liu, Liping; Li, Jin; Huang, Liyan; Tang, Hailing; Deng, Qiuhua; Zheng, Yue; Peng, Lihua; Liu, Geng; Gu, Xia; He, Ping; Gu, Yingying; Lin, Weixuan; He, Huiming; Xie, Guoyun; Liang, Han; An, Na; Wang, Hui; Teixeira, Manuel; Vieira, Joana; Liang, Wenhua; Zhao, Xin; Peng, Zhiyu; Mu, Feng; Zhang, Xiuqing; Xu, Xun; Yang, Huanming; Kristiansen, Karsten; Wang, Jian; Zhong, Nanshan; Wang, Jun; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; He, Jianxing

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of genetic alterations in lung adenocarcinoma derived from Asian patients is largely uncharacterized. Here we present an integrated genomic and transcriptomic analysis of 335 primary lung adenocarcinomas and 35 corresponding lymph node metastases from Chinese patients. Altogether 13 significantly mutated genes are identified, including the most commonly mutated gene TP53 and novel mutation targets such as RHPN2, GLI3 and MRC2. TP53 mutations are furthermore significantly enriched in tumours from patients harbouring metastases. Genes regulating cytoskeleton remodelling processes are also frequently altered, especially in metastatic samples, of which the high expression level of IQGAP3 is identified as a marker for poor prognosis. Our study represents the first large-scale sequencing effort on lung adenocarcinoma in Asian patients and provides a comprehensive mutational landscape for both primary and metastatic tumours. This may thus form a basis for personalized medical care and shed light on the molecular pathogenesis of metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26647728

  8. Frequent alterations in cytoskeleton remodelling genes in primary and metastatic lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kui; Zhang, Xin; Li, Fuqiang; Xiao, Dakai; Hou, Yong; Zhu, Shida; Liu, Dongbing; Ye, Xiaofei; Ye, Mingzhi; Yang, Jie; Shao, Libin; Pan, Hui; Lu, Na; Yu, Yuan; Liu, Liping; Li, Jin; Huang, Liyan; Tang, Hailing; Deng, Qiuhua; Zheng, Yue; Peng, Lihua; Liu, Geng; Gu, Xia; He, Ping; Gu, Yingying; Lin, Weixuan; He, Huiming; Xie, Guoyun; Liang, Han; An, Na; Wang, Hui; Teixeira, Manuel; Vieira, Joana; Liang, Wenhua; Zhao, Xin; Peng, Zhiyu; Mu, Feng; Zhang, Xiuqing; Xu, Xun; Yang, Huanming; Kristiansen, Karsten; Wang, Jian; Zhong, Nanshan; Wang, Jun; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; He, Jianxing

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of genetic alterations in lung adenocarcinoma derived from Asian patients is largely uncharacterized. Here we present an integrated genomic and transcriptomic analysis of 335 primary lung adenocarcinomas and 35 corresponding lymph node metastases from Chinese patients. Altogether 13 significantly mutated genes are identified, including the most commonly mutated gene TP53 and novel mutation targets such as RHPN2, GLI3 and MRC2. TP53 mutations are furthermore significantly enriched in tumours from patients harbouring metastases. Genes regulating cytoskeleton remodelling processes are also frequently altered, especially in metastatic samples, of which the high expression level of IQGAP3 is identified as a marker for poor prognosis. Our study represents the first large-scale sequencing effort on lung adenocarcinoma in Asian patients and provides a comprehensive mutational landscape for both primary and metastatic tumours. This may thus form a basis for personalized medical care and shed light on the molecular pathogenesis of metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26647728

  9. Primary tumor prevalence has an impact on the constituent ratio of metastases to the jaw but not on metastatic sites

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fu-gui; Hua, Cheng-ge; Shen, Mo-lun; Tang, Xiu-fa

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an overview of metastases to jaws (MJ), mainly concerning the differences between American and Chinese patients, and exploring the relationship between the primary tumors' prevalence (PTP) and constituent ratio of MJ. Information concerning of 399 MJ cases in 215 papers, including one new case in our hospital, was subjected to statistic analysis. The main clinical features of MJ, such as constituent ratio of PTP and that of MJ, metastatic sites, treatments, and prognosis were summarized. Breast, lung, kidney, prostate and thyroid (in descending order) were the leading primary sites of MJ. Furthermore, the constituent ratio of MJ was found to be correlated with that of PTP in all subjects including American and Chinese subjects in our study. As to metastatic sites in the mandible, a specific “M” shaped pattern appeared regardless of the tumor type or constituent ratios of MJ were in all subjects. Almost all subjects received traditionally palliative treatments, and the prognosis was quite poor. The PTP had a significant impact on the constituent ratio of MJ. However, it was the properties of the microenvironment rather than characteristics or constituent ratios of tumor cells, that decided the metastatic sites in various tumor subjects. PMID:21789963

  10. Inhibition of primary and metastatic tumors in mice by E-selectin-targeted polymer-drug conjugates.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Yosi; Raviv, Lior; Golan, Moran; Voronov, Elena; Apte, Ron N; David, Ayelet

    2015-11-10

    There is currently no effective means to prevent or control metastatic dissemination of cancer cells. E-selectin, an adhesion molecule expressed exclusively on inflamed and angiogenic blood vessels, plays an important role in several rate-limiting steps of cancer metastasis. In this study, we assessed the in vivo antitumor efficacy of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers conjugated to an E-selectin binding peptide (Esbp, DITWDQLWDLMK) and equipped with the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (P-(Esbp)-DOX) or with the proapoptotic peptide D(KLAKLAK)2 (P-(Esbp)-KLAK). Following a single intravenous injection, P-(Esbp)-DOX reduced tumor growth rate and prolonged the survival of mice bearing primary Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) tumors significantly more than treatment with a non-targeted copolymer (P-DOX) or with free DOX. In an experimental B16-F10 lung metastasis model, a single intravenous dose of P-(Esbp)-DOX or P-(Esbp)-KLAK prolonged mice survival time significantly more than the non-targeted copolymers or the free drugs, and the percentage of complete tumor regression increased with increasing doses and with dosing frequency. In addition, mice pretreated with an E-selectin-targeted "drug-free" copolymer (P-(Esbp)-FITC) exhibited significantly fewer B16-F10 tumor foci in the lungs as compared with non-treated mice, demonstrating the anti-metastatic properties of the copolymer and its ability to control cancer spread through E-selectin-mediated interactions. Biodistribution analysis further confirmed the preferential accumulation of the E-selectin-targeted near-infrared fluorescently-labeled copolymer P-(Esbp)-IR783 in B16-F10 lung metastases. Taken together, this study demonstrates, for the first time, that the E-selectin targeted copolymer-drug conjugates can inhibit primary tumor growth and prevent metastases in vivo. PMID:26297207

  11. Anti-tumor immunity generated by photodynamic therapy in a metastatic murine tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2005-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a modality for the treatment of cancer involving excitation of photosensitizers with harmless visible light producing reactive oxygen species. The major biological effects of PDT are apoptosis of tumor cells, destruction of the blood supply and activation of the immune system. The objective of this study is to compare in an animal model of metastatic cancer, PDT alone and PDT combined with low-dose cyclophosphamide (CY). Since the tumor we used is highly metastatic, it is necessary to generate anti-tumor immunity using PDT to both cure the primary tumor and prevent death from metastasis. This immunity may be potentiated by low dose CY. In our model we used J774 cells (a Balb/c reticulum cell sarcoma line with the characteristics of macrophages) and the following PDT regimen: benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD, 2mg/kg injected IV followed after 15 min by 150 J/cm2 of 690-nm light). CY (50 mg/kg i.p.) was injected 48 hours before light delivery. BPD-PDT led to complete regression of the primary tumor in more than half the mice but no permanent cures were obtained. BPD-PDT in combination with CY led to 60% permanent cures. CY alone gave no permanent cures but did provide a survival advantage. To probe permanent immunity cured animals were rechallenged with the same tumor cell line and the tumors were rejected in 71% of mice cured with BPD-PDT plus CY. We conclude that BPD-PDT in combination with CY gives best overall results and that this is attributable to immunological response activation in addition to PDT-mediated destruction of the tumor.

  12. Expression Profiling of Primary and Metastatic Ovarian Tumors Reveals Differences Indicative of Aggressive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Alexander S.; Fischer, Andrew; Miller, Daniel H.; Vang, Souriya; MacLaughlan, Shannon; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Yu, Jovian; Steinhoff, Margaret; Collins, Colin; Smith, Peter J. S.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Brard, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The behavior and genetics of serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) metastasis, the form of the disease lethal to patients, is poorly understood. The unique properties of metastases are critical to understand to improve treatments of the disease that remains in patients after debulking surgery. We sought to identify the genetic and phenotypic landscape of metastatic progression of EOC to understand how metastases compare to primary tumors. DNA copy number and mRNA expression differences between matched primary human tumors and omental metastases, collected at the same time during debulking surgery before chemotherapy, were measured using microarrays. qPCR and immunohistochemistry validated findings. Pathway analysis of mRNA expression revealed metastatic cancer cells are more proliferative and less apoptotic than primary tumors, perhaps explaining the aggressive nature of these lesions. Most cases had copy number aberrations (CNAs) that differed between primary and metastatic tumors, but we did not detect CNAs that are recurrent across cases. A six gene expression signature distinguishes primary from metastatic tumors and predicts overall survival in independent datasets. The genetic differences between primary and metastatic tumors, yet common expression changes, suggest that the major clone in metastases is not the same as in primary tumors, but the cancer cells adapt to the omentum similarly. Together, these data highlight how ovarian tumors develop into a distinct, more aggressive metastatic state that should be considered for therapy development. PMID:24732363

  13. Multimodal Approach to the Management of Metastatic Epidural Spinal Cord Compression (MESCC) Due to Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Tancioni, Flavio; Navarria, Pierina; Lorenzetti, Martin A.; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Masci, Giovanna; Mancosu, Pietro; Alloisio, Marco; Morenghi, Emanuela; Santoro, Armando; Rodriguez y Baena, Riccardo; Scorsetti, Marta

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of a multidisciplinary approach for treatment of patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression in terms of feasibility, local control, and survival. Methods and Materials: Eighty-nine consecutive patients treated between January 2004 and December 2007 were included. The most common primary cancers were lung, breast, and kidney cancers. Ninety-eight surgical procedures were performed. Radiotherapy was performed within the first month postoperatively. Clinical outcome was evaluated by modified visual analog scale for pain, Frankel scale for neurologic deficit, and magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography scan. Nearly all patients (93%) had back pain before treatment, whereas major or minor preoperative neurologic deficit was present in 62 cases (63%). Results: Clinical remission of pain was obtained in the vast majority of patients (91%). Improvement of neurologic deficit was observed in 45 cases (72.5%). Local relapse occurred in 10%. Median survival was 11 months (range, 0-46 months). Overall survival at 1 year was 43.6%. Type of primary tumor significantly affected survival. Conclusions: In patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression, the combination of surgery plus radiotherapy is feasible and provides clinical benefit in most patients. The discussion of each single case within a multidisciplinary team has been of pivotal importance in implementing the most appropriate therapeutic approach.

  14. Melanoma induces, and adenosine suppresses, CXCR3-cognate chemokine production and T-cell infiltration of lungs bearing metastatic-like disease

    PubMed Central

    Clancy-Thompson, Eleanor; Perekslis, Thomas J.; Croteau, Walburga; Alexander, Matthew P.; Chabanet, Tamer B.; Turk, Mary Jo; Huang, Yina H.; Mullins, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Despite immunogenicity, melanoma-specific vaccines have demonstrated minimal clinical efficacy in patients with established disease but enhance survival when administered in the adjuvant setting. Therefore, we hypothesized that organs bearing metastatic-like melanoma may differentially produce T-cell chemotactic proteins over the course of tumor development. Using an established model of metastatic-like melanoma in lungs, we assessed the production of specific cytokines and chemokines over a time-course of tumor growth, and we correlated chemokine production with chemokine receptor-specific T-cell infiltration. We observed that the interferon (IFN)-inducible CXCR3-cognate chemokines (CXCL9 and CXCL10) were significantly increased in lungs bearing minimal metastatic lesions, but chemokine production was at or below basal levels in lungs with substantial disease. Chemokine production correlated with infiltration of the organ compartment by adoptively transferred CD8+ tumor antigen-specific T cells in a CXCR3- and host IFNγ-dependent manner. Adenosine signaling in the tumor microenvironment suppressed chemokine production and T-cell infiltration in the advanced metastatic lesions, and this suppression could be partially reversed by administration of the adenosine receptor antagonist aminophylline. Collectively, our data demonstrate that CXCR3-cognate ligand expression is required for efficient T cell access of tumor-infiltrated lungs, and these ligands are expressed in a temporally restricted pattern that is governed, in part, by adenosine. Therefore, pharmacologic modulation of adenosine activity in the tumor microenvironment could impart therapeutic efficacy to immunogenic but clinically ineffective vaccine platforms. PMID:26048575

  15. Circulating tumor DNA and circulating tumor cells in metastatic triple negative breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Madic, Jordan; Kiialainen, Anna; Bidard, Francois-Clement; Birzele, Fabian; Ramey, Guillemette; Leroy, Quentin; Rio Frio, Thomas; Vaucher, Isabelle; Raynal, Virginie; Bernard, Virginie; Lermine, Alban; Clausen, Inga; Giroud, Nicolas; Schmucki, Roland; Milder, Maud; Horn, Carsten; Spleiss, Olivia; Lantz, Olivier; Stern, Marc-Henri; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Weisser, Martin; Lebofsky, Ronald

    2015-05-01

    Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is a new circulating tumor biomarker which might be used as a prognostic biomarker in a way similar to circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Here, we used the high prevalence of TP53 mutations in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) to compare ctDNA and CTC detection rates and prognostic value in metastatic TNBC patients. Forty patients were enrolled before starting a new line of treatment. TP53 mutations were characterized in archived tumor tissues and in plasma DNA using two next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms in parallel. Archived tumor tissue was sequenced successfully for 31/40 patients. TP53 mutations were found in 26/31 (84%) of tumor samples. The same mutation was detected in the matched plasma of 21/26 (81%) patients with an additional mutation found only in the plasma for one patient. Mutated allele fractions ranged from 2 to 70% (median 5%). The observed correlation between the two NGS approaches (R(2) = 0.903) suggested that ctDNA levels data were quantitative. Among the 27 patients with TP53 mutations, CTC count was ≥1 in 19 patients (70%) and ≥5 in 14 patients (52%). ctDNA levels had no prognostic impact on time to progression (TTP) or overall survival (OS), whereas CTC numbers were correlated with OS (p = 0.04) and marginally with TTP (p = 0.06). Performance status and elevated LDH also had significant prognostic impact. Here, absence of prognostic impact of baseline ctDNA level suggests that mechanisms of ctDNA release in metastatic TNBC may involve, beyond tumor burden, biological features that do not dramatically affect patient outcome. PMID:25307450

  16. Inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 block breast cancer metastatic niche formation and lung metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Carmen Chak-Lui; Zhang, Huafeng; Gilkes, Daniele M; Chen, Jasper; Wei, Hong; Chaturvedi, Pallavi; Hubbi, Maimon E; Semenza, Gregg L

    2012-07-01

    Intratumoral hypoxia, a frequent finding in metastatic cancer, results in the activation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). HIFs are implicated in many steps of breast cancer metastasis, including metastatic niche formation through increased expression of lysyl oxidase (LOX) and lysyl oxidase-like (LOXL) proteins, enzymes that remodel collagen at the metastatic site and recruit bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) to the metastatic niche. We investigated the effect of two chemically and mechanistically distinct HIF inhibitors, digoxin and acriflavine, on breast cancer metastatic niche formation. Both drugs blocked the hypoxia-induced expression of LOX and LOXL proteins, collagen cross-linking, CD11b⁺ BMDC recruitment, and lung metastasis in an orthotopic breast cancer model. Patients with HIF-1 α-overexpressing breast cancers are at increased risk of metastasis and mortality and our results suggest that such patients may benefit from aggressive therapy that includes a HIF inhibitor. PMID:22231744

  17. The BMP Inhibitor Coco Reactivates Breast Cancer Cells at Lung Metastatic sites

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hua; Chakraborty, Goutam; Lee-Lim, Ai Ping; Mo, Qianxing; Decker, Markus; Vonica, Alin; Shen, Ronglai; Brogi, Edi; Brivanlou, Ali H.; Giancotti, Filippo G.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The mechanistic underpinnings of metastatic dormancy and reactivation are poorly understood. A gain-of-function cDNA screen reveals that Coco, a secreted antagonist of TGF-β ligands, induces dormant breast cancer cells to undergo reactivation in the lung. Mechanistic studies indicate that Coco exerts this effect by blocking lung-derived BMP ligands. Whereas Coco enhances the manifestation of traits associated with cancer stem cells, BMP signaling suppresses it. Coco induces a discrete gene expression signature, which is strongly associated with metastatic relapse to the lung but not to the bone or brain in patients. Experiments in mouse models suggest that these latter organs contain niches devoid of bioactive BMP. These findings reveal that metastasis-initiating cells need to overcome organ-specific anti-metastatic signals in order to undergo reactivation. PMID:22901808

  18. What Are the Key Statistics for Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » What are the key statistics about lung carcinoid tumors? Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  19. What Are the Risk Factors for Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » What are the risk factors for lung carcinoid tumors? Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  20. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » What should you ask your doctor about lung carcinoid tumors? Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  1. What Happens after Treatment for Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » What happens after treatment for lung carcinoid tumors? Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  2. What's New in Lung Carcinoid Tumor Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for lung carcinoid tumors What’s new in lung carcinoid tumor research and treatment? Many ... controlling when our cells grow and divide into new cells. Certain genes that cause cells to grow, ...

  3. The Effect of Flattening Filter Free on Three-dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy (3D-CRT), Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Plans for Metastatic Brain Tumors from Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Li-Wan; Lai, You-Qun; Lin, Qin; Ha, Hui-Ming; Fu, Li-Rong

    2015-07-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) may affect outcome measures of radiotherapy. The objective of this study is to compare the dosimetric parameters in three types of radiotherapy plans, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), with or without the flattening filter (FF), developed for the treatment of metastatic brain tumors from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). From July 2013 to October 2013, 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT treatment plans were designed using 6 MV and 10 MV, with and without FF, for 10 patients with brain metastasis from NSCLC. The evaluation of the treatment plans included homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), monitor units (MU), mean dose (Dmean), treatment time, and the influence of FFF on volumes. There was no difference in CI or HI between FFF and FF models with 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT plans. At 6 MV, a lower Dmean was seen in the FFF model of 3D-CRT and in the VMAT plan at 10 MV. In the IMRT 6 MV, IMRT 10 MV, and VMAT 10 MV plans, higher MUs were seen in the FFF models. FFF treatments are similar in quality to FF plans, generally lead to more monitor units, and are associated with shorter treatment times. FFF plans ranked by the order of superiority in terms of a time advantage are VMAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT. PMID:26011493

  4. Expression profile of mucins in ovarian mucinous tumors: distinguishing primary ovarian from metastatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jayson; El-Bahrawy, Mona A

    2014-03-01

    Ovarian mucinous tumors (OMTs) of the intestinal type share morphologic features with primary tumors of other sites, and it can often be difficult to distinguish primary ovarian from metastatic mucinous tumors. MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC, and MUC6 expressions were studied by immunohistochemistry in 36 OMTs of intestinal type (17 malignant, 19 borderline), 18 pancreatic, 12 biliary, 15 esophageal, 9 gastric, and 7 colorectal/appendiceal adenocarcinomas. All samples were from primary sites, except for colorectal tumors which were from ovarian metastases. Borderline and malignant OMTs show similar mucin immunoprofile, being strongly and uniformly positive for MUC5AC (97.2% of cases), whereas only focally positive for MUC1 (19.4%), MUC2 (38.9%), and MUC6 (22.2%). The positive frequencies of pancreatic adenocarcinomas for MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC, and MUC6, respectively, were 100%, 16.7%, 94.4%, and 61.1%; for biliary (cholangiocarcinomas) were 91.7%, 0%, 16.7%, and 8.3%; for esophageal carcinomas were 73.3%, 33.3%, 53.3%, and 26.7%; for gastric carcinomas were 44.4%, 44.4%, 44.4%, and 0% and for lower gastrointestinal tract cancers were 28.6%, 85.7%, 42.9%, and 0%. Our study shows that OMTs are usually MUC5AC+/MUC1-, which is different from pancreatic, biliary, esophageal, gastric, and colorectal/appendiceal carcinomas. We recommend that these mucin stains be added to the panel of immunostains to differentiate metastatic tumors to the ovary from primary OMTs. PMID:24487472

  5. Total En Bloc Spondylectomy for Primary and Metastatic Spine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Mesfin, Addisu; El Dafrawy, Mostafa H; Jain, Amit; Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Kebaish, Khaled M

    2015-11-01

    This study reports the surgical and clinical outcomes of spinal tumors managed with total en bloc spondylectomy. The authors searched their prospectively maintained database for patients undergoing total en bloc spondylectomy between 2001 and 2013. Ten patients (9 men, 1 woman; average age, 50.7 years; range, 42-68 years) were identified. The authors obtained demographic information, surgical outcomes (estimated blood loss, complications), and clinical outcomes (recurrence, survival). All patients had pain and were classified as American Spinal Injury Association grade E. The lesions were located in the thoracic (8 patients) and lumbar (2 patients) spine. Anterior column reconstruction was performed with strut allograft (7 patients), mesh cage (2 patients), and polymethyl methacrylate (1 patient). An average of 2.3 (range, 2-4) of 6 portions of the vertebrae were involved, according to the Kostuik classification. Mean estimated blood loss, operative time, and hospital stay were 3.5 L, 500 minutes, and 7.8 days, respectively. Perioperative complications included pleural tear (2 patients) and aortic tear, vena cava tear, retained sponge, pulmonary embolism, urinary tract infection, pneumothorax, anterior column support failure, and prominent instrumentation requiring removal (1 patient each). Postoperatively, all patients remained classified as American Spinal Injury Association grade E. Two patients had recurrence at distant spinal segments, and 1 had a new lesion in the thigh. Five patients had died (mean, 34.5 months after surgery), and 5 were alive a mean of 19.6 months after surgery (range, 6-48 months). Total en bloc spondylectomy is challenging, but in appropriately selected patients, it can be used to treat primary and metastatic spinal lesions. PMID:26558680

  6. Control of metastatic mammary tumors by laser immunotherapy through local treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1998-08-01

    Malignant tumors kill hosts almost entirely by tumor invasion to multiple sites including vital organs. These metastases are often difficult to detect and when detected it is usually too late for effective treatment. Therefore, control of metastatic tumors is by far the biggest challenge in cancer treatment. Can the metastases be prevented or eradicated by a treatment of local tumor that can be easily detected and treated? It apparently requires a systemic reaction, usually a tumor- specific immune response. Laser immunotherapy, a novel approach using laser, photosensitizer and immunoadjuvant, has shown the potential to achieve such an immune reaction. This new method was applied in treatment of rat metastatic mammary tumors. The tumor model is DMBA-4, an aggressive tumor that invades different sites through blood vessels and lymphatics. Without treatment, all the tumor-bearing rats died with an average survival time of less than 35 days. Remote metastases were observed in all late-stage tumor-bearing rats. Laser immunotherapy was capable of eradicating treated primary tumors, and more importantly, the metastases at remote sites were also eradicated without direct treatment. The probable mechanism is an induced tumor-specific immune response, and this hypothesis has been supported by several immunoassays. This new therapy may prove to be an effective treatment modality for metastatic tumors by a non-invasive local laser application.

  7. Significance of Trask protein interactions in brain metastatic cohorts of lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hua; Shang, Li-Qun; Chen, Rui-Lin; Yang, Shu-Mei; Wang, Shui-Li; Wang, Jun; Sun, Gang

    2015-06-01

    A class of adhesion protein that occurs in the membrane with both extracellular and intracellular domain and play vital role in maintaining multicellularity is TRASK, also called CUB-domain containing protein1, CD318 (CDCP1). Specifically, in the current study, documented aggressive grades of lung cancers and distant metastatic tissues were examined for protein interactions of Trask and compared with lung cancer variants in situ. The intracellular domain of Trask has the ability to undergo tyrosine phosphorylation and thereafter undergo increased genomic expression, as well as interact with cytoskeletal proteins in the cell periphery and other local signal transduction machinery to induce invadopodia formation and distant metastasis. We incorporated proximity ligation assay to examine protein interactions of Trask in metastatic lung cancer tissues and compare with advanced and low-grade lung cancers restricted to the primary site of origins. Here, we provide direct evidence that activated Trask, which is a phosphorylated form, binds with cytoskeletal proteins actin and spectrin. These interactions were not seen in locally growing lung cancer and cancer in situ. These interactions may be responsible for invadopodia formation and breaking free from a multicellular environment. Functional studies demonstrated interaction between Trask and the STOCs Orai1 and Stim1. Calcium release from internal stores was highest in metastatic lung cancers, suggesting this mechanism as an initial stimulus for the cells to respond chaotically to external growth factor stimulation, especially in aggressive metastatic variants of lung cancers. Recently, inhibitors of STOCs have been identified, and preclinical evidence may be obtained whether these drugs may be of benefit in preventing the deadly consequences of lung cancer. PMID:25775948

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Small Lung Tumors in the University of Tokyo Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Akihiro; Kida, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Our work on stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary and metastatic lung tumors will be described. The eligibility criteria for SBRT, our previous SBRT method, the definition of target volume, heterogeneity correction, the position adjustment using four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) immediately before SBRT, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) method for SBRT, verifying of tumor position within internal target volume (ITV) using in-treatment 4D-CBCT during VMAT-SBRT, shortening of treatment time using flattening-filter-free (FFF) techniques, delivery of 4D dose calculation for lung-VMAT patients using in-treatment CBCT and LINAC log data with agility multileaf collimator, and SBRT method for centrally located lung tumors in our institution will be shown. In our institution, these efforts have been made with the goal of raising the local control rate and decreasing adverse effects after SBRT. PMID:25110653

  9. Surgical Intervention Improves Survival for Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hong; Cao, Ying; Li, Xiaofen; Tan, Yinuo; Chen, Jiaqi; Yang, Ziru; Kong, Yiyao; Yuan, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Surgical intervention for stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is still controversial. This study sought to evaluate the clinical effects of surgical intervention on survival in patients with stage IV NSCLCs and to identify the cohort benefitting the most from surgery. A retrospective study from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was performed to compare the survival of stage IV NSCLC patients who had undergone surgery with those who did not undergo surgery. Overall survival (OS) was evaluated using the Kaplan–Meier method and the log-rank test. The Cox proportional hazards model was used for multivariate analysis. The total number of eligible patients was 43,538, including 16.8% in the M1a stage and 83.2% in the M1b stage. The percentages of patients with no surgery (NONE), only metastatic tumor resection (MTR), only primary tumor resection (PTR), and both primary and metastatic tumor resection (PMTR) were 89.0%, 6.7%, 3.5%, and 0.8%, respectively; the corresponding 5-year survival rates were 2.0%, 4.0%, 13.0%, and 20.0%, respectively (P < 0.001); and the corresponding OS rates were 11.1 months, 14.7 months, 29.4 months, and 34.9 months, respectively (P < 0.001). Notably, the pairwise comparisons of 5-year survival rate and OS among the subgroups were all statistically significant. The multivariate analysis showed that surgical intervention was correlated with longer survival in patients with stage IV NSCLC. The stratified analysis showed significant differences in the OS on strata of the M1a stage and strata of the M1b stage. In the M1a stage, patients with PTR had significantly better OS than those with NONE (P < 0.001) or MTR (P < 0.001) but showed no significant differences compared with those with PMTR (P = 0.174); patients with MTR did not have prolonged survival compared with patients with NONE (P = 0.185), and they also did not have prolonged survival compared with patients with PMTR (P

  10. Differential Effects of Drugs Targeting Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) and Non-CSC Populations on Lung Primary Tumors and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Larzabal, Leyre; El-Nikhely, Nefertiti; Redrado, Miriam; Seeger, Werner; Savai, Rajkumar; Calvo, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for tumor initiation and recurrence after chemotherapy. Targeting CSCs and non-CSCs with specific compounds may be an effective approach to reduce lung cancer growth and metastasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of salinomycin, a selective inhibitor of CSCs, with or without combination with paclitaxel, in a metastatic model. To evaluate the effect of these drugs in metastasis and tumor microenvironment we took advantage of the immunocompetent and highly metastatic LLC mouse model. Aldefluor assays were used to analyze the ALDH+/− populations in murine LLC and human H460 and H1299 lung cancer cells. Salinomycin reduced the proportion of ALDH+ CSCs in LLC cells, whereas paclitaxel increased such population. The same effect was observed for the H460 and H1299 cell lines. Salinomycin reduced the tumorsphere formation capacity of LLC by more than 7-fold, but paclitaxel showed no effect. In in vivo experiments, paclitaxel reduced primary tumor volume but increased the number of metastatic nodules (p<0.05), whereas salinomycin had no effect on primary tumors but reduced lung metastasis (p<0.05). Combination of both drugs did not improve the effect of single therapies. ALDH1A1, SOX2, CXCR4 and SDF-1 mRNA levels were higher in metastatic lesions than in primary tumors, and were significantly elevated in both locations by paclitaxel treatment. On the contrary, such levels were reduced (or in some cases did not change) when mice were administered with salinomycin. The number of F4/80+ and CD11b+ cells was also reduced upon administration of both drugs, but particularly in metastasis. These results show that salinomycin targets ALDH+ lung CSCs, which has important therapeutic effects in vivo by reducing metastatic lesions. In contrast, paclitaxel (although reducing primary tumor growth) promotes the selection of ALDH+ cells that likely modify the lung microenvironment to foster metastasis. PMID

  11. Differential effects of drugs targeting cancer stem cell (CSC) and non-CSC populations on lung primary tumors and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Larzabal, Leyre; El-Nikhely, Nefertiti; Redrado, Miriam; Seeger, Werner; Savai, Rajkumar; Calvo, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for tumor initiation and recurrence after chemotherapy. Targeting CSCs and non-CSCs with specific compounds may be an effective approach to reduce lung cancer growth and metastasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of salinomycin, a selective inhibitor of CSCs, with or without combination with paclitaxel, in a metastatic model. To evaluate the effect of these drugs in metastasis and tumor microenvironment we took advantage of the immunocompetent and highly metastatic LLC mouse model. Aldefluor assays were used to analyze the ALDH+/- populations in murine LLC and human H460 and H1299 lung cancer cells. Salinomycin reduced the proportion of ALDH+ CSCs in LLC cells, whereas paclitaxel increased such population. The same effect was observed for the H460 and H1299 cell lines. Salinomycin reduced the tumorsphere formation capacity of LLC by more than 7-fold, but paclitaxel showed no effect. In in vivo experiments, paclitaxel reduced primary tumor volume but increased the number of metastatic nodules (p<0.05), whereas salinomycin had no effect on primary tumors but reduced lung metastasis (p<0.05). Combination of both drugs did not improve the effect of single therapies. ALDH1A1, SOX2, CXCR4 and SDF-1 mRNA levels were higher in metastatic lesions than in primary tumors, and were significantly elevated in both locations by paclitaxel treatment. On the contrary, such levels were reduced (or in some cases did not change) when mice were administered with salinomycin. The number of F4/80+ and CD11b+ cells was also reduced upon administration of both drugs, but particularly in metastasis. These results show that salinomycin targets ALDH+ lung CSCs, which has important therapeutic effects in vivo by reducing metastatic lesions. In contrast, paclitaxel (although reducing primary tumor growth) promotes the selection of ALDH+ cells that likely modify the lung microenvironment to foster metastasis. PMID

  12. P30. Ki-67 expression in lung carcinoid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Budimir, Bernard; Kukulj, Suzana; Brcic, Luka; Opasic, Luka; Cucevic, Branka; Serdarevic, Marina; Drpa, Gordana; Sovic, Slavica

    2014-01-01

    Background Ki-67 is nuclear protein with essential role in the control and timing of cell proliferation, largely studied in neuroendocrine tumors, but yet without clear clinical implications. A difference of percentage of Ki-67 labeling index (LI) was observed in different neuroendocrine tumors. This study intended to determine difference of Ki-67 LI between typical (TC) and atypical lung carcinoid (AC) using imunohistochemical methods, and to correlate clinical parameters with percentage of Ki-67 LI in TC and AC. Methods and participants A total of 49 specimens of TC and AC between year 2007 and 2009 were retrieved from our archive. Minimum follow-up period was 5 years. The clinical parameters included age, gender, tumor size, node and metastasis stage, recurrence of disease, therapy and overall survival (OS). Ki-67 was evaluated in the areas of highest positivity, and expressed as percentage of 400 tumor cells. Results Median value Ki-67 LI for atypical carcinoid was 17.1 (min 1.5, max 61.5). Median value Ki-67 LI for typical carcinoid was 3.8 (min 0.3, max 16). Although there is statistical difference in an average tumor size between AC and TC (P=0.02), there was no correlation between tumor size and Ki-67 expression. There was statistical difference between AC and TC concerning recurrence/metastatic disease (P=0.01) and OS (P=0.004), but none is in any relation with Ki-67 LI. The 5-year OS for typical carcinoid is 97.4% (95% CI: 97.3-97.5). The 5-year OS for atypical carcinoid is 60% (95% CI: 30-90). Conclusions Our study showed that Ki-67 LI was useful in dividing TC and AC, which is in concordance with published data. We also demonstrated that lower Ki-67 LI correlated with survival of the patients, regardless of carcinoid type. This study did not show any significant difference between AC and TC and Ki-67 LI in regards with age, gender, tumor size, recurrence/metastatic disease, therapy and overall survival, probably because small number of participants.

  13. A Case of Metastatic Bladder Cancer in Both Lungs Treated with Korean Medicine Therapy Alone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Su; Seong, Shin; Woo, Chang-Ryoul; Han, Jae-Bok

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This case report is aimed to investigate the effects of Korean medicine therapy (KMT) including oral herbal medicine and herb nebulizer therapy in treating metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with metastatic bladder cancer in both lungs in August 2013. He refused any chemotherapy and was admitted to our hospital in a much progressed state on January 11, 2014. Since then, he was treated with KMT until May 17, 2014. The main oral herbal medicines were Hyunamdan made of heat-processed ginseng, Hangamdan S made of Cordyceps militaris, Panax ginseng radix, Commiphora myrrha, calculus bovis, margarita, Boswellia carteri, Panax notoginseng radix and Cremastra appendiculata tuber, and nebulizer therapy with Soram nebulizer solution made of wild ginseng and Cordyceps sinensis distillate. Their effect was evaluated considering the change of the main symptoms and using serial chest X-ray. The size and number of multiple metastatic nodules in both lungs were markedly decreased and the symptoms had disappeared. These results suggest that KMT can be an effective method to treat metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. PMID:25232323

  14. A case of metastatic bladder cancer in both lungs treated with korean medicine therapy alone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Su; Seong, Shin; Woo, Chang-Ryoul; Han, Jae-Bok

    2014-05-01

    This case report is aimed to investigate the effects of Korean medicine therapy (KMT) including oral herbal medicine and herb nebulizer therapy in treating metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with metastatic bladder cancer in both lungs in August 2013. He refused any chemotherapy and was admitted to our hospital in a much progressed state on January 11, 2014. Since then, he was treated with KMT until May 17, 2014. The main oral herbal medicines were Hyunamdan made of heat-processed ginseng, Hangamdan S made of Cordyceps militaris, Panax ginseng radix, Commiphora myrrha, calculus bovis, margarita, Boswellia carteri, Panax notoginseng radix and Cremastra appendiculata tuber, and nebulizer therapy with Soram nebulizer solution made of wild ginseng and Cordyceps sinensis distillate. Their effect was evaluated considering the change of the main symptoms and using serial chest X-ray. The size and number of multiple metastatic nodules in both lungs were markedly decreased and the symptoms had disappeared. These results suggest that KMT can be an effective method to treat metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. PMID:25232323

  15. Metastatic cystosarcoma phylloides in an adolescent girl: an unusually malignant tumor.

    PubMed

    Hoover, H C; Trestioreanu, A; Ketcham, A S

    1975-03-01

    The first case of metastatic cystosarcoma phylloides in an adolescent is reported. This case also represents the first reported response of this tumor to chemotherapy and irradiation. This tumor showed an unusually rapid rate of cell division probably making it more susceptible to these agents. The importance of an early diagnosis and definitive excision is stressed. PMID:165788

  16. I-123 MIBG imaging of metastatic carcinoid tumor from the rectum.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, N; Seto, H; Ishiki, M; Shimizu, M; Kageyama, M; Wu, Y W; Nagayoshi, T; Kamisaki, Y; Kakishita, M

    1995-04-01

    I-131 MIBG, a specific radiopharmaceutical agent for scintigraphic imaging and treatment of pheochromocytoma and neuroblastoma may be useful for detection of apudomas. Scintigraphy with I-123 radiolabeled MIBG was performed in a patient with metastatic carcinoid tumor from the rectum. I-123 MIBG scintigraphic findings showed multiple areas of abnormal tumor uptake of hepatic and bone metastases from the rectal carcinoid. Bone scintigraphy demonstrated multiple metastatic lesions. Computed tomography revealed multiple solid tumors of the liver. This report describes accumulation of I-123 MIBG in the liver and bone metastases from the rectal carcinoid. Radioiodine MIBG scintigraphy may be useful for detecting metastatic lesions, for evaluating postoperative recurrence, and also for the treatment of the carcinoid tumor. PMID:7788995

  17. Optical Detection and Virotherapy of Live Metastatic Tumor Cells in Body Fluids with Vaccinia Strains

    PubMed Central

    Minev, Boris R.; Zimmermann, Martina; Aguilar, Richard J.; Zhang, Qian; Sturm, Julia B.; Fend, Falko; Yu, Yong A.; Cappello, Joseph; Lauer, Ulrich M.; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic tumor cells in body fluids are important targets for treatment, and critical surrogate markers for evaluating cancer prognosis and therapeutic response. Here we report, for the first time, that live metastatic tumor cells in blood samples from mice bearing human tumor xenografts and in blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with cancer were successfully detected using a tumor cell-specific recombinant vaccinia virus (VACV). In contrast to the FDA-approved CellSearch system, VACV detects circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in a cancer biomarker-independent manner, thus, free of any bias related to the use of antibodies, and can be potentially a universal system for detection of live CTCs of any tumor type, not limited to CTCs of epithelial origin. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that VACV was effective in preventing and reducing circulating tumor cells in mice bearing human tumor xenografts. Importantly, a single intra-peritoneal delivery of VACV resulted in a dramatic decline in the number of tumor cells in the ascitic fluid from a patient with gastric cancer. Taken together, these results suggest VACV to be a useful tool for quantitative detection of live tumor cells in liquid biopsies as well as a potentially effective treatment for reducing or eliminating live tumor cells in body fluids of patients with metastatic disease. PMID:24019862

  18. Extratumoral Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) Expressing Macrophages Likely Promote Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Adamo, Hanibal; Thysell, Elin; Jernberg, Emma; Stattin, Pär; Widmark, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Bergh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive tumors induce tumor-supporting changes in the benign parts of the prostate. One factor that has increased expression outside prostate tumors is hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1). To investigate HO-1 expression in more detail, we analyzed samples of tumor tissue and peritumoral normal prostate tissue from rats carrying cancers with different metastatic capacity, and human prostate cancer tissue samples from primary tumors and bone metastases. In rat prostate tumor samples, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR showed that the main site of HO-1 synthesis was HO-1+ macrophages that accumulated in the tumor-bearing organ, and at the tumor-invasive front. Small metastatic tumors were considerably more effective in attracting HO-1+ macrophages than larger non-metastatic ones. In clinical samples, accumulation of HO-1+ macrophages was seen at the tumor invasive front, almost exclusively in high-grade tumors, and it correlated with the presence of bone metastases. HO-1+ macrophages, located at the tumor invasive front, were more abundant in bone metastases than in primary tumors. HO-1 expression in bone metastases was variable, and positively correlated with the expression of macrophage markers but negatively correlated with androgen receptor expression, suggesting that elevated HO-1 could be a marker for a subgroup of bone metastases. Together with another recent observation showing that selective knockout of HO-1 in macrophages reduced prostate tumor growth and metastatic capacity in animals, the results of this study suggest that extratumoral HO-1+ macrophages may have an important role in prostate cancer. PMID:27280718

  19. Extratumoral Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) Expressing Macrophages Likely Promote Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Nilsson, Maria; Adamo, Hanibal; Thysell, Elin; Jernberg, Emma; Stattin, Pär; Widmark, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Bergh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive tumors induce tumor-supporting changes in the benign parts of the prostate. One factor that has increased expression outside prostate tumors is hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1). To investigate HO-1 expression in more detail, we analyzed samples of tumor tissue and peritumoral normal prostate tissue from rats carrying cancers with different metastatic capacity, and human prostate cancer tissue samples from primary tumors and bone metastases. In rat prostate tumor samples, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR showed that the main site of HO-1 synthesis was HO-1+ macrophages that accumulated in the tumor-bearing organ, and at the tumor-invasive front. Small metastatic tumors were considerably more effective in attracting HO-1+ macrophages than larger non-metastatic ones. In clinical samples, accumulation of HO-1+ macrophages was seen at the tumor invasive front, almost exclusively in high-grade tumors, and it correlated with the presence of bone metastases. HO-1+ macrophages, located at the tumor invasive front, were more abundant in bone metastases than in primary tumors. HO-1 expression in bone metastases was variable, and positively correlated with the expression of macrophage markers but negatively correlated with androgen receptor expression, suggesting that elevated HO-1 could be a marker for a subgroup of bone metastases. Together with another recent observation showing that selective knockout of HO-1 in macrophages reduced prostate tumor growth and metastatic capacity in animals, the results of this study suggest that extratumoral HO-1+ macrophages may have an important role in prostate cancer. PMID:27280718

  20. Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma Metastatic to the Pituitary: A Case Report and Discussion of Potential Diagnostic Value of Magnetic Resonance Elastography in Pituitary Tumors.

    PubMed

    D Hughes, Joshua; Retzlaff, Amber; Sims, John; O'Brien, Erin; Giannini, Caterina; Huston, John; Van Gompel, Jamie J

    2016-07-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is an exocrine gland tumor accounting for approximately 10%-15% of all epithelial salivary neoplasms and occurs most often in the parotid and submandibular glands. Metastatic pituitary tumors are rare, and there is only 1 previously reported case of parotid ACC metastatic to the pituitary. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based technique that measures the propagation of mechanically induced shear waves through a particular tissue to determine stiffness and offers a method to evaluate tissue consistency. We present the case of a 72-year-old woman with a remote history of parotid gland ACC and subsequent lung metastases presented after a fall that resulted in facial trauma. A non-contrast head computed tomography scan revealed a sellar/suprasellar mass, and follow-up MRI revealed a well-defined, enhancing 3.8-cm lesion. MRE showed the tumor to be firm. The tumor was resected through a transsphenoidal approach and was consistent with the MRE findings. Pathology returned as metastatic ACC. We report the second case of ACC metastatic to pituitary and the first firm pituitary tumor found by MRE and discuss the potential diagnostic value of MRE in pituitary lesions. PMID:27018011

  1. Ubiquitin-specific protease 4 controls metastatic potential through β-catenin stabilization in brain metastatic lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Su Jin; Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Hye Ree; Lee, Hong; Shin, Chang Hoon; Yun, Sun-Il; Lee, Dong Heon; Kim, Duk-Hwan; Kim, Kyeong Kyu; Joo, Kyeung Min; Kim, Hyeon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastasis is the most common type of intracranial cancer and is the main cause of cancer-associated mortality. Brain metastasis mainly originates from lung cancer. Using a previously established in vitro brain metastatic model, we found that brain metastatic PC14PE6/LvBr4 cells exhibited higher expression of β-catenin and increased migratory activity than parental PC14PE6 cells. Knockdown of β-catenin dramatically suppressed the motility and invasiveness of PC14PE6/LvBr4 cells, indicating β-catenin is involved in controlling metastatic potential. Since β-catenin protein was increased without a significant change in its mRNA levels, the mechanism underlying increased β-catenin stability was investigated. We found that ubiquitin-specific protease 4 (USP4), recently identified as a β-catenin-specific deubiquitinylating enzyme, was highly expressed in PC14PE6/LvBr4 cells and involved in the increased stability of β-catenin protein. Similar to β-catenin knockdown, USP4-silenced PC14PE6/LvBr4 cells showed decreased migratory and invasive abilities. Moreover, knockdown of both USP4 and β-catenin inhibited clonogenicity and induced mesenchymal-epithelial transition by downregulating ZEB1 in PC14PE6/LvBr4 cells. Using bioluminescence imaging, we found that knockdown of USP4 suppressed brain metastasis in vivo and significantly increased overall survival and brain metastasis-free survival. Taken together, our results indicate that USP4 is a promising therapeutic target for brain metastasis in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26883469

  2. Ubiquitin-specific protease 4 controls metastatic potential through β-catenin stabilization in brain metastatic lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Su Jin; Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Hye Ree; Lee, Hong; Shin, Chang Hoon; Yun, Sun-Il; Lee, Dong Heon; Kim, Duk-Hwan; Kim, Kyeong Kyu; Joo, Kyeung Min; Kim, Hyeon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastasis is the most common type of intracranial cancer and is the main cause of cancer-associated mortality. Brain metastasis mainly originates from lung cancer. Using a previously established in vitro brain metastatic model, we found that brain metastatic PC14PE6/LvBr4 cells exhibited higher expression of β-catenin and increased migratory activity than parental PC14PE6 cells. Knockdown of β-catenin dramatically suppressed the motility and invasiveness of PC14PE6/LvBr4 cells, indicating β-catenin is involved in controlling metastatic potential. Since β-catenin protein was increased without a significant change in its mRNA levels, the mechanism underlying increased β-catenin stability was investigated. We found that ubiquitin-specific protease 4 (USP4), recently identified as a β-catenin-specific deubiquitinylating enzyme, was highly expressed in PC14PE6/LvBr4 cells and involved in the increased stability of β-catenin protein. Similar to β-catenin knockdown, USP4-silenced PC14PE6/LvBr4 cells showed decreased migratory and invasive abilities. Moreover, knockdown of both USP4 and β-catenin inhibited clonogenicity and induced mesenchymal-epithelial transition by downregulating ZEB1 in PC14PE6/LvBr4 cells. Using bioluminescence imaging, we found that knockdown of USP4 suppressed brain metastasis in vivo and significantly increased overall survival and brain metastasis-free survival. Taken together, our results indicate that USP4 is a promising therapeutic target for brain metastasis in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26883469

  3. Clinical Significance of Tumor-Associated Inflammatory Cells in Metastatic Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Salo, Jill A.; Ji, Lingyun; Oberthuer, André; Fischer, Matthias; Berthold, Frank; Hadjidaniel, Michael; Liu, Cathy Wei-Yao; Metelitsa, Leonid S.; Pique-Regi, Roger; Wakamatsu, Peter; Villablanca, Judith G.; Kreissman, Susan G.; Matthay, Katherine K.; Shimada, Hiroyuki; London, Wendy B.; Sposto, Richard; Seeger, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Children diagnosed at age ≥ 18 months with metastatic MYCN-nonamplified neuroblastoma (NBL-NA) are at high risk for disease relapse, whereas those diagnosed at age < 18 months are nearly always cured. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that expression of genes related to tumor-associated inflammatory cells correlates with the observed differences in survival by age at diagnosis and contributes to a prognostic signature. Methods Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in localized and metastatic neuroblastomas (n = 71) were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Expression of 44 genes representing tumor and inflammatory cells was quantified in 133 metastatic NBL-NAs to assess age-dependent expression and to develop a logistic regression model to provide low- and high-risk scores for predicting progression-free survival (PFS). Tumors from high-risk patients enrolled onto two additional studies (n = 91) served as independent validation cohorts. Results Metastatic neuroblastomas had higher infiltration of TAMs than locoregional tumors, and metastatic tumors diagnosed in patients at age ≥ 18 months had higher expression of inflammation-related genes than those in patients diagnosed at age < 18 months. Expression of genes representing TAMs (CD33/CD16/IL6R/IL10/FCGR3) contributed to 25% of the accuracy of a novel 14-gene tumor classification score. PFS at 5 years for children diagnosed at age ≥ 18 months with NBL-NA with a low- versus high-risk score was 47% versus 12%, 57% versus 8%, and 50% versus 20% in three independent clinical trials, respectively. Conclusion These data suggest that interactions between tumor and inflammatory cells may contribute to the clinical metastatic neuroblastoma phenotype, improve prognostication, and reveal novel therapeutic targets. PMID:22927533

  4. Non-metastatic 2 (NME2)-mediated suppression of lung cancer metastasis involves transcriptional regulation of key cell adhesion factor vinculin

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Ram Krishna; Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Kumar, Akinchan; Singh, Ankita; Pal, Krishnendu; Hoeppner, Luke; Saha, Dhurjhoti; Purohit, Gunjan; Basundra, Richa; Kar, Anirban; Halder, Rashi; Kumar, Pankaj; Baral, Aradhita; Kumar, MJ Mahesh; Baldi, Alfonso; Vincenzi, Bruno; Lorenzon, Laura; Banerjee, Rajkumar; Kumar, Praveen; Shridhar, Viji; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2014-01-01

    Tumor metastasis refers to spread of a tumor from site of its origin to distant organs and causes majority of cancer deaths. Although >30 metastasis suppressor genes (MSGs) that negatively regulate metastasis have been identified so far, two issues are poorly understood: first, which MSGs oppose metastasis in a tumor type, and second, which molecular function of MSG controls metastasis. Herein, integrative analyses of tumor-transcriptomes (n = 382), survival data (n = 530) and lymph node metastases (n = 100) in lung cancer patients identified non-metastatic 2 (NME2) as a key MSG from a pool of >30 metastasis suppressors. Subsequently, we generated a promoter-wide binding map for NME2 using chromatin immunoprecipitation with promoter microarrays (ChIP-chip), and transcriptome profiling. We discovered novel targets of NME2 which are involved in focal adhesion signaling. Importantly, we detected binding of NME2 in promoter of focal adhesion factor, vinculin. Reduced expression of NME2 led to enhanced transcription of vinculin. In comparison, NME1, a close homolog of NME2, did not bind to vinculin promoter nor regulate its expression. In line, enhanced metastasis of NME2-depleted lung cancer cells was found in zebrafish and nude mice tumor models. The metastatic potential of NME2-depleted cells was remarkably diminished upon selective RNA-i-mediated silencing of vinculin. Together, we demonstrate that reduced NME2 levels lead to transcriptional de-repression of vinculin and regulate lung cancer metastasis. PMID:25249619

  5. pp-GalNAc-T13 induces high metastatic potential of murine Lewis lung cancer by generating trimeric Tn antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Yasuyuki; Zhang, Qing; Akita, Kaoru; Nakada, Hiroshi; Hamamura, Kazunori; Tokuda, Noriyo; Tsuchida, Akiko; Matsubara, Takeshi; Hori, Tomoko; Okajima, Tetsuya; Furukawa, Keiko; Urano, Takeshi; Furukawa, Koichi

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ppGalNAc-T13 was up-regulated in high metastatic sublines of Lewis lung cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ppGalNAc-T13 expression enhanced cell invasion activity in low metastatic sublines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trimeric Tn antigen was induced in the transfectant cells of ppGalNAc-T13 cDNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A major protein carrying trimeric Tn structure was identified as Syndecan-1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of ppGalNAc-T13 resulted in the reduction of invasion and of metastasis.. -- Abstract: In order to analyze the mechanisms for cancer metastasis, high metastatic sublines (H7-A, H7-Lu, H7-O, C4-sc, and C4-ly) were obtained by repeated injection of mouse Lewis lung cancer sublines H7 and C4 into C57BL/6 mice. These sublines exhibited increased proliferation and invasion activity in vitro. Ganglioside profiles exhibited lower expression of GM1 in high metastatic sublines than the parent lines. Then, we established GM1-Si-1 and GM1-Si-2 by stable silencing of GM1 synthase in H7 cells. These GM1-knockdown clones exhibited increased proliferation and invasion. Then, we explored genes that markedly altered in the expression levels by DNA microarray in the combination of C4 vs. C4-ly or H7 vs. H7 (GM1-Si). Consequently, pp-GalNAc-T13 gene was identified as up-regulated genes in the high metastatic sublines. Stable transfection of pp-GalNAc-T13 cDNA into C4 (T13-TF) resulted in increased invasion and motility. Then, immunoblotting and flow cytometry using various antibodies and lectins were performed. Only anti-trimeric Tn antibody (mAb MLS128), showed increased expression levels of trimeric Tn antigen in T13-TF clones. Moreover, immunoprecipitation/immunoblotting was performed by mAb MLS128, leading to the identification of an 80 kDa band carrying trimeric Tn antigen, i.e. Syndecan-1. Stable silencing of endogenous pp-GalNAc-T13 in C4-sc (T13-KD) revealed that primary tumors generated by

  6. Metastatic tumor: the complementary role of the marrow aspirate and biopsy.

    PubMed

    Atac, B; Lawrence, C; Goldberg, S N

    1991-10-01

    To determine whether bone marrow aspiration or biopsy is more sensitive in the detection of nonhematologic metastatic involvement of marrow, all 1569 consecutive paired biopsy and aspirate samples obtained between January 1975 and January 1, 1986 in an 800 bed municipal hospital were reviewed. At least eight aspirate slides and 10 biopsy cross sections were examined for each pair. In 39 samples, both biopsy and aspirate identified metastatic tumor. No biopsies contained tumor that was not also seen on the aspirate. However, five aspirate slides contained metastatic malignancies not identified on biopsy. The hematologist or oncologist viewing individual cells in a monolayer at 1000 x magnification has the advantage of identifying very small clusters of tumor cells. That accounted for three of the five positive aspirate samples in which the biopsies were negative. The other two positive aspirate slides each contained tumor on only one of eight slides. The results of our study indicate that when carefully reviewed, the aspirate is at least as sensitive as the marrow biopsy for identifying metastatic tumor. Our results indicate that marrow aspirates and biopsies are useful and complementary examinations for identifying metastatic malignancy. PMID:1928232

  7. Synergistic anti-tumor effects of zoledronic acid and radiotherapy against metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Morii, Kazuhiko; Aoyama, Yuhki; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Okushin, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    A 72-year-old man with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma and decompensated hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis suffered from a metastatic femoral fracture. After undergoing radiotherapy, he was only treated with supportive care, except for the administration of zoledronic acid (ZA). Thereafter, the initially elevated serum α-fetoprotein and des-gamma carboxyprothrombin levels declined to within the normal ranges. Hepatic and metastatic adrenal tumors, distant from the radiation field, exhibited a surprising regression. ZA is known to inhibit the activity of osteoclasts, bone-residential macrophages, and has been reported to have a direct anti-tumor effect. ZA may adjust the immunological milieu in tumor microenvironments by inhibiting the tumor-associated macrophages. Because radiotherapy can enhance the presentation of tumor-associated antigens, ZA and radiotherapy may exert synergistic anti-tumor effects. PMID:26466697

  8. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-10

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  9. KRAS Mutations in Primary Colorectal Cancer Tumors and Related Metastases: A Potential Role in Prediction of Lung Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Cejas, Paloma; López-Gómez, Miriam; Aguayo, Cristina; Madero, Rosario; de Castro Carpeño, Javier; Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; Barriuso, Jorge; Moreno García, Víctor; Larrauri, Javier; López, Rocío; Casado, Enrique; Gonzalez-Barón, Manuel; Feliu, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Background KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer primary tumors predict resistance to anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, and thus represent a true indicator of EGFR pathway activation status. Methodology/Principal Findings KRAS mutations were retrospectively studied using polymerase chain reactions and subsequent sequencing of codons 12 and 13 (exon 2) in 110 patients with metastatic colorectal tumors. These studies were performed using tissue samples from both the primary tumor and their related metastases (93 liver, 84%; 17 lung, 16%). All patients received adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil-based polychemotherapy after resection of metastases. None received anti-EGFR therapy. Mutations in KRAS were observed in 37 (34%) of primary tumors and in 40 (36%) of related metastases, yielding a 94% level of concordance (kappa index 0.86). Patients with primary tumors possessing KRAS mutations had a shorter disease-free survival period after metastasis resection (12.0 vs 18.0 months; P = 0.035) than those who did not. A higher percentage of KRAS mutations was detected in primary tumors of patiens with lung metastases than in patients with liver metastases (59% vs 32%; p = 0.054). To further evaluate this finding we analyzed 120 additional patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer who previously had their primary tumors evaluated for KRAS mutational status for clinical purposes. Separately, the analysis of these 120 patients showed a tendency towards a higher degree of KRAS mutations in primary tumors of patients with lung metastases, although it did not reach statistical significance. Taken together the group of 230 patients showed that KRAS was mutated significantly more often in the primary tumors of patients with lung metastases (57% vs 35%; P = 0.006). Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest a role for KRAS mutations in the propensity of primary colorectal tumors to

  10. The impact of personalized medicine on survival: comparisons of results in metastatic breast, colorectal and non-small-cell lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Antonio; Torri, Valter; Garassino, Marina Chiara; Porcu, Luca; Galetta, Domenico

    2014-05-01

    Breast, colorectal and lung cancers represent the three most incident forms of cancer worldwide. Among these three "big killers", lung cancer is considered the one with the worst prognosis due to its high mortality even in early stages. Due to their more favorable prognosis, breast and colorectal cancers might appear to have benefited from major advances. Most oncologists who are faced with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) find the reported results very frustrating when compared with those for metastatic breast (MBC) and colorectal cancers (MCRC). The aim of this analysis was to quantify and compare the relative magnitude of overall survival (OS) improvements in the first-line approaches in metastatic NSCLC, MBC and MCRC through the analysis of the main landmark meta-analyses and randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of commercially available drugs. Five items were considered and analyzed for each cancer. Moreover we evaluated the real clinical impact of the results reported by each item on the entire population; for each "big killer" an overall hazard ratio (HR) was estimated: 0.88 (95%(+) CI: 0.72-1.07) for MBC, 0.94 (95%(+) CI: 0.82-1.07) for MCRC, and about 0.80 (95%(+) CI: 0.73-0.90) for advanced NSCLC. We showed that, in the last decades, these three tumors had important and constant OS improvements reached step by step. The relative magnitude of OS improvement seems higher in metastatic NSCLC than MBC and MCRC. PMID:24112813

  11. Once-Weekly, High-Dose Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer: 6-Year Analysis of 60 Early-Stage, 42 Locally Advanced, and 7 Metastatic Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, Omar M. Sandhu, Taljit S.; Lattin, Paul B.; Chang, Jung H.; Lee, Choon K.; Groshko, Gayle A.; Lattin, Cheryl J.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To explore once-weekly stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in nonoperable patients with localized, locally advanced, or metastatic lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 primary (89 untreated plus 13 recurrent) and 7 metastatic tumors were studied. The median follow-up was 38 months, the average patient age was 75 years. Of the 109 tumors studied, 60 were Stage I (45 IA and 15 IB), 9 were Stage II, 30 were Stage III, 3 were Stage IV, and 7 were metastases. SBRT only was given in 73% (40 Gy in four fractions to the planning target volume to a total dose of 53 Gy to the isocenter for a biologically effective dose of 120 Gy{sub 10}). SBRT was given as a boost in 27% (22.5 Gy in three fractions once weekly for a dose of 32 Gy at the isocenter) after 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the primary plus the mediastinum. The total biologically effective dose was 120 Gy{sub 10}. Respiration gating was used in 46%. Results: The overall response rate was 75%; 33% had a complete response. The overall response rate was 89% for Stage IA patients (40% had a complete response). The local control rate was 82%; it was 100% and 93% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The failure rate was 37%, with 17% within the planning target volume. No Grade 3-4 acute toxicities developed in any patient; 12% and 7% of patients developed Grade 1 and 2 toxicities, respectively. Late toxicity, all Grade 2, developed in 3% of patients. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate for Stage I was 70% and was 74% and 64% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The 3-year Stage III cause-specific survival rate was 30%. The patients with metastatic lung cancer had a 57% response rate, a 27% complete response rate, an 86% local control rate, a median survival time of 19 months, and 23% 3-year survival rate. Conclusions: SBRT is noninvasive, convenient, fast, and economically attractive; it achieves results similar to surgery for early or metastatic lung cancer patients who are older

  12. Pulmonary Codelivery of Doxorubicin and siRNA by pH-Sensitive Nanoparticles for Therapy of Metastatic Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Caina; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Jingpeng; Tian, Huayu; Park, Kinam; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-09-01

    A pulmonary codelivery system that can simultaneously deliver doxorubicin (DOX) and Bcl2 siRNA to the lungs provides a promising local treatment strategy for lung cancers. In this study, DOX is conjugated onto polyethylenimine (PEI) by using cis-aconitic anhydride (CA, a pH-sensitive linker) to obtain PEI-CA-DOX conjugates. The PEI-CA-DOX/siRNA complex nanoparticles are formed spontaneously via electrostatic interaction between cationic PEI-CA-DOX and anionic siRNA. The drug release experiment shows that DOX releases faster at acidic pH than at pH 7.4. Moreover, PEI-CA-DOX/Bcl2 siRNA complex nanoparticles show higher cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction in B16F10 cells than those treated with either DOX or Bcl2 siRNA alone. When the codelivery systems are directly sprayed into the lungs of B16F10 melanoma-bearing mice, the PEI-CA-DOX/Bcl2 siRNA complex nanoparticles exhibit enhanced antitumor efficacy compared with the single delivery of DOX or Bcl2 siRNA. Compared with systemic delivery, most drug and siRNA show a long-term retention in the lungs via pulmonary delivery, and a considerable number of the drug and siRNA accumulate in tumor tissues of lungs, but rarely in normal lung tissues. The PEI-CA-DOX/Bcl2 siRNA complex nanoparticles are promising for the treatment of metastatic lung cancer by pulmonary delivery with low side effects on the normal tissues. PMID:26136261

  13. Effectiveness of crizotinib in a patient with ALK IHC-positive/FISH-negative metastatic lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rosoux, A; Pauwels, P; Duplaquet, F; D'Haene, N; Weynand, B; Delos, M; Menon, R; Heukamp, L C; Thunnissen, E; Ocak, S

    2016-08-01

    We report a case of crizotinib effectiveness in a heavily pretreated patient with a metastatic NSCLC initially considered IHC-positive and FISH-negative for ALK rearrangement. After repeated analyses of tumor samples, borderline ALK FISH-positivity (18.5% positive cells) was demonstrated. PMID:27393517

  14. Safety and efficacy of carmustine (BCNU) wafers for metastatic brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ene, Chibawanye I.; Nerva, John D.; Morton, Ryan P.; Barkley, Ariana S.; Barber, Jason K.; Ko, Andrew L.; Silbergeld, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carmustine (BCNU) wafers (Gliadel) prolongs local disease control and progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with malignant gliomas. However, in metastatic brain tumors, there is a paucity of evidence in support of its safety and efficacy. The goal of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of Gliadel wafers in patients with metastatic brain tumors. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the University of Washington experience with Gliadel wafers for metastatic brain tumors between 2000 and 2015. Results: Gliadel wafers were used in 14 patients with metastatic brain tumors during the period reviewed. There were no postoperative seizures, strokes, or hemorrhages. There was one postoperative wound infection necessitating return to the operating room. The mean time to tumor progression (n = 7) and death (n = 5) after Gliadel wafer implantation was 2.5 and 2.9 years, respectively. Age was the only variable affecting PFS in patients receiving Gliadel wafers. Patients <53 years old (n = 7) had a PFS of 0.52 years, whereas patients >53 years old (n = 7) had a PFS of 4.29 years (P = 0.02). There was no significant difference in PFS in relation to presenting Karnofsky Performance Status (P = 0.26), number of brain metastasis (P = 0.82), tumor volume (P = 0.54), prior surgery (P = 0.57), or prior radiation (P = 0.41). There were no significant differences in the mean survival in relationship to any variable including age. Conclusions: BCNU wafers are a safe and a potentially efficacious adjunct to surgery and radiation for improving local disease control in metastatic brain tumors. Larger studies, however, are needed to examine overall efficacy and tumor specific efficacy. PMID:27217968

  15. Visualization of immediate immune responses to pioneer metastatic cells in the lung.

    PubMed

    Headley, Mark B; Bins, Adriaan; Nip, Alyssa; Roberts, Edward W; Looney, Mark R; Gerard, Audrey; Krummel, Matthew F

    2016-03-24

    Lung metastasis is the lethal determinant in many cancers and a number of lines of evidence point to monocytes and macrophages having key roles in its development. Yet little is known about the immediate fate of incoming tumour cells as they colonize this tissue, and even less known about how they make first contact with the immune system. Primary tumours liberate circulating tumour cells (CTCs) into the blood and we have developed a stable intravital two-photon lung imaging model in mice for direct observation of the arrival of CTCs and subsequent host interaction. Here we show dynamic generation of tumour microparticles in shear flow in the capillaries within minutes of CTC entry. Rather than dispersing under flow, many of these microparticles remain attached to the lung vasculature or independently migrate along the inner walls of vessels. Using fluorescent lineage reporters and flow cytometry, we observed 'waves' of distinct myeloid cell subsets that load differentially and sequentially with this CTC-derived material. Many of these tumour-ingesting myeloid cells collectively accumulated in the lung interstitium along with the successful metastatic cells and, as previously understood, promote the development of successful metastases from surviving tumour cells. Although the numbers of these cells rise globally in the lung with metastatic exposure and ingesting myeloid cells undergo phenotypic changes associated with microparticle ingestion, a consistently sparse population of resident conventional dendritic cells, among the last cells to interact with CTCs, confer anti-metastatic protection. This work reveals that CTC fragmentation generates immune-interacting intermediates, and defines a competitive relationship between phagocyte populations for tumour loading during metastatic cell seeding. PMID:26982733

  16. Multidisciplinary management of advanced lung neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ferolla, Piero; Guerrera, Francesco; Ruffini, Enrico; Travis, William D.; Rossi, Giulio; Lausi, Paolo Olivo; Oliaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The optimal clinical management of aggressive/advanced lung neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) is still debated, due to their rarity and the lack of prospective randomized studies. Results derive from retrospective mono-Institutional series, and few dedicated prospective trials, recently designed, are still ongoing. In low-grade tumors [bronchial carcinoids (BCs)] surgery, whenever feasible, remains the mainstay of treatment, and chemo/radiotherapy (RT) should be reserved to progressive diseases (PD). In case of resected N1-N2 BCs, a “watch and see” policy associated with a close clinical/radiological follow-up is recommended. Somatostatin analogs (SSA) seem to be effective in controlling BCs associated endocrine syndromes, while SSA antiproliferative effect has also been reported in the past. Targeted therapy with new drugs (Everolimus) seems to be very promising, but further trials are needed. Surgery alone is not sufficient to treat high-grade NETs: adjuvant CT is required also in early stages. Platinum-Etoposide regimen demonstrated to be the most effective; irinotecan and other biological drugs are considered very promising. In conclusion, the management of advanced lung NETs should be individualized by multidisciplinary teams which include Medical and Radiation Oncologists, Surgeons, Pathologists, Pulmonologists, Endocrinologists, Interventional Radiologists, and the prognosis is mainly dependent on tumor grade and its anatomical extent. PMID:25984363

  17. Arctigenin Inhibits Lung Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer by Regulating Cell Viability and Metastatic Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yo-Han; Kee, Ji-Ye; Kim, Dae-Seung; Mun, Jeong-Geon; Jeong, Mi-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Byung-Min; Park, Sung-Joo; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Um, Jae-Young; Hong, Seung-Heon

    2016-01-01

    Arctigenin (ARC) has been shown to have an anti-cancer effect in various cell types and tissues. However, there have been no studies concerning metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we investigated the anti-metastatic properties of ARC on colorectal metastasis and present a potential candidate drug. ARC induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CT26 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via MAPKs signaling. In several metastatic phenotypes, ARC controlled epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through increasing the expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expressions of mesenchymal markers; N-cadherin, vimentin, β-catenin, and Snail. Moreover, ARC inhibited migration and invasion through reducing of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 expressions. In an experimental metastasis model, ARC significantly inhibited lung metastasis of CT26 cells. Taken together, our study demonstrates the inhibitory effects of ARC on colorectal metastasis. PMID:27618887

  18. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis Biomarkers Linked to Lung Metastatic Potential and Cell Stemness

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz de Garibay, Gorka; Herranz, Carmen; Llorente, Alicia; Boni, Jacopo; Serra-Musach, Jordi; Mateo, Francesca; Aguilar, Helena; Gómez-Baldó, Laia; Petit, Anna; Vidal, August; Climent, Fina; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Cordero, Álex; González-Suárez, Eva; Sánchez-Mut, José Vicente; Esteller, Manel; Llatjós, Roger; Varela, Mar; López, José Ignacio; García, Nadia; Extremera, Ana I.; Gumà, Anna; Ortega, Raúl; Plà, María Jesús; Fernández, Adela; Pernas, Sònia; Falo, Catalina; Morilla, Idoia; Campos, Miriam; Gil, Miguel; Román, Antonio; Molina-Molina, María; Ussetti, Piedad; Laporta, Rosalía; Valenzuela, Claudia; Ancochea, Julio; Xaubet, Antoni; Casanova, Álvaro; Pujana, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare lung-metastasizing neoplasm caused by the proliferation of smooth muscle-like cells that commonly carry loss-of-function mutations in either the tuberous sclerosis complex 1 or 2 (TSC1 or TSC2) genes. While allosteric inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) has shown substantial clinical benefit, complementary therapies are required to improve response and/or to treat specific patients. However, there is a lack of LAM biomarkers that could potentially be used to monitor the disease and to develop other targeted therapies. We hypothesized that the mediators of cancer metastasis to lung, particularly in breast cancer, also play a relevant role in LAM. Analyses across independent breast cancer datasets revealed associations between low TSC1/2 expression, altered mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway signaling, and metastasis to lung. Subsequently, immunohistochemical analyses of 23 LAM lesions revealed positivity in all cases for the lung metastasis mediators fascin 1 (FSCN1) and inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (ID1). Moreover, assessment of breast cancer stem or luminal progenitor cell biomarkers showed positivity in most LAM tissue for the aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), integrin-ß3 (ITGB3/CD61), and/or the sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9) proteins. The immunohistochemical analyses also provided evidence of heterogeneity between and within LAM cases. The analysis of Tsc2-deficient cells revealed relative over-expression of FSCN1 and ID1; however, Tsc2-deficient cells did not show higher sensitivity to ID1-based cancer inhibitors. Collectively, the results of this study reveal novel LAM biomarkers linked to breast cancer metastasis to lung and to cell stemness, which in turn might guide the assessment of additional or complementary therapeutic opportunities for LAM. PMID:26167915

  19. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis Biomarkers Linked to Lung Metastatic Potential and Cell Stemness.

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Garibay, Gorka; Herranz, Carmen; Llorente, Alicia; Boni, Jacopo; Serra-Musach, Jordi; Mateo, Francesca; Aguilar, Helena; Gómez-Baldó, Laia; Petit, Anna; Vidal, August; Climent, Fina; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Cordero, Álex; González-Suárez, Eva; Sánchez-Mut, José Vicente; Esteller, Manel; Llatjós, Roger; Varela, Mar; López, José Ignacio; García, Nadia; Extremera, Ana I; Gumà, Anna; Ortega, Raúl; Plà, María Jesús; Fernández, Adela; Pernas, Sònia; Falo, Catalina; Morilla, Idoia; Campos, Miriam; Gil, Miguel; Román, Antonio; Molina-Molina, María; Ussetti, Piedad; Laporta, Rosalía; Valenzuela, Claudia; Ancochea, Julio; Xaubet, Antoni; Casanova, Álvaro; Pujana, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare lung-metastasizing neoplasm caused by the proliferation of smooth muscle-like cells that commonly carry loss-of-function mutations in either the tuberous sclerosis complex 1 or 2 (TSC1 or TSC2) genes. While allosteric inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) has shown substantial clinical benefit, complementary therapies are required to improve response and/or to treat specific patients. However, there is a lack of LAM biomarkers that could potentially be used to monitor the disease and to develop other targeted therapies. We hypothesized that the mediators of cancer metastasis to lung, particularly in breast cancer, also play a relevant role in LAM. Analyses across independent breast cancer datasets revealed associations between low TSC1/2 expression, altered mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway signaling, and metastasis to lung. Subsequently, immunohistochemical analyses of 23 LAM lesions revealed positivity in all cases for the lung metastasis mediators fascin 1 (FSCN1) and inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (ID1). Moreover, assessment of breast cancer stem or luminal progenitor cell biomarkers showed positivity in most LAM tissue for the aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), integrin-ß3 (ITGB3/CD61), and/or the sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9) proteins. The immunohistochemical analyses also provided evidence of heterogeneity between and within LAM cases. The analysis of Tsc2-deficient cells revealed relative over-expression of FSCN1 and ID1; however, Tsc2-deficient cells did not show higher sensitivity to ID1-based cancer inhibitors. Collectively, the results of this study reveal novel LAM biomarkers linked to breast cancer metastasis to lung and to cell stemness, which in turn might guide the assessment of additional or complementary therapeutic opportunities for LAM. PMID:26167915

  20. Metastatic model of HPV+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma demonstrates heterogeneity in tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, Daniel W; Coppock, Joseph D; Zeng, Erliang; Lee, Kimberly M; Spanos, William C; Onken, Michael D; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Lee, John H; Vermeer, Paola D

    2016-04-26

    Human papillomavirus induced (HPV+) cancer incidence is rapidly rising, comprising 60-80% of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs); while rare, recurrent/metastatic disease accounts for nearly all related deaths. An in vivo pre-clinical model for these invasive cancers is necessary for testing new therapies. We characterize an immune competent recurrent/metastatic HPV+ murine model of OPSSC which consists of four lung metastatic (MLM) cell lines isolated from an animal with HPV+ OPSCC that failed cisplatin/radiation treatment. These individual metastatic clonal cell lines were tested to verify their origin (parental transgene expression and define their physiological properties: proliferation, metastatic potential, heterogeneity and sensitivity/resistance to cisplatin and radiation. All MLMs retain expression of parental HPV16 E6 and E7 and degrade P53 yet are heterogeneous from one another and from the parental cell line as defined by Illumina expression microarray. Consistent with this, reverse phase protein array defines differences in protein expression/activation between MLMs as well as the parental line. While in vitro growth rates of MLMs are slower than the parental line, in vivo growth of MLM clones is greatly enhanced. Moreover, in vivo resistance to standard therapies is dramatically increased in 3 of the 4 MLMs. Lymphatic and/or lung metastasis occurs 100% of the time in one MLM line. This recurrent/metastatic model of HPV+ OPSCC retains the characteristics evident in refractory human disease (heterogeneity, resistance to therapy, metastasis in lymph nodes/lungs) thus serving as an ideal translational system to test novel therapeutics. Moreover, this system may provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27013584

  1. Fatal complications after stereotactic body radiation therapy for central lung tumors abutting the proximal bronchial tree

    PubMed Central

    Haseltine, Justin M.; Rimner, Andreas; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Modh, Ankit; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Jackson, Andrew; Yorke, Ellen D.; Wu, Abraham J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is associated with excess toxicity following treatment of central lung tumors. Risk-adapted fractionation appears to have mitigated this risk, but it remains unclear whether SBRT is safe for all tumors within the central lung zone, especially those abutting the proximal bronchial tree (PBT). We investigated the dependence of toxicity on tumor proximity to PBT and whether tumors abutting the PBT had greater toxicity than other central lung tumors after SBRT. Materials and methods A total of 108 patients receiving SBRT for central lung tumors were reviewed. Patients were classified based on closest distance from tumor to PBT. Primary endpoint was SBRT-related death. Secondary endpoints were overall survival, local control, and grade 3+ pulmonary adverse events. We compared tumors abutting the PBT to nonabutting and those ≤1 cm and >1 cm from PBT. Results Median follow-up was 22.7 months. Median distance from tumor to PBT was 1.78 cm. Eighty-eight tumors were primary lung and 20 were recurrent or metastatic; 23% of tumors were adenocarcinoma and 71% squamous cell. Median age was 77.5 years. Median dose was 4500 cGy in 5 fractions prescribed to the 100% isodose line. Eighteen patients had tumors abutting the PBT, 4 of whom experienced SBRT-related death. No other patients experienced death attributed to SBRT. Risk of SBRT-related death was significantly higher for tumors abutting the PBT compared with nonabutting tumors (P < .001). Two patients with SBRT-related death received anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy and experienced pulmonary hemorrhage. Patients with tumors ≤1 cm from PBT had significantly more grade 3+ events than those with tumors >1cm from PBT (P = .014). Conclusions Even with risk-adapted fractionation, tumors abutting PBT are associated with a significant and differential risk of SBRT-related toxicity and death. SBRT should be used with particular caution in central-abutting tumors

  2. 'Inflammatory breast cancer' due to metastatic adenocarcinoma of lung.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Jacob; Naik, Vinay; George, Gemy Maria

    2016-01-01

    A 67-year-old woman with a history of lung adenocarcinoma presented with 3 weeks of redness, pain, swelling and skin changes in her right breast. Her vital signs and physical examination were within physiological limits except for the right breast. She had extensive red streaks radiating from the right nipple with peau d'orange appearance of her overlying skin. Her breast was tender on examination and did not have any associated cervical or axillary lymphadenopathy. Her mammography revealed thickening of the skin, increased parenchymal markings and shrinkage the breast. Multiple skin biopsies demonstrated moderately differentiated lung adenocarcinoma with lymphovascular invasion. The patient made an informed decision to undergo radiotherapy following discussion with her oncologist and breast surgeon. She succumbed to her illness 2 months after the diagnosis of metastasis to her breast. PMID:27587745

  3. Percutaneous cryoablation of metastatic lesions from non-small cell lung carcinoma: Initial survival, local control, and cost observations

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun J.; Littrup, Peter J.; Currier, Brandt P.; Goodrich, Dylan J.; Aoun, Hussein D.; Klein, Lydia C.; Kuo, Jarret C.; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Gadgeel, Shirish; Goodman, Allen C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess feasibility, complications, local tumor recurrences, overall survival (OS) and estimates of cost-effectiveness for multi-site cryoablation (MCA) of oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer (mNSCLC). Materials and Methods 49 CT and/or US-guided percutaneous MCA procedures were performed on 60 tumors in 31 oligo-mNSCLC patients. Average patient age was 65 years, including 19 females and 12 males. Tumor location was grouped according to common metastatic sites. Median OS was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method and defined life years gained (LYG). Estimates of MCA costs per LYG were compared with established values for systemic therapies. Results Total number of tumors and cryoablation procedures for each anatomical site are as follows: 20, 18 – lung; 9, 7 – liver; 12, 11 - superficial; 7, 7 – adrenal; 2, 2 – para-aortic/isolated; and 10, 7 – bone. A mean 1.6 procedures per patient were performed with a median clinical follow-up of 11 months. Major complication and local recurrence rates were 8% (4/49) and 8% (5/60), respectively. Median OS for MCA was 1.33 years with an estimated 1-year survival of ~53%. MCA appeared cost-effective even when added to the cost of BSC or systemic regimens, with an adjunctive cost-effectiveness ratio (ACER) of $49,008 – $87,074. Conclusions Multi-site cryoablation had very low morbidity and local tumor recurrence rates for all anatomic sites, and possibly increased OS. Even as an adjunct to systemic therapies, MCA appeared cost-effective for palliation of oligo-mNSCLC. PMID:22626267

  4. Copy number and targeted mutational analysis reveals novel somatic events in metastatic prostate tumors.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Christiane M; Tembe, Waibov A; Baker, Angela; Sinari, Shripad; Moses, Tracy Y; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen; Beckstrom-Sternberg, James; Barrett, Michael; Long, James; Chinnaiyan, Arul; Lowey, James; Suh, Edward; Pearson, John V; Craig, David W; Agus, David B; Pienta, Kenneth J; Carpten, John D

    2011-01-01

    Advanced prostate cancer can progress to systemic metastatic tumors, which are generally androgen insensitive and ultimately lethal. Here, we report a comprehensive genomic survey for somatic events in systemic metastatic prostate tumors using both high-resolution copy number analysis and targeted mutational survey of 3508 exons from 577 cancer-related genes using next generation sequencing. Focal homozygous deletions were detected at 8p22, 10q23.31, 13q13.1, 13q14.11, and 13q14.12. Key genes mapping within these deleted regions include PTEN, BRCA2, C13ORF15, and SIAH3. Focal high-level amplifications were detected at 5p13.2-p12, 14q21.1, 7q22.1, and Xq12. Key amplified genes mapping within these regions include SKP2, FOXA1, and AR. Furthermore, targeted mutational analysis of normal-tumor pairs has identified somatic mutations in genes known to be associated with prostate cancer including AR and TP53, but has also revealed novel somatic point mutations in genes including MTOR, BRCA2, ARHGEF12, and CHD5. Finally, in one patient where multiple independent metastatic tumors were available, we show common and divergent somatic alterations that occur at both the copy number and point mutation level, supporting a model for a common clonal progenitor with metastatic tumor-specific divergence. Our study represents a deep genomic analysis of advanced metastatic prostate tumors and has revealed candidate somatic alterations, possibly contributing to lethal prostate cancer. PMID:21147910

  5. Copy number and targeted mutational analysis reveals novel somatic events in metastatic prostate tumors

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Christiane M.; Tembe, Waibov A.; Baker, Angela; Sinari, Shripad; Moses, Tracy Y.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen; Beckstrom-Sternberg, James; Barrett, Michael; Long, James; Chinnaiyan, Arul; Lowey, James; Suh, Edward; Pearson, John V.; Craig, David W.; Agus, David B.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Carpten, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced prostate cancer can progress to systemic metastatic tumors, which are generally androgen insensitive and ultimately lethal. Here, we report a comprehensive genomic survey for somatic events in systemic metastatic prostate tumors using both high-resolution copy number analysis and targeted mutational survey of 3508 exons from 577 cancer-related genes using next generation sequencing. Focal homozygous deletions were detected at 8p22, 10q23.31, 13q13.1, 13q14.11, and 13q14.12. Key genes mapping within these deleted regions include PTEN, BRCA2, C13ORF15, and SIAH3. Focal high-level amplifications were detected at 5p13.2-p12, 14q21.1, 7q22.1, and Xq12. Key amplified genes mapping within these regions include SKP2, FOXA1, and AR. Furthermore, targeted mutational analysis of normal-tumor pairs has identified somatic mutations in genes known to be associated with prostate cancer including AR and TP53, but has also revealed novel somatic point mutations in genes including MTOR, BRCA2, ARHGEF12, and CHD5. Finally, in one patient where multiple independent metastatic tumors were available, we show common and divergent somatic alterations that occur at both the copy number and point mutation level, supporting a model for a common clonal progenitor with metastatic tumor-specific divergence. Our study represents a deep genomic analysis of advanced metastatic prostate tumors and has revealed candidate somatic alterations, possibly contributing to lethal prostate cancer. PMID:21147910

  6. Aptamers Selected to Postoperative Lung Adenocarcinoma Detect Circulating Tumor Cells in Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Zamay, Galina S; Kolovskaya, Olga S; Zamay, Tatiana N; Glazyrin, Yury E; Krat, Alexey V; Zubkova, Olga; Spivak, Ekaterina; Wehbe, Mohammed; Gargaun, Ana; Muharemagic, Darija; Komarova, Mariia; Grigorieva, Valentina; Savchenko, Andrey; Modestov, Andrey A; Berezovski, Maxim V; Zamay, Anna S

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are rare cells and valuable clinical markers of prognosis of metastasis formation and prediction of patient survival. Most CTC analyses are based on the antibody-based detection of a few epithelial markers; therefore miss an important portion of mesenchymal cancer cells circulating in blood. In this work, we selected and identified DNA aptamers as specific affinity probes that bind to lung adenocarcinoma cells derived from postoperative tissues. The unique feature of our selection strategy is that aptamers are produced for lung cancer cell biomarkers in their native state and conformation without previous knowledge of the biomarkers. The aptamers did not bind to normal lung cells and lymphocytes, and had very low affinity to A549 lung adenocarcinoma culture. We applied these aptamers to detect CTCs, apoptotic bodies, and microemboli in clinical samples of peripheral blood of lung cancer and metastatic lung cancer patients. We identified aptamer-associated protein biomarkers for lung cancer such as vimentin, annexin A2, annexin A5, histone 2B, neutrophil defensin, and clusterin. Tumor-specific aptamers can be produced for individual patients and synthesized many times during anticancer therapy, thereby opening up the possibility of personalized diagnostics. PMID:26061649

  7. Aptamers Selected to Postoperative Lung Adenocarcinoma Detect Circulating Tumor Cells in Human Blood.

    PubMed

    Zamay, Galina S; Kolovskaya, Olga S; Zamay, Tatiana N; Glazyrin, Yury E; Krat, Alexey V; Zubkova, Olga; Spivak, Ekaterina; Wehbe, Mohammed; Gargaun, Ana; Muharemagic, Darija; Komarova, Mariia; Grigorieva, Valentina; Savchenko, Andrey; Modestov, Andrey A; Berezovski, Maxim V; Zamay, Anna S

    2015-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are rare cells and valuable clinical markers of prognosis of metastasis formation and prediction of patient survival. Most CTC analyses are based on the antibody-based detection of a few epithelial markers; therefore miss an important portion of mesenchymal cancer cells circulating in blood. In this work, we selected and identified DNA aptamers as specific affinity probes that bind to lung adenocarcinoma cells derived from postoperative tissues. The unique feature of our selection strategy is that aptamers are produced for lung cancer cell biomarkers in their native state and conformation without previous knowledge of the biomarkers. The aptamers did not bind to normal lung cells and lymphocytes, and had very low affinity to A549 lung adenocarcinoma culture. We applied these aptamers to detect CTCs, apoptotic bodies, and microemboli in clinical samples of peripheral blood of lung cancer and metastatic lung cancer patients. We identified aptamer-associated protein biomarkers for lung cancer such as vimentin, annexin A2, annexin A5, histone 2B, neutrophil defensin, and clusterin. Tumor-specific aptamers can be produced for individual patients and synthesized many times during anticancer therapy, thereby opening up the possibility of personalized diagnostics. PMID:26061649

  8. A metastatic glomus jugulare tumor. A temporal bone report

    SciTech Connect

    El Fiky, F.M.; Paparella, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    The clinicopathologic findings in the temporal bone of a patient with a highly malignant metastasizing glomus jugulare tumor are reported. The patient exhibited all the symptoms of primary malignant tumors of the ear, including facial paralysis, otorrhea, pain, hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness, and vertigo. He was treated with cobalt irradiation followed by radium implant in the ear canal for a residual tumor; then a left-sided radical mastoidectomy was performed.

  9. Drug therapy in metastatic neuroendocrine tumors of the gastroenteropancreatic system.

    PubMed

    Faiss, S; Scherübl, H; Riecken, E O; Wiedenmann, B

    1996-01-01

    Successful treatment of neuroendocrine tumor disease of the gastroenteropancreatic system requires a multimodal approach. Radical tumor surgery is required before other therapies are initiated. So far, only surgery has proven to be curative. If surgical intervention is not possible or a tumor-free state cannot be achieved, biotherapy with the somatostatin analogues octreotide or lanreotide should then be preferably carried out in patients with functional tumors. Interferon-alpha can alternatively be given. In patients with gastrinoma, therapy with proton pump inhibitors (e.g., omeprazol) is the initial treatment of choice. In patients with nonfunctional tumors, indication for treatment is only given in cases of documented tumor progress. In case of progressive tumor disease or functionality under the above-mentioned therapies, treatment with somatostatin analogues can be intensified by dose escalation or alternatively by a combination therapy with interferon-alpha and a somatostatin analogue. On the basis of the less favorable response of neuroendocrine foregut tumors to biotherapy, chemotherapy should be initiated after failure of biotherapy in documented tumor progression. A combination of streptozotocin and 5-fluorouracil, possibly combined with D,L-folinic acid, is the treatment of choice, considering the response and side effect rates. In case of predominantly anaplastic neuroendocrine tumors in advanced stages, good tumor response rates with a chemotherapeutic scheme consisting of cisplatin and etoposide can be achieved. Since the chemotherapy scheme is less effective in patients with midgut or hindgut tumors, chemoembolization of liver metastases should follow biotherapy. The response to chemoembolization may be increased by simultaneous systemic chemotherapy. Attention should always be paid to an adequate analgesic drug administration. PMID:8893342

  10. Integrated imaging of hepatic tumors in childhood. Part I. Malignant lesions (primary and metastatic)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; Greenspan, B.S.

    1985-01-01

    Both the prognosis and treatment of hepatic tumors in children depend upon the histological diagnosis and the extent of disease. Recent advances in imaging techniques permit characterization of specific tumors and differentiation from other intrahepatic processes. An integrated imaging protocol involving a combination of ultrasound, computed tomography, and scintigraphy often provides a high degree of accuracy. Patterns derived from 40 cases of hepatoblastoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, monotypic small-cell sarcoma, and metastatic tumors are discussed and an algorithm for evaluation of hepatic tumors in children is presented.

  11. Activation of latent metastases in the lung after resection of a metastatic lymph node in a lymph node metastasis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shao, Lenan; Ouchi, Tomoki; Sakamoto, Maya; Mori, Shiro; Kodama, Tetsuya

    2015-05-01

    Iatrogenic induction of regional and distant cancer metastases is a risk associated with clinical resection of tumor-positive sentinel lymph nodes. However, there have been no studies of this risk in a mouse model of cancer metastasis. Here, we report that resection of a tumor-bearing subiliac lymph node (SiLN) enhanced lung metastasis in a mouse model of lymph node metastasis. Bioluminescence imaging revealed that metastatic tumor cells in the secondary lymph node continued to grow after resection of the SiLN, and that the probability of metastasis to the lungs was increased when the interval between SiLN inoculation and resection was reduced. Futhermore, histological analysis demonstrated that latents in the lung were stimulated to grow after resection of the SiLN. Fluorescence imaging indicated that the route of tumor cell dissemination from SiLN to the lung was the venous system located over the SiLN. We speculate that our mouse model will be useful for studying the mechanisms of tumor cell latency, with a view to improving the detection and treatment of latent metastases. PMID:25824032

  12. Laser immunotherapy: a novel approach for metastatic tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Korbelik, Mladen; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2004-08-01

    The ideal treatment modality for tumors, particularly for those that metastasize to multiple remote sites, should eradicate the primary tumor and elicit a systemic, tumor-specific response leading to elimination of metastases and to long-term tumor immunity. Using the selective photothermal interaction as a precursor, laser immunotherapy was developed by introducing a novel immunoadjuvant administered in conjunction with the laser-absorbing dye. Specifically, an 805-nm laser and indocyanine green (ICG) was used for the selective photothermal interaction, and a novel immunoadjuvant, glycated chitosan (GC), was used as the immunological stimulant. The laser-ICG-GC combinations has been resulted in the following results in animal studies. (1) Selective destruction of deep target tumor target has been achieved; (2) Eradication of treated primary tumors and regression and disappearance of untreated distant metastases have been observed; (3) Long-term survival of tumor-bearing rats have been resulted; (4) Long-term immunity for resistance to repeated, dose-escalated subsequent tumor challenges has been induced; (5) Tumor-specific immunological responses, after laser immunotherapy treatment, have been detected at cellular and molecular levels. The procedure of laser immunotherapy and major results in animal studies will be summarized and some new results using the immunological enhancement for photodynamic therapy treatment will be presented.

  13. Solid Pseudopapillary Tumor of the Pancreas: One Case with a Metastatic Evolution in a Caucasian Woman

    PubMed Central

    Lestelle, Valentin; de Coster, Claire; Sarran, Anthony; Poizat, Flora; Delpero, Jean-Robert; Raoul, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a Caucasian woman, operated on for a solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas in 2009, who recurred 4 years later with multiple liver metastases requiring liver resection. This disease is infrequent, particularly among the Caucasian population, and metastatic evolution is very rare. PMID:26557078

  14. Solid Pseudopapillary Tumor of the Pancreas: One Case with a Metastatic Evolution in a Caucasian Woman.

    PubMed

    Lestelle, Valentin; de Coster, Claire; Sarran, Anthony; Poizat, Flora; Delpero, Jean-Robert; Raoul, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a Caucasian woman, operated on for a solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas in 2009, who recurred 4 years later with multiple liver metastases requiring liver resection. This disease is infrequent, particularly among the Caucasian population, and metastatic evolution is very rare. PMID:26557078

  15. Polymethylmethacrylate-augmented screw fixation for stabilization in metastatic spinal tumors. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jee Soo; Lee, Sang Ho; Rhee, Chang Hun; Lee, Seung Hoon

    2002-01-01

    Screw fixation augmented with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or some other biocompatible bone cement has been used in patients with osteoporosis requiring spinal fusion. No clinical studies have been conducted on PMMA-augmented screw fixation for stabilization of the vertebral column in patients with metastatic spinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine whether screw fixation augmented with PMMA might be suitable in patients treated for multilevel metastatic spinal tumors. Ten patients with metastatic spinal tumors involving multiple vertebral levels underwent stabilization procedures in which PMMA was used to augment screw fixation after decompression of the spinal cord. Within 15 days, partial or complete relief from pain was obtained in all patients postoperatively. Two of four patients in whom neurological deficits caused them to be nonambulatory before surgery were able to ambulate postoperatively. Neither collapse of the injected vertebral bodies nor failure of the screw fixation was observed during the mean follow-up period of 6.7 months. Screw fixation augmented with PMMA may offer stronger stabilization and facilitate the instrumentation across short segments in the treatment of multilevel metastatic spinal tumors. PMID:11795702

  16. A rare cause in etiology of left atrial mass: metastatic testicular germ cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Huseyin, Serhat; Okyay, Ahmet; Hacıbekiroğlu, İlhan; Tastekin, Ebru; Yılmaztepe, Mustafa; Taylan, Gökay; Canbaz, Suat; Çiçin, İrfan

    2016-01-01

    Although intracardiac metastasis of germ cell tumors is rare, it can be localized in the right or left heart by disseminating spread and give their cardiac symptoms depending on the location of metastatic mass. We present a 38-year-old male patient with a preliminary diagnosis of testicular tumor who was followed by the medical oncology clinic with cerebrovascular event and heart failure symptoms. PMID:27212979

  17. Metastatic cystosarcoma phylloides in an adolescent girl: an unusually malignant tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, H C; Trestioreanu, A; Ketcham, A S

    1975-01-01

    The first case of metastatic cystosarcoma phylloides in an adolescent is reported. This case also represents the first reported response of this tumor to chemotherapy and irradiation. This tumor showed an unusually rapid rate of cell division probably making it more susceptible to these agents. The importance of an early diagnosis and definitive excision is stressed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:165788

  18. Tumor Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase Signaling and Development of Metastatic Disease in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ree, Anne Hansen; Kristensen, Annette Torgunrud; Saelen, Marie Grøn; de Wijn, Rik; Edvardsen, Hege; Jovanovic, Jovana; Abrahamsen, Torveig Weum; Dueland, Svein; Flatmark, Kjersti

    2012-01-01

    Background Recognizing EGFR as key orchestrator of the metastatic process in colorectal cancer, but also the substantial heterogeneity of responses to anti-EGFR therapy, we examined the pattern of composite tumor kinase activities governed by EGFR-mediated signaling that might be implicated in development of metastatic disease. Patients and Methods Point mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA and ERBB2 amplification were determined in primary tumors from 63 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer scheduled for radical treatment. Using peptide arrays with tyrosine kinase substrates, ex vivo phosphopeptide profiles were generated from the same baseline tumor samples and correlated to metastasis-free survival. Results Unsupervised clustering analysis of the resulting phosphorylation of 102 array substrates defined two tumor classes, both consisting of cases with and without KRAS/BRAF mutations. The smaller cluster group of patients, with tumors generating high ex vivo phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-related substrates, had a particularly aggressive disease course, with almost a half of patients developing metastatic disease within one year of follow-up. Conclusion High phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-mediated signaling activity of the primary tumor, rather than KRAS/BRAF mutation status, was identified as a hallmark of poor metastasis-free survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing radical treatment of the pelvic cavity. PMID:23226389

  19. Visualization of immediate immune responses to pioneer metastatic cells in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Headley, Mark B.; Bins, Adriaan; Nip, Alyssa; Roberts, Edward W.; Looney, Mark R.; Gerard, Audrey; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2016-01-01

    Lung metastasis is the lethal determinant in many cancers1,2 and a number of lines of evidence point to monocytes and macrophages having key roles in its development3–5. Yet little is known about the immediate fate of incoming tumour cells as they colonize this tissue and even less known about how they make first contact with the immune system. Primary tumours liberate circulating tumour cells (CTCs) into the blood and we have developed a stable intravital two-photon lung imaging model in mice6 for direct observation of the arrival of CTCs and subsequent host interaction. Here we show dynamic generation of tumour microparticles in shear flow in the capillaries within minutes of CTC entry. Rather than dispersing under flow, many of these microparticles remain attached to the lung vasculature or independently migrate along the inner walls of vessels. Using fluorescent lineage reporters and flow cytometry, we observed ‘waves’ of distinct myeloid cell subsets that load differentially and sequentially with this CTC-derived material. Many of these tumour-ingesting myeloid cells collectively accumulated in the lung interstitium along with the successful metastatic cells and, as previously understood, promote the development of successful metastases from surviving tumour cells3. Although the numbers of these cells rise globally in the lung with metastatic exposure and ingesting myeloid cells undergo phenotypic changes associated with microparticle ingestion, a consistently sparse population of resident conventional dendritic cells, among the last cells to interact with CTCs, confer antimetastatic protection. This work reveals that CTC fragmentation generates immune-interacting intermediates, and defines a competitive relationship between phagocyte populations for tumour loading during metastatic cell seeding. PMID:26982733

  20. SIRT7 inactivation reverses metastatic phenotypes in epithelial and mesenchymal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Shivani; Villanova, Lidia; Tanaka, Shinji; Aonuma, Misato; Roy, Nilotpal; Berber, Elisabeth; Pollack, Jonathan R.; Michishita-Kioi, Eriko; Chua, Katrin F.

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is responsible for over 90% of cancer-associated mortality. In epithelial carcinomas, a key process in metastatic progression is the epigenetic reprogramming of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-like (EMT) change towards invasive cellular phenotypes. In non-epithelial cancers, different mechanisms must underlie metastatic change, but relatively little is known about the factors involved. Here, we identify the chromatin regulatory Sirtuin factor SIRT7 as a key regulator of metastatic phenotypes in both epithelial and mesenchymal cancer cells. In epithelial prostate carcinomas, high SIRT7 levels are associated with aggressive cancer phenotypes, metastatic disease, and poor patient prognosis, and depletion of SIRT7 can reprogram these cells to a less aggressive phenotype. Interestingly, SIRT7 is also important for maintaining the invasiveness and metastatic potential of non-epithelial sarcoma cells. Moreover, SIRT7 inactivation dramatically suppresses cancer cell metastasis in vivo, independent of changes in primary tumor growth. Mechanistically, we also uncover a novel link between SIRT7 and its family member SIRT1, providing the first demonstration of direct interaction and functional interplay between two mammalian sirtuins. Together with previous work, our findings highlight the broad role of SIRT7 in maintaining the metastatic cellular phenotype in diverse cancers. PMID:25923013

  1. Paired Tumor and Normal Whole Genome Sequencing of Metastatic Olfactory Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Glen J.; Liang, Winnie S.; Izatt, Tyler; Arora, Shilpi; Cherni, Irene; Raju, Robert N.; Hostetter, Galen; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Christoforides, Alexis; Sinari, Shripad; Baker, Angela S.; Metpally, Raghu; Tembe, Waibhav D.; Phillips, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Background Olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB) is a rare cancer of the sinonasal tract with little molecular characterization. We performed whole genome sequencing (WGS) on paired normal and tumor DNA from a patient with metastatic-ONB to identify the somatic alterations that might be drivers of tumorigenesis and/or metastatic progression. Methodology/Principal Findings Genomic DNA was isolated from fresh frozen tissue from a metastatic lesion and whole blood, followed by WGS at >30X depth, alignment and mapping, and mutation analyses. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm selected mutations. Sixty-two somatic short nucleotide variants (SNVs) and five deletions were identified inside coding regions, each causing a non-synonymous DNA sequence change. We selected seven SNVs and validated them by Sanger sequencing. In the metastatic ONB samples collected several months prior to WGS, all seven mutations were present. However, in the original surgical resection specimen (prior to evidence of metastatic disease), mutations in KDR, MYC, SIN3B, and NLRC4 genes were not present, suggesting that these were acquired with disease progression and/or as a result of post-treatment effects. Conclusions/Significance This work provides insight into the evolution of ONB cancer cells and provides a window into the more complex factors, including tumor clonality and multiple driver mutations. PMID:22649506

  2. Total enbloc spondylectomy for metastatic high grade spinal tumors: Early results

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sanganagouda S; Nene, Abhay M

    2016-01-01

    Background: High grade metastatic spinal tumors are most common and are invasive. These patients can succumb to disease progression if not treated timely. Although considered as invasive and morbid, total enbloc spondylectomy (TES) in selected cases has better survival rates. The authors describe the results of TES for high grade metastatic spinal tumors. Materials and Methods: Five patients (four females and one male) underwent TES for solitary metastatic vertebral lesion between November 2012 and January 2014. These patients presented to us with spinal instability, unrelenting severe spinal pain and/or with severe progressive radiculopathy. Average age was 46.2 years (range 39–62 years). After complete investigations, computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging scan and positron emission tomography (PET) scan, it was confirmed that these patients had high grade solitary vertebral metastatic tumor. Results: Average duration of followup was 18 months (range 16–20 months). The average preoperative visual analog scale score of 9.4 (range 9–10) improved to 2 (range 1–4) at last followup. Average blood loss was 1440 mL (range 1000–2000 mL). Average duration of surgery was 198 min (range 180–240 min). Significant pain relief was noticed in each patient in the immediate postoperative period and during followups. These patients attained complete functional activities of daily living with in a month. The imaging showed implants in situ, no recurrence of tumor, and no activity on PET scan at the final followup. Conclusion: The present series shows favorable short term results of TES for solitary, metastatic, high grade vertebral body tumors by a team approach. PMID:27512215

  3. Radius neck-to-humerus trochlea transposition elbow reconstruction after proximal ulnar metastatic tumor resection: case and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Wide en bloc excision of proximal ulna sections is used to treat traumatic and pathological fractures of the ulna, though poor standardization of clinical treatment often results in long-term failure of such reconstructed biomechanical structures. In order to provide insight into effective ulnar reconstructive treatments, the case of an 80-year-old Chinese Han male presenting with pathological fracture caused by a proximal ulnar metastatic tumor concurrent with metastatic renal cancer complicated by occurrence in the brain and lungs is reported and contrasted with alternative treatment techniques. Wide resectioning of the proximal ulna and reconstruction with local radius neck-to-humerus trochlea transposition resulted in preservation of functionality, sensitivity, and biomechanical integrity after postsurgical immobilization, 6 weeks of passive- and active-assisted flexion, and extension with a hinged brace. The resultant Musculoskeletal Tumor Society rating score was 25 of 30 (83 %). Full sensitivity and mobility of the left hand and elbow (10° to 90° with minimally impaired supination and pronation) was restored with minimal discomfort. No evidence of local recurrence or other pathological complications were observed within a 1-year follow-up period. Efficient reconstruction of osseous and capsuloligamentous structures in the elbow is often accomplished by allografts, prosthesis, and soft tissue reconstruction, though wide variations in risk and prognosis associated with these techniques has resulted in disagreements regarding the most effective standards for clinical treatment. Current findings suggest that radius neck-to-humerus trochlea transposition offers a superior range of elbow movement and fewer complications than similar allograft and prosthetic techniques for patients with multiple metastatic cancers. PMID:22800611

  4. Effect of bevacizumab combined with boron neutron capture therapy on local tumor response and lung metastasis

    PubMed Central

    MASUNAGA, SHIN-ICHIRO; SAKURAI, YOSHINORI; TANO, KEIZO; TANAKA, HIROKI; SUZUKI, MINORU; KONDO, NATSUKO; NARABAYASHI, MASARU; WATANABE, TSUBASA; NAKAGAWA, YOSUKE; MARUHASHI, AKIRA; ONO, KOJI

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of bevacizumab on local tumor response and lung metastatic potential during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and in particular, the response of intratumor quiescent (Q) cells. B16-BL6 melanoma tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were continuously administered bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all proliferating (P) tumor cells. The tumors were irradiated with thermal neutron beams following the administration of a 10B-carrier [L-para-boronophenylalanine-10B (BPA) or sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate-10B (BSH)], with or without the administration of bevacizumab. This was further combined with an acute hypoxia-releasing agent (nicotinamide) or mild temperature hyperthermia (MTH, 40°C for 60 min). Immediately following the irradiation, cells from certain tumors were isolated and incubated with a cytokinesis blocker. The responses of the Q cells and the total (P+Q) cell populations were assessed based on the frequency of micronuclei using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. In other tumor-bearing mice, 17 days following irradiation, lung metastases were enumerated. Three days following bevacizumab administration, the sensitivity of the total tumor cell population following BPA-BNCT had increased more than that following BSH-BNCT. The combination with MTH, but not with nicotinamide, further enhanced total tumor cell population sensitivity. Regardless of the presence of a 10B-carrier, MTH enhanced the sensitivity of the Q cell population. Regardless of irradiation, the administration of bevacizumab, as well as nicotinamide treatment, demonstrated certain potential in reducing the number of lung metastases especially in BPA-BNCT compared with BSH-BNCT. Thus, the current study revealed that BNCT combined with bevacizumab has the potential to sensitize total tumor cells and cause a reduction in the number of lung metastases to a similar level as nicotinamide. PMID:24944637

  5. Large Malignant Phyllodes Tumor of the Breast with Metastases to the Lungs.

    PubMed

    Augustyn, Alexander; Sahoo, Sunati; Wooldridge, Rachel D

    2015-05-01

    Phyllodes tumors of the breast account for less than 0.5% of breast cancers and present most commonly in women 45 to 49 years old. The importance in managing fibroepithelial lesions lies in distinguishing fibroadenomas, which are benign, from phyllodes tumors, which can be malignant and require complete surgical excision. We report the case of a 56-year-old female who presented with a rapidly enlarging mass in her right breast 18 cm in maximum dimension that completely effaced the breast and distorted the nipple. The patient underwent a successful total mastectomy after core biopsy revealed a diagnosis of phyllodes tumor. Surgical resection is the primary treatment modality; neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies remain controversial. Here, we report the case of a large malignant phyllodes tumor metastatic to the lungs, review the literature, and discuss diagnostic modalities and adjunct nonsurgical therapies. PMID:26266007

  6. Anti-ganglioside anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibody-based cancer vaccine induces apoptosis and antiangiogenic effect in a metastatic lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Y; Gonzalez, A; Lopez, A; Perez, R; Vazquez, A M; Montero, E

    2009-07-01

    Anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb) 1E10 was generated by immunizing BALB/c mice with an Ab1 mAb which recognizes NeuGc-containing gangliosides, sulfatides and some tumor antigens. 1E10 mAb induces therapeutic effects in a primary breast carcinoma and a melanoma model. However, the tumor immunity mechanisms have not been elucidated. Here we show that aluminum hydroxide-precipitated 1E10 mAb immunization induced anti-metastatic effect in the 3LL-D122 Lewis Lung carcinoma, a poorly immunogenic and highly metastatic model in C57BL/6 mice. The therapeutic effect was associated to the increment of T cells infiltrating metastases, the reduction of new blood vessels formation and the increase of apoptotic tumor cells in lung nodules. Interestingly, active immunization does not induce measurable antibodies to the 1E10 mAb, the NeuGc-GM3 or tumor cells, which may suggest a different mechanism which has to be elucidated. These findings may support the relevance of this target for cancer biotherapy. PMID:19066887

  7. In vivo targeting of metastatic breast cancer via tumor vasculature-specific nano-graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongzhi; Feng, Liangzhu; Dougherty, Casey A; Luker, Kathryn E; Chen, Daiqin; Cauble, Meagan A; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Luker, Gary D; Ross, Brian D; Liu, Zhuang; Hong, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Angiogenesis, i.e. the formation of neovasculatures, is a critical process during cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis. Targeting of angiogenic markers on the tumor vasculature can result in more efficient delivery of nanomaterials into tumor since no extravasation is required. Herein we demonstrated efficient targeting of breast cancer metastasis in an experimental murine model with nano-graphene oxide (GO), which was conjugated to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR). FSHR has been confirmed to be a highly selective tumor vasculature marker, which is abundant in both primary and metastatic tumors. These functionalized GO nano-conjugates had diameters of ∼120 nm based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), TEM, and dynamic laser scattering (DLS) measurement. (64)Cu was incorporated as a radiolabel which enabled the visualization of these GO conjugates by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Breast cancer lung metastasis model was established by intravenous injection of click beetle green luciferase-transfected MDA-MB-231 (denoted as cbgLuc-MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells into female nude mice and the tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Systematic in vitro and in vivo studies have been performed to investigate the stability, targeting efficacy and specificity, and tissue distribution of GO conjugates. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy examination confirmed the targeting specificity of FSHR-mAb attached GO conjugates against cellular FSHR. More potent and persistent uptake of (64)Cu-NOTA-GO-FSHR-mAb in cbgLuc-MDA-MB-231 nodules inside the lung was witnessed when compared with that of non-targeted GO conjugates ((64)Cu-NOTA-GO). Histology evaluation also confirmed the vasculature accumulation of GO-FSHR-mAb conjugates in tumor at early time points while they were non-specifically captured in liver and spleen. In addition, these GO conjugates can serve as good drug carriers

  8. Multiple brown tumors in parathyroid carcinoma mimicking metastatic bone disease.

    PubMed

    Pai, M; Park, C H; Kim, B S; Chung, Y S; Park, H B

    1997-10-01

    An unusual case of multiple brown tumors due to parathyroid carcinoma is reported. The patient presented with lower leg pain. Plain radiographs demonstrated multiple lytic lesions of the lower legs and a Tc-99m MDP bone scan depicted multiple areas of increased uptake suggesting skeletal metastases. Tc-99m sestamibi tumor scintigraphy showed multiple sites of tumor uptake in bones and a large area of increased uptake with a cystic component in the right lower pole of the thyroid gland. An open biopsy from the right tibial lesion revealed a brown tumor. A large parathyroid carcinoma with a necrotic cyst was removed. After parathyroidectomy and right thyroid lobectomy, the patient became free of bone pain and serum PTH levels normalized. A 9-month follow-up Tc-99m MDP bone scan demonstrated less intense uptake in the pelvis, tibia, and fibulae. Nine-month follow-up tumor imaging with Tc-99m MIBI revealed disappearance of the preoperative uptake of multiple brown tumor. PMID:9343725

  9. Itraconazole inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aftab, Blake T.; Dobromilskaya, Irina; Liu, Jun O.; Rudin, Charles M.

    2011-01-01

    The anti-angiogenic agent bevacizumab has been approved for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer, although the survival benefit associated with this agent is marginal, and toxicities and cost are substantial. A recent screen for selective inhibitors of endothelial cell proliferation identified the oral anti-fungal drug itraconazole as a novel agent with potential anti-angiogenic activity. Here we define and characterize the anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer activities of itraconazole in relevant preclinical models of angiogenesis and lung cancer. Itraconazole consistently demonstrated potent, specific, and dose-dependent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in response to both vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)- and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-mediated angiogenic stimulation. In vivo, using primary xenograft models of human non-small cell lung cancer, oral itraconazole showed single agent growth-inhibitory activity associated with induction of tumor HIF1α expression and marked inhibition of tumor vascularity. Itraconazole significantly enhanced the anti-tumor efficacy of the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin in the same model systems. Taken together, these data suggest that itraconazole has potent and selective inhibitory activity against multiple key aspects of tumor-associated angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, and strongly support clinical translation of its use. Based on these observations we have initiated a randomized phase II study comparing the efficacy of standard cytotoxic therapy with or without daily oral itraconazole in patients with recurrent metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:21896639

  10. Metabolomic Changes Accompanying Transformation and Acquisition of Metastatic Potential in a Syngeneic Mouse Mammary Tumor Model*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin; Bennet, Bryson; Mu, Euphemia; Rabinowitz, Joshua; Kang, Yibin

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer type for women in the western world. Despite decades of research, the molecular processes associated with breast cancer progression are still inadequately defined. Here, we focus on the systematic alteration of metabolism by using the state of the art metabolomic profiling techniques to investigate the changes of 157 metabolites during the progression of normal mouse mammary epithelial cells to an isogenic series of mammary tumor cell lines with increasing metastatic potentials. Our results suggest a two-step metabolic progression hypothesis during the acquisition of tumorigenic and metastatic abilities. Metabolite changes accompanying tumor progression are identified in the intracellular and secreted forms in several pathways, including glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the pentose phosphate pathway, fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis, and the GSH-dependent antioxidative pathway. These results suggest possible biomarkers of breast cancer progression as well as opportunities of interrupting tumor progression through the targeting of metabolic pathways. PMID:20139083

  11. Fn14 receptor promotes invasive potential and metastatic capacity of non-small lung adenocarcinoma cells through the up-regulation of integrin α6

    PubMed Central

    Jandova, J.; Mason, C. J.; Pawar, S. C.; Watts, G. S.

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death around the world with the majority of diagnoses being non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Given the poor survival rate and efficacy of current therapy for NSCLC, there is a need to identify and develop new therapeutic targets for treatment. We have observed significantly up-regulated levels of Fn14 in clinical samples of lung cancer relative to normal adjacent tissue. However, the functional role of Fn14 in these tumors is not understood yet. We used RT-PCR to establish the Fn14 expression profile in various NSCLC cell lines. Using isogenic variants of H460 NSCLC cell line with low, intermediate and high Fn14 expression as a cellular model, we determined that increased levels of integrin α6 in cells over-expressing Fn14 is suggestive of an important role of α6β1-fn14 interactions in motility of lung carcinoma and formation of metastases. Enhanced levels of Fn14 correlated with higher tumor cell migration and invasion in an MMP-1 dependent manner. Cells over-expressing Fn14 showed increased in vivo tumor formation with metastatic capacity to lymph nodes, lungs and liver. Thus, this research may be a step toward developing improved treatment strategies for NSCLC by improved detection and inhibition of metastases. PMID:25563366

  12. Docetaxel-induced hypersensitivity pneumonitis mimicking lymphangitic carcinomatosis in a patient with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Taj, Asma

    2013-01-01

    Docetaxel belongs to the taxane family of anti-cancer drugs, which are commonly used in non-small cell lung cancers. They stabilize microtubules by preventing depolymerization, resulting in cell death. Pneumonitis is an uncommon side effect of docetaxel. We report a case of docetaxel induced hypersensitivity pneumonitis mimicking lymphangitic carcinomatosis in a patient with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lung. PMID:24096092

  13. Adoptive chemoimmunotherapy using ex vivo activated memory T-cells and cyclophosphamide: tumor lysis syndrome of a metastatic soft tissue sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Gold, J E; Malamud, S C; LaRosa, F; Osband, M E

    1993-09-01

    Adoptively transferred immune cells in combination with chemotherapeutic agents form the basis for adoptive chemoimmunotherapy (ACIT) of neoplastic disease. Autolymphocytes (ALT-cells) are ex vivo activated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from tumor-bearing hosts (TBH) that consist primarily of tumor-specific CD45RO+ (memory) T-cells. These ALT-cells combined with cimetidine (CIM) as autolymphocyte therapy (ALT), have previously been demonstrated to be a safe and active form of outpatient adoptive immunotherapy (AIT) in human TBH with metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC). We have previously described an effective ACIT protocol using ALT and cyclophosphamide (CY) for patients with relapsed and refractory non-RCC solid tumors. We now report a case of a patient with a metastatic gastric leiomyosarcoma to the liver, who developed a clinical picture consistent with a tumor-lysis syndrome (TLS), following salvage therapy for his tumor with ACIT using ALT and CY. TLS is a well-known complication resulting from the treatment of rapidly proliferating hematopoietic tumors such as Burkitt's lymphoma and acute lymphocytic leukemia. TLS has also been rarely described in chronic lymphocytic leukemia, as well as certain solid tumors such as breast cancer, small cell lung cancer, and medulloblastoma. However, there have been no previous reports of TLS occurring either secondary to immunotherapy or in sarcomas. The nature of these unusual findings is discussed. PMID:8342564

  14. Anti-metastatic effects of antrodan, the Antrodia cinnamomea mycelia glycoprotein, in lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fa, Kuan-Ning; Yang, Chih-Min; Chen, Pei-Chun; Lee, Yin-Ying; Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the anti-metastatic effects of antrodan, the glycoprotein from Antrodia cinnamomea (AC) mycelia, through direct actions and indirect immunomodulatory effects in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC). Antrodan was isolated from AC mycelia by alkali extraction, acid precipitation, and purification using sepharose CL-6B column chromatography. In the direct anti-metastatic action, antrodan (30-70 μg/mL) was found to significantly inhibit invasion and migration of LLC cells, and these effects involved up-regulation of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, TIMP-2, and nm23-H1 protein expression leading to decreased activities and protein expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. For testing the indirect immunomodulatory effect, antrodan was incubated for 3d with mononuclear cells (MNCs) isolated from human peripheral blood to obtain the condition medium (CM). Antrodan significantly increased interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-1β levels, but decreased TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 levels in the MMC-CM, which also significantly inhibited invasion, migration, and the activities and protein expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9, but significantly increased protein expression of TIMP-1, TIMP-2, and nm23-H1 in LLC cells. The indirect immunomodulatory effect of antrodan was stronger than the direct anti-metastatic effect at the same concentrations (50 and 60 μg/mL). Overall, the results suggest the anti-metastatic potential of antrodan in LLC cells. PMID:25583024

  15. The CXCR4-CXCL12 axis in Ewing sarcoma: promotion of tumor growth rather than metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chemokine receptor CXCR4, together with its ligand CXCL12, plays critical roles in cancer progression, including growth, metastasis and angiogenesis. Ewing sarcoma is a sarcoma with poor prognosis despite current therapies, particularly for patients with advanced-stage disease. Lungs and bone (marrow), organs of predilection for (primary/metastatic) Ewing sarcoma, represent predominant CXCL12 sources. Methods To gain insight into the role of the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis in Ewing sarcoma, CXCR4, CXCL12 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α protein expression was studied in therapy-naïve and metastatic tumors by immunohistochemistry. CXCR4 function was assessed in vitro, by flow cytometry and proliferation/ cell viability assays, in the presence of recombinant CXCL12 and/or CXCR4-antagonist AMD3100 or under hypoxic conditions. Results Whereas CXCR4 was predominantly expressed by tumor cells, CXCL12 was observed in both tumor and stromal areas. Survival analysis revealed an (expression level-dependent) negative impact of CXCR4 expression (p < 0.04). A role for the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis in Ewing sarcoma growth was suggested by our observations that i) CXCR4 expression correlated positively with tumor volume at diagnosis (p = 0.013), ii) CXCL12 was present within the microenvironment of virtually all cases, iii) CXCL12 induced proliferation of CXCR4-positive Ewing sarcoma cell lines, which could be abrogated by AMD3100. CXCR4 expression was not correlated with occurrence of metastatic disease. Also, therapy-naïve tumors demonstrated higher CXCR4 expression as compared to metastases (p = 0.027). Evaluation of in vivo hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression and culture of cells under hypoxic conditions revealed no role for hypoxia in CXCR4 expression. Conclusions Together, our results imply a crucial role for the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis in auto- and/or paracrine growth stimulation. Integration of CXCR4-targeting strategies into first- and/or second-line treatment

  16. Identification of Independent Primary Tumors and Intrapulmonary Metastases Using DNA Rearrangements in Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Stephen J.; Aubry, Marie-Christine; Harris, Faye R.; Halling, Geoffrey C.; Johnson, Sarah H.; Terra, Simone; Drucker, Travis M.; Asiedu, Michael K.; Kipp, Benjamin R.; Yi, Eunhee S.; Peikert, Tobias; Yang, Ping; Vasmatzis, George; Wigle, Dennis A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Distinguishing independent primary tumors from intrapulmonary metastases in non–small-cell carcinoma remains a clinical dilemma with significant clinical implications. Using next-generation DNA sequencing, we developed a chromosomal rearrangement–based approach to differentiate multiple primary tumors from metastasis. Methods Tumor specimens from patients with known independent primary tumors and metastatic lesions were used for lineage test development, which was then applied to multifocal tumors. Laser capture microdissection was performed separately for each tumor. Genomic DNA was isolated using direct in situ whole-genome amplification methodology, and next-generation sequencing was performed using an Illumina mate-pair library protocol. Sequence reads were mapped to the human genome, and primers spanning the fusion junctions were used for validation polymerase chain reaction. Results A total of 41 tumor samples were sequenced (33 adenocarcinomas [ADs] and eight squamous cell carcinomas [SQCCs]), with a range of three to 276 breakpoints per tumor identified. Lung tumors predicted to be independent primary tumors based on different histologic subtype did not share any genomic rearrangements. In patients with lung primary tumors and paired distant metastases, shared rearrangements were identified in all tumor pairs, emphasizing the patient specificity of identified breakpoints. Multifocal AD and SQCC samples were reviewed independently by two pulmonary pathologists. Concordance between histology and genomic data occurred in the majority of samples. Discrepant tumor samples were resolved by genome sequencing. Conclusion A diagnostic lineage test based on genomic rearrangements from mate-pair sequencing demonstrates promise for distinguishing independent primary from metastatic disease in lung cancer. PMID:25385739

  17. Selective photothermal laser-tissue interaction with augmentation of immunoadjuvants in treatment of DMBA-4 metastatic mammary tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong; Wolf, Roman F.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2002-09-01

    Induced anti-tumor immunity can be the most effective and long-term cure for cancers, particularly for metastatic tumors. Laser immunotherapy has been developed to induce such immunological responses in rats bearing DMBA-4 metastatic mammary tumors. It involves an intratumoral administration of a laser-absorbing dye (indocyanine green) and a specially formulated immunoadjuvant (glycated chitosan), followed by an irradiation of a near-infrared laser (805-nm diode laser). To understand the immunity induced in this tumor model, immunization using freeze-thaw cell lysates against the DMBA-4 tumors was performed, followed by the tumor challenge twenty-one days later. Also performed is the surgical removal of the primary tumors of the rats before the observation of metastatic tumors. The immunization only delayed the emergence of the primary and metastases in the rats but did not provide immunity against the tumor challenge. After surgical removal of the primary tumors, the tumors re-emerged at the primary sites and the metastases developed at multiple remote sites. In contrast, laser immunotherapy cured rats experienced tumor regression and eradication. Our research has provided strong support for the working mechanism of laser immunotherapy. The experimental results showed that selective photothermal laser-tissue interaction with a complementary use of immunoadjuvant could be a potential therapy for treatment of metastatic tumors by inducing a tumor-specific, long-lasting immunity.

  18. Interstitial laser immunotherapy for treatment of metastatic mammary tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Daniel; Joshi, Chet; Wolf, Roman F.; Walla, Jonny; Goddard, Jessica; Martin, Mallory; Kosanke, Stanley D.; Broach, Fred S.; Pontius, Sean; Brown, Destiny; Li, Xiaosong; Howard, Eric; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-03-01

    Thermal therapy has been used for cancer treatment for more than a century. While thermal effect can be direct, immediate, and controllable, it is not sufficient to completely eradicate tumors, particularly when tumors have metastasized locally or to the distant sites. Metastases are the major cause of treatment failure and cancer deaths. Current available therapies, such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, only have limited curative effects in patients with late-stage, metastatic cancers. Immunotherapy has been considered as the ultimate approach for cancer treatment since a systemic, anti-tumor, immunological response can be induced. Using the combination of photothermal therapy and immunotherapy, laser immunotherapy (LIT),a novel immunotherapy modality for late-stage cancer treatment, has been developed. LIT has shown great promise in pre-clinical studies and clinical breast cancer and melanoma pilot trials. However, the skin color and the depth of the tumor have been challenges for effective treatment with LIT. To induce a thermal destruction zone of appropriate size without causing thermal damage on the skin, we have developed interstitial laser immunotherapy (ILIT) using a cylindrical diffuser. To determine the effectiveness of ILIT, we treated the DMBA-4 metastatic tumors in rats. The thermal damage in tumor tissue was studied using TTC immersion and hematoxolin and eosin (H & E) staining. Also observed was the overall survival of the treated animals. Our results demonstrated that the ILIT could impact a much larger tumor area, and it significantly reduced the surface damage compared with the early version of non-invasive LIT. The survival data also indicate that ILIT has the potential to become an effective tool for the treatment of deeper, larger, and metastatic tumors, with reduced side effects.

  19. Ablation techniques for primary and metastatic liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael J; Willatt, Jonathon; Majdalany, Bill S; Kielar, Ania Z; Chong, Suzanne; Ruma, Julie A; Pandya, Amit

    2016-01-28

    Ablative treatment methods have emerged as safe and effective therapies for patients with primary and secondary liver tumors who are not surgical candidates at the time of diagnosis. This article reviews the current literature and describes the techniques, complications and results for radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation. PMID:26839642

  20. Ablation techniques for primary and metastatic liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Michael J; Willatt, Jonathon; Majdalany, Bill S; Kielar, Ania Z; Chong, Suzanne; Ruma, Julie A; Pandya, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Ablative treatment methods have emerged as safe and effective therapies for patients with primary and secondary liver tumors who are not surgical candidates at the time of diagnosis. This article reviews the current literature and describes the techniques, complications and results for radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation. PMID:26839642

  1. Identification of Genes Associated with Local Aggressiveness and Metastatic Behavior in Soft Tissue Tumors12

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Isabela Werneck; Carvalho, Katia Candido; Martins, Waleska Keller; Marques, Sarah Martins; Muto, Nair Hideko; Falzoni, Roberto; Rocha, Rafael Malagoli; Aguiar, Samuel; Simoes, Ana C. Q.; Fahham, Lucas; Neves, Eduardo Jordão; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Reis, Luiz Fernando Lima

    2010-01-01

    Soft tissue tumors represent a group of neoplasia with different histologic and biological presentations varying from benign, locally confined to very aggressive and metastatic tumors. The molecular mechanisms responsible for such differences are still unknown. The understanding of these molecular alterations mechanism will be critical to discriminate patients who need systemic treatment from those that can be treated only locally and could also guide the development of new drugs' against this tumors. Using 102 tumor samples representing a large spectrum of these tumors, we performed expression profiling and defined differentially expression genes that are likely to be involved in tumors that are locally aggressive and in tumors with metastatic potential. We described a set of 12 genes (SNRPD3, MEGF9, SPTAN-1, AFAP1L2, ENDOD1, SERPIN5, ZWINTAS, TOP2A, UBE2C, ABCF1, MCM2, and ARL6IP5) showing opposite expression when these two conditions were compared. These genes are mainly related to cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions and cell proliferation and might represent helpful tools for a more precise classification and diagnosis as well as potential drug targets. PMID:20165692

  2. Non-lethal heat treatment of cells results in reduction of tumor initiation and metastatic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoo-Shin; Lee, Tae Hoon; O'Neill, Brian E.

    2015-08-14

    Non-lethal hyperthermia is used clinically as adjuvant treatment to radiation, with mixed results. Denaturation of protein during hyperthermia treatment is expected to synergize with radiation damage to cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Alternatively, hyperthermia is known to cause tissue level changes in blood flow, increasing the oxygenation and radiosensitivity of often hypoxic tumors. In this study, we elucidate a third possibility, that hyperthermia alters cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction, with particular impact on the cancer stem cell population. We demonstrate that cell heating results in a robust but temporary loss of cancer cell aggressiveness and metastatic potential in mouse models. In vitro, this heating results in a temporary loss in cell mobility, adhesion, and proliferation. Our hypothesis is that the loss of cellular adhesion results in suppression of cancer stem cells and loss of tumor virulence and metastatic potential. Our study suggests that the metastatic potential of cancer is particularly reduced by the effects of heat on cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction. If true, this could help explain both the successes and failures of clinical hyperthermia, and suggest ways to target treatments to those who would most benefit. - Highlights: • Non-lethal hyperthermia treatment of cancer cells is shown to cause a reduction in rates of tumor initiation and metastasis. • Dynamic imaging of cells during heat treatment shows temporary changes in cell shape, cell migration, and cell proliferation. • Loss of adhesion may lead to the observed effect, which may disproportionately impact the tumor initiating cell fraction. • Loss or suppression of the tumor initiating cell fraction results in the observed loss of metastatic potential in vivo. • This result may lead to new approaches to synergizing hyperthermia with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.

  3. Grating-Based Phase-Contrast Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis in Lung Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangting; Wang, Yujie; Ding, Bei; Shi, Chen; Liu, Huanhuan; Tang, Rongbiao; Sun, Jianqi; Yan, Fuhua; Zhang, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the feasibility of the grating-based phase-contrast imaging (GPI) technique for studying tumor angiogenesis in nude BALB/c mice, without contrast agents. Methods We established lung metastatic models of human gastric cancer by injecting the moderately differentiated SGC-7901 gastric cancer cell line into the tail vein of nude mice. Samples were embedded in a 10% formalin suspension and dried before imaging. Grating-based X-ray phase-contrast images were obtained at the BL13W beamline of the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) and compared with histological sections. Results Without contrast agents, grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging still differentiated angiogenesis within metastatic tumors with high spatial resolution. Vessels, down to tens of microns, showed gray values that were distinctive from those of the surrounding tumors, which made them easily identifiable. The vessels depicted in the imaging study were similar to those identified on histopathology, both in size and shape. Conclusions Our preliminary study demonstrates that grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging has the potential to depict angiogenesis in lung metastases. PMID:25811626

  4. EF5 and Motexafin Lutetium in Detecting Tumor Cells in Patients With Abdominal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Localized Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Localized Gallbladder Cancer; Localized Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage 0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Gastric Cancer; Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Colon Cancer; Stage II Gastric Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Rectal Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage

  5. Vaccine Therapy and Sargramostim With or Without Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Metastatic Lung Cancer or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-28

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  6. Imaging characteristic analysis of metastatic spine lesions from breast, prostate, lung, and renal cell carcinomas for surgical planning: Osteolytic versus osteoblastic

    PubMed Central

    Reddington, Justin A.; Mendez, Gustavo A.; Ching, Alex; Kubicky, Charlotte Dai; Klimo, Paul; Ragel, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgeons treating metastatic spine disease can use computed tomography (CT) imaging to determine whether lesions are osteolytic, osteoblastic, or mixed. This enables treatment that considers the structural integrity of the vertebral body (VB), which is impaired with lytic lesions but not blastic lesions. The authors analyzed CT imaging characteristics of spine metastasis from breast, lung, prostate, and renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) to determine the metastasis patterns of each of these common tumors. Methods: The authors identified patients with metastatic spine disease treated during a 3-year period. Variables studied included age, sex, and cancer type. Lesions from breast, lung, prostate, and RCC primary lesions were selected for imaging analysis. Results: Sixty-six patients were identified: 17 had breast metastasis, 14 prostate, 18 lung, and 17 RCC. Breast cancer metastasis involved 33% of VBs with 56%, 20%, and 24% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. Prostate cancer metastasis involved 35% of VBs with 14%, 62%, and 24% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. Lung cancer metastasis involved 13% of VBs with 64%, 33%, and 3% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. RCC metastasis involved 11% of VBs with 91%, 7%, and 2% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed lesions, respectively. Conclusions: To improve surgical planning, we advocate the use of CT prior to surgery to evaluate whether spine metastases are osteolytic or osteoblastic. In cases of osteolytic lesions, the concern is of segmental instability requiring reconstruction and the risk for screw pull out should instrumentation be considered. In cases of osteoblastic lesions, surgeons should consider debulking dense bone. PMID:27274410

  7. Rectal neuroendocrine tumor with uncommon metastatic spread: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Tsoukalas, Nikolaos; Galanopoulos, Michail; Tolia, Maria; Kiakou, Maria; Nakos, Georgios; Papakostidi, Aristoula; Koumakis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are rare neoplasms. Rectal neuroendocrine tumors consist approximately the 5%-14% of all neuroendocrine neoplasms in Europe. These tumors are diagnosed in relatively young patients, with a mean age at diagnosis of 56 years. Distant metastases from rectal neuroendocrine tumors are not very common. Herein we describe a case of a rectal neuroendocrine tumor which metastasized to the lung, mediastinum and orbit. This case underscores the importance of early identification and optimal management to improve patient’s prognosis. Therefore, the clinical significance of this case is the necessity of physicians’ awareness and education regarding neuroendocrine tumors’ diagnosis and management. PMID:26909138

  8. Cutaneous metastatic adenocarcinoma complicated by spontaneous tumor lysis syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YU; YUAN, CAIJUN; LIU, XIAOMEI

    2014-01-01

    The present study reports the case of a 71-year-old female with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the skin who developed tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) upon admittance to the First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University (Jinzhou, China). The patient presented to the hospital due to multiple subcutaneous nodules, lethargy and weakness, but succumbed without any cancer therapy. Metastases to the skin from solid carcinomas are uncommon, and several studies have reported patients with minimal primary symptoms despite extensive metastatic skin disease. However, few cases were accompanied with spontaneous TLS at the time of presentation. TLS may be a severe complication during the therapy for hematological and oncological diseases. Although spontaneous TLS in internal tumors has been reported, it is extremely rare. The present study highlights the fact that multiple subcutaneous metastases may occur with the symptoms of spontaneous TLS, and may be key for the early recognition of this syndrome. PMID:25013514

  9. Selection of Mesenchymal-Like Metastatic Cells in Primary Tumors – An in silico Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Vipin; Wong, Shek Yoon; Leong, Shiang Rong; Harish, Bindu; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Gouaillard, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    In order to metastasize, cancer cells must undergo phenotypic transition from an anchorage-dependent form to a motile form via a process referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transition. It is currently unclear whether metastatic cells emerge late during tumor progression by successive accumulation of mutations, or whether they derive from distinct cell populations already present during the early stages of tumorigenesis. Similarly, the selective pressures that drive metastasis are poorly understood. Selection of cancer cells with increased proliferative capacity and enhanced survival characteristics may explain how some transformations promote a metastatic phenotype. However, it is difficult to explain how cancer cells that disseminate can emerge due to such selective pressure, since these cells usually remain dormant for prolonged periods of time. In the current study, we have used in silico modeling and simulation to investigate the hypothesis that mesenchymal-like cancer cells evolve during the early stages of primary tumor development, and that these cells exhibit survival and proliferative advantages within the tumor microenvironment. In an agent-based tumor microenvironment model, cancer cell agents with distinct sets of attributes governing nutrient consumption, proliferation, apoptosis, random motility, and cell adhesion were allowed to compete for space and nutrients. These simulation data indicated that mesenchymal-like cancer cells displaying high motility and low adhesion proliferate more rapidly and display a survival advantage over epithelial-like cancer cells. Furthermore, the presence of mesenchymal-like cells within the primary tumor influences the macroscopic properties, emergent morphology, and growth rate of tumors. PMID:22566967

  10. Function of immunoadjuvants in laser immunotherapy for treatment of metastatic breast tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong; Wolf, Roman F.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2002-06-01

    Tumor cell destruction usually induces host immune responses, such as local inflammation and increased activities of macrophages and neutrophils. Use of immunoadjuvant can usually enhance such immune activities. Laser immunotherapy is designed to use the combination of laser photothermal and immunological interactions to induce long-term antitumor immunity with the help of immunoadjuvant. It uses a selective hyperthermia for acute tumor destruction through an intratumor administration of indocyanine green and a noninvasive irradiation by an 805-nm laser. The concurrent in situ administration of immunoadjuvant helped achieve the desired effect: tumor eradication and antitumor immunity. The current study further explores the function of immunoadjuvants in laser immunotherapy by testing four different adjuvants: glycated chitosan, complete Freund's adjuvant, incomplete Freund's adjuvant, and c-parvum. Each adjuvant provided long-term tumor cure in the treatment of a metastatic mammary tumor model in rats. However, glycated chitosan and complete Freund's adjuvant were most effective with 25% and 18% long- term cure rates, respectively. Different concentrations of glycated chitosan were also used in treatment of rats bearing metastatic breast tumors.

  11. Radiation Therapy and MK-3475 for Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer, Renal Cell Cancer, Melanoma, and Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  12. Tumor budding predicts response to anti-EGFR therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Zlobec, Inti; Molinari, Francesca; Martin, Vittoria; Mazzucchelli, Luca; Saletti, Piercarlo; Trezzi, Rosangela; De Dosso, Sara; Vlajnic, Tatjana; Frattini, Milo; Lugli, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the evaluation of tumor budding can complement K-RAS analysis to improve the individualized prediction of response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor based therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. METHODS: Forty-three patients with mCRC treated with cetuximab or panitumumab were entered into this study. According to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, 30 patients had stable or progressive disease (non-responsive), while 13 patients had a partial response. Tumor buds were evaluated from whole tissue sections stained for pan-cytokeratin, evaluated in the densest region using a 40 × objective and “high-grade” tumor budding was defined as 15 buds/high-power field. RESULTS: Tumor buds and K-RAS mutation both correctly classified 68% of patients. All patients with K-RAS mutation (n = 7) or high-grade tumor budding (n = 11) were non-responsive, of which 4 patients had both features. All 13 partial responders were K-RAS wild-type with low-grade tumor budding. Combined, the predictive value of K-RAS and tumor budding was 80%. Additionally, high-grade tumor budding was significantly related to worse progression-free survival [HR (95% CI): 2.8 (1.3-6.0, P = 0.008)]. CONCLUSION: If confirmed in larger cohorts, the addition of tumor budding to K-RAS analysis may represent an effective approach for individualized patient management in the metastatic setting. PMID:20939111

  13. Estimation of lung tissue incompressibility variation throughout respiration for tumor targeting in lung radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzadi, Zahra; Samani, Abbas

    2013-03-01

    A novel technique is proposed to characterize lung tissue incompressibility variation during respiration. Lung tissue incompressibility variation stems from significant air content variation in the tissue throughout respiration. Estimating lung tissue incompressibility and its variation is critical for computer assisted tumor motion tracking. Continuous tumor motion during respiration is a major challenge in lung cancer treatment by external beam radiotherapy. If not accounted for, this motion leads to areas of radiation over dosage for the lung normal tissues. Since no effective imaging modality is available for real-time lung tumor tracking, computer based modeling which has the capability for accurate tissue deformation estimation can be a good alternative. Lung tissue deformation estimation can be made using the lung Finite Element (FE) model where its accuracy depends on input tissue biomechanical properties including incompressibility parameter. In this research, an optimization algorithm is proposed to estimate the incompressibility parameter function in terms of respiration cycle time. In this algorithm, the incompressibility parameter and lung pressure values are varied systematically until optimal values, which result in maximum similarity between acquired and simulated 4D CT images of the lung, are achieved for each respiration time point. The simulated images are constructed using a reference image in conjunction with the deformation field obtained from the lung's FE model in each respiration time increment. We demonstrated that utilizing the calculated function along with respiratory system FE modeling leads to accurate tumor targeting, hence potentially improving lung radiotherapy outcome.

  14. Chemotherapy and irradiation for locally advanced and metastatic pulmonary carcinoid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Curtis R.; Wirth, Lori J.; Nishino, Mizuki; Chen, Aileen B.; Sholl, Lynette M.; Kulke, Matthew H.; McNamee, Ciaran J.; Jänne, Pasi A.; Johnson, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The optimal management of locally advanced and metastatic pulmonary carcinoid tumors remains to be determined. Materials and methods A retrospective review was conducted on patients with typical and atypical pulmonary carcinoid tumors treated at our institutions between 1990 and 2012. Results 300 patients were identified with pulmonary carcinoid, (80 patients with atypical carcinoid), of whom 29 presented with metastatic disease (16 atypical). Of evaluable patients, 26 (41%) with stages I–III atypical carcinoid tumors recurred at a median time of 3.7 years (range, 0.4–32), compared to 3 (1%) patients with typical carcinoid (range, 8–12.3). 39 patients were treated with chemotherapy, including 30 patients with metastatic disease (27 atypical), and 7 patients were treated with adjuvant platinum–etoposide chemoradiation (6 atypical, 1 typical, 6 stage IIIA, 1 stage IIB). At a median follow-up of 2 years there were 2 recurrences in the 7 patients receiving adjuvant treatment. Median survival after diagnosis of metastatic disease for patients with atypical pulmonary carcinoid was 3.3 years with a 5-year survival of 24%. Treatment regimens showing efficacy in pulmonary carcinoid include 15 patients treated with octreotide-based therapies (10% response rate (RR), 70% disease control rate (DCR), 15 month median progression-free survival (PFS)), 13 patients treated with etoposide + platinum (23% RR, 69% DCR, 7 month median PFS), and 14 patients treated with temozolomide-based therapies (14% RR, 57% DCR, 10 month median PFS). 8 of 10 patients with octreotide-avid disease treated with an octreotide-based regimen experienced disease control (1 partial response, 7 stable disease) for a median of 18 months (range 6–72 months). Conclusions These results support our previous finding that a subset of pulmonary carcinoid tumors are responsive to chemotherapy. PMID:25218177

  15. The Fractalkine-Receptor Axis Improves Human Colorectal Cancer Prognosis by Limiting Tumor Metastatic Dissemination.

    PubMed

    Erreni, Marco; Siddiqui, Imran; Marelli, Giulia; Grizzi, Fabio; Bianchi, Paolo; Morone, Diego; Marchesi, Federica; Celesti, Giuseppe; Pesce, Samantha; Doni, Andrea; Rumio, Cristiano; Roncalli, Massimo G; Laghi, Luigi; Mantovani, Alberto; Allavena, Paola

    2016-01-15

    Human colorectal cancer (CRC) is a frequent neoplasia in Western countries, and its metastatic progression is a major cause of cancer-related death. In search of specific molecules upregulated in CRC, with possible clinical relevance, we performed a differential gene-profiling analysis in surgery-derived CRC samples and adjacent uninvolved intestinal mucosa. The chemokine CX3CL1 and its specific receptor CX3CR1 were significantly upregulated in tumors. Higher expression of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in 100 CRC tumor samples (stages I-III). Unexpectedly, high immune scores of CX3CL1 did not correlate with the density of tumor-infiltrating CD3(+) T cells or CD68(+) macrophages. Coexpression of ligand and receptor by tumor cells (axis-positive tumors) significantly associated with longer disease-free (p = 0.01) and disease-specific survival (p = 0.001). Conversely, axis-negative tumors (with low expression of both ligand and receptor) had increased risk of tumor relapse (p = 0.02), and increased likelihood of metachronous metastasis (p = 0.001), including after stage adjustment (p = 0.006). Transduction of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 in CRC tumor cell lines induced cell aggregation that strongly inhibited in vitro migration in chemotaxis assays. In a mouse model of spleen-liver metastases, cancer dissemination to liver was dramatically reduced in CX3CL1-CX3CR1-expressing tumors, and ligand-receptor interaction was confirmed in cancer cells in vivo by fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis. In conclusion, tumoral expression of the CX3CL1-CX3CR1 chemokine axis functions as a retention factor, increasing homotypic cell adhesion and limiting tumor spreading to metastatic sites. Lack or low levels of expression of CX3CL1-CX3CR1 by tumor cells identifies a group of CRC patients at increased risk of metastatic progression. PMID:26673138

  16. Transcription of a novel mouse semaphorin gene, M-semaH, correlates with the metastatic ability of mouse tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Christensen, C R; Klingelhöfer, J; Tarabykina, S; Hulgaard, E F; Kramerov, D; Lukanidin, E

    1998-03-15

    In the attempt to identify genes associated with metastasis, we have compared gene expressions of two metastatic cell lines, 4T1 and 66cl4, and one noninvasive, nonmetastatic cell line, 67NR, which originate from the same mouse mammary adenocarcinoma. Using the technique of differential display, we identified a novel member of the semaphorin/collapsin family in the two metastatic cell lines. We have named it M-semaH. Northern hybridization to a panel of tumor cell lines revealed transcripts in 12 of 12 metastatic cell lines but in only 2 of 6 nonmetastatic cells and none in immortalized mouse fibroblasts. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the expression of a semaphorin gene has been shown to correlate positively with tumor progression. We have characterized two transcripts present in the tumor cells. One transcript, M-semaH-v, is a putative splice variant, which is less abundant in normal tissue and lacks 478 bp in the 3' untranslated region. Both transcripts encode the same 775 amino acids with the features of a secreted glycoprotein. Northern analysis suggests that the M-semaH gene is involved in embryonic development and in situ hybridization locates the M-semaH expression to the developing lungs, to developing skeletal elements, and to the ventral horns of the developing neural tube. PMID:9515811

  17. In vivo selection for spine-derived highly metastatic lung cancer cells is associated with increased migration, inflammation and decreased adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huayun; Zhang, Jishen; Li, Shichang; Wei, Haifeng; Yang, Cheng; Xu, Leqin; Jin, Rongrong; Li, Zhenxi; Zhou, Wang; Ding, JianDong; Chu, Jianjun; Jia, Lianshun; Jia, Qi; Tan, Chengjun; Liu, Mingyao; Xiao, Jianru

    2015-01-01

    We developed a murine spine metastasis model by screening five metastatic non-small cell lung cancer cell lines (PC-9, A549, NCI-H1299, NCI-H460, H2030). A549 cells displayed the highest tendency towards spine metastases. After three rounds of selection in vivo, we isolated a clone named A549L6, which induced spine metastasis in 80% of injected mice. The parameters of the A549L6 cell spinal metastatic mouse models were consistent with clinical spine metastasis features. All the spinal metastatic mice developed symptoms of nerve compression after 40 days. A549L6 cells had increased migration, invasiveness and decreased adhesion compared to the original A549L0 cells. In contrast, there was no significant differences in cell proliferation, apoptosis and sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. Comparative transcriptomic analysis and Real-time PCR analysis showed that expression of signaling molecules regulating several tumor properties including migration (MYL9), metastasis (CEACAM6, VEGFC, CX3CL1, CST1, CCL5, S100A9, IGF1, NOTCH3), adhesion (FN1, CEACAM1) and inflammation (TRAF2, NFκB2 and RelB) were altered in A549L6 cells. We suggest that migration, adhesion and inflammation related genes contribute to spine metastatic capacity. PMID:26090868

  18. Assessment of Tumor Radioresponsiveness and Metastatic Potential by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ovrebo, Kirsti Marie; Gulliksrud, Kristine; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: It has been suggested that gadolinium diethylene-triamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) may provide clinically useful biomarkers for personalized cancer treatment. In this preclinical study, we investigated the potential of DCE-MRI as a noninvasive method for assessing the radioresponsiveness and metastatic potential of tumors. Methods and Materials: R-18 melanoma xenografts growing in BALB/c nu/nu mice were used as experimental tumor models. Fifty tumors were subjected to DCE-MRI, and parametric images of K{sup trans} (the volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v{sub e} (the fractional distribution volume of Gd-DTPA) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI series. The tumors were irradiated after the DCE-MRI, either with a single dose of 10 Gy for detection of radiobiological hypoxia (30 tumors) or with five fractions of 4 Gy in 48 h for assessment of radioresponsiveness (20 tumors). The host mice were then euthanized and examined for lymph node metastases, and the primary tumors were resected for measurement of cell survival in vitro. Results: Tumors with hypoxic cells showed significantly lower K{sup trans} values than tumors without significant hypoxia (p < 0.0001, n = 30), and K{sup trans} decreased with increasing cell surviving fraction for tumors given fractionated radiation treatment (p < 0.0001, n = 20). Tumors in metastasis-positive mice had significantly lower K{sup trans} values than tumors in metastasis-negative mice (p < 0.0001, n = 50). Significant correlations between v{sub e} and tumor hypoxia, radioresponsiveness, or metastatic potential could not be detected. Conclusions: R-18 tumors with low K{sup trans} values are likely to be resistant to radiation treatment and have a high probability of developing lymph node metastases. The general validity of these observations should be investigated further by studying preclinical tumor models with biological

  19. An improved CTC isolation scheme for pairing with downstream genomics: Demonstrating clinical utility in metastatic prostate, lung and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Premasekharan, Gayatri; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Okimoto, Ross A; Hamirani, Ashiya; Lindquist, Karla J; Ngo, Vy T; Roy, Ritu; Hough, Jeffrey; Edwards, Matthew; Paz, Rosa; Foye, Adam; Sood, Riddhi; Copren, Kirsten A; Gubens, Matthew; Small, Eric J; Bivona, Trever G; Collisson, Eric A; Friedlander, Terence W; Paris, Pamela L

    2016-09-28

    Improvements in technologies to yield purer circulating tumor cells (CTCs) will enable a broader range of clinical applications. We have previously demonstrated the use of a commercially available cell-adhesion matrix (CAM) assay to capture invasive CTCs (iCTCs). To improve the purity of the isolated iCTCs, here we used fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) in combination with the CAM assay (CAM + FACS). Our results showed an increase of median purity from the CAM assay to CAM + FACS for the spiked-in cell lines and patient samples analyzed from three different metastatic cancer types: castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), non-small cell lung cancer (mNSCLC) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cancer (mPDAC). Copy number profiles for spiked-in mCRPC cell line and mCRPC patient iCTCs were similar to expected mCRPC profiles and a matched biopsy. A somatic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation specific to mNSCLC was observed in the iCTCs recovered from EGFR(+) mNSCLC cell lines and patient samples. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of spiked-in pancreatic cancer cell line and mPDAC patient iCTCs showed mPDAC common mutations. CAM + FACS iCTC enrichment enables multiple downstream genomic characterizations across different tumor types. PMID:27343980

  20. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for a patient with metastatic lung cancer--a case report.

    PubMed

    Crevenna, Richard; Marosi, Christine; Schmidinger, Manuela; Fialka-Moser, Veronika

    2006-09-01

    A 47-year-old female patient suffering from advanced lung cancer with metastatic bone and brain disease participated in a passive exercise program, consisting of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) five times a week, carried out for 4 weeks. After the training period, the results of the 6-min walk (420 m before and 603 m after the training period) have improved by 44%, which demonstrates the increase of physical performance (mobility, endurance capacity). The results of the "Timed up and go" indicate an improvement of mobility and functional health of skeletal muscles. Furthermore, the quality of life (QOL)-scales (assessed by using the SF-36 health survey) "Physical functioning", "Role-physical", "Mental health", "Role-emotional", "Vitality", "Bodily pain", and "General health" showed improvements after the intervention period. Feasibility, safety, and beneficial effects of the NMES program were proven for the patient in this case study. These findings indicate that NMES, initiated and executed with appropriate care, may serve as a useful supportive means of palliative treatment in some patients with advanced cancer and metastatic disease, especially in cases of metastatic involvement of the brain and of the skeletal system with the risk of seizures and pathological fractures where volitional training is not allowed. PMID:16523264

  1. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-21

    Breast Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Metastatic Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  2. Retroperitoneal metastatic germ cell tumor presenting as a psoas abscess: a diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Dieker, Carrie A; De Las Casas, Luis E; Davis, Brian R

    2013-07-01

    Most testicular neoplasms are germ cell tumors, the vast majority of which represent seminomas. Most seminomas present localized to the testis, whereas nonseminomatous germ cell tumors more often present with lymph node metastases. Psoas abscesses generally arise from a contiguous intra-abdominal or pelvic infectious process, an adjacent focus of osteomyelitis or septic emboli from distant infectious foci. In this study, the case of a 24-year-old man who presented with a right psoas mass presumptively diagnosed as an abscess secondary to fever and leukocytosis is presented. The patient had a history of right testicular seminoma, and normal serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein and human chorionic gonadotropin. Surgical exploration and biopsy demonstrated seminoma metastasis. This case represents an extremely unusual clinical presentation of metastatic germ cell tumor presenting as a psoas abscess. This unique case represents an unusual presentation of a recurrent germ cell tumor mimicking a psoas abscess. Awareness of possible metastatic testicular germ cell neoplasm as a psoas abscess could prevent diagnosis delay before retroperitoneal tumor debulking. PMID:23360792

  3. Patient-derived tumor xenograft strategies for informed management of patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Qassemyar, Ahmad; Gabert, Pierre-Elliott; Kluza, Jerome; Duquennoy-Martinot, Véronique; Mortier, Laurent; Marchetti, Philippe; Guerreschi, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    Metastatic melanoma has benefited from immunotherapy and targeted therapy advances. Faced with the inescapable onset of treatment resistance, the choice of a second-line treatment can be guided by a patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDTX). This new approach requires an excellent multidisciplinary collaboration where the surgeon has a key role to play. Each patient included (stage IIIC or IV) presented with subcutaneous melanoma metastasis that could be surgically resected. The surgeon performed orthotopic PDTX on CB17-SCID mice. To validate the model, tumor material was amplified over three successive generations of animals to obtain cohorts compatible with carrying out a study to compare treatment response by targeted therapy (vemurafenib versus controls). Tumors were characterized (histologically and genetically) at all stages of the generations' amplification. Functional imaging by fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET scan was performed for the third generation PDTX. Seventeen patients with a mutated BRAF V600E subcutaneous metastasis were included, yielding 257 PDTX. Clinical, histological, and genetic characteristics of the grafted tumors were stable over the three mice generations. The treatment response to vemurafenib was observed for all PDTX. The fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET scan evidenced a decreased in glucose uptake in the treated tumors. PDTX models are being widely used in fundamental research and are more compatible with clinical issues. If PDTX are simple and easily reproducible in metastatic melanoma, an organized multidisciplinary platform is essential to implement them. In our experience, surgeons have a key role to play in the cohesion of this new therapeutic approach. PMID:26983079

  4. The diaphragm as an anatomic surrogate for lung tumor motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerviño, Laura I.; Chao, Alvin K. Y.; Sandhu, Ajay; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-06-01

    Lung tumor motion due to respiration poses a challenge in the application of modern three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Direct tracking of the lung tumor during radiation therapy is very difficult without implanted fiducial markers. Indirect tracking relies on the correlation of the tumor's motion and the surrogate's motion. The present paper presents an analysis of the correlation between tumor motion and diaphragm motion in order to evaluate the potential use of diaphragm as a surrogate for tumor motion. We have analyzed the correlation between diaphragm motion and superior-inferior lung tumor motion in 32 fluoroscopic image sequences from ten lung cancer patients. A simple linear model and a more complex linear model that accounts for phase delays between the two motions have been used. Results show that the diaphragm is a good surrogate for tumor motion prediction for most patients, resulting in an average correlation factor of 0.94 and 0.98 with each model respectively. The model that accounts for delays leads to an average localization prediction error of 0.8 mm and an error at the 95% confidence level of 2.1 mm. However, for one patient studied, the correlation is much weaker compared to other patients. This indicates that, before using diaphragm for lung tumor prediction, the correlation should be examined on a patient-by-patient basis.

  5. Fluoroscopic tumor tracking for image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tong; Cerviño, Laura I.; Tang, Xiaoli; Vasconcelos, Nuno; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-02-01

    Accurate lung tumor tracking in real time is a keystone to image-guided radiotherapy of lung cancers. Existing lung tumor tracking approaches can be roughly grouped into three categories: (1) deriving tumor position from external surrogates; (2) tracking implanted fiducial markers fluoroscopically or electromagnetically; (3) fluoroscopically tracking lung tumor without implanted fiducial markers. The first approach suffers from insufficient accuracy, while the second may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previous studies in fluoroscopic markerless tracking are mainly based on template matching methods, which may fail when the tumor boundary is unclear in fluoroscopic images. In this paper we propose a novel markerless tumor tracking algorithm, which employs the correlation between the tumor position and surrogate anatomic features in the image. The positions of the surrogate features are not directly tracked; instead, we use principal component analysis of regions of interest containing them to obtain parametric representations of their motion patterns. Then, the tumor position can be predicted from the parametric representations of surrogates through regression. Four regression methods were tested in this study: linear and two-degree polynomial regression, artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM). The experimental results based on fluoroscopic sequences of ten lung cancer patients demonstrate a mean tracking error of 2.1 pixels and a maximum error at a 95% confidence level of 4.6 pixels (pixel size is about 0.5 mm) for the proposed tracking algorithm.

  6. Cure of metastatic growth of EMT6 tumor cells in mice following manipulation of CD200:CD200R signaling.

    PubMed

    Gorczynski, Reginald M; Chen, Zhiqi; Khatri, Ismat; Podnos, Anna; Yu, Kai

    2013-11-01

    In previous studies, we observed that regulation of expression of CD200, both on cells of a transplantable breast cancer, EMT6, and of the host, as well as of the receptor, CD200R in host mice, regulated local tumor growth and metastasis in immunocompetent animals. This in turn led to an improved ability to document immunity to EMT6 in CD200R1KO mice. In the current study, we have explored the ability to cure BALB/c CD200KO or CD200R1KO mice of tumors ≤1 cm(3) in size by surgical resection of localized tumor, followed by immunization with irradiated EMT6 cells along with CpG as adjuvant. While control animals treated in this fashion developed significant pulmonary and liver metastases within 30 days of surgery, significant protection was seen in both CD200KO or CD200R1KO mice, with no macroscopic lung/liver metastases observed in CD200R1KO mice on sacrifice at day 300. Following surgical resection and immunization, draining lymph nodes from control mice contained tumor cells cloned at limiting dilution in vitro even before pulmonary and hepatic metastasis was seen. In contrast, within the limits of detection of the assay used (sensitivity ~1 in 10(7) cells), no tumor cells were detected at limiting dilution in similarly treated CD200R1KO mice, and significant reductions were seen in CD200KO mice. Infusion of anti-CD4, but less so anti-CD8, mAb into surgically treated and immunized CD200R1KO mice attenuated protection from both macroscopic (liver/lung) and microscopic (assayed by limiting dilution of DLN) metastasis. Adoptive transfer of lymphocytes from treated CD200R1KO mice to surgically treated control mice also attenuated metastatic growth of tumor, which was abolished by pretreatment of transferred cells with anti-CD4 mAb. Our data suggest that CD200:CD200R attenuates a potentially tumor-protective CD4 host response to breast cancer. PMID:24166280

  7. Id Proteins Contribute to Tumor Development and Metastatic Colonization in a Model of Bladder Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Cao, Marta; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A.; Chin, Yvette; Bochner, Bernard H.; Benezra, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Bladder cancer is one of the most common malignant genitourinary diseases worldwide. Despite advances in surgical technique, medical oncology and radiation therapy, cure of invasive tumors remains elusive for patients with late stage disease. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are needed to improve the response rates with regard to recurrence, invasion and metastasis. Objective: Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id) proteins have been proposed as therapeutic targets due to the key regulatory role they exert in multiple steps of cancer. We aimed to explore the role of Id proteins in bladder cancer development and the pattern of expression of Id proteins in bladder carcinomas. Methods: We used a well-established chemically induced model of bladder carcinogenesis. Wild type and Id-deficient mice were given N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN) in the drinking water and urinary bladder lesions were analyzed histopathologically and stained for Id1. We assessed the effects of Id1 inactivation in cultured bladder cancer cells and in a model of metastatic lung colonization. We also performed Id1 staining of human urothelial carcinoma samples and matched lymph node metastases. Results: Id1 protein was overexpressed in the BBN-induced model of bladder cancer. Id1 deficiency resulted in the development of urinary bladder tumors with areas of extensive hemorrhage and decreased invasiveness when compared to wild type mice. Id1 inactivation led to decreased cell growth in vitro and lung colonization in vivo of human bladder cancer cells. Immunohistochemistry performed on human urothelial carcinoma samples showed Id1 positive staining in both primary tumors and lymph node metastases. Conclusions: In summary, our studies reveal the physiological relevance of Id1 in bladder cancer progression and suggest that targeting Id1 may be important in the development of novel therapies for the treatment of bladder cancer.

  8. Percutaneous Cryoablation of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma for Local Tumor Control: Feasibility, Outcomes, and Estimated Cost-effectiveness for Palliation

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun J.; Littrup, Peter J.; Goodrich, Dylan J.; Currier, Brandt P.; Aoun, Hussein D.; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Adam, Barbara; Goodman, Allen C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess complications, local tumor recurrences, overall survival (OS), and estimates of cost-effectiveness for multisite cryoablation (MCA) of oligometastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Materials and Methods A total of 60 computed tomography- and/or ultrasound-guided percutaneous MCA procedures were performed on 72 tumors in 27 patients (three women and 24 men). Average patient age was 63 years. Tumor location was grouped according to common metastatic sites. Established surgical selection criteria graded patient status. Median OS was determined by Kaplan–Meier method and defined life-years gained (LYGs). Estimates of MCA costs per LYG were compared with established values for systemic therapies. Results Total number of tumors and cryoablation procedures for each anatomic site are as follows: nephrectomy bed, 11 and 11; adrenal gland, nine and eight; paraaortic, seven and six; lung, 14 and 13; bone, 13 and 13; superficial, 12 and nine; intraperitoneal, five and three; and liver, one and one. A mean of 2.2 procedures per patient were performed, with a median clinical follow-up of 16 months. Major complication and local recurrence rates were 2% (one of 60) and 3% (two of 72), respectively. No patients were graded as having good surgical risk, but median OS was 2.69 years, with an estimated 5-year survival rate of 27%. Cryoablation remained cost-effective with or without the presence of systemic therapies according to historical cost comparisons, with an adjunctive cost-effectiveness ratio of $28,312–$59,554 per LYG. Conclusions MCA was associated with very low morbidity and local tumor recurrence rates for all anatomic sites, with apparent increased OS. Even as an adjunct to systemic therapies, MCA appeared cost-effective for palliation of oligometastatic RCC. PMID:22538119

  9. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition, the tumor microenvironment, and metastatic behavior of epithelial malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Lindsay J; Bhattacharya, Syamal D; Kuo, Paul C

    2012-01-01

    Objective The mechanisms of cancer metastasis have been intensely studied recently and may provide vital therapeutic targets for metastasis prevention. We sought to review the contribution of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and the tumor microenvironment to cancer metastasis. Summary Background Data Epithelial-mesenchymal transition is the process by which epithelial cells lose cell-cell junctions and baso-apical polarity and acquire plasticity, mobility, invasive capacity, stemlike characteristics, and resistance to apoptosis. This cell biology program is active in embryology, wound healing, and pathologically in cancer metastasis, and along with the mechanical and cellular components of the tumor microenvironment, provides critical impetus for epithelial malignancies to acquire metastatic capability. Methods A literature review was performed using PubMed for “epithelial-mesenchymal transition”, “tumor microenvironment”, “TGF-β and cancer”, “Wnt and epithelial-mesenchymal transition”, “Notch and epithelial-mesenchymal transition”, “Hedgehog and epithelial-mesenchymal transition” and “hypoxia and metastasis”. Relevant primary studies and review articles were assessed. Results Major signaling pathways involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition include TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, and others. These pathways converge on several transcription factors, including zinc finger proteins Snail and Slug, Twist, ZEB 1/2, and Smads. These factors interact with one another and others to provide crosstalk between the relevant signaling pathways. MicroRNA suppression and epigenetic changes also influence the changes involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Cellular and mechanical components of the tumor microenvironment are also critical in determining metastatic potential. Conclusions While the mechanisms promoting metastasis are extremely wide ranging and still under intense investigation, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition program and

  10. Promotion of lung tumor growth by interleukin-17

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Beibei; Guenther, James F.; Pociask, Derek A.; Wang, Yu; Kolls, Jay K.; You, Zongbing; Chandrasekar, Bysani; Shan, Bin; Sullivan, Deborah E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings demonstrate that inhaled cigarette smoke, the predominant lung carcinogen, elicits a T helper 17 (Th17) inflammatory phenotype. Interleukin-17A (IL-17), the hallmark cytokine of Th17 inflammation, displays pro- and antitumorigenic properties in a manner that varies according to tumor type and assay system. To investigate the role of IL-17 in lung tumor growth, we used an autochthonous tumor model (K-RasLA1 mice) with lung delivery of a recombinant adenovirus that expresses IL-17A. Virus-mediated expression of IL-17A in K-RasLA1 mice at 8–10 wk of age doubled lung tumor growth in 3 wk relative to littermates that received a green fluorescent protein-expressing control adenovirus. IL-17 induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression in vivo and in vitro. In accord with this finding, selective and specific inhibitors of MMP-9 repressed the increased motility and invasiveness of IL-17-treated lung tumor cells in culture. Knockdown or mutation of p53 promoted the motility of murine lung tumor cells and abrogated the promigratory role of IL-17. Coexpression of siRNA-resistant wild-type, but not mutant, human p53 rescued both IL-17-mediated migration and MMP-9 mRNA induction in p53 knockdown lung tumor cells. IL-17 increased MMP-9 mRNA stability by reducing interaction with the mRNA destabilizing serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1). Taken together, our results indicate that IL-17 stimulates lung tumor growth and regulates MMP-9 mRNA levels in a p53- and SRSF1-dependent manner. PMID:25038189