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  1. The impact of cocaine and heroin on the placental transfer of methadone

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Antoine; Obrist, Cristina; Wenzinger, Silvana; von Mandach, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    Background Methadone is the therapeutic agent of choice for the treatment of opiate addiction in pregnancy. The co-consumption (heroin, cocaine) which may influence the effects of methadone is frequent. Therefore, the impact of cocaine and heroin on the placental transfer of methadone and the placental tissue was investigated under in vitro conditions. Methods Placentae (n = 24) were ex-vivo perfused with medium (m) (control, n = 6), m plus methadone (n = 6), m plus methadone and cocaine (n = 6) or m plus methadone and heroin (n = 6). Placental functionality parameters like antipyrine permeability, glucose consumption, lactate production, hormone production (hCG and leptin), microparticles release and the expression of P-glycoprotein were analysed. Results Methadone accumulated in placental tissue. Methadone alone decreased the transfer of antipyrine from 0.60 +/- 0.07 to 0.50 +/- 0.06 (fetal/maternal ratio, mean +/- SD, P < 0.01), whereas the combination with cocaine or heroin increased it (0.56 +/- 0.08 to 0.68 +/- 0.13, P = 0.03 and 0.58 +/- 0.21 to 0.71 +/- 0.24; P = 0.18). Microparticles (MPs) released from syncytiotrophoblast into maternal circuit increased by 30% after cocaine or heroin (P < 0.05) and the expression of P-glycoprotein in the tissue increased by ? 49% after any drug (P < 0.05). All other measured parameters did not show any significant effect when methadone was combined with cocaine or heroine. Conclusion The combination of cocaine or heroin with methadone increase antipyrine permeability. Changes of MPs resemble findings seen in oxidative stress of syncytiotrophoblast. PMID:19519880

  2. Development and validation of a solid-phase extraction gas chromatographymass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantification of methadone, heroin, cocaine and metabolites in sweat

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Bertrand R.; Barnes, Allan J.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Mura, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    A sensitive and specific method is presented to simultaneously quantify methadone, heroin, cocaine and metabolites in sweat. Drugs were eluted from sweat patches with sodium acetate buffer, followed by SPE and quantification by GC/MS with electron impact ionization and selected ion monitoring. Daily calibration for anhydroecgonine methyl ester, ecgonine methyl ester, cocaine, benzoylecgonine (BE), codeine, morphine, 6-acetylcodeine, 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), heroin (51000 ng/patch) and methadone (101000 ng/patch) achieved determination coefficients of >0.995, and calibrators quantified to within 20% of the target concentrations. Extended calibration curves (100010,000 ng/patch) were constructed for methadone, cocaine, BE and 6AM by modifying injection techniques. Within (N=5) and between-run (N=20) imprecisions were calculated at six control levels across the dynamic ranges with coefficients of variation of <6.5%. Accuracies at these concentrations were 11.9% of target. Heroin hydrolysis during specimen processing was <11%. This novel assay offers effective monitoring of drug exposure during drug treatment, workplace and criminal justice monitoring programs. PMID:18607576

  3. Methadone Anonymous: A 12-Step Program for Methadone Maintained Heroin Addicts.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Stephen M.; Galanter, Marc; Dermatis, Helen

    2001-12-01

    Methadone Anonymous (MA) is a new 12-step fellowship developed for methadone maintained heroin addicts. A total of 53 MA members completed a survey assessing factors related to methadone maintenance treatment program (MMTP) entry, drug use, MA participation, beliefs concerning effectiveness of MMTP and MA, and level of social cohesiveness. Length of time in MA was associated with a decreased use of alcohol, cocaine, and marijuana. Clients rated components of MA to be significantly more helpful to recovery than MMTP treatment components. Affiliation to five MA members known best by the respondents was significantly greater than affiliation to non-MA members. Length of time in MA was positively associated with MA affiliation. Social affiliation and endorsement of 12-step principles were positively correlated. These findings suggest that MA participation has benefits not available in professionally driven MMTP, and should be further studied. PMID:12466684

  4. Implosive Therapy Treatment of Heroin Addicts during Methadone Detoxification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirt, Michael; Greenfield, Heywood

    1979-01-01

    Examined effectiveness of implosive therapy with heroin addicts during detoxification from methadone. Treatment groups received 12 sessions of implosive therapy or eclectic counseling and were followed for a six-week period. The implosive therapy group were the only ones to significantly reduce their methadone level during treatment and follow-up.

  5. Implosive Therapy Treatment of Heroin Addicts during Methadone Detoxification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirt, Michael; Greenfield, Heywood

    1979-01-01

    Examined effectiveness of implosive therapy with heroin addicts during detoxification from methadone. Treatment groups received 12 sessions of implosive therapy or eclectic counseling and were followed for a six-week period. The implosive therapy group were the only ones to significantly reduce their methadone level during treatment and follow-up.…

  6. Randomized Trial of Prize-Based Reinforcement Density for Simultaneous Abstinence from Cocaine and Heroin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghitza, Udi E.; Epstein, David H.; Schmittner, John; Vahabzadeh, Massoud; Lin, Jia-Ling; Preston, Kenzie L.

    2007-01-01

    To examine the effect of reinforcer density in prize-based abstinence reinforcement, heroin/cocaine users (N = 116) in methadone maintenance (100 mg/day) were randomly assigned to a noncontingent control group (NonC) or to 1 of 3 groups that earned prize draws for abstinence: manual drawing with standard prize density (MS) or computerized drawing…

  7. Randomized Trial of Prize-Based Reinforcement Density for Simultaneous Abstinence from Cocaine and Heroin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghitza, Udi E.; Epstein, David H.; Schmittner, John; Vahabzadeh, Massoud; Lin, Jia-Ling; Preston, Kenzie L.

    2007-01-01

    To examine the effect of reinforcer density in prize-based abstinence reinforcement, heroin/cocaine users (N = 116) in methadone maintenance (100 mg/day) were randomly assigned to a noncontingent control group (NonC) or to 1 of 3 groups that earned prize draws for abstinence: manual drawing with standard prize density (MS) or computerized drawing

  8. Cocaine and heroin dependence compared in poly-drug abusers.

    PubMed Central

    Hasin, D S; Grant, B F; Endicott, J; Harford, T C

    1988-01-01

    Concerns about cocaine dependence are increasing, in some ways replacing heroin as the focus of highest concern. We compared cocaine and heroin dependence by levels of cocaine and heroin use in poly-drug users. While dependence indicators differed markedly between regular and sporadic users of these drugs, cocaine dependence indicators did not differ from heroin dependence indicators. Implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:3354742

  9. Satisfaction With Methadone Among Heroin-Dependent Patients With Current Substance Use Disorders During Methadone Maintenance Treatment.

    PubMed

    Perez de Los Cobos, Jose; Trujols, Joan; Siñol, Núria; Duran-Sindreu, Santiago; Batlle, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) has long been used to treat heroin-dependent patients. However, satisfaction with methadone in this patient population is unknown. The aim of this cross-sectional case-control study was to evaluate satisfaction with methadone in heroin-dependent patients with current substance use disorders (SUDs). Cases included 152 methadone-maintained patients with current SUD, requiring inpatient detoxification treatment, and controls included 33 methadone-maintained patients in sustained full remission for SUD. Satisfaction with methadone as a medication to treat heroin addiction was measured by using the Scale to Assess Satisfaction with Medications for Addiction Treatment-methadone for heroin addiction (SASMAT-METHER). The SASMAT-METHER subscales assess the following domains: personal functioning and well-being, antiaddictive effect on heroin, and antiaddictive effect on other substances. Compared with patients with remitted SUD, patients with current SUD scored lower on all SASMAT-METHER assessments. In such patients, overall SASMAT-METHER scores were independently and negatively associated with downward desired adjustment of methadone dose and days of heroin use during last month; although various sets of factors were independently associated with each of the SASMAT-METHER subscales, the only determinant of dissatisfaction on all subscales was the desire for downward adjustment of methadone dose. In summary, MMT patients with current SUD are less satisfied with methadone than MMT patients with remitted SUD. In patients with current SUD, downward desired adjustment of methadone dose and days of heroin use during last month are independently associated with overall dissatisfaction with methadone. PMID:26825608

  10. Daily temporal patterns of heroin and cocaine use and craving: relationship with business hours regardless of actual employment status.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Karran A; Epstein, David H; Preston, Kenzie L

    2013-10-01

    Real-time monitoring of behavior using Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) has provided detailed data about daily temporal patterns of craving and use in cigarette smokers. We have collected similar data from a sample of cocaine and heroin users. Here we analyzed it in the context of its relationship with a societal construct of daily temporal organization: 9-to-5 business hours. In a 28-week prospective study, 112 methadone-maintained polydrug-abusing individuals initiated an electronic-diary entry and provided data each time they used cocaine, heroin, or both during weeks 4 to 28. EMA data were collected for 10,781 person-days and included: 663 cocaine-craving events, 710 cocaine-use events, 288 heroin-craving events, 66 heroin-use events, 630 craving-both-drugs events, and 282 use-of-both-drugs events. At baseline, 34% of the participants reported full-time employment in the preceding 3-year period. Most participants' current employment status fluctuated throughout the study. In a generalized linear mixed model (SAS Proc Glimmix), cocaine use varied by time of day relative to business hours (p<0.0001) and there was a significant interaction between Day of the Week and Time Relative to Business Hours (p<0.002) regardless of current work status. Cocaine craving also varied by time of day relative to business hours (p<0.0001), however, there was no significant interaction between Day of the Week and Time Relative to Business Hours (p=.57). Heroin craving and use were mostly reported during business hours, but data were sparse. Cocaine craving is most frequent during business hours while cocaine use is more frequent after business hours. Cocaine use during business hours, but not craving, seems suppressed on most weekdays, but not weekends, suggesting that societal conventions reflected in business hours influence drug-use patterns even in individuals whose daily schedules are not necessarily dictated by employment during conventional business hours. PMID:23770647

  11. Neuropsychological functioning in methadone maintenance patients versus abstinent heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    Verdejo, Antonio; Toribio, Inmaculada; Orozco, Carmen; Puente, Krista Lee; Prez-Garca, Miguel

    2005-06-01

    Several studies have reported on neuropsychological status as an important contributing variable in drug abuse rehabilitation outcomes. However, few studies have dealt with cognitive impairment in methadone maintenance patients (MMP), despite the fact that methadone is the most frequently used opioid substitution treatment in European countries. The objective of the present study is to contrast the neuropsychological performance of MMP with that of abstinent heroin abusers (AHA). Participants were matched with respect to age, education, pre-morbid IQ, employment status and lifetime drug abuse, and they underwent a set of tests aimed at assessing visuo-spatial attention, processing speed and executive functions. Although processing speed and attention deficits have previously been the focus of studies with MMP, executive functions have not received a similar degree of attention. The purpose of comparing matched MMP and AHA is two-fold: firstly, to test the differential effects of current opioid consumption and past opioid abuse on cognitive-executive performance and secondly, to assess the potential consequences of opioid-related neuropsychological deficits. Results showed a significantly slower performance by MMP on processing speed, visuo-spatial attention, and cognitive flexibility tests (Five Digit Test (FDT) parts 1 and 3; Oral Trails (OT) parts 1, 2; Interference 2-1), and less accuracy in working memory and analogical reasoning tests extracted from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS III). Effect sizes for significant comparisons ranged from 0.67 to 1. These results seem to suggest that methadone consumption by itself induces significant cognitive impairments that could compromise drug-treatment outcomes in MMP. PMID:15893159

  12. Incarceration and opioid withdrawal: the experiences of methadone patients and out-of-treatment heroin users.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Kelly, Sharon M; Brown, Barry S; Reisinger, Heather Schacht; Peterson, James A; Ruhf, Adrienne; Agar, Michael H; Schwartz, Robert P

    2009-06-01

    Both heroin-addicted individuals and methadone maintenance patients are likely to face untreated opioid withdrawal while incarcerated. Limited research exists concerning the withdrawal experiences of addicted inmates and their impact on individuals' attitudes and plans concerning drug abuse treatment. In the present study, 53 opioid dependent adults (32 in methadone treatment and 21 out of treatment) were interviewed in an ethnographic investigation of withdrawal experiences during incarceration. When treatment for opioid withdrawal was unavailable, detoxification experiences were usually described as negative and were often associated with a variety of unhealthy behaviors designed to relieve withdrawal symptoms. Negative methadone withdrawal experiences also negatively influenced participants' receptivity to seeking methadone treatment upon release. A minority of participants took a positive view of their withdrawal experience and saw it as an opportunity to detox from heroin or discontinue methadone. Findings support the importance of providing appropriate opioid detoxification and/or maintenance therapy to opioid-dependent inmates. PMID:19705676

  13. Epigenetically modified nucleotides in chronic heroin and cocaine treated mice.

    PubMed

    Chao, Mu-Rong; Fragou, Domniki; Zanos, Panos; Hu, Chiung-Wen; Bailey, Alexis; Kouidou, Sofia; Kovatsi, Leda

    2014-09-17

    Epigenetic changes include the addition of a methyl group to the 5' carbon of the cytosine ring, known as DNA methylation, which results in the generation of the fifth DNA base, namely 5-methylcytosine. During active or passive demethylation, an intermediate modified base is formed, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. We have currently quantified 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in the liver and brain of mice treated with cocaine or heroin, using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Our results show that global 5-methylcytosine levels are not affected by heroin or cocaine administration, neither in the liver nor in the brain. However, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine levels are reduced in the liver following cocaine administration, while they are not affected by cocaine in the brain or by heroin administration in the liver and the brain. Elucidation of the epigenetic phenomena that takes place with respect to drug abuse and addiction, via quantitative analysis of different modified bases, may enable a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms and may lead to more personalized and effective treatment options. PMID:25064621

  14. Rates of mood and anxiety disorders and contributors to continued heroin use in methadone maintenance patients: A comparison by HIV status

    PubMed Central

    Applebaum, Allison J; Bullis, Jacqueline R; Traeger, Lara N; Ocleirigh, Conall; Otto, Michael W; Pollack, Mark H; Safren, Steven A

    2013-01-01

    The frequency of mood and anxiety disorders is elevated among individuals with a history of intravenous drug abuse and among those with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and these disorders are associated with continued substance use despite treatment. The present study examined rates of mood and anxiety disorders, and recent heroin use, among HIV-infected and HIV-noninfected patients receiving methadone maintenance therapy. Participants were 160 (80 HIV-infected, 80 HIV-noninfected) methadone patients. Clinician-administered, semistructured interviews were used to identify unipolar and bipolar depression, and four major anxiety disorders (panic disorder with agoraphobia [PDA], generalized anxiety disorder [GAD], post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD], and social anxiety disorder [SAD]). Toxicology screens and self-reporting were used to assess heroin, cocaine, marijuana, and alcohol use over the past month. The entire sample met criteria for at least one psychiatric disorder other than substance dependence. Substantial proportions of participants met criteria for major depressive disorder (55.6%), bipolar I, bipolar II, or cyclothymia (6.4%), PDA (34.4%), GAD (22.5%), SAD (16.9%), and PTSD (34.4%). A greater proportion of HIV-infected participants met criteria for SAD (?2 = 5.03), and a greater proportion of HIV-noninfected participants met criteria for GAD (?2 = 5.39, P < 0.01). About 14% of participants continued to use heroin over the past month, a significantly greater proportion of whom were HIV-infected. In adjusted analyses, none of the mood or anxiety disorders emerged as significant predictors of recent heroin use, but being HIV-infected did. This study highlights the high rate of psychopathology and continued heroin use despite substance abuse treatment, and underscores the need for interventions that help mitigate these problems among methadone patients. PMID:24062619

  15. QTc Prolongation in Veterans With Heroin Dependence on Methadone Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hassamal, Sameer; Fernandez, Antony; Moradi Rekabdarkolaee, Hossein; Pandurangi, Ananda

    2015-01-01

    Background: QTc prolongation and Torsade de Ppointes have been reported in patients on methadone maintenance. Objectives: In this study, QTc was compared before and after the veteran (n = 49) was on a stable dosage of methadone for 8.72 4.50 years to treat heroin dependence. Risk factors were correlated with the QTc once the veteran was on a stable dose of methadone. Differences in the clinical risk factors in subgroups of veterans with below and above mean QTc change was compared. Patients and Methods: ECG data was obtained from a 12-lead electrocardiogram (pre-methadone and on methadone) on 49 veterans. Data and risk factors were retrospectively collected from the medical records. Results: The mean QTc at baseline (pre-methadone) was 426 34 msec and after being on methadone for an average of 8.72 4.50 years was significantly higher at 450 35 msec. No significant relationships were found between QTc prolongation and risk factors except for calcium. The methadone dosage was significantly higher in veterans with a QTc change above the mean change of ? 24 msec (88.48 27.20 mg v.s 68.96 19.84 mg). None of the veterans experienced cardiac arrhythmias. Conclusions: The low complexity of medical co-morbidities may explain the lack of a significant correlation between any risk factor with the QTc except calcium and methadone dosage. The absence of TdP may be explained by the low prevalence of QTc values > 500 msec as well as the retrospective design of the study. During long-term methadone treatment, there was a slight increase in the QTc interval but we did not find evidence of increased cardiac toxicity as a reason for treatment termination. PMID:26097838

  16. Desipramine treatment of cocaine dependence in methadone-maintained patients.

    PubMed

    Arndt, I O; Dorozynsky, L; Woody, G E; McLellan, A T; O'Brien, C P

    1992-11-01

    We performed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized 12-week trial of desipramine hydrochloride treatment of cocaine dependence among methadone-maintained patients. Fifty-nine patients completed the 12-week medication trial (36 received desipramine and 23 received placebo), and 94% were recontacted 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. There were significantly more dropouts in the desipramine than in the placebo group. Baseline to 12-week comparisons of Addiction Severity Index interview data indicated that both groups showed improvements. At 12 weeks, the desipramine group showed significantly better psychiatric status than the placebo group but did not differ from the placebo group on any of 21 other outcome measures, including cocaine use. During the 12-week medication phase and at the 1-month follow-up evaluation, urine toxicology screenings showed no significant difference between groups, but the placebo group had significantly less cocaine use at both the 3- and 6-month follow-up points. We conclude that desipramine has few benefits with regard to control of cocaine use in this population. PMID:1444727

  17. Effect of Reinforcement Probability and Prize Size on Cocaine and Heroin Abstinence in Prize-Based Contingency Management

    PubMed Central

    Ghitza, Udi E; Epstein, David H; Schmittner, John; Vahabzadeh, Massoud; Lin, Jia-Ling; Preston, Kenzie L

    2008-01-01

    Although treatment outcome in prize-based contingency management has been shown to depend on reinforcement schedule, the optimal schedule is still unknown. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective analysis of data from a randomized clinical trial (Ghitza et al., 2007) to determine the effects of the probability of winning a prize (low vs. high) and the size of the prize won (small, large, or jumbo) on likelihood of abstinence until the next urine-collection day for heroin and cocaine users (N ?=? 116) in methadone maintenance. Higher probability of winning, but not the size of individual prizes, was associated with a greater percentage of cocaine-negative, but not opiate-negative, urines. PMID:19192858

  18. Illicit Heroin and Methamphetamine Use among Methadone Maintenance Treatment Patients in Dehong Prefecture of Yunnan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Song; Ye, Runhua; Yang, Yuecheng; Wang, Jibao; Tang, Renhai; Gao, Meiyang; He, Na

    2015-01-01

    Objective Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) was introduced to China in 2004 to reduce the harm of injecting drug users (IDUs). However, little is known about continued drug use, especially methamphetamine (MAMP), among MMT patients. Methods A survey was conducted among patients attending five major MMT clinics in Dehong Prefecture in 2014 to investigate the heroin and MAMP use and their associated risk factors. Participants were administered with face-to-face interviews, and urine tests for morphine and MAMP. Results A total of 2,121 were eligible and participated in the study. Among them, 220 (10.4%) were only positive for morphine, 12.9% were only positive for MAMP, and 196 (9.2%) were positive for both morphine and MAMP. Compared with neither use of heroin nor MAMP during MMT, heroin use (not using MAMP) was associated with ethnicity, shorter duration of MMT, lower dose of methadone, and having had no more than two sex partners in the past year; MAMP use (not using heroin) was associated with ethnicity, longer duration of MMT, higher dose of methadone and being aged <30 years (vs. ?50 years); use of both heroin and MAMP was associated with being Dai minority (vs. Han), a marital status of divorced or widowed, having used drugs for ?10 years and shorter duration of MMT. Conclusion These findings indicate the complexity in the treatment of heroin users and underscore the importance in prescribing appropriate methadone dosages in order to reduce both heroin and MAMP use. PMID:26196394

  19. Changes in HIV risk behaviors among patients receiving combined pharmacological and behavioral interventions for heroin and cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Jennifer R; Epstein, David H; Umbricht, Annie; Preston, Kenzie L

    2006-05-01

    Cocaine use is associated with injecting and sexual HIV risk behaviors. This study was a randomized controlled trial of behavioral interventions for cocaine dependence and HIV risk behaviors among dually (cocaine and heroin) dependent outpatients. Methadone maintenance was augmented with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), contingency management (CM), both (CBT+CM), or neither. The study sample (n=81) was 52% female, 70% African American, and 37.9+/-7.0 years old. Proportions reporting HIV risk behaviors at intake were: 96.3% (78/81) injection drug use, 56.8% (46/81) sharing needles, 30.9% (25/81) unprotected sex, 28.4% (23/81) trading sex for money or drugs. Proportions who no longer reported behaviors at study exit were: 51.3% (40/78) injection drug use, 91.3% (42/46) sharing needles, 88% (22/25) unprotected sex, 91.3% (21/23) trading sex for money or drugs. Participants receiving CBT+CM were more likely to report cessation of unprotected sex relative to control (OR=5.44, 95% CI 1.14-26.0, p=0.034) but this effect was no longer significant after adjusting for drug-negative urines. These results suggest broad beneficial effects of methadone maintenance augmented with behavioral interventions for reducing HIV risk behaviors. PMID:16085366

  20. Effect of chronic heroin and cocaine administration on global DNA methylation in brain and liver.

    PubMed

    Fragou, Domniki; Zanos, Panos; Kouidou, Sofia; Njau, Samuel; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis; Kovatsi, Leda

    2013-04-26

    Drug abuse is associated with epigenetic changes, such as histone modifications and DNA methylation. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of chronic cocaine and heroin administration on global DNA methylation in brain and liver. Male, 8 week old, C57BL/6J mice received heroin in a chronic 'intermittent' escalating dose paradigm, or cocaine in a chronic escalating dose 'binge' paradigm, which mimic the human pattern of opioid or cocaine abuse respectively. Following sacrifice, livers and brains were removed and DNA was extracted from them. The extracted DNA was hydrolyzed and 2'-deoxycytidine and 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine were determined by HPLC-UV. The % 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine content of DNA was significantly higher in the brain compared to the liver. There were no differences between the control animals and the cocaine or heroin treated animals in neither of the tissues examined, which is surprising since cocaine administration induced gross morphological changes in the liver. Moreover, there was no difference in the % 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine content of DNA between the cocaine and the heroin treated animals. The global DNA methylation status in the brain and liver of mice chronically treated with cocaine or heroin remains unaffected, but this finding cannot exclude the existence of anatomical region or gene-specific methylation differences. This is the first time that global DNA methylation in the liver and whole brain has been studied following chronic cocaine or heroin treatment. PMID:23454526

  1. Dysfunctional Default Mode Network in Methadone Treated Patients Who Have a Higher Heroin Relapse Risk

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Li, Qiang; Wang, Defeng; Xiao, Wei; Liu, Kai; Shi, Lin; Zhu, Jia; Li, Yongbin; Yan, Xuejiao; Chen, Jiajie; Ye, Jianjun; Li, Zhe; Wang, Yarong; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify whether heroin relapse is associated with changes in the functional connectivity of the default mode network (DMN) during methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data of chronic heroin relapsers (HR) (12 males, 1 female, age: 36.1 ± 6.9 years) and abstainers (HA) (11males, 2 female; age: 42.1 ± 8.1 years) were investigated with an independent component analysis to address the functional connectivity of their DMN. Group comparison was then performed between the relapsers and abstainers. Our study found that the left inferior temporal gyrus and the right superior occipital gyrus associated with DMN showed decreased functional connectivity in HR when compared with HA, while the left precuneus and the right middle cingulum had increased functional connectivity. Mean intensity signal, extracted from left inferior temporal gyrus of HR patients, showed a significant negative correlation corresponding to the degree of heroin relapse. These findings suggest that altered functional connectivity of DMN may contribute to the potential neurobiological mechanism(s) of heroin relapse and have a predictive value concerning heroin relapse under MMT. PMID:26469876

  2. Dysfunctional Default Mode Network in Methadone Treated Patients Who Have a Higher Heroin Relapse Risk.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Li, Qiang; Wang, Defeng; Xiao, Wei; Liu, Kai; Shi, Lin; Zhu, Jia; Li, Yongbin; Yan, Xuejiao; Chen, Jiajie; Ye, Jianjun; Li, Zhe; Wang, Yarong; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify whether heroin relapse is associated with changes in the functional connectivity of the default mode network (DMN) during methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data of chronic heroin relapsers (HR) (12 males, 1 female, age: 36.1??6.9 years) and abstainers (HA) (11males, 2 female; age: 42.1??8.1 years) were investigated with an independent component analysis to address the functional connectivity of their DMN. Group comparison was then performed between the relapsers and abstainers. Our study found that the left inferior temporal gyrus and the right superior occipital gyrus associated with DMN showed decreased functional connectivity in HR when compared with HA, while the left precuneus and the right middle cingulum had increased functional connectivity. Mean intensity signal, extracted from left inferior temporal gyrus of HR patients, showed a significant negative correlation corresponding to the degree of heroin relapse. These findings suggest that altered functional connectivity of DMN may contribute to the potential neurobiological mechanism(s) of heroin relapse and have a predictive value concerning heroin relapse under MMT. PMID:26469876

  3. Do methadone and buprenorphine have the same impact on psychopathological symptoms of heroin addicts?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The idea that the impact of opioid agonist treatment is influenced by the psychopathological profile of heroin addicts has not yet been investigated, and is based on the concept of a specific therapeutic action displayed by opioid agents on psychopathological symptoms. In the present report we compared the effects of buprenorphine and methadone on the psychopathological symptoms of 213 patients (106 on buprenorphine and 107 on methadone) in a follow-up study lasting 12 months. Methods Drug addiction history was collected by means of the Drug Addiction History Rating Scale (DAH-RS) and psychopathological features were collected by means of the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90), using a special five-factor solution. Toxicological urinalyses were carried out for each patient during the treatment period. Results No statistically significant differences were detected in psychopathological symptoms, including 'worthlessness-being trapped', 'somatization', and 'panic-anxiety'. Methadone proved to be more effective on patients characterized by 'sensitivity-psychoticism', whereas buprenorphine was more effective on patients displaying a 'violence-suicide' symptomatology. Conclusions Heroin-dependent patients with psychiatric comorbidities may benefit from opioid agonist treatment not only because it targets their addictive problem, but also, precisely due to this, because it is effective against their mental disorder too. PMID:21569624

  4. Prize Reinforcement Contingency Management for Cocaine Dependence: Integration with Group Therapy in a Methadone Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Nancy M.; Martin, Bonnie; Simcic, Francis

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors evaluated a low-cost contingency management (CM) procedure for reducing cocaine use and enhancing group therapy attendance in 77 cocaine-dependent methadone patients. Patients were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of standard treatment or standard treatment with CM, in which patients earned the opportunity to win prizes

  5. Prize Reinforcement Contingency Management for Cocaine Dependence: Integration with Group Therapy in a Methadone Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Nancy M.; Martin, Bonnie; Simcic, Francis

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors evaluated a low-cost contingency management (CM) procedure for reducing cocaine use and enhancing group therapy attendance in 77 cocaine-dependent methadone patients. Patients were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of standard treatment or standard treatment with CM, in which patients earned the opportunity to win prizes…

  6. Latent classes of heroin and cocaine users predict unique HIV/HCV risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Harrell, PT; Mancha, B; Petras, H; Trenz, R; Latimer, WW

    2011-01-01

    Background Patterns of heroin and cocaine use vary and may be associated with unique risk factors for bloodborne infections. Methods Latent class analysis identified sub-populations of 552 heroin and cocaine users in Baltimore, Maryland. Using latent class regression, these classes were analyzed for associations with demographic characteristics, risky behaviors, Hepatitis C, and HIV. Results Three classes were found: Crack / Nasal-Heroin users (43.5%), Polysubstance users (34.8%), and Heroin Injectors (21.8%). Compared to Polysubstance users, Crack / Nasal-Heroin users were almost 7 times more likely to identify as Black (OR = 6.97, 95% CI = 4.35-11.2). Sharing needles was over 2.5 times more likely among Polysubstance users than among Heroin Injectors (OR = 2.66, 95% CI = 1.49-4.75). Crack/Nasal-Heroin users were 2.5 times more likely than Polysubstance users to exchange drugs for sex (OR = 2.50, 95% CI = 1.22-5.13). Crack/Nasal-Heroin users were less likely than Heroin Injectors to have Hepatitis C (OR = 0.10, 95% CI = 0.06-0.18), but no significant differences were found for HIV. Conclusions Subpopulations of cocaine and heroin users differed in demographic classifications, HIV-risk behaviors, and Hepatitis C infection. All subpopulations included substantial numbers of HIV-positive individuals. Findings provide further evidence that non-injection drug users face significant infectious disease risk. PMID:22030276

  7. Impact of One-Year Methadone Maintenance Treatment in Heroin Users in Jiangsu Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guohong; Fujiwara, Takeo

    2009-01-01

    Context Although the effectiveness of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is well-established in many countries, it is a relatively new therapy for heroin users in China. Jiangsu Province, a relatively wealthy province, set up 4 MMT clinics in February 2006. No previous studies have evaluated the impact of MMT in a wealthy Chinese province. Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a 1-year MMT among heroin users in Jiangsu Province. We investigated the impact of the treatment by examining the following outcomes: 1) reduction of heroin use, 2) increase of appropriate sexual intercourse, 3) reduction of antisocial behavior, 4) increase of better social and family relationships, and 5) HIV prevalence among heroin users in MMT clinics. Design and Setting Repeated cross-sectional surveys were conducted before and after heroin users in Jiangsu Province received at least 1-year of treatment in the MMT clinics. A questionnaire survey was implemented for those who agreed to participate from March to April 2006, before the initiation of MMT (N = 554). The second survey was from August to September 2007 and was administered to those who received MMT for more than 1 year (N = 804). One hundred and ninety-six patients who were investigated in both surveys were included in a longitudinal study to evaluate the factors attributable to behavior change. Results MMT helped in reducing the percentage of heroin injection and also improved social and familial relationships. Antisocial behavior, including theft, prostitution, and dealing in heroin, decreased after 1-year treatment in the MMT clinics. However, the percentage of patients using condoms was not statistically significant. No case was found to be HIV-positive among those who received more than 1 year MMT. In the longitudinal study of 196 patients who participated in both surveys, no specific demographic variables were found to be associated with heroin use, anti-social behaviors after 1-year MMT. Conclusions MMT was thought to reduce heroin use, antisocial behaviors and HIV prevalence, and increased appropriate sexual intercourse behaviors and better social and family relationships among heroin users in a wealthy province in China, which was true regardless of gender, age, marital status, or working status. PMID:24357931

  8. Elevated Hair Cortisol Levels among Heroin Addicts on Current Methadone Maintenance Compared to Controls

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin; Li, Jifeng; Xu, Guanyi; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Zheng; Lu, Zuhong; Deng, Huihua

    2016-01-01

    Whether methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) can improve the basal function of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis, which is suppressed by long-term heroin consumption, is a matter of debate. The stress state and depression and anxiety symptoms may affect the basal activity of the HPA axis in MMT patients. However, the effect of psychological factors on HPA activity was not simultaneously controlled in previous studies. This study investigated differences in HPA basal activity between MMT patients and controls using psychological variables as covariates. The participants included 52 MMT patients and 41 age-matched, non-heroin-dependent controls. Psychological states were self-reported with the Perceived Stress Scale, Self-Rating Depression Scale and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale. The hair cortisol level was adopted as a biomarker of HPA basal activity and was determined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The results revealed that MMT patients had significantly higher hair cortisol levels than the controls (p<0.05), but the difference was not significant (p>0.05) when the perceived stress, depression and anxiety scores were used as covariates. We concluded that patients with long-term MMT showed higher basal activity of the HPA axis. The high chronic stress state and increase in depression and anxiety symptoms may mask the suppression effect of methadone on the HPA activity. PMID:27010803

  9. Social defeat stress in rats: Escalation of cocaine and speedball binge self-administration, but not heroin

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Fabio C.; Quadros, Isabel M.; Hogenelst, Koen; Planeta, Cleopatra S.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Exposure to intermittent episodes of social defeat stress can increase drug seeking and leads to intense drug taking in rats. Objectives This study investigated the consequences of repeated, intermittent social defeat stress on patterns of drug self-administration in rats with access to heroin, cocaine, or a heroin-cocaine combination (speedball). Methods Male Long-Evans rats were either handled (controls) or subjected to 25 min social defeat stress episodes on days 1, 4, 7 and 10 during confrontations with an aggressive resident. Ten days following the last defeat, rats were assessed for locomotor cross-sensitization in response to heroin or cocaine. Animals were then prepared with intrajugular catheters for drug self-administration. Separate groups of controls and defeated rats were examined for self-administration of heroin (Experiment 1), a heroin-cocaine combination (Experiment 2), or cocaine (Experiment 3). Drug self-administration patterns were evaluated using fixed or progressive ratio schedules (FR, PR respectively) of reinforcement during limited access sessions or a 24-h unlimited access binge. Results Rats with a history of intermittent social defeat stress showed sensitized locomotor behavior when challenged with heroin or cocaine relative to controls. During the 24-h binge session, defeated rats escalated cocaine taking behavior (ca. 110 mg/kg vs. 66 mg/kg in controls), persisted in self-administering cocaine or the heroin-cocaine mixture for more hours, and showed a tendency for increased heroin-cocaine intake, but no effects on heroin taking. Conclusions A history of social defeat stress seems to preferentially promote escalated intake of cocaine but not heroin, unless a heroin-cocaine combination is available. PMID:21197616

  10. Factors associated with mortality among heroin users after seeking treatment with methadone: a population-based cohort study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Charles Lung-Cheng; Lee, Chung Wei

    2013-03-01

    Data concerning factors associated with mortality among heroin users under methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) in the Han Chinese population are limited. This study examined mortality risk among heroin users after seeking treatment with methadone in a catchment area using a cohort of 1616 Taiwanese heroin users between October 2006 and December 2008. During the study period, 26 (1.6%) people died, with an all-cause mortality rate per 100 person years of 3.42. The primary cause of death among our patients was accidents, followed by suicide and drug overdose. Older age, HIV infection, psychiatric treatment history, and alcohol abuse/dependence were risk factors for all-cause mortality; remaining on MMT was protective for survival. Our findings suggest that although mortality is mainly associated with medical and psychiatric comorbidities, continuing with the MMT program is still an important predictor for survival. PMID:23021097

  11. Sexual Dysfunction in Heroin Dependents: A Comparison between Methadone and Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Anne; Danaee, Mahmoud; Loh, Huai Seng; Sulaiman, Ahmad Hatim; Ng, Chong Guan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Methadone has long been regarded as an effective treatment for opioid dependence. However, many patients discontinue maintenance therapy because of its side effects, with one of the most common being sexual dysfunction. Buprenorphine is a proven alternative to methadone. This study aimed to investigate sexual dysfunction in opioid-dependent men on buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT) and methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). The secondary aim was to investigate the correlation between sexual dysfunction and the quality of life in these patients. Methods Two hundred thirty-eight men participated in this cross-sectional study. Four questionnaires were used, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Opiate Treatment Index, Malay version of the International Index of Erectile Function 15 (Mal-IIEF-15), and World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF Scale. Multivariate analysis of covariance was used to examine the relationship between MMT and BMT and the Mal-IIEF 15 scores while controlling for all the possible confounders. Results The study population consisted of 171 patients (71.8%) on MMT and 67 (28.2%) on BMT. Patients in the MMT group who had a sexual partner scored significantly lower in the sexual desire domain (p < 0.012) and overall satisfaction (p = 0.043) domain compared with their counterparts in the BMT group. Similarly, patients in the MMT group without a sexual partner scored significantly lower in the orgasmic function domain (p = 0.008) compared with those in the BMT group without a partner. Intercourse satisfaction (p = 0.026) and overall satisfaction (p = 0.039) were significantly associated with the social relationships domain after adjusting for significantly correlated sociodemographic variables. Conclusions Sexual functioning is critical for improving the quality of life in patients in an opioid rehabilitation program. Our study showed that buprenorphine causes less sexual dysfunction than methadone. Thus, clinicians may consider the former when treating heroin dependents who have concerns about sexual function. PMID:26820154

  12. Randomized Trial of Contingent Prizes versus Vouchers in Cocaine-Using Methadone Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Nancy M.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Hanson, Tressa; Sierra, Sean

    2007-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) interventions frequently utilize vouchers as reinforcers, but a prize-based system is also efficacious. This study compared these approaches. Seventy-four cocaine-dependent methadone outpatients were randomly assigned to standard treatment (ST), ST plus a maximum of $585 in contingent vouchers, or ST plus an expected…

  13. Randomized Trial of Contingent Prizes versus Vouchers in Cocaine-Using Methadone Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Nancy M.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Hanson, Tressa; Sierra, Sean

    2007-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) interventions frequently utilize vouchers as reinforcers, but a prize-based system is also efficacious. This study compared these approaches. Seventy-four cocaine-dependent methadone outpatients were randomly assigned to standard treatment (ST), ST plus a maximum of $585 in contingent vouchers, or ST plus an expected

  14. Retention in methadone maintenance drug treatment for prescription-type opioid primary users compared to heroin users.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Banta-Green CJ; Maynard C; Koepsell TD; Wells EA; Donovan DM

    2009-05-01

    AIMS: To assess retention in methadone maintenance treatment for prescription-type opioid primary (PTOP) users compared to heroin users.DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: A retrospective cohort study was carried out to examine the association between opiate types used on 12-month retention. The study population consisted of adults admitted to one of 11 not-for-profit methadone maintenance clinics in 2004 and 2005 throughout Washington State (n = 2308). Logistic regression analyses with fixed effects for treatment agencies were conducted.MEASUREMENTS: Opiate use type in past 30 days: any heroin use or primary prescription opioid without heroin use. Demographics, other drugs used, self-reported medical and psychiatric concerns, social, familial and legal issues, public assistance type and housing stability were documented at intake using a comprehensive biopsychosocial instrument, the Treatment and Assessment Reports Generation Tool.FINDINGS: The odds of being retained in treatment for PTOP compared to heroin users not adjusting for other factors was 1.33 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03, 1.71). In the final logistic regression model the odds of retention for PTOP compared to heroin users was 1.25 (95% CI, 0.93, 1.67), indicating that there was no statistically significant difference in treatment retention by opiate type after adjusting for demographics, treatment agencies, other drug use, public assistance type, medical, psychiatric, social, legal and familial factors.CONCLUSION: The findings of this study suggest that PTOP can be treated at methadone maintenance treatment facilities at least as effectively as heroin users in terms of treatment retention.

  15. Simultaneous analysis of buprenorphine, methadone, cocaine, opiates and nicotine metabolites in sweat by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Concheiro, Marta; Shakleya, Diaa M; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-04-01

    A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for buprenorphine (BUP), norbuprenorphine (NBUP), methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), cocaine, benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester (EME), morphine, codeine, 6-acetylmorphine, heroin, 6-acetylcodeine, cotinine, and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine quantification in sweat was developed and comprehensively validated. Sweat patches were mixed with 6 mL acetate buffer at pH 4.5, and supernatant extracted with Strata-XC-cartridges. Reverse-phase separation was achieved with a gradient mobile phase of 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile in 15 min. Quantification was achieved by multiple reaction monitoring of two transitions per compound. The assay was a linear 1-1,000 ng/patch, except EME 5-1,000 ng/patch. Intra-, inter-day and total imprecision were <10.1%CV, analytical recovery 87.2-107.7%, extraction efficiency 35.3-160.9%, and process efficiency 25.5-91.7%. Ion suppression was detected for EME (-63.3%) and EDDP (-60.4%), and enhancement for NBUP (42.6%). Deuterated internal standards compensated for these effects. No carryover was detected, and all analytes were stable for 24 h at 22 C, 72 h at 4 C, and after three freeze/thaw cycles. The method was applied to weekly sweat patches from an opioid-dependent BUP-maintained pregnant woman; 75.0% of sweat patches were positive for BUP, 93.8% for cocaine, 37.5% for opiates, 6.3% for methadone and all for tobacco biomarkers. This method permits a fast and simultaneous quantification of 14 drugs and metabolites in sweat patches, with good selectivity and sensitivity. PMID:21125263

  16. Simultaneous analysis of buprenorphine, methadone, cocaine, opiates and nicotine metabolites in sweat by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Concheiro, Marta; Shakleya, Diaa M.

    2013-01-01

    A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for buprenorphine (BUP), norbuprenorphine (NBUP), methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), cocaine, benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester (EME), morphine, codeine, 6-acetylmorphine, heroin, 6-acetylcodeine, cotinine, and trans-3?-hydroxycotinine quantification in sweat was developed and comprehensively validated. Sweat patches were mixed with 6 mL acetate buffer at pH 4.5, and supernatant extracted with Strata-XC-cartridges. Reverse-phase separation was achieved with a gradient mobile phase of 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile in 15 min. Quantification was achieved by multiple reaction monitoring of two transitions per compound. The assay was a linear 11,000 ng/patch, except EME 51,000 ng/patch. Intra-, inter-day and total imprecision were <10.1%CV, analytical recovery 87.2107.7%, extraction efficiency 35.3 160.9%, and process efficiency 25.591.7%. Ion suppression was detected for EME (?63.3%) and EDDP (?60.4%), and enhancement for NBUP (42.6%). Deuterated internal standards compensated for these effects. No carryover was detected, and all analytes were stable for 24 h at 22 C, 72 h at 4 C, and after three freeze/thaw cycles. The method was applied to weekly sweat patches from an opioid-dependent BUP-maintained pregnant woman; 75.0% of sweat patches were positive for BUP, 93.8% for cocaine, 37.5% for opiates, 6.3% for methadone and all for tobacco biomarkers. This method permits a fast and simultaneous quantification of 14 drugs and metabolites in sweat patches, with good selectivity and sensitivity. PMID:21125263

  17. A series of forensic toxicology and drug seizure cases involving illicit fentanyl alone and in combination with heroin, cocaine or heroin and cocaine.

    PubMed

    Marinetti, Laureen J; Ehlers, Brooke J

    2014-10-01

    The Montgomery County Coroner's Office Toxicology Section and the Miami Valley Regional Crime Lab (MVRCL) Drug Chemistry Section have been receiving case work in drug seizures, death cases and human performance cases involving products marketed as heroin or as illicit fentanyl. Upon analysis by the Drug Chemistry Section, these products were found to contain various drug(s) including illicit fentanyl only, illicit fentanyl and heroin, illicit fentanyl and cocaine and illicit fentanyl, heroin and cocaine. Both the Chemistry and Toxicology Sections began seeing these combinations starting in late October 2013. The percentage of the combinations encountered by the MVRCL as well as the physical appearance of the product, and the results of presumptive screening tests will be discussed. The demographics of the users and the results of toxicology and autopsy findings on the decedents will also be discussed. According to regional drug task force undercover agents, there is evidence that some of the products are being sold as illicit fentanyl and not just as a heroin product. Also, there is no evidence to support that the fentanyl source is being diverted from pharmaceutical grade fentanyl. The chemistry section currently has over 109 confirmed cases, and the toxicology section currently has 81 confirmed drug deaths, 8 driving under the influence of drugs and 1 suicidal hanging. Both sections are continuing to see these cases at the present time. PMID:25217552

  18. Qualitative, quantitative and temporal study of cutting agents for cocaine and heroin over 9 years.

    PubMed

    Broséus, Julian; Gentile, Natacha; Bonadio Pont, Federica; Garcia Gongora, Juan Manuel; Gasté, Laëtitia; Esseiva, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Forensic laboratories mainly focus on the qualification and the quantitation of the illicit drug under analysis as both aspects are used for judiciary purposes. Therefore, information related to cutting agents (adulterants and diluents) detected in illicit drugs is limited in the forensic literature. This article discusses the type and frequency of adulterants and diluents detected in more than 6000 cocaine specimens and 3000 heroin specimens, confiscated in western Switzerland from 2006 to 2014. The results show a homogeneous and quite unchanging adulteration for heroin, while for cocaine it could be characterised as heterogeneous and relatively dynamic. Furthermore, the results indicate that dilution affects more cocaine than heroin. Therefore, the results provided by this study tend to reveal differences between the respective structures of production or distribution of cocaine and heroin. This research seeks to promote the systematic analysis of cutting agents by forensic laboratories. Collecting and processing data related to the presence of cutting agents in illicit drug specimens produces relevant information to understand and to compare the structure of illicit drug markets. PMID:26448535

  19. Effects of Disulfiram on QTc Interval in non-Opioid Dependent and Methadone-Treated Cocaine Dependent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Thomas S.; Sanders, Nichole; Mancino, Michael; Oliveto, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Methadone and cocaine are each known to prolong the QTc interval, a risk factor for developing potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias. Disulfiram, often administered in the context of methadone maintenance to facilitate alcohol abstinence, has been shown to have some efficacy for cocaine dependence. Disulfiram has differential effects on cocaine and methadone metabolism, but its impact on methadone- or cocaine-induced changes in QTc interval is unclear. Thus, the effects of disulfiram on QTc interval in a subset of cocaine dependent patients participating in a 14 week, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of disulfiram was prospectively determined. Methods Opioid dependent participants were inducted onto methadone (wks 1-2; MT) and both MT and nonopioid dependent (UT) participants were randomized to receive disulfiram (wks 3-14) at one of the following doses: 0, 250, 375, or 500 mg/day. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) were obtained prior to study entry and during weeks 2 and 4. Results Complete QTc interval data in 23 MT and 18 UT participants were analyzed. QTc interval tended to be higher in MT relative to UT dependent participants, regardless of disulfiram dose and time point, but disulfiram did not differentially alter QTc interval. QTc interval was, however, significantly greater in participants with recent cocaine use than those with no recent use. Conclusions These results suggest that cocaine use and possibly MT status, but not disulfiram, are risk factors for QTc prolongation. PMID:23648640

  20. Self-Administered Heroin and Cocaine Combinations in the Rat: Additive Reinforcing Effects—Supra-Additive Effects on Nucleus Accumbens Extracellular Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Smith, James E; Co, Conchita; Coller, Michael D; Hemby, Scott E; Martin, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    The concurrent use of cocaine and opiate combinations (speedball) has increased since the 1970s and now represents a growing subset of intravenous drug abusers. An isobolographic analysis was applied to the ascending limb of the dose–effect curves for rat self-administration of cocaine, heroin, and their combination to determine the nature of the interaction. The addition of heroin to cocaine shifted the dose–effect curve for self-administration to the left, and the modulation in reinforcing efficacy of the combination of cocaine and heroin was found to be additive. A second experiment used microdialysis to determine the effects of this drug combination on nucleus accumbens (NAc) extracellular levels of dopamine ([DA]e) in rats self-administering low doses of cocaine, heroin, or cocaine/ heroin combinations. These doses of cocaine and cocaine/heroin combinations significantly increased NAc [DA]e, while heroin alone did not. The ratio of the % baseline of [DA]e (or the dialysate concentrations of DA) to cocaine in the dialysate was higher during self-administration of cocaine/heroin combinations than with cocaine alone. These data indicate that although the interaction between cocaine and heroin in maintaining self-administration is additive, a potentiation of NAc dopaminergic neurotransmission is present, suggesting that NAc [DA]e may not be a direct measure of reinforcing efficacy and/or it is not central to the mediation of the self-administration of this drug combination. PMID:15956989

  1. Characteristics of Hidden Status Among Users of Crack, Powder Cocaine, and Heroin in Central Harlem

    PubMed Central

    Davis, W. Rees; Johnson, Bruce D.; Liberty, Hilary James; Randolph, Doris D.

    2007-01-01

    This article analyzes hidden status among crack, powder cocaine, and heroin users and setters, in contrast to more accessible users/sellers. Several sampling strategies acquired 657 users (N=559) and sellers (N=98). Indicators of hidden status were those who (1) paid rent in full in the last 30 days, (2) used nonstreet drug procurement. (3) had legal jobs, and (4) earned $1,000 or more in legal income in the last 30 days. Nearly half had at least one indicator: approximately 16% of users/sellers had two to four indicators. In logistic regression analyses, those who had not panhandled in the last 30 days, those who had used powder cocaine in the last 30 days, and those never arrested were the most likely to have hidden status, whether the analysis predicted those having any indicators or those having two to four indicators. The four indicators begin to operationally define hidden status among users of cocaine and heroin. PMID:17710217

  2. Self-administration of cocaine, cannabis and heroin in the human laboratory: benefits and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Haney, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this review is to describe self-administration procedures for modeling addiction to cocaine, cannabis and heroin in the human laboratory, the benefits and pitfalls of the approach, and the methodological issues unique to each drug. In addition, the predictive validity of the model for testing treatment medications will be addressed. The results show that all three drugs of abuse are reliably and robustly self-administered by non-treatment-seeking research volunteers. In terms of pharmacotherapies, cocaine use is extraordinarily difficult to disrupt either in the laboratory or in the clinic. A range of medications has been shown to significantly decrease cocaines subjective effects and craving without decreasing either cocaine self-administration or cocaine abuse by patients. These negative data combined with recent positive findings with modafinil suggest that self-administration procedures are an important intermediary step between pre-clinical and clinical studies. In terms of cannabis, a recent study suggests that medications that improve sleep and mood during cannabis withdrawal decrease the resumption of marijuana self-administration in abstinent volunteers. Clinical data on patients seeking treatment for their marijuana use are needed to validate these laboratory findings. Finally, in contrast to cannabis or cocaine dependence, there are three efficacious Food and Drug Administration-approved medications to treat opioid dependence, all of which decrease both heroin self-administration and subjective effects in the human laboratory. In summary, self-administration procedures provide meaningful behavioral data in a small number of individuals. These studies contribute to our understanding of the variables maintaining cocaine, marijuana and heroin intake, and are important in guiding the development of more effective drug treatment programs. PMID:18855806

  3. Topiramate for Cocaine Dependence during Methadone Maintenance Treatment: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Umbricht, Annie; DeFulio, Anthony; Winstanley, Erin L.; Andrew Tompkins, D.; Peirce, Jessica; Mintzer, Miriam Z.; Strain, Eric C.; Bigelow, George E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dual dependence on opiate and cocaine occurs in about 60% of patients admitted to methadone maintenance and negatively impacts prognosis (Kosten et al., 2003). Topiramate (TOP) is an antiepileptic drug that may have utility in the treatment of cocaine dependence because it enhances the GABAergic system, antagonizes the glutamatergic system, and has been identified by NIDA as one of only a few medications providing a “positive signal” warranting further clinical investigation. (Vocci and Ling, 2005). Method In this double-blind controlled clinical trial, cocaine dependent methadone maintenance patients (N=171) were randomly assigned to one of four groups. Under a factorial design, participants received either TOP or placebo, and monetary voucher incentives that were either contingent (CM) or non-contingent (Non-CM) on drug abstinence. TOP participants were inducted onto TOP over 7 weeks, stabilized for 8 weeks at 300 mg daily then tapered over 3 weeks. Voucher incentives were supplied for 12 weeks, starting during the fourth week of TOP induction. Primary outcome measures were cocaine abstinence (Y/N) as measured by thrice weekly urinalysis and analyzed using Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) and treatment retention. All analyses were intent to treat and included the 12-week evaluation phase of combined TOP/P treatment and voucher intervention period. Results There was no significant difference in cocaine abstinence between the TOP vs P conditions nor between the CM vs Non-CM conditions. There was no significant TOP/CM interaction. Retention was not significantly different between the groups. Conclusion Topiramate is not efficacious for increasing cocaine abstinence in methadone patients. PMID:24814607

  4. Interdependent Group Contingency Management for Cocaine-Dependent Methadone Maintenance Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Kimberly C; Kerwin, MaryLouise E; Carpenedo, Carolyn M; Rosenwasser, Beth J; Gardner, Robert S

    2008-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) for drug abstinence has been applied to individuals independently even when delivered in groups. We developed a group CM intervention in which the behavior of a single, randomly selected, anonymous individual determined reinforcement delivery for the entire group. We also compared contingencies placed only on cocaine abstinence (CA) versus one of four behaviors (CA, treatment attendance, group CM attendance, and methadone compliance) selected randomly at each drawing. Two groups were formed with 22 cocaine-dependent community-based methadone patients and exposed to both CA and multiple behavior (MB) conditions in a reversal design counterbalanced across groups for exposure order. The group CM intervention proved feasible and safe. The MB condition improved group CM meeting attendance relative to the CA condition. PMID:19192861

  5. Heroin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What Is Heroin? Short-Term Effects Long-Term Effects Other Possible Problems How Can Someone Quit? Avoiding Heroin What Is Heroin? Heroin is a highly addictive drug made from the seed pod of the opium poppy plant. Users take heroin because of the highs, but ...

  6. A Randomized Trial of Long-Term Reinforcement of Cocaine Abstinence in Methadone-Maintained Patients Who Inject Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Kenneth; Robles, Elias; Mudric, Timothy; Bigelow, George E.; Stitzer, Maxine L.

    2004-01-01

    This study determined whether long-term abstinence reinforcement could maintain cocaine abstinence throughout a yearlong period. Patients who injected drugs and used cocaine during methadone treatment (n = 78) were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 abstinence-reinforcement groups or to a usual care control group. Participants in the 2

  7. Attendance Rates in a Workplace Predict Subsequent Outcome of Employment-Based Reinforcement of Cocaine Abstinence in Methadone Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donlin, Wendy D.; Knealing, Todd W.; Needham, Mick; Wong, Conrad J.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed whether attendance rates in a workplace predicted subsequent outcome of employment-based reinforcement of cocaine abstinence. Unemployed adults in Baltimore methadone programs who used cocaine (N = 111) could work in a workplace for 4 hr every weekday and earn $10.00 per hour in vouchers for 26 weeks. During an induction…

  8. A Randomized Trial of Long-Term Reinforcement of Cocaine Abstinence in Methadone-Maintained Patients Who Inject Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Kenneth; Robles, Elias; Mudric, Timothy; Bigelow, George E.; Stitzer, Maxine L.

    2004-01-01

    This study determined whether long-term abstinence reinforcement could maintain cocaine abstinence throughout a yearlong period. Patients who injected drugs and used cocaine during methadone treatment (n = 78) were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 abstinence-reinforcement groups or to a usual care control group. Participants in the 2…

  9. Methadone

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in liquid) tablet , a solution (liquid), and a concentrated solution to take by mouth. When methadone is ... if you are breast-feeding. If you breast-feed during your treatment with methadone, your baby may ...

  10. Field ion spectrometry: a new technology for cocaine and heroin detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnahan, Byron L.; Day, Stephen; Kouznetsov, Viktor; Tarassov, Alexandre

    1997-02-01

    Field ion spectrometry, also known as transverse field compensation ion mobility spectrometry, is a new technique for trace gas analysis that can be applied to the detection of cocaine and heroin. Its principle is based on filtering ion species according to the functional dependence of their mobilities with electric field strength. Field ion spectrometry eliminates the gating electrodes needed in conventional IMS to pulse ions into the spectrometer; instead, ions are injected in to the spectrometer and reach the detector continuously, resulting in improved sensitivity. The technique enables analyses that are difficult with conventional constant field strength ion mobility spectrometers. We have shown that a filed ion spectrometer can selectively detect the vapors from cocaine and heroin emitted from both their base and hydrochloride forms. The estimated volumetric limits of detection are in the low pptv range, based on testing with standardized drug vapor generation systems. The spectrometer can detect cocaine base in the vapor phase, at concentrations well below its estimated 100 pptv vapor pressure equivalent at 20 degrees C. This paper describes the underlying principles of field ion spectrometry in relation to narcotic drug detection, and recent results obtained for cocaine and heroin. The work has been sponsored in part by the United States Advanced Research Projects Agency under contract DAAB10-95C-0004, for the DOD Counterdrug Technology Development Program.

  11. Topiramate impairs cognitive function in methadone-maintained individuals with concurrent cocaine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Rass, Olga; Umbricht, Annie; Bigelow, George E.; Strain, Eric C.; Johnson, Matthew W.; Mintzer, Miriam Z.

    2014-01-01

    Topiramate is being investigated as a potential pharmacotherapy for the treatment of addictive disorders. However, its cognitive side effects raise concerns about its use, especially in populations with cognitive impairment, such as persons with chronic substance use disorders. This study investigated the topiramate's cognitive effects in individuals dually dependent on cocaine and opioids as part of a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial of topiramate for the cocaine dependence treatment. Following five weeks of stabilization on daily oral methadone (M=96 mg), participants were randomized to topiramate (n=18) or placebo (n=22). Cognitive testing took place at two time points: study weeks 4-5 to assess baseline performance and 10-13 weeks later to assess performance during stable dosing (300 mg topiramate or placebo). All participants were maintained on methadone at both testing times, and testing occurred two hours after the daily methadone plus topiramate/placebo administration. The topiramate and placebo groups did not differ on sex, level of education, premorbid intelligence, methadone dose, or illicit drug use. Topiramate slowed psychomotor and information processing speed, worsened divided attention, reduced n-back working memory accuracy, and increased the false alarm rate in recognition memory. Topiramate had no effects on visual processing, other measures of psychomotor function, risk-taking, self-control, Sternberg working memory, free recall, and metamemory. These findings indicate that topiramate may cause cognitive impairment in this population. This effect may limit its acceptability and use as a treatment in individuals with chronic opiate and cocaine use disorders, among whom pre-existing cognitive impairments are common. PMID:25365653

  12. Rooming-in compared with standard care for newborns of mothers using methadone or heroin

    PubMed Central

    Abrahams, Ronald R.; Kelly, S. Ann; Payne, Sarah; Thiessen, Paul N.; Mackintosh, Jessica; Janssen, Patricia A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of rooming-in (rather than standard nursery care) on the incidence and severity of neonatal abstinence syndrome among opioid-exposed newborns and on the proportion of mothers who retain custody of their babies at hospital discharge. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. SETTING Lower mainland in southwestern British Columbia. PARTICIPANTS We selected 32 women in the city of Vancouver known to have used heroin or methadone during pregnancy between October 2001 and December 2002. Comparison groups were a historical cohort of 38 women in Vancouver and a concurrent cohort of 36 women cared for in a neighbouring community hospital. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Need for treatment with morphine, number of days of treatment with morphine, and whether babies were discharged in the custody of their mothers. RESULTS Rooming-in was associated with a significant decrease in need for treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome compared with the historical cohort (adjusted relative risk [RR] 0.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.20 to 0.78) and the concurrent cohort (adjusted RR 0.39, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.75). Rooming-in was also associated with shorter newborn length of stay in hospital compared with both comparison groups. Newborns who roomed in at BC Womens Hospital were significantly more likely to be discharged in the custody of their mothers than babies in the historical cohort (RR 2.23, 95% CI 1.43 to 3.98) or the concurrent cohort (RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.15 to 2.53) were. CONCLUSION Rooming-in might ease opioid-exposed newborns transition to extrauterine life and promote more effective mothering. PMID:17934036

  13. [Heroin].

    PubMed

    Demaret, I; Lemaître, A; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Heroin (or diacetylmorphine), a depressant nervous central system, is a semi-synthetic opiate. Its main adverse effect, respiratory depression, can lead to death, especially after an intravenous injection. By loss of tolerance, an overdose can be lethal following heroin use after a period of abstinence (voluntary or not). Mortality rate among heroin users is between 1 and 3%. Addiction, following a regular and continuous use, occurs in less than a quarter of persons who ever tried heroine. Heroin addicts often present with different problems (for instance, a criminal behaviour), without any obvious link with addiction. For a fraction of the addicts, addiction becomes a chronic relapsing disease, requiring a long term maintenance substitution therapy. However, relapses and sometimes continuous heroin use are frequent, For treatment resistant and severe heroin addicts, heroin-assisted treatment can be a solution. Despite the numerous available therapies, heroin is considered to be the drug with the most negative effects on the user. PMID:23888578

  14. Heroin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... AIDS and hepatitis. Regular use of heroin can lead to tolerance. This means users need more and more drug to have the same effect. At higher doses over time, the body becomes dependent on heroin. If dependent users stop ...

  15. Heroin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Ribbon Week DEA Red Ribbon Week Patch Program Heroin Last Updated: Tuesday, December 8, 2015 What is ... from morphine and extracted from certain poppy plants. Heroin comes in a white or brownish powder, or ...

  16. Heroin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/Nicotine Related Topics Addiction Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults ... treatment options available for those struggling with heroin addiction. En Espaol Heroin (DrugFacts) Revised October 2014 . Offers ...

  17. Heroin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... causing permanent damage to vital organs. Treating Heroin Addiction A range of treatments including behavioral therapies and ... more information, see NIDAs handbook, Principles of Drug Addiction Treatment . Chronic use of heroin leads to physical ...

  18. Changes in dopamine transporter binding in nucleus accumbens following chronic self-administration of cocaine:heroin combinations

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Lindsey P.; McIntosh, Scot; Sexton, Tammy; Childers, Steven R.; Hemby, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent use of cocaine and heroin (speedball) has been shown to exert synergistic effects on dopamine neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), as observed by significant increases in extracellular dopamine levels and compensatory elevations in the maximal reuptake rate (Vmax) of dopamine. The present studies were undertaken to determine whether chronic self-administration of cocaine, heroin or a combination of cocaine:heroin led to compensatory changes in the abundance and/or affinity of high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Saturation binding of the cocaine analog [125I] 3?-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2?-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([125I]RTI-55) in rat NAc membranes resulted in binding curves that were best fit to two-site binding models, allowing calculation of dissociation constant (Kd) and binding density (Bmax) values corresponding to high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Scatchard analysis of the saturation binding curves clearly demonstrate the presence of high- and low- affinity binding sites in the NAc, with low-affinity sites comprising 85 to 94% of the binding sites. DAT binding analyses revealed that self-administration of cocaine and a cocaine:heroin combination increased the affinity of the low-affinity site for the cocaine congener RTI-55 compared to saline. These results indicate that the alterations observed following chronic speedball self-administration are likely due to the cocaine component alone; thus further studies are necessary to elaborate upon the synergistic effect of cocaine:heroin combinations on the dopamine system in the NAc. PMID:24916769

  19. Buprenorphine/Naloxone and Methadone Maintenance Treatment Outcomes for Opioid Analgesic, Heroin, and Combined Users: Findings From Starting Treatment With Agonist Replacement Therapies (START)

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Jennifer S.; Marino, Elise N.; Hillhouse, Maureen P.; Nielsen, Suzanne; Wiest, Katharina; Canamar, Catherine P.; Martin, Judith A.; Ang, Alfonso; Baker, Rachael; Saxon, Andrew J.; Ling, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this secondary analysis was to explore differences in baseline clinical characteristics and opioid replacement therapy treatment outcomes by type (heroin, opioid analgesic [OA], or combined [heroin and OA]) and route (injector or non-injector) of opioid use. Method: A total of 1,269 participants (32.2% female) were randomized to receive one of two study medications (methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone [BUP]). Of these, 731 participants completed the 24-week active medication phase. Treatment outcomes were opioid use during the final 30 days of treatment (among treatment completers) and treatment attrition. Results: Non-opioid substance dependence diagnoses and injecting differentiated heroin and combined users from OA users. Non-opioid substance dependence diagnoses and greater heroin use differentiated injectors from non-injectors. Further, injectors were more likely to be using at end of treatment compared with non-injectors. OA users were more likely to complete treatment compared with heroin users and combined users. Non-injectors were more likely than injectors to complete treatment. There were no interactions between type of opioid used or injection status and treatment assignment (methadone or BUP) on either opioid use or treatment attrition. Conclusions: Findings indicate that substance use severity differentiates heroin users from OA users and injectors from non-injectors. Irrespective of medication, heroin use and injecting are associated with treatment attrition and opioid misuse during treatment. These results have particular clinical interest, as there is no evidence of superiority of BUP over methadone for treating OA users versus heroin users. PMID:23739025

  20. Clinical characteristics and risk behavior as a function of HIV status among heroin users enrolled in methadone treatment in northern Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Methadone treatment was introduced in Taiwan in 2006 as a harm-reduction program in response to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which is endemic among Taiwanese heroin users. The present study was aimed at examining the clinical and behavioral characteristics of methadone patients in northern Taiwan according to their HIV status. Methods The study was conducted at four methadone clinics. Participants were patients who had undergone methadone treatment at the clinics and who voluntarily signed a consent form. Between August and November 2008, each participant completed a face-to-face interview that included questions on demographics, risk behavior, quality of life, and psychiatric symptoms. Data on HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, methadone dosage, and morphine in the urine were retrieved from patient files on the clinical premises, with permission of the participants. Results Of 576 participants, 71 were HIV positive, and 514 had hepatitis C. There were significant differences between the HIV-positive and HIV-negative groups on source of treatment payment, HCV infection, urine test results, methadone dosage, and treatment duration. The results indicate that HIV-negative heroin users were more likely to have sexual intercourse and not use condoms during the 6 months prior to the study. A substantial percent of the sample reported anxiety (21.0%), depression (27.2%), memory loss (32.7%), attempted suicide (32.7%), and administration of psychiatric medications (16.1%). There were no significant differences between the HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients on psychiatric symptoms or quality of life. Conclusions HIV-positive IDUs were comorbid with HCV, indicating the need to refer both HIV- and HCV-infected individuals for treatment in methadone clinics. Currently, there is a gap between psychiatric/psychosocial services and patient symptoms, and more integrated medical services should be provided to heroin-using populations. PMID:21473789

  1. Use of methylene blue as a simulant for the physical properties of cocaine HCl and heroin HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Julie C.; Orzechowska, Grazyna E.; Poziomek, Edward J.

    1997-02-01

    Technological challenges in the development and testing of illicit narcotics include assuring safety of researchers and operations personnel from drug exposure, assessing the efficiency of sampling and sample handling, checking for artifacts introduced by field procedures, and maintaining quality control/quality assurance. The dye methylene blue was chosen as a simulant for cocaine HCl and heroin HCl. The similarities include the presence of fused ring systems, molecular weights over 300 g/mol, and melting points between 200 and 300 degrees C. A significant difference is that methylene blue has a much lower solubility in water than cocaine HCl and heroin HCl. Experiments have been conducted to successfully increase the solubility of the simulant to match those of cocaine HCl and heroin HCl by adding solidum methyl sulfate.

  2. Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status, Personal Network Attributes, and Use of Heroin and Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Chyvette T.; Latkin, Carl A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Drug abuse is a significant public health problem because of its association with numerous negative health and social consequences. Examining the social context of drug use represents a burgeoning avenue of research in drug abuse. This study investigates the effects of neighborhood disadvantage and network factors on current heroin and cocaine use among a predominantly African-American adult sample residing in Baltimore City. Methods This study employs a cross-sectional, multilevel design using data from two sources: the SHIELD Study, a network-oriented HIV intervention in Baltimore City and the 1990 US Decennial Census. The sample consisted of 1305 adults from 249 neighborhoods (census block groups) across Baltimore City. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was performed to examine personal network and neighborhood effects on current heroin and cocaine use. Results Neighborhood poverty was significantly associated with current heroin and cocaine use (OR=1.51, CI: 1.06, 2.15). Social support (OR=0.80, CI: 0.69, 0.92) and having ties to employed persons (OR=0.47, CI: 0.24, 0.92) were protective of current drug use, but did not buffer negative effects of neighborhood poverty in the face of negative drug influences in the network (OR=8.62, CI: 5.81, 12.79). Conclusions The contexts of neighborhoods and networks represent key determinants in understanding the social epidemiology of drug abuse. Network attributes have strong influences on drug use and neighborhood poverty may increase odds of use. Further research is warranted to determine other aspects of neighborhood environments that may put individuals at risk for drug use and abuse. PMID:17543712

  3. Heroin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home + Drug Facts Alcohol Anabolic Steroids Bath Salts Cocaine Cough and Cold Medicine (DXM and Codeine Syrup) ... Home Drug Facts Alcohol Anabolic Steroids Bath Salts Cocaine Cough and Cold Medicine (DXM and Codeine Syrup) ...

  4. Overlapping dopaminergic pathway genetic susceptibility to heroin and cocaine addictions in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Levran, Orna; Randesi, Matthew; da Rosa, Joel Correa; Ott, Jurg; Rotrosen, John; Adelson, Miriam; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2015-05-01

    Drugs of abuse activate the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway. Genetic variations in the dopaminergic system may contribute to drug addiction. Several processes are shared between cocaine and heroin addictions but some neurobiological mechanisms may be specific. This study examined the association of 98 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 13 dopamine-related genes with heroin addiction (OD) and/or cocaine addiction (CD) in a sample of 801 African Americans (315 subjects with OD CD, 279 subjects with CD, and 207 controls). Single-marker analyses provided nominally significant evidence for associations of 24 SNPs) in DRD1, ANKK1/DRD2, DRD3, DRD5, DBH, DDC, COMT and CSNK1E. A DRD2 7-SNPs haplotype that includes SNPs rs1075650 and rs2283265, which were shown to alter D2S/D2L splicing, was indicated in both addictions. The Met allele of the functional COMT Val158Met was associated with protection from OD. None of the signals remained significant after correction for multiple testing. The study results are in accordance with the results of previous studies, including our report of association of DRD1 SNP rs5326 with OD. The findings suggest the presence of an overlap in genetic susceptibility for OD and CD, as well as shared and distinct susceptibility for OD in subjects of African and European descent. PMID:25875614

  5. Patterns of Cognitive Impairments among Heroin and Cocaine Users: The Association with Self-Reported Learning Disabilities and Infectious Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severtson, Stevan G.; Hedden, Sarra L.; Martins, Silvia S.; Latimer, William W.

    2012-01-01

    This study used data from six neuropsychological measures of executive function (EF) and general intellectual functioning (GIF) administered to 303 regular users of heroin and/or cocaine as indicators in a latent profile analysis (LPA). Results indicated the presence of three profiles: impaired GIF and EF profile (30.8%), intact GIF and EF profile

  6. Patterns of Cognitive Impairments among Heroin and Cocaine Users: The Association with Self-Reported Learning Disabilities and Infectious Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severtson, Stevan G.; Hedden, Sarra L.; Martins, Silvia S.; Latimer, William W.

    2012-01-01

    This study used data from six neuropsychological measures of executive function (EF) and general intellectual functioning (GIF) administered to 303 regular users of heroin and/or cocaine as indicators in a latent profile analysis (LPA). Results indicated the presence of three profiles: impaired GIF and EF profile (30.8%), intact GIF and EF profile…

  7. A randomized controlled trial of fluoxetine in the treatment of cocaine dependence among methadone-maintained patients

    PubMed Central

    Winstanley, Erin L.; Bigelow, George E.; Silverman, Kenneth; Johnson, Rolley E.; Strain, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cocaine abuse and dependence continue to be widespread. Currently there are no pharmacotherapies shown to be effective in the treatment of cocaine dependence. Methods A 33-week outpatient clinical trial of fluoxetine (60 mg/day, p.o.) for cocaine dependence was conducted that incorporated abstinence-contingent voucher incentives. Participants (n=145) were both cocaine and opioid dependent and treated with methadone. A stratified randomization procedure assigned subjects to one of four conditions: fluoxetine plus voucher incentives (FV), placebo plus voucher incentives (PV), fluoxetine without vouchers (F), and placebo without vouchers (P). Dosing of fluoxetine/placebo was double blind. Primary outcomes were treatment retention and cocaine use based on thrice-weekly urine testing. Results The PV group had the longest treatment retention (mean of 165 days) and lowest probability of cocaine use. The adjusted predicted probabilities of cocaine use were: 65% in the P group, 60% in the F group, 56% in the FV group, and 31% in the PV group. Conclusions Fluoxetine was not efficacious in reducing cocaine use in patients dually dependent on cocaine and opioids. PMID:21266301

  8. Heroin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of serious health conditions, including fatal overdose, spontaneous abortion, and infectious diseases like hepatitis and HIV (see ... and/or relapse. Besides the risk of spontaneous abortion, heroin abuse during pregnancy (together with related factors ...

  9. Heroin Addiction and Methadone Treatment in America: Using Our Heads in the Search for Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basham, Richard

    1977-01-01

    An examination of America's attempts to cope with the problem of heroin (and other drug) addiction must proceed through an analysis of the basic responses to the problem--penal, behavioral and medical--from two quite different, and frequently conflicting, vantage points: that of the individual addict and that of the society as a whole. (Author/NQ)

  10. Differences in Mortality among Heroin, Cocaine, and Methamphetamine Users: A Hierarchical Bayesian Approach

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Li-Jung; Huang, David; Brecht, Mary-Lynn; Hser, Yih-ing

    2010-01-01

    Studies examining differences in mortality among long-term drug users have been limited. In this paper, we introduce a Bayesian framework that jointly models survival data using a Weibull proportional hazard model with frailty, and substance and alcohol data using mixed-effects models, to examine differences in mortality among heroin, cocaine, and methamphetamine users from five long-term follow-up studies. The traditional approach to analyzing combined survival data from numerous studies assumes that the studies are homogeneous, thus the estimates may be biased due to unobserved heterogeneity among studies. Our approach allows us to structurally combine the data from different studies while accounting for correlation among subjects within each study. Markov chain Monte Carlo facilitates the implementation of Bayesian analyses. Despite the complexity of the model, our approach is relatively straightforward to implement using WinBUGS. We demonstrate our joint modeling approach to the combined data and discuss the results from both approaches. PMID:21052518

  11. A Randomized Investigation of Methadone Doses at or Over 100 mg/day, Combined with Contingency Management*

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Ashley P.; Phillips, Karran A.; Epstein, David H.; Reamer, Dave; Schmittner, John; Preston, Kenzie L.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Methadone maintenance for heroin dependence reduces illicit drug use, crime, HIV risk, and death. Typical dosages have increased over the past few years, based on strong experimental and clinical evidence that dosages under 60 mg/day are inadequate and that dosages closer to 100 mg/day produce better outcomes. However, there is little experimental evidence for the benefits of exceeding 100 mg/day, or for individualizing methadone dosages. We sought to provide such evidence. METHODS We combined individualized methadone dosages over 100 mg/day with voucher-based cocaine-targeted contingency management (CM) in 58 heroin- and cocaine-dependent outpatients. Participants were randomly assigned to receive a fixed dose increase from 70 mg/day to 100 mg/day, or to be eligible for further dose increases (up to 190 mg/day, based on withdrawal symptoms, craving, and continued heroin use). All dosing was double-blind. The main outcome measure was simultaneous abstinence from heroin and cocaine. RESULTS We stopped the study early due to slow accrual. Cocaine-targeted CM worked as expected to reduce cocaine use. Polydrug use (effect-size h = .30) and heroin craving (effect-size d = .87) were significantly greater in the flexible/high-dose condition than in the fixed-dose condition, with no trend toward lower heroin use in the flexible/high-dose participants. CONCLUSIONS Under double-blind conditions, dosages of methadone over 100 mg/day, even when prescribed based on specific signs and symptoms, were not better than 100 mg/day. This counterintuitive finding requires replication, but supports the need for additional controlled studies of high-dose methadone. PMID:23195924

  12. Analysis of the impact of treatment setting on outcomes from methadone treatment.

    PubMed

    Comiskey, Catherine M; Cox, Gemma

    2010-10-01

    How methadone setting, duration of drug career, and dose impact on treatment are assessed. Two hundred fifteen participants were recruited. Analysis revealed significant reductions in drug use at 1 year within all settings, but the pattern varied. Proportions using heroin reduced in all settings, unprescribed benzodiazepines reduced in community, and general practitioner settings and cocaine use reduced in community and Government health board settings. A logistic model controlling for intake methadone dose, setting, previous treatments, and intake heroin use revealed that setting was a significant factor in predicting heroin use at 1 year but was not significant in predicting changes in health. Findings illustrate that drug outcomes improved across all settings, and health did not improve in any setting. For optimum outcomes to be achieved, opiate users must be directed to settings that best match their needs and that the "one-stop-shop for methadone" is not the most effective solution. PMID:20619999

  13. Low frequency genetic variants in the mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1) affect risk for addiction to heroin and cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Toni-Kim; Crist, Richard C.; Kampman, Kyle M.; Dackis, Charles A.; Pettinati, Helen M.; OBrien, Charles P.; Oslin, David W.; Ferraro, Thomas N.; Lohoff, Falk W.; Berrettini, Wade H.

    2013-01-01

    The ?-opioid receptor (MOR) binds exogenous and endogenous opioids and is known to mediate the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. Numerous genetic studies have sought to identify common genetic variation in the gene encoding MOR (OPRM1) that affects risk for drug addiction. The purpose of this study was to examine the contribution of rare coding variants in OPRM1 to the risk for addiction. Rare and low frequency variants were selected using the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Exome Sequencing Project (NHLBI-ESP) database, which has screened the exomes of over 6500 individuals. Two SNPs (rs62638690 and rs17174794) were selected for genotyping in 1377 European American individuals addicted to heroin and/or cocaine. Two different SNPs (rs1799971 and rs17174801) were genotyped in 1238 African American individuals addicted to heroin and/or cocaine. Using the minor allele frequencies from the NHLBI-ESP dataset as a comparison group, case-control association analyses were performed. Results revealed an association between rs62638690 and cocaine and heroin addiction in European Americans (p=0.02; 95% C.I. 0.47 [0.240.92]). This study suggests a potential role for rare OPRM1 variants in addiction disorders and highlights an area worthy of future study. PMID:23454283

  14. Dosing adjustments in postpartum patients maintained on buprenorphine or methadone.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hendre E; Johnson, Rolley E; O'Grady, Kevin E; Jasinski, Donald R; Tuten, Michelle; Milio, Lorraine

    2008-06-01

    Scant scientific attention has been given to examining the need for agonist medication dose changes in the postpartum period. Study objectives were: 1) to determine the need for medication dose adjustments in participants stabilized on buprenorphine or methadone 3 weeks before and 4 weeks after delivery, and 2) to evaluate the need for methadone dose adjustments during the first 7 days in participants transferred from buprenorphine to methadone at 5 weeks postpartum. Participants were opioid-dependent pregnant women who had completed a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, flexible dosing comparison of buprenorphine to methadone. Participants received a stable dose of methadone (N = 10) or buprenorphine (N = 8) before and 4 weeks after delivery. Buprenorphine-maintained participants were transferred to methadone at 5 weeks postpartum. There were no significant differences predelivery and/or postdelivery between the buprenorphine and methadone conditions in the mean ratings of dose adequacy, "liking," "hooked," and "craving" of heroin or cocaine. Patient response to the conversion from buprenorphine to methadone seems variable. Buprenorphine-maintained participants required dose changes postpartum only after they transferred to methadone. Regardless of type of medication, postpartum patients should be monitored for signs of overmedication. PMID:21768979

  15. [Application of hair analysis of selected psychoactive substances for medico-legal purposes. Part II. Cases of complex fatal poisonings: interactions of heroine - cocaine - amphetamines].

    PubMed

    Rojek, Sebastian; Kłys, Małgorzata; Rzepecka-Woźniak, Ewa; Konopka, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    The study represents an attempt at employing segmental hair analysis in complex poisonings with xenobiotic mixtures of heroine - cocaine - amphetamines in the context of the cause of death as a consequence of complex interaction mechanisms which occurred prior to death. Two cases of complex poisonings: heroine - cocaine and heroine - cocaine - amphetamines were analyzed and documented with macro- and microscopic examinations and complex toxicological examinations, including the analysis of classic biological material, i.e. samples of selective blood, and alternative material, i.e. hair samples. Determinations of opioids, cocaine and its metabolite and amphetamines in the hair biological matrix were performed using high performance liquid chromatography--atmospheric pressure chemical ionization--tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-APCI-MS-MS). Segmental hair analysis of the investigated cases indicated a prolonged intake of similar psychoactive substances and a developed adaptation of the addicted to interaction mechanisms, which, however, led gradually to multiorgan anatomopathological changes, and in consequence to death. PMID:21180103

  16. Correlates of illicit methadone use in New York City: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Ompad, Danielle C; Fuller, Crystal M; Chan, Christina A; Frye, Victoria; Vlahov, David; Galea, Sandro

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite growing concern about illicit methadone use in the US and other countries, there is little data about the prevalence and correlates of methadone use in large urban areas. We assessed the prevalence and examined correlates of lifetime and recent illicit methadone use in New York City (NYC). Methods 1,415 heroin, crack, and cocaine users aged 1540 years were recruited in NYC between 2000 and 2004 to complete interviewer-administered questionnaires. Results In multivariable logistic regression, non-injection drug users who used illicit methadone were more likely to be heroin dependent, less than daily methamphetamine users and to have a heroin using sex partner in the last two months. Injection drug users who used illicit methadone were more likely to use heroin daily, share injection paraphernalia and less likely to have been in a detoxification program and to have not used marijuana in the last six months. Conclusion The results overall suggest that illicit (or street) methadone use is likely not a primary drug of choice, but is instead more common in concert with other illicit drug use. PMID:18957116

  17. Interim Methadone Treatment Compared to Standard Methadone Treatment: 4-month Findings

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Robert P.; Kelly, Sharon M.; OGrady, Kevin E.; Gandhi, Devang; Jaffe, Jerome H.

    2011-01-01

    Interim methadone (with emergency counseling only) (IM), is an effective, but highly restricted alternative to Methadone Treatment Program (MTP) waiting lists. However, it is not known whether IM disadvantages patients as compared to standard methadone treatment (SM). In this clinical trial, conducted in two MTPs, 230 newly-admitted patients were randomly assigned to: IM, SM and Restored Methadone treatment (SM with a counselor with a reduced case load) (RM). Data were analyzed using generalized estimating equations and generalized linear modeling. There were no significant differences among Conditions in: days in treatment or of heroin or cocaine use and heroin or cocaine positive urine drug tests. The IM as compared to the SM group had significantly fewer self-reported days of criminal activity and lower amounts of money spent on drugs and illegal income. These findings suggest that when SM is unavailable, IM should be more widely used and less restricted. These findings suggest that when SM is unavailable IM should be more widely utilized and less restricted. PMID:21353445

  18. Novelty seeking as a predictor of treatment retention for heroin dependent cocaine users.

    PubMed

    Helmus, T C; Downey, K K; Arfken, C L; Henderson, M J; Schuster, C R

    2001-02-01

    This study examined the relationship between novelty seeking between treatment retention and among heroin dependent cocaine users. Participants were treated with buprenorphine maintenance and contingency management. The Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire's (TPQ) Novelty Seeking scale was administered to 68 participants prior to buprenorphine induction. Demographics, mood and anxiety disorders, antisocial personality disorder, and substance use were also assessed. Variables with significant relationships with overall retention were entered into a logistic regression analysis. In addition, using a survival analysis, all variables with significant relationships with time to drop-out were entered into a multivariate proportional hazards regression with time dependent covariates. Results demonstrated that although high novelty seekers, in comparison to low novelty seekers, were more likely to drop-out by the end of treatment, they had higher retention rates during the early phases of treatment. It is suggested that buprenorphine and contingency management were viewed by participants as novel treatment components and thus facilitated high novelty seekers' success early in treatment. If replicated, results suggest that inclusion of novel treatment components might facilitate retention among this at-risk group. PMID:11164693

  19. Drug use in the social networks of heroin and cocaine users before and after drug cessation

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Amy S.; Latkin, Carl A.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined Social Control processes in drug cessation among adults. Social Control theory posits that the association between drug use and the drug use of a persons social network results from an individual seeking out similar peers. The data included 629 individuals who reported past-year heroin or cocaine use at baseline and had follow-up data in a community study in Baltimore, MD. Negative binomial regression modeling indicated that the reduction in social network drug use was significantly greater for quitters than those who did not quit. Compared to non-quitters at baseline, the IRR of the number of drug-using network members was 0.86 for quitters at baseline, 0.71 for non-quitters at follow-up, and 0.28 for quitters at follow-up (all p < 0.05). These findings support Social Control theory in adult drug use cessation. Future research should extend the length of follow-up and assess bidirectional influences. PMID:18455887

  20. THE FIRST INJECTION EVENT: DIFFERENCES AMONG HEROIN, METHAMPHETAMINE, COCAINE, AND KETAMINE INITIATES

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, Stephen E.; Wagner, Karla D.; Jackson Bloom, Jennifer; Sanders, Bill; Hathazi, Dodi; Shin, Charles

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how the drug type injected at the first injection event is related to characteristics of the initiate, risk behaviors at initiation, and future drug-using trajectories. A diverse sample (n=222) of young injection drug users (IDUs) were recruited from public settings in New York, New Orleans, and Los Angeles during 2004 and 2005. The sample was between 16 and 29 years old, and had injected ketamine at least once in the preceding two years. Interview data was analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Young IDUs initiated with four primary drug types: heroin (48.6%), methamphetamine (20.3%), ketamine (17.1%), and cocaine (14%). Several variables evidenced statistically significant relationships with drug type: age at injection initiation, level of education, region of initiation, setting, mode of administration, patterns of self-injection, number of drugs ever injected, current housing status, and their hepatitis C virus (HCV) status. Qualitative analyses revealed that rationale for injection initiation and subjective experiences at first injection differed by drug type. PMID:21423792

  1. Drug Abuse: Methadone Becomes the Solution and the Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazell, Robert J.

    1973-01-01

    Methadone is used to divert heroin addicts from using stronger drugs. Rate of crimes committed by drug addicts has fallen considerably after putting them on methadone. Despite criticisms, methadone use seems to be encouraging for the future. (PS)

  2. Genome-Wide Pharmacogenomic Study on Methadone Maintenance Treatment Identifies SNP rs17180299 and Multiple Haplotypes on CYP2B6, SPON1, and GSG1L Associated with Plasma Concentrations of Methadone R- and S-enantiomers in Heroin-Dependent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hsin-Chou; Chu, Shih-Kai; Huang, Chieh-Liang; Kuo, Hsiang-Wei; Wang, Sheng-Chang; Liu, Sheng-Wen; Ho, Ing-Kang; Liu, Yu-Li

    2016-01-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is commonly used for controlling opioid dependence, preventing withdrawal symptoms, and improving the quality of life of heroin-dependent patients. A steady-state plasma concentration of methadone enantiomers, a measure of methadone metabolism, is an index of treatment response and efficacy of MMT. Although the methadone metabolism pathway has been partially revealed, no genome-wide pharmacogenomic study has been performed to identify genetic determinants and characterize genetic mechanisms for the plasma concentrations of methadone R- and S-enantiomers. This study was the first genome-wide pharmacogenomic study to identify genes associated with the plasma concentrations of methadone R- and S-enantiomers and their respective metabolites in a methadone maintenance cohort. After data quality control was ensured, a dataset of 344 heroin-dependent patients in the Han Chinese population of Taiwan who underwent MMT was analyzed. Genome-wide single-locus and haplotype-based association tests were performed to analyze four quantitative traits: the plasma concentrations of methadone R- and S-enantiomers and their respective metabolites. A significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs17180299 (raw p = 2.24 × 10−8), was identified, accounting for 9.541% of the variation in the plasma concentration of the methadone R-enantiomer. In addition, 17 haplotypes were identified on SPON1, GSG1L, and CYP450 genes associated with the plasma concentration of methadone S-enantiomer. These haplotypes accounted for approximately one-fourth of the variation of the overall S-methadone plasma concentration. The association between the S-methadone plasma concentration and CYP2B6, SPON1, and GSG1L were replicated in another independent study. A gene expression experiment revealed that CYP2B6, SPON1, and GSG1L can be activated concomitantly through a constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation pathway. In conclusion, this study revealed new genes associated with the plasma concentration of methadone, providing insight into the genetic foundation of methadone metabolism. The results can be applied to predict treatment responses and methadone-related deaths for individualized MMTs. PMID:27010727

  3. Genome-Wide Pharmacogenomic Study on Methadone Maintenance Treatment Identifies SNP rs17180299 and Multiple Haplotypes on CYP2B6, SPON1, and GSG1L Associated with Plasma Concentrations of Methadone R- and S-enantiomers in Heroin-Dependent Patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsin-Chou; Chu, Shih-Kai; Huang, Chieh-Liang; Kuo, Hsiang-Wei; Wang, Sheng-Chang; Liu, Sheng-Wen; Ho, Ing-Kang; Liu, Yu-Li

    2016-03-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is commonly used for controlling opioid dependence, preventing withdrawal symptoms, and improving the quality of life of heroin-dependent patients. A steady-state plasma concentration of methadone enantiomers, a measure of methadone metabolism, is an index of treatment response and efficacy of MMT. Although the methadone metabolism pathway has been partially revealed, no genome-wide pharmacogenomic study has been performed to identify genetic determinants and characterize genetic mechanisms for the plasma concentrations of methadone R- and S-enantiomers. This study was the first genome-wide pharmacogenomic study to identify genes associated with the plasma concentrations of methadone R- and S-enantiomers and their respective metabolites in a methadone maintenance cohort. After data quality control was ensured, a dataset of 344 heroin-dependent patients in the Han Chinese population of Taiwan who underwent MMT was analyzed. Genome-wide single-locus and haplotype-based association tests were performed to analyze four quantitative traits: the plasma concentrations of methadone R- and S-enantiomers and their respective metabolites. A significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs17180299 (raw p = 2.24 × 10-8), was identified, accounting for 9.541% of the variation in the plasma concentration of the methadone R-enantiomer. In addition, 17 haplotypes were identified on SPON1, GSG1L, and CYP450 genes associated with the plasma concentration of methadone S-enantiomer. These haplotypes accounted for approximately one-fourth of the variation of the overall S-methadone plasma concentration. The association between the S-methadone plasma concentration and CYP2B6, SPON1, and GSG1L were replicated in another independent study. A gene expression experiment revealed that CYP2B6, SPON1, and GSG1L can be activated concomitantly through a constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation pathway. In conclusion, this study revealed new genes associated with the plasma concentration of methadone, providing insight into the genetic foundation of methadone metabolism. The results can be applied to predict treatment responses and methadone-related deaths for individualized MMTs. PMID:27010727

  4. The Methadone Illusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennard, Henry L.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    Methadone treatment for heroin addiction does not touch the roots of the drug problem" and to think that the use of another drug can solve the profound and complex task facing us is indeed an illusion." (Author/AL)

  5. Sweat testing in addicts under methadone treatment: an Italian experience.

    PubMed

    Fucci, N; De Giovanni, N; Scarlata, S

    2008-01-30

    In the last years the interest in monitoring drug exposure with human sweat as alternative biological fluid, is increasing. Sweat collection is convenient, less invasive and difficult to adulterate compared to traditional specimens. The objective of this study was to determine the excretion profile of methadone and other drugs into human sweat. Pharmscope sweat patches (Medical Europe Diagnostic, Madrid, Spain) were used on heroin abusers under methadone treatment. Sweat patches were applied to 10 heroin addicts and 3 drug free volunteers admitted into the study. Sweat patches were worn for about 1 week; urine, saliva and hair samples were collected at the time of the removal of patches. After the extraction, sweat eluates were directly analyzed by GC/MS for the presence of nicotine, cotinine, caffeine, methadone, EDDP and cocaine. The extracts were subsequently derivatized to detect benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester, morphine, codeine and 6-acetylmorphine. No false positive results were obtained on the drug free samples. All the patches showed positive results for methadone. Cocaine was detected in two cases. Mainly the parent drug was identified rather than the metabolites. The results obtained show the usefulness of sweat as complementary specimen to saliva and urine providing a longer detection window. Moreover, sweat testing offers the advantage of being a non-invasive means of obtaining information about drug exposure. PMID:17428631

  6. A Preliminary Examination of the Relationships between Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms and Crack/Cocaine, Heroin, and Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Tull, Matthew T.; Gratz, Kim L.; Aklin, Will M.; Lejuez, C.W.

    2009-01-01

    High rates of co-occurrence between posttraumatic stress (PTS) and substance use disorders (SUDs) have led to the suggestion that substance use among individuals experiencing PTS symptoms might serve a self-medication function. However, research is still needed to provide a more comprehensive evaluation of the unique associations between PTS symptom clusters and substances (licit and illicit) with both anxiolytic/depressant and stimulant properties. Consequently, this study examined the relationship between severity of different PTS symptom clusters and heroin, crack/cocaine, and alcohol dependence among 48 treatment-seeking SUD patients with a history of traumatic exposure. No evidence was found for a relationship between PTS symptom clusters and crack/cocaine or alcohol dependence; however, results suggested a relationship between hyperarousal and avoidance (inversely-related) symptoms and heroin dependence. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for understanding motivations underlying the substance of choice among individuals with PTS symptoms, as well as the development of treatments for co-occurring PTS and SUDs. PMID:19767174

  7. Results of international and federal German evaluation studies of methadone substitution therapy--an overview.

    PubMed

    Verthein, U; Kalke, J; Raschke, P

    1994-01-01

    After a brief historical review results of German evaluation studies are contrasted for the first time with international results concerning the efficiency of methadone treatment of heroin addicts. All studies report a fast and obvious improvement of the patients' physical and psychic well-being. Decrease is observed in drug related criminality as well as in its following consequences such as arrests, trials, and inprisonments. Patients distance themselves from the drug-scene and at the same time increase communication with a drug-free environment. One problem persisting for German methadone-patients is the reintegration into their education or job. As to this only minor improvements have been obtained. Already after a short time patients on a methadone-therapy reduce their illicit use of drugs substantially. Especially the consume of heroin is getting reduced if not totally given up. The use of other drugs such as cocaine, tranquilizers and barbiturates gets reduced. For a number of patients the use of benzodiazepines remains a problem. The time patients stay in methadone-therapies (and to a high degree the success of the therapy itself) depends on a well structured arrangement of the methadone program and on the methadone dosage. Long-term follow-up studies abroad show that after methadone treatment the percentage of patients staying abstinent in the long run is almost the same as after drugfree treatment. PMID:8177939

  8. [Methadone treatment and its dangers].

    PubMed

    Reingardiene, Dagmara; Jodzi?niene, Liucija; Lazauskas, Robertas

    2009-01-01

    Methadone is a long-acting synthetic opioid with high affinity for various opioid receptors, especially for m-opioid receptors. Methadone has been used as a successful pharmacologic intervention for the treatment of heroin dependence and acute and chronic pain. This treatment is effective for opiate addiction, reducing morbidity and mortality associated with heroin use. However, overdosing with methadone has become a growing phenomenon because of the increased availability of this drug. Patients enrolled in a methadone maintenance treatment program may become physically dependent and may experience methadone withdrawal symptoms. In this review article, there are discussed about pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of methadone, clinical symptoms of its overdose, dosage problems, detection of methadone in biological samples, treatment, and causes of methadone overdose-related deaths. PMID:19535889

  9. [Methadone treatment and its dangers].

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Reingardiene D; Jodzi?niene L; Lazauskas R

    2009-01-01

    Methadone is a long-acting synthetic opioid with high affinity for various opioid receptors, especially for m-opioid receptors. Methadone has been used as a successful pharmacologic intervention for the treatment of heroin dependence and acute and chronic pain. This treatment is effective for opiate addiction, reducing morbidity and mortality associated with heroin use. However, overdosing with methadone has become a growing phenomenon because of the increased availability of this drug. Patients enrolled in a methadone maintenance treatment program may become physically dependent and may experience methadone withdrawal symptoms. In this review article, there are discussed about pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of methadone, clinical symptoms of its overdose, dosage problems, detection of methadone in biological samples, treatment, and causes of methadone overdose-related deaths.

  10. Determination of cocaine and methadone in urine samples by thin-film solid-phase microextraction and direct analysis in real time (DART) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Lafuente, Angel; Mirnaghi, Fatemeh S; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2013-12-01

    The use of thin-film solid-phase microextraction (SPME) as the sampling preparation step before direct analysis in real time (DART) was evaluated for the determination of two prohibited doping substances, cocaine and methadone, in urine samples. Results showed that thin-film SPME improves the detectability of these compounds: signal-to-blank ratios of 5 (cocaine) and 13 (methadone) were obtained in the analysis of 0.5 ng/ml in human urine. Thin-film SPME also provides efficient sample cleanup, avoiding contamination of the ion source by salt residues from the urine samples. Extraction time was established in 10 min, thus providing relatively short analysis time and high throughput when combined with a 96-well shaker and coupled with DART technique. PMID:23685960

  11. Computer-Assisted Delivery of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: Efficacy and durability of CBT4CBT among cocaine-dependent individuals maintained on methadone

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Kathleen M.; Kiluk, Brian D.; Nich, Charla; Gordon, Melissa A.; Portnoy, Galina A.; Marino, Daniel R.; Ball, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A previous pilot trial evaluating computer-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT4CBT) among 77 heterogeneous substance users (alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, opioids) provided preliminary support for its efficacy in the context of a community-based outpatient clinic. Aims of the present trial were to conduct a more definitive trial in a larger, more homogeneous sample. Methods Randomized clinical trial in which 101 cocaine-dependent methadone maintained individuals were randomized to standard methadone maintenance or methadone maintenance with weekly access to CBT4CBT, with 7 modules delivered within an 8 week trial. Results Treatment retention and data availability were high and comparable across the treatment conditions. Participants assigned to the CBT4CBT condition were significantly more likely to attain three or more consecutive weeks of abstinence from cocaine (36 versus 17%, p<.05, OR=.36). The group assigned to CBT4CBT also had better outcomes on most dimensions, including urine specimens negative for all drugs, but these reached statistical significance only for the completer sample (N=69). Follow-up data collected 6 months after treatment termination were available from 93% of the randomized sample; these indicated continued improvement for those assigned to the CBT4CBTgroup, replicating previous findings regarding its durability. Conclusions This trial replicates earlier findings indicating CBT4CBT is an effective adjunct to addiction treatment with durable effects. CBT4CBT is an easily disseminable strategy for broadening the availability of CBT, even in challenging populations such as cocaine-dependent individuals enrolled in methadone maintenance programs. Clinical trials.gov ID number NCT00350610 PMID:24577287

  12. [Therapy in heroin addiction].

    PubMed

    Hosztafi, Sáandor; Fürst, Zsuzsanna

    2014-09-01

    Heroin addiction is one of the most devastating and expensive of public health problems. The most effective treatment is opioid replacement therapy. Replacement of heroin, a short-acting euphoriant with methadone or other opioids that have significantly longer duration of action provides a number of therapeutic benefits. Opioid detoxification has a role in both preventing acute withdrawal and maintaining long-term abstinence. Opioid-based detoxification is based on the principle of cross-tolerance, in which one opioid is replaced with another one that is slowly tapered. For the treatment of heroin addicts a wide range of psychosocial and pharmacotherapeutic treatments are available; of these, methadone maintenance therapy has the most evidence of benefit. Methadone maintenance reduces and/or eliminates the use of heroin, reduces the death rate and criminality associated with heroin use, and allows patients to improve their health and social productivity. In addition, enrollment in methadone maintenance has the potential to reduce the transmission of infectious diseases associated with heroin injection, such as hepatitis and HIV. The principal effects of methadone maintenance are to relieve narcotic craving, suppress the abstinence syndrome, and block the euphoric effects associated with heroin. There is growing interest in expanding treatment into primary care, allowing opioid addiction to be managed like other chronic illnesses. Buprenorphine which is a long-acting partial agonist was also approved as pharmacotherapy for opioid dependence. Opioid antagonists can reduce heroin self-administration and opioid craving in detoxified addicts. Naltrexone, which is a long-acting competitive antagonist at the opioid receptors, blocks the subjective and objective responses produced by intravenous opioids. Naltrexone is employed to accelerate opioid detoxification by displacing heroin and as a maintenance agent for detoxified formerly heroin-dependent patients who want to remain opioid-free. PMID:25347242

  13. Cocaine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cocaine KidsHealth > For Teens > Cocaine Print A A A ... How Can Someone Quit? Avoiding Cocaine What Is Cocaine? Cocaine is a powerful and highly addictive drug ...

  14. Cocaine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Teens: Stimulants NIDA Therapy Manuals for Cocaine Addiction (Archives): Manual 1: A Cognitive-Behavioral Approach: Treating Cocaine Addiction Manual 2: A Community Reinforcement Approach: Treating Cocaine ...

  15. Cocaine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search Share Print Home » Drugs of Abuse » Cocaine Cocaine Email Facebook Twitter Brief Description Cocaine is a ... NIDA for Teens: Stimulants NIDA Therapy Manuals for Cocaine Addiction (Archives): Manual 1: A Cognitive-Behavioral Approach: ...

  16. Cocaine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... DEA Press Room » Multi-Media Library » Image Gallery » Cocaine COCAINE To Save Images: First click on the thumbnail ... your Save in directory and then click Save. Cocaine Crack Cocaine RESOURCE CENTER Controlled Substances Act DEA ...

  17. The Reliability and Validity of Drug Users' Self Reports of Amphetamine Use Among Primarily Heroin and Cocaine Users

    PubMed Central

    Napper, Lucy E.; Fisher, Dennis G.; Johnson, Mark E.; Wood, Michele M.

    2009-01-01

    Relatively few studies have addressed the psychometric properties of self-report measures of amphetamine use. This study examines the reliability and validity of the Risk Behavior Assessment's (RBA) lifetime and recent amphetamine-use questions. To evaluate validity, 4027 out-of-treatment primarily cocaine and heroin users provided urine samples that were compared to self-report data; to evaluate reliability, 218 completed the RBA at two time points, 48 hours apart. In the overall sample, self-reports demonstrated moderately high validity, with a 95% accuracy rate (kappa =.54). When analysis was restricted to recent amphetamine users validity was slightly lower (71.5% accuracy; kappa = .41). Test-retest data indicated good reliability for self-reports of ever having used amphetamine (kappa =.79), and amphetamine use in the past 30 days (.75 < r < .91). Out-of-treatment drug users provided accurate self-reports of amphetamine use. Reliable and valid measures are essential for describing and predicting trends in amphetamine use, evaluating the effectiveness of interventions, and developing policies and programs. PMID:20053503

  18. Risks for HIV infection among users and sellers of crack, powder cocaine and heroin in central Harlem: Implications for interventions

    PubMed Central

    DAVIS, W. REES; JOHNSON, B. D.; RANDOLPH, D.; LIBERTY, H. J.

    2007-01-01

    This article investigates behaviours that may be associated HIV infection among users and sellers of crack, powder cocaine and heroin in central Harlem. Chain referral sampling and other strategies were combined to acquire a sample of 637 (Users = 546; Sellers = 91) who provided urine specimens that were tested for the presence of drugs and HIV. Nearly a quarter (23.9%) of all respondents were HIV positive. Drug injectors were more than 2.5 times more likely to have HIV infections than other respondents (OR = 2.66; 95% CI 1.664.26). Those involved in frauds/cons were almost as likely to be HIV positive (OR = 2.58; 95% CI 1.644.06). Those with a marital status of being separated, divorced or widowed were twice as likely to be HIV infected (OR 2.16; 95% CI 1.433.25). Respondents currently having multiple partner sex (OR = 1.66; 95% CI 1.12.51) or who were female (OR = 1.66; 95% CI 1.122.45) were more than 1.5 times more likely to be HIV positive. Thus, controlling for lifetime drug injection and current multiple partner sex, other factors, such as participating in frauds/cons, as well as relationship status and being female, were also associated with HIV infection. PMID:16338774

  19. Sex-Related Differences in Self-Reported Neurocognitive Impairment among High-Risk Cocaine Users in Methadone Maintenance Treatment Program

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Roman; Huedo-Medina, Tania B; Copenhaver, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Previous research has suggested possible sex-related differences in executive functioning among cocaine users; however, no studies specifically explain sex-related differences in neurocognitive impairment (NCI) among cocaine users receiving clinical care. Knowledge about this association can aid in the development of targeted prevention strategies to reduce adverse health outcomes. This study was designed to examine the sex-related differences in NCI among high-risk cocaine users receiving substance-abuse treatment. METHODS The Neuropsychological Impairment Scale (NIS) was administered to 199 cocaine users (98 men; 101 women), receiving methadone maintainance treatment, to assess self-reported NCI by identifying the patients awareness of neuropsychological symptoms. We used T-test comparison to find differences in NCI between men and women and multiple regression analysis to explore the relative contribution of sex to NCI. RESULTS Consistent with prior work, high NCI was evident within this sample, as indicated by high scores on most of the NIS subscales. Women reported greater impairment than men, as evidenced by significantly higher scores on several NIS subscales, after controlling for demographic and other confounding variables. Interestingly, cocaine craving significantly predicted NCI among men but not among women, as suggested by the significant association between cocaine craving and all except one of the NIS subscales. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that cocaine users enter into treatment with a range of NCI with women having significantly more neurocognitive deficits than men that may contribute to differential treatment outcomes. This highlights the need to include additional services such as neuropsychological screening and sex-specific treatment programs to optimally reduce adverse health outcomes in these high-risk, cognitively impaired patients. PMID:25861219

  20. Cocaine. Specialized Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Do It Now Foundation, Phoenix, AZ.

    This compilation of journal articles on cocaine includes a report describing cocaine as the recreational drug of the middle class, statistics from the United States Department of Health on health consequences of cocaine use, an article on "speedballing" (use of cocaine and heroin in combination), and a discussion of the various ways cocaine is…

  1. Cocaine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piazza, Nick J.; Yeager, Rebecca D.

    Cocaine was first used by Europeans in the nineteenth century when extract from the coca leaf was combined with various beverages. Cocaine comes as a white crystalline powder. However, a product called crack cocaine may come as an opaque crystal similar in size and shape to rock salt. A third form of cocaine is known as coca paste, which is an…

  2. Application of ToFSIMS to Studying Surface Diffusion: Do cocaine and heroin form a two-dimensional gas on surfaces?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avci, Recep; Maccagnano, Sara; Bohannan, Gary; Gresham, Gary; Groenewold, Gary

    2001-03-01

    Imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy ( ToFSIMS) is a practical tool for studying the movement of molecules on material surfaces as a function of time. The high detection sensitivity, rapid data acquisition and reasonable spatial resolution present ideal conditions for such studies. An application of ToFSIMS is presented characterizing the diffusion of large molecules on gold-coated Si wafers. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was selected for study because it contaminates material surfaces and can be detected easily. Also, the temperature dependent diffusion properties of hydrochlorinated heroin and cocaine are presented as part of a forensic application. While the PDMS diffusion could be explained by a two-dimensional ( 2-D) Brownian motion with a Gaussian probability distribution function (pdf) with a diffusion coefficient of 1.6 μ m^2/sec, the cocaine and to a lesser extent heroin were observed to move nearly freely on the surfaces as though they were part of a 2-D gas evaporating in 2-D from a condensed phase. The results could be described reasonably well using an extreme Lévi pdf with an index of stability α<= 0.01.

  3. Sustained Release d-Amphetamine Reduces Cocaine but not ‘Speedball'-Seeking in Buprenorphine-Maintained Volunteers: A Test of Dual-Agonist Pharmacotherapy for Cocaine/Heroin Polydrug Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Mark K; Lundahl, Leslie H; Steinmiller, Caren L

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether oral sustained release d-amphetamine (SR-AMP) reduces cocaine and opioid/cocaine combination (‘speedball'-like) seeking in volunteers with current opioid dependence and cocaine dependence. Following outpatient buprenorphine (BUP) 8 mg/day stabilization without SR-AMP, eight participants completed a 3-week in-patient study with continued BUP 8 mg/day maintenance and double-blind ascending SR-AMP weekly doses of 0, 30, and 60 mg/day, respectively. After 3 days (Saturday–Monday) stabilization at each SR-AMP weekly dose (0, 15, or 30 mg administered at 0700 and 1225 each day), on Tuesday–Friday mornings (0900–1200 hours), participants sampled four drug combinations in randomized, counterbalanced order under double-blind, double-dummy (intranasal cocaine and intramuscular hydromorphone) conditions: cocaine (COC 100 mg+saline); hydromorphone (COC 4 mg+HYD 24 mg); ‘speedball' (COC 100 mg+HYD 24 mg); and placebo (COC 4 mg+saline). Subjective and physiological effects of these drug combinations were measured. From 1230 to 1530 hours, participants could respond on a choice, 12-trial progressive ratio schedule to earn drug units (1/12th of total morning dose) or money units (US$2). SR-AMP significantly reduced COC, but not HYD or speedball, choices and breakpoints. SR-AMP also significantly reduced COC subjective (eg, abuse-related) effects and did not potentiate COC-induced cardiovascular responses. This study shows the ability of SR-AMP to attenuate COC self-administration, as well as its selectivity, in cocaine/heroin polydrug abusers. Further research is warranted to ascertain whether SR-AMP combined with BUP could be a useful dual-agonist pharmacotherapy. PMID:20881947

  4. Qualitative analysis of cocaine and heroin users main partner sex-risk behavior: is safety in love safety in health?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2009, 27% of the 48,100 estimated new cases of HIV were attributed to heterosexual contact with an infected or at-risk person. Sexually active adults are less likely to use condoms in relationships with main partners than with non-regular partners, despite general knowledge that condom use reduces HIV transmission. Methods The purpose of this secondary qualitative analysis was to explore and contextualize perceptions of main partnerships, HIV risk, and attitudes toward condom use within main partner relationships among a subsample of intervention-arm cocaine- and/or heroin-using patients enrolled in a negative trial of brief motivational intervention to reduce the incidence of sexually transmitted disease and unsafe sexual behaviors. The open-ended portion of these interview audiotapes consisted of questions about perceptions of risk and attitudes about condom use with main partners. Enrollees were aged 18-54, English or Spanish speaking, and included in this analysis only if they reported having a main partner. We identified codes and elaborated important themes through a standard inductive three step coding process, using HyperRESEARCH software. Results Among 48 interviewees, 65% were male, half were non-Hispanic white, over 60% were 20-39 years of age, 58% had intravenous drug use (IDU), and 8% were HIV-positive. Participants defined respect, support, trust, and shared child-rearing responsibility as the most valued components of main partner relationships. Condom use was viewed occasionally as a positive means of showing respect with main partners but more often as a sign of disrespect and a barrier to intimacy and affection. Enrollees appraised their partners HIV risk in terms of perceptions of physical health, cleanliness, and sexual and HIV testing history. They based decisions regarding condom use mainly on perceived faithfulness, length of involvement, availability of condoms, and pregnancy desirability. Conclusions Risk appraisal was commonly based on appearance and subjective factors, and condom use with main sexual partners was described most often as a demonstration of lack of trust and intimacy. Trial registration NCT01379599 PMID:23618318

  5. Methadone Maintenance as Law and Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyman, Florence

    1972-01-01

    Argues that substitution of methadone for heroin would not rehabilitate the drug addict, but it may be used as a method of tranquilizing a potentially troublesome ghetto and poor white population. (RJ)

  6. Cocaine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... problems with swallowing, hoarseness, and a chronically runny nose. Ingesting cocaine by the mouth can cause severe bowel gangrene as a result of reduced blood flow. Injecting cocaine can bring about severe allergic reactions ...

  7. Optimum Methadone Compliance Testing

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this analysis was to determine the diagnostic utility of oral fluid testing collected with the Intercept oral fluid collection device. Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Opioids (opiates or narcotics) are a class of drugs derived from the opium poppy plant that typically relieve pain and produce a euphoric feeling. Methadone is a long-acting synthetic opioid used to treat opioid dependence and chronic pain. It prevents symptoms of opioid withdrawal, reduces opioid cravings and blocks the euphoric effects of short-acting opioids such as heroin and morphine. Opioid dependence is associated with harms including an increased risk of exposure to Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C as well as other health, social and psychological crises. The goal of methadone treatment is harm reduction. Treatment with methadone for opioid dependence is often a long-term therapy. The Ontario College of Physicians and Surgeons estimates that there are currently 250 physicians qualified to prescribe methadone, and 15,500 people in methadone maintenance programs across Ontario. Drug testing is a clinical tool whose purpose is to provide objective meaningful information, which will reinforce positive behavioral changes in patients and guide further treatment needs. Such information includes knowledge of whether the patient is taking their methadone as prescribed and reducing or abstaining from using opioid and other drugs of abuse use. The results of drug testing can be used with behavior modification techniques (contingency management techniques) where positive reinforcements such as increased methadone take-home privileges, sustained employment or parole are granted for drug screens negative for opioid use, and negative reinforcement including loss of these privileges for drug screens positive for opioid used. Body fluids including blood, oral fluid, often referred to as saliva, and urine may contain metabolites and the parent drug of both methadone and drugs of abuse and provide a means for drug testing. Compared with blood which has a widow of detection of several hours, urine has a wider window of detection, approximately 1 to 3 days, and is therefore considered more useful than blood for drug testing. Because of this, and the fact that obtaining a urine specimen is relatively easy, urine drug screening is considered the criterion measure (gold standard) for methadone maintenance monitoring. However, 2 main concerns exist with urine specimens: the possibility of sample tampering by the patient and the necessity for observed urine collection. Urine specimens may be tampered with in 3 ways: dilution, adulteration (contamination) with chemicals, and substitution (patient submits another persons urine specimen). To circumvent sample tampering the supervised collection of urine specimens is a common and recommended practice. However, it has been suggested that this practice may have negative effects including humiliation experienced by patient and staff, and may discourage patients from staying in treatment. Supervised urine specimen collection may also present an operational problem as staff must be available to provide same-sex supervision. Oral fluid testing has been proposed as a replacement for urine because it can be collected easily under direct supervision without infringement of privacy and reduces the likelihood of sample tampering. Generally, the results of oral fluid drug testing are similar to urine drug testing but there are some differences, such as lower concentrations of substances in oral fluid than urine, and some drugs remain detectable for longer periods of time in urine than oral fluid. The Technology Being Reviewed The Intercept Oral Specimen Collection Device (Ora-Sure Technologies, Bethlehem, PA) consists of an absorbent pad mounted on a plastic stick. The pad is coated with common salts. The absorbent pad is inserted into the mouth and placed between the cheek and gums for 3 minutes on average. The pad absorbs the oral fluid. After 3 minutes (range 2min-5 min) the collection device is removed from the mouth and the absorbent pad is placed in a small vial which contains 0.8mL of pH-balanced preservative, for transportation to a laboratory for analysis. It is recommended that the person undergoing oral fluid drug testing have nothing to eat or drink for a 10- minute period before the oral fluid specimen is collected. This will remove opportunity for adulteration. Likewise, it is recommended that the person be observed for the duration of the collection period to prevent adulteration of the specimen. An average of 0.4 mL of saliva can be collected. The specimen may be stored at 4C to 37C and tested within 21 days of collection (or within 6 weeks if frozen). The oral fluid specimen must be analyzed in a laboratory setting. There is no point-of-care (POC) oral fluid test kit for drugs of abuse (other than for alcohol). In the laboratory the oral fluid is extracted from the vial after centrifugation and a screening test is completed to eliminate negative specimens. Similar to urinalysis, oral fluid specimens are analyzed first by enzyme immunoassay with positive specimens sent for confirmatory testing. Comparable cut-off values to urinalysis by enzyme immunoassay have been developed for oral fluids Review Strategy Research Question What is the diagnostic utility of the Intercept oral specimen device? Inclusion criteria: Studies evaluating paired urine and oral fluid specimens from the same individual with the Intercept oral fluid collection device. The population studied includes drug users. Exclusion criteria: Studies testing for marijuana (THC) only. Outcomes: Sensitivity and Specificity of oral fluid testing compared to urinalysis for methadone (methadone metabolite), opiates, cocaine, benzodiazepines, and alcohol. Quality of the Body of Evidence The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was used to evaluate the overall quality of the body of evidence (defined as 1 or more studies) supporting the research questions explored in this systematic review. A description of the GRADE system is reported in Appendix 1. Summary of Findings A total of 854 potential citations were retrieved. After reviewing titles and abstracts, 2 met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Two other relevant studies were found after corresponding with the author of the 2 studies retrieved from the literature search. Therefore a total of 4 published studies are included in this analysis. All 4 studies carried out by the same investigator meet the definition of Medical Advisory Secretariat level III (not a-randomized controlled trial with contemporaneous controls) study design. In each of the studies, paired urine and oral fluid specimens where obtained from drug users. Urine collection was not observed in the studies however, laboratory tests for pH and creatinine were used to determine the reliability of the specimen. Urine specimens thought to be diluted and unreliable were removed from the evaluation. Urinalysis was used as the criterion measurement for which to determine the sensitivity and specificity of oral fluid testing by the Intercept oral fluid device for opiates, benzodiazepines, cocaine and marijuana. Alcohol was not tested in any of the 4 studies. From these 4 studies, the following conclusions were drawn: The evidence indicates that oral fluid testing with the Intercept oral fluid device has better specificity than sensitivity for opiates, benzodiazepines, cocaine and marijuana. The sensitivity of oral fluids testing with the Intercept oral fluid device seems to be from best to worst: cocaine > benzodiazepines >opiates> marijuana. The sensitivity and specificity for opiates of the Intercept oral fluid device ranges from 75 to 90% and 97- 100% respectively. The consequences of opiate false-negatives by oral fluid testing with the Intercept oral fluid device need to be weighed against the disadvantages of urine testing, including invasion of privacy issues and adulteration and substitution of the urine specimen. The window of detection is narrower for oral fluid drug testing than urinalysis and because of this oral fluid testing may best be applied in situations where there is suspected frequent drug use. When drug use is thought to be less frequent or remote, urinalysis may offer a wider (24-48 hours more than oral fluids) window of detection. The narrow window of detection for oral fluid testing may mean more frequent testing is needed compared to urinalysis. This may increase the expense for drug testing in general. POC oral fluid testing is not yet available and may limit the practical utility of this drug testing methodology. POC urinalysis by immunoassay is available. The possible applications of oral fluid testing may include: Because of its narrow window of detection compared to urinalysis oral fluid testing may best be used during periods of suspected frequent or recent drug use (within 24 hours of drug testing). This is not to say that oral fluid testing is superior to urinalysis during these time periods. In situations where an observed urine specimen is difficult to obtain. This may include persons with shy bladder syndrome or with other urinary conditions limiting their ability to provide an observed urine specimen. When the health of the patient would make urine testing unreliable (e,g., renal disease) As an alternative drug testing method when urine specimen tampering practices are suspected to be affecting the reliability of the urinalysis test. Possible limiting Factors to Diffusion of Oral Fluid Technology No oral fluid POC test equivalent to onsite urine dips or POC analyzer reducing immediacy of results for patient care. Currently, physicians get reimbursed directly for POC urinalysis. Oral fluid must be analyzed in a lab setting removing physician reimbursement, which is a source of program funding for many methadone clinics. Small amount of oral fluid specimen obtained; repeat testing on same sample will be difficult. Reliability of positive oral fluid methadone (parent drug) results may decrease because of possible contamination of oral cavity after ingestion of dose. Therefore high methadone levels may not be indicative of compliance with treatment. Oral fluid does not as yet test for methadone metabolite. There currently is no licensed provincial laboratory that analyses oral fluid specimens. Abbreviations EDDP 2-ethylidene- 1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine EIA enzyme immunoassay ELISA Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), EMIT Enzyme Multiplied Immunoassay Test (EMIT) GC Gas chromatography GC/MS gas chromatography/mass spectrometry HPLC High-performance liquid chromatography LOD Limit of Detection MS Mass spectrometry MMT Methadone Maintenance Treatment OFT Oral fluid testing PCP Phencyclidine POC Point of Care Testing THC tetrahydrocannabinol THCCOOHC 11-nor-delta-9-tetrhydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid UDT urine drug testing PMID:23074492

  8. Cocaine

    MedlinePLUS

    Cocaine is a white powder. It can be snorted up the nose or mixed with water and injected with a needle. Cocaine can also be made into small white rocks, ... Crack is smoked in a small glass pipe. Cocaine speeds up your whole body. You may feel ...

  9. Going Through the Changes: Methadone in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agar, Michael

    1977-01-01

    Methadone has been defined as an agent to draw addicts out of the street life into "straight" society. However, the complementary perspective of the streets sees methadone as a new, widely available drug to be integrated into a subculture previously dominated by heroin. This article discusses the adaptation to methadone and its implications. (NQ)

  10. Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Ravindra; Wagner, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine abuse is commonly associated with myocardial ischemia, mesenteric ischemia, and cerebrovascular accidents. Renal infarction is an uncommon complication of cocaine abuse. Various mechanisms have been postulated for this cocaine-related injury. There are only 15 cases reported on cocaine-induced renal infarction. Among the cases with available data, very few cases had left kidney involvement. We report a case of a 65-year-old African American man with history of cocaine abuse who presented with left flank pain and had left renal infarction. PMID:26425633

  11. Uses of diverted methadone and buprenorphine by opioid-addicted individuals in Baltimore, Maryland

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Kelly, Sharon M.; Brown, Barry S.; Reisinger, Heather Schacht; Peterson, James A.; Ruhf, Adrienne; Agar, Michael H.; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Schwartz, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the uses of diverted methadone and buprenorphine among opiate-addicted individuals recruited from new admissions to methadone programs and from out-of-treatment individuals recruited from the streets. Self-report data regarding diversion were obtained from surveys and semi-structured qualitative interviews. Approximately 16% (n=84) of the total sample (N=515) reported using diverted (street) methadone 23 times per week for six months or more, and for an average of 7.8 days (SD=10.3) within the past month. The group reporting lifetime use of diverted methadone as compared to the group that did not report such use was less likely to use heroin and cocaine in the 30 days prior to admission (ps < .01) and had lower ASI Drug Composite scores (p < .05). Participants in our qualitative sub-sample (n=22) indicated that street methadone was more widely used than street buprenorphine and that both drugs were largely used as self-medication for detoxification and withdrawal symptoms. Participants reported using low dosages and no injection of either medication was reported. PMID:19874152

  12. Cocaine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cold Medicine (DXM and Codeine Syrup) Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy or Molly) Methamphetamine (Meth) Prescription Depressant ... for Teens Guest Blogger Healthy Minds and Bodies Marijuana National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week NIDA News ...

  13. Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) in general practice or in specialized centers: profile of patients in the Swiss Canton of Vaud.

    PubMed

    Pelet, Anne; Doll, Sebastien; Huissoud, Thérèse; Resplendino, Janine; Besson, Jacques; Favrat, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    We studied profile of patients (n=1782) treated in specialized centers and general practice (GP) enrolled in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) programs during 2001 in the Swiss Canton of Vaud. We found that GPs treated the majority of patients (76%). Specialized centers treated a higher proportion of patients with uncontrolled intravenous use of cocaine and heroin, and prescribed neuroleptics as concomitant medication three times more frequently than GPs. Patients treated in specialized centers were more likely to undergo screening for HIV, HBV, HCV, and receive complete HBV immunization. In conclusion, specialized centers are more likely to treat severely addicted patients and patients with a poor global assessment (physical, psychiatric, and social). PMID:17891659

  14. Methadone maintenance patients in general medical practice. A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Novick, D M; Pascarelli, E F; Joseph, H; Salsitz, E A; Richman, B L; Des Jarlais, D C; Anderson, M; Dole, V P; Nyswander, M E

    1988-06-10

    Medical maintenance is the treatment by primary care physicians of rehabilitated methadone maintenance patients who are stable, employed, not abusing drugs, and not in need of supportive services. In this research project, physicians with experience in drug abuse treatment provided both the pharmacologic treatment of addiction as well as therapy for other medical problems, as needed. Decisions regarding treatment were based on the individual needs of the patient and on currently accepted medical practice rather than on explicit regulations. We studied the first 40 former heroin addicts who were transferred to this program from more conventional methadone clinics. At a follow-up visit at 12 to 55 months, 33 (82.5%) of 40 patients had remained in treatment; five (12.5%) had been discharged because of cocaine abuse and two (5%) had been voluntarily discharged. Personal benefits of medical maintenance include the dignity of a standard professional atmosphere and a more flexible reporting schedule. This program has the potential for improving treatment of selected methadone maintenance patients. PMID:3373662

  15. Cocaine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cocaine that has been processed to make a rock crystal (also called “freebase cocaine”) that can be ... refers to the crackling sound produced by the rock as it is heated.) The intensity and duration ...

  16. Abuse of Prescription Pain Medications Risks Heroin Use

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Trends Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold ... Risks Heroin Use The authors conducted an independent analysis of the National Survey on Drug Use and ...

  17. Analyses related to the development of DSM-5 criteria for substance use related disorders: 2. Proposed DSM-5 criteria for alcohol, cannabis, cocaine and heroin disorders in 663 substance abuse patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasin, Deborah S.; Fenton, Miriam C.; Beseler, Cheryl; Park, Jung Yeon; Wall, Melanie M.

    2013-01-01

    Background A number of changes have been proposed and investigated in the criteria for substance use disorders in DSM-5. However, although clinical utility of DSM-5 is a high priority, relatively little of the empirical evidence supporting the changes was obtained from samples of substance abuse patients. Methods Proposed changes were examined in 663 patients in treatment for substance use disorders, evaluated by experienced clinicians using the Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders (PRISM). Factor and item response theory analysis was used to investigate the dimensionality and psychometric properties of alcohol, cannabis, cocaine and heroin abuse and dependence criteria, and craving. Results The seven dependence criteria, three of the abuse criteria (hazardous use; social/interpersonal problems related to use; neglect of roles to use), and craving form a unidimensional latent trait for alcohol, cannabis, cocaine and heroin. Craving did not add significantly to the total information offered by the dependence criteria, but adding the three abuse criteria and craving together did significantly increase total information for the criteria sets associated with alcohol, cannabis and heroin. Conclusion Among adult patients in treatment for substance disorders, the alcohol, cannabis, cocaine and heroin criteria for dependence, abuse (with the exception of legal problems), and craving measure a single underlying dimension. Results support the proposal to combine abuse and dependence into a single diagnosis in the DSM-5, omitting legal problems. Mixed support was provided for the addition of craving as a new criterion, warranting future studies of this important construct in substance use disorders. PMID:21963333

  18. Heroin reduces startle and cortisol response in opioid-maintained heroin-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Walter, Marc; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Degen, Bigna; Albrich, Jrgen; Oppel, Monika; Schulz, Andr; Schchinger, Hartmut; Drsteler-MacFarland, Kenneth M

    2011-01-01

    Heroin dependence (HD) is a chronic relapsing brain disorder characterized by a compulsion to seek and use heroin. Stress is seen as a key factor for heroin use. Methadone maintenance and the prescription of pharmaceutical heroin [diacetylmorphine (DAM)] are established treatments for HD in several countries. The present study examined whether DAM-maintained patients and methadone-maintained patients differ from healthy controls in startle reflex and cortisol levels. Fifty-seven participants, 19 of each group matched for age, sex and smoking status, completed a startle session which included the presentation of 24 bursts of white noise while eye-blink responses to startling noises were recorded. Salivary cortisol was collected three times after awakening, before, during and after the startle session. DAM was administered before the experiment, while methadone was administered afterwards. Both heroin-dependent patient groups exhibited significantly smaller startle responses than healthy controls (P < 0.05). Whereas the cortisol levels after awakening did not differ across the three groups, the experimental cortisol levels were significantly lower in DAM-maintained patients, who received their opioid before the experiment, than in methadone-maintained patients and healthy controls (P < 0.0001). Opioid maintenance treatment for HD is associated with reduced startle responses. Acute DAM administration may suppress cortisol levels, and DAM maintenance treatment may represent an effective alternative to methadone in stress-sensitive, heroin-dependent patients. PMID:20331562

  19. A randomized controlled trial of the therapeutic workplace for community methadone patients: a partial failure to engage.

    PubMed

    Knealing, Todd W; Wong, Conrad J; Diemer, Karly N; Hampton, Jacqueline; Silverman, Kenneth

    2006-08-01

    The Therapeutic Workplace is an employment-based treatment for drug addiction that uses wages for work to reinforce drug abstinence. The Therapeutic Workplace has promoted abstinence from heroin and cocaine in treatment-resistant mothers in methadone treatment. This study attempted to replicate that effect in crack cocaine users recruited from community-based methadone programs. Participants were randomly assigned to a Therapeutic Workplace (n=22) or usual care control (n=25) group. Therapeutic Workplace participants were invited to work in the workplace and earn vouchers every weekday for 9 months contingent on documented opiate and cocaine abstinence. The two groups did not differ significantly on measures of cocaine or opiate use collected during study participation. Daily attendance and urinalysis results of the Therapeutic Workplace group were analyzed, and only 7 of the 22 participants initiated consistent periods of abstinence and workplace attendance. Two individuals gained access to the workplace on a few days, and 9 participants attempted to gain access to the workplace but never provided a drug-negative urine sample. Possible reasons for differences between the current study and the previous Therapeutic Workplace study are considered. Procedures that increase participant contact with the Therapeutic Workplace and its reinforcement contingencies might increase the likelihood of these individuals being successful in the treatment program. PMID:16893278

  20. Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy during Methadone Dose Reduction: Rationale, Treatment Description, and a Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stotts, Angela L.; Masuda, Akihiko; Wilson, Kelly

    2009-01-01

    Many clients who undergo methadone maintenance (MM) treatment for heroin and other opiate dependence prefer abstinence from methadone. Attempts at methadone detoxification are often unsuccessful, however, due to distressing physical as well as psychological symptoms. Outcomes from an MM client who voluntarily participated in an Acceptance and

  1. Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy during Methadone Dose Reduction: Rationale, Treatment Description, and a Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stotts, Angela L.; Masuda, Akihiko; Wilson, Kelly

    2009-01-01

    Many clients who undergo methadone maintenance (MM) treatment for heroin and other opiate dependence prefer abstinence from methadone. Attempts at methadone detoxification are often unsuccessful, however, due to distressing physical as well as psychological symptoms. Outcomes from an MM client who voluntarily participated in an Acceptance and…

  2. Methadone Maintenance: The Experience of Four Programs. The Drug Abuse Council Manuscript Series, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danaceau, Paul

    Methadone maintenance is a relatively new method for treating heroin addiction. Controversy and questions remain about the drug itself and its use of methadone. The author was engaged by The Drug Abuse Council to prepare these descriptions of four methadone programs and the accompanying summary. The evolution of these programs is examined, and the

  3. Methadone Maintenance: The Experience of Four Programs. The Drug Abuse Council Manuscript Series, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danaceau, Paul

    Methadone maintenance is a relatively new method for treating heroin addiction. Controversy and questions remain about the drug itself and its use of methadone. The author was engaged by The Drug Abuse Council to prepare these descriptions of four methadone programs and the accompanying summary. The evolution of these programs is examined, and the…

  4. The methadone epidemic: methadone-related deaths on the rise in Vermont.

    PubMed

    Madden, Michelle E; Shapiro, Steven L

    2011-06-01

    The prevalence of methadone-related overdose deaths is increasing worldwide and has been a topic of recent debate. Methadone-related deaths, to this point, have not been systematically reviewed in the state of Vermont. All of the methadone-related fatalities from 2001 to 2006 (total, 76 cases), which were examined by the Vermont Office of the Chief Medical Examiner were retrospectively reviewed. The mean age of the decedents was 36 years (range, 16-74 years), and 72% were male. The manners of death were classified as follows: 84% accident, 12% undetermined, and 4% suicide. The mean level of methadone was 457 ng/mL (range, 50-3793 ng/mL). The substances causing death were determined to be methadone alone in 26 (34%), methadone with only other prescribed medications in 29 (38%), methadone with only illicit drugs (excluding tetrahydrocannabinol) in 13 (17%), methadone with both illicit and prescribed medications in 5 (7%), and methadone with ethanol in 3 (4%). The methadone was obtained by illegal diversion (sale, gift, or theft) in 67% of cases. In the remaining cases (33%), the methadone was obtained by physician's prescription for chronic pain (60%), acute pain or injury (8%), methadone maintenance therapy for heroin dependence (8%), and unknown reasons (24%). The number of overdose deaths has increased 4-fold from 2001 (17 deaths) to 2006 (79 deaths). The proportion of methadone-related deaths has increased by 300% from 2001 (0.6% of reported deaths, 12% of overdose deaths) to 2006 (3% of reported deaths, 37% of overdose deaths). Methadone maintenance therapy for heroin dependence in our population comprises an insignificant number of the methadone-related deaths (3% of the decedents). In Vermont, the populations most at risk are those taking methadone for chronic pain and those obtaining diverted methadone for abuse. Education of clinicians regarding the increasing number of methadone-related deaths, the potential for abuse and diversion, and the pharmacokinetics of methadone may help halt this epidemic and reduce the number of fatalities from this drug. PMID:21030851

  5. Methadone-related deaths. A ten year overview.

    PubMed

    Vignali, Claudia; Stramesi, Cristiana; Morini, Luca; Pozzi, Fulvia; Groppi, Angelo

    2015-12-01

    Over the last 10 years we have registered in our district (about 500,000 inhabitants) 36 cases of fatal methadone poisoning, involving both patients on treatment and naive subjects: this is a significant increase of deaths due to methadone use, misuse or abuse compared with previous years. Twenty-four patients (66.7%) were on methadone maintenance programs for heroin detoxification, while 12 (33.3%) were taking the drug without a medical prescription. The average blood concentration of methadone in patients undergoing a maintenance program was 1.06mg/L (0.21-3.37mg/L), against 0.79mg/L (0.2-3.15mg/L) in those taking the non-prescribed drug. Since 111 heroin-related deaths were recorded in our district in the same period, the fact that there appear to be many methadone deaths (about a third of heroin-related deaths) cannot be overlooked. The aim of this work is to understand the possible reasons for such a large number of methadone-related deaths. On this subject, we have noticed that risks associated with methadone intake are often underestimated by clinicians prescribing the drug: sometimes methadone is prescribed without taking into account patient's tolerance to opiates, and a large number of subjects enrolled in methadone maintenance programs in Italy, have also been given take-home doses, thus increasing the risk of abuse and diversion. PMID:26360592

  6. Cocaine, Other Drugs and Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... vessels and heart valves. Many drugs, such as cocaine, heroin and various forms of amphetamine, affect the ... heart attacks, seizures, and respiratory arrest More about Cocaine - the "perfect heart-attack drug" The powdered form ...

  7. Wheel Running Decreases the Positive Reinforcing Effects of Heroin

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Mark A.; Pitts, Elizabeth G.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of voluntary wheel running on the positive reinforcing effects of heroin in rats with an established history of drug self-administration. Rats were assigned to sedentary (no wheel) and exercise (wheel) conditions and trained to self-administer cocaine under positive reinforcement contingencies. Rats acquiring cocaine self-administration were then tested with various doses of heroin during daily test sessions. Sedentary rats self-administered more heroin than exercising rats, and this effect was greatest at low and moderate doses of heroin. These data suggest that voluntary wheel running decreases the positive reinforcing effects of heroin. PMID:23087148

  8. Heroin Use: What Communities Should Know. Monthly Action Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Join Together, Boston, MA.

    This action kit was created in response to a rise in heroin use. Facts are provided about the scope of heroin use since it is the one illegal drug that is growing in popularity in some areas among young people. A brief explanation of some treatment options is provided including detoxification, methadone treatment, other medications, and behavioral…

  9. Heroin overdose

    MedlinePLUS

    ... olds in the United States use opiates (heroin/opium). If a user becomes dependent, then they are ... it naturally occurs in the seedpods of Asian (opium) poppy plants. Street names for heroin include "junk," " ...

  10. Extended Heroin Access Increases Heroin Choices Over a Potent Nondrug Alternative

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Magalie; Cantin, Lauriane; Vanhille, Nathalie; Serre, Fuschia; Ahmed, Serge H

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological research shows that the proportion of drug users who become addicted to heroin is higher than to cocaine. Here we tested whether this difference could be due to a difference in the addiction liability between the two drugs. Addiction liability was assessed under a discrete-trials choice procedure by measuring the proportion of rats that prefer the drug over a potent alternative reward (ie, water sweetened with saccharin). Previous research on choice between self-administration of i.v. cocaine or sweet water showed that the proportion of cocaine-preferring rats remains relatively low and invariable (ie, 15%), even after extended drug access and regardless of past drug consumption (ie, total drug use before choice testing). By contrast, the present study shows that under similar choice conditions, the proportion of heroin-preferring rats considerably increases with extended heroin access (69?h per day for several weeks) and with past heroin consumption, from 11 to 51% at the highest past drug consumption level. At this level, the proportion of drug-preferring rats was about three times higher with heroin than with cocaine (51% vs 15%). This increase in the rate of heroin preference after extended heroin access persisted even after recovery from acute heroin withdrawal. Overall, these findings show that choice procedures are uniquely sensitive to different drugs and suggest that heroin is more addictive than cocaine. This higher addiction liability may contribute to explain why more drug users become addicted to heroin than to cocaine in epidemiological studies. PMID:23322185

  11. Relationship between plasma concentrations of the l-enantiomer of methadone and response to methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Meini, Milo; Moncini, Marco; Daini, Laura; Giarratana, Tania; Scaramelli, Daniela; Chericoni, Silvio; Stefanelli, Fabio; Rucci, Paola

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between the plasma concentration of l-methadone and response to methadone in real-world patients, in order to identify a minimum plasma concentration above which methadone treatment is effective. Ninety-four patients with opioid dependence under maintenance methadone treatment were consecutively recruited. Response was defined as negative urine analyses in the three weeks prior to the blood sampling. The percentage of participants with a plasma l-methadone concentration between 100 and 250 ng/ml was 54.2% among those with a methadone dosage ≥60 mg/day. Plasma l-methadone concentrations were significantly higher in patients with negative urine analyses compared with those with positive urine analyses (median 93 vs. 77 ng/ml, Mann-Whitney test, P<0.05). Above plasma l-methadone concentrations of 200 ng/ml no heroin use was reported and urine analyses were negative. Moreover, above concentrations of 250 ng/ml craving was absent. Examination of demographic correlates of treatment outcome indicated that older age, a stable job and being married were protective against the use of heroin. Mean plasma l-methadone concentration was significantly lower in patients who used cannabis compared with those who did not use cannabis, after adjusting for methadone dosage. In conclusion our results identify specific cut-offs for plasma l-methadone concentrations about which therapeutic response is observed and provide new evidence that therapeutic response is associated with patient׳s demographic characteristics. This underscores the need to monitor plasma methadone concentrations as part of Drug Addiction Services routine practice, in order to provide an objective framework for changing the methadone dosage. PMID:25891369

  12. Role of Methadone in Induction and/or Exacerbation of Cluster Headache in Patients Treated for Opioid Addiction.

    PubMed

    Diot, Caroline; Eiden, Céline; Leglise, Yves; Donnadieu-Rigole, Hélène; Peyrière, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    Methadone is a potent opioid agonist widely used in opioid maintenance therapy. In some countries, methadone is available for pain treatment. We report the cases of two patients with history of substance abuse (mainly heroin), who presented with cluster headache possibly related to high-dose methadone. One possible explanation for the severe pain described in these cases is hyperalgesia induced by high doses of methadone. PMID:25487851

  13. Methadone overdose

    MedlinePLUS

    ... takes methadone with certain painkillers, such as oxycontin, hydrocodone (Vicodin), or morphine. This is for information only ... of responsiveness) Disorientation Dizziness Drowsiness Fatigue Muscle ... Weakness Skin: Blue fingernails and lips Cold, clammy ...

  14. Heroin Purchasing is Income and Price Sensitive

    PubMed Central

    Roddy, Juliette; Steinmiller, Caren L.; Greenwald, Mark K.

    2011-01-01

    Semi-structured interviews were used to assess behavioral economic drug demand in heroin dependent research volunteers. Findings on drug price, competing purchases, and past 30-day income and consumption, established in a previous study, are replicated. We extended these findings by having participants indicate whether hypothetical environmental changes would alter heroin purchasing. Participants (n = 109) reported they would significantly (p < .005) decrease heroin daily purchasing amounts (DPA) from past 30-day levels (mean = $60/day) if: (1) they encountered a 33% decrease in income (DPA = $34), (2) family/friends no longer paid their living expenses (DPA = $32), or (3) they faced four-fold greater likelihood of police arrest at their purchasing location (DPA = $42). Participants in higher income quartiles (who purchase more heroin) show greater DPA reductions (but would still buy more heroin) than those in lower income quartiles. For participants receiving government aid (n = 31), heroin purchasing would decrease if those subsidies were eliminated (DPA = $28). Compared to participants whose urine tested negative for cocaine (n = 31), cocaine-positive subjects (n = 32) reported more efficient heroin purchasing, i.e., live closer to their primary dealer, more likely to have heroin delivered or walk to obtain it (and less likely to ride the bus), thus reducing purchasing time (52 vs. 31 min, respectively), and purchasing more heroin per episode. These simulation results have treatment and policy implications: Daily heroin users purchasing repertoire is very cost-effective, more so for those also using cocaine, and only potent environmental changes (income reductions or increased legal sanctions) may impact this behavior. PMID:21443296

  15. Profile of Clients Attending a Methadone Clinic

    PubMed Central

    JACOB, Sabrina Anne; MOHAMMED, Fauziah; HASSALI, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Client characteristics provide useful information for designing programs that target individuals with risk factors for substance use and for determining client retention. Therefore, this study examined the profiles of clients attending a methadone clinic. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of clients of a methadone clinic was conducted through a survey to obtain a profile of methadone clients. Results: Of the 51 patients who responded (response rate: 66.2%), the mean (SD) age at which they started substance use was 19.8 (5.1) years. Friends were cited as the most regular source of drugs (82.4%), and heroin was the most commonly used drug (98%). Daily substance use was reported by 72.5% of the respondents; 23.5% admitted to having stolen money to purchase drugs; 92.2% tried quitting substance use on their own and 98% stated that the main reason for registering at the clinic was that they wanted to stop their drug dependence. Approximately 60% of clients were receiving methadone doses of less than 60 mg/day. Conclusion: Heroin is still the most popular drug of abuse and most clients still receive methadone doses below the recommended level, despite evidence of poor patient retention rates associated with these low doses. PMID:25892951

  16. Quantitation of methadone and metabolite in patients under maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Diong, Shiau Hui; Mohd Yusoff, Nor Shuhadah; Sim, Maw Shin; Raja Aziddin, Raja Elina; Chik, Zamri; Rajan, Poppy; Abdul Rashid, Rusdi; Chemi, Norliza; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2014-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry quantitative method was developed to monitor concentrations of methadone and its metabolite 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) in plasma and urine of patients. The developed method was simple, accurate and reproducible to quantify methadone and EDDP in plasma and urine samples in the concentration range of 15-1,000 and 50-2,000 ng/mL, respectively. The proposed analytical method was applied to plasma and urine samples obtained from 96 patients undergoing methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) with daily methadone doses of 2-120 mg/day. Urinary methadone excretion was observed to be significantly affected by pH, in which the ratio of methadone to EDDP was two times higher in acidic urine (P = 0.029). The findings of this study further enhance the guidelines for monitoring of methadone treatment among outpatients. Methadone-to-EDDP ratio in urine was found to be consistent at 24 and 4 h, hence suggesting the possibility that outpatients may be monitored with single urine sample in order to check for compliance. This study which provides data on peak concentrations of methadone and EDDP as well as the ratio of both compounds has added to the body of knowledge regarding pharmacokinetic properties of methadone among heroin-dependent patients under MMT. PMID:25106416

  17. Evaluation of Drug Abuse Treatment: A Repeated Measures Design Assessing Methadone Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hser, Yih-Ing; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A repeated measures design was used to evaluate methadone maintenance (MM) treatment effects for 720 heroin addicts who entered MM in Southern California in 1971-1978. Compared to pretreatment measures, results show significant improvement for methadone users. Level of improvement was affected by sex, ethnicity, and treatment duration. (TJH)

  18. Cerebral vasculitis associated with cocaine abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, B.R.; Fainstat, M.

    1987-10-16

    A case of cerebral vasculitis in a previously healthy 22-year-old man with a history of cocaine abuse is described. Cerebral angiograms showed evidence of vasculitis. A search for possible causes other than cocaine produced no results. The authors include cocaine with methamphetamines, heroin, and ephedrine as illicit drugs that can cause cerebral vasculitis.

  19. Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... That People Abuse » Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Listen Heroin is a white ... Previous Index Next Español English Español "I needed heroin just to get by." Deon was addicted to ...

  20. THE NEURAL CIRCUITRY UNDERLYING REINSTATEMENT OF HEROIN-SEEKING BEHAVIOR IN AN ANIMAL MODEL OF RELAPSE

    PubMed Central

    ROGERS, J.L.; GHEE, S.; SEE, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    Reinstatement of extinguished drug-seeking has been utilized in the study of the neural substrates of relapse to drugs of abuse, particularly cocaine. However, limited studies have examined the circuitry that drives the reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior in the presence of conditioned cues, or by heroin itself. In order to test the hypothesis that the circuitry underlying reinstatement in heroin-experienced animals would show overlapping, yet distinct differences from cocaine-experienced animals, we used transient inhibition of several cortical, striatal, and limbic brain regions during reinstatement of heroin-seeking produced by heroin-paired cues, or by a single priming dose of heroin. Rats lever pressed for i.v. heroin discretely paired with a conditioned stimulus (CS) during daily 3-hr sessions for a period of 2 weeks, followed by daily extinction of lever responding. Subsequent reinstatement of heroin-seeking was measured as lever responding in the absence of heroin reinforcement. The first set of reinstatement tests involved response-contingent CS presentations following bilateral intracranial infusion of either a combination of GABA receptor agonists (baclofen-muscimol, B/M) or vehicle (saline) into one of thirteen different brain regions. The second set of reinstatement tests involved a single heroin injection (0.25 mg/kg, s.c.) following either B/M or vehicle infusions. Our results showed that vehicle infused animals reinstated to both CS presentations and a priming injection of heroin, while B/M inactivation of several areas known to be important for the reinstatement of cocaine-seeking also attenuated heroin-seeking in response to CS presentations and/or a priming dose of heroin. However, as predicted, inactivation of areas previously shown to not affect cocaine-seeking significantly attenuated heroin-seeking, supporting the hypothesis that the circuitry underlying the reinstatement of heroin-seeking is more diffusely distributed than that for cocaine. PMID:18061358

  1. Interaction of counseling rapport and topics discussed in sessions with methadone treatment clients.

    PubMed

    Joe, George W; Simpson, D Dwayne; Rowan-Szal, Grace A

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic rapport between counselors and clients in drug user treatment has been shown to be an important predictor of follow-up outcomes. This naturalistic study investigated the relationship of counseling rapport to drug-related topics discussed in counseling sessions in a sample of 330 clients and nine counselors. These voluntary clients had been admitted to a private, for-profit outpatient methadone treatment in Texas between September 1995 and August 1997 and received no-fee services for a year for participation in this study. The data were gathered using forms in the TCU community treatment assessments (www.ibr.tcu.edu) that measured intake information, counseling session topics, and counselor evaluation of the client. A majority were males, Hispanic, had a pending legal status and the average age was 39. Co-occurring drug dependence for these heroin users included cocaine (38%) and alcohol (31%). The results supported the hypothesis that higher rapport would be associated with addressing clients in a more "supportive approach" that emphasized relapse prevention and strengths-building while lower rapport would be associated with a punitive counseling style that stressed program rules and compliance. The influences of client background, counselor differences, and during-treatment positive urines were also examined. Although counselors differed in their general manner of dealing with clients, each also showed flexibility determined in part by client behavior (such as continued cocaine use). The findings indicate that focusing on constructive solutions is the preferred counseling approach. PMID:19137479

  2. Attitudes of Employers toward Hiring Methadone Maintenance Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugliese, Anthony

    1978-01-01

    Results of this study indicate that at present employers are not ready to accept methadone maintained patients into their firms. The stigma placed on heroin addicts by employers is a very important issue when the treated patient tries to make it in the employment field. More employer education is needed. (Author)

  3. Search for Genetic Markers and Functional Variants Involved in the Development of Opiate and Cocaine Addiction, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yuferov, Vadim; Levran, Orna; Proudnikov, Dmitri; Nielsen, David A.; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Addiction to opiates and illicit use of psychostimulants is a chronic, relapsing brain disease that, if left untreated, can cause major medical, social and economic problems. This article reviews recent progress in studies of association of gene variants with vulnerability to develop opiate and cocaine addictions, focusing primarily on genes of the opioid and monoaminergic systems. In addition, we provide the first evidence of a cis-acting polymorphism and a functional haplotype in the PDYN gene, of significantly higher DNA methylation rate of the OPRM1 gene in the lymphocytes of heroin addicts, and significant differences in genotype frequencies of three single nucleotide polymorphisms of the P-glycoprotein gene (ABCB1) between “higher” and “lower” methadone doses in methadone-maintained patients. In genome-wide and multi-gene association studies, we have found association of a number of new genes and new variants of known genes with heroin addiction. Finally, we have described the development and application of a novel technique: molecular haplotyping for studies in genetics of drug addiction. PMID:20201854

  4. Gender differences in health related quality of life of young heroin users

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Health Related Quality of Life (HRQL) of opiate users has been studied in treatment settings, where assistance for drug use was sought. In this study we ascertain factors related to HRQL of young opiate users recruited outside treatment facilities, considering both genders separately. Methods Current opiate users (18-30 y) were recruited in outdoor settings in three Spanish cities (Barcelona, Madrid, Sevilla). Standardised laptop interviews included socio-demographic data, drug use patterns, health related issues, the Severity of Dependence Scale (SDS) and the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP). Results A total of 991 subjects (73% males), mean age = 25.7 years were interviewed. The mean global NHP score differed by gender (women: 41.2 (sd:23.8); men:34.1(sd:23.6);p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis was implemented separately by gender, variables independently related with global NHP score, both for males and females, were heroin and cocaine SDS scores. For women, only other drug related variables (alcohol intake and length of cocaine use) were independently associated with their HRQL. HIV+ males who suffered an opiate overdose or had psychiatric care in the last 12 months perceived their health as poorer, while those who had ever been in methadone treatment in the last 12 months perceived it as better. The model with both genders showed all factors for males plus quantity of alcohol and an interaction between gender and HIV status. Conclusions Heroin users were found to be at a considerable risk of impaired HRQL, even in these young ages. A score approaching severity of dependence was the factor with the strongest relation with it. PMID:21122134

  5. Miss Heroin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Bernice

    This script, with music, lyrics and dialog, was written especially for youngsters to inform them of the potential dangers of various drugs. The author, who teaches in an elementary school in Harlem, New York, offers Miss Heroin as her answer to the expressed opinion that most drug and alcohol information available is either too simplified and

  6. Opioid Agonist Treatments and Heroin Overdose Deaths in Baltimore, Maryland, 1995–2009

    PubMed Central

    Gryczynski, Jan; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Sharfstein, Joshua M.; Warren, Gregory; Olsen, Yngvild; Mitchell, Shannon G.; Jaffe, Jerome H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the association between the expansion of methadone and buprenorphine treatment and the prevalence of heroin overdose deaths in Baltimore, Maryland from 1995 to 2009. Methods. We conducted a longitudinal time series analysis of archival data using linear regression with the Newey–West method to correct SEs for heteroscedasticity and autocorrelation, adjusting for average heroin purity. Results. Overdose deaths attributed to heroin ranged from a high of 312 in 1999 to a low of 106 in 2008. While mean heroin purity rose sharply (1995–1999), the increasing number of patients treated with methadone was not associated with a change in the number of overdose deaths, but starting in 2000 expansion of opioid agonist treatment was associated with a decline in overdose deaths. Adjusting for heroin purity and the number of methadone patients, there was a statistically significant inverse relationship between heroin overdose deaths and patients treated with buprenorphine (P = .002). Conclusions. Increased access to opioid agonist treatment was associated with a reduction in heroin overdose deaths. Implementing policies that support evidence-based medication treatment of opiate dependence may decrease heroin overdose deaths. PMID:23488511

  7. Online extraction LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous quantitative confirmation of urine drugs of abuse and metabolites: amphetamines, opiates, cocaine, cannabis, benzodiazepines and methadone.

    PubMed

    de Jager, Andrew D; Bailey, Neville L

    2011-09-01

    A rapid LC-MS/MS method for confirmatory testing of five major categories of drugs of abuse (amphetamine-type substances, opiates, cocaine, cannabis metabolites and benzodiazepines) in urine has been developed. All drugs of abuse mandated by the Australian/New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 4308:2008 are quantified in a single chromatographic run. Urine samples are diluted with a mixture of isotope labelled internal standards. An on-line trap-and-flush approach, followed by LC-ESI-MS/MS has been successfully used to process samples in a functioning drugs of abuse laboratory. Following injection of diluted urine samples, compounds retained on the trap cartridge are flushed onto a reverse-phase C18 HPLC column (5-?m particle size) with embedded hydrophylic functionality. A total chromatographic run-time of 15 min is required for adequate resolution. Automated quantitation software algorithms have been developed in-house using XML scripting to partially automate the identification of positive samples, taking into account ion ratio (IR) and retention times (Rt). The sensitivity of the assay was found to be adequate for the quantitation of drugs in urine at and below the confirmation cut-off concentrations prescribed by AS/NZS 4308:2008. PMID:21839693

  8. HIV transmission and the cost-effectiveness of methadone maintenance.

    PubMed Central

    Zaric, G S; Barnett, P G; Brandeau, M L

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study determined the cost-effectiveness of expanding methadone maintenance treatment for heroin addiction, particularly its effect on the HIV epidemic. METHODS: We developed a dynamic epidemic model to study the effects of increased methadone maintenance capacity on health care costs and survival, measured as quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). We considered communities with HIV prevalence among injection drug users of 5% and 40%. RESULTS: Additional methadone maintenance capacity costs $8200 per QALY gained in the high-prevalence community and $10,900 per QALY gained in the low-prevalence community. More than half of the benefits are gained by individuals who do not inject drugs. Even if the benefits realized by treated and untreated injection drug users are ignored, methadone maintenance expansion costs between $14,100 and $15,200 per QALY gained. Additional capacity remains cost-effective even if it is twice as expensive and half as effective as current methadone maintenance slots. CONCLUSIONS: Expansion of methadone maintenance is cost-effective on the basis of commonly accepted criteria for medical interventions. Barriers to methadone maintenance deny injection drug users access to a cost-effective intervention that generates significant health benefits for the general population. PMID:10897189

  9. The economic cost of heroin dependency and quality of life among heroin users in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Hsien; Chen, Kao Chin; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Hsiao, Chih-Yin; Lee, I Hui; Yeh, Tzung Lieh; Chen, Po See; Lu, Ru-Band; Yang, Yen Kuang

    2013-10-30

    Heroin dependence may cause an economic burden and has an impact on quality of life (QOL). However, assessments of economic cost are scarce and the relationship between economic cost and QOL is unclear in the Asian population. In the present study, an established questionnaire was modified to assess the economic cost and its association with QOL. A total of 121 volunteer subjects in a methadone maintenance therapy programme and 157 normal controls were enrolled. The total economic cost of heroin dependency is US$ 18,310 per person-year. The direct cost is US$ 11,791 per person-year (64% of the total cost), mostly consisting of the cost of heroin and other illegal drugs. The indirect cost is US$ 6519 (36% of the total cost) per person-year, most of which arises from productivity loss caused by unemployment and incarceration. The QOL of heroin-dependent patients is poorer than that of healthy controls in all domains. The overall QOL is negatively related to direct cost and total cost. The economic cost of heroin dependency is huge, equal to 1.07 times the average gross domestic product per capita. Reduction of the economic cost to society and the economic burden for heroin users is important. PMID:23477899

  10. Influence of treatment with inhalable heroin on pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Buster, M C A; van den Brink, W; van Brussel, G H A; van Ree, J M

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to asses the influence of inhalable heroin on pulmonary function in chronic heroin-dependent patients treated with inhalable heroin. Among 32 patients (all cigarette smokers), a spirometric test was conducted at baseline and after an average period of 10 months of treatment with medically prescribed heroin. Patients showed a high frequency of pulmonary dysfunction at baseline [34%, with percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (%FEV1)<80%]. However, after excluding those who started pulmonary treatment (n=2) or who used heroin intravenously only (n=2), no statistically significant differences in %FEV1 between baseline and follow-up were observed (n=28; mean %FEV1 86% at baseline vs. 91% at follow-up; p=0.09). This small and relatively brief study suggests that 10 months of co-prescribed inhalable heroine base does not seem to (further) deteriorate pulmonary function in chronic, cigarette smoking treatment refractory heroin addicts. Screening for and treatment of pulmonary dysfunction is recommended for methadone patients with and without co-prescribed heroin. PMID:21422758

  11. Heroin. Specialized Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Do It Now Foundation, Phoenix, AZ.

    The document presents a collection of articles about heroin. Article 1 provides general information on heroin identification, drug dependence, effects of abuse, cost, source of supply, and penalties for illegal heroin use. Article 2 gives statistical information on heroin-related deaths in the District of Columbia between 1971 and 1982. Article 3…

  12. Heroin. Specialized Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Do It Now Foundation, Phoenix, AZ.

    The document presents a collection of articles about heroin. Article 1 provides general information on heroin identification, drug dependence, effects of abuse, cost, source of supply, and penalties for illegal heroin use. Article 2 gives statistical information on heroin-related deaths in the District of Columbia between 1971 and 1982. Article 3

  13. Integrated care for pregnant women on methadone maintenance treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ordean, Alice; Kahan, Meldon; Graves, Lisa; Abrahams, Ronald; Boyajian, Talar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe the characteristics of a national cohort of pregnant women on methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) and to provide treatment outcome data for integrated care programs. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Three different integrated care programs in geographically distinct cities: the Toronto Centre for Substance Use in Pregnancy in Toronto, Ont; the Herzl Family Practice Centre in Montreal, Que; and the Sheway clinic in Vancouver, BC. Participants Pregnant women meeting criteria for opioid dependence and attending an integrated care program between 1997 and 2009. Women were excluded if they were on MMT only for chronic pain. Main outcome measures Patient demographic characteristics, concurrent medical and psychiatric disorders, and substance use outcome data. Results A total of 102 opioid-dependent pregnancies were included. The mean age was 29.7 years and 64% of women were white. Women in Montreal were more likely to have partners and had fewer children. Differences in living and housing situations among the sites tended to resolve by the time of delivery. Almost half of this cohort tested positive for hepatitis C. Women had a high prevalence of depression and anxiety across all sites. Half of this cohort was on MMT before conception and for the other half, MMT was initiated at a mean gestational age of 20.7 weeks, resulting in a mean dose of 82.4 mg at delivery. At the first visit, polysubstance use was common. Prescription opioid use was more frequent in Toronto and heroin use was more prevalent in Vancouver and Montreal. For the entire population, significant reductions were found by the time of delivery for illicit (P < .001) and prescription opioids (P = .001), cocaine (P < .001), marijuana (P = .009), and alcohol use (P < .001). Conclusion Despite geographic differences, all 3 integrated care programs have been associated with significant decreases in substance use in pregnant opioid-dependent women. PMID:24130301

  14. [The history of heroin].

    PubMed

    Hosztafi, S

    2001-08-01

    The discovery of heroin and the development of heroin abuse are introduced. Heroin, the hydrochloride of diacetylmorphine, was discovered by acetylation of morphine. Heroin, in pharmacological studies, proved to be more effective than morphine or codeine. The Bayer Company started the production of heroin in 1898 on a commercial scale. The first clinical results were so promising that heroin was considered a wonder drug. Indeed, heroin was more effective than codeine in respiratory diseases. It has turned out, however, that repeated administration of heroin results in the development of tolerance and the patients become heroin-addicts soon. In the early 1910s morphine addicts "discovered" the euphorising properties of heroin and this effect was enhanced by intravenous administration. Heroin became a narcotic drug and its abuse began to spread quickly. Restrictions on its production, use and distribution were regulated by international treties. The total ban on heroin production was also proposed. As a result of the strict regulations the production and cosumption of heroin showed a significant decrease after 1931. At the same time the underworld recognized the shortage of heroin and started the illicit production and trafficking. The quantity of heroin seized by law enforcement agencies in the past decades rose gradually. As an indicator of the worldwide heroin market, the quantity of confiscated heroin underwent a tenfold increase since 1970. The paper surveys the most important heroin-producing and trafficking countries. Heroin, prepared in clandestine ("kitchen" or "jungle") laboratories, is diluted ("cut") by every member of the illegal heroin distributing chain, i.e. smugglers, traffickers, dealers and vendors. PMID:11862675

  15. Effects of Receiving Additional Off-Site Services on Abstinence from Illicit Drug Use Among Men on Methadone: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Elwin; El-Bassel, Nabila; Gilbert, Louisa; Chang, Mingway; Sanders, Glorice

    2009-01-01

    Health and psychosocial service needs that may be co-morbid with opioid addiction may impede the success of drug treatment among patients attending methadone maintenance treatment programs (MMTPs). This longitudinal panel study investigates whether receipt of services from one or more helping professionals outside of the MMTP confers a benefit for drug treatment outcomes among a random sample of male MMTP patients (N = 356). Each participant was interviewed 3 times, with 6 months between each interview. Since this observational study did not employ random assignment, propensity score matching was employed to strengthen causal validity of effect estimates. Results support hypotheses that receiving additional off-site services has significant beneficial effects in increasing the likelihood of abstaining from cocaine, heroin, and any illicit drug use over both the ensuing 6 month and 12 month time periods. These findings indicate that receipt of additional medical and/or psychosocial services enhances the efficacy of methadone treatment in increasing abstinence from illicit drug use. PMID:20034671

  16. Changes to the daily pattern of methadone-related deaths in England and Wales, 1993-2003.

    PubMed

    Morgan, O W; Johnson, H; Rooney, C; Seagroatt, V; Griffiths, C

    2006-12-01

    Previous studies suggest that fatal poisoning deaths involving methadone occur more frequently on the weekends. We assessed changes in the daily pattern of mortality because of methadone poisoning following a review of drug misuse services in 1996 and publication of revised clinical guidelines in 1999. We also compared this to the daily pattern of deaths involving heroin/morphine. The Office for National Statistics provided data on all deaths in England and Wales between 1993 and 2003 for which methadone and heroin/morphine were mentioned on the coroner's certificate of death registration after inquest, with or without alcohol or other drugs. There were 3098 deaths involving methadone. The death rate increased up to 1997 and then declined. Initially, there was a marked excess of deaths occurring on Saturdays. The rate of decline was greatest for deaths occurring on Saturdays. As a result, the Saturday peak disappeared (P = 0.006). There were 6328 deaths involving heroin/morphine. No change in the daily pattern of heroin/morphine deaths was observed during the study period. Although the marked change in the epidemiology of methadone deaths coincided with recommendations for service redevelopment and clinical management of methadone treatment, the contribution of improved prescribing practice or treatment services is unclear. PMID:17060353

  17. Pleasure, power and dangerous substances: applying Foucault to the study of 'heroin dependence' in Germany.

    PubMed

    Bergschmidt, Viktoria B

    2004-04-01

    Taking the observation of disciplining and controlling everyday practices of methadone substitution as a point of departure, this paper explores the question of what exactly is so threatening or dangerous about heroin and heroin users. Drawing on the work of Michel Foucault and Judith Butler, the main argument of this article is that the danger of heroin use is a discursive construction in accordance with bio-power. On the one hand, the juridical governance of heroin dependence is shifting from punishment to therapy, and biomedical discourses proclaim the substitution of a moral notion of heroin dependence by a disease model. Nevertheless, in the context of the anxiety associated with HIV, heroin remains the dangerous drug par excellence, and heroin users are constructed as 'abject others', unable to subordinate to certain social norms. As a reaction to such injurious ascriptions, I argue, applicants to the methadone programme in their life stories intensely narrate a desire for normalization, which I read as a desire to emerge from the realm of the abject. Both the danger and the pleasure associated with heroin use are bound to fundamental processes of subject formation, which are often ignored in biomedical and anthropological discourses. PMID:26868099

  18. [Heroin and oral health].

    PubMed

    Brand, H S; Van Zalingen, D; Veerman, E C I

    2009-09-01

    Heroin is a half synthetic opiate with. It is used by a relatively small number of the general population, but relatively frequently by homeless people and prisoners. Since heroin has an inhibitory effect on the nervous system and on breathing, an overdose of heroin can have fatal consequences. Sudden abstinence of heroin results in general discomfort, restlessness, muscle cramps, perspiration, nausea, shivers and goose bumps. Oral effects of heroin include increased risks of caries, periodontitis and bruxism. Saliva has the potential of detecting heroin abuse. PMID:19791491

  19. Heroin Use Is Associated with Suppressed Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Response after LPS Exposure in HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Meijerink, Hinta; Indrati, Agnes; Utami, Fitri; Soedarmo, Suharyani; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Netea, Mihai G.; van Crevel, Reinout; Wisaksana, Rudi; van der Ven, Andre Jam

    2015-01-01

    Background Opioid use is associated with increased incidence of infectious diseases. Although experimental studies have shown that opioids affect various functions of immune cells, only limited data are available from human studies. Drug use is an important risk factor for HIV transmission; however no data are available whether heroin and/or methadone modulate immune response. Therefore, we examined the effect of heroin and methadone use among HIV-infected individuals on the production of cytokines after ex vivo stimulation with various pathogens. Methods Treatment nave HIV-infected individuals from Indonesia were recruited. Several cohorts of individuals were recruited: 1) using heroin 2) receiving methadone opioid substitution 3) using heroin over 1 year ago and 4) controls (never used opioids). Whole blood was stimulated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Candida albicans and LPS for 24 to 48 hours. Cytokine production (IL-1 ?, IL-6, IL-10, IFN-?, IFN-? and TNF-?) was determined using multiplex beads assay. Results Among 82 individuals, the cytokine levels in unstimulated samples did not differ between groups. Overall, heroin users had significantly lower cytokine response after exposure to LPS (p<0.05). After stimulation with either M. tuberculosis or C. albicans the cytokine production of all groups were comparable. Conclusion The cytokine production after exposure to LPS is significantly down-regulated in HIV-infected heroin users. Interesting, methadone use did not suppress cytokine response, which could have implications guidelines of opioid substitution. PMID:25830312

  20. Youth, Heroin, Crack: A Review of Recent British Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seddon, Toby

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review the research evidence on recent British trends in the use of heroin and/or crack-cocaine by young people in order to appraise the scale and nature of the contemporary health problem they pose. Design/methodology/approach: The approach consists of a narrative review of the main current data sources on…

  1. Youth, Heroin, Crack: A Review of Recent British Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seddon, Toby

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review the research evidence on recent British trends in the use of heroin and/or crack-cocaine by young people in order to appraise the scale and nature of the contemporary health problem they pose. Design/methodology/approach: The approach consists of a narrative review of the main current data sources on

  2. Neuroelectrophysiological approaches in heroin addiction research: A review of literatures.

    PubMed

    Motlagh, Farid; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Menke, J Michael; Rashid, Rusdi; Seghatoleslam, Tahereh; Habil, Hussain

    2016-04-01

    Neuroelectrophysiological properties have been used in human heroin addiction studies. These studies vary in their approach, experimental conditions, paradigms, and outcomes. However, it is essential to integrate previous findings and experimental methods for a better demonstration of current issues and challenges in designing such studies. This Review examines methodologies and experimental conditions of neuroelectrophysiological research among heroin addicts during withdrawal, abstinence, and methadone maintenance treatment and presents the findings. The results show decrements in attentional processing and dysfunctions in brain response inhibition as well as brain activity abnormalities induced by chronic heroin abuse. Chronic heroin addiction causes increased β and α2 power activity, latency of P300 and P600, and diminished P300 and P600 amplitude. Findings confirm that electroencephalography (EEG) band power and coherence are associated with craving indices and heroin abuse history. First symptoms of withdrawal can be seen in high-frequency EEG bands, and the severity of these symptoms is associated with brain functional connectivity. EEG spectral changes and event-related potential (ERP) properties have been shown to be associated with abstinence length and tend to normalize within 3-6 months of abstinence. From the conflicting criteria and confounding effects in neuroelectrophysiological studies, the authors suggest a comprehensive longitudinal study with a multimethod approach for monitoring EEG and ERP attributes of heroin addicts from early stages of withdrawal until long-term abstinence to control the confounding effects, such as nicotine abuse and other comorbid and premorbid conditions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26748947

  3. Why don’t out-of-treatment individuals enter methadone treatment programs?

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, James A.; Schwartz, Robert P.; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Reisinger, Heather Schacht; Kelly, Sharon M.; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Brown, Barry S.; Agar, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the proven effectiveness of methadone treatment, the majority of heroin-dependent individuals are out-of-treatment. Methods Twenty-six opioid-dependent adults who met the criteria for methadone maintenance who were neither seeking methadone treatment at the time of study enrollment, nor had participated in such treatment during the past 12 months, were recruited from the streets of Baltimore, Maryland through targeted sampling. Ethnographic interviews were conducted to ascertain participants’ attitudes toward methadone treatment and their reasons for not seeking treatment. Results Barriers to treatment entry included: waiting lists, lack of money or health insurance, and requirements to possess a photo identification card. For some participants, beliefs about methadone such as real or rumored side effects, fear of withdrawal from methadone during an incarceration, or disinterest in adhering to the structure of treatment programs kept them from applying. In addition, other participants were not willing to commit to indefinite “maintenance” but would have accepted shorter time-limited methadone treatment. Conclusion Barriers to treatment entry could be overcome by an infusion of public financial support to expand treatment access, which would reduce or eliminate waiting lists, waive treatment-related fees, and/or provide health insurance coverage for treatment. Treatment programs could overcome some of the barriers by waiving their photo I.D. requirements, permitting time-limited treatment with the option to extend such treatment upon request, and working with corrections agencies to ensure continued methadone treatment upon incarceration. PMID:18805686

  4. Sexual Dysfunction in Men Receiving Methadone Maintenance Treatment: Clinical History and Psychobiological Correlates.

    PubMed

    Gerra, Gilberto; Manfredini, Matteo; Somaini, Lorenzo; Maremmani, Icro; Leonardi, Claudio; Donnini, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    A variety of studies evidenced a relationship between drug use disorders and sexual dysfunction. In particular, heroin and opioid agonist medications to treat heroin dependence have been found to be associated with erectile dysfunction and reduced libido. Controversial findings also indicate the possibility of factors other than the pharmacological effects of opioid drugs concurring to sexual dysfunction. With the present study, we investigated the link between sexual dysfunction and long-term exposure to opioid receptor stimulation (heroin dependence, methadone maintenance treatment, methadone dosage), the potentially related hormonal changes reflecting hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis function and prolactin (PRL) pituitary release, the role of adverse childhood experiences in the clinical history and the concomitant symptoms of comorbid mental health disorders in contributing to sexual problems. Forty male patients participating in a long-term methadone treatment program were included in the present study and compared with 40 healthy control subjects who never used drugs nor abused alcohol. All patients and controls were submitted to the Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale (ASEX), Child Experiences of Care and Abuse-Questionnaire (CECA-Q) and the Symptom Check List-90 Scale. A blood sample for testosterone and PRL assays was collected. Methadone dosages were recorded among heroin-dependent patients on maintenance treatment. Methadone patients scored significantly higher than controls on the 5-item rating ASEX scale, on CECA-Q and on Symptoms Check List 90 (SCL 90) scale. Testosterone plasma levels were significantly lower and PRL levels significantly higher in methadone patients with respect to the healthy control group. ASEX scores reflecting sexual dysfunction were directly and significantly correlated with CECA-Q neglect scores and SCL 90 psychiatric symptoms total score. The linear regression model, when applied only to addicted patients, showed that methadone dosages were not significantly correlated with sexual dysfunction scores except for 'erectile dysfunction', for which an inverse association was evidenced. Testosterone values showed a significant inverse correlation with ASEX sexual dysfunction scores, CECA-Q neglect scores and psychiatric symptom at SCL 90 among methadone patients. PRL levels were directly and significantly correlated with sexual dysfunction scores, psychiatric symptoms at SCL 90 and CECA-Q neglect scores. Both testosterone and PRL did not correlate with methadone dosages. The present findings appear to support the view of childhood adversities and comorbid psychiatric symptoms contributing to sexual dysfunction and related hormonal changes among methadone patients, challenging the assumption that attributes sexual problems entirely to the direct pharmacological effects of opioid agonist medications. PMID:26595117

  5. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin

    PubMed Central

    Jolley, Caroline J.; Bell, James; Rafferty, Gerrard F.; Moxham, John; Strang, John

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction) undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone) (IOT), and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine) after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%), end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2%) and neural respiratory drive (NRD) (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography). Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% < 90% for >10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. PMID:26495843

  6. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin.

    PubMed

    Jolley, Caroline J; Bell, James; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Moxham, John; Strang, John

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction) undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone) (IOT), and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine) after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%), end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2%) and neural respiratory drive (NRD) (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography). Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% < 90% for >10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. PMID:26495843

  7. Randomized Trial Comparing Two Treatment Strategies Using Prize-Based Reinforcement of Abstinence in Cocaine and Opiate Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Kenzie L.; Ghitza, Udi E.; Schmittner, John P.; Schroeder, Jennifer R.; Epstein, David H.

    2008-01-01

    We compared two strategies of prize-based contingency management (CM) in methadone-maintained outpatients. Urine was tested thrice weekly for 5 weeks pre-CM, 12 weeks CM, and 8 weeks post-CM. Participants were randomly assigned to a cocaine contingency (four prize draws for each cocaine-negative urine, N = 29) or an opiate-cocaine contingency (one…

  8. Cocaine withdrawal

    MedlinePLUS

    Cocaine withdrawal occurs when someone who has used a lot of cocaine cuts down or quits taking the drug. Symptoms ... even if the user is not completely off cocaine and still has some of the drug in ...

  9. Determining what heroin means to heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Tokar, J T; Brunse, A J; Stefflre, V J; Sodergren, J A; Napior, D A

    1975-02-01

    For purposes of treatment, description, typological and psychological instrumentation, agreement judgements were obtained from 20 heroin addicts and 51 normal controls on data matrices constructed from sentences obtained from the heroin addicts. Correlations demonstrate controls are similar to one another and qualitatively different from addicts. Multidimensional scaling techniques and perspective summary maps demonstrate these differences and provide the technology for developing a typology of addicts for future studies. Heroin addicts have an inability to tolerate frustration, a depressive core, a negative sense of identity and a sense of futility and isolation. Heroin addicts deviate from normals at well beyond the p less than .001 level of significance in using heroin to handle problems that normals handle in other ways. For treatment of the addict, the drug must be withdrawn and new ways of coping with old needs must be taught. This matrix qualitatively demonstrates and pinpoints the deficiencies and excesses of the addict which need treatment. The epidemiology of drug use relating narcotics, delinquency, and social policy has been well documented (Chein, 1964). One major problem posed by narcotic addition is the problem of getting people to stay off drugs (withdrawal). Another major problem is the alleviation of the human misery that motivates drug use (rehabilitation). (Jaffee, 1970, Chein, 1964). In addition to the above, a problem of recent importance has been the key question of whether or not the Vietnam addicts differ basically from addicts socialized in the drug culture in the united States. (Walsh, 1971). Numerous investigators have discussed personality and addiction (Chein, 1964; Eddy, 1965, Jaffee, 1970) usually from the vantage point of the investigators. This study attempted to describe the personalities of heroin addicts from the vantage point of the addicts using instruments borrowed from descriptive semantics. (Goodenough, 1967; Stefflre, Reich, Wendell, 1967). The purpose of the pilot study was to: 1) determine where heroin positioned in the conceptual frames of reference of heroin addicts and non-addicted control subjects, 2) to establish a classification procedure for determining subtypes of heroin addicts, and 3) to demonstrate the usefulness of a linguistically based instrument in application in clinical psychiatry. PMID:1116419

  10. Heroin Addicts Reporting Previous Heroin Overdoses Also Report Suicide Attempts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradvik, Louise; Frank, Arne; Hulenvik, Per; Medvedeo, Alvaro; Berglund, Mats

    2007-01-01

    Nonfatal heroin overdoses and suicide attempts are both common among heroin addicts, but there is limited knowledge about the association between them. The sample in the present study consisted of 149 regular heroin users in Malmo, Sweden. Out of these 98 had taken an unintentional heroin overdose at some time and 51 had made at least one attempt

  11. Heroin Addicts Reporting Previous Heroin Overdoses Also Report Suicide Attempts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradvik, Louise; Frank, Arne; Hulenvik, Per; Medvedeo, Alvaro; Berglund, Mats

    2007-01-01

    Nonfatal heroin overdoses and suicide attempts are both common among heroin addicts, but there is limited knowledge about the association between them. The sample in the present study consisted of 149 regular heroin users in Malmo, Sweden. Out of these 98 had taken an unintentional heroin overdose at some time and 51 had made at least one attempt…

  12. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Methadone Maintenance for Prisoners: Prediction of Treatment Entry and Completion in Prison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michael S.; Kinlock, Timothy W.; Couvillion, Kathryn A.; Schwartz, Robert P.; O'Grady, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The present report is an intent-to-treat analysis involving secondary data drawn from the first randomized clinical trial of prison-initiated methadone in the United States. This study examined predictors of treatment entry and completion in prison. A sample of 211 adult male prerelease inmates with preincarceration heroin dependence were randomly

  13. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Methadone Maintenance for Prisoners: Prediction of Treatment Entry and Completion in Prison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michael S.; Kinlock, Timothy W.; Couvillion, Kathryn A.; Schwartz, Robert P.; O'Grady, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The present report is an intent-to-treat analysis involving secondary data drawn from the first randomized clinical trial of prison-initiated methadone in the United States. This study examined predictors of treatment entry and completion in prison. A sample of 211 adult male prerelease inmates with preincarceration heroin dependence were randomly…

  14. Methadone versus buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid abuse in pregnancy: science and stigma.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, Amber M

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen an increase in rates of opioid abuse during pregnancy. This clinical challenge has been met with debate regarding whether or not illicit and prescription opioid-dependent individuals require different treatment approaches; whether detoxification is preferable to maintenance; and the efficacy of methadone versus buprenorphine as treatment options during pregnancy. The clinical recommendations resulting from these discussions are frequently influenced by the comparative stigma attached to heroin abuse and methadone maintenance versus prescription opioid abuse and maintenance treatment with buprenorphine. While some studies have suggested that a subset of individuals who abuse prescription opioids may have different characteristics than heroin users, there is currently no evidence to suggest that buprenorphine is better suited to treatment of prescription opioid abuse than methadone. Similarly, despite its perennial popularity, there is no evidence to recommend detoxification as an efficacious approach to treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy. While increased access to treatment is important, particularly in rural areas, there are multiple medical and psychosocial reasons to recommend comprehensive substance abuse treatment for pregnant women suffering from substance use disorders rather than office-based provision of maintenance medication. Both methadone and buprenorphine are important treatment options for opioid abuse during pregnancy. Methadone may still remain the preferred treatment choice for some women who require higher doses for stabilization, have a higher risk of treatment discontinuation, or who have had unsuccessful treatment attempts with buprenorphine. As treatment providers, we should advocate to expand available treatment options for pregnant women in all States. PMID:26154531

  15. Methadone Treatment: Overview and Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, Lawrence; Tang, Beth Archibald

    This overview focuses on methadone treatment. Briefly, it describes the clinical uses of methadone for substance abuse treatment, explores dosage guidelines, and discusses counseling components. This overview also reviews research data on the application of methadone treatment to special populations, such as pregnant women, polydrug users, and…

  16. Medically assisted recovery from opiate dependence within the context of the UK drug strategy: methadone and Suboxone (buprenorphine-naloxone) patients compared.

    PubMed

    McKeganey, Neil; Russell, Christopher; Cockayne, Lucinda

    2013-01-01

    The focus of drug policy in the UK has shifted markedly in the past 5 years to move beyond merely emphasising drug abstinence towards maximising individuals' opportunities for recovery. The UK government continues to recognise the prescribing of narcotic medications indicated for opiate dependence as a key element of these individuals' recovery journey. This article describes a small, naturalistic comparison of the efficacy of the two most commonly prescribed opiate substitute medications in the UK--methadone hydrochloride (methadone oral solution) and Suboxone (buprenorphine-naloxone sublingual tablets)--for reducing current heroin users' (n = 34) days of heroin use, and preventing short-term abstainers (n = 37) from relapsing to regular heroin use. All patients had been prescribed either methadone or Suboxone for maintenance for 6 months prior to intake. Results showed that when controlling for a number of patient-level covariates, both methadone and Suboxone significantly reduced current users' days of heroin use between the 90 days prior to intake and at the 8-month follow-up, with Suboxone yielding a significantly larger magnitude reduction in heroin use days than methadone. Methadone and Suboxone were highly and equally effective for preventing relapse to regular heroin use, with all but 3 of 37 (91.9%) patients who were abstinent at intake reporting past 90-day point prevalence heroin abstinence at the 8-month follow-up. Overall, prescribing methadone or Suboxone for eight continuous months was highly effective for initiating abstinence from heroin use, and for converting short-term abstinence to long-term abstinence. However, the study design, which was based on a relatively small sample size and was not able randomise patients to medication and so could not control for the effects of potential prognostic factors inherent within each patient group, means that these conclusions can only be made tentatively. These positive but preliminary indications of the comparative efficacy of methadone and Suboxone for treating opiate dependence now require replication in a well-powered, randomised controlled trial. PMID:22703715

  17. Heroin crystal nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Josef Edrik Keith; Merhi, Basma; Gregory, Oliver; Hu, Susie; Henriksen, Kammi; Gohh, Reginald

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an interesting case of acute kidney injury and severe metabolic alkalosis in a patient with a history of heavy heroin abuse. Urine microscopy showed numerous broomstick-like crystals. These crystals are also identified in light and electron microscopy. We hypothesize that heroin crystalizes in an alkaline pH, resulting in tubular obstruction and acute kidney injury. Management is mainly supportive as there is no known specific therapy for this condition. This paper highlights the utility of urine microscopy in diagnosing the etiology of acute kidney injury and proposes a novel disease called heroin crystal nephropathy. PMID:26034599

  18. Is there a need for heroin substitution treatment in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside? Yes there is, and in many other places too.

    PubMed

    Schechter, Martin T; Kendall, Perry

    2011-01-01

    The prescription of medically-supervised diacetylmorphine, the active ingredient in heroin, to individuals with treatment-refractory opioid dependence is a controversial and often politically charged subject. Just as methadone maintenance was opposed in the 1960s by some treatment providers who preferred abstinence-based therapies, heroin-assisted therapy is now being opposed by some methadone treatment providers--this despite the fact that the effectiveness of heroin-assisted treatment has been demonstrated in no less than six randomized trials in Switzerland, the Netherlands, Spain, Germany, Canada and the UK. The North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI) trial in Canada clearly showed heroin-assisted therapy to be superior to methadone in individuals with chronic, treatment-refractory heroin addiction both in terms of retention in addiction treatment and clinical response. An international internal review panel, three Research Ethics Boards, the CIHR RCT review panel, the Therapeutic Products Directorate of Health Canada, and several journal peer-reviewers reviewed the NAOMI trial. Nevertheless, authors of a commentary in this issue of CJPH find fault with the trial in terms of methadone prescribing, use of intention-to-treat analysis, safety and cost. We take this opportunity to respond to the numerous misconceptions and errors in their commentary. PMID:21608377

  19. Therapeutic and recreational methadone cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lusetti, Monia; Licata, Manuela; Silingardi, Enrico; Reggiani Bonetti, Luca; Palmiere, Cristian

    2016-04-01

    Several classes of drugs have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and occurrence of arrhythmias potentially involved in sudden deaths in chronic users even at therapeutic doses. The study presented herein focuses on pathological changes involving the heart possibly due to methadone use. 60 cases were included in the study in total and were divided into three groups (therapeutic methadone users: 20 cases, recreational methadone users: 20 cases, and sudden death group in subjects who had never taken methadone: 20 cases). Autopsies, histology, biochemistry and toxicology were performed in all cases. Macroscopic and microscopic investigation results in therapeutic methadone users were similar to those observed in sudden, unexpected deaths in non-methadone users. In recreational methadone consumers, macroscopic and microscopic examination of the heart failed to provide results consistent with acute or chronic myocardial or coronary damage, thereby corroborating the hypothesis of death most likely following respiratory depression. PMID:26859696

  20. Gender Differences Among Older Heroin Users

    PubMed Central

    HAMILTON, ALISON B.; GRELLA, CHRISTINE E.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives This purpose of this study was to explore the following question: Are there gender differences among older individuals with a history of heroin addiction with regard to social and family relationships and health problems? Methods Eight gender-specific focus groups were conducted with 38 (19 women, 19 men) older (50+ years) individuals with long-term histories of heroin dependence. Four groups were conducted in a methadone maintenance (MM) clinic and four groups were derived from the Los Angeles community. Results Modest gender differences were observed, but mainly in the focus-group dynamics. Women typically described the impact of their addiction on their families, while men typically described their surprise at still being alive. Hepatitis C was the primary health concern in all groups; mental health issues were also discussed. Discussion Remarkable gender differences were not apparent in the qualitative experiences of these participants. Instead, we found overriding similarities related to the interactive effects of drug use and aging. Longitudinal studies of this population as they age and interact with the health-care system and other social systems will help to untangle the complicated relationship between aging, drug addiction, gender, and health. PMID:19418342

  1. The Problem of Heroin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James Q.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    Argues that most of the underlying assumptions of presently recommended solutions to the problem of heroin addiction are unreasonable, unwarranted, or at least open to more than one interpretation. (DM)

  2. Greater avoidance of a heroin-paired taste cue is associated with greater escalation of heroin self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Imperio, Caesar G; Grigson, Patricia S

    2015-08-01

    Heroin addiction is a disease of chronic relapse affecting over half of its users. Therefore, modeling individual differences in addiction-like behavior is needed to better reflect the human condition. In a rodent model, avoidance of a cocaine-paired saccharin cue is associated with greater cocaine seeking and taking. Here, we tested whether rats would avoid a saccharin cue when paired with the opportunity to self-administer heroin and whether the rats that most greatly avoid the heroin-paired taste cue would exhibit the greatest drug escalation over time, the greatest willingness to work for drug, and the greatest heroin-induced relapse. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received 5 min access to a 0.15% saccharin solution followed by the opportunity to self-administer either saline or heroin for 3 hr (short access) or 6 hr (extended access). Following 16 to 18 pairings, terminal saccharin intake was used to categorize the rats into small (>200 licks/5min) or large (<200 licks/5min) suppressors and responding for drug was examined accordingly. Only 5% of the short access rats reached the criteria for large suppressors. This large suppressor did not differ from the small suppressors in drug-taking behavior. On the other hand, 50% of the extended access saccharin-heroin rats were large suppressors and showed the largest escalation of drug intake, drug-loading behavior, and the greatest relapse-like behaviors. Extended access small suppressors displayed drug-taking behaviors that were similar to rats in the short access heroin condition. Avoidance of a heroin-paired taste cue reliably identifies individual differences in addiction-like behavior for heroin using extended drug access. PMID:26214212

  3. Quantitative analysis of 26 opioids, cocaine, and their metabolites in human blood by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fernndez, Mara del Mar Ramrez; Wille, Sarah M R; Kummer, Nathalie; Di Fazio, Vincent; Ruyssinckx, Evi; Samyn, Nele

    2013-08-01

    A sensitive and selective ultra performance liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric method was developed and fully validated for the simultaneous determination of (in order of chromatographic elution) methylecgonine, pholcodine, morphine, hydromorphone, oxymorphone, norcodeine, codeine, dihydrocodeine, oxycodone, 6-Monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM), hydrocodone, ethylmorphine, norfentanyl, benzoylecgonine, tramadol, normeperidine, meperidine, cocaine, pentazocine, cocaethylene, fentanyl, norbuprenorphine, 2-ethylidine-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), buprenorphine, propoxyphene, and methadone in blood. The matrixes analyzed during the validation experiments were as follows: citrated blank plasma for calibrators, fluoride blank plasma for internal quality control (QC), lyophilized serum for external QC, fluoride plasma and whole blood for authentic samples, and lyophilized serum and whole blood for proficiency testing schemes. Samples were extracted with cation exchange solid-phase extraction cartridges. The target drugs were separated and quantified in a chromatographic run of 8.1 minutes using 0.1% formic acid in water and methanol (with 0.1% formic acid) as mobile phase. The limit of quantification ranged from 0.5 to 2.5 ng/mL depending on the compound and the therapeutic concentration. The intra- and interassay precision was less than 15% for all the compounds (except for pentazocine and EDDP, which was <20%) determined with 2 internal and 2 external QC samples, and the bias was within 15% (except for methylecgonine, which was <20%). Extraction efficiency was greater than 70% for all the compounds except for EDDP. Matrix effects were evaluated with authentic blood samples (n = 10), and they ranged from 47 to 95%, but they were compensated for most analytes using deuterated analogs as internal standards. Prepared samples were stable for 62 hours in the autosampler. This method was successfully applied to authentic samples (n = 120), involving the use of heroin, cocaine, tramadol, and methadone, and to proficiency testing schemes. PMID:23783166

  4. Superior methadone treatment outcome in Hmong compared to non-Hmong patients

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Gavin; Wang, Qi; Hodges, James S.; Nolan, Chris; Carlson, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    The Hmong are a distinct ethnic group from Laos. Little is known about how opiate addicted Hmong respond to methadone maintenance treatment. Therefore, opium addicted Hmong (exclusive route of administration: smoking) attending an urban methadone maintenance program in Minneapolis, Minnesota were matched by gender and date of admission with predominately heroin addicted non-Hmong (predominant route of administration: injection) attending the same program and both groups were evaluated for 1-year treatment retention, stabilization dose of methadone, and urine drug screen results. Hmong had greater 1-year treatment retention (79.8%) than non-Hmong (63.5%; p<0.01). In both groups, methadone dose was significantly associated with retention (p=0.005). However, Hmong required lower doses of methadone for stabilization (mean 49.0 mg versus 77.1 mg; p<0.0001). For both groups, positive urine drug screens were associated with stopping treatment. Further research to determine levels of tolerance, psychosocial, and pharmacogenetic factors contributing to differences methadone treatment outcome and dosing in Hmong may provide further insight into opiate addiction and its treatment. PMID:22285835

  5. Cocaine intoxication

    MedlinePLUS

    ... higher than normal amounts of some biochemicals. However, cocaine's effects on other parts of the body can be ... hot, which leads to more harm and side effects because of dehydration Using cocaine with certain other drugs Severe intoxication and death ...

  6. Psychopathology and Urine Toxicology in Methadone Patients.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Gamal; Cernovsky, Zack; Chiu, Simon

    2015-02-24

    Several studies reported high rates of psychiatric commorbidity among methadone patients. We examined the relationships of measures of psychopathology to outcomes of screening urine tests for cocaine, opiates, and benzodiazepines in a sample of 56 methadone patients. They also completed the Symptom Check List-90-Revised (SCL-90-R). The highest scales in the SCL-90-R profile of our patients were those indicating somatic discomfort, anger, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, and also obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms (scores above the 39(th) percentile). The only significant correlations between urine tests and SCL-90-R psychopathology were those involving benzodiazepines: patients with urine tests positive for benzodiazepines had lower social self-confidence (r=0.48), were more obsessive-compulsive (r=0.44), reported a higher level of anger (r=0.41), of phobic tendencies (r=40), of anxiety (r=0.39), and of paranoid tendencies (r=0.38), and also reported more frequent psychotic symptoms (r=0.43). PMID:26266026

  7. Patient outcomes after initiation of Sabbath closure of a methadone maintenance clinic in Israel.

    PubMed

    Gelkopf, M; Bleich, A; Hayward, R; Adelson, M

    1998-11-01

    The study examined whether closing of a methadone maintenance clinic in Israel on the Sabbath was associated with adverse patient outcomes. One take-home dose of methadone was given to all patients for that day regardless of whether they had earned take-home privileges. No difference was found in dropout rates for the six-month periods before and after Saturday closure was initiated. Results of random, twice-weekly urinalyses for all patients did not indicate increased use of heroin. The findings suggest that closure of a methadone clinic at least one day a week does not jeopardize patient outcome. Cutting hours of operation would reduce workload and enable clinics to function more economically. PMID:9826253

  8. Drug-Related HIV Risk Behaviors and Cocaine Preference among Injection Drug Users in Los Angeles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longshore, Douglas; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Compared drug-related risk behavior of drug users whose preferred injection drug was cocaine and users with preference for heroin or no preference between the two drugs (total n=422). Found cocaine preference unrelated to likelihood of needle sharing overall, needle sharing with strangers, needle sharing at shooting galleries, and failure to use…

  9. Methadone and prescription drug overdose.

    PubMed

    Hendrikson, Hollie; Hansen, Melissa

    2014-12-01

    (1) Methadone accounted for 2 percent of painkiller prescriptions and more than 30 percent of prescription painkiller deaths in 2009. (2) Data suggest that the rise in deaths from methadone overdose is not related to its use in treating drug abuse but, rather, to its use for pain management. (3) Preferred drug lists in most Medicaid programs identify methadone as a preferred drug for managing chronic pain, but most experts do no recommend it as a first choice. PMID:25556261

  10. N-acetylcysteine reduces extinction responding and induces enduring reductions in cue- and heroin-induced drug-seeking

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenhua; Kalivas, Peter W

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies show that the acute administration of N-acetylcysteine inhibits the desire for cocaine in addicts and cocaine seeking in animals Methods Rats were trained to self-administer heroin and the reinstatement model of drug seeking was used to determine if chronic N-acetylcysteine treatment inhibited heroin seeking. Results Daily N-acetylcysteine administration inhibited cue- and heroin-induced seeking. Moreover, repeated N-acetylcysteine administration during extinction training reduced extinction responding and inhibited cue- and heroin-induced reinstatement for up to 40 days after discontinuing daily N-acetylcysteine injection. Conclusions These data show that daily N-acetylcysteine inhibits heroin-induced reinstatement and produces an enduring reduction in cue- and heroin-induced drug seeking for over a month after the last injection of N-acetylcysteine. Both the inhibitory effect of N-acetylcysteine on the reinstatement of heroin-seeking and the ability of N-acetylcysteine to reduce extinction responding support clinical evaluation of repeated N-acetylcysteine administration to decreases in drug seeking in heroin addicts. PMID:17719565

  11. Rates of Fetal Polydrug Exposures in Methadone-Maintained Pregnancies from a High-Risk Population

    PubMed Central

    Delano, Kaitlyn; Gareri, Joey; Koren, Gideon

    2013-01-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is the standard of care during pregnancy for opioid-dependency, showing efficacy in improving prenatal care and reducing risk of relapse. By design, however, MMT is only intended to prevent withdrawal thus facilitating cognitive behavioural interventions. In order to maximize the benefits of MMT, it is essential that methadone is both properly prescribed and that additional addiction treatment is concurrently administered. This study aims to determine the effectiveness of MMT engagement in high-risk pregnant women in reducing polydrug use by objective laboratory examination of neonatal meconium. Patients and Methods Over a 29-month period, the Motherisk Laboratory at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto analyzed meconium samples as per request by social services and hospitals for drugs of abuse. Results Of the 904 meconium samples received, 273 were tested for methadone with 164 positive and 109 negative for methadone. Almost half of the methadone positive samples (46.34%) were also positive for at least one other opioid compound, which did not differ statistically from the methadone-negative control samples (46.79%; Chi square test, p=0.94). No differences were found between the methadone positive and negative groups in rates of concurrent amphetamines, cocaine, cannabis, and alcohol use indicating a similar risk of polydrug use between pregnant women taking or not taking methadone in this population. Discussion The high rates of additional opioid and other drug use in the MMT group, suggest that MMT is failing this population of patients. It is possible that methadone doses during pregnancy are not appropriately adjusted for changes in pharmacokinetic parameters (e.g. blood volume, renal function) during the second and third trimesters. This may result in sub-therapeutic dosing creating withdrawal symptoms leading to additional substance use. Alternatively, these results may be demonstrating a substantial lack in delivery of addiction support services in this vulnerable population. PMID:24312668

  12. Categorising methadone: Addiction and analgesia.

    PubMed

    Keane, Helen

    2013-11-01

    While methadone was first developed as an analgesic, and used for this purpose before it was adopted as a therapy for drug dependence, it is this latter use which has saturated its identity. Most of the literature and commentary on methadone discusses it in the context of methadone maintenance therapy (MMT). But one of the effects of the liberalization of opiate prescription for chronic pain which took place in the 1990s was the re-emergence of methadone as a painkiller. This article examines the relationship between methadone the painkiller and methadone the addiction treatment as it is constituted in recent medical research literature and treatment guidelines. It highlights the way medical discourse separates methadone into two substances with different effects depending on the problem that is being treated. Central to this separation is the classification of patients into addicts and non-addicts; and pain sufferers and non-pain sufferers. The article argues that despite this work of making and maintaining distinctions, the similarities in the way methadone is used and acts in these different medical contexts complicates these categories. The difficulties of keeping the 'two methadones' separate becomes most apparent in cases of MMT patients also being treated for chronic pain. PMID:23768774

  13. The effects of the opioid pharmacotherapies methadone, LAAM and buprenorphine, alone and in combination with alcohol, on simulated driving.

    PubMed

    Lenn, Michael G; Dietze, Paul; Rumbold, Greg R; Redman, Jennifer R; Triggs, Thomas J

    2003-12-11

    While methadone is currently the primary pharmacotherapy used in the treatment of heroin dependence in Australia, levo-alpha-acetyl-methodol (LAAM) and buprenorphine are new pharmacotherapies that are being examined as alternatives to methadone maintenance treatment. The aim of this research is to consider the effects of the methadone, buprenorphine and LAAM, as used in maintenance pharmacotherapy for heroin dependence, upon simulated driving. Clients stabilised in methadone, LAAM and buprenorphine treatment programs for 3 months, and a control group of non-drug-using participants, took part in this study which involved operating a driving simulator over a 75 min period. All participants attended one session without alcohol and one session with alcohol at around the 0.05% blood alcohol level. Simulated driving skill was measured through standard deviations of lateral position, speed and steering wheel angle, and reaction time to a subsidiary task was also measured. While alcohol impaired all measures of driving performance, there were no differences in driving skills across the four participant groups. These findings suggest that typical community standards around driving safety should be applied to clients stabilised in methadone, LAAM and buprenorphine treatment. The findings are important in terms of the widespread implementation of these treatment options in Victoria given that a large proportion of pharmacotherapy clients drive. PMID:14643944

  14. Validation of an automated solid-phase extraction method for the analysis of 23 opioids, cocaine, and metabolites in urine with ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ramrez Fernndez, Mara del Mar; Van Durme, Filip; Wille, Sarah M R; di Fazio, Vincent; Kummer, Natalie; Samyn, Nele

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this work was to automate a sample preparation procedure extracting morphine, hydromorphone, oxymorphone, norcodeine, codeine, dihydrocodeine, oxycodone, 6-monoacetyl-morphine, hydrocodone, ethylmorphine, benzoylecgonine, cocaine, cocaethylene, tramadol, meperidine, pentazocine, fentanyl, norfentanyl, buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, propoxyphene, methadone and 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine from urine samples. Samples were extracted by solid-phase extraction (SPE) with cation exchange cartridges using a TECAN Freedom Evo 100 base robotic system, including a hydrolysis step previous extraction when required. Block modules were carefully selected in order to use the same consumable material as in manual procedures to reduce cost and/or manual sample transfers. Moreover, the present configuration included pressure monitoring pipetting increasing pipetting accuracy and detecting sampling errors. The compounds were then separated in a chromatographic run of 9 min using a BEH Phenyl analytical column on a ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry system. Optimization of the SPE was performed with different wash conditions and elution solvents. Intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) were within 15% and bias was within 15% for most of the compounds. Recovery was >69% (RSD < 11%) and matrix effects ranged from 1 to 26% when compensated with the internal standard. The limits of quantification ranged from 3 to 25 ng/mL depending on the compound. No cross-contamination in the automated SPE system was observed. The extracted samples were stable for 72 h in the autosampler (4C). This method was applied to authentic samples (from forensic and toxicology cases) and to proficiency testing schemes containing cocaine, heroin, buprenorphine and methadone, offering fast and reliable results. Automation resulted in improved precision and accuracy, and a minimum operator intervention, leading to safer sample handling and less time-consuming procedures. PMID:24790061

  15. Predictors of heroin relapse: Personality traits, impulsivity, COMT gene Val158met polymorphism in a 5-year prospective study in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Su, Hang; Li, Zhibin; Du, Jiang; Jiang, Haifeng; Chen, Zhikang; Sun, Haiming; Zhao, Min

    2015-12-01

    Relapse is a typical feature of heroin addiction and rooted in genetic and psychological determinants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of personality traits, impulsivity, and COMT gene polymorphism (rs4680) on relapse to heroin use during 5-year follow up. 564 heroin dependent patients were enrolled in compulsory drug rehabilitation center. 12 months prior to their release, personality traits were measured by BIS-11 (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11) and Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). The COMT gene rs4680 polymorphism was genotyped using a DNA sequence detection system. The heroin use status was evaluated for 5 years after discharged. Among the 564 heroin-dependent patients, 500 were followed for 5 years after discharge and 53.0% (n?=?265) were considered as relapsed to heroin use according to a strict monitor system. Univariate analysis showed that age, having ever been in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT), the total scores and non-planning scores of BIS-11, and the COMT rs4680 gene variants were different between relapse and abstinent groups. Logistic regression analysis showed higher BIS total score, having ever been in MMT and younger first heroin use age are the predictors of relapse to heroin use during 5 years follow-up, and the COMT rs4680 gene had an interaction with BIS scores. Our findings indicated that the impulsive personality traits, methadone use history, and onset age could predict relapse in heroin-dependent patients during 5 year's follow up. The COMT gene showed a moderational effect in part the relationship of impulsivity with heroin relapse. PMID:26345603

  16. Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine among adolescents and young adults in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine has been described as a growing problem in Sweden in recent years, and has been associated with an increased drug-related mortality. Critics claim that the substances have become popular among adolescents and that they function as a gateway to heroin use. The aim of this study is to investigate, firstly, the extent to which illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine occurs among adolescents and young adults in Sweden, and secondly, at what stage in a users drug career these substances tend to appear. Methods The study is based on surveys and structured interviews on drug use among various populations of young people, in addition to qualitative interviews with 86 informants who, in their professional capacity, encounter adolescents or young adults who are using illicit drugs. Results Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is rare among young people in Sweden. According to high school surveys, less than 0.1% have tried these substances. Among young drug users in general, few have tried the substances, and there is nothing to indicate that they act as gateway drugs. Among adolescents and young adults with severe drug problems, however, the illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is more common (54% in a compulsory care sample). These substances normally enter the drug career late, and few use them as their main drug of choice. Other prescription drugs, like benzodiazepines and tramadol, are used by adolescents to a far greater extent. Diversion and illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is not seen as a serious problem by the professionals interviewed. A general view is that the substances are mainly used by people with a heroin or polydrug addiction, often for self-medication purposes. However, several informants express concern that methadone and buprenorphine may cause fatalities among young drug users without an opioid tolerance. Conclusions Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine among young drug users is not a widespread problem in Sweden. Harm-reduction measures should target drug users with more severe problems, among whom illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is more common and pose a medical risk. Illicit use of other prescription drugs, which are less controlled and more widely used by young people, is an important issue for further research. PMID:24139199

  17. Methadone patients and alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Ottomanelli, G

    1999-03-01

    A literature review was conducted on the excess use of alcohol by methadone patients. Although the rate of alcohol abuse among methadone patients was found to be high (compared to general population estimates), the rate was comparable to individuals who engaged in risk-taking behaviors and individuals under stress, such as college students and emergency room patients. Comparisons of rates for different samples was difficult because of the varying criteria used to define alcohol abuse and the absence of operational criteria applicable across different populations. Another source of difficulty was that some studies evaluated motivational variables (why the person drank) and found them to be more important predictors than sociodemographic variables (for example, history of drinking and social class). Contrary to the expectation that methadone patients who consumed excessive amounts of alcohol would require higher dosages of methadone, it was found that nonalcohol-abusing methadone patients requested the higher dosage levels. This finding, however, was subject to methodological confounds. The issue of whether the methadone patient who abused alcohol has a negative treatment outcome was a multifaceted question. The definition of treatment outcome for alcohol-abusing methadone patients determined whether the investigator concluded that there was a negative impact versus minimal impact. PMID:10023608

  18. Signs of Heroin Abuse and Addiction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Signs of Heroin Use and Addiction Signs of Heroin Use and Addiction Listen People who are trying ... Previous Index Next Español English Español "I needed heroin just to get by." Deon was addicted to ...

  19. Enhanced development of dispositional tolerance to methadone by desipramine given together with methadone

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.J.; Wang, R.I.H.

    1985-02-25

    Rats given 2-day oral administration of methadone (15 mg/kg, twice on day 1 and once on day 2) by gastric tube developed dispositional tolerance to methadone analgesia as demonstrated by a decrease in analgesic response and by an increase in methadone metabolism. The increased metabolism of methadone was evidenced by a decrease in brain concentration of /sup 14/C-methadone and increases in the percentages of total /sup 14/C in liver or urine as /sup 14/C-water-soluble metabolites (/sup 14/C-WSM) after the rats were challenged with a test dose of /sup 14/C-methadone. Two-day pretreatment with a combination of desipramine (DMI) (10 mg/kg, ip) and methadone (15 mg/kg, po) enhanced the development of dispositional tolerance to methadone analgesia which was evidenced by a greater decrease in the brain concentration of methadone and a greater increase in methadone metabolism as compared to those changes in rats pretreated with only methadone. Repeated treatment with DMI alone neither decreased the analgesic effect of methadone nor stimulated methadone metabolism. It is suggested that DMI given together with methadone promoted the induction of methadone metabolism in the liver by prolonging the enzyme-stimulating state of methadone, thus enhancing the development of dispositional tolerance to methadone. 20 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  20. Opponent process properties of self-administered cocaine.

    PubMed

    Ettenberg, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade, data collected in our laboratory have demonstrated that self-administered cocaine produces Opponent-Process-like behavioral effects. Animals running a straight alley once each day for IV cocaine develop over trials an approach-avoidance conflict about re-entering the goal box. This conflict behavior is characterized by a stop in forward locomotion (usually at the very mouth of the goal box) followed by a turn and 'retreat' back toward the goal box. The results of a series of studies conducted over the past decade collectively suggest that the behavioral ambivalence exemplified by rats running the alley for IV cocaine stems from concurrent and opponent positive (rewarding) and negative (anxiogenic) properties of the drug--both of which are associated with the goal box. These opponent properties of cocaine have been shown to result from temporally distinct affective states. Using a conditioned place preference test, we have been able to demonstrate that while the initial immediate effects of IV cocaine are reinforcing, the state present 15 min post-injection is aversive. In our most recent work, the co-administration of IV cocaine with either oral ethanol or IV heroin was found to greatly diminish the development and occurrence of retreat behaviors in the runway. It may therefore be that the high incidence of co-abuse of cocaine with either ethanol or heroin, stems from the users' motivation to alleviate some of the negative side effects of cocaine. It would seem then that the Opponent Process Theory has provided a useful conceptual framework for the study of the behavioral consequences of self-administered cocaine including the notion that both positive and negative reinforcement mechanisms are involved in the development and maintenance of cocaine abuse. PMID:15019422

  1. Ethnic diversity of DNA methylation in the OPRM1 promoter region in lymphocytes of heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, David A; Hamon, Sara; Yuferov, Vadim; Jackson, Colin; Ho, Ann; Ott, Jurg; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2010-06-01

    The mu-opioid receptor is the site of action of many endogenous opioids as well as opiates. We hypothesize that differences in DNA methylation of specific CpG dinucleotides between former severe heroin addicts in methadone maintenance treatment and control subjects will depend, in part, upon ethnicity. DNA methylation analysis of the mu-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) promoter region was performed on African-Americans (118 cases, 80 controls) and Hispanics (142 cases, 61 controls) and these were compared with a similar Caucasian cohort from our earlier study. In controls, a higher methylation level was found in the African-Americans compared with the Hispanics or Caucasians. Significant experiment-wise differences in methylation levels were found at the -25 and +12 CpG sites in the controls among the three ethnicities. The overall methylation level of the CpG sites were significantly higher in the former heroin addicts when compared with the controls (point-wise P = 0.0457). However, in the African-Americans, the degree of methylation was significantly decreased experiment-wise in the former heroin addicts at the +12 CpG site (P = 0.0032, Bonferroni corrected general estimating equations). In Hispanics, the degree of methylation was increased in the former heroin addicts at the -25 (P < 0.001, experiment-wise), -14 (P = 0.001, experiment-wise), and +27 (P < 0.001, experiment-wise) CpG sites. These changes in methylation of the OPRM1 promoter region may lead to altered expression of the mu-opioid receptor gene in the lymphocytes of former heroin addicts who are stabilized in methadone maintenance treatment. PMID:20237803

  2. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... English Español "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." Stacey is recovering from her ...

  3. Onsite QTc interval screening for patients in methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Fareed, Ayman; Vayalapalli, Sreedevi; Byrd-Sellers, Johnita; Casarella, Jennifer; Drexler, Karen; Amar, Richard; Smith-Cox, Jocelyn; Lutchman, Tamara Shaw

    2010-01-01

    To improve the electrocardiogram screening process and early detection of patients at high risk for cardiac arrhythmias, the authors created a model in their clinic where they provided an onsite electrocardiogram screening that might be feasible and practical. The authors then performed a retrospective chart review to access the efficacy and feasibility of their new onsite procedure in identifying methadone maintained patients at high risk for cardiac arrhythmias. Records from all patients who are currently or had previously been maintained on methadone in the methadone maintenance program at the Atlanta VA Medical Center between 2002 and 2009 were evaluated. Of the 140 patients treated at the clinic between 2002 and 2009, 85 were excluded from the study because they had been treated as guests (had been in treatment in other clinics but received methadone dosing temporarily from our clinic), were treated in the clinic for less than 6 months, or dropped out of treatment. Thus, 55 patient charts were selected for review. Most patients (95%) received baseline and annual electrocardiogram screening. The average baseline QTc was (417 +/- 30) and most recent QTc (442 +/- 25). This QTc prolongation from baseline showed statistical significance (P < .0001). Sixty-seven percent of patients had statistically significant QTc prolongation from baseline but was less than 450 ms (mean: 428 +/- 16, P = .008). Twenty-seven percent of patients had statistically significant QTc prolongation from baseline of more 450 ms but was less than 500 ms (mean: 460 +/- 8, P < .0001). Six percent of patients had statistically significant QTc prolongation from baseline of more 500 ms (mean: 503 +/- 1.15, P = .027). Recent cocaine use was the only individual variable that showed statistically significant correlation with QTc prolongation (F = 6.98, P = .01). The authors demonstrated in this study that providing an onsite electrocardiogram screening with a focus on patient education and limiting the referral to specialty care for patients at high risk for cardiac arrhythmias could be practical and feasible. PMID:20390695

  4. Endogenous GDNF in ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens does not play a role in the incubation of heroin craving

    PubMed Central

    Airavaara, Mikko; Pickens, Charles L.; Stern, Anna L.; Wihbey, Kristina A.; Harvey, Brandon K.; Bossert, Jennifer M.; Liu, Qing-Rong; Hoffer, Barry J.; Shaham, Yavin

    2010-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) activity in ventral tegmental area (VTA) mediates the time-dependent increases in cue-induced cocaine-seeking after withdrawal (incubation of cocaine craving). Here, we studied the generality of these findings to incubation of heroin craving. Rats were trained to self-administer heroin for 10 days (6-h/day; 0.075 mg/kg/infusion; infusions were paired with a tone-light cue) and tested for cue-induced heroin-seeking in extinction tests after 1, 11 or 30 withdrawal days. Cue-induced heroin seeking was higher after 11 or 30 days than after 1 day (incubation of heroin craving), and the time-dependent increases in extinction responding were associated with time-dependent changes in GDNF mRNA expression in VTA and nucleus accumbens. Additionally, acute accumbens (but not VTA) GDNF injections (12.5-μg/side) administered 1–3 h after the last heroin self-administration training session enhanced the time-dependent increases in extinction responding after withdrawal. However, the time-dependent increases in extinction responding after withdrawal were not associated with changes in GDNF protein expression in VTA and accumbens. Additionally, interfering with endogenous GDNF function by chronic delivery of anti-GDNF monoclonal neutralizing antibodies (600-ng/side/day) into VTA or accumbens had no effect on the time-dependent increases in extinction responding. In summary, heroin self-administration and withdrawal regulate VTA and accumbens GDNF mRNA expression in a time-dependent manner, and exogenous GDNF administration into accumbens but not VTA potentiates cue-induced heroin seeking. However, based on the GDNF protein expression and the anti-GDNF monoclonal neutralizing antibodies manipulation data, we conclude that neither accumbens nor VTA endogenous GDNF mediates the incubation of heroin craving. PMID:21182575

  5. Methadone and buprenorphine prescribing and referral practices in US prison systems: results from a nationwide survey.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Nunn A; Zaller N; Dickman S; Trimbur C; Nijhawan A; Rich JD

    2009-11-01

    BACKGROUND: More than 50% of incarcerated individuals have a history of substance use, and over 200,000 individuals with heroin addiction pass through American correctional facilities annually. Opiate replacement therapy (ORT) with methadone or buprenorphine is an effective treatment for opiate dependence and can reduce drug-related disease and recidivism for inmates. Provision of ORT is nevertheless a frequently neglected intervention in the correctional setting.OBJECTIVE AND METHODS: We surveyed the 50 state; Washington, District of Columbia (DC); and Federal Department of Corrections' medical directors or their equivalents about their facilities' ORT prescribing policies and referral programs for inmates leaving prison.RESULTS: We received responses from 51 of 52 prison systems nationwide. Twenty-eight prison systems (55%) offer methadone to inmates in some situations. Methadone use varies widely across states: over 50% of correctional facilities that offer methadone do so exclusively for pregnant women or for chronic pain management. Seven states' prison systems (14%) offer buprenorphine to some inmates. The most common reason cited for not offering ORT was that facilities "prefer drug-free detoxification over providing methadone or buprenorphine." Twenty-three states' prison systems (45%) provide referrals for some inmates to methadone maintenance programs after release, which increased from 8% in 2003; 15 states' prison systems (29%) provide some referrals to community buprenorphine providers.CONCLUSION: Despite demonstrated social, medical, and economic benefits of providing ORT to inmates during incarceration and linkage to ORT upon release, many prison systems nationwide still do not offer pharmacological treatment for opiate addiction or referrals for ORT upon release.

  6. Methadone treatment protects against HIV infection: two decades of experience in the Bronx, New York City.

    PubMed Central

    Hartel, D M; Schoenbaum, E E

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We undertook a study of the role of methadone maintenance in protecting injecting drug users (IDUs) from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection from the earliest days of the HIV epidemic in New York City to the present. The historical context of the epidemic in the Bronx is discussed. METHODS: For close to two decades, we have been tracking changes in injecting drug use and HIV infection levels in a Bronx cohort study of IDUs. An initial sample of 622 IDUs was recruited from a methadone treatment program in 1985, with historical data going back to 1978. Behavioral interviews and HIV testing were performed and methadone treatment program records (urine toxicology and methadone dose history) were reviewed. We examined both prevalent and incident HIV infections. The sample included African Americans (24.3%), Latinos (50.3%), and white non-Latinos (24.4%). The average methadone dose was 64 milligrams (mg) per day with an average time in treatment of five and a half years. RESULTS: We found a very low rate of incident infection of 1.7 per 100 person-years observation since 1986. Because of this low rate of infection, we were unable to determine the association between methadone treatment factors and HIV seroincidence. We found that our prevalence data on the 622 IDUs enrolled from 1985 to 1988 yielded strong findings on the role of methadone maintenance in a period when most infections occurred in this population. HIV seroprevalence was 42.9%. Logistic regression analysis revealed associations of methadone dose > or = 80 mg (adjusted odds ratio = 3.07/yr, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.23-7.68) and last year entered methadone treatment (adjusted odds ratio = 1.22/yr, 95% CI: 1.06-1.41) to HIV infection, independent of year of last cocaine injection, needle sharing in shooting galleries, number of IDU sex partners, low income, and African American of Latino ethnicity. CONCLUSIONS: Properly dosed, long-term methadone treatment was found to be a central protective factor in preventing HIV infection from the earliest days of the epidemic in New York City. It is crucial to have high quality drug treatment programs in place before an epidemic draws our attention to the inadequacies through excess and unnecessary morbidity and mortality. PMID:9722816

  7. Correlates of heavy smoking among alcohol-using methadone maintenance clients.

    PubMed

    Nyamathi, Adeline M; Sinha, Karabi; Marfisee, Mary; Cohen, Allan; Greengold, Barbara; Leake, Barbara

    2009-10-01

    This cross-sectional study examines predictors of heavy smoking among 256 male and female methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) clients from five MMT clinics in the Los Angeles area. The authors find that women report lower rates of heavy smoking than men (47% vs. 54%, respectively), in concordance with current literature pointing to gender differences in smoking behaviors. In particular, men who report heavy drinking, fair or poor health, and recent heroin use are more likely to report heavy smoking compared with men not reporting these factors. Women who report recent heroin use, a lifetime history of sex trade, and who have been ill enough to require a blood transfusion also have greater odds of reporting heavy cigarette smoking. Findings from this study may aid not only in designing gender-based smoking cessation programs for MMT clients but also in addressing the gender-based issues related to smoking in such a population. PMID:19597186

  8. A Randomized Trial of Methadone Initiation Prior to Release from Incarceration

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Michelle; Zaller, Nickolas; Dickman, Samuel L.; Green, Traci C.; Parihk, Amisha; Friedmann, Peter D.; Rich, Josiah D.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals who use heroin and illicit opioids are at high risk for infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other blood-borne pathogens, as well as incarceration. The purpose of the randomized trial reported here is to compare outcomes between participants who initiated methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) prior to release from incarceration, with those who were referred to treatment at the time of release. Participants who initiated MMT prior to release were significantly more likely to enter treatment postrelease (P < .001) and for participants who did enter treatment, those who received MMT prerelease did so within fewer days (P = .03). They also reported less heroin use (P = .008), other opiate use (P = .09), and injection drug use (P = .06) at 6 months. Initiating MMT in the weeks prior to release from incarceration is a feasible and effective way to improve MMT access postrelease and to decrease relapse to opioid use. PMID:22263710

  9. [Heroin abuse, autobiographical memory and depression].

    PubMed

    Eiber, R; Puel, M; Schmitt, L

    1999-01-01

    The early psychiatric interviews with opiate addicts are characterized by three features: 1) the patient has a very factual and objective conversation, 2) the evaluation of the autobiographical memory is very difficult, 3) there is a high prevalence of affective disorders responsible for an impairment in cognitive functions. Therefore we have two aims: First, to compare episodic and semantic autobiographical memory in opiate addicts and healthy controls. Autobiographical memory is the knowledge a person has about oneself and his past. Personal semantic memory is the knowledge of the biographical facts, general knowledge and beliefs about oneself. Autobiographical episodic memory concerns recollections of personal events clearly delineated in time and space. Second, to estimate the impact of depression on the ability to produce autobiographical recollection in a population of opiatre addicts. Participants were consecutive attenders of a methadone outpatient clinic who are multiple drug dependent patients consuming mainly heroine. The first investigation took place in entry and after two months. We have recruited 21 patients with a mean duration of intoxication of 11 years. Ten of these patients have been investigated again after 2 months and 8 of them have been included in a methadone maintenance program. The patients'investigation comprised two parts: first, the evaluation of autobiographical memory (only assessed at entry of the study) with an autobiographical fluency test and the semi-structured autobiographical memory interview of Kopelman; second, the psychiatric assessment included self-rating questionnaires and observer-rating questionnaires. Opiate addicts showed a decrease in episodic autobiographical memory but an increase in semantic affective memory and objective modalization. In the fluency test, there was no difference in the number of evoked items between opiate addicts and healthy controls. The educational level influences several results. The possible explanations of these results are the action of the toxic products and a particular psychic functioning. The lack of correlation between autobiographical memory and affective disorder suggests the implication of the drugs in the emergence of memory deficits. The improvement of depressive symptomatology after two months occurring without psychotropic drugs suggests the transient feature of depression and emphasises on non-pharmacological aspects of treatment. PMID:10668597

  10. Measuring the geographic coverage of methadone maintenance programme in Hong Kong by using geographic information system (GIS)

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Tak Ting P; Lee, Shui Shan

    2008-01-01

    Objective While access and utilization form core components in assessing the effectiveness of a health service, the concept of coverage is often neglected. In this study we propose to develop a GIS-based methodological framework for the measurement of district-based geographic coverage to examine the service effectiveness of methadone treatment programme (MTP) in Hong Kong on a regular basis. Methods To overcome the incompatibility of spatial units, population data and data of heroin addiction of the year 2001 are interpolated by population-weighted and area-weighted algorithms. Standard overlay and proximity analytical functions are used to delineate altogether 20 accessible zones around each methadone clinic at a fixed 1.5 km Euclidean distance. Geographic coverage here is defined as the percentage of heroin addicts covered by a methadone clinic within the accessible zone by district. Results A total of 6413 out of 11000 reported heroin addicts are found geographically covered. The average geographic coverage in Hong Kong is 44.6%, with the figure varying from 0% to 96% by district. One district having no clinic results in 0% coverage whereas another without a clinic yields 15.3% coverage from the clinic in adjacent district. Maps illustrating district-based geographic coverage are generated. Conclusion As continuous data collection is required for a monitoring system, the simplified approach facilitates the handling of large volume data and relevant data analysis. It is concluded that the number of methadone clinics is as important as their locations. Geographic coverage could become an important consideration for monitoring harm reduction. PMID:18234088

  11. Characteristics and consequences of heroin use among older adults in the United States: a review of the literature, treatment implications, and recommendations for further research

    PubMed Central

    Hunsaker, Amanda; Albert, Steven M.; Cornelius, Jack R.; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2010-01-01

    This review reports on the results of a comprehensive literature search of studies examining the physical and mental health characteristics of older adults in the United States who use heroin. Multiple databases were searched for papers meeting the inclusion criteria of heroin users who were age 50 years or older. A total of 14 articles covering 9 different studies met the review inclusion criteria. All of the studies were convenience samples, and seven of the nine studies (77.8%) were entirely drawn from substance abuse treatment programs, primarily methadone maintenance programs. Findings from the qualitative studies suggest that the marginalization of older heroin users was a predominant experience that impacted intent to seek treatment as well as treatment retention. While articles reported high levels of physical and psychological/psychiatric comorbidities with substance misuse, research on heroin use and methadone treatment among older adults is scant and the quantitative findings are inconsistent. The articles reviewed in this study demonstrate that the needs of this population will be significant, yet the development of appropriate interventions and treatment for older adult heroin users will be contingent on empirical research that adequately describes mental and physical health problems. PMID:21237575

  12. Satisfaction with methadone as a medication: psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the treatment satisfaction questionnaire for medication.

    PubMed

    Trujols, Joan; Iraurgi, Ioseba; Siñol, Núria; Portella, Maria J; Pérez, Víctor; Pérez de Los Cobos, José

    2012-02-01

    There is a manifest lack of psychometrically sound instruments designed for specific and multidimensional assessment of satisfaction with methadone as a medication within the context of methadone maintenance treatment. Therefore, it may be worthwhile to assess the pertinence and utility of using a generic and multidimensional medication satisfaction instrument that has not been specifically developed for use in methadone maintenance treatment.The aim of this study was thus to explore the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM version 1.4 [Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2004;2:12]) in a sample of methadone-maintained heroin-dependent patients.Two hundred three methadone-maintained patients filled out the TSQM and other several measures related to the construct of patient satisfaction (eg, Verona Service Satisfaction Scale for methadone treatment). Dimensionality of the TSQM was assessed by means of a confirmatory factor analysis. Internal consistency was examined using the ordinal coefficient α. Spearman correlations were used to explore the relationship between the TSQM and the measures conceptually related to patient satisfaction.Regarding the dimensionality of the TSQM, its original factor structure adequately fitted the data (Satorra-Bentler χ58, 72.14 [P = 0.100]; root-mean-square error of approximation, 0.045; comparative fit index, 0.978). All but 1 of the 4 TSQM subscales showed acceptable to good internal consistency values (0.78-0.89). The dimensions of the TSQM were differentially and congruently correlated with related measures.The results strongly suggest the TSQM value as a brief, generic, and psychometrically sound instrument to assess satisfaction with methadone as a medication in a multidimensional manner. Notwithstanding, more research is needed not only to assess the generalizability of these findings but also to provide pieces of evidence for other psychometric properties, especially the TSQM predictive validity. PMID:22198457

  13. The Dreams of Heroin Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looney, Maryanne

    1972-01-01

    Few heroin addicts get high'' in their dreams. An exploration of the reasons for this failure provides some clues to the conflicts and other problems that retard an addict's progress in therapy. (Author)

  14. Methadone Maintenance for Opiate Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, John C.

    1970-01-01

    The use of the synthetic opiate methadone on a continuing maintenance scheduled is unquestionably the most successful and most widely applicable treatment for the control of opiate dependence. Though the medical aspects of the treatment are simple, the nature of the medication and the nature of the problems of opiate dependence are such that administration of a program requires careful attention. Because the problem is so serious both to society and the addict, it is urgent that we develop and adequate number of well run methadone programs throughout the state and the nation. PMID:5486539

  15. Methadone Maintenance for HIV Positive and HIV Negative Patients in Kyiv: Acceptability and Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Dvoriak, Sergii; Karachevsky, Andrey; Chhatre, Sumedha; Booth, Robert; Metzger, David; Schumacher, Joseph; Chychula, Nina; Pecoraro, Anna; Woody, George

    2014-01-01

    Background With up to 40% of opioid injectors infected with HIV, Ukraine has one of the most concentrated HIV epidemics in the world, mainly due to unsterile injection practices and a historical absence of effective prevention services. Harm reduction programs, including syringe exchange and a small buprenorphine treatment program, were introduced in 2004 and methadone maintenance was allowed in 2007. Despite an initial expansion, by 2009, only 3221 injectors were receiving methadone treatment. A growing body of research on methadone maintenance has found high retention rates with reduction in opioid use and HIV risk behaviors. We report on the acceptability and initial outcome of methadone treatment as a function of HIV status, an issue that has not yet been reported for injectors in Ukraine. Methods Longitudinal observational study of a 12-week course of methadone treatment in 25 HIV+ and 25 HIV− opioid addicted individuals recruited from a harm reduction program and the city AIDS Center. Drug use and HIV risk were assessed at baseline and weeks 4, 8, 12 and 20; all patients were offered continued methadone maintenance in the Kyiv city program at the end of 12 weeks. Results Fifty-four individuals were asked if they were interested in the study and 50, demographically similar to other samples of opioid addicted Ukrainians, agreed to participate. Two died of non-study related causes; the other 48 completed assessments at weeks 4, 8 and 12, and 47 completed followups at week 20. Significant reductions were seen in use of heroin (p<. 0001), other opiates/analgesics (p< 0.0001), and HIV risk behaviors (drug, sex, total; all p <0.0001). All 48 patients chose to continue methadone after the 12-weeks of study medication ended. Unlike most opioid treatment studies, sexual risk was somewhat higher than injecting risk at study intake. Conclusions Methadone maintenance was well accepted by HIV+ and HIV− opioid dependent individuals and has the potential for significant public health impact if made more widely available with sustained access and support. PMID:24548802

  16. Activation of AMPA receptor in the infralimbic cortex facilitates extinction and attenuates the heroin-seeking behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weisheng; Wang, Yiqi; Sun, Anna; Zhou, Linyi; Xu, Wenjin; Zhu, Huaqiang; Zhuang, Dingding; Lai, Miaojun; Zhang, Fuqiang; Zhou, Wenhua; Liu, Huifen

    2016-01-26

    Infralimbic cortex (IL) is proposed to suppress cocaine seeking after extinction, but whether the IL regulates the extinction and reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior is unknown. To address this issue, the male SD rats were trained to self-administer heroin under a FR1 schedule for consecutive 14 days, then the rats underwent 7 daily 2h extinction session in the operant chamber. The activation of IL by microinjection PEPA, an allosteric AMPA receptor potentiator into IL before each of extinction session facilitated the extinction responding after heroin self-administration, but did not alter the locomotor activity in an open field testing environment. Other rats were first trained under a FR1 schedule for heroin self-administration for 14 days, followed by 14 days of extinction training, and reinstatement of heroin-seeking induced by cues was measured for 2h. Intra-IL microinjecting of PEPA at 15min prior to test inhibited the reinstatement of heroin-seeking induced by cues. Moreover, the expression of GluR1 in the IL and NAc remarkably increased after treatment with PEPA during the reinstatement. These finding suggested that activation of glutamatergic projection from IL to NAc shell may be involved in the extinction and reinstatement of heroin-seeking. PMID:26639425

  17. Predicting subsequent relapse by drug-related cue-induced brain activation in heroin addiction: an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Li, Wei; Wang, Hanyue; Wang, Yarong; Zhang, Yi; Zhu, Jia; Zheng, Ying; Zhang, Dongsheng; Wang, Lina; Li, Yongbin; Yan, Xuejiao; Chang, Haifeng; Fan, Min; Li, Zhe; Tian, Jie; Gold, Mark S; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yijun

    2015-09-01

    Abnormal salience attribution is implicated in heroin addiction. Previously, combining functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a drug cue-reactivity task, we demonstrated abnormal patterns of subjective response and brain reactivity in heroin-dependent individuals. However, whether the changes in cue-induced brain response were related to relapse was unknown. In a prospective study, we recruited 49 heroin-dependent patients under methadone maintenance treatment, a gold standard treatment (average daily dose 41.8??16.0?mg), and 20 healthy subjects to perform the heroin cue-reactivity task during fMRI. The patients' subjective craving was evaluated. They participated in a follow-up assessment for 3 months, during which heroin use was assessed and relapse was confirmed by self-reported relapse or urine toxicology. Differences between relapsers and non-relapsers were analyzed with respect to the results from heroin-cue responses. Compared with healthy subjects, relapsers and non-relapsers commonly demonstrated significantly increased brain responses during the processing of heroin cues in the mesolimbic system, prefrontal regions and visuospatial-attention regions. However, compared with non-relapsers, relapsers demonstrated significantly greater cue-induced craving and the brain response mainly in the bilateral nucleus accumbens/subcallosal cortex and cerebellum. Although the cue-induced heroin craving was low in absolute measures, the change in craving positively correlated with the activation of the nucleus accumbens/subcallosal cortex among the patients. These findings suggest that in treatment-seeking heroin-dependent individuals, greater cue-induced craving and greater specific regional activations might be related to reward/craving and memory retrieval processes. These responses may predict relapse and represent important targets for the development of new treatment for heroin addiction. PMID:25214465

  18. Impact of morphine dependency and detoxification by methadone on males rat reproductive system

    PubMed Central

    Ghowsi, Mahnaz; Yousofvand, Namdar

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the problems that addicts suffer from is decreased libido. Erectile dysfunction has been reported in men using opioids for treatment of heroin addiction. Objective: The study was performed to investigate the effects of morphine and detoxification with methadone as causes of sexual dysfunction in addiction. Methods and Methods: A total of 40 adult male rats (Wistar) were used. Animals were divided in to 4 groups. Control groups received saline for 30 days. Other 2 groups received 10 mg/kg morphine on day 1 and the morphine doses increased daily by 2 mg/kg increments per day until in day 30 a maximum of 68 mg/kg twice daily was achieved. Withdrawal syndrome sings were evaluated. At the end of period, one group of 2 morphine dependent groups was treated with methadone during 14 days. Animals in group 4 (saline solution+ methadone) received saline for 30 consecutive days and then detoxified with methadone during 14 days. Partial weights of seminal vesicles, testes, prostates, seminal vesicles content, concentrations of luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, and testosterone in serum were determined. Results: In the dependent group serum levels of testosterone (p<0.001), folicle stimulating hormone (p=0.0097) and luteinizing hormone (p=0.0031) as well as the weights of testes (p=0.0051), partial weights of prostates, seminal vesicles and seminal vesicles contents (p<0.001) were reduced as compared with control group. In the morphine dependent animals detoxified with methadone, testosterone concentrations and seminal vesicles contents remained lower than levels in the control group (p<0.001). Conclusion: The results suggest that morphine dependence may impair the reproductive function in male rats. PMID:26221126

  19. Improvement of saccadic functions after dosing with methadone in opioid addicted individuals.

    PubMed

    Gorzela?czyk, Edward Jacek; Walecki, Piotr; Feit, Julia; Kunc, Marek; Fareed, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    In the current experiment, we used the saccadometric test to study the effect of a single therapeutic dose of methadone on the integrity of cortico-subcortical brain functioning. In this prospective study, we used the Saccadometer System (Advanced Clinical Instrumentation, Cambridge, UK). The saccadometric test was performed before and 1.5 hours after methadone dosing. We analyzed the following saccadic parameters: latency, duration, amplitude, average and peak velocity, and processing performance (promptness) as well as a number of different types of saccades (like correct/incorrect, under/overshoot, and left-sided/right-sided). The sample consists of 40 subjects with an average 18 years of opioid addiction. The mean age is 35.3 7 (80% males and 20% females). The mean period of heroin dependence is 15.3 6.3 years. The mean daily dose of methadone in substitution therapy is 90 26.5 mg. After administration of a single therapeutic dose of methadone, there were statistically significant differences in the values of saccade duration and latency when compared to the values before the drug administration. Average duration of saccade was significantly longer [51.40 8.75 ms versus 48.93 6.91 ms, z = 2.53, p = .01] and average latency was significantly longer [198.85 52.57 ms versus 183.05 30.95 ms, z = 2.09 p < .03]. This is the first study to test the therapeutic effect of daily methadone dosing on the integrity of the cortico-subcortical brain functions as measured by the saccadometry. More research is needed to explore the effect of illicit opioid use on the integrity of brain structures and functions, and the protective effect of opioid agonist therapy on reversing the damaging effects of illicit opioid use. PMID:26488804

  20. Opiate addiction and cocaine addiction: underlying molecular neurobiology and genetics

    PubMed Central

    Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Levran, Orna; Reed, Brian; Schlussman, Stefan D.; Zhou, Yan; Butelman, Eduardo R.

    2012-01-01

    Addictive diseases, including addiction to heroin, prescription opioids, or cocaine, pose massive personal and public health costs. Addictions are chronic relapsing diseases of the brain caused by drug-induced direct effects and persisting neuroadaptations at the epigenetic, mRNA, neuropeptide, neurotransmitter, or protein levels. These neuroadaptations, which can be specific to drug type, and their resultant behaviors are modified by various internal and external environmental factors, including stress responsivity, addict mindset, and social setting. Specific gene variants, including variants encoding pharmacological target proteins or genes mediating neuroadaptations, also modify vulnerability at particular stages of addiction. Greater understanding of these interacting factors through laboratory-based and translational studies have the potential to optimize early interventions for the therapy of chronic addictive diseases and to reduce the burden of relapse. Here, we review the molecular neurobiology and genetics of opiate addiction, including heroin and prescription opioids, and cocaine addiction. PMID:23023708

  1. Predictors of patient retention in methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Steven L; Copeland, Amy L; Kopak, Albert M; Hoffmann, Norman G; Herschman, Philip L; Polukhina, Nadiya

    2015-12-01

    This study sought to determine whether select pretreatment demographic and in-treatment clinical variables predict premature treatment discharge at 6 and 12 months among patients receiving methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). Data were abstracted from electronic medical records for 1,644 patients with an average age of 34.7 years (SD = 11.06) admitted to 26 MMT programs located throughout the United States from 2009 to 2011. Patients were studied through retrospective chart review for 12 months or until treatment discharge. Premature discharge at 6- and 12-month intervals were the dependent variables, analyzed in logistic regressions. Clinical predictor variables included average methadone dosage (mg/d) and urinalysis drug screen (UDS) findings for opioids and various nonopioid substances at intake and 6 months. Pretreatment demographic variables included gender, race/ethnicity, employment status, marital status, payment method, and age at admission. UDS findings positive (UDS+) for cocaine at intake and 6 months were found to be independent predictors of premature discharge at 12 months. UDS+ for opioids at 6 months was also an independent predictor of premature discharge at 12 months. Higher average daily methadone dosages were found to predict retention at both 6 and 12 months. Significant demographic predictors of premature discharge at 6 months included Hispanic ethnicity, unemployment, and marital status. At 12 months, male gender, younger age, and self-pay were found to predict premature discharge. Select demographic characteristics may be less important as predictors of outcome after patients have been in treatment beyond a minimum period of time, while others may become more important later on in treatment. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26098127

  2. Maintenance treatment for opioid dependence with slow-release oral morphine: a randomized cross-over, non-inferiority study versus methadone

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Thilo; Haasen, Christian; Verthein, Uwe; Walcher, Stephan; Schuler, Christoph; Backmund, Markus; Ruckes, Christian; Reimer, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Aims To compare the efficacy of slow-release oral morphine (SROM) and methadone as maintenance medication for opioid dependence in patients previously treated with methadone. Design Prospective, multiple-dose, open label, randomized, non-inferiority, cross-over study over two 11-week periods. Methadone treatment was switched to SROM with flexible dosing and vice versa according to period and sequence of treatment. Setting Fourteen out-patient addiction treatment centres in Switzerland and Germany. Participants Adults with opioid dependence in methadone maintenance programmes (dose ?50 mg/day) for ?26 weeks. Measurements The efficacy end-point was the proportion of heroin-positive urine samples per patient and period of treatment. Each week, two urine samples were collected, randomly selected and analysed for 6-monoacetyl-morphine and 6-acetylcodeine. Non-inferiority was concluded if the two-sided 95% confidence interval (CI) in the difference of proportions of positive urine samples was below the predefined boundary of 10%. Findings One hundred and fifty-seven patients fulfilled criteria to form the per protocol population. The proportion of heroin-positive urine samples under SROM treatment (0.20) was non-inferior to the proportion under methadone treatment (0.15) (least-squares mean difference 0.05; 95% CI = 0.02, 0.08; P > 0.01). The 95% CI fell within the 10% non-inferiority margin, confirming the non-inferiority of SROM to methadone. A dose-dependent effect was shown for SROM (i.e. decreasing proportions of heroin-positive urine samples with increasing SROM doses). Retention in treatment showed no significant differences between treatments (period 1/period 2: SROM: 88.7%/82.1%, methadone: 91.1%/88.0%; period 1: P = 0.50, period 2: P = 0.19). Overall, safety outcomes were similar between the two groups. Conclusions Slow-release oral morphine appears to be at least as effective as methadone in treating people with opioid use disorder. PMID:24304412

  3. Opioids: The Prescription Drug & Heroin Overdose Epidemic

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources Law Enforcement Resources Opioids: The Prescription Drug & Heroin Overdose Epidemic Opioids are natural or synthetic chemicals ... in your brain or body. Common opioids include heroin and prescription drugs such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, and ...

  4. Methadone Maintenance Therapy and the Dental Patient.

    PubMed

    Raymond, George; Maloney, William

    2015-01-01

    Methadone is a Schedule II drug best known for its use in the treatment of opioid dependence. Dental providers should be aware of the oral and systemic effects of methadone. In patients undergoing methadone maintenance therapy, there is a higher incidence of rampant caries, xerostomia, bruxism and poor oral hygiene. A review of the pharmacology, systemic effects, drug interactions and oral manifestations is presented, as well as possible modifications to treatment and specific considerations in dental therapies. PMID:26521328

  5. Perioperative Pharmacokinetics of Methadone in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anshuman; Tallchief, Danielle; Blood, Jane; Kim, Thomas; London, Amy; Kharasch, Evan D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Methadone is frequently used in adult anesthesia and pain treatment. Methadone pharmacokinetics in adults are well characterized, including the perioperative period. Methadone is also used in children. There is, however, no information on methadone pharmacokinetics in children of any age. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the pharmacokinetics of intravenous methadone in children undergoing surgery. Perioperative opioid-sparing effects were also assessed. Methods Eligible subjects were children 5–18 yr undergoing general anesthesia and surgery, with an anticipated postoperative inpatient stay exceeding 3d. Three groups of 10–11 patients each received intravenous methadone HCl after anesthetic induction in ascending dose groups of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mg/kg (up to 20 mg). Anesthetic care was not otherwise changed. Venous blood was obtained for 4d, for stereoselective determination of methadone and metabolites. Pain assessments were made each morning. Daily and total opioid consumption was determined. Perioperative opioid consumption and pain was determined in a second cohort, which was matched to age, sex, race, ethnicity, surgical procedure, and length of stay, but not receiving methadone. Results The final methadone study cohort was 31 adolescents (14 ± 2 yr, range 10–18) undergoing major spine surgery for a diagnosis of scoliosis. Methadone pharmacokinetics were linear over the dose range 0.1–0.3 mg/kg. Disposition was stereoselective. Methadone administration did not dose-dependently affect postoperative pain scores, and did not dose-dependently decrease daily or total postoperative opioid consumption in spinal fusion patients. Conclusions Methadone enantiomers disposition in adolescents undergoing surgery was similar to that in healthy adults. PMID:22037641

  6. The Dynamics of a Heroin Addiction Epidemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPont, Robert L.; Greene, Mark H.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses recent trends in heroin addiction in Washington, D.C. In 1969 a comprehensive, multimodal treatment program for addicts was introduced and a major law enforcement commitment was made to reduce the heroin supply. These factors, together with changing community attitudes, may be responsible for a remarkable decline in heroin addiction. (JR)

  7. Tips for Teens: The Truth about Heroin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... it enters the brain so rapidly. It particularly affects those regions of the brain responsible for producing physical dependence. Heroin is not what it may seem. Despite the glamorization of “heroin chic” in films, fashion, and music, heroin use can have tragic consequences that extend ...

  8. Combined liquid chromatography-coulometric detection and microextraction by packed sorbent for the plasma analysis of long acting opioids in heroin addicted patients.

    PubMed

    Somaini, Lorenzo; Saracino, Maria Addolorata; Marcheselli, Chiara; Zanchini, Silvia; Gerra, Gilberto; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2011-09-30

    The sublingual combination of buprenorphine and naloxone (Suboxone()) and Methadone Maintenance Therapy have been found effective in treating heroin addiction. A new analytical method suitable for the simultaneous determination of buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, methadone and naloxone in human plasma by means of liquid chromatography with coulometric detection has been developed. The chromatographic separation was achieved with a phosphate buffer-acetonitrile mixture as the mobile phase on a cyano column. The monitoring cell of the coulometric detector was set at an oxidation potential of +0.600 V. A rapid clean-up procedure of the biological samples using a microextraction by packed sorbent technique has been implemented, employing a C8 sorbent inserted into a syringe needle. The extraction yield values were satisfactory for all analytes (>85%). The calibration curves were linear over a range of 0.25-20.0 ng mL(-1) for buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine, 3.0-1000.0 ng mL(-1) for methadone and 0.13-10.0 ng mL(-1) for naloxone. The sensitivity was also high with limits of detection of 0.08 ng mL(-1) for both buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine, 0.9 ng mL(-1) for methadone and 0.04 ng mL(-1) for naloxone. The intraday and interday precision data were always satisfactory. The method was successfully applied to plasma samples obtained from former heroin addicts treated with opioid replacement therapy. PMID:21839210

  9. [The message from heroin overdoses].

    PubMed

    Pap, Ágota; Hegedűs, Katalin

    2015-03-01

    Drug use can be defined as a kind of self destruction, and it is directly linked to attitudes toward death and suicide occurring in a significant number of users of different narcotics. The aim of the authors was to look for the background of this relationship between drug and death and examine the origin, development, and motives behind heroin overdose based on an analysis of previous studies. It seems clear that pure heroin overdose increased gradually over the years. The fear of the police is the inhibitory factor of the overdose prevention and notification of emergency health care service. Signs of suicide could be the own home as the chosen location for heroin overdose and the presence of partners ("moment of death companion"). Interventions should include simple techniques such as first aid, naloxone administration, resuscitation, prevention of relapse of prisoners and social network extension involving maintenance programs. PMID:25702255

  10. Cognitive Control in Opioid Dependence and Methadone Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ding-Lieh; Huang, Cheng-Yi; Hu, Sien; Fang, Su-Chen; Wu, Chi-Shin; Chen, Wei-Ti; Lee, Tony Szu-Hsien; Chen, Pau-Chung; Li, Chiang-shan R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Substance misuse is associated with cognitive dysfunction. We used a stop signal task to examine deficits in cognitive control in individuals with opioid dependence (OD). We examined how response inhibition and post-error slowing are compromised and whether methadone maintenance treatment (MMT), abstinence duration, and psychiatric comorbidity are related to these measures in individuals with OD. Methods Two-hundred-and-sixty-four men with OD who were incarcerated at a detention center and abstinent for up to 2 months (n = 108) or at a correctional facility and abstinent for approximately 6 months (n = 156), 65 OD men under MMT at a psychiatric clinic, and 64 age and education matched healthy control (HC) participants were assessed. We computed the stop signal reaction time (SSRT) to index the capacity of response inhibition and post-error slowing (PES) to represent error-related behavioral adjustment, as in our previous work. We examined group effects with analyses of variance and covariance analyses, followed by planned comparisons. Specifically, we compared OD and HC participants to examine the effects of opioid dependence and MMT and compared OD sub-groups to examine the effects of abstinence duration and psychiatric comorbidity. Results The SSRT was significantly prolonged in OD but not MMT individuals, as compared to HC. The extent of post-error slowing diminished in OD and MMT, as compared to HC (trend; p = 0.061), and there was no difference between the OD and MMT groups. Individuals in longer abstinence were no less impaired in these measures. Furthermore, these results remained when psychiatric comorbidities including misuse of other substances were accounted for. Conclusions Methadone treatment appears to be associated with relatively intact cognitive control in opioid dependent individuals. MMT may facilitate public health by augmenting cognitive control and thereby mitigating risky behaviors in heroin addicts. PMID:24727743

  11. Premature Discharge from Methadone Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Reisinger, Heather Schacht; Schwartz, Robert P.; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Peterson, James A.; Kelly, Sharon M.; OGrady, Kevin E.; Marrari, Erica A.; Brown, Barry S.; Agar, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Longer retention in drug abuse treatment is associated with better patient outcomes and research indicates the first 12 months of methadone treatment are critical to patient success. Nevertheless, large-scale multi-site longitudinal studies over the past three decades indicate that the majority of patients drop out during the first year of methadone treatment. Through an examination of 42 qualitative interviews with patients prematurely discharged from six methadone treatment programs in Baltimore, this paper highlights factors patients describe as contributing to their reasons for being discharged within the first 12 months of the treatment. The two most consistent themes are program-related factors and incarceration. The former factors are richly described through patients words and underscore the ways in which patients perceptions of control exerted by the program and by the medication and misunderstandings of program structure can lead to premature discharge. Patients reasons for discharge were compared to counselors reasons as indicated in discharge summary forms. An analysis of the patterns of agreement and disagreement are presented. Patient-centered program and policy implications are discussed. PMID:19999682

  12. 21 CFR 862.3620 - Methadone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methadone test system. 862.3620 Section 862.3620....3620 Methadone test system. (a) Identification. A methadone test system is a device intended to measure methadone, an addictive narcotic pain-relieving drug, in serum and urine. Measurements obtained by...

  13. 21 CFR 862.3620 - Methadone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Methadone test system. 862.3620 Section 862.3620....3620 Methadone test system. (a) Identification. A methadone test system is a device intended to measure methadone, an addictive narcotic pain-relieving drug, in serum and urine. Measurements obtained by...

  14. 21 CFR 862.3620 - Methadone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Methadone test system. 862.3620 Section 862.3620....3620 Methadone test system. (a) Identification. A methadone test system is a device intended to measure methadone, an addictive narcotic pain-relieving drug, in serum and urine. Measurements obtained by...

  15. 21 CFR 862.3620 - Methadone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Methadone test system. 862.3620 Section 862.3620....3620 Methadone test system. (a) Identification. A methadone test system is a device intended to measure methadone, an addictive narcotic pain-relieving drug, in serum and urine. Measurements obtained by...

  16. 21 CFR 862.3620 - Methadone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Methadone test system. 862.3620 Section 862.3620....3620 Methadone test system. (a) Identification. A methadone test system is a device intended to measure methadone, an addictive narcotic pain-relieving drug, in serum and urine. Measurements obtained by...

  17. Experience-Seeking Characteristics of Methadone Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Paul M.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Methadone clients scored higher than controls on measures reflecting boredom, desire for change and attraction to physically thrilling activities. Correlations of these measures with length of most recent dependency before treatment, time on program, and time since initial dependency suggest peculiarities of methadone clients antedated involvement

  18. Experience-Seeking Characteristics of Methadone Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Paul M.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Methadone clients scored higher than controls on measures reflecting boredom, desire for change and attraction to physically thrilling activities. Correlations of these measures with length of most recent dependency before treatment, time on program, and time since initial dependency suggest peculiarities of methadone clients antedated involvement…

  19. Clinical nuances of pediatric methadone intoxication.

    PubMed

    Brooks, D E; Roberge, R J; Spear, A

    1999-12-01

    Pediatric methadone intoxication may present with clinically unusual findings which could cause confusion to the inexperienced practitioner. We present a case of pediatric methadone overdose, address clinical nuances pertinent to these overdoses, and discuss measures aimed at limiting these potentially catastrophic exposures. PMID:10592949

  20. Sleep Quality and Sexual Function in Patients Under Methadone Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kheradmand, Ali; Amini Ranjbar, Zahra; Zeynali, Zahra; Sabahy, Abdol Reza; Nakhaee, Nouzar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Methadone maintenance has remained the main modality of treatment for opioid dependent subjects. Side effects of methadone treatment may be potential obstacles to its continuation. Sleep quality and sexual function are two culture-based concerns, directly related to patients’ compliance with methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) program. Objectives: This research was conducted to examine the frequency of sleep disparity and sexual dysfunction in patients under MMT referring to MMT clinics of Kerman, Iran. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 198 adult subjects under MMT for more than 6 months were enrolled. Measurement tool consisted of Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), Arizona sexual experience scale (ASEX), the 12-item general health questionnaire (GHQ-12), and a demographic questionnaire. The questionnaires were self-completed, except where individuals were illiterate. Results: Mean ± SD age of the subjects was 41.2 ± 7.9 years and 93.4% of them were male. More than half of them used heroin. Prevalence of poor sleeping and sexual dysfunction in patients under MMT were 67.7% and 18.2%, respectively. There was no association between sleep quality or sexual dysfunction and demographics or methadone dose. However, a significant correlation was observed between mental health and sleep quality (r =0.16, P = 0.033), and sexual function (r = 0.18, P = 0.011). Conclusions: Sleep quality showed a poorer profile than sexual function. Therefore, more emphasis should be laid on treatment of sleep disparity during follow up of MMT patients comparing to their sexual function. Patients should be reassured that probable sexual dysfunctions should not be regarded as a consequence of MMT. PMID:26870710

  1. Methadone adverse reaction presenting with large increase in plasma methadone binding: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The use of methadone as an analgesic is on the increase, but it is widely recognized that the goal of predictable and reproducible dosing is confounded by considerable variability in methadone pharmacokinetics, and unpredictable side effects that include sedation, respiratory depression and cardiac arrhythmias. The mechanisms underlying these unpredictable effects are frequently unclear. Here, to the best of our knowledge we present the first report of an association between accidental methadone overexposure and increased plasma protein binding, a new potential mechanism for drug interactions with methadone. Case presentation We describe here the cases of two patients who experienced markedly different responses to the same dose of methadone during co-administration of letrozole. Both patients were post-menopausal Caucasian women who were among healthy volunteers participating in a clinical trial. Under the trial protocol both patients received 6 mg of intravenous methadone before and then after taking letrozole for seven days. One woman (aged 59) experienced symptoms consistent with opiate overexposure after the second dose of methadone that were reversed by naloxone, while the other (aged 49) did not. To understand the etiology of this event, we measured methadone pharmacokinetics in both patients. In our affected patient only, a fourfold to eightfold increase in methadone plasma concentrations after letrozole treatment was observed. Detailed pharmacokinetic analysis indicated no change in metabolism or renal elimination in our patient, but the percentage of unbound methadone in the plasma decreased 3.7-fold. As a result, the volume of distribution of methadone decreased approximately fourfold. The increased plasma binding in our affected patient was consistent with observed increases in plasma protein concentrations. Conclusions The marked increase in the total plasma methadone concentration observed in our patient, and the enhanced pharmacodynamic effect, appear primarily due to a reduced volume of distribution. The extent of plasma methadone binding may help to explain the unpredictability of its pharmacokinetics. Changes in volume of distribution due to plasma binding may represent important causes of clinically meaningful drug interactions. PMID:21985665

  2. Buprenorphine Outpatient Outcomes Project: can Suboxone be a viable outpatient option for heroin addiction?

    PubMed Central

    Sittambalam, Charmian D.; Vij, Radhika; Ferguson, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Opioid dependence treatment traditionally involves methadone clinics, for which dispensing schedules can be cumbersome. Buprenorphine, a partial agonist of the mu receptor and antagonist of the kappa receptor, is a potential outpatient alternative to methadone. Funded by a grant from the State of Maryland's Community Health Resources Commission (CHRC), the Buprenorphine Outpatient Outcomes Project (BOOP) evaluates the outcome of Suboxone (buprenorphine/naloxone) treatment on abstinence from heroin use, rates of emergency room visits and hospitalizations, legal issues, and quality of life. Methods Active heroin users were recruited between June 2007 and June 2010 and induction therapy with Suboxone was instituted during hospitalization. Once discharged, patients were followed as outpatients for maintenance treatment and counseling. Data were collected from electronic medical records, Maryland state legal records, and SF-36 Health Surveys regarding several parameters and patients were categorized according to duration of treatment with Suboxone into one of three groups: <1 month, 13 months, and >3 months. Results A total of 220 participants were included in the study. The age range of participants was 1867 years with most being African American males. Eighty-three (38%) remained in the study for at least 1 month, with 37 of the 83 (45%) remaining in treatment for >3 months. Ten of the 37 (27%) never relapsed after their longest period of abstinence from heroin. During the first year after initiating treatment with Suboxone, hospitalization and emergency room visit rates for all 220 participants decreased by 45 and 23%, respectively, as compared to the year prior to starting treatment. The number of legal charges for drug possession decreased from 70 to 62. Anecdotally, the quality of life seemed to improve in those who were treated with Suboxone for longer periods of time and received regular counseling. Conclusion Overall, Suboxone is an effective treatment method for heroin addiction and is a viable outpatient therapy option. Individualized treatment plans and counseling must be implemented for maximum benefits to be seen. Retention of patients for a long duration of therapy was difficult, but for those who did remain, benefits were seen in overall health, abstinence from heroin use, cognition, and quality of life. PMID:24765257

  3. Outcome of heroin-dependent adolescents presenting for opiate substitution treatment.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Bobby P; Fagan, John; Kernan, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Because the outcome of methadone and buprenorphine substitution treatment in adolescents is unclear, we completed a retrospective cohort study of 100 consecutive heroin-dependent adolescents who sought these treatments over an 8-year recruitment period. The participants' average age was 16.6 years, and 54 were female. Half of the patient group remained in treatment for over 1 year. Among those still in treatment at 12 months, 39% demonstrated abstinence from heroin. The final route of departure from the treatment program was via planned detox for 22%, dropout for 32%, and imprisonment for 8%. The remaining 39% were transferred elsewhere for ongoing opiate substitution treatment after a median period of 23 months of treatment. Males were more likely to exit via imprisonment (p < .05), but other outcomes were not predicted by gender. There were no deaths during treatment among these 100 patients who had a cumulative period of 129 person years at risk. Our findings suggest that this treatment delivers reductions in heroin use and that one fifth of patients will exit treatment following detox completion within a 1- to 2-year time frame. PMID:21940134

  4. Increased Sensitivity to Cocaine Self-Administration in HIV-1 Transgenic Rats is Associated with Changes in Striatal Dopamine Transporter Binding.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scot; Sexton, Tammy; Pattison, Lindsey P; Childers, Steven R; Hemby, Scott E

    2015-09-01

    Cocaine abuse in HIV patients accelerates the progression and severity of neuropathology, motor impairment and cognitive dysfunction compared to non-drug using HIV patients. Cocaine and HIV interact with the dopamine transporter (DAT); however, the effect of their interaction on DAT binding remains understudied. The present study compared the dose-response functions for intravenous self-administration of cocaine and heroin between male HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1 Tg) and Fischer 344 rats. The cocaine and heroin dose-response functions exhibit an inverted U-shape for both HIV-1 Tg and F344 rats. For cocaine, the number of infusions for each dose on the ascending limb was greater for HIV-1 Tg versus F344 rats. No significant changes in the heroin dose-response function were observed in HIV-1 Tg animals. Following the conclusion of self-administration experiments, DAT binding was assessed in striatal membranes. Saturation binding of the cocaine analog [(125)I] 3?-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2?-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([(125)I]RTI-55) in rat striatal membranes resulted in binding curves that were best fit to a two-site binding model, allowing for calculation of dissociation constant (Kd) and binding density (Bmax) values that correspond to high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Control HIV-1 Tg rats exhibited a significantly greater affinity (i.e., decrease in Kd value) in the low-affinity DAT binding site compared to control F344 rats. Furthermore, cocaine self-administration in HIV-1 Tg rats increased low-affinity Kd (i.e., decreased affinity) compared to levels observed in control F344 rats. Cocaine also increased low-affinity Bmax in HIV-1 Tg rats as compared to controls, indicating an increase in the number of low-affinity DAT binding sites. F344 rats did not exhibit any change in high- or low-affinity Kd or Bmax values following cocaine or heroin self-administration. The increase in DAT affinity in cocaine HIV-1 Tg rats is consistent with the leftward shift of the ascending limb of the cocaine dose-response curve observed in HIV-1 Tg vs. F344 rats, and has major implications for the function of cocaine binding to DAT in HIV patients. The absence of HIV-related changes in heroin intake are likely due to less dopaminergic involvement in the mediation of heroin reward, further emphasizing the preferential influence of HIV on dopamine-related behaviors. PMID:25749646

  5. Australian heroin seizures and the causes of the 2001 heroin shortage.

    PubMed

    Jiggens, John

    2008-08-01

    This paper uses Australian heroin seizure data, along with estimates of the size of the Australian heroin market to evaluate the impact of drug law enforcement on the 2001 Australian heroin shortage from the percentage of the market seized. It also critically examines international heroin production trends and published reports on the causes of the Australian heroin shortage. Its conclusion is that previous studies may have overstated the success of drug law enforcement and that the most likely explanation for Australia's 2001 heroin shortage was a significant decline in heroin production world-wide, due to a general move away from heroin production in the countries of Southeast Asia and the prohibition on opium growing by the Taliban regime in Afghanistan. PMID:17920258

  6. Do Young Heroin Users in Madrid, Barcelona and Seville have Sufficient Knowledge of the Risk Factors for Unintentional Opioid Overdose?

    PubMed Central

    Barrio, Gregorio; Brugal, M. Teresa; de la Fuente, Luis; Ballesta, Rosario; Bravo, María J.; Silva, Teresa C.; Rodríguez-Martos, Alicia

    2006-01-01

    To identify the self-perceived reasons for unintentional opioid overdose of young heroin users in three Spanish cities and their agreement with objective risk factors for overdose. Computer-Assisted Personal Interviews (CAPI) were held with 991 street-recruited current heroin users aged 18–30. The general reasons for overdose and the reasons for the last overdose suffered were explored with open-ended (OEQs) and pre-coded questions (PCQs). Limited knowledge of overdose risk factors was defined as mention of fewer than two objective risk factors for unintentional overdose in the OEQ. Univariate, bivariate, and logistic regression methods were used. 77.8% (Seville), 64.9% (Madrid) and 57.2% (Barcelona) of participants have limited knowledge of overdose risk factors. Residence in Seville and not having attended courses or meetings on overdoses were significantly associated with limited knowledge, after adjusting for other factors. The most frequently identified general reasons in OEQ or PCQ were using heroin in large amounts (66.8%), together with tranquilizers (62.0%), adulterated (60.7%), or purer than usual (57.6%). Most reasons were selected more frequently in PCQ than in OEQ, especially rapid injection of the entire dose and using heroin shortly after using tranquilizers or alcohol, by injection, or after a period of abstinence. The results were similar for overdoses suffered by participants. Most young heroin users do not have sufficient knowledge of overdose risk factors, especially the use of heroin by injection, after a period of abstinence, or together with alcohol or methadone. Specific informational or educational programs adapted to the local context are critically needed. PMID:16739049

  7. Continuing methadone for pain in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Philippa; Liebscher, Ryan; Wilford, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Methadone is one of the most important medications used for the treatment of refractory pain in the palliative care setting, and is usually initially prescribed by one of a limited number of physicians who have acquired authorization for its use. A lack of authorized physicians able to take over prescribing when the patient is stable is a barrier to accessing methadone for analgesia. OBJECTIVE: To determine the barriers to family physicians becoming authorized to prescribe methadone for pain in palliative care. METHODS: A survey exploring the perceived barriers to continuing methadone for pain in palliative care following initial prescription by a specialist was mailed to a randomly selected group of 870 family physicians in British Columbia. RESULTS: The response rate was 30.9%. Of the 204 responding physicians, 76.1% described themselves as positioned to provide ongoing palliative care to their patients. Within this group, 38 (18.6%) were already authorized to prescribe methadone for pain. The remaining 166 (81.4%) had significant knowledge deficits regarding methadone use in palliative care, but were largely aware of their deficits, and more than one-half were willing to learn more and to obtain an authorization if requested. CONCLUSIONS: Responding family physicians had mostly received little education regarding methadone for pain, but were aware of their need for education and were willing to learn. Physicians who had already become authorized were generally satisfied with the process of authorization, and believed the process of education through authorization was appropriate and not onerous. PMID:23662290

  8. Candida folliculitis in heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, G; Weber, M; Contet-Audonneau, N; Beurey, J

    1986-03-01

    Three heroin addicts had Candida folliculitis of the scalp, beard, and pubis associated with fever, chills, headache, and fatigue. In each case, pseudohyphae were found within a hair and yeasts around it and Candida was recovered from urine. These facts support a systemic dissemination. Since serious ocular and osteoarticular lesions have been described with this type of skin lesion, prompt diagnosis may be important to initiate treatment and prevent sequelae. PMID:3699950

  9. Heroin in brown, black and white: Structural factors and medical consequences in the US heroin market

    PubMed Central

    Ciccarone, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Background Heroin coming into the United States historically comes from three widely dispersed geographical regions: Southwest Asia, Southeast Asia and Mexico. A fourth source of US-bound heroin, from Colombia, originated in the early 1990s. The fact that the four heroin sources produce differing morphologies and qualities of heroin has not been critically examined. In addition, it is not well established how the contemporary competing dynamics of interdiction, or restriction of heroin flows across international boundaries, and neoliberal, e.g., global expansion of free trade, policies are affecting heroin markets. This paper will highlight changes in the US heroin market, including source trends, the political economy of the now dominant source and the resultant effects on the heroin risk environment by US region. Methods Using a structural and historical framework this paper examines two decades of secondary data sources, including government and drug control agency documents, on heroin flows together with published work on the political and economic dynamics in Latin America. Results Co-occurring neoliberal economic reforms may have contributed to paradoxical effects of US/Colombian interdiction efforts. Since entering the US market, heroin from Colombia has been distributed at a much higher quality and lower retail price. An increasingly exclusive market has developed with Mexican and Colombian heroin gaining market share and displacing Asian heroin. These trends have had dramatic effects on the risk environment for heroin consumers. An intriguing factor is that different global sources of heroin produce substantially different products. Plausible associations exist between heroin source/form and drug use behaviours and harms. For example, cold water-soluble powdered heroin (sources: Asia, Colombia) may be associated with higher HIV prevalence in the US, while low-solubility “black tar” heroin (BTH; source: Mexico) is historically used in areas with reduced HIV prevalence. BTH is associated with soft tissue infections caused by Clostridium bacteria. Conclusion Source and type of heroin are structural factors in the risk environment of heroin users: source dictates distribution and type predicts practice. How specific types of heroin are used and with what risk is therefore distributed geographically. Continued flux in the heroin market and its effects on the risk environment for drug users deserves further attention. PMID:18945606

  10. Methadone's effect on nAChRs--a link between methadone use and smoking?

    PubMed

    Talka, Reeta; Tuominen, Raimo K; Salminen, Outi

    2015-10-15

    Methadone is a long-acting opioid agonist that is frequently prescribed as a treatment for opioid addiction. Almost all methadone maintenance patients are smokers, and there is a correlation between smoking habit and use of methadone. Methadone administration increases tobacco smoking, and heavy smokers use higher doses of methadone. Nevertheless, methadone maintenance patients are willing to quit smoking although their quit rates are low. Studies on nicotine-methadone interactions provide an example of the bedside-to-bench approach, i.e., observations in clinical settings have been studied experimentally in vivo and in vitro. In vivo studies have revealed the interplay between nicotine and the endogenous opioid system. At the receptor level, methadone has been shown to be an agonist of human α7 nAChRs and a non-competitive antagonist of human α4β2 and α3* nAChRs. These drugs do not have significant interactions at the level of drug metabolism, and thus the interaction is most likely pharmacodynamic. The net effect of the interaction may depend on individual characteristics because pharmacogenetic factors influence the disposition of both methadone and nicotine. PMID:26231941

  11. Evaluation of Ongoing Oxycodone Abuse among Methadone-Maintained Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kelly E.; Sigmon, Stacey C.; McGee, Mark R.; Heil, Sarah H; Higgins, Stephen T.

    2008-01-01

    Prevalence of prescription opioid abuse has increased dramatically in recent years in the United States generally, and a similar pattern of increasing prescription opioid use has also been noted among patients seeking treatment for opioid dependence. The current study presents results from an internal quality-assurance project conducted by an outpatient methadone-maintenance (MM) treatment clinic which sought to examine the extent of ongoing oxycodone abuse among patients that might be going undetected with current urinalysis testing methods. One-hundred and five MM patients provided 437 urine samples over a 6-week period. Samples were analyzed using the clinic’s usual enzyme multiplied immunoassay test (EMIT) opiate assay (300 ng/ml opiate cutpoint) and a supplemental oxycodone test strip (100 ng/ml oxycodone cutpoint). The EMIT assay identified only 6% (20/437) of samples as positive for oxycodone, while the oxycodone test strip indicated that 19% (83/437) tested positive for recent oxycodone use. Inspection of patient characteristics revealed that oxycodone users were more likely to report a prescription opioid as their primary drug at intake, be in MM treatment for a significantly shorter duration and provide significantly more opioid- and cocaine-positive urine samples. Overall, these data illustrate the potential importance of monitoring for ongoing oxycodone use in MM clinics. While future efforts should examine this question using more rigorous experimental methods, findings from this initial project have implications for clinical issues such as evaluating patient stability in treatment, making medication dosing decisions, and determining patient eligibility for methadone take-home privileges. PMID:18295434

  12. Differences in methylphenidate abuse rates among methadone maintenance treatment patients in two clinics.

    PubMed

    Peles, Einat; Schreiber, Shaul; Linzy, Shirley; Domani, Yoav; Adelson, Miriam

    2015-07-01

    Methylphenidate, an amphetamine-like prescription medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was suspected as being abused among methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) patients. We tested its presence in the routine urine monitoring of all patients in both Tel Aviv and Las Vegas MMT clinics. Data on demographic and addiction history, ADHD (Wender Utah Rating Scale), cognitive impairment (Mini Mental State Exam), and lifetime DSM-IV-TR psychiatric diagnosis from admission were retrieved, and retention following 6 months. None of the 190 patients in Las Vegas tested positive for methylphenidate, while 14.7% (45/306) did in Tel Aviv. Abusers were less educated (p = 0.01), had higher ADHD scores (p = 0.02), lower cognitive scores (p = 0.05), and a higher benzodiazepine (BDZ) abuse rate (p < 0.0005), with no difference in age, gender, duration in MMT, cannabis, opiates, and cocaine abuse and infectious disease. Of the methylphenidate abuse 42.2% have take-home methadone dose privileges. Not like opiate use, being methylphenidate positive did not relate to 6-months retention. Compared to Tel Aviv, Las Vegas patients were more educated, with lower BDZ, and cocaine abuse. The greater abuse of methylphenidate among ADHD subjects might indicate their using it as self-medication, raising a possible indication for its prescription for that subgroup of MMT patients. The high rate of methylphenidate abuse in Israel needs future study. PMID:25605438

  13. Cocaine and Cardiovascular Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, John D.; Rose, Fred D.

    1986-01-01

    The case of a 21-year-old man who suffered a myocardial infarction after using cocaine and amphetamines is reported. A brief literature review provides evidence of cocaine's potential cardiovascular effects. (Author/MT)

  14. Mind Over Matter: Cocaine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... need help? Menu | Search Home + Drug Facts Alcohol Anabolic Steroids Bath Salts Cocaine Cough and Cold Medicine (DXM ... site Citation Site Map Home Drug Facts Alcohol Anabolic Steroids Bath Salts Cocaine Cough and Cold Medicine (DXM ...

  15. Buprenorphine versus methadone in the treatment of opioid dependence: self-reports, urinalysis, and addiction severity index.

    PubMed

    Strain, E C; Stitzer, M L; Liebson, I A; Bigelow, G E

    1996-02-01

    This article reports results for patients who completed the 16-week maintenance phase of a double-blind clinical trial comparing buprenorphine (N = 43; average dose = 9.0 mg/day sublingually) with methadone (N = 43; average dose = 54 mg/day orally) in the outpatient treatment of opioid dependence. In addition to pharmacotherapy, treatment during the clinical trial included individual counseling, weekly group therapy, and on-site medical services. Patients in both medication groups showed significant and substantial improvements over time in areas of psychosocial functioning, as assessed by the Addiction Severity Index, rates of urinalysis tests positive for opioids, and self-reports of opioid withdrawal symptoms, illicit opioid use, and cocaine use. Buprenorphine and methadone produced very similar outcomes on the wide array of outcome measures assessed, and improvements for both groups were large and occurred rapidly after treatment entry. A trend toward continued improvement in opioid-positive urines over time was noted for the buprenorphine but not the methadone group. These results provide further evidence of the efficacy of buprenorphine in the treatment of opioid dependence and provide a characterization of the time course of effects for buprenorphine and methadone. In addition, these results demonstrate the benefits of drug abuse treatment, both for drug and alcohol use and in other areas of psychosocial functioning. PMID:8834420

  16. A study on photodegradation of methadone, EDDP, and other drugs of abuse in hair exposed to controlled UVB radiation.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Donata; Tucci, Marianna; Monaldi, Alice; Ferrara, Santo Davide; Miolo, Giorgia

    2014-06-01

    The drug content of hair may be affected by washing, chemical or thermal treatments, the use of cosmetics, or exposure to the environment. Knowledge concerning the effect of natural or artificial light on drug content in hair can be helpful to the forensic toxicologist, in particular when investigating drug concentrations above or below pre-determined cut-offs. The photodegradation of methadone and its metabolite, 2-ethyl-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) was studied in authentic positive hair samples by comparing drug concentrations determined by liquid chromatrography-high resolution mass spectrometry before and after exposure to UVB light (in vivo study). The same approach was applied in order to investigate the light sensitivity of opiates (6-monoacetylmorphine and morphine) and cocainics (cocaine and benzoylecgonine) in true positive hair. The yields of photodegradation were calculated for each drug class in eight different positive hair samples irradiated by UVB at 300 J/cm(2) obtaining averages, ranges and standard deviations. In parallel, the photostability of all the compounds as 10(-5) -10(-4)  M standard solutions in methanol were examined by means of UVB light irradiation in the range 0-100 J/cm(2) followed by UV/Vis spectroscopic analysis and direct infusion electrospray ionization-high resolution mass spectrometry (in vitro study). In hair, methadone was shown to be significantly affected by light (photodegradation of 55% on average), while its metabolite EDDP proved to be more photostable (17%). 6-monoacetylmorphine, morphine, benzoylecgonine, and cocaine were more photostable than methadone in vivo (on average, 21%, 17%, 20%, and 11% of degradation, respectively). When irradiated in standard solutions, the target molecules exhibited a larger photodegradation than in vivo with the exception of cocaine (photodegradation for methadone up to 70%, 6-monoacetylmorphine and morphine up to 90%, benzoylecgonine up to 67%, cocaine up to 15%). Some factors possibly affecting the yields of photodegradation in hair and partially explaining the differences observed between the in vivo and the in vitro studies were also investigated, such as the colour of hair (the role of melanin) and the integrity of the keratin matrix. PMID:24817052

  17. [Heroin. II. Preparation, hydrolysis, stability, pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Hosztafi, S

    2001-10-01

    Heroin is prepared by treating morphine with acetyl chloride or acetic anhydride. It is a simple reaction and the yields are generally quantitative. Nowadays the whole process is illegal. Morphine is the major alkaloid present in the opium poppy. Opium is manufactured illicitly then morphine is extracted from it in clandestine laboratories. Numerous studies were carried out on heroin to investigate its rate of hydrolysis. It has been shown that heroin is rapidly deacylated in aqueous solution at alkaline or acidic pH to form 6-acethylmorphine and finally, to morphine. Heroin also rapidly decomposes in biological medium yielding first 6-acetylmorphine and then morphine. Hydrolysis can be performed in blood and in tissue homogenates. Heroin can be administered by several routes. Smoking and intravenous administration are preferred, but intranasal, intramuscular and subcutaneous administration are also common. Recently, there has been a shift in heroin use patterns from injection to sniffing and smoking. Sharing of the injection equipment can result in several severe infectious diseases, such as AIDS, hepatitis B and C. Soon after administration, heroin metabolizes to 6-acetylmorphine and morphine. Most of the pharmacological activities of heroin are due to these active metabolites. Therefore, knowledge of distribution of 6-acetylmorphine and morphine is essential to understand pharmacological properties of heroin. Heroin, which is relatively nonpolar compound compared with morphine, has high lipid solubility facilitating rapid absorption from the bloodstream and passage through the blood-brain barrier. When heroin is administered by intravenously the drug takes 10 s to reach the brain i.e. pharmacological effects appear quickly. PMID:11961908

  18. Voltammetric assay of methadone in urine.

    PubMed

    Barreira Rodrguez, J R; Costa Garca, A; Tun Blanco, P

    1989-08-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive voltammetric method for the determination of methadone in human urine is proposed, which permits the detection of concentrations of methadone as low as 0.3-0.4 microgram ml-1. The proposed method was compared with methods normally used in clinical trials, such as the enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique, and was found to be superior with regard to cost and to possess high sensitivity. PMID:2802169

  19. Efficacy of contingency management in improving retention and compliance to methadone maintenance treatment: a random controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Haifeng; Du, Jiang; Wu, Fei; Wang, Zhaowei; Fan, Shujun; Li, Zhibin; Hser, Yih-Ing; Zhao, Min

    2012-01-01

    Background Compliance with methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) in China is poor. Objective To evaluate the effects of adjunctive contingency management (CM) on the efficacy of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) in patients with opioid dependence. Hypothesis A 12-week prize-based contingency management (CM) intervention can increase the retention and compliance of heroin abusers to standardized MMT programs in Shanghai. Methods 160 heroin-dependent patients from three voluntary MMT clinics in Shanghai were randomly assigned to a treatment as usual group (MMT, n=80) and an intervention group (MMT+CM, n=80). Daily use of methadone was recorded and urine drug tests were conducted weekly during the first 12 weeks and then at week 16, week 20 and week 24. Results The 12-week retention rates for the intervention (MMT+CM) and treatment-as-usual (MMT) groups were both quite high: 87.5% and 86.2%, respectively. The average durations of using methadone in the two groups were equal (70 days versus 71 days, respectively). There was a non-significant increase in the mean longest drug-free period (7.4 weeks versus 6.5 weeks) and in the mean number of negative urine tests (7.9 versus 7.6). Secondary analysis of the 24-week outcomes (12 weeks after termination of the adjunctive CM treatment) also found no significant differences between the groups. Among those who remained in the program the severity of addiction as assessed by the Addiction Severity Index decreased dramatically over the 24 weeks but, again, there were no significant differences in the addiction measures between those in the intervention group and those in the treatment-as-usual group. Conclusion Prize-based CM is not effective in improving the retention and compliance of heroin abusers to MMT in Shanghai. The main reasons for failure to replicate western studies were the unexpectedly high baseline rates of compliance in this sample (86%) and the relatively weak financial incentives provided by the CM program. CM programs are context dependent so a careful preliminary situational analysis is needed to determine their potential effectiveness at a particular site and to identify the types of incentives (prizes) that will effectively encourage behavioral change in the target participants. PMID:25324596

  20. Heroin: Challenge for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Susan M.

    The rise in heroin use in the 1990s is attributed to an increase in snorting and smoking heroin as opposed to earlier epidemics that relied on intravenous use. An increase in purity has also added to the addiction problem. The trend towards use by young people was confirmed by the 2000 Monitoring the Future Study, which reported that 10.6% of high…

  1. The heroin addict! A personal view.

    PubMed

    Cyngler, Charles

    2002-04-01

    Heroin beckons like the sweet seductive calls of Ulysses' sirens. The alluring nectar of the poppy seed, once experienced is not easy to escape. The greed for pleasure is endless. Gratification begets gratification. This paper explores issues and complications of treatment intervention in heroin addiction. The author is a general practitioner with 25 years experience and special interest in substance abuse medicine. PMID:12043133

  2. NAOMI: The trials and tribulations of implementing a heroin assisted treatment study in North America

    PubMed Central

    Gartry, Candice C; Oviedo-Joekes, Eugenia; Laliberté, Nancy; Schechter, Martin T

    2009-01-01

    Background Opioid addiction is a chronic, relapsing disease and remains a major public health challenge. Despite important expansions of access to conventional treatments, there are still significant proportions of affected individuals who remain outside the reach of the current treatment system and who contribute disproportionately to health care and criminal justice costs as well as to public disorder associated with drug addiction. The NAOMI study is a Phase III randomized clinical trial comparing injectable heroin maintenance to oral methadone. The study has ethics board approval at its Montréal and Vancouver sites, as well as from the University of Toronto, the New York Academy of Medicine and Johns Hopkins University. The main objective of the NAOMI Study is to determine whether the closely supervised provision of injectable, pharmaceutical-grade opioid agonist is more effective than methadone alone in recruiting, retaining, and benefiting chronic, opioid-dependent, injection drug users who are resistant to current standard treatment options. Methods The case study submitted chronicles the challenges of getting a heroin assisted treatment trial up and running in North America. It describes: a brief background on opioid addiction; current standard therapies for opioid addiction; why there is/was a need for a heroin assisted treatment trial; a description of heroin assisted treatment; the beginnings of creating the NAOMI study in North America; what is the NAOMI study; the science and politics of the NAOMI study; getting NAOMI started in Canada; various requirements and restrictions in getting the study up and running; recruitment into the study; working with the media; a status report on the study; and a brief conclusion from the authors' perspectives. Results and conclusion As this is a case study, there are no specific results or main findings listed. The case study focuses on: the background of the study; what it took to get the study started in Canada; the unique requirements and conditions of getting a site, and the study, approved; working with the media; recruitment into the study; a brief status report on the study; and a brief conclusion from the authors' perspectives. Trail Registration ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT00175357 PMID:19159475

  3. Manifest and Latent Components in Methadone Maintenance: The Methadone Maintenance Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Charles H.

    1975-01-01

    This paper discusses various difficulties which arise when the staff of a methadone maintenance clinic must come to grips with the manifest and latent issues in service delivery. A solution is suggested which involves severing the tie between methadone and the behaviors which are reinforced by its use. (Author)

  4. The Correlation between Methadone Dosage and Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders in Patients on Methadone Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Parvaresh, Nooshin; Masoudi, Arman; Majidi-Tabrizi, Shiva; Mazhari, Shahrzad

    2012-01-01

    Background Methadone Maintenance Treatment is a useful method for opioid dependents, which results in harm reduction and increased quality of life in opioid dependents. The prevalence of psychiatric disorders in addicts is higher than in the general population which can interfere with the course and treatment of substance dependents and decrease the efficacy of treatment. Methods This descriptive, cross-sectional study was aimed to determine the correlation between psychiatric disorders and methadone dosage. It was performed on 154 patients of Kerman Shahid Beheshti Hospitals Methadone Clinic during a six month period from Dec 2010 to Jul 2011. The study population was chosen by convenience sampling. The searching tools were Socio-Demographic Questionnaire, psychiatric structured interview based on DSM-IV-TR, Beck Depression Inventory, Young Mania Rating Scales, and Anxiety and Depression Rating Scales. Findings Significant correlations were observed between increased methadone dosage and antisocial personality disorder. In addition, significant positive correlations were observed between increased methadone dosage and Hamilton anxiety scores, Hamilton depression scores and Young Mania scores. Conclusion High methadone dosage may be a marker of coexisting psychiatric disorders in patients on methadone maintenance treatment which indicates the necessity of devoting further attention to this group. Psychiatric services should be open and accessible to the patients, especially those who seek treatment voluntarily. Early diagnosis and treatment of patients with coexisting psychiatric disorders may increase the efficacy of methadone maintenance treatment. PMID:24494130

  5. SELF-REPORTS OF ILLEGAL ACTIVITY, SCL-90-R PERSONALITY SCALES, AND URINE TESTS IN METHADONE PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Cernovsky, Zack; Sadek, Gamal; Chiu, Simon

    2015-12-01

    In routine work, medical staff usually has to rely on the patient's self-reports of criminal activity and of recent involvement in fights. This study examines how these self-reports of crime correlate with the patients' routine urine tests and personality measures. Pearson correlations of these self-reports by 55 methadone patients (M age = 34.1 yr., SD = 9.1; 35 men, 20 women) were calculated to their urine screening tests (those for opiates, benzodiazepines, and cocaine) and to personality scores on the Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R). Patients who reported being involved in recent illegal activities to obtain drugs had significantly higher scores on the SCL-90-R scale assessing obsessive-compulsive symptoms (r = .28) and had more frequent positive urine tests for cocaine (r = .35). Those who reported having engaged in fights within the last 12 mo. had higher scores on SCL-90-R measures of somatic complaints (r = .32), anxiety (r = .31), and depression (r = .29), and of overall psychopathology (r = .29), and they also had more often positive urine tests for cocaine (r = .28) than other patients. Studies on larger samples are needed to help clinicians to predict criminal or hostile behavior during methadone treatment. PMID:26595299

  6. Heroin addiction, ethics and philosophy of medicine.

    PubMed Central

    ten Have, H; Sporken, P

    1985-01-01

    This article discusses various ethical and philosophical aspects of heroin addiction. It arose as a result of the plan by the Amsterdam city council to supply free heroin to drug addicts. The objective of treatment of heroin addicts is ambivalent because what is in fact a socio-cultural problem is transformed into a medical problem. The characteristics of this treatment are made explicit through a philosophical analysis which sees the medical intervention as part of a strategy aimed at achieving social normalisation. The reason why such a social control function is practised by physicians is discussed, as well as the reason why heroin users in particular are the object of such a process. In this paper, heroin addiction is considered primarily as a cultural problem. The consequences of this for treatment and ethics form the conclusion. PMID:4078854

  7. Intraparenchymal hemorrhage after heroin use.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neha; Bhalla, Mary Colleen; Frey, Jennifer A; Southern, Alison

    2015-08-01

    Heroin-associated stroke is a rare complication of use. Various proposed mechanisms of heroin-associated ischemic stroke have been proposed, including the following: cardioembolism in the setting of infective endocarditis, hypoxic ischemic brain injury in the setting of hypoxemia and hypotension, and infective arteritis or vasculitis from drug adulterants. A previously healthy 28-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with altered mental status and normal vitals after she was found wandering outside her apartment. During ambulance transport, she endorsed heroin use. The patient was alert but could not recall her name, place, or time. She intermittently responded "I don't know" to questioning and could not perform simple commands. No motor or sensory deficits were apparent other than sluggish pinpoint pupils. There were no signs of trauma other than antecubital track marks. Her laboratory results were unremarkable. Reevaluation at 2 hours after presentation showed persistent confusion and disorientation. A computed tomographic scan of the head was obtained, which showed a large 5.1 5-cm intraparenchymal hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe, vasogenic edema, and a 5-mm midline shift. A workup for cardioembolic, vasculitis, and other etiologies for stroke did not reveal an underlying cause. The patient remained confused with significant memory loss throughout her hospital stay and was eventually discharged to a long-term care facility. Drug abuse should be considered a risk factor for stoke in young adults. In patients with persistent neurologic deficits, physicians must be vigilant and order appropriate workup while managing drug overdose. PMID:25656330

  8. A Placebo-Controlled Trial of Dextromethorphan as an Adjunct in Opioid-Dependent Patients Undergoing Methadone Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chen, Po See; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Wang, Liang-Jen; Lee, I Hui; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Chen, Kao Chin; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low-dose dextromethorphan (DM) might have anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic effects mechanistically remote from an NMDA receptor. In a randomized, double-blind, controlled 12 week study, we investigated whether add-on dextromethorphan reduced cytokine levels and benefitted opioid-dependent patients undergoing methadone maintenance therapy (MMT). Methods: Patients were randomly assigned to a group: DM60 (60mg/day dextromethorphan; n = 65), DM120 (120mg/day dextromethorphan; n = 65), or placebo (n = 66). Primary outcomes were the methadone dose required, plasma morphine level, and retention in treatment. Plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, C-reactive protein, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, transforming growth factor–β1, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were examined during weeks 0, 1, 4, 8, and 12. Multiple linear regressions with generalized estimating equation methods were used to examine the therapeutic effect. Results: After 12 weeks, the DM60 group had significantly longer treatment retention and lower plasma morphine levels than did the placebo group. Plasma TNF-α was significantly decreased in the DM60 group compared to the placebo group. However, changes in plasma cytokine levels, BDNF levels, and the methadone dose required in the three groups were not significantly different. Conclusions: We provide evidence—decreased concomitant heroin use—of low-dose add-on DM’s efficacy for treating opioid-dependent patients undergoing MMT. PMID:25716777

  9. Polysubstance Use and Heroin Relapse among Adolescents following Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Christopher E.; Clemmey, Philip; Harrell, Paul; Subramaniam, Geetha; Fishman, Marc

    2012-01-01

    This study examined posttreatment patterns of polysubstance use and heroin relapse in a sample of 43 adolescents (ages 14-20) entering short-term residential treatment for primary heroin use. At 12-month follow-up, youths that achieved heroin abstinence (N = 19) were significantly less likely than youths that relapsed to heroin (N = 24) to endorse

  10. Polysubstance Use and Heroin Relapse among Adolescents following Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Christopher E.; Clemmey, Philip; Harrell, Paul; Subramaniam, Geetha; Fishman, Marc

    2012-01-01

    This study examined posttreatment patterns of polysubstance use and heroin relapse in a sample of 43 adolescents (ages 14-20) entering short-term residential treatment for primary heroin use. At 12-month follow-up, youths that achieved heroin abstinence (N = 19) were significantly less likely than youths that relapsed to heroin (N = 24) to endorse…

  11. Development of Mechanical Hypersensitivity in Rats During Heroin and Ethanol Dependence: Alleviation by CRF1 Receptor Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Scott; Vendruscolo, Leandro F.; Schlosburg, Joel E.; Misra, Kaushik K.; Wee, Sunmee; Park, Paula E.; Schulteis, Gery; Koob, George F.

    2011-01-01

    Animal models of drug dependence have described both reductions in brain reward processes and potentiation of stress-like (or anti-reward) mechanisms, including a recruitment of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling. Accordingly, chronic exposure to opiates often leads to the development of mechanical hypersensitivity. We measured paw withdrawal thresholds (PWTs) in male Wistar rats allowed limited (short access group: ShA) or extended (long access group: LgA) access to heroin or cocaine self-administration, or in rats made dependent on ethanol via ethanol vapor exposure (ethanol-dependent group). In heroin self-administering animals, after transition to LgA conditions, thresholds were reduced to around 50% of levels observed at baseline, and were also significantly lower than thresholds measured in animals remaining on the ShA schedule. In contrast, thresholds in animals self-administering cocaine under either ShA (1 h) or LgA (6 h) conditions were unaltered. Similar to heroin LgA rats, ethanol-dependent rats also developed mechanical hypersensitivity after eight weeks of ethanol vapor exposure compared to non-dependent animals. Systemic administration of the CRF1R antagonist MPZP significantly alleviated the hypersensitivity observed in rats dependent on heroin or ethanol. The emergence of mechanical hypersensitivity with heroin and ethanol dependence may thus represent one critical drug-associated negative emotional state driving dependence on these substances. These results also suggest a recruitment of CRF-regulated nociceptive pathways associated with escalation of intake and dependence. A greater understanding of relationships between chronic drug exposure and pain-related states may provide insight into mechanisms underlying the transition to drug addiction, as well as reveal new treatment opportunities. PMID:22119954

  12. Diversion of methadone and buprenorphine from opioid substitution treatment: a staff perspective.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Bjrn; Richert, Torkel

    2014-01-01

    Opioid substitution treatment (OST) is still controversial, despite positive results. The issue of diversion to the illicit drug market is a cornerstone in the criticism typically voiced against the treatment. Little research is available concerning how professionals who work in OST view the issue of diversion. In this article, we discuss existing ideas and attitudes toward diversion of methadone and buprenorphine among OST staff in Sweden. The article is based on semi-structured interviews with 25 professionals working in eight OST-programs in southern Sweden. Diversion was seen as a deleterious phenomenon by the interviewees. Three problematic aspects were highlighted: medical risks in the form of overdose fatalities and the recruitment of new opiate/opioid users; negative consequences for the legitimacy of OST; and moral objections, since diversion means that the patients remain in a criminal environment. However, positive aspects were also highlighted. Illicit methadone or buprenorphine is perceived as safer than heroin. In this way, diversion can fulfill a positive function; for instance, if there is a shortage of access to regular treatment. Patients who share their medication with opioid-dependent friends are seen as less culpable than those who sell to anyone for money. PMID:25364995

  13. Long term outcomes of pharmacological treatments for opioid dependence: does methadone still lead the pack?

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Portilla, Maria Paz; Bobes-Bascaran, Maria Teresa; Bascaran, Maria Teresa; Saiz, Pilar Alejandra; Bobes, Julio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review was to update and summarize the scientific knowledge on the long term outcomes of the different pharmacological treatment options for opioid dependence currently available and to provide a critical discussion on the different treatment options based on these results. We performed a literature search using the PubMed databases and the reference lists of the identified articles. Data from research show that the three pharmacological options reviewed are effective treatments for opioid dependence with positive long term outcomes. However, each one has its specific target population and setting. While methadone and buprenorphine are first line options, heroin-assisted treatment is a second line option for those patients refractory to treatment with methadone with concomitant severe physical, mental, social and/or functional problems. Buprenorphine seems to be the best option for use in primary care offices. The field of opioid dependence treatment is poised to undergo a process of reinforcement and transformation. Further efforts from researchers, clinicians and authorities should be made to turn new pharmacological options into clinical reality and to overcome the structural and functional obstacles that maintenance programmes face in combatting opioid dependence. PMID:23145768

  14. Examine the Relationship between Mindfulness and Drug Craving in Addicts Undergoing Methadone Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    ARDAME, Ali; BASSAKNEJAD, Soodabe; ZARGARD, Yadollah; ROKNI, Parisa; SAYYAH, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was examination the relationship between mindfulness and drug craving in addicts undergoing methadone maintenance treatment. Methods The subjects of this research were 80 addicts undergoing methadone maintenance treatment selected through available sampling from four addiction treatment center in Ahvaz from March 2012 to September 2012. Two questionnaires to examine the variables of this study were the five facets mindfulness questionnaire (FFMQ) and hero-in craving questionnaire (HCQ). The data were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Results The Pearson correlational results indicated significant reverse relation between mindfulness factors and craving sub scales (P<0.05). Besides, the regression results indicated that four factors of mindfulness such as observation, describing, acting with awareness and non-reactivity to inner experience can totally predict 48 percent of craving variance (P<0.01 ). Conclusion There is a reverse relation between mindfulness and craving. Therefore we advise the researchers in addiction fields that in line with various studies that indicated effectiveness of mindfulness based interventions in improving various psychological problems, be researcher in effectiveness of this intervention in addiction fields. Moreover, we advise the addiction therapists to use mindfulness based interventions and technics in order to reduction of emotional and cognitive problems co morbidities with addiction such as craving that is one of potential factors affecting survival and relapse to drug abuse. PMID:25988095

  15. Work Adjustment of the Methadone-Maintained Corporate Employee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yankowitz, Robert; Randell, Joan

    1977-01-01

    The work adjustment of 26 methadone-maintained corporate employees was evaluated. Results indicated: (a) relative to their nonmethadone-maintained coworkers, the methadone-maintained employees had comparable job performance and superior punctuality and attendance; and (b) the methadone-maintained skilled laborers were satisfied with their…

  16. [Neuropsychological deficit in chronic heroin abusers].

    PubMed

    Briun, E A; Gekht, A B; Polunina, A G; Davydov, D M; Gusev, E I

    2001-01-01

    Neurological consequences of chronic heroin exposure are poorly known. 38 male patients with current heroin abuse or dependence were examined in withdrawal period that lasted more than 10 days, and were compared with 19 healthy controls. Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), "Delayed Alternation" Test (DAT), "Tower of London" Test (TLT), Russian version of WAIS (1995) were used. Patients were medicated and medication status was evaluated by psychomotor speed level. Patients with the duration of daily heroin abuse more than 1.5 years performed significantly less effectively TLT solutions as compared with the healthy controls (after Bonferroni correction, p = 0001). Patients with shorter duration of daily heroin abuse had a trend to perform TLT solutions poorer as compared to healthy controls and better than group with longer duration (after Bonferroni correction, p = 0.07 and 0.08). Three groups did not differ by WCST and DAT significantly, and general intelligence was in normal range in three groups. Multiple regression analysis confirmed significant influence of daily heroin abuse duration on TLT performance efficiency in our population (beta = -0.426, p < 0.05) without effect of age, education, IQ, dosage of heroin per day, withdrawal duration and current medication status (psychomotor speed level). Perseverative responses on DAT were significantly related to daily heroin dosages before treatment (beta = 0.405, p < 0.05) and negatively correlated with the withdrawal duration. These data give grounds to suppose, that chronic heroin exposure impairs planning functions of prefrontal cortex (TLT), that can be explained by cumulative neuronal damages of prefrontal cortex and VTA dopamine neurons. That was demonstrated in experimental and morphological studies of opiate addicts who died after opiate overdose. Large doses of heroin can induce more extensive functional impairment with possible involvement of orbit frontal cortex. The latter deficit may be partially reversible during short-term withdrawal. PMID:11490442

  17. Mind Over Matter: Cocaine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cold Medicine (DXM and Codeine Syrup) Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy or Molly) Methamphetamine (Meth) Prescription Depressant ... for Teens Guest Blogger Healthy Minds and Bodies Marijuana National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week NIDA News ...

  18. Treatment of Heroin Dependence: Effectiveness, Costs, and Benefits of Methadone Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Robert; Dornig, Katrina; Lungren, Lena

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: Social workers will increasingly be required to attend to the cost-effectiveness of practices, programs, and policies. In the area of substance abuse, there is little evidence to suggest that social workers' decisions are based on evidence of either effectiveness or costs. Method: This article provides an overview of existing evidence

  19. Treatment of Heroin Dependence: Effectiveness, Costs, and Benefits of Methadone Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Robert; Dornig, Katrina; Lungren, Lena

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: Social workers will increasingly be required to attend to the cost-effectiveness of practices, programs, and policies. In the area of substance abuse, there is little evidence to suggest that social workers' decisions are based on evidence of either effectiveness or costs. Method: This article provides an overview of existing evidence…

  20. Investigation of the Interactions between Methadone and Elvitegravir-Cobicistat in Subjects Receiving Chronic Methadone Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Winkle, P.; Custodio, J. M.; Wei, X.; Rhee, M. S.; Kearney, B. P.; Ramanathan, S.; Friedland, Gerald H.

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between HIV and opioid dependence therapies are known to occur. We sought to determine if such interactions occurred between methadone and elvitegravir boosted with cobicistat (EVG/COBI). We performed a within-subject open-label pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study of 11 HIV-seronegative subjects stabilized on at least 2 weeks of methadone. Subjects underwent baseline and steady-state evaluation of the effect of elvitegravir 150 mg once a day (QD) boosted with 150 mg QD of cobicistat (EVG/COBI) on methadone pharmacokinetic parameters. Safety and pharmacodynamics were monitored throughout the study. Compared to baseline values, the R-methadone mean area under the concentration-time curve to the end of the dosing period (AUCtau) (5,550 versus 6,210 h ng/ml) and mean maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax) (316 versus 337 ng/ml) did not significantly increase in the presence of EVG/COBI. Compared to baseline values, the S-methadone mean AUCtau (7,040 versus 7,540 h ng/ml) and mean Cmax (446 versus 452 ng/ml) did not significantly increase in the presence of EVG/COBI. The AUCtau, Cmax, and Ctau of elvitegravir and cobicistat did not significantly differ from those of historical controls. Opioid withdrawal or overdose was not observed among subjects in this study. The addition of EVG/COBI to stabilized patients receiving methadone did not affect methadone pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. These two agents can be safely coadministered. PMID:24080665

  1. [Fatal methadone poisoning of a child].

    PubMed

    Klupp, N; Risser, D; Stichenwirth, M; Hnigschnabl, S; Stimpfl, T; Bauer, G

    2000-04-21

    The substance methadone is used for substitution therapy since the 1960s in the U.S. Mainly because of the endemic spread of HIV-1 infections among intravenous drug abusers methadone was made legally available through medical prescription in Austria in 1987. Legal authorities today also allow the patient to take home the necessary daily consumption for weekends or public holidays. The drug is distributed as a watery solution in tiny bottles, which are fitted with an ordinary screw cap. This kind of distribution may, however, have fatal consequences. This is demonstrated in the following case of accidental poisoning of an infant: A two-year-old girl whose parents were both participating in the substitution scheme was found dead in her bed in Vienna in 1997. Forensic autopsy revealed a methadone concentration in the liver tissue of 640 ng/g. The criminal investigation determined that the girl had opened a bottle of methadone solution and subsequently had taken the drug. Considering the circumstances of this accident, from the medical point of view safety devices for the screw caps of the methadone bottles should be required by law, in order to avoid future accidental poisoning. PMID:10849943

  2. Correlates of Heavy Smoking Among Alcohol-Using Methadone Maintenance Clients

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline M.; Sinha, Karabi; Marfisee, Mary; Cohen, Allan; Greengold, Barbara; Leake, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine predictors of heavy smoking among 256 male and female methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) clients from five MMT clinics in the Los Angeles area. We found that females reported lower rates of heavy smoking than males (47% vs 54%, respectively), in concordance with current literature pointing to gender-differences in smoking behaviors. In particular, males who reported heavy drinking, fair/poor health, and recent heroin use were more likely to report heavy smoking compared to males not reporting these factors. On the other hand, females who reported recent heroin use, a lifetime history of sex trade, and who had been ill enough to require a blood transfusion also had greater odds of reporting heavy cigarette-smoking. Findings from this study may direct us to not only design gender-based smoking cessation program for MMT clients but also to address the gender-based issues related to smoking in such a population. PMID:19597186

  3. Methadone use among HIV-positive injection drug users in a Canadian setting

    PubMed Central

    Pettes, Tyler; Wood, Evan; Guillemi, Silvia; Lai, Calvin; Montaner, Julio; Kerr, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We examined methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) use among HIV-positive injection drug users (IDU) in Vancouver. Among 353 participants, 199 (56.3%) were on MMT at baseline, and 48 initiated MMT during follow-up. Female gender (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.14 2.62) and antiretroviral therapy use (AOR = 2.04, 95% CI: 1.46 2.86) were positively associated with MMT use, while frequent heroin injection (AOR = 0.34, 95% CI: 0.230.50), public injection (AOR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.59 0.97), syringe borrowing (AOR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.32 0.90), and non-fatal overdose (AOR = 0.58, 95% CI: 0.36 0.92) were negatively associated with MMT use. The rate of discontinuation of MMT was 12.46 (95% CI: 8.28 18.00) per 100 person years. Frequent heroin use (adjusted hazards ratio = 4.49, 95%CI: 1.81 11.13) was positively associated with subsequent discontinuation of MMT. These findings demonstrate the benefits of MMT among HIV-positive IDU and the need to improve access to and retention in MMT. PMID:20598827

  4. The Effects of Maternally Administered Methadone, Buprenorphine and Naltrexone on Offspring: Review of Human and Animal Data

    PubMed Central

    Farid, W.O; Dunlop, S.A; Tait, R.J; Hulse, G.K

    2008-01-01

    Most women using heroin are of reproductive age with major risks for their infants. We review clinical and experimental data on fetal, neonatal and postnatal complications associated with methadone, the current gold standard, and compare these with more recent, but limited, data on developmental effects of buprenorphine, and naltrexone. Methadone is a -opioid receptor agonist and is commonly recommended for treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy. However, it has undesired outcomes including neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Animal studies also indicate detrimental effects on growth, behaviour, neuroanatomy and biochemistry, and increased perinatal mortality. Buprenorphine is a partial -opioid receptor agonist and a ?-opioid receptor antagonist. Clinical observations suggest that buprenorphine during pregnancy is similar to methadone on developmental measures but is potentially superior in reducing the incidence and prognosis of NAS. However, small animal studies demonstrate that low doses of buprenorphine during pregnancy and lactation lead to changes in offspring behaviour, neuroanatomy and biochemistry. Naltrexone is a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist. Although data are limited, humans treated with oral or sustained-release implantable naltrexone suggest outcomes potentially superior to those with methadone or buprenorphine. However, animal studies using oral or injectable naltrexone have shown developmental changes following exposure during pregnancy and lactation, raising concerns about its use in humans. Animal studies using chronic exposure, equivalent to clinical depot formulations, are required to evaluate safety. While each treatment is likely to have maternal advantages and disadvantages, studies are urgently required to determine which is optimal for offspring in the short and long term. PMID:19305793

  5. 'Diversion’ of methadone or buprenorphine: 'harm’ versus 'helping’

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background 'Non-compliant’ individuals in opioid maintenance treatment, OMT, are often met with tight control regimes to reduce the risk of 'diversion’, which may lead to harm or death among persons outside of OMT. This article explores reported practices of, and motivations for, diversion of methadone and buprenorphine, in a group of imprisoned individuals in OMT. Findings 28 in-depths interviews were conducted among 12 OMT-enrolled, imprisoned individuals, most of whom were remand prisoners. All had experienced tight control regimes prior to imprisonment due to varying degrees of 'non-compliance’ and illicit drug use during treatment. Their acquired norm of sharing with others in a drug using community was maintained when entering OMT. Giving one’s prescription opioids to an individual in withdrawal was indeed seen as an act of helping, something that takes on particular significance for couples in which only one partner is included in OMT and the other is using illicit heroin. Individuals enrolled in OMT might thus be trapped between practicing norms of helping and sharing and adhering to treatment regulations. ’Diversion’, as this term is conventionally used, is not typically understood as practices of giving and helping, but may nevertheless be perceived as such by those who undertake them. Conclusions As we see it, the need to sustain oneself as a decent person in one’s own eyes and those of others through practices such as sharing and helping should be recognized. Treatment providers should consider including couples in which both individuals are motivated for starting OMT. PMID:24131626

  6. Heroin

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  9. Pharmacogenomics of methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, Andrew A; Barratt, Daniel T; Ali, Robert L; Coller, Janet K

    2014-05-01

    Methadone is the major opioid substitution therapy for opioid dependence. Dosage is highly variable and is often controlled by the patient and prescriber according to local and national policy and guidelines. Nevertheless many genetic factors have been investigated including those affecting its metabolism (CYP2B6-consistent results), efflux transport (P-gp-inconsistent results), target μ-opioid receptor (μ-opioid receptor-inconsistent results) and a host of other receptors (DRD2) and signaling elements (GIRK2 and ARRB2; not replicated). None by themselves have been able to substantially explain dosage variation (the major but not sole end point). When multiple genes have been combined such as ABCB1, CYP2B6, OPRM1 and DRD2 a greater contribution to dosage variation was found but not as yet replicated. As stabilization of dosage needs to be made rapidly, it is imperative that larger internationally based studies be instigated so that genetic contribution to dosage can be properly assessed, which may or may not tailor to different ethnic groups and each country's policy towards an outcome that benefits all. PMID:24956254

  10. "Addiction Proneness" and Personality in Heroin Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Jerome J.

    1975-01-01

    A carefully controlled comparison of the personality characteristics of heroin addict (n=27) and nonaddict (n=20) offenders was carried out so as to avoid methodological problems associated with earlier studies. (Editor)

  11. Determinants of seeking treatment for cocaine abuse: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Pavarin, Raimondo Maria; Consonni, Dario; Berardi, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study, which targeted long-term socially integrated cocaine users (in powder form, no heroin), was to analyze potential determinants of request for treatment for primary cocaine abuse. Two hundred and twenty-three cases (users who sought treatment for primary cocaine abuse) and 223 controls (users who did not seek treatment) were interviewed in Italy. A semistructured interview was created. Conditional logistic regression models were used. Cases had begun consuming illicit substances later, started using cocaine quicker, had high-risk drinking habits, had more intense recent use of cocaine, and used alone and at work. Some of the motivations of use that characterize subjects who seek treatment (to experience a 'high', disinhibition, avoidance, and to feel more confident) seem specifically to obtain immediate gratification, without concern for future consequences. Variability in cocaine abusers seeking treatment has been a long-recognized feature of this population and the results show that the appropriate target population (cocaine users experiencing problems and using more frequently) is reached by treatment services. PMID:23006508

  12. A comparison of voucher-delivery schedules for the initiation of cocaine abstinence.

    PubMed

    Correia, Christopher J; Sigmon, Stacey C; Silverman, Kenneth; Bigelow, George; Stitzer, Maxine L

    2005-08-01

    Studies on the use of shaping procedures to increase rates of cocaine abstinence have produced promising results. This study used a Brief Abstinence Test to examine the impact of reinforcement for initial reductions in cocaine use on a subsequent abstinence reinforcement test. Methadone maintenance patients showing evidence of cocaine use were exposed to two 1-week reinforcement conditions. During the shaping condition, participants could earn $50 vouchers on Wednesday and Friday for meeting quantitative urinalysis criteria and a $100 voucher on the following Monday for meeting the more stringent qualitative criteria. During the terminal condition, only the $100 earning opportunity for meeting the qualitative criteria was provided. Participants were more likely to meet the qualitative reinforcement criteria on Wednesday and Friday in the shaping condition than in the terminal condition. However, contrary to the initial hypothesis, the shaping reinforcement condition did not increase rates of abstinence on the final abstinence test. PMID:16173889

  13. The MTHFR C677T Variant is Associated with Responsiveness to Disulfiram Treatment for Cocaine Dependency

    PubMed Central

    Spellicy, Catherine J.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Hamon, Sara C.; Harding, Mark J.; Nielsen, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Disulfiram is a one of the few pharmacotherapies for cocaine addiction that shows promise. Since disulfiram and cocaine both affect levels of global methylation we hypothesized the MTHFR gene, whose product is involved in supplying methyl groups for DNA and protein methylation, may be associated with responsiveness to disulfiram in cocaine-dependent individuals. Methods: Sixty-seven cocaine-dependent patients were stabilized on methadone for 2?weeks and then randomized into disulfiram (250?mg/day, N?=?32) and placebo groups (N?=?35) for 10?weeks. Patients were genotyped for the MTHFR (rs1801133, also known as C677T) polymorphism and the data was evaluated for association with cocaine-free urines in the disulfiram or placebo groups. Data from patients that completed all 10?weeks of the study (N?=?56) were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), corrected for population structure. Results: The CT or TT MTHFR genotype group (N?=?32) dropped from 73 to 52% cocaine-positive urines on disulfiram (p?=?0.0001), while the placebo group showed no treatment effect. The CC MTHFR genotype group (N?=?24) showed a smaller, but still significant, reduction in cocaine-positive urines on disulfiram compared to placebo; 8169% (p?=?0.007). Conclusion: This study indicates that a patients MTHFR genotype may be used to identify individuals who might show improved response to disulfiram treatment for cocaine dependence. Clinical Trial: Pharmacogenetics of Disulfiram for Cocaine, clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00149630, NIDA-18197-2, NCT00149630. PMID:23335901

  14. Pharmacogenetic Randomized Trial for Cocaine Abuse: Disulfiram and ?1A-adrenoceptor gene variation

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, D.; Nielsen, D.A.; Huang, W.; Harding, M. J.; Hamon, S.C.; Kosten, T.R.

    2013-01-01

    Disulfiram is a cocaine addiction pharmacotherapy that inhibits dopamine ?-hydroxylase (D?H) and reduces norepinephrine production. We examined whether a functional variant of the ADRA1A gene (Cys to Arg at codon 347 in exon 2, Cys347Arg) may enhance treatment response through decreased stimulation of this ?1A-adrenoceptor, since antagonists of this receptor show promise in reducing cocaine use. Sixty-nine cocaine and opioid co-dependent (DSM-IV) subjects were stabilized on methadone for two weeks and subsequently randomized into disulfiram (250 mg/day, N = 32) and placebo groups (N = 37) for 10 weeks. We genotyped the ADRA1A gene polymorphism (rs1048101) and evaluated its role for increasing cocaine free urines in those subjects treated with disulfiram using repeated measures analysis of variance, corrected for population structure. The 47 patients who carried at least one T allele of rs1048101 (TT or TC genotype) reduced their cocaine positive urines from 84% to 56% on disulfiram (p = .0001), while the 22 patients with the major allele CC genotype showed no disulfiram effect. This study indicates that a patients ADRA1A genotype could be used to identify a subset of individuals for which disulfiram and, perhaps, other ?1-adrenoceptor blockers may be an effective pharmacotherapy for cocaine dependence. PMID:23849431

  15. Pharmacogenetic randomized trial for cocaine abuse: disulfiram and α1A-adrenoceptor gene variation.

    PubMed

    Shorter, D; Nielsen, D A; Huang, W; Harding, M J; Hamon, S C; Kosten, T R

    2013-11-01

    Disulfiram is a cocaine addiction pharmacotherapy that inhibits dopamine β-hydroxylase (DβH) and reduces norepinephrine production. We examined whether a functional variant of the ADRA1A gene (Cys to Arg at codon 347 in exon 2, Cys347Arg) may enhance treatment response through decreased stimulation of this α1A-adrenoceptor, since antagonists of this receptor show promise in reducing cocaine use. Sixty-nine cocaine and opioid co-dependent (DSM-IV) subjects were stabilized on methadone for two weeks and subsequently randomized into disulfiram (250 mg/day, N=32) and placebo groups (N=37) for 10 weeks. We genotyped the ADRA1A gene polymorphism (rs1048101) and evaluated its role for increasing cocaine free urines in those subjects treated with disulfiram using repeated measures analysis of variance, corrected for population structure. The 47 patients who carried at least one T allele of rs1048101 (TT or TC genotype) reduced their cocaine positive urines from 84% to 56% on disulfiram (p=0.0001), while the 22 patients with the major allele CC genotype showed no disulfiram effect. This study indicates that a patient's ADRA1A genotype could be used to identify a subset of individuals for which disulfiram and, perhaps, other α1-adrenoceptor blockers may be an effective pharmacotherapy for cocaine dependence. PMID:23849431

  16. A randomized trial of employment-based reinforcement of cocaine abstinence in injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Kenneth; Wong, Conrad J; Needham, Mick; Diemer, Karly N; Knealing, Todd; Crone-Todd, Darlene; Fingerhood, Michael; Nuzzo, Paul; Kolodner, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    High-magnitude and long-duration abstinence reinforcement can promote drug abstinence but can be difficult to finance. Employment may be a vehicle for arranging high-magnitude and long-duration abstinence reinforcement. This study determined if employment-based abstinence reinforcement could increase cocaine abstinence in adults who inject drugs and use cocaine during methadone treatment. Participants could work 4 hr every weekday in a workplace where they could earn about $10.00 per hour in vouchers; they were required to provide routine urine samples. Participants who attended the workplace and provided cocaine-positive urine samples during the initial 4 weeks were invited to work 26 weeks and were randomly assigned to an abstinence-and-work (n = 28) or work-only (n = 28) group. Abstinence-and-work participants had to provide urine samples showing cocaine abstinence to work and maintain maximum pay. Work-only participants could work independent of their urinalysis results. Abstinence-and-work participants provided more (p = .004; OR = 5.80, 95% CI = 2.03-16.56) cocaine-negative urine samples (29%) than did work-only participants (10%). Employment-based abstinence reinforcement can increase cocaine abstinence. PMID:17970256

  17. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  18. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  19. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  20. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  1. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  2. Cocaine Treatment and Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunes-Dinis, Maria; Barth, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Describes dimensions of current cocaine problem in United States, drug treatment models, and cocaine treatment effectiveness and outcome. Analyzes research on effectiveness of specific drug treatments, including women-sensitive services. Notes that recommended treatment approaches incorporate variety of rehabilitative services and call for social

  3. Substance use - cocaine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... also called the feel-good brain chemical. Using cocaine may cause pleasurable effects such as: Joy (euphoria, or a "flash" or " ... medicine that can help reduce the use of cocaine by blocking its effects, although scientists are researching such medicines.

  4. Is the promise of methadone Kenya’s solution to managing HIV and addiction? A mixed-method mathematical modelling and qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Tim; Guise, Andy; Ndimbii, James; Strathdee, Steffanie; Ngugi, Elizabeth; Platt, Lucy; Kurth, Ann; Cleland, Charles; Vickerman, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Promoted globally as an evidence-based intervention in the prevention of HIV and treatment of heroin addiction among people who inject drugs (PWID), opioid substitution treatment (OST) can help control emerging HIV epidemics among PWID. With implementation in December 2014, Kenya is the third Sub-Saharan African country to have introduced OST. We combine dynamic mathematical modelling with qualitative sociological research to examine the ‘promise of methadone’ to Kenya. Methods, setting and participants We model the HIV prevention impact of OST in Nairobi, Kenya, at different levels of intervention coverage. We draw on thematic analyses of 109 qualitative interviews with PWID, and 43 with stakeholders, to chart their narratives of expectation in relation to the promise of methadone. Results The modelled impact of OST shows relatively slight reductions in HIV incidence (5–10%) and prevalence (2–4%) over 5 years at coverage levels (around 10%) anticipated in the planned roll-out of OST. However, there is a higher impact with increased coverage, with 40% coverage producing a 20% reduction in HIV incidence, even when accounting for relatively high sexual transmissions. Qualitative findings emphasise a culture of ‘rationed expectation’ in relation to access to care and a ‘poverty of drug treatment opportunity’. In this context, the promise of methadone may be narrated as a symbol of hope—both for individuals and community—in relation to addiction recovery. Conclusions Methadone offers HIV prevention potential, but there is a need to better model the effects of sexual HIV transmission in mediating the impact of OST among PWID in settings characterised by a combination of generalised and concentrated epidemics. We find that individual and community narratives of methadone as hope for recovery coexist with policy narratives positioning methadone primarily in relation to HIV prevention. Our analyses show the value of mixed methods approaches to investigating newly-introduced interventions. PMID:25748417

  5. Orbitofrontal response to drug-related stimuli after heroin administration.

    PubMed

    Walter, Marc; Denier, Niklaus; Gerber, Hana; Schmid, Otto; Lanz, Christian; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Scheffler, Klaus; Seifritz, Erich; McGuire, Philip; Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    The compulsion to seek and use heroin is frequently driven by stress and craving during drug-cue exposure. Although previous neuroimaging studies have indicated that craving is mediated by increased prefrontal cortex activity, it remains unknown how heroin administration modulates the prefrontal cortex response. This study examines the acute effects of heroin on brain function in heroin-maintained patients. Using a crossover, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 27 heroin-maintained patients performed functional magnetic resonance imaging 20 minutes after the administration of heroin or placebo (saline) while drug-related and neutral stimuli were presented. Images were processed and analysed with statistical parametric mapping. Plasma concentrations of heroin and its main metabolites were assessed using high-performance liquid chromatography. Region of interest analyses showed a drug-related cue-associated blood-oxygen-level-dependent activation in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in heroin-dependent patients during both treatment conditions (heroin and placebo). This activation of the OFC was significantly higher after heroin than after placebo administration. These findings may indicate the importance of OFC activity for impulse control and decision-making after regular heroin administration and may emphasize the benefit of the heroin-assisted treatment in heroin dependence. PMID:24720731

  6. Methadone Maintenance: The Addict's Family Recreated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartzman, John; Bokos, Peter

    1979-01-01

    A study of four methadone clinics, the addicts treated at these clinics, and their families, reveals basic dissonances in treatment ideology and professional-paraprofessional relationships which, combined with the addict's particular mode of functioning, make significant change in his behavior improbable. (Author)

  7. Employment Patterns of Methadone Maintenance Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloch, Harriet I.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of employment patterns of methadone maintenance clients had indicated that the majority were not employed at time of program admission. At time of evaluation, 70 percent of the sample were employed; 88 percent of these clients had previous work histories and brought marketable skills with them. (Author)

  8. Birth Order and Polydrug Abuse Among Heroin Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Steven E.; Linder, Ronald L.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of possible relationships between birth order and polydrug use patterns of heroin addicts prior to undergoing treatment. Overrepresentation of "only child" heroin addicts was evident among the population studied. (Author)

  9. Why More Painkiller Addicts Are Using Heroin, Too

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 155391.html Why More Painkiller Addicts Are Using Heroin, Too Interviews confirm desire for cheaper, more plentiful ... Addicts who have moved from narcotic painkillers to heroin are helping researchers understand this deadly tradeoff. Looking ...

  10. More Americans Seek Treatment for Painkiller, Heroin Abuse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 156029.html More Americans Seek Treatment for Painkiller, Heroin Abuse Report reflects changing patterns of substance abuse ... American teens and adults are seeking treatment for heroin and prescription painkiller abuse, a new U.S. government ...

  11. Attitudes toward buprenorphine and methadone among opioid-dependent individuals

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Robert P.; Kelly, Sharon M.; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Peterson, James A.; Reisinger, Heather Schacht; Agar, Michael H.; Brown, Barry S.

    2009-01-01

    Attitudes and beliefs about drug abuse treatment have long been known to shape response to that treatment. Two major pharmacological alternatives are available for opioid dependence: methadone, which has been available for the past 40 years, and buprenorphine, a recently-introduced medication. This mixed methods study examined the attitudes of opioid-dependent individuals toward methadone and buprenorphine. A total of 195 participants (n = 140 who were enrolling in one of 6 Baltimore area methadone programs and n = 55 who were out-of-treatment) were administered the Attitudes toward Methadone and toward Buprenorphine Scales and a subset (n = 46) received an ethnographic interview. In-treatment group had significantly more positive attitudes toward methadone than did the out-of-treatment group (p < .001), while they did not differ in their attitudes toward buprenorphine. Both groups had significantly more positive attitudes toward buprenorphine than methadone. Addressing these attitudes may increase treatment entry and retention. PMID:18770082

  12. What You Need to Know About Drugs: Heroin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Booger? What You Need to Know About Drugs: Heroin KidsHealth > For Kids > What You Need to Know About Drugs: Heroin Print A A A Text Size en español ... sobre las drogas: La heroína What It Is: Heroin (say: HAIR-uh-win) comes from the opium ...

  13. Children's Heroes and Heroines: Developing Values Manifested through Artwork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrary, Judy H.

    This study assessed the personal values of a group of 17 kindergarten-age children. Children participated in a classroom discussion of heroes and heroines, then drew a picture of their heroes or heroines. The researcher analyzed each child's artwork and determined the outstanding values represented by the hero or heroine. A parallel was drawn…

  14. Characteristics of methadone-related fatalities in Norway.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Jean-Paul; Khiabani, Hassan Z; Hilberg, Thor; Karinen, Ritva; Slrdal, Lars; Waal, Helge; Mrland, Jrg

    2015-11-01

    There are currently over 7000 patients enrolled in opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) programs in Norway. A rise in methadone-related deaths proportional to increasing methadone sales over the period 2000-2006 has been observed, but the causative factors for these fatalities have been elusive. In the present study, individual characteristics, methadone concentrations and additional toxicological findings were analyzed. Methadone intoxication deaths (n=264) were divided into 3 groups according to toxicological findings in whole blood: group 1 - methadone detected alone, or together with one additional drug at low or therapeutic levels, or a low concentration of ethanol (<1g/L) (n=21); group 2 - multiple additional drugs/substances detected below lethal levels (n=175); group 3 - one or more additional drugs/substances detected at lethal levels, or ethanol >3g/L (n=55). Methadone blood concentrations in decedents who had been enrolled in OMT were higher than for decedents not in treatment, in all groups. Blood methadone concentrations around 1mg/L were present in fatal multi-drug intoxications in OMT patients. Results suggest that some patients may be at risk of dying when combining therapeutic concentrations of methadone with other psychoactive substances. Somatic disease was a common finding among deceased OMT patients. Concentrations in methadone users not enrolled in OMT were predominantly between 0.3 and 0.4mg/L and were not related to the presence of other drugs. However, methadone concentrations below 0.1mg/L may be associated with intoxication following methadone use, both alone and in combination with other drugs. Younger male users (mean age 34 years) seemed to have a higher susceptibility to methadone intoxication. PMID:26439870

  15. Carrier-Mediated Cocaine Transport at the Blood-Brain Barrier as a Putative Mechanism in Addiction Liability

    PubMed Central

    Chapy, Hlne; Smirnova, Maria; Andr, Pascal; Schlatter, Jol; Chiadmi, Fouad; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Declves, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Background: The rate of entry of cocaine into the brain is a critical factor that influences neuronal plasticity and the development of cocaine addiction. Until now, passive diffusion has been considered the unique mechanism known by which cocaine crosses the blood-brain barrier. Methods: We reassessed mechanisms of transport of cocaine at the blood-brain barrier using a human cerebral capillary endothelial cell line (hCMEC/D3) and in situ mouse carotid perfusion. Results: Both in vivo and in vitro cocaine transport studies demonstrated the coexistence of a carrier-mediated process with passive diffusion. At pharmacological exposure level, passive diffusion of cocaine accounted for only 22.5% of the total cocaine influx in mice and 5.9% in hCMEC/D3 cells, whereas the carrier-mediated influx rate was 3.4 times greater than its passive diffusion rate in vivo. The functional identification of this carrier-mediated transport demonstrated the involvement of a proton antiporter that shared the properties of the previously characterized clonidine and nicotine transporter. The functionnal characterization suggests that the solute carrier (SLC) transporters Oct (Slc22a1-3), Mate (Slc47a1) and Octn (Slc22a4-5) are not involved in the cocaine transport in vivo and in vitro. Diphenhydramine, heroin, tramadol, cocaethylene, and norcocaine all strongly inhibited cocaine transport, unlike benzoylecgonine. Trans-stimulation studies indicated that diphenhydramine, nicotine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (ecstasy) and the cathinone compound 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) were also substrates of the cocaine transporter. Conclusions: Cocaine transport at the BBB involves a proton-antiporter flux that is quantitatively much more important than its passive diffusion. The molecular identification and characterization of this transporter will provide new tools to understand its role in addictive mechanisms. PMID:25539501

  16. Methadone as a chemical weapon: two fatal cases involving babies.

    PubMed

    Kintz, Pascal; Villain, Marion; Dumestre-Toulet, Véronique; Capolaghi, Bernard; Cirimele, Vincent

    2005-12-01

    Methadone is largely used for the substitution management of opiate-dependent individuals but can also be easily found on the black market. The first cases involving repetitive sedation linked to the use of methadone and subsequent death of 2 babies are reported. At the autopsy, no particular morphologic changes were noted except for pulmonary and visceral congestion. There was no evidence of violence, and the pathologist in both cases found no needle marks. Toxicological analyses, as achieved by GC/MS, demonstrated both recent and repetitive methadone exposure. In case 1, a 14-month-old girl was found dead at home. Blood concentrations were 1071 and 148 ng/mL for methadone and EDDP, respectively. Hair (6 cm) tested positive at 1.91 and 0.82 ng/mg for methadone and EDDP, respectively. In case 2, a 5-month-old girl was taken to hospital in a pediatric unit for coma. Antemortem blood analysis demonstrated methadone exposure (142 ng/mL), and the baby was declared dead 12 days after admission. Hair analysis (5 cm) by segmentation was positive for methadone in the range 1.0 (root) to 21.3 ng/mg (end). The death of the babies was attributed to accidental asphyxia ina situation where methadone was considered as a chemical weapon. The mothers, who were the perpetrators in both cases, did not deny the use of methadone as a sedative drug. PMID:16404812

  17. Measurement of QTc in patients receiving chronic methadone therapy.

    PubMed

    Cruciani, Ricardo A; Sekine, Ryuichi; Homel, Peter; Lussier, David; Yap, Ysmael; Suzuki, Yukako; Schweitzer, Paul; Yancovitz, Stanley R; Lapin, Jeanne A; Shaiova, Lauren; Sheu, Robert G; Portenoy, Russell K

    2005-04-01

    Recent reports suggest that methadone may prolong the QTc interval and cause torsades de pointes. This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of QTc prolongation during oral methadone therapy and identify factors associated with prolongation. Patients receiving oral methadone as treatment for chronic pain or addiction were eligible for the study. One hundred four patients who were receiving > or = 20 mg methadone per day for > or = 2 weeks underwent electrocardiograms to measure QTc interval duration. Sixty-three (61%) patients were male and 63 (61%) were receiving methadone maintenance for opioid addiction. The mean (+/- SD) age was 45.3 +/- 9.4 years. The median (range) methadone dose was 110 mg/day (20-1200 mg/day); median (range) number of months on methadone was 12.5 months (1-444 months). The median (range) QTc interval was 428 msec (396-494 msec). Thirty-three percent had QTc prolongation (males 40%, females 20%; P=0.03). No patient had a QTc longer than 500 msec. Significant dose response was observed in males on methadone <12 months (rho=0.60, P=0.02). Our study suggests that methadone may prolong the QTc interval in specific subpopulations but poses little risk of serious prolongation. PMID:15857742

  18. Dynamic vaccine blocks relapse to compulsive intake of heroin.

    PubMed

    Schlosburg, Joel E; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Bremer, Paul T; Lockner, Jonathan W; Wade, Carrie L; Nunes, Ashlee A K; Stowe, G Neil; Edwards, Scott; Janda, Kim D; Koob, George F

    2013-05-28

    Heroin addiction, a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by excessive drug taking and seeking, requires constant psychotherapeutic and pharmacotherapeutic interventions to minimize the potential for further abuse. Vaccine strategies against many drugs of abuse are being developed that generate antibodies that bind drug in the bloodstream, preventing entry into the brain and nullifying psychoactivity. However, this strategy is complicated by heroin's rapid metabolism to 6-acetylmorphine and morphine. We recently developed a "dynamic" vaccine that creates antibodies against heroin and its psychoactive metabolites by presenting multihaptenic structures to the immune system that match heroin's metabolism. The current study presents evidence of effective and continuous sequestration of brain-permeable constituents of heroin in the bloodstream following vaccination. The result is efficient blockade of heroin activity in treated rats, preventing various features of drugs of abuse: heroin reward, drug-induced reinstatement of drug seeking, and reescalation of compulsive heroin self-administration following abstinence in dependent rats. The dynamic vaccine shows the capability to significantly devalue the reinforcing and motivating properties of heroin, even in subjects with a history of dependence. In addition, targeting a less brain-permeable downstream metabolite, morphine, is insufficient to prevent heroin-induced activity in these models, suggesting that heroin and 6-acetylmorphine are critical players in heroin's psychoactivity. Because the heroin vaccine does not target opioid receptors or common opioid pharmacotherapeutics, it can be used in conjunction with available treatment options. Thus, our vaccine represents a promising adjunct therapy for heroin addiction, providing continuous heroin antagonism, requiring minimal medical monitoring and patient compliance. PMID:23650354

  19. Cocaine and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the semen and may reduce the number of sperm, and increase the number of abnormal sperm. This can result in fertility problems. Cocaine can attach to sperm. This has led to the suggestion that sperm ...

  20. Employment-based abstinence reinforcement promotes opiate and cocaine abstinence in out-of-treatment injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Holtyn, August F; Koffarnus, Mikhail N; DeFulio, Anthony; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur O; Strain, Eric C; Schwartz, Robert P; Silverman, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    We examined the use of employment-based abstinence reinforcement in out-of-treatment injection drug users, in this secondary analysis of a previously reported trial. Participants (N?=?33) could work in the therapeutic workplace, a model employment-based program for drug addiction, for 30 weeks and could earn approximately $10 per hr. During a 4-week induction, participants only had to work to earn pay. After induction, access to the workplace was contingent on enrollment in methadone treatment. After participants met the methadone contingency for 3 weeks, they had to provide opiate-negative urine samples to maintain maximum pay. After participants met those contingencies for 3 weeks, they had to provide opiate- and cocaine-negative urine samples to maintain maximum pay. The percentage of drug-negative urine samples remained stable until the abstinence reinforcement contingency for each drug was applied. The percentage of opiate- and cocaine-negative urine samples increased abruptly and significantly after the opiate- and cocaine-abstinence contingencies, respectively, were applied. These results demonstrate that the sequential administration of employment-based abstinence reinforcement can increase opiate and cocaine abstinence among out-of-treatment injection drug users. PMID:25292399

  1. Pharmacotherapy in the Treatment of Addiction: Methadone

    PubMed Central

    Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Borg, Lisa; Ducat, Elizabeth; Ray, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment is the most widely available pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction and has been shown over a period of 40 years to be an effective and safe treatment. While women comprise approximately 40% of clients currently being treated in MMT programs, comparatively little research geared specifically toward this group has been published. This article begins with an overview of neurobiological studies on opioid addiction, including a discussion of gender differences, followed by a review of the pharmacology of methadone The authors then examine the particular needs and differences of women being treated in MMTs, including co-dependence with other substances, womens health issues and psychosocial needs unique to this population. In conclusion, research shows that women have different substance abuse treatment needs in comparison to their male counterparts. One New York City MMT program that has attempted to address these differences is highlighted. PMID:20407977

  2. Usefulness of multi-parameter opiates-amphetamines-cocainics analysis in hair of drug users for the evaluation of an abuse profile by means of LC-APCI-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    K?ys, Ma?gorzata; Rojek, Sebastian; Kulikowska, Joanna; Bozek, Edward; Scis?owski, Mariusz

    2007-07-01

    The report presents a segmental hair analysis for the retrospective multi-parameter evaluation of drugs of abuse including opioids, cocainics and amphetamines. The analysis was carried out with the use of liquid chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS-MS). The authors have evaluated the differences in the contents of particular opiates in the hair as related to the origin of a sample taken from Polish drug users taking "Polish heroin", and also from heroin abusers from Western European countries taking "Western heroin". The results indicate distinct differences in the 6-MAM concentration values in the Polish and foreigners, suggesting that the foreigners take products containing high concentrations of heroin and the Polish take the poppy product "compote" characterized by its variable and low heroin content. An additional argument for a different abuse profile in the Polish and Western drug users is found in the presence of cocaine detected in hair samples originating from the latter, while cocaine is much less frequently detected in Polish drug users. PMID:17540626

  3. Cocaine Abuse Versus Cocaine Dependence: Cocaine Self-Administration and Pharmacodynamic Response in the Human Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Sharon L.; Donny, Eric C.; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Umbricht, Annie; Bigelow, George E.

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine has high abuse liability but only a subset of individuals who experiment with it develop dependence. The DSM-IV (APA, 2000) provides criteria for diagnosing cocaine abuse and cocaine dependence as distinct disorders- the latter characterized by additional symptoms related to loss of control over drug use. In this study, two groups of cocaine users (n=8/group), matched on demographic factors and length of cocaine use history and meeting criteria for either cocaine abuse (CocAb) or cocaine dependence (CocDep), were compared on 1) measures related to impulsivity and sensation seeking, 2) response to experimenter-administered cocaine (0, 12.5, 25 and 50 mg/70 kg, iv), and 3) cocaine self-administration using a Relapse Choice and a Progressive Ratio Procedure (0, 12.5 and 25 mg/70 kg, iv). Groups did not differ on impulsivity or sensation seeking scores. After experimenter-administered cocaine, the CocAb group reported feeling more suspicious and observers rated them significantly higher on unpleasant effects (e.g., irritability, difficulty concentrating). In contrast, the CocDep group reported significantly greater desire for cocaine, which was sustained over the course of the study, and gave higher street value estimates for cocaine (p< .05). While cocaine self-administration was dose-related and generally comparable across the two procedures, the CocDep users chose to take significantly more cocaine than the CocAb users. These data suggest that, while regular long-term users of cocaine with cocaine abuse or dependence diagnoses cannot be distinguished by trait measures related to impulsivity, they do exhibit significant differences with regard to cocaine-directed behavior and response to cocaine administration. PMID:19717246

  4. Postpartum changes in methadone maintenance dose.

    PubMed

    Pace, Christine A; Kaminetzky, Leah B; Winter, Michael; Cheng, Debbie M; Saia, Kelley; Samet, Jeffrey H; Walley, Alexander Y

    2014-09-01

    The optimal approach to postpartum dosing among women treated with methadone maintenance is unclear. We examined doses among 101 methadone-maintained pregnant women 2, 6 and 12 weeks postpartum, and compared the incidence of having doses held for oversedation during pregnancy and postpartum. The average dose at delivery was 83.3mg, and the mean change from delivery to 12 weeks postpartum was -3.7 mg (95% CI -6.3, -1.1). The incidence of oversedation events per 10,000 days was 2.8 among pregnant women and 5.6 for postpartum women (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 2.04, 95% CI 0.66, 6.28). After adjusting for benzodiazepine prescriptions, the IRR of an oversedation event among postpartum women compared to pregnant women was 1.74 (95% CI 0.56, 5.30). In conclusion, postpartum dose changes were small in a methadone clinic using clinical assessments to determine dose. Although the incidence of oversedation events remained low postpartum, the clinically important but not statistically significant increase in events among postpartum women and those prescribed benzodiazepines requires further research. While there are not yet adequate data to support pre-specified postpartum dose reductions, the findings suggest that more frequent clinical assessments continuing as late as 12 weeks postpartum may be warranted. PMID:24953167

  5. Effects of cortisol administration on craving in heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Walter, M; Bentz, D; Schicktanz, N; Milnik, A; Aerni, A; Gerhards, C; Schwegler, K; Vogel, M; Blum, J; Schmid, O; Roozendaal, B; Lang, U E; Borgwardt, S; de Quervain, D

    2015-01-01

    Heroin dependence is a severe and chronically relapsing substance use disorder with limited treatment options. Stress is known to increase craving and drug-taking behavior, but it is not known whether the stress hormone cortisol mediates these stress effects or whether cortisol may rather reduce craving, for example, by interfering with addiction memory. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of cortisol administration on craving in heroin-dependent patients and to determine whether the effects depend on the daily dose of heroin consumption. We used a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study in 29 heroin-dependent patients in a stable heroin-assisted treatment setting. A single oral dose of 20 mg of cortisol or placebo was administered 105 min before the daily heroin administration. The primary outcome measure was cortisol-induced change in craving. Secondary measures included anxiety, anger and withdrawal symptoms. For the visual analog scale for craving, we found a significant interaction (P = 0.0027) between study medication and heroin-dose group (that is, daily low, medium or high dose of heroin). Cortisol administration reduced craving in patients receiving a low dose of heroin (before heroin administration: P = 0.0019; after heroin administration: P = 0.0074), but not in patients receiving a medium or high dose of heroin. In a picture-rating task with drug-related pictures, cortisol administration did not affect the ratings for the picture-characteristic craving in all the three heroin-dose groups. Cortisol also did not significantly affect secondary outcome measures. In conclusion, a single administration of cortisol leads to reduced craving in low-dose heroin addicts. The present findings might have important clinical implications with regard to understanding stress effects and regarding treatment of addiction. PMID:26218852

  6. Stigma towards Marijuana Users and Heroin Users.

    PubMed

    Brown, Seth A

    2015-01-01

    Despite high levels of stigmatizing attitudes and behaviors toward individuals with substance use problems, there is surprisingly limited research on understanding the contributors to such high levels. College students with no history of marijuana or heroin use (N=250) completed self-report measures to examine the level of substance use stigma towards individuals using two illicit substances (marijuana and heroin) and the contribution of three perceiver characteristics (sex, previous contact with substance users, and five beliefs about substance use) to three dimensions of stigma (social distance, negative emotions, and forcing treatment). Greater levels of internalized stigma were noted towards individuals who use heroin (versus marijuana). For marijuana use, those who had less previous contact and higher endorsement of certain beliefs (rarity, severity, and less controllability) were associated with greater stigmatizing attitudes. For heroin use, the associations were weak or non-existent. The findings strengthen the argument that substance use stigma needs to be examined and perhaps addressed substance by substance, rather than as a group. Further, contact interventions may be a particularly effective strategy for altering substance use stigma. PMID:26148124

  7. Martha E. Rogers: heretic and heroine.

    PubMed

    Phillips, John R

    2015-01-01

    Rhythms of Martha Rogers' life and work are presented showing her evolution as a heretic and a heroine through her heretical thinking. New concepts of unitariology, energyspirit, wellbecoming, integral presence, and soul are presented with their relevance for advancing Rogers' science of unitary human beings. New dimensions of practice make explicit pandimensional ministering to humankind and living in the universe. PMID:25520464

  8. Human Methadone Self-Administration and the Generalized Matching Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiga, Ralph; Maxwell, R. Stockton; Meisch, Richard A.; Grabowski, John

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined whether in humans the generalized matching law described the relation between relative responding and relative drug intake by humans under concurrent variable interval variable interval (conc VI VI) schedules of drug reinforcement. Methadone-maintained patients, stabilized on 80 mg per day of methadone, were recruited…

  9. Factors Associated with Illegal Drug Use among Older Methadone Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The overall aims of this study are to describe the life stressors of, exposure to illegal drug use of, and illegal drug use by older methadone clients. Design and Methods. The current study focuses on a sub-sample of the larger administrative data of a methadone clinic that is limited to African American and White clients over the age of

  10. Decreasing Methadone Dose Via Anxiety Reduction: A Treatment Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kushner, Marlene; And Others

    This manual describes a Relaxation-Information Presentation program based on the clinical observation that anxiety is a serious barrier to detoxification for many methadone clients, and on experimental evidence indicating that expectations may play a greater role in the discomfort experienced during detoxification than the actual methadone dose.

  11. Human Methadone Self-Administration and the Generalized Matching Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiga, Ralph; Maxwell, R. Stockton; Meisch, Richard A.; Grabowski, John

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined whether in humans the generalized matching law described the relation between relative responding and relative drug intake by humans under concurrent variable interval variable interval (conc VI VI) schedules of drug reinforcement. Methadone-maintained patients, stabilized on 80 mg per day of methadone, were recruited

  12. Factors Associated with Illegal Drug Use among Older Methadone Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The overall aims of this study are to describe the life stressors of, exposure to illegal drug use of, and illegal drug use by older methadone clients. Design and Methods. The current study focuses on a sub-sample of the larger administrative data of a methadone clinic that is limited to African American and White clients over the age of…

  13. Methadone Diversion: Experiences and Issues. Services Research Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inciardi, James A.

    This report is a description of the phenomenon of methadone diversion as it exists now and places it in the context of prior research in this area. The intent here is to clarify issues around methadone diversion and to provide guidance to treatment administrators and program planners regarding efforts they can initiate to monitor this significant…

  14. Multimodality Approach to Methadone Treatment of Narcotic Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brill, Leon; Chambers, Carl D.

    1971-01-01

    This multimodality approach is geared primarily to the goal of abstinence. For addicts who cannot achieve this goal, methadone maintenance is suggested as the next step. The modalities described range from low-dose maintenance for clinic outpatients to intensive rehabilitation in a methadone maintenance residential center facility. (Author)

  15. Decreasing Methadone Dose Via Anxiety Reduction: A Treatment Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kushner, Marlene; And Others

    This manual describes a Relaxation-Information Presentation program based on the clinical observation that anxiety is a serious barrier to detoxification for many methadone clients, and on experimental evidence indicating that expectations may play a greater role in the discomfort experienced during detoxification than the actual methadone dose.…

  16. Immunohistochemical detection of methadone in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Wehner, F; Wehner, H; Schieffer, M C; Subke, J

    2000-07-24

    To develop a method of detecting methadone in the human brain by immunohistochemistry, brain tissue of frontal cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, basal ganglions and brain stem from victims of a lethal methadone overdose was examined. The staining was performed with a monoclonal anti-methadone antibody from the mouse, originally developed for immunochemichal purposes (ELISA). With the help of the DAKO((R)) Catalyzed Signal Amplification (CSA) System, a specific positive immunoreaction was obtained in the neurons of the frontal cortex and hippocampus, as compared with specimen from deaths without exposition to methadone. Thus, along with metamphetamine, phenobarbital, morphine and insulin, immunohistochemical detection is also possible for methadone and the intake of this medicament can now be proven morphologically. PMID:10882827

  17. Methadone Treatment in Iranian Opiate Addicts: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Eslami Shahrbabaki, Mahin; Ziaaddini, Hassan; Hagh Doost, Ali Akbar; Ghasemi, Mahdi; Eslami Shahrbabaki, Parvin; Alizadeh Nouri, Roghayeh; Eslami Shahrbabaki, Nasrin

    2011-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the initial dosage of methadone and factors affecting it in maintenance therapy. Methods This cross-sectional, descriptive-analytic study was conducted on 157 individuals referring to a methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) clinic. The initial dosage of methadone was 20-45 mg which was adjusted during the treatment based on each patient's evaluation. Three groups were formed according to methadone dosage (less than 30 mg, between 30-50 mg, and more than 50 mg). Findings Significant relations were observed between increased methadone dosage in the initial phase and marital status (P = 0.03), injection (P = 0.03), medical comorbidity (P = 0.009), and borderline personality disorder (P < 0.001). Conclusion Further studies with larger sample size and including the history of previous detoxification, substance abuse, omission of self-recording, evaluation of womens addiction and MMT program performance with counseling support should be performed. PMID:24494117

  18. Neural correlates of adherence to extended-release naltrexone pharmacotherapy in heroin dependence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, A-L; Elman, I; Lowen, S B; Blady, S J; Lynch, K G; Hyatt, J M; O'Brien, C P; Langleben, D D

    2015-01-01

    Injectable extended-release naltrexone (XRNTX) presents an effective therapeutic strategy for opioid addiction, however its utility could be hampered by poor adherence. To gain a better insight into this phenomenon, we utilized blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in conjunction with a validated cue-induced craving procedure to examine neural correlates of XRNTX adherence. We operationalized treatment adherence as the number of monthly XRNTX injections (range: 0–3) administered to a group of fully detoxified heroin-dependent subjects (n=32). Additional outcomes included urine toxicology screening and self-reported tobacco use. The presented heroin-related visual cues reliably elicited heroin craving in all tested subjects. Nine, five, three and 15 of the participants, respectively, received zero, one, two and three XRNTX injections, predicted by the individual baseline fMRI signal change in response to the cues in the medial prefrontal cortex, a brain region involved in inhibitory self-control and emotional appraisal. The incidence of opioid-positive urines during the XRNTX therapy was low and remained about half the pre-treatment rate after the XRNTX ended. During the treatment, cigarette smoking behaviors followed patterns of opioid use, while cocaine consumption was increased with reductions in opioid use. The present data support the hypothesis that medial prefrontal cortex functions are involved in adherence to opioid antagonist therapy. A potential role of concurrent non-opioid addictive substances consumption during the XRNTX pharmacotherapy warrants further investigation. Our findings set the stage for further bio-behavioral investigations of the mechanisms of relapse prevention in opioid dependence. PMID:25781230

  19. Neural correlates of adherence to extended-release naltrexone pharmacotherapy in heroin dependence.

    PubMed

    Wang, A-L; Elman, I; Lowen, S B; Blady, S J; Lynch, K G; Hyatt, J M; O'Brien, C P; Langleben, D D

    2015-01-01

    Injectable extended-release naltrexone (XRNTX) presents an effective therapeutic strategy for opioid addiction, however its utility could be hampered by poor adherence. To gain a better insight into this phenomenon, we utilized blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in conjunction with a validated cue-induced craving procedure to examine neural correlates of XRNTX adherence. We operationalized treatment adherence as the number of monthly XRNTX injections (range: 0-3) administered to a group of fully detoxified heroin-dependent subjects (n=32). Additional outcomes included urine toxicology screening and self-reported tobacco use. The presented heroin-related visual cues reliably elicited heroin craving in all tested subjects. Nine, five, three and 15 of the participants, respectively, received zero, one, two and three XRNTX injections, predicted by the individual baseline fMRI signal change in response to the cues in the medial prefrontal cortex, a brain region involved in inhibitory self-control and emotional appraisal. The incidence of opioid-positive urines during the XRNTX therapy was low and remained about half the pre-treatment rate after the XRNTX ended. During the treatment, cigarette smoking behaviors followed patterns of opioid use, while cocaine consumption was increased with reductions in opioid use. The present data support the hypothesis that medial prefrontal cortex functions are involved in adherence to opioid antagonist therapy. A potential role of concurrent non-opioid addictive substances consumption during the XRNTX pharmacotherapy warrants further investigation. Our findings set the stage for further bio-behavioral investigations of the mechanisms of relapse prevention in opioid dependence. PMID:25781230

  20. Bioavailabilities of rectal and oral methadone in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Ola; Sheffels, Pamela; Kharasch, Evan D

    2004-01-01

    Aims Rectal administration of methadone may be an alternative to intravenous and oral dosing in cancer pain, but the bioavailability of the rectal route is not known. The aim of this study was to compare the absolute rectal bioavailability of methadone with its oral bioavailability in healthy humans. Methods Seven healthy subjects (six males, one female, aged 2039 years) received 10 mg d5-methadone-HCl rectally (5 ml in 20% glycofurol) together with either d0-methadone intravenously (5 mg) or orally (10 mg) on two separate occasions. Blood samples for the LC-MS analyses of methadone and it's metabolite EDDP were drawn for up to 96 h. Noninvasive infrared pupillometry was peformed at the same time as blood sampling. Results The mean absolute rectal bioavalability of methadone was 0.76 (0.7, 0.81), compared to 0.86 (0.75, 0.97) for oral administration (mean (95% CI)). Rectal absorption of methadone was more rapid than after oral dosing with Tmax values of 1.4 (0.9, 1.8) vs. 2.8 (1.6, 4.0) h. The extent of formation of the metabolite EDDP did not differ between routes of administration. Single doses of methadone had a duration of action of at least 10 h and were well tolerated. Conclusions Rectal administration of methadone results in rapid absorption, a high bioavailability and long duration of action. No evidence of presystemic elimination was seen. Rectal methadone has characteristics that make it a potential alternative to intravenous and oral administration, particularly in cancer pain and palliative care. PMID:15255797

  1. Excretion of methadone in sweat of pregnant women throughout gestation after controlled methadone administration.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Allan J; Brunet, Bertrand R; Choo, Robin E; Mura, Patrick; Johnson, Rolley E; Jones, Hendrée E; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2010-08-01

    Sweat patches (n = 350) were collected throughout gestation from 29 opioid-dependent pregnant women participating in an outpatient methadone-assisted therapy program. Volunteers provided informed consent to participate in institutional review board-approved protocols. Methadone was eluted from sweat patches with sodium acetate buffer, followed by solid-phase extraction and quantification by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (limit of quantification > or = 10 ng/patch). Methadone was present in all weekly patches (n = 311) in concentrations ranging from 10.2 to 12,129.7 nanograms per patch and in 92.3% of short-term patches (n = 39, worn for 12 or 24 hours) in concentrations up to 3303.9 nanograms per patch. Correlation between patch concentrations and total amount of drug administered (r = 0.224), and concentrations and duration of patch wear (r = 0.129) were both weak. Although there were large intra- and intersubject variations in sweat drug concentrations, sweat testing was an effective alternative technique to qualitatively monitor illicit drug use and simultaneously document methadone medication-assisted treatment. PMID:20592651

  2. Monitoring Pregnant Womens Illicit Opiate and Cocaine Use With Sweat Testing

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Bertrand R.; Barnes, Allan J.; Choo, Robin E.; Mura, Patrick; Jones, Hendre E.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    Dependence on illicit drugs during pregnancy is a major public health concern as there may be associated adverse maternal, fetal, and neonatal consequences. Sweat patches (n = 389) were collected from 39 pregnant volunteers who provided written informed consent for this Institutional Review Board-approved protocol and wore patches, replaced approximately weekly, from study entry until delivery. Patches were analyzed for opiates (heroin, 6-acetylmor-phine, 6-acetylcodeine, morphine and codeine) and cocaine (cocaine, benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester, anhydroecgonine methyl ester) by solid phase extraction and gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Seventy-one percent (276) of collected sweat patches were ?5 ng per patch (limit of quantification) for one or more analytes. Cocaine was present in 254 (65.3%) patches in concentrations ranging from 5.2 to 11,835 ng per patch with 154 of these high enough to satisfy the proposed Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration guidelines for a confirmatory drug test (25 ng per patch). Interestingly, 6-acetylmorphine was the most prominent opiate analyte documented in 134 patches (34.4%) with 11.3% exceeding the proposed opiate Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration cut-off (25 ng per patch). Heroin was identified in fewer patches (77), but in a similar concentration range (5.3345.4 ng per patch). Polydrug use was evident by the presence of both cocaine and opiate metabolites in 136 (35.0%) patches. Sweat testing is an effective method for monitoring abstinence or illicit drug use relapse in this high-risk population of pregnant opiate- and/or cocaine-dependent women. PMID:19927046

  3. Toxic Effects of Xylazine on Endothelial Cells in Combination with Cocaine and 6-monoacetylmorphine

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Torres, L.A.; Vlez, C.; Alvarez, J. Lyvia; Ortiz, J.G.; Zayas, B.

    2014-01-01

    The use of xylazine as a drug of abuse has emerged worldwide in the last 7 years, including Puerto Rico. Clinical findings reported that xylazine users present greater physiological deterioration, than heroin users. The aim of this study was to assess the xylazine toxicity on endothelial cells, as this is one of the first tissues impact upon administration. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture were treated with xylazine, cocaine, 6-monoacetylmorphine (heroin metabolite) and its combinations, at concentrations of 0.10 M to 400 M, for periods of 24, 48 and 72 hours. IC50 were calculated and the Annexin V assay implemented to determine the cell death mechanism. Results indicated IC50 values at 24 hours as follow: xylazine 62 M, cocaine 210 M, 6-monoacetylmorphine 300 M. When these drugs were combined the IC50 value was 57 M. Annexin V results indicated cell death by an apoptosis mechanism in cells treated with xylazine or in combination. Results demonstrated that xylazine use inhibits the endothelial cell proliferation, at lower concentrations than cocaine and 6-monoacetylmorphine. These findings contribute to the understanding of the toxicity mechanisms induced by xylazine on endothelial cells. PMID:25017475

  4. A Web-Based Behavior Therapy Program Influences the Association Between Cognitive Functioning and Retention and Abstinence in Clients Receiving Methadone Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Michelle C.; Marsch, Lisa A.; Xie, Haiyi; Guarino, Honoria; Aponte-Melendez, Yesenia

    2013-01-01

    Objective Deficits in cognitive functioning have been well-documented in persons with substance use disorders. In addition, some evidence suggests that poorer cognitive functioning predicts poorer engagement in substance abuse treatment and worse treatment outcomes. TRIAL DESIGN Non-blind, randomized clinical trial with parallel design. Methods Clients were recruited from a local methadone maintenance clinic within the first 30 days of treatment. All participants completed a comprehensive, computerized neuropsychological assessment (MicroCog) at the time they entered the clinical trial. Participants were randomized to receive 12 months of either standard methadone maintenance treatment, or methadone maintenance treatment with an integrated web-based intervention as part of treatment. The aims of the current study were to (1) characterize the cognitive functioning of clients entering methadone maintenance treatment; (2) evaluate the impact of cognitive functioning on the primary outcomes of treatment retention and opioid abstinence; and (3) determine whether cognitive functioning had a differential impact on these outcomes across treatment conditions. Randomization was non-blind and participants were stratified on past month cocaine use, prior history of methadone, LAAM or buprenorphine treatment, and counselor. Results Eighty participants were randomized to each condition (total n=160). Mean scores on MicroCog scales fell in the average and low average ranges and there were no differences in scores between treatment groups. Lower scores on General Cognitive Proficiency predicted longer study retention (?2=5.03, p < .05), though this effect was quite small. Generalized linear modeling showed that scores on all MicroCog scales except for Spatial Processing significantly predicted opioid abstinence (defined as percent of total weeks and percent of tested weeks with continuous abstinence), with lower scores predicting smaller percentages of continuous weeks of abstinence. This pattern was not evident in regression analyses in which abstinence was defined as number of total weeks of abstinence. An interaction effect was observed, whereby lower cognitive scores predicted lower levels of abstinence for participants in standard methadone maintenance treatment, but not for those who received the web-based intervention as part of methadone maintenance treatment. Conclusions Technology-based interventions may hold promise for minimizing the impact of poorer cognitive functioning on treatment outcomes. PMID:23671409

  5. The phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor rolipram attenuates heroin-seeking behavior induced by cues or heroin priming in rats.

    PubMed

    Lai, Miaojun; Zhu, Huaqiang; Sun, Anna; Zhuang, Dingding; Fu, Dan; Chen, Weisheng; Zhang, Han-Ting; Zhou, Wenhua

    2014-09-01

    Inhibition of phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4), an enzyme that specifically hydrolyzes cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) increases intracellular cAMP/cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) signaling. Activation of this signaling is considered as an important compensatory response that decreases motivational properties of drugs of abuse. However, it is not known whether PDE4 is involved in heroin seeking. Self-administration of heroin (50 ?g/kg/infusion) was performed under the fixed ratio 1 (FR1) schedule for 14 d and then drug seeking was extinguished for 10 d. The progressive ratio schedule was used to evaluate the relative motivational value of heroin reinforcement. After training, the conditioned cue or heroin priming (250 ?g/kg) was introduced for the reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior. Pretreatment (i.p.) with rolipram (0.03-0.3 mg/kg), a prototypical, selective PDE4 inhibitor, failed to inhibit heroin self-administration under the FR1 schedule, but decreased the reward values under the progressive ratio schedule in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, rolipram decreased the reinstatement of heroin seeking induced by cues or heroin priming even at the lowest dose (0.03 mg/kg); in contrast, the highest dose (0.3 mg/kg) of rolipram was required to decrease sucrose reinforcement. Finally, the effects of rolipram on heroin-seeking behavior were correlated with the increases in expression of phosphorylated CREB in the nucleus accumbens. The study demonstrated that rolipram inhibited heroin reward and heroin-seeking behavior. The results suggest that PDE4 plays an essential role in mediating heroin seeking and that PDE4 inhibitors may be used as a potential pharmacotherapeutic approach for heroin addiction. PMID:24832929

  6. Factors associated with HCV risk practices in methadone-maintained patients: the importance of considering the couple in prevention interventions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One important public health issue associated with opioid use today is the risk of hepatitis C (HCV) infection. Although methadone maintenance may help to decrease HCV-related risk practices, HCV risk behaviors persist and are strongly associated with specific substance use patterns, mental status and social context. The ANRS-Methaville study gave us the opportunity to better disentangle the different relationships between these various factors and HCV risk practices. Methods The ANRS-Methaville multisite randomized trial was designed to assess the feasibility of initiating methadone in primary care by comparing it with methadone initiation in specialized centers. This study recruited 195 participants initiating methadone maintenance and followed up for 12 months. Longitudinal data from this trial was used to acquire a greater understanding of HCV risk practices and their pattern of correlates in this population. We selected 176 patients who had data on HCV risk practices at M0 and M12, accounting for 312 visits. HCV risk practices were defined as follows: sharing needles or syringes, sharing drug paraphernalia, getting a tattoo or having a piercing in a non-professional context, sharing toiletry items. To identify factors associated with HCV risk practices, we performed a mixed logistic regression analysis. Results HCV risk practices were reported by 19% and 15% of participants at baseline and M12, respectively. After adjustment for age, cocaine use and alcohol dependence as well as suicidal risk, living in a couple with a non-drug user and in a couple with a drug user were both independent predictors of HCV risk practices (OR[CI95%] = 4.16 [1.42-12.12]; OR[CI95%] = 9.85 [3.13-31.06], respectively). Conclusions Identifying individuals at risk of HCV transmission during methadone treatment such as stimulant users, alcohol dependent individuals, and those at suicidal risk is necessary to optimize response to treatment. Innovative prevention approaches tailored to couples are also urgently needed and could decrease HCV-risk in this population. The trial is registered with the French Agency of Pharmaceutical Products (ANSM) under the number 2008-A0277-48, the European Union Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials. Number Eudract 2008-001338-28, the ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00657397 and the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Register ISRCTN31125511. PMID:25209306

  7. Risks and predictors of current suicidality in HIV-infected heroin users in treatment in Yunnan, China: A controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hua; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Duarte, Nichole A.; Yu, Xin; Shi, Chuan; Riggs, Patricia K.; Li, Jianhua; Gupta, Saurabh; Wolfson, Tanya; Knight, Adam; Franklin, Donald; Letendre, Scott; Wu, Zunyou; Grant, Igor; Heaton, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Suicide is an important public health problem in China. Elsewhere injection drug use and HIV infection have independently been associated with suicidality, but research has often overlooked these high-risk groups in China. We determined the frequency and predictors of suicidal ideas in Chinese, HIV-infected (HIV+) and uninfected (HIV-) heroin injection drug users in treatment (IDUs) and a control sample. We hypothesized that rates of suicidal ideas would be significantly higher among IDUs compared to controls, and highest among HIV+ IDUs. Method We assessed suicidal ideas within the past two weeks in HIV+ (N = 204) and HIV- (N = 202) heroin IDUs in methadone treatment in Yunnan, a province at the intersection of the heroin and HIV epidemics, and in demographically matched, uninfected non-drug using controls (N = 201). Results Rates of suicidality were higher in IDUs than controls but there was no additive effect of HIV infection (HIV+ IDU 43.1%; HIV- IDU 37.1%; controls 8.5%). Among HIV+ IDUs suicidality was associated most strongly with a combination of prior history of major depression, low perceived social support, and experience of HIV-relevant stress, but not with AIDS diagnosis. Among HIV- IDUs suicidality was associated with prior history of major depressive or alcohol use disorder. Less than 25% of IDUs with suicidality had histories of mood or alcohol use diagnoses. Conclusion Because suicidal ideation is frequent in IDUs in China, regardless of HIV status, and is not fully accounted for by past psychiatric history, additional research may be warranted. PMID:23196829

  8. Cocaine detection using piezoresistive microcantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srijanto, Bernadeta; Cheney, Christine P.; Hedden, David L.; Gehl, Anthony; Ferrell, Thomas L.

    2008-03-01

    Sensitive and inexpensive sensors play a significant role in the analysis of drugs and drug metabolites. Specifically, reliable in vivo detection of cocaine and cocaine metabolites serves as a useful tool in research of the body's reaction to the drug and in the treatment of the drug addiction. We present here a promising cocaine biosensor to be used in the human body. The sensor's active element consists of piezoresistive microcantilevers coated with an oligonucleotide-based aptamer as the cocaine binder. In vitro cocaine detection was carried out by flowing a cocaine solution over the microcantilevers. Advantages of this device are its low power consumption, its high sensitivity, and its potential for miniaturization into an implantable capsule. The limit of detection for cocaine in distilled water was found to be 1 ng/ml.

  9. Contingent methadone delivery: effects on illicit-opiate use.

    PubMed

    Higgins, S T; Stitzer, M L; Bigelow, G E; Liebson, I A

    1986-07-01

    This study examined the effects of contingent vs. non-contingent delivery of a methadone dose supplement on relapse to illicit opiate use in the context of a methadone outpatient detoxification program. Following a 3-week methadone stabilization period on 30 mg, patients (N = 39) were randomly assigned to a contingent, a non-contingent, or a control treatment group. All patients received identical gradual reductions in their assigned methadone dose. During the dose reduction period (weeks 4-11), members of the contingent (N = 13) and non-contingent groups (N = 13) could obtain daily methadone-dose supplements up to 20 mg, but contingent group members could obtain supplements only if their most recent urinalysis results were opiate negative. Control subjects (N = 13) did not have dose increases available. The contingent group presented significantly lower opiate-positive urines during weeks 8-11 (14% positive) of the detox than the non-contingent (38% positive) or control (50% positive) groups. Additionally, the availability of extra methadone improved treatment retention and increased clinic attendance above levels observed in the control group. The potential for further use of methadone's reinforcing properties in the treatment of opiate dependence is discussed. PMID:3757767

  10. A systematic review of the cardiotoxicity of methadone

    PubMed Central

    Alinejad, Samira; Kazemi, Toba; Zamani, Nasim; Hoffman, Robert S.; Mehrpour, Omid

    2015-01-01

    Methadone is one of the most popular synthetic opioids in the world with some favorable properties making it useful both in the treatment of moderate to severe pain and for opioid addiction. Increased use of methadone has resulted in an increased prevalence of its toxicity, one aspect of which is cardiotoxicity. In this paper, we review the effects of methadone on the heart as well as cardiac concerns in some special situations such as pregnancy and childhood. Methods: We searched for the terms methadone, toxicity, poisoning, cardiotoxicity, heart, dysrhythmia, arrhythmia, QT interval prolongation, torsade de pointes, and Electrocardiogram (ECG) in bibliographical databases including TUMS digital library, PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar. This review includes relevant articles published between 2000 and 2013. The main cardiac effects of methadone include prolongation of QT interval and torsade de pointes. Other effects include changes in QT dispersion, pathological U waves, Taku-Tsubo syndrome (stress cardiomyopathy), Brugada-like syndrome, and coronary artery diseases. The aim of this paper is to inform physicians and health care staff about these adverse effects. Effectiveness of methadone in the treatment of pain and addiction should be weighed against these adverse effects and physicians should consider the ways to lessen such undesirable effects. This article presents some recommendations to prevent heart toxicity in methadone users. PMID:26869865

  11. Hapten Optimization for Cocaine Vaccine with Improved Cocaine Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Muthu; Kinsey, Berma M.; Singh, Rana A.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Orson, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of any effective pharmacotherapy for cocaine addiction, immunotherapy is being actively pursued as a therapeutic intervention. While several different cocaine haptens have been explored to develop anti-cocaine antibodies, none of the hapten was successfully designed which had a protonated tropane nitrogen as is found in native cocaine under physiological conditions, including the succinyl norcocaine (SNC) hapten that has been tested in phase II clinical trials. Herein, we discuss three different cocaine haptens: hexyl-norcocaine (HNC), bromoacetamido butyl- norcocaine (BNC), and succinyl-butyl- norcocaine (SBNC), each with a tertiary nitrogen structure mimicking that of native cocaine which could optimize the specificity of anti-cocaine antibodies for better cocaine recognition. Mice immunized with these haptens conjugated to immunogenic proteins produced high titer anti-cocaine antibodies. However, during chemical conjugation of HNC and BNC haptens to carrier proteins, the 2? methyl ester group is hydrolyzed and immunizing mice with these conjugate vaccines in mice produced antibodies that bound both cocaine and the inactive benzoylecgonine metabolite. While in the case of the SBNC conjugate vaccine hydrolysis of the methyl ester did not appear to occur, leading to antibodies with high specificity to cocaine over BE. Though we observed similar specificity with a SNC hapten, the striking difference is that SBNC carries a positive charge on the tropane nitrogen atom, and therefore it is expected to have better binding of cocaine. The 50% cocaine inhibitory concentration (IC50) value for SBNC antibodies (2.8 ?M) was significantly better than the SNC antibodies (9.4 ?M) when respective hapten-BSA was used as a substrate. In addition, antibodies from both sera had no inhibitory effect from BE. In contrast to BNC and HNC, the SBNC conjugate was also found to be highly stable without any noticeable hydrolysis for several months at 4C and 2-3 days in pH 10 buffer at 37C. PMID:24803171

  12. Rethinking Informed Consent in Research on Heroin-Assisted Treatment.

    PubMed

    Uusitalo, Susanne; Broers, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Can heroin addicts give consent to research on trials in which heroin is prescribed to them? Analyses of addicts and informed consent have been objects of debate in several articles. Informed consent requires the agent not only to be competent but also to give consent voluntarily. This has been questioned because of alleged features of heroin addiction. Until recently the discussion has focused on heroin addicts' desires for heroin, whether these are irresistible and thus pose a problem for giving consent. Still, in light of empirical evidence, there seems to be a consensus more or less that the problem is not whether the addicts can resist their desire for heroin. A recent article concentrates specifically on heroin addicts' false assumptions of options and voluntariness. We argue that the prevailing framing of the options in this discussion in terms of heroin and access to it is problematic. The way in which the options are typically laid out suggests an assumption that participation in the research is allegedly based on the addicts' views on using the drug. We argue that this way of presenting the options is, first, a mismatch to the studies carried out and, second, symptomatic of potential misconceptions about heroin addiction and addicts. Furthermore, we also suggest that the account of voluntariness needs to be realistic in order for subjects to be able to give consent voluntarily in actual situations, and for medical research to carry out studies on improving outcomes in addiction treatment in an ethical way. PMID:25425507

  13. A VACCINE STRATEGY THAT INDUCES PROTECTIVE IMMUNITY AGAINST HEROIN

    PubMed Central

    Stowe, G. Neil; Vendruscolo, Leandro F.; Edwards, Scott; Schlosburg, Joel E.; Misra, Kaushik K.; Schulteis, Gery; Mayorov, Alexander V.; Zakhari, Joseph S.; Koob, George F.; Janda, Kim D.

    2011-01-01

    Heroin addiction is a wide-reaching problem with a spectrum of damaging social consequences. A vaccine capable of blocking heroin's effects could provide a long-lasting and sustainable adjunct to heroin addiction therapy. Heroin, however, presents a particularly challenging immunotherapeutic target as it is metabolized to multiple psychoactive molecules. To reconcile this dilemma we examined the idea of a singular vaccine with the potential to display multiple drug-like antigens; thus two haptens were synthesized, one heroin-like and another morphine-like in chemical structure. A key feature in this approach is that immunopresentation with the heroin-like hapten is thought to be immunochemically dynamic such that multiple haptens are simultaneously presented to the immune system. We demonstrate the significance of this approach though the extremely rapid generation of robust polyclonal antibody titers with remarkable specificity. Importantly, both the antinociceptive effects of heroin and acquisition of heroin self-administration were blocked in rats vaccinated using the heroin-like hapten. PMID:21692508

  14. Documentation of a heroin manufacturing process in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Zerell, U; Ahrens, B; Gerz, P

    2005-01-01

    The present article documents an authentic process of heroin manufacturing in Afghanistan: white heroin hydrochloride produced using simple equipment and a small quantity of chemicals. The quantities of chemicals actually used corresponded to the minimum needed for manufacturing heroin. The only organic solvent used was acetone, and only a very small quantity of it was used. Because the chemicals used in the demonstration were from actual seizures in Afghanistan, some of the chemicals had been disguised or repackaged by smugglers. Others had been put into labelled containers that proved to be counterfeit, and some glass containers used were not the original containers of the manufacturer displayed on the label. The brown heroin base prepared as an intermediate step in the process shares some of the characteristics of the South-West Asia type of heroin preparations often seized in Germany. The final product of the documented heroin manufacturing process was white heroin hydrochloride, which shares the key characteristics of the white heroin occasionally seized in Germany and other countries in Western Europe since 2000. The present article demonstrates that this kind of heroin can be produced in Afghanistan. PMID:21338014

  15. Trends of heroin use and heroin injection epidemics in Europe: findings from the EMCDDA treatment demand indicator (TDI).

    PubMed

    Barrio, Gregorio; Montanari, Linda; Bravo, Mara J; Guarita, Bruno; de la Fuente, Luis; Pulido, Jos; Vicente, Julin

    2013-07-01

    We estimate trends and geographical differences in the heroin epidemic in the European Union plus Croatia and Turkey by analyzing aggregated data on first heroin treatment admissions (cases) during 2000-2009. In 2005-2009 the proportion of drug injectors was higher in Central and Eastern European countries (CEECs) than in Western European countries (WECs), whereas the opposite occurred with mean age at first heroin use and first treatment. During this period, the number of cases, cases per center, and proportion of injectors in WECs declined, whereas mean age at first treatment and first heroin use increased. The opposite occurred in Turkey, except for proportion of injectors, while trends were less clear in the other CEECs. In the 7 WECs with data, trends in 2000-2005 and 2005-2009 were similar. This suggests that the number of recent-onset heroin users and heroin injectors may have declined some years before the study period, especially in WECs. PMID:23462151

  16. Cocaine: Abuse and Addiction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... abusers? Where can I get further information about cocaine? Glossary References Ordering Publications Call 1-877-643-2644 or: Get this Publication Espaol PDF (2MB) ePub (373KB) Kindle (561KB) Online Only Featured Publications Drugs, Brains, and Behavior: The ...

  17. From gold-medal glory to prohibition: the early evolution of cocaine in the United Kingdom and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, Dawna

    2013-01-01

    As reported in the 2011 World Drug Report, cocaine is likely to be the most problematic drug worldwide in terms of trafficking-related violence and second only to heroin in terms of negative health consequences and drug deaths. Over a period of 60 years, cocaine evolved from the celebrated panacea of the 1860s to outlawed street drug of the 1920s. As demonstrated by the evolution of cocaine use and abuse in the United Kingdom and United States during this time period, cultural attitudes influenced both the acceptance of cocaine into the medical field and the reaction to the harmful effects of cocaine. Our review of articles on cocaine use in the United Kingdom and the United States from 1860 to 1920 reveals an attitude of caution in the United Kingdom compared with an attitude of progressivism in the United States. When the trends in medical literature are viewed in the context of the development of drug regulations, our analysis provides insight into the relationship between cultural attitudes and drug policy, supporting the premise that it is cultural and social factors which shape drug policy, rather than drug regulations changing culture. PMID:23772315

  18. From gold-medal glory to prohibition: the early evolution of cocaine in the United Kingdom and the United States.

    PubMed

    Wielenga, Vicki; Gilchrist, Dawna

    2013-05-01

    As reported in the 2011 World Drug Report, cocaine is likely to be the most problematic drug worldwide in terms of trafficking-related violence and second only to heroin in terms of negative health consequences and drug deaths. Over a period of 60 years, cocaine evolved from the celebrated panacea of the 1860s to outlawed street drug of the 1920s. As demonstrated by the evolution of cocaine use and abuse in the United Kingdom and United States during this time period, cultural attitudes influenced both the acceptance of cocaine into the medical field and the reaction to the harmful effects of cocaine. Our review of articles on cocaine use in the United Kingdom and the United States from 1860 to 1920 reveals an attitude of caution in the United Kingdom compared with an attitude of progressivism in the United States. When the trends in medical literature are viewed in the context of the development of drug regulations, our analysis provides insight into the relationship between cultural attitudes and drug policy, supporting the premise that it is cultural and social factors which shape drug policy, rather than drug regulations changing culture. PMID:23772315

  19. Detecting cocaine use? The autobiographical implicit association test (aIAT) produces false positives in a real-world setting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The autobiographical Implicit Association Test (aIAT) is a novel application of the implicit association concept for detecting life events. It has been used to reveal concealed knowledge in clinical and forensic settings, including detecting drug use. In this study, we aimed to explore the functionality of the aIAT to identify drug use in real-world settings. Methods The study used mixed methodology with known groups of drug users and nonusers. Recreational cocaine users (n = 23) and non-users (n = 23) were recruited through ethnographic methodology and assessed using a bespoke brief aIAT for cocaine use. An identical aIAT test for heroin detection was also administered to a sub-sample of 10 cocaine users and 13 nonusers. The accuracy of the cocaine aIAT was measured through ROC analysis. Paradoxical aIAT results were explored by integrating craving, consumption measures and life-story interviews into the analysis. Results Whilst the two brief aIATs showed good concurrent validity for cocaine users by accurately detecting drug using status for 18 of the 23 users (78.3%), the test falsely reported 61% cocaine users in the non-user comparison group. The average D-scores were 0.2570.246 for the cocaine users and 0.1340.367 for the non-users, showing no discriminatory power (t(44) = 1.339, p = 0.187; AUC = 0.605, p = 0.223). Results were independent from craving and recent cocaine use. The comparison groups cocaine and heroin aIAT scores correlated significantly (r(13) = 0.776, p = 0.002) whilst an accurate absence of such relationship was evidenced in the cocaine using sample (r(10) = 0.061, p = 0.866). Triangulation with life-story interviews suggests that in the absence of an autobiographical event, this test may measure an alternative cognitive construct linked to the Self-concept. Conclusion The aIAT is a variant of an attitude measure and can be better rationalized if propositional thinking is implied to explain outcomes. The Relational Frame and Social Knowledge Structure theories can perhaps provide a more plausible theoretical background. Further work is required to clarify which factors underlie this testing techniques functioning. Reappraisal is advised before further forensic use of the instrument to ensure that general associations not related to autobiographical memory do not confound results. PMID:23767665

  20. Emotion recognition during cocaine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, K P C; Steenbergen, L; Theunissen, E L; Toennes, S W; Ramaekers, J G

    2015-11-01

    Chronic or repeated cocaine use has been linked to impairments in social skills. It is not clear whether cocaine is responsible for this impairment or whether other factors, like polydrug use, distort the observed relation. We aimed to investigate this relation by means of a placebo-controlled experimental study. Additionally, associations between stressor-related activity (cortisol, cardiovascular parameters) induced by the biological stressor cocaine, and potential cocaine effects on emotion recognition were studied. Twenty-four healthy recreational cocaine users participated in this placebo-controlled within-subject study. Participants were tested between 1 and 2h after treatment with oral cocaine (300mg) or placebo. Emotion recognition of low and high intensity expressions of basic emotions (fear, anger, disgust, sadness, and happiness) was tested. Findings show that cocaine impaired recognition of negative emotions; this was mediated by the intensity of the presented emotions. When high intensity expressions of Anger and Disgust were shown, performance under influence of cocaine 'normalized' to placebo-like levels while it made identification of Sadness more difficult. The normalization of performance was most notable for participants with the largest cortisol responses in the cocaine condition compared to placebo. It was demonstrated that cocaine impairs recognition of negative emotions, depending on the intensity of emotion expression and cortisol response. PMID:26328908

  1. The Recovery Line: A pilot trial of automated, telephone-based treatment for continued drug use in methadone maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brent A.; Fazzino, Tera; Barry, Declan T.; Fiellin, David A.; Cutter, Christopher J.; Schottenfeld, Richard S.; Ball, Samuel A.

    2013-01-01

    The current pilot study evaluated feasibility, acceptability, and initial efficacy of a therapeutic Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system (The Recovery Line) for patients receiving methadone maintenance who continue to use illicit drugs. Patients were randomized (N=36) to four weeks of Treatment-as-Usual (TAU) or Recovery Line plus TAU. Ratings of The Recovery Line were high and remained stable throughout the study. However, despite instructions and reminders, patients used substantially less than the recommended daily use (<10 days of 28). Patients were more likely to report abstinence for opioids and cocaine on days they used the Recovery Line (p = .01) than those they did not. Conditions did not differ significantly on patient satisfaction, urine screen outcomes, or coping efficacy. As with other computer-based treatments, findings suggest the Recovery Line is acceptable and feasible. However, additional methods to increase patient utilization of automated systems and larger clinical trials are needed. PMID:23375114

  2. Pregnancies exposed to methadone, methadone and other illicit substances, and poly-drugs without methadone: A comparison of fetal neurobehaviors and infant outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, L.M.; Di Pietro, J.A.; Elko, A.; Williams, E.L.; Milio, L.; Velez, M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is suspected that there is a continuum of impairment among prenatally drug-exposed infants, such that opioid and/or poly-drug exposure confers the highest risk for adverse neonatal outcomes than other classes of substances or single substance exposures. Suitable control groups are difficult to identify. This study compared fetal neurobehavioral development and infant outcomes in offspring of three groups of pregnant women in drug treatment. Exposure groups include: Methadone + other illicit substances (MM+Poly) and two groups currently abstinent for poly drug exposures: Methadone only (MM/A) and Non-methadone (NM/A). METHODS Forty-nine women (19 MM+Poly, 18 MM/A, and 12 NM/A) underwent fetal monitoring at 36 weeks gestation at peak and trough levels of methadone (MM+Poly; MM/A) or at comparable morning and afternoon times (NM/A). Fetal heart rate (FHR), heart rate variability (FHRV) and motor activity (FM) data were collected. Infant measures included birth outcomes and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) assessment. RESULTS As compared to the NM/A group, cardiac measures were decreased in methadone-exposed fetuses at peak levels. FHR was significantly more suppressed in the MM+Poly group. FM was significantly lower in the MM/A versus the NM/A group at both peak and trough, indicative of more persistent exposure effects. The MM+Poly group delivered one week earlier and required NAS pharmacological treatment twice as often as the MM/A group. CONCLUSIONS Results support the notion that poly-drug exposure may potentiate the effects of methadone on the fetus and infant and highlights the need for intensified treatment for methadone-maintained women who abuse other substances. PMID:22041255

  3. Signs of Cocaine Abuse and Addiction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Signs of Cocaine Use and Addiction Signs of Cocaine Use and Addiction Listen After the "high" of ... English Español "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." Stacey is recovering from her ...

  4. Enhanced Choice for Viewing Cocaine Pictures in Cocaine Addiction

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, S.J.; Goldstein, R.; Moeller, S.J.; Maloney, T. Parvaz, M.A.; Dunning, J.P.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik, P.A.; Hajcak, G.; Telang, F.; Wang, G.-J.; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2009-02-01

    Individuals with cocaine use disorder (CUD) chose cocaine over nondrug rewards. In two newly designed laboratory tasks with pictures, we document this modified choice outside of a cocaine administration paradigm. Choice for viewing cocaine, pleasant, unpleasant, or neutral pictures-under explicit contingencies (choice made between two fully visible side-by-side images) and under more implicit contingencies (selections made between pictures hidden under flipped-over cards)-was examined in 20 CUD and 20 matched healthy control subjects. Subjects also provided self-reported ratings of each picture's pleasantness and arousal. Under both contingencies, CUD subjects chose to view more cocaine pictures than control subjects, group differences that were not fully explained by the self-reported picture ratings. Furthermore, whereas CUD subjects choice for viewing cocaine pictures exceeded choice for viewing unpleasant pictures (but did not exceed choice for viewing pleasant pictures, in contrast to their self-reported ratings), healthy control subjects avoided viewing cocaine pictures as frequently as, or even more than, unpleasant pictures. Finally, CUD subjects with the most cocaine viewing selections, even when directly compared with selections of the pleasant pictures, also reported the most frequent recent cocaine use. Enhanced drug-related choice in cocaine addiction can be demonstrated even for nonpharmacologic (pictorial) stimuli. This choice, which is modulated by alternative stimuli, partly transcends self-reports (possibly indicative of a disconnect in cocaine addiction between self-reports and objective behavior) to provide an objective marker of addiction severity. Neuroimaging studies are needed to establish the neural underpinnings of such enhanced cocaine-related choice.

  5. Prenatal and postnatal cocaine exposure predict teen cocaine use

    PubMed Central

    Delaney-Black, Virginia; Chiodo, Lisa M.; Hannigan, John H.; Greenwald, Mark K.; Janisse, James; Patterson, Grace; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Partridge, Robert T.; Ager, Joel; Sokol, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical studies have identified alterations in cocaine and alcohol self-administration and behavioral responses to pharmacological challenges in adolescent offspring following prenatal exposure. To date, no published human studies have evaluated the relation between prenatal cocaine exposure and postnatal adolescent cocaine use. Human studies of prenatal cocaine-exposed children have also noted an increase in behaviors previously associated with substance use/abuse in teens and young adults, specifically childhood and teen externalizing behaviors, impulsivity, and attention problems. Despite these findings, human research has not addressed prior prenatal exposure as a potential predictor of teen drug use behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relations between prenatal cocaine exposure and teen cocaine use in a prospective longitudinal cohort (n = 316) that permitted extensive control for child, parent and community risk factors. Logistic regression analyses and Structural Equation Modeling revealed that both prenatal exposure and postnatal parent/caregiver cocaine use were uniquely related to teen use of cocaine at age 14 years. Teen cocaine use was also directly predicted by teen community violence exposure and caregiver negativity, and was indirectly related to teen community drug exposure. These data provide further evidence of the importance of prenatal exposure, family and community factors in the intergenerational transmission of teen/young adult substance abuse/use. PMID:20609384

  6. A Bacterial Cocaine Esterase Protects Against Cocaine-Induced Epileptogenic Activity and Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Jutkiewicz, Emily M.; Baladi, Michelle G.; Cooper, Ziva D.; Narasimhan, Diwahar; Sunahara, Roger K.; Woods, James H.

    2012-01-01

    Study objective Cocaine toxicity results in cardiovascular complications, seizures, and death and accounts for approximately 20% of drug-related emergency department visits every year. Presently, there are no treatments to eliminate the toxic effects of cocaine. The present study hypothesizes that a bacterial cocaine esterase with high catalytic efficiency would provide rapid and robust protection from cocaine-induced convulsions, epileptogenic activity, and lethality. Methods Cocaine-induced paroxysmal activity and convulsions were evaluated in rats surgically implanted with radiotelemetry devices (N=6 per treatment group). Cocaine esterase was administered 1 minute after a lethal dose of cocaine or after cocaine-induced convulsions to determine the ability of the enzyme to prevent or reverse, respectively, the effects of cocaine. Results The cocaine esterase prevented all cocaine-induced electroencephalographic changes and lethality. This effect was specific for cocaine because the esterase did not prevent convulsions and death induced by a cocaine analog, (?)-2?-carbomethoxy-3?-phenyltropane. The esterase prevented lethality even after cocaine-induced convulsions occurred. In contrast, the short-acting benzodiazepine, midazolam, prevented cocaine-induced convulsions but not the lethal effects of cocaine. Conclusion The data showed that cocaine esterase successfully degraded circulating cocaine to prevent lethality and that cocaine-induced convulsions alone are not responsible for the lethal effects of cocaine in this model. Therefore, further investigation into the use of cocaine esterase for treating cocaine overdose and its toxic effects is warranted. PMID:19013687

  7. ['Methadone substitution therapy and driving'. Results of an experimental study].

    PubMed

    Dittert, S; Naber, D; Soyka, M

    1999-05-01

    The aim of our experimental study was to gain informations and data on the driving ability of patients undergoing a methadone substitution programme as well as to explore the influence of an HIV infection. 28 patients, five of them HIV-positive, were compared to a control group equal in age, sex and education. For the traffic relevant tests the methadone patients showed significantly reduced performance. Six of the methadone patients passed the tests in a way regarded to have sufficient driving skills. We were unable to prove an influence of HIV infection on driving skills when lacking relevant somatic and neuropsychiatric symptoms. There was no significant correlation between the test results and patients age or dose of medication. We conclude that in general methadone substitution does not implicate driving inability although the majority of our patients showed some reduction of their psychomotoric skills. PMID:10407842

  8. A review of common methods to convert morphine to methadone.

    PubMed

    Wong, Eric; Walker, Kathryn A

    2012-01-01

    When dosed appropriately on carefully chosen patients, methadone can be a very safe and effective choice in managing chronic pain. Many authors have discussed important issues surrounding patient selection, drug interactions, screening for QTc prolongation and monitoring. This article will focus on the dosing dilemma that exists after the patient is deemed an appropriate candidate for methadone and a conversion is necessary from another opioid. Despite many publications dedicated to addressing this challenging topic, there is no consensus on the most appropriate method for converting an opioid regimen to methadone. Given the lack of concrete guidance, clinicians in a community setting are likely to be faced with an increased challenge if there are no available pain specialists to provide clinical support. Common methods for converting morphine to methadone will be reviewed and two clinical patient scenarios used to illustrate the outcomes of applying the methods. PMID:23882384

  9. A review of common methods to convert morphine to methadone

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Eric; Walker, Kathryn A.

    2013-01-01

    When dosed appropriately on carefully chosen patients, methadone can be a very safe and effective choice in managing chronic pain. Many authors have discussed important issues surrounding patient selection, drug interactions, screening for QTc prolongation and monitoring. This article will focus on the dosing dilemma that exists after the patient is deemed an appropriate candidate for methadone and a conversion is necessary from another opioid. Despite many publications dedicated to addressing this challenging topic, there is no consensus on the most appropriate method for converting an opioid regimen to methadone. Given the lack of concrete guidance, clinicians in a community setting are likely to be faced with an increased challenge if there are no available pain specialists to provide clinical support. Common methods for converting morphine to methadone will be reviewed and two clinical patient scenarios used to illustrate the outcomes of applying the methods. PMID:23882384

  10. Cellular mechanisms of cocaine cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Welder, A A; Grammas, P; Melchert, R B

    1993-09-01

    Although cocaine abuse has been a major drug problem in the United States for over 100 years, it has only been in the last decade that the adverse effects of cocaine on the cardiovascular system have become a serious health issue. The cardiotoxic effects of cocaine are multifactorial and remain a puzzle for investigators to solve. Evidence suggests that cocaine-induced toxic effects on the cardiac and vascular cells include both direct as well as indirect components. In addition, other chemical, physiologic, and environmental factors may further complicate and alter mechanisms and endpoints of cocaine-induced cellular toxicity. In order to fully understand the overall cardiotoxic response to cocaine, the cellular mechanisms and endpoints of toxicity of each of these potentially injurious factors must be identified. PMID:8212064

  11. [Fatal toxic leukoencephalopathy associated with consumption of pasta base of cocaine: Report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Cartier R, Luis; Gonzlez L, Daniela; Harn D, Jorge

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of drug-associated toxic encephalopathy is unknown, but it is an uncommon condition. Toxic leukoencephalopathy was described associated with heroin consumption, it has been less commonly described with the use of cocaine and there are no reports of its association with consumption pasta base of cocaine (PBC). We report two females aged 31 years and a male aged 19 years, consumers of PBC who developed a fatal toxic leukoencephalopathy. They initiated their disease with severe and persistent headache, sequential focal neurologic deficits and a progressive impairment of consciousness that culminated with their death. Laboratory parameters such as blood count, cerebrospinal fluid analyses or infectious biological indices were normal. MRI showed multifocal lesions in brain white matter of both hemispheres confirming the leukoencephalopathy. There was no response to the use of methylprednisolone. PMID:26757874

  12. Differences in Methadone Metabolism by CYP2B6 Variants.

    PubMed

    Gadel, Sarah; Friedel, Christina; Kharasch, Evan D

    2015-07-01

    Methadone is a long-acting opioid with considerable unexplained interindividual variability in clearance. Cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) mediates clinical methadone clearance and metabolic inactivation via N-demethylation to 2-ethyl-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP). Retrospective studies suggest that individuals with the CYP2B6*6 allelic variant have higher methadone plasma concentrations. Catalytic activities of CYP2B6 variants are highly substrate- and expression-system dependent. This investigation evaluated methadone N-demethylation by expressed human CYP2B6 allelic variants in an insect cell coexpression system containing P450 reductase. Additionally, the influence of coexpressing cytochrome b5, whose role in metabolism can be inhibitory or stimulatory depending on the P450 isoform and substrate, on methadone metabolism, was evaluated. EDDP formation from therapeutic (0.25-1 ?M) R- and S-methadone concentrations was CYP2B6.4 ? CYP2B6.1 ? CYP2B6.5 > CYP2B6.9 ? CYP2B6.6, and undetectable from CYP2B6.18. Coexpression of b5 had small and variant-specific effects at therapeutic methadone concentrations but at higher concentrations stimulated EDDP formation by CYP2B6.1, CYP2B6.4, CYP2B6.5, and CYP2B6.9 but not CYP2B6.6. In vitro intrinsic clearances were generally CYP2B6.4 ? CYP2B6.1 > CYP2B6.5 > CYP2B6.9 ? CYP2B6.6. Stereoselective methadone metabolism (S>R) was maintained with all CYP2B6 variants. These results show that methadone N-demethylation by CYP2B6.4 is greater compared with CYP2B6.1, whereas CYP2B6.9 and CYP2B6.6 (which both contain the 516G>T, Q172H polymorphism), are catalytically deficient. The presence or absence of b5 in expression systems may explain previously reported disparate catalytic activities of CYP2B6 variants for specific substrates. Differences in methadone metabolism by CYP2B6 allelic variants provide a mechanistic understanding of pharmacogenetic variability in clinical methadone metabolism and clearance. PMID:25897175

  13. Neurobiological underpinnings of sensation seeking trait in heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gordon L F; Liu, Yu-Pin; Chan, Chetwyn C H; So, Kwok-Fai; Zeng, Hong; Lee, Tatia M C

    2015-11-01

    Neurobiological investigation of heroin revealed that abusers of this highly addictive substance show dysregulation in brain circuits for reward processing and cognitive control. Psychologically, personality traits related to reward processing and cognitive control differed between heroin abusers and non-abusers. Yet, there is no direct evidence on the relationship between these neurobiological and psychological findings on heroin abusers, and whether such relationship is altered in these abusers. The present study filled this research gap by integrating findings obtained via magnetic resonance imaging (structural volume and resting-state functional connectivity) and self-reported personality trait measures (Zuckerman?s Sensation Seeking Scale and Barratt Impulsivity Scale) on 33 abstinent heroin users and 30 matched healthy controls. The key finding is a negative relationship between high sensation seeking tendency and midbrain structural volume in the heroin users. Importantly, there was stronger coupling between the midbrain and ventromedial prefrontal cortex and weaker coupling between the midbrain and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in heroin users. Our findings offer significant insight into the neural underpinning of sensation seeking in heroin users. Importantly, the data shed light on a novel relationship between the mesolimbic-prefrontal pathway of the reward system and the high sensation seeking personality trait in heroin abusers. PMID:26364127

  14. Association between heroin dependence and prodynorphin gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Wei, S G; Zhu, Y S; Lai, J H; Xue, H X; Chai, Z Q; Li, S B

    2011-05-30

    Dynorphin peptides and k-opioid receptor are important in the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse such as heroin. This study examined potential association between heroin dependence and four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of prodynorphin (PDYN) gene (rs35286281 in promoter region and rs1022563, rs2235749, rs910080 in 3'UTR). Participants included 304 heroin-dependent subjects and 300 healthy controls. Genotype, allele frequencies and difference between groups were analyzed by HaploView 4.0 and SPSS 11.5 software. The analysis indicated a significant higher frequency of the PDYN 68bp VNTR (rs35286281) H allele in heroin-dependent subjects than in controls (p=0.002 after Bonferroni correction). Strong linkage disequilibrium was observed between rs1022563, rs2235749 and rs910080 polymorphism (D'>0.9). Significantly more TCT haplotypes were found in heroin-dependent patients than in the controls (p=0.006 after Bonferroni correction). We found significant pointwise correlation of these three variants (rs1022563, rs2235749 and rs910080) with heroin dependence. These findings support the important role of PDYN polymorphism in heroin dependence, and may guide future studies to identify genetic risk factors for heroin dependence. PMID:21382455

  15. cAMP levels in monocytes of heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Castrilln, J L; Arellano, J L; Palomo, J D; Rodriguez, M M; Lpez, A J

    1989-02-15

    Intravenous heroin addicts have a high intracellular cAMP level in relation to control monocytes. Incubation in vitro with ascorbic acid normalizes the cellular content of cAMP. We discuss the role of cAMP in the pathogenesis of defective monocyte chemotaxis in intravenous heroin addicts. PMID:2538675

  16. cAMP levels in monocytes of heroin addicts.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Castrilln JL; Arellano JL; Palomo JD; Rodriguez MM; Lpez AJ

    1989-02-15

    Intravenous heroin addicts have a high intracellular cAMP level in relation to control monocytes. Incubation in vitro with ascorbic acid normalizes the cellular content of cAMP. We discuss the role of cAMP in the pathogenesis of defective monocyte chemotaxis in intravenous heroin addicts.

  17. Contingency management interventions: effects on treatment outcome during methadone detoxification.

    PubMed Central

    McCaul, M E; Stitzer, M L; Bigelow, G E; Liebson, I A

    1984-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of a contingency management program in preventing relapse to illicit opiate use and increasing treatment retention during outpatient methadone detoxification treatment. Twenty male opiate addicts were randomly assigned to an experimental or control group. Following a 3-week methadone stabilization period, men in both groups received identical gradual methadone dose reductions during Weeks 4 through 9 and were maintained on placebo during Weeks 10 through 13. Beginning in Week 4, control patients received $5.00 for providing a specimen twice weekly. Experimental patients received $10.00 and a take home methadone dose for each opiate-free urine specimen but forfeited the incentives and participated in more intensive clinic procedures when specimens were opiate positive. The contingency management procedure slowed the rate of relapse to illicit opiate use. Experimental patients provided significantly more opiate-free urines during the methadone dose reduction in Weeks 4 through 9 than control patients, although the difference between groups was no longer significant during placebo administration in Weeks 10 through 13. In addition, the contingency management program improved treatment retention and reduced symptom complaints during the detoxification. The usefulness and limitations of contingency management procedures for outpatient methadone detoxification are discussed. PMID:6725168

  18. Gender differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of methadone substitution therapy

    PubMed Central

    Graziani, Manuela; Nistic, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Gender-related differences in the pharmacological effects of drug are an emerging topic. This review examines gender differences in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects of methadone, a long-acting opioid agonist that is prescribed as a treatment for opioid dependence and the management of chronic pain. Method: We performed a search in the Medline database from 1990 to 2014 in order to find published literature related to gender differences in pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of methadone. Results: None of the studies were carried out with the primary or secondary aim to identify any gender differences in the pharmacokinetic profile of methadone. Importantly; high inter-subjects variability in PK parameters was found also intra female population. The reported differences in volume of distribution could be ascribed to the physiological differences between men and women in body weight and composition, taking into account that the dose of methadone was established irrespective of body weight of patients (Peles and Adelson, 2006). On the other hand, the few studies present in literature found no gender difference in some direct pharmacodynamic parameters. Some reports have suggested that female gender is associated with an increased risk for long-QT-related cardiac arrhythmias in methadone maintenance subjects. Conclusion: Even though it may be too simplistic to expect variability only in one parameter to explain inter-individual variation in methadone response, we believe that a better knowledge of gender-related differences might have significant implications for better outcomes in opioid dependence substitution therapy in women. PMID:26106330

  19. Study on the sampling of methadone from exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Beck, Olof; Sandqvist, Sören; Böttcher, Michael; Eriksen, Paul; Franck, Johan; Palmskog, Göran

    2011-06-01

    This study aimed at develop and validate the procedure for collecting exhaled breath for drug testing. Patients receiving methadone maintenance treatment were recruited for the study. Methadone levels were measured using liquid chromatography- electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry. The sampling device was based on a 47-mm C(18) filter and used under pressure to aid flow through the filter. The mouth was rinsed before sampling, and the device was constructed to protect against any saliva contamination. Methadone was present in breath samples before and after the daily intake of methadone. The mean (± SD) pre-dose level was found to be 135 ± 109 pg/min (n = 48, median 121). The exhaled methadone increased after dose intake. Saliva levels of methadone were high in comparison with exhaled breath levels. Saliva contamination was suspected in about 10% of the collected samples. Similar results were obtained using 1, 3, and 10 min sampling times. The inter- and intraindividual variability were found to be similar and in the order of 50%. Alternative sampling using XAD-2 beads and solid-phase microextraction fiber was found to be possible and enables sampling with low back pressure and with no need for pump assistance. The presented results confirm that breath testing is a new possibility for the detection of drugs of abuse. PMID:21619719

  20. Medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction: methadone and buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    Saxon, Andrew J.; Hser, Yih-Ing; Woody, George; Ling, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Among agents for treatment of opioid addiction, methadone is a full mu-opioid receptor agonist, whereas buprenorphine is a partial agonist. Both are long-acting. Buprenorphine has a superior safety profile. Methadone is formulated for oral administration and buprenorphine for sublingual administration. A subdermal buprenorphine implant with a 6-month duration of action is being considered for approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Both medications reduce mortality rates and improve other outcomes. Data from a recent randomized controlled comparison of both medications (N = 1269) show better treatment retention with methadone but reduced illicit opioid use early in treatment with buprenorphine. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviors were measured using the Risk Behavior Survey at baseline, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks for study completers. In the 30 days prior to treatment entry, 14.4% of the completers randomized to treatment with buprenorphine (n = 340) and 14.1% of the completers randomized to methadone treatment (n = 391) shared needles. The percent sharing needles decreased to 2.4% for buprenorphine and 4.8 for methadone in the 30 days prior to Week 24 (p < 0.0001). In the 30 days prior to treatment entry, 6.8% of the completers randomized to buprenorphine and 8.2% of the completers randomized to methadone had multiple sexual partners, with only 5.2% and 5.1%, respectively, reporting multiple partners at Week 24 (p < 0.04). PMID:24436573

  1. The Source of Methadone in Overdose Deaths in Western Virginia in 2004

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Melissa B.; Korthuis, P. Todd; Behonick, George S.; Wunsch, Martha J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Methadone-related overdose deaths increased in the United States by 468% from 1999 to 2005. Current studies associate the nonmedical use of methadone with methadone-related deaths. This study describes medical examiner cases in rural Virginia in 2004 with methadone identified by toxicology and compares cases according to source of methadone. Methods In 2004, all intentional and unintentional poisoning deaths from the Office of The Chief Medical Examiner, Western District of Virginia, were reviewed to identify cases in which methadone was a direct or contributing cause of death. The Virginia Prescription Monitoring Program was reviewed for prescription opioids in the name of these identified decedents. Decedent participation in local opioid treatment programs (OTP) was also assessed. Results The source of methadone in the 61 methadone-related overdose deaths was mostly nonprescribed (67%), although 28% of decedents were prescribed methadone for analgesia. Only 5% of decedents were actively enrolled in an OTP. The majority of deaths were attributed to polysubstance overdose. Conclusions The majority of methadone overdose deaths in this study were related to illicit methadone use, rather than prescribed or OTP uses. Interventions to decrease methadone-related deaths should focus on reduction of nonprescription use of methadone. PMID:21844834

  2. Determination and Validation of a Solid-phase Extraction Gas Chromatography-mass Spectrometry for the Quantification of Methadone and Its Principal Metabolite in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Chiadmi, Fouad; Schlatter, Joël

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a solid-phase extraction gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring-mass spectrometry method for the determination of methadone (MDN) and 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) in human plasma. The linear response was obtained over the concentration range from 10 to 2000 ng/mL for MDN and EDDP. The absolute recoveries of MDN and EDDP were 95.9%–98.9% and 94.8%–102.4%, with relative standard deviation (RSD) ranging from 1.8% to 2.7% and 1.8% to 3.9%, respectively. The intra- and interday precisions were found to be less than 5% for both analytes. The limits of detection of MDN and EDDP were 4 and 5 ng/mL, respectively. The presented method was convenient for therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacokinetic studies in patients on heroin-assisted MDN therapy. PMID:26339186

  3. Acute Heroin Fatalities in San Francisco Demographic and Toxicologic Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Baselt, Randall C.; Allison, Donna J.; Wright, James A.; Scannell, James R.; Stephens, Boyd G.

    1975-01-01

    The mortality rate due to heroin overdosage in San Francisco has increased dramatically since 1968 and now stands as one of the highest in the United States. While the numbers of heroin fatalities in many eastern United States cities have declined substantially in the past few years, the figures for San Francisco and the other West Coast areas continue to increase. The group of heroin overdose victims from the 1970 through 1973 period is more predominantly Caucasian and younger than from the 1963 through 1965 period. In nearly all of the victims, the presence of morphine (a heroin metabolite) was noted in bile or urine, and in about half the results of blood alcohol tests were positive. Measurement of blood morphine concentrations in the victims showed no significant difference from the concentrations noted in a control group of heroin addicts dying from causes other than overdosage. PMID:1136431

  4. Managing Heroin Addiction in an Outpatient Setting: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Malliarakis, Kate Driscoll

    2015-12-01

    Heroin use may be under-recognized among older adults. Baby Boomers are the largest age as well as the largest drug-using cohort in modern history. Although some drug users age out of their addiction, others do not. Nurses caring for older adults may come into contact with heroin users due to associated conditions or sequelae of their drug use that cause them to seek care. Few nurses are prepared to provide the care needed when heroin use accompanies other health problems. Using an individual example, the current article provides guidance for identifying heroin addiction, essential information about heroin use, and resources for guiding patients to experts for the comprehensive care needed for recovery. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 41(12), 10-14.]. PMID:26594950

  5. Escalation Patterns of Varying Periods of Heroin Access

    PubMed Central

    Vendruscolo, Leandro F.; Schlosburg, Joel E.; Misra, Kaushik K.; Chen, Scott A.; Greenwell, Thomas N.; Koob, George F.

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of opioid abuse and dependence has been on the rise in just the past few years. Animal studies indicate that extended access to heroin produces escalation of intake over time, whereas stable intake is observed under limited-access conditions. Escalation of drug intake has been suggested to model the transition from controlled drug use to compulsive drug seeking and taking. Here, we directly compared the pattern of heroin intake in animals with varying periods of heroin access. Food intake was also monitored over the course of escalation. Rats were allowed to lever press on a fixed-ratio 1 schedule of reinforcement to receive intravenous infusions of heroin for 1, 6, 12, or 23 h per day for 14 sessions. The results showed that heroin intake in the 12 and 23 h groups markedly increased over time, whereas heroin intake in the 1 h group was stable. The 6 h group showed a significant but modest escalation of intake. Total heroin intake was similar in the 12 and 23 h groups, but the rate of heroin self-administration was two-fold higher in the 12 h group compared with the 23 h group. Food intake decreased over sessions only in the 12 h group. The 12 and 23 h groups showed marked physical signs of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. These findings suggest that 12 h heroin access per day may be the optimal access time for producing escalation of heroin intake. The advantages of this model and the potential relevance for studying drug addiction are discussed. PMID:21406200

  6. Negative Cocaine Effect Expectancies are Associated with Subjective Response to Cocaine Challenge In Recreational Cocaine Users

    PubMed Central

    Lundahl, Leslie H.; Lukas, Scott E.

    2012-01-01

    Although many studies have shown that cognitive effect expectancies are associated with drug use and drug reatment outcomes, few studies have compared effect expectancies with drug response following drug challenge. Healthy male and female volunteers (n=19, ages 21-35) who reported using cocaine 1-4 times per month completed the Cocaine Effect Expectancy Questionnaire (CEEQ: Schafer and Brown, 1991), were challenged with cocaine (0.9 mg/kg, i.n.), then completed a series of visual analog scales (VAS) and the Addiction Research Center Inventory (ARCI) at 15 min intervals for 3 hrs following cocaine administration. Significant positive correlations were found between global negative expectancies and peak responses on the VAS measures “Good,” “Happy,” “High,” “Stimulated,” and “Desire to Use Cocaine,” and on the LSD subscale of the ARCI post-cocaine administration, and between global positive expectancies and the MBG subscale of the ARCI, and on VAS items “Anxious” and “Good” post-cocaine administration. Global positive expectancies also were positively correlated with peak systolic blood pressure, and global negative expectancies with peak heart rate after cocaine administration. These results suggest that negative and positive effect expectancies both play a complex role in the subjective experience of cocaine effects, and thus likely in the progression of nonuse to recreational use, in the transition to abuse, and in individualized treatment strategies. PMID:17110052

  7. Personality Differences among Black, White, and Hispanic-American Male Heroin Addicts on MMPI Content Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, M. P.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Assessed personality differences among Black, White, and Hispanic-American heroin addicts (N=423). Results confirmed the hypotheses that minority group heroin addicts (Blacks and Hispanics) would show better adjustment than White heroin addicts and that Hispanic-American heroin addicts would evidence personality characteristics unlike those of…

  8. Personality Differences among Black, White, and Hispanic-American Male Heroin Addicts on MMPI Content Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, M. P.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Assessed personality differences among Black, White, and Hispanic-American heroin addicts (N=423). Results confirmed the hypotheses that minority group heroin addicts (Blacks and Hispanics) would show better adjustment than White heroin addicts and that Hispanic-American heroin addicts would evidence personality characteristics unlike those of

  9. Employment-Based Reinforcement to Motivate Naltrexone Ingestion and Drug Abstinence in the Treatment of Drug Addiction. - 1

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2005-11-03

    Behavior Therapy; Cocaine; Cocaine (IV); Cocaine Abuse; Cocaine Dependence; Contingency Management; HIV Risk Behaviors; Heroin; Heroin Dependence; Naltrexone; Opioid Dependence; Substance Abuse, Intravenous; Sexual Risk Behaviors

  10. Copper thiocyanato complexes and cocaine - a case of 'black cocaine'.

    PubMed

    Laussmann, Tim; Grzesiak, Ireneus; Krest, Alexander; Stirnat, Kathrin; Meier-Giebing, Sigrid; Ruschewitz, Uwe; Klein, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition of a black powder confiscated by German customs was elucidated. Black powders are occasionally used as a 'transporter' for cocaine and are obviously especially designed to cloak the presence of the drug. The material consisting of cocaine, copper, iron, thiocyanate, and graphite was approached by analytical tools and chemical modelling. Graphite is added to the material probably with the intention of masking the typical infrared (IR) fingerprints of cocaine and can be clearly detected by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Cu(2+) and NCS(-) ions, when carefully reacted with cocaine hydrochloride, form the novel compound (CocH)2 [Cu(NCS)4 ] (CocH(+) ?=?protonated cocaine), which has been characterised by single crystal XRD, IR, NMR, UV/Vis absorption and EPR spectroscopy. Based on some further experiments the assumed composition of the original black powder is discussed. PMID:24753444

  11. The price elasticity of demand for heroin: Matched longitudinal and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, Todd A; Alessi, Sheila M; Kline, Brendan; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Petry, Nancy M

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports estimates of the price elasticity of demand for heroin based on a newly constructed dataset. The dataset has two matched components concerning the same sample of regular heroin users: longitudinal information about real-world heroin demand (actual price and actual quantity at daily intervals for each heroin user in the sample) and experimental information about laboratory heroin demand (elicited by presenting the same heroin users with scenarios in a laboratory setting). Two empirical strategies are used to estimate the price elasticity of demand for heroin. The first strategy exploits the idiosyncratic variation in the price experienced by a heroin user over time that occurs in markets for illegal drugs. The second strategy exploits the experimentally induced variation in price experienced by a heroin user across experimental scenarios. Both empirical strategies result in the estimate that the conditional price elasticity of demand for heroin is approximately -0.80. PMID:25702687

  12. Factors Associated with Relapse among Heroin Addicts: Evidence from a Two-Year Community-Based Follow-Up Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Chao; Jiang, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Rui-Wen; Zhang, Li-Juan; Zhang, Jian-Chen; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Xue-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many countries including China are facing a serious opiate dependence problem. Anti-drug work effectiveness was affected by the high relapse rate all over the world. This study aims to analyze the factors influencing heroin addict relapse, and to provide evidence for generating relapse prevention strategies. Methods: A community-based follow-up study was conducted in China between October 2010 and September 2012. A total of 554 heroin addicts in accordance with the inclusion criteria from 81 streets in 12 districts of Shanghai, China were divided into 4 groups: group 1—daily dosage taken orally of 60 mL of methadone or under combined with psychological counseling and social supports (n = 130); group 2—daily dosage taken orally of over 60 mL of methadone combined with psychological counseling and social supports (n = 50); group 3—JTT (Jitai tablets) combined with psychological counseling and social supports (n = 206); group 4—JTT combined with social supports (n = 168). Results: Log-rank test results showed that the cumulative relapse rate differences among four groups during the two-year follow-up period were not statistically significant (χ2 = 5.889, p = 0.117). Multivariate Cox regression analysis results showed that only three independent variables were still statistically significant, including compliance with participation in psychological counseling (OR = 3.563, p = 0.000), the years of drug use (OR = 1.078, p = 0.001)and intervention model. Conclusions: Using the detoxification medications combined with appropriate psychological counseling and social support measures will help improve the effectiveness of relapse prevention, which is a kind of alternative community detoxification pattern. Appropriate and standard psychological counseling is very important for anti-drug treatment. The longer the drug addiction lasts, the longer the anti-drug treatment takes. PMID:26828510

  13. Interdependent Group Contingency Management for Cocaine-Dependent Methadone Maintenance Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Kimberly C.; Kerwin, MaryLouise E.; Carpenedo, Carolyn M.; Rosenwasser, Beth J.; Gardner, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) for drug abstinence has been applied to individuals independently even when delivered in groups. We developed a group CM intervention in which the behavior of a single, randomly selected, anonymous individual determined reinforcement delivery for the entire group. We also compared contingencies placed only on cocaine…

  14. Cause of death conundrum with methadone use: a case report.

    PubMed

    Letsky, Michael C; Zumwalt, Ross E; Seifert, Steven A; Benson, Blaine E

    2011-06-01

    Deaths caused by a methadone intoxication or overdose are becoming more frequent. We report a case involving a patient who had extremely high methadone blood concentrations but whose cause of death may have been unrelated to the drug. A 51-year-old woman was found deceased in bed by her daughter. At the scene were numerous bottles of methadone, with the chronic dosage of 240 mg 3 times a day. There was no history of prior suicide attempts, there were no reports of suicidal ideation having been voiced and there was no suicide note. At autopsy, there were no pills found in the stomach. Microscopic tissue examination revealed lobar pneumonia of the right lower lobe. Postmortem lung cultures grew out Streptococcus pneumoniae. Femoral blood contained methadone, 5.7 mg/L; EDDP, 2.1 mg/L; oxycodone, 0.017 mg/L; doxylamine, 0.022 mg/L; and ethanol, 13.0 mg/dL. The postmortem methadone concentration was consistent with her known dose, plausible pharmacokinetics and conditions of discovery. Various causes of death, such as a methadone-related arrhythmia from QTc prolongation or the contribution of methadone to the development of the pneumonia, cannot be ruled out and may well have caused or contributed to death, but the pneumonia was felt to be a competent cause of death. Ultimately, the most likely cause(s) of death, is a decision left to the individual medical examiner. This case is illustrative of the growing number of similar cases facing forensic pathologists. The cause of death cannot be solely based on drug concentrations and it may not be possible to come to a conclusion as to "the" cause of death and the forensic pathologist must be content with "a" cause of death. PMID:20190634

  15. Pain Among High-Risk Patients on Methadone Maintenance Treatment.

    PubMed

    Voon, Pauline; Hayashi, Kanna; Milloy, M-J; Nguyen, Paul; Wood, Evan; Montaner, Julio; Kerr, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    The complexity of treating concurrent pain and opioid dependence among many methadone-maintained individuals presents a major challenge in many clinical settings. Furthermore, recent expert guidelines have called for increased research on the safety of methadone in the context of chronic pain. This study explores the prevalence and correlates of pain among a prospective cohort of people who use illicit drugs in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, who reported enrollment in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) between 2011 and 2014. Among the 823 participants eligible for this analysis, 338 (40.9%) reported moderate pain and 91 (11.1%) reported extreme pain at the first study visit. In multivariable, generalized, linear mixed model analyses, higher pain severity was positively and independently associated with self-managing pain (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.77-2.60), patient perception of methadone dose being too low (AOR 1.82, 95% CI 1.41-2.34), older age (AOR 1.31, 95% CI 1.13-1.51), having a physical disability (AOR 4.59, 95% CI 3.73-5.64), having ever been diagnosed with a mental illness (AOR 1.44, 95% CI 1.13-1.84), white ethnicity (AOR 1.42, 95% CI 1.10-1.83), and marijuana use (AOR 1.25, 95% CI 1.02-1.52). These findings suggest several areas for clinical intervention, particularly related to patient education and alternative analgesic approaches for MMT patients experiencing pain. Perspective: To better understand the complexity of concurrent pain and opioid dependency among individuals on methadone maintenance treatment, this article describes the prevalence and correlates of higher pain severity among methadone-maintained people who use illicit drugs. Patients on methadone with comorbid pain may benefit from education and alternative analgesic approaches. PMID:26101814

  16. Cocaine/Crack: The Big Lie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This pamphlet focuses on cocaine and crack use and the addictive nature of cocaine/crack. It contains a set of 21 questions about crack and cocaine, each accompanied by a clear and complete response. Interspersed throughout the booklet are photographs and quotes from former cocaine or crack users/addicts. Questions and answers focus on what…

  17. Cocaine Intoxication and Thyroid Storm

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Cocaine, a widely used sympathomimetic drug, causes thermoregulatory and cardiac manifestations that can mimic a life-threatening thyroid storm. Case. A man presented to the emergency department requesting only cocaine detoxification. He reported symptoms over the last few years including weight loss and diarrhea, which he attributed to ongoing cocaine use. On presentation he had an elevated temperature of 39.4°C and a heart rate up to 130 beats per minute. Examination revealed the presence of an enlarged, nontender goiter with bilateral continuous bruits. He was found to have thyrotoxicosis by labs and was treated for thyroid storm and cocaine intoxication concurrently. The patient was ultimately diagnosed with Graves’ disease and treated with iodine-131 therapy. Conclusion. Cocaine use should be considered a possible trigger for thyroid storm. Recognition of thyroid storm is critical because of the necessity for targeted therapy and the significant mortality associated with the condition if left untreated. PMID:26425625

  18. Covalent modification of proteins by cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shi-Xian; Bharat, Narine; Fischman, Marian C.; Landry, Donald W.

    2002-03-01

    Cocaine covalently modifies proteins through a reaction in which the methyl ester of cocaine acylates the -amino group of lysine residues. This reaction is highly specific in vitro, because no other amino acid reacts with cocaine, and only cocaine's methyl ester reacts with the lysine side chain. Covalently modified proteins were present in the plasma of rats and human subjects chronically exposed to cocaine. Modified endogenous proteins are immunogenic, and specific antibodies were elicited in mouse and detected in the plasma of human subjects. Covalent modification of proteins could explain cocaine's autoimmune effects and provide a new biochemical approach to cocaine's long-term actions.

  19. Intracerebral hemorrhage associated with cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Nolte, K B; Gelman, B B

    1989-07-01

    With the current epidemic of cocaine abuse, there have been many clinical reports of cocaine toxicity, including stroke. Autopsy findings were reported in only one case of intracerebral hemorrhage associated with cocaine abuse. We describe the autopsy toxicological findings in a case of sudden death in a young person due to intracerebral hemorrhage associated with cocaine abuse. In view of the present epidemic of cocaine abuse, cocaine toxicity should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intracerebral hemorrhage. We suggest that the pharmacodynamic effects of cocaine on the cerebral vasculature is the most likely cause. PMID:2742464

  20. Cocaine withdrawal in rats selectively bred for low (LoS) versus high (HiS) saccharin intake.

    PubMed

    Radke, Anna K; Zlebnik, Natalie E; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2015-02-01

    Cocaine use results in anhedonia during withdrawal, but it is not clear how this emotional state interacts with an individual's vulnerability for addiction. Rats selectively bred for high (HiS) or low (LoS) saccharin intake are a well-established model of drug abuse vulnerability, with HiS rats being more likely to consume sweets and drugs of abuse such as cocaine and heroin (Carroll et al., 2002) than LoS rats. This study examined whether the motivational consequences of cocaine withdrawal are differentially expressed in HiS and LoS rats. HiS and LoS rats were trained to respond for a sucrose reward on a progressive ratio (PR) schedule of reinforcement and breakpoints were measured during and after chronic, continuous exposure to cocaine (30 mg/kg/day). Cocaine, but not saline, treatment resulted in lower breakpoints for sucrose during withdrawal in LoS rats only. These results suggest anhedonia during withdrawal is more pronounced in the less vulnerable LoS rats. Fewer motivational deficits during withdrawal may contribute to greater drug vulnerability in the HiS line. PMID:25482327

  1. Male sex work and HIV risk among young heroin users in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Clatts, Michael C; Giang, Le M; Goldsamt, Lloyd A; Yi, Huso

    2007-12-01

    The present study describes complex drug and sexual risk in a group of male sex workers (n = 79) who were recruited in the context of a larger study of young heroin users in Hanoi, Vietnam (n = 1270). Male sex workers were significantly more likely than male non-sex workers to be migrants (P < 0.001) and to have unstable housing (P < 0.001), to have lifetime exposure to marijuana (P < 0.001), 3,4 methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) (P < 0.01), amphetamines (P < 0.05), cocaine (P < 0.01) and morphine (P < 0.001). Male sex workers are more likely to currently use MDMA (P < 0.05), amphetamines (P < 0.001), morphine (P < 0.05) and to 'smoke' as their most frequent mode of heroin administration (P < 0.01). Male sex workers are more likely to have both male and female concurrent sex partners (P < 0.001), to have a history of sexual victimisation (P < 0.001), to have had more than three different sex partners in the past 30 days (P < 0.001), and to have had partners who injected drugs before sex (P < 0.001) or who used drugs during sex (P < 0.01). In their last sexual encounter with a client partner, approximately one-third (31.1%) reported having had receptive anal sex. In nearly three-quarters of these exchanges (71.4%), no condom was used. Similarly, in their last sexual encounter with a client partner, 42.2% reported having had insertive anal sex and in nearly half (47.4%) of these encounters no condom was used. Consistent with recent data from elsewhere in the region, there is an urgent need for additional research on male sex work in South-east Asia in order to properly situate behavioural interventions for male sex workers in this region. PMID:18082070

  2. Odor impact of volatiles emitted from marijuana, cocaine, heroin and their surrogate scents

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Somchai; Koziel, Jacek A.

    2015-01-01

    Volatile compounds emitted into headspace from illicit street drugs have been identified, but until now odor impact of these compounds have not been reported. Data in support of identification of these compounds and their odor impact to human nose are presented. In addition, data is reported on odor detection thresholds for canines highlighting differences with human ODTs and needs to address gaps in knowledge. New data presented here include: (1) compound identification, (2) gas chromatography (GC) column retention times, (3) mass spectral data, (4) odor descriptors from 2 databases, (5) human odor detection thresholds from 2 databases, (6) calculated odor activity values, and (7) subsequent ranking of compounds by concentration and ranking of compounds by odor impact (reported as calculated odor activity values). For further interpretation and discussion, see Rice and Koziel [1] and Rice [2]. PMID:26958621

  3. Impact of Cannabis Use During Stabilization on Methadone Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Scavone, Jillian L.; Sterling, Robert C.; Weinstein, Stephen P.; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Illicit drug use, particularly of cannabis, is common among opiate-dependent individuals, and has the potential to impact treatment in a negative manner. Methods To examine this, patterns of cannabis use prior to and during methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) were examined to assess possible cannabis-related effects on MMT, particularly during methadone stabilization. Retrospective chart analysis was used to examine outpatient records of patients undergoing MMT (n=91), focusing specifically on past and present cannabis use and its association with opiate abstinence, methadone dose stabilization, and treatment compliance. Results Objective rates of cannabis use were high during methadone induction, dropping significantly following dose stabilization. History of cannabis use correlated with cannabis use during MMT, but did not negatively impact the methadone induction process. Pilot data also suggested that objective ratings of opiate withdrawal decrease in MMT patients using cannabis during stabilization. Conclusions and Scientific Significance The present findings may point to novel interventions to be employed during treatment for opiate dependence that specifically target cannabinoid-opioid system interactions. PMID:23795873

  4. Priapism Followed by Discontinuation of Methadone: A rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mostafavi, Seyed-Ali; Bidaki, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Priapism is defined by persistent, painful penile erection which occurs without sexual stimulation. Methadone is used as an analgesic and is also used in detoxification and maintenance protocol for opioid dependence treatment. Here we will report a case of a male with priapism after rapid discontinuation doses of methadone. Case presentation: The case was a young married male who referred to a psychiatry clinic due to long-time spontaneous erections. The patient had no history of mental disorders, trauma or sickle cell anemia. He used to smoke opium for five years and used methadone for four years at a dose of 17 cc daily, which he abruptly discontinued. Then he often experienced spontaneous and painful erections without physical or mental stimulation that caused him shame and embarrassment. Conclusion: In this case, chronology indicates that rapid discontinuation of methadone was possibly responsible for the occurrence of priapism. This may have happened due to a compensatory reaction to methadone side effect of erectile dysfunction, followed by its rapid withdrawal.

  5. Methadone use in cancer patients with pain: a review.

    PubMed

    Bruera, Eduardo; Sweeney, Catherine

    2002-02-01

    In recent years a better understanding of the pharmacologic and pharmacokinetic properties of methadone, including equianalgesic ratios has led to its increased use as a second line opioid for the treatment of pain in patients with cancer. Methadone may be an important alternative for those who have side effects related to the use of other opioids because it has no known active metabolites, is well absorbed by oral and rectal routes, and also has the advantage of very low cost. However, it has a long, unpredictable half-life, which can result in accumulation and toxicity in some patients. In addition, rotation to methadone as a second line agent is more complex than with other opioids because of its increased potency in those patients who are opioid tolerant, particularly those who have been on higher doses of other opioids. Future research should address the use of methadone as a first-line agent in the management of cancer pain, its use in patients with neuropathic pain, and in those who develop rapid tolerance to other opioids. In some patients with cancer the long half-life of methadone offers the advantage of extended dosing intervals to 12 and even 24 hours, further research is also needed in this area. PMID:11839235

  6. Treating cocaine addiction with viruses

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, M. Rocio A.; Kaufmann, Gunnar F.; Mee, Jenny M.; Meijler, Michael M.; Koob, George F.; Janda, Kim D.

    2004-01-01

    Cocaine addiction continues to be a major health and social problem in the United States and other countries. Currently used pharmacological agents for treating cocaine abuse have proved inadequate, leaving few treatment options. An alternative is to use protein-based therapeutics that can eliminate the load of cocaine, thereby attenuating its effects. This approach is especially attractive because the therapeutic agents exert no pharmacodynamic action of their own and therefore have little potential for side effects. The effectiveness of these agents, however, is limited by their inability to act directly within the CNS. Bacteriophage have the capacity to penetrate the CNS when administered intranasally. Here, a method is presented for engineering filamentous bacteriophage to display cocaine-binding proteins on its surface that sequester cocaine in the brain. These antibody-displaying constructs were examined by using a locomotor activity rodent model to assess the ability of the phage-displayed proteins to block the psychoactive effects of cocaine. Results presented demonstrate a strategy in the continuing efforts to find effective treatments for cocaine addiction and suggest the application of this protein-based treatment for other drug abuse syndromes. PMID:15226496

  7. Emerging patterns of cocaine use and the epidemic of cocaine overdose deaths in Dade County, Florida.

    PubMed

    Escobedo, L G; Ruttenber, A J; Agocs, M M; Anda, R F; Wetli, C V

    1991-09-01

    With the increasing use of cocaine in the United States, cocaine overdose deaths are being reported with increasing frequency. To describe patterns of cocaine use involved in cocaine overdose deaths, we reviewed the postmortem records from the Metropolitan Dade County Medical Examiner Department, Miami, Fla. We identified 239 cocaine overdose deaths from 1971 through 1987. During this period, the incidence of cocaine overdose deaths increased 20-fold, with the largest proportional increases occurring among persons aged older than 24 years, white persons, and men. The percentage of deaths that involved use of cocaine by nonparenteral routes, as well as newer and unknown preparations of cocaine (such as "crack" and "free-base" cocaine), increased. For example, the percentage of deaths that involved use of crack or free-base cocaine increased from 8% in 1981 to 20% in 1987. Persons who died after smoking crack or free-base cocaine had lower blood cocaine levels at autopsy (median level, 0.3 mg/L) than persons who died as a result of using cocaine hydrochloride (median level, 3.7 mg/L). Patterns of cocaine use involved in the epidemic of cocaine overdose deaths are changing. The data suggest that the newer preparations of cocaine, such as crack or free-base cocaine are playing an increasingly important role in this epidemic and that these preparations may be more toxic than cocaine hydrochloride. PMID:1929786

  8. The ethics of experimental heroin maintenance.

    PubMed

    Ostini, R; Bammer, G; Dance, P R; Goodin, R E

    1993-09-01

    In response to widespread concern about illegal drug use and the associated risk of the spread of HIV/AIDS, a study was undertaken to examine whether it was, in principle, feasible to conduct a trial providing heroin to dependent users in a controlled manner. Such a trial involves real ethical issues which are examined in this paper. The general issues examined are: should a trial be an experiment or an exercise in public policy?; acts and omissions; countermobilization; termination of a trial, and payment for drugs and for a trial. The specific issues examined are: selection of trial participants; privacy; issues for staff working on a trial; coupling the trial with other treatment, and issues for researchers. A number of alternative approaches to the various ethical issues are presented and discussed. PMID:8230151

  9. HIV Risk Reduction With Buprenorphine-Naloxone or Methadone: Findings From A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Woody, George; Bruce, Douglas; Korthuis, P. Todd; Chhatre, Sumedha; Hillhouse, Maureen; Jacobs, Petra; Sorensen, James; Saxon, Andrew J.; Metzger, David; Ling, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Compare HIV injecting and sex risk in patients being treated with methadone (MET) or buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP). Methods Secondary analysis from a study of liver enzyme changes in patients randomized to MET or BUP who completed 24-weeks of treatment and had 4 or more blood draws. The initial 1:1 randomization was changed to 2:1 (BUP: MET) after 18 months due to higher dropout in BUP. The Risk Behavior Survey (RBS) measured past 30-day HIV risk at baseline and weeks 12 and 24. Results Among 529 patients randomized to MET, 391 (74%) were completers; among 740 randomized to BUP, 340 (46%) were completers; 700 completed the RBS. There were significant reductions in injecting risk (p< 0.0008) with no differences between groups in mean number of times reported injecting heroin, speedball, other opiates, and number of injections; or percent who shared needles, did not clean shared needles with bleach, shared cookers, or engaged in front/back loading of syringes. The percent having multiple sex partners decreased equally in both groups (p<0.03). For males on BUP the sex risk composite increased; for males on MET, the sex risk decreased resulting in significant group differences over time (p<0.03). For females, there was a significant reduction in sex risk (p<0.02) with no group differences. Conclusions Among MET and BUP patients that remained in treatment, HIV injecting risk was equally and markedly reduced, however MET retained more patients. Sex risk was equally and significantly reduced among females in both treatment conditions, but increased for males on BUP, and decreased for males on MET. PMID:24751432

  10. Assessment of Cognitive Functions in Methadone Maintenance Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mazhari, Shahrzad; Keshvari, Zeinab; Sabahi, Abdolreza; Mottaghian, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    Background Methadone maintenance has received little scientific attention regarding neurocognitive effects. This study is aimed to assess the neuropsychological performance of methadone maintenance patients (MMP) compared to those healthy controls. Methods Thirty-five MMP and 35 healthy controls, matched for age, gender, education and employment status, examined on a battery of tests aimed at assessing verbal fluency, executive functions, verbal memory, and working memory, using controlled oral word association test (COWAT), trial making test (TMT) Part A and B, Rey auditory verbal learning test (RAVLT), and backward digit span. Findings MMP performed significantly poorly than controls in cognitive domains of verbal fluency, executive function, and verbal memory. MMP did not exhibit impairment in working memory, and TMT Part A compared to controls. Conclusion These results suggest that methadone consumption induces significant cognitive impairment that could compromise drug-treatment outcomes in MMP. PMID:26885347

  11. Coexisting Addiction and Pain in People Receiving Methadone for Addiction

    PubMed Central

    St. Marie, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to examine the narratives of people who experience chronic pain (lasting 6 months or more) and were receiving methadone for the treatment of their opiate addiction through a major methadone clinic. This paper featured the pathway of how the participants developed chronic pain and addiction, and their beliefs of how prescription opioids would impact their addiction in the future. Thirty-four participants who experienced chronic pain and received methadone for treatment of opiate addiction were willing to tell the story of their experiences. The findings in three areas are presented: (a) whether participants experienced addiction first or pain first and how their exposures to addictive substances influenced their experiences, (b) the significance of recreational drug use and patterns of abuse behaviors leading to chronic pain, and (c) participants’ experiences and beliefs about the potential for abuse of prescription opioid used for treatment of pain. PMID:23858068

  12. Quinine-induced thrombocytopenia following intravenous use of heroin

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, D.J.; Walker, R.H.; Kolins, M.D.; Wilner, F.M.; Aster, R.H.

    1983-06-01

    Profound thrombocytopenia developed in a 22-year-old man after intravenous use of heroin. A high-titer, quinine-dependent, platelet-specific antibody was detected in his serum using lysis of normal platelets labeled with chromium 51 and an electroimmunoassay for measurement of platelet-associated IgG. The antibody was specific for quinine and failed to react with platelets in the presence of quinidine hydrochloride or two structural analogues of heroin. Quinine, a common adulterant found in heroin, was detected in the patient's blood and urine. On the basis of these observations, the patient was judged to have quinine-induced immunologic thrombocytopenia. To our knowledge, this report is the first to confirm that quinine used as an adulterant can induce immunologic thrombocytopenia following an injection of heroin.

  13. Heroin inhalation-induced unilateral complete hippocampal stroke.

    PubMed

    Benoilid, Aurélien; Collongues, Nicolas; de Seze, Jérôme; Blanc, Fréderic

    2013-08-01

    A 33-year-old man presented to our clinic with amnesia 48 hours after his first heroin inhalation. Examination showed lateral tongue biting and anterograde amnesia demonstrated by impaired performance on verbal and visual Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised tests carried out 10 days after onset, suggesting hippocampal involvement. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was performed 48 hours after heroin snorting and evoked cortical laminar necrosis (CLN) of the left hippocampus without vascular abnormality. This is the first description of complete hippocampal CLN as a complication subsequent to acute intranasal heroine abuse. While the pathogenic mechanism remains uncertain, our case provides a very specific MRI lesion pattern and highlights the risk of intranasal heroin uptake-induced neurological complication. PMID:22624985

  14. Voltammetric assay of heroin in illicit dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Barreira Rodrguez, J R; Cabal Daz, V; Costa Garca, A; Tun Blanco, P

    1990-02-01

    The oxidation of heroin on a carbon paste electrode has been studied by using voltammetric techniques under both semi-infinite linear diffusion and hydrodynamic conditions. By employing a simple and rapid in situ pre-treatment of the electrode, excellent reproducibility of the current signal was obtained. Subsequently, the current was measured and the concentration of total heroin present could be determined. The method compared favourably with instrumental methods that are more commonly used for the quantification of heroin in clinical laboratories such as chromatographic, spectrophotometric or radiometric techniques. Moreover, the proposed method showed good selectivity and was superior with respect to cost and time of analysis, permitting the determination of heroin in seized drug samples over a wide concentration range. PMID:2321771

  15. What You Need to Know About Drugs: Heroin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Booger? What You Need to Know About Drugs: Heroin KidsHealth > For Kids > What You Need to Know ... side effects and is very addictive. Sometimes Called: horse, smack, big H, black tar, caballo (Spanish), 8- ...

  16. Cocaine-induced recurrent leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Gonzlez-Duarte, Alejandra; Williams, Ricardo

    2013-10-01

    Cocaine-induced leukoencephalopathy is a rare neurological complication. It is most likely related to the substances used to adulterate the cocaine. Levamisole is one of the most common adulterants of cocaine and causes reversible leukoencephalopathy. Patients display severe neurological symptoms that resolve at termination of the exposure. MRI shows diffuse white matter involvement with sparing of the U fibers, without brain stem or cerebellar involvement. We describe the case of a woman with three neurologic episodes and remitting and recurrent brain white matter lesions. PMID:24199810

  17. Cocaine Smoking and Its Implications for Health and Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, David F.

    1987-01-01

    The introduction of cocaine smoking in the l970s revolutionized cocaine use patterns in the United States. The history of cocaine freebase is described. The importance of health educators addressing the myths regarding cocaine smoking is emphasized. (MT)

  18. Prevalence of heroin markers in urine for pain management patients.

    PubMed

    Knight, Julie; Puet, Brandi L; DePriest, Anne; Heltsley, Rebecca; Hild, Cheryl; Black, David L; Robert, Timothy; Caplan, Yale H; Cone, Edward J

    2014-10-01

    Surveys of current trends indicate heroin abuse is associated with nonmedical use of pain relievers. Consequently, there is an interest in evaluating the presence of heroin-specific markers in chronic pain patients who are prescribed controlled substances. A total of 926,084 urine specimens from chronic pain patients were tested for heroin/diacetylmorphine (DAM), 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), 6-acetylcodeine (6AC), codeine (COD), and morphine (MOR). Heroin and markers were analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Opiates were analyzed following hydrolysis using LC-MS-MS. The prevalence of heroin use was 0.31%, as 2871 were positive for one or more heroin-specific markers including DAM, 6AM, or 6AC (a known contaminant of illicit heroin). Of these, 1884 were additionally tested for the following markers of illicit drug use: 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), methamphetamine (MAMP), 11-nor-9-carboxy-?(9)-tetracannabinol (THCCOOH), and benzoylecgonine (BZE); 654 (34.7%) had positive findings for one or more of these analytes. The overall prevalence of heroin markers were as follows: DAM 1203 (41.9%), 6AM 2570 (89.5%), 6AC 1082 (37.7%). MOR was present in 2194 (76.4%) and absent (heroin-positive specimens. COD was present in 1218 (42.4%) specimens. Prevalence of combinations for specimens containing MOR were as follows: DAM only 13 (0.59%), 6AM only 1140 (52.0%), 6AC only 24 (1.1%), DAM/6AM/6AC 710 (32.4%), 6AM/6AC 188 (8.6%), DAM/6AM 113 (5.2%), DAM/6AC 6 (0.27%). Importantly, the prevalence of combinations for specimens without MOR were as follows: DAM only 161 (23.8%), 6AM only 217 (32.1%), 6AC only 92 (13.6%), DAM/6AM/6AC 50 (7.4%), 6AM/6AC 7 (1.0%), DAM/6AM 145 (21.4%), DAM/6AC 5 (0.74%). Unexpected patterns of excretion were observed, such as the presence of DAM and 6AC in the absence of 6AM and MOR; therefore, multiple heroin markers may be useful to assess for heroin use. PMID:24858136

  19. Pitfalls of opioid rotation: substituting another opioid for methadone in patients with cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Moryl, Natalie; Santiago-Palma, Juan; Kornick, Craig; Derby, Susan; Fischberg, Daniel; Payne, Richard; Manfredi, Paolo L

    2002-04-01

    The successful use of methadone in cancer pain has been supported by numerous case reports and clinical studies. Methadone is usually used as a second or third line opioid medication. As the use of methadone increases we are facing the challenge of converting methadone to other opioids as part of sequential opioid trials. Data on the equianalgesic ratios for the substitution of other opioids for methadone are lacking. We present prospective data on 13 consecutive rotations from methadone to a different opioid. The opioid rotation was followed by escalation of pain and/or severe dysphoria, not controlled by a rapid increase in the dose of the second opioid, in 12 of the 13 patients. Only one patient was successfully maintained on the second opioid after the discontinuation of methadone, while 12 patients required a switch back to methadone. We conclude that opioid rotation from methadone to another opioid is often complicated by worsening pain and dysphoria. These symptoms may not improve despite upward titration of the second opioid. A uniformly accepted conversion ratio for substituting methadone with another opioid is currently not available. More data on the rotation from methadone to other opioids are needed. PMID:11973005

  20. Lead brachial neuropathy in heroin addiction. A case report.

    PubMed

    Antonini, G; Palmieri, G; Spagnoli, L G; Millefiorini, M

    1989-01-01

    The possible toxical effect of heavy metals in the pathogenesis of brachial and lumbar plexopathies during heroin addiction has been previously hypothesized by some authors, but never detected. A 24-year-old man, addicted to heroin showed the clinical picture of a symmetrical brachial neuropathy, without other neurological involvement. Lead poisoning was detected in this patient and the chelating therapy induced a marked improvement of the clinical symptoms. PMID:2543530

  1. Cocaine, Appetitive Memory and Neural Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Suchismita

    2013-01-01

    This review examines existing cognitive experimental and brain imaging research related to cocaine addiction. In section 1, previous studies that have examined cognitive processes, such as implicit and explicit memory processes in cocaine users are reported. Next, in section 2, brain imaging studies are reported that have used chronic users of cocaine as study participants. In section 3, several conclusions are drawn. They are: (a) in cognitive experimental literature, no study has examined both implicit and explicit memory processes involving cocaine related visual information in the same cocaine user, (b) neural mechanisms underlying implicit and explicit memory processes for cocaine-related visual cues have not been directly investigated in cocaine users in the imaging literature, and (c) none of the previous imaging studies has examined connectivity between the memory system and craving system in the brain of chronic users of cocaine. Finally, future directions in the field of cocaine addiction are suggested. PMID:25009766

  2. Nicotine dependence and depression among methadone maintenance patients.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, T. J.; Lin, M. M.; Brown, L. S.

    1996-01-01

    There recently has been increasing interest at substance abuse treatment centers in smoking cessation treatment. Because a history of depression has been shown in other populations to complicate cessation efforts, the relationship between depression and nicotine dependence was tested in 726 methadone patients. Elevated odds of nicotine dependence given depression were found with three of four depression measures. Additional research is recommended to determine whether smoking cessation treatment will be more successful for methadone patients with a history of depression if it also addresses depression. PMID:8990806

  3. Morphine-like insomnia from heroin in nondependent human addicts.

    PubMed Central

    Kay, D C; Pickworth, W B; Neider, G L

    1981-01-01

    1 This study was performed because dose-related effects of heroin on human sleep had not been described previously, and to discover if heroin produces a morphine-like insomnia. 2 After three adaptation nights, the sleep of seven male nondependent opiate addicts was studied following i.m. doses of heroin (3, 6, 12 mg/70 kg), morphine (10, 20 mg/70 kg) or placebo at weekly intervals in a randomized double-blind crossover design. 3 Heroin produces a dose-related increase in wakefulness, drowsiness episodes, muscle tension, and shifts in sleep-waking states. 4 Heroin produces a dose-related decrease in total sleep, sleep efficiency, delta sleep and REM sleep (REMS). 5 Heroin is about twice as potent as morphine in producing this type of insomnia. 6 'Morphine insomnia' appears to be a characteristic initial effect of several opioids, at least in nondependent opiate addicts, and might serve as a model insomnia for evaluation of hypnotics. PMID:7213520

  4. Quantitation of methadone enantiomers in humans using stable isotope-labeled (2H3)-, (2H5)-, and (2H8)Methadone

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Hachey, D.L.; Kreek, M.J.; Irving, C.S.; Klein, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    A new technique for simultaneous stereoselective kinetic studies of methadone enantiomers was developed using three deuterium-labeled forms of methadone and GLC-chemical-ionization mass spectrometry. A racemic mixture (1:1) of (R)-(-)-(2H5)methadone (l-form) and (S)-(R)-(2H3)methadone (d-form) was administered orally in place of a single daily dose of unlabeled (+/-)-(2H0)methadone in long-term maintenance patients. Racemic (+/-)-(2H8)methadone was used as an internal standard for the simultaneous quantitation of (2H0)-, (2H3)-, and (2H5)methadone in plasma and urine. A newly developed extraction procedure, using a short, disposable C18 reversed-phase cartridge and improved chemical-ionization procedures employing ammonia gas, resulted in significant reduction of the background impurities contributing to the ions used for isotopic abundance measurements. These improvements enabled the measurement of labeled plasma methadone levels for 120 hr following a single dose. This methodology was applied to the study of methadone kinetics in two patients; in both patients, the analgesically active l-enantiomer of the drug had a longer plasma elimination half-life and a smaller area under the plasma disappearance curve than did the inactive d-form.

  5. The Neuropsychology of Cocaine Addiction: Recent Cocaine Use Masks Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Woicik, Patricia A; Moeller, Scott J; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Maloney, Thomas; Lukasik, Tanya M; Yeliosof, Olga; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D; Goldstein, Rita Z

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with current cocaine use disorders (CUD) form a heterogeneous group, making sensitive neuropsychological (NP) comparisons with healthy individuals difficult. The current study examined the effects on NP functioning of four factors that commonly vary among CUD: urine status for cocaine (positive vs negative on study day), cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and dysphoria. Sixty-four cocaine abusers were matched to healthy comparison subjects on gender and race; the groups also did not differ in measures of general intellectual functioning. All subjects were administered an extensive NP battery measuring attention, executive function, memory, facial and emotion recognition, and motor function. Compared with healthy control subjects, CUD exhibited performance deficits on tasks of attention, executive function, and verbal memory (within one standard deviation of controls). Although CUD with positive urine status, who had higher frequency and more recent cocaine use, reported greater symptoms of dysphoria, these cognitive deficits were most pronounced in the CUD with negative urine status. Cigarette smoking, frequency of alcohol consumption, and dysphoria did not alter these results. The current findings replicate a previously reported statistically significant, but relatively mild NP impairment in CUD as compared with matched healthy control individuals and further suggest that frequent/recent cocaine may mask underlying cognitive (but not mood) disturbances. These results call for development of pharmacological agents targeted to enhance cognition, without negatively impacting mood in individuals addicted to cocaine. PMID:18496524

  6. Ethnic and genetic factors in methadone pharmacokinetics: A population pharmacokinetic study?

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Gavin; Lenz, Scott; Straka, Robert J.; Brundage, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment of opiate use disorders with methadone is complicated by wide interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics. To identify potentially contributing covariates in methadone pharmacokinetics, we used population pharmacokinetic modeling to estimate clearance (CL/F) and volume of distribution (V/F) for each methadone enantiomer in an ethnically diverse methadone maintained population. Methods Plasma levels of the opiate-active R-methadone and opiate-inactive S-methadone were measured in 206 methadone maintained subjects approximately two and twenty-three hours after a daily oral dose of racmethadone. A linear one-compartment population pharmacokinetic model with first-order conditional estimation with interaction (FOCE-I) was used to evaluate methadone CL/F and V/F. The influence of covariates on parameter estimates was evaluated using stepwise covariate modeling. Covariates included ethnicity, gender, weight, BMI, age, methadone dose, and 21 single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes implicated in methadone pharmacokinetics. Results In the final model, for each enantiomer, Hmong ethnicity reduced CL/F by approximately 30% and the rs2032582 (ABCB1 2677G > T/A) GG genotype was associated with a 20% reduction in CL/F. The presence of the rs3745274 minor allele (CYP2B6 515G > T) reduced CL/F by up to 20% for S-methadone only. A smaller effect of age was noted on CL/F for R-methadone. Conclusion This is the first report showing the influence of the rs2032582 and rs3745274 variants on methadone pharmacokinetics rather than simply dose requirements or plasma levels. Population pharmacokinetics is a valuable method for identifying the influences on methadone pharmacokinetic variability. PMID:25456329

  7. Nanomaterial-based cocaine aptasensors.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; Dolatabadi, Jafar Ezzati Nazhad; Abnous, Khalil; de la Guardia, Miguel; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2015-06-15

    Up to now, many different methods have been developed for detection of cocaine, but most of these methods are usually time-consuming, tedious and require special or expensive equipment. Therefore, the development of simple, sensitive and rapid detection methods is necessary. In the last decade, aptamers have been used as a new biosensor platform for detection of cocaine in different samples. Aptamers are artificial single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides capable of binding to specific molecular targets with high affinity and if integrated to nanomaterials, it may lead in precise methods for cocaine detection in the common laboratories. In this review, recent advances and applications of aptamer-based biosensors and nanobiosensors, have been updated, paying attention to the use of fluorescence, colorimetric and electrochemical techniques for the detection and quantitative determination of cocaine. PMID:25562736

  8. Cocaine Use: 2002 and 2003. The NSDUH Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Cocaine, including crack cocaine, was responsible for 12.8 percent of admissions to substance abuse treatment services in 2002.1 The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) asks persons aged 12 or older to report their use of illicit drugs, including cocaine. NSDUH defines cocaine use as use of cocaine in any form, including crack cocaine.…

  9. A role for kappa-, but not mu-opioid, receptor activation in acute food deprivation-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking in rats.

    PubMed

    Sedki, Firas; Eigenmann, Karine; Gelinas, Jessica; Schouela, Nicholas; Courchesne, Shannon; Shalev, Uri

    2015-05-01

    Stress is considered to be one of the major triggers to drug relapse, even after prolonged periods of abstinence. In rats, the activation of stress-related brain systems, including corticotropin-releasing factor and norepinephrine, is critical for stress-induced reinstatement of extinguished drug seeking, an animal model for drug relapse. In addition, there are strong indications that activation of the endogenous opioid system is important for the effects of stress on drug seeking. More specifically, activation of the dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system is critically involved in the reinstatement of cocaine seeking following exposure to stressors, such as footshock, forced swimming or social stress. However, studies on the role of the dynorphin/KOR system in stress-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking are scarce. Here, rats were trained to self-administer heroin (0.1?mg/kg/infusion) for 10 days. Drug seeking was then extinguished and the rats were tested for acute (21 hours) food deprivation-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking. In two separate experiments, rats were injected with the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonist, naltrexone (0.0, 1.0, 10.0?mg/kg; s.c.) or the KOR antagonist, norBNI (0.0, 1.0, 10.0?mg/kg; i.p.) before the reinstatement test. Naltrexone treatment did not affect stress-induced reinstatement. In contrast, treatment with norBNI dose-dependently attenuated food deprivation-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking. These results support the hypothesis that activation of KOR, but not MOR, is critically involved in stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking. PMID:24725195

  10. The North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI): Profile of Participants in North Americas First Trial of Heroin-Assisted Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nosyk, Bohdan; Brissette, Suzanne; Chettiar, Jill; Schneeberger, Pascal; Marsh, David C.; Krausz, Michael; Anis, Aslam; Schechter, Martin T.

    2008-01-01

    The North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI) is a randomized controlled trial evaluating the feasibility and effectiveness of heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) in the Canadian context. Our objective is to analyze the profile of the NAOMI participant cohort in the context of illicit opioid use in Canada and to evaluate its comparability with patient profiles of European HAT studies. Recruitment began in February 2005 and ended in March 2007. Inclusion criteria included opioid dependence, 5 or more years of opioid use, regular opioid injection, and at least two previous opiate addiction treatment attempts. Standardized assessment instruments such as the European Addiction Severity Index and the Maudsley Addiction Profile were employed. A total of 251 individuals were randomized from Vancouver, BC (192, 76.5%), and Montreal, Quebec (59, 23.5%); 38.5% were female, the mean age was 39.7years (SD:8.6), and participants had injected drugs for 16.5years (SD:9.9), on average. In the prior month, heroin was used a mean of 26.5days (SD:7.4) and cocaine 16days (SD;12.6). Vancouver had significantly more patients residing in unstable housing (88.5 vs. 22%; p?cocaine (16.9days vs. 2.3days in the prior month; p?cocaine use and social marginalization. PMID:18758964

  11. Physician Peer Assessments for Compliance with Methadone Maintenance Treatment Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strike, Carol; Wenghofer, Elizabeth; Gnam, William; Hillier, Wade; Veldhuizen, Scott; Millson, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Medical associations and licensing bodies face pressure to implement quality assurance programs, but evidence-based models are lacking. To improve the quality of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT), the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario, Canada, conducts an innovative quality assurance program on the basis of peer

  12. Tandem DART™ MS Methods for Methadone Analysis in Unprocessed Urine.

    PubMed

    Beck, Rachel; Carter, Patrick; Shonsey, Erin; Graves, David

    2016-03-01

    Current methods of methadone analysis in untreated urine are traditionally limited to enzyme immunoassays (EIA) while confirmation techniques require specimen processing (i.e., sample clean-up) before analyzing by gas or liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS or LC-MS-MS). EIA and traditional confirmation techniques can be costly and, at times inefficient. As an alternative approach, we present Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART™) coupled with both time-of-flight and triple quadrupole linear ion trap (Q-TRAP™) mass spectrometers for screening and confirming methadone in untreated urine specimens. These approaches require neither expensive kits nor sample clean-up for analysis. More importantly, the total combined analysis time for both screening and confirmation methods was <5 min per sample; in contrast to the 3-5 day process required by traditional EIA, GC-MS and LC-MS-MS techniques. To examine the fundamental protocol and its applicability for routine drug screening, studies were performed that included limits of detection, precision, selectivity and specificity, sample recovery and stability and method robustness. The methods described in this report were determined to be highly specific and selective; allowing for detection of methadone at 250 ng/mL, consistent with cutoffs for current EIA techniques (300 ng/mL). The results reported here demonstrate the DART™ MS platform provides rapid and selective methadone analysis and the potential for providing savings of both time and resources compared with current analysis procedures. PMID:26590378

  13. Physician Peer Assessments for Compliance with Methadone Maintenance Treatment Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strike, Carol; Wenghofer, Elizabeth; Gnam, William; Hillier, Wade; Veldhuizen, Scott; Millson, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Medical associations and licensing bodies face pressure to implement quality assurance programs, but evidence-based models are lacking. To improve the quality of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT), the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario, Canada, conducts an innovative quality assurance program on the basis of peer…

  14. Cost Analysis of Training and Employment Services in Methadone Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Michael T.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A cost analysis is presented for developing a training and employment (TEP) program at four methadone treatment centers in a quasi-experimental pilot study. Average annual costs for TEP per client were derived. The methodology can be used in other projects to compare standard and TEP-enhanced substance-abuse treatment. (SLD)

  15. Integrating Fieldwork into Employment Counseling for Methadone-Treatment Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankertz, Laura; Spinelli, Michael; Magura, Stephen; Bali, Priti; Madison, Elizabeth M.; Staines, Graham L.; Horowitz, Emily; Guarino, Honoria; Grandy, Audrey; Fong, Chunki; Gomez, Augustin; Dimun, Amy; Friedman, Ellen

    2005-01-01

    An innovative employment counseling model, Customized Employment Supports, was developed for methadone-treatment patients, a population with historically low employment rates. The effectiveness of a key component of the model, "vocational fieldwork," the delivery of services in the community rather than only within the clinic, was assessed through…

  16. Counseling with Methadone Clients: A Review of Recent Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Robert J.; Powers, Henrietta B.

    1978-01-01

    A review of studies on counseling with methadone clients affirmed the importance of counseling services. Support was found for analytic therapy, T-group therapy, behavioral training, reality therapy, and family therapy. There was evidence of client resistance to group therapy. (Author)

  17. Changing Needle Practices in Community Outreach and Methadone Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsberg, Wendee M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This pretest/posttest study used two samples of injecting drug users (184 from street outreach and 103 from a methadone program) to assess drug use and human immunodeficiency virus risk practices. The improvement in risk behaviors at posttest suggests that intervention programs were agents of change. (SLD)

  18. Characteristics and 9-month outcomes of discharged methadone maintenance clients.

    PubMed

    Coviello, Donna M; Zanis, Dave A; Wesnoski, Susan A; Lynch, Kevin G; Drapkin, Michelle

    2011-03-01

    This study is a secondary data analysis of a clinical trial assessing the effectiveness of outreach case management (OCM) in linking discharged methadone patients back into treatment. The original trial assessed the effectiveness of the OCM intervention compared to a passive referral among methadone clients who needed treatment postdischarge but had not reengaged. The purpose of this study was to assess the characteristics and long-term outcomes of all clients who were discharged from methadone maintenance treatment including those who had reengaged in treatment. A total of 230 methadone clients were interviewed 3 months and then again at 9 months following discharge from treatment. Compared with participants who needed treatment but had not reengaged (NoTx: 56%), those who had successfully reenrolled in treatment (Tx; 44%) were more likely to be female, not married, and unemployed; had a longer history of sedative use; reported more psychiatric hospitalizations; and were originally enrolled in a community-based rather than a Veterans Administration program. Despite having more severe problems, the Tx group had fewer opioid-positive urines and reported less IV drug use at 9 months postdischarge compared to the NoTx group. The findings highlight the importance of rapid treatment reengagement. PMID:21036510

  19. Reduced volume of the nucleus accumbens in heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Christian L; Magon, Stefano; Sprenger, Till; Lang, Undine E; Huber, Christian G; Denier, Niklaus; Vogel, Marc; Schmidt, Andr; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Borgwardt, Stefan; Walter, Marc

    2015-12-01

    The neural mechanisms of heroin addiction are still incompletely understood, even though modern neuroimaging techniques offer insights into disease-related changes in vivo. While changes on cortical structure have been reported in heroin addiction, evidence from subcortical areas remains underrepresented. Functional imaging studies revealed that the brain reward system and particularly the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of drug addiction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was a volume difference of the NAcc in heroin addiction in comparison to healthy controls. A further aim was to correlate subcortical volumes with clinical measurements on negative affects in addiction. Thirty heroin-dependent patients under maintenance treatment with diacetylmorphine and twenty healthy controls underwent structural MRI scanning at 3T. Subcortical segmentation analysis was performed using FMRIB's Integrated Registration and Segmentation Tool function of FSL. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory were used to assess trait anxiety and depressive symptoms, respectively. A decreased volume of the left NAcc was observed in heroin-dependent patients compared to healthy controls. Depression score was negatively correlated with left NAcc volume in patients, whereas a positive correlation was found between the daily opioid dose and the volume of the right amygdala. This study indicates that there might be structural differences of the NAcc in heroin-dependent patients in comparison with healthy controls. Furthermore, correlations of subcortical structures with negative emotions and opioid doses might be of future relevance for the investigation of heroin addiction. PMID:25467383

  20. A rapid assessment of heroin use in Mombasa, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Beckerleg, Susan; Telfer, Maggie; Sadiq, Ahmed

    2006-01-01

    This article reports on a rapid assessment (RA) carried out in the city port of Mombasa, Kenya in March 2004 by the Omari Project to inform the scaling up of their services to heroin users. Heroin has been a street drug in Mombasa for over 25 years. From 1998, white crest, probably from Thailand, started to replace brown sugar, and there was a major shift from inhalation of the vapor ("chasing the dragon") to injecting. The Omari Project has been monitoring the heroin situation in Mombasa and treating heroin users from Mombasa since 1997. In the course of the RA, 496 heroin users were interviewed of whom 95% were men and 5% were women. A range of methods were used, including mapping of the Mombasa region, work with a key informant/guide who was a heroin user, administration of a brief questionnaire and informal interviews, and feedback of findings to other local agencies working with drug users. Respondents were from a wide range of cultural/ethnic groups, the two largest being Mijikenda and Swahili, who are indigenous to the Kenya coast. Overall, 15% of respondents had "ever injected" heroin, and 7% were current injectors (n = 37). These data indicate a shift away from injecting but also reflect the death of many established injectors, either through overdose or AIDS or hepatitis. The figure of 7% of the sample reporting being current injectors is likely to be an underestimate. Syringes were available from a number of pharmacies and most injectors reported using a syringe for 1-3 days. The majority reported injecting in a group of three or more and described risk behaviors for HIV transmission. The results of the assessment highlight the need for a range of services, including needle exchange, counseling, and referral to residential treatment programs. However, progress toward responding to the findings of the RA by establishing effective services are hampered because of legal impediments to operating needle exchange programs in Kenya. PMID:16809185

  1. Cytochrome P4503A does not mediate the interaction between methadone and ritonavir-lopinavir.

    PubMed

    Kharasch, Evan D; Stubbert, Kristi

    2013-12-01

    Plasma concentrations of orally administered methadone are reduced by the human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor combination ritonavir and lopinavir, but the mechanism is unknown. Methadone metabolism, clearance, and drug interactions have been attributed to CYP3A4, but this remains controversial. This investigation assessed the effects of acute (2 days) and steady-state (2 weeks) ritonavir-lopinavir on intravenous and oral methadone metabolism and clearance, hepatic and intestinal CYP3A4/5 activity (using the probe substrate intravenous and oral alfentanil), and intestinal transporter activity (using oral fexofenadine) in healthy volunteers. Plasma and urine concentrations of methadone and metabolite enantiomers, and other analytes, were determined by mass spectrometry. Acute and chronic ritonavir-lopinavir reduced plasma methadone enantiomer concentrations in half, with an average 2.6- and 1.5-fold induction of systemic and apparent oral methadone clearances. Induction was attributable to stereoselectively increased hepatic methadone N-demethylation, hepatic extraction, and hepatic clearance, and there was a strong correlation between methadone N-demethylation and clearance. Methadone renal clearance was unchanged. Alfentanil's systemic clearance and hepatic extraction, apparent oral clearance, and intestinal extraction were reduced to 25%, 16%, and 35% of control, indicating strong inhibition of hepatic and intestinal CYP3A activities. Ritonavir-lopinavir (acute > chronic) increased fexofenadine exposure, suggesting intestinal P-glycoprotein inhibition. No correlation was found between methadone clearance and CYP3A activity. Acute and steady-state ritonavir-lopinavir stereoselectively induced methadone N-demethylation and clearance, despite significant inhibition of hepatic and intestinal CYP3A activity. Ritonavir-lopinavir inhibited intestinal transporters activity but had no effect on methadone bioavailability. These results do not support a significant role for CYP3A or ritonavir-lopinavir-inhibitable intestinal transporters in single-dose methadone disposition. PMID:24067429

  2. Cytochrome P4503A Does Not Mediate the Interaction between Methadone and Ritonavir-Lopinavir

    PubMed Central

    Stubbert, Kristi

    2013-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of orally administered methadone are reduced by the human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor combination ritonavir and lopinavir, but the mechanism is unknown. Methadone metabolism, clearance, and drug interactions have been attributed to CYP3A4, but this remains controversial. This investigation assessed the effects of acute (2 days) and steady-state (2 weeks) ritonavir-lopinavir on intravenous and oral methadone metabolism and clearance, hepatic and intestinal CYP3A4/5 activity (using the probe substrate intravenous and oral alfentanil), and intestinal transporter activity (using oral fexofenadine) in healthy volunteers. Plasma and urine concentrations of methadone and metabolite enantiomers, and other analytes, were determined by mass spectrometry. Acute and chronic ritonavir-lopinavir reduced plasma methadone enantiomer concentrations in half, with an average 2.6- and 1.5-fold induction of systemic and apparent oral methadone clearances. Induction was attributable to stereoselectively increased hepatic methadone N-demethylation, hepatic extraction, and hepatic clearance, and there was a strong correlation between methadone N-demethylation and clearance. Methadone renal clearance was unchanged. Alfentanil’s systemic clearance and hepatic extraction, apparent oral clearance, and intestinal extraction were reduced to 25%, 16%, and 35% of control, indicating strong inhibition of hepatic and intestinal CYP3A activities. Ritonavir-lopinavir (acute > chronic) increased fexofenadine exposure, suggesting intestinal P-glycoprotein inhibition. No correlation was found between methadone clearance and CYP3A activity. Acute and steady-state ritonavir-lopinavir stereoselectively induced methadone N-demethylation and clearance, despite significant inhibition of hepatic and intestinal CYP3A activity. Ritonavir-lopinavir inhibited intestinal transporters activity but had no effect on methadone bioavailability. These results do not support a significant role for CYP3A or ritonavir-lopinavir-inhibitable intestinal transporters in single-dose methadone disposition. PMID:24067429

  3. Magnetic Brain Stimulation Might Treat Cocaine Addiction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fullstory_156031.html Magnetic Brain Stimulation Might Treat Cocaine Addiction Cravings and use decreased in pilot study ... pulses may offer the first therapeutic treatment for cocaine addiction, a small new study suggests. Though the ...

  4. Predictors of Opioid-Related Death During Methadone Therapy.

    PubMed

    Leece, Pamela; Cavacuiti, Christopher; Macdonald, Erin M; Gomes, Tara; Kahan, Meldon; Srivastava, Anita; Steele, Leah; Luo, Jin; Mamdani, Muhammad M; Juurlink, David N

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to examine pharmacologic, demographic and medical comorbidity risk factors for opioid-related mortality among patients currently receiving methadone for an opioid use disorder. We conducted a population-based, nested case-control study linking healthcare and coroner's records in Ontario, Canada, from January 31, 1994 to December 31, 2010. We included social assistance recipients receiving methadone for an opioid use disorder. Within this group, cases were those who died of opioid-related causes. For each case, we identified up to 5 controls matched on calendar quarter. The primary analysis examined the association between use of psychotropic drugs (benzodiazepines, antidepressants or antipsychotics) and opioid-related mortality. Secondary analyses examined the associations between baseline characteristics, health service utilization, comorbidities and opioid-related mortality. Among 43,545 patients receiving methadone for an opioid use disorder, we identified 175 (0.4%) opioid-related deaths, along with 873 matched controls. Psychotropic drug use was associated with a two fold increased risk of opioid-related death (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.0; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2 to 3.5). Specifically, benzodiazepines (adjusted OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.1 to 2.5) and antipsychotics (adjusted OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.5 to 3.5) were independently associated with opioid-related death. Other associated factors included chronic lung disease (adjusted OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.2 to 2.6), an alcohol use disorder (adjusted OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.2 to 3.2), mood disorders (adjusted OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.0 to 3.2), and a history of heart disease (adjusted OR 5.3; 95% CI 2.0 to 14.0). Psychotropic drug use is associated with opioid-related death in patients receiving methadone. Mindfulness of these factors may reduce the risk of death among methadone recipients. PMID:26014916

  5. Pyrolysis and volatilization of cocaine

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, B.R.; Lue, L.P.; Boni, J.P. )

    1989-05-01

    The increasing popularity of inhaling cocaine vapor prompted the present study, to determine cocaine's fate during this process. The free base of (3H)cocaine (1 microCi/50 mg) was added to a glass pipe, which was then heated in a furnace to simulate freebasing. Negative pressure was used to draw the vapor through a series of glass wool, ethanol, acidic, and basic traps. Air flow rate and temperature were found to have profound effects on the volatilization and pyrolysis of cocaine. At a temperature of 260 degrees C and a flow rate of 400 mL/min, 37% of the radioactivity remained in the pipe, 39% was found in the glass wool trap, and less than 1% in the remainder of the volatilization apparatus after a 10-min volatilization. Reducing the air flow rate to 100 mL/min reduced the amount of radioactivity collected in the glass wool trap to less than 10% of the starting material and increased the amount that remained in the pipe to 58%. GC/MS analysis of the contents of the glass wool trap after volatilization at 260 degrees C and a flow rate of 400 mL/min revealed that 60% of the cocaine remained intact, while approximately 6 and 2% of the starting material was recovered as benzoic acid and methylecgonidine, respectively. As the temperature was increased to 650 degrees C, benzoic acid and methylecgonidine accounted for 83 and 89% of the starting material, respectively, whereas only 2% of the cocaine remained intact. Quantitation of cocaine in the vapor during the course of volatilization revealed high concentrations during the first two min and low concentrations for the remaining time.

  6. Chronic carotid glomitis in heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    Porzionato, A; Macchi, V; Parenti, A; De Caro, R

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the occurrence and immunological characteristics of chronic carotid glomitis in opiate addicts. Carotid bodies were sampled at autopsy from 50 subjects who died of heroin intoxication (mean age 28 years), and from 16 young (24 years) and 10 older subjects (66 years) who died of trauma. Sections were stained with haematoxylin-eosin and azan-Mallory, and immunohistochemistry was carried out with anti-CD45, -CD3, -CD8, -CD4, -CD20, -CD68, -CD56. Inflammatory aggregates were not observed in young cases, but were found in 21/50 (42%) opiate cases and in 4/10 (40%) older cases. Infiltrates were mainly located in subcapsular and interlobular positions, and were also found around nerve fibres. Inflammatory aggregates were mainly composed of T suppressor/cytotoxic lymphocytes (50-80%). Monocytic/macrophagic cells and B lymphocytes comprised about 10% and 5-20% of inflammatory cells, respectively. T helper lymphocytes were fewer and only rare Natural Killer cells were found. Chronic carotid glomitis must be included among the autopsy findings of opiate addiction, and may be ascribed to inflammatory reactions to exogenous immunogens or to responses to drug-induced degenerative changes of carotid body components. PMID:19337969

  7. Methadone-induced Damage to White Matter Integrity in Methadone Maintenance Patients: A Longitudinal Self-control DTI Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Li, Qiang; Wang, Yarong; Zhu, Jia; Ye, Jianjun; Yan, Xuejiao; Li, Yongbin; Chen, Jiajie; Liu, Jierong; Li, Zhe; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yijun

    2016-01-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) can induce impairments in brain function and structure, despite its clinical effectiveness. However, the effect of chronic MMT on brain white matter (WM) is not fully known. Thirty-three MMT patients underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) twice - at the start of the study (Scan1) and one year later (Scan2). Tract-based spatial statistics were used to investigate changes in fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD) between the two scans. The correlations between DTI indices and methadone consumption and neuropsychological status were analysed. We found significantly decreased FA, decreased AD and increased RD in Scan2 in extensive WM regions; overlapping regions were found in the left posterior limb and the retrolenticular part of internal capsule, superior and posterior corona radiata, bilateral external capsule and the right superior longitudinal fasciculus. In addition, the change of FA in the overlapping regions was positively correlated with the accumulated dosage of methadone use, the RD value in Scan2 and non-planning impulsiveness (NPI) measured at follow-up. The results suggest that methadone has damaging effects on WM integrity. The dose-dependent pattern and characteristics of the impairment may suggest new strategies for MMT. PMID:26794650

  8. Methadone-induced Damage to White Matter Integrity in Methadone Maintenance Patients: A Longitudinal Self-control DTI Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Li, Qiang; Wang, Yarong; Zhu, Jia; Ye, Jianjun; Yan, Xuejiao; Li, Yongbin; Chen, Jiajie; Liu, Jierong; Li, Zhe; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yijun

    2016-01-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) can induce impairments in brain function and structure, despite its clinical effectiveness. However, the effect of chronic MMT on brain white matter (WM) is not fully known. Thirty-three MMT patients underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) twice – at the start of the study (Scan1) and one year later (Scan2). Tract-based spatial statistics were used to investigate changes in fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD) between the two scans. The correlations between DTI indices and methadone consumption and neuropsychological status were analysed. We found significantly decreased FA, decreased AD and increased RD in Scan2 in extensive WM regions; overlapping regions were found in the left posterior limb and the retrolenticular part of internal capsule, superior and posterior corona radiata, bilateral external capsule and the right superior longitudinal fasciculus. In addition, the change of FA in the overlapping regions was positively correlated with the accumulated dosage of methadone use, the RD value in Scan2 and non-planning impulsiveness (NPI) measured at follow-up. The results suggest that methadone has damaging effects on WM integrity. The dose-dependent pattern and characteristics of the impairment may suggest new strategies for MMT. PMID:26794650

  9. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure and Infant Cortisol Reactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiden, Rina D.; Veira, Yvette; Granger, Douglas A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on infant hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and reactivity at 7 months of infant age. Participants were 168 caregiver-infant dyads (87 cocaine exposed, 81 not cocaine exposed; 47% boys). Maternal behavior, caregiving instability, and infant growth and behavior were assessed,…

  10. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure and Infant Cortisol Reactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiden, Rina D.; Veira, Yvette; Granger, Douglas A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on infant hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and reactivity at 7 months of infant age. Participants were 168 caregiver-infant dyads (87 cocaine exposed, 81 not cocaine exposed; 47% boys). Maternal behavior, caregiving instability, and infant growth and behavior were assessed,

  11. Unrecognized "crack" cocaine abuse in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D; Parr, M J; Shutt, L E

    1996-10-01

    We report a case of "crack" cocaine abuse in a pregnant patient associated with haematuria, proteinuria, haemolytic anaemia, renal impairment, thrombocytopenia and pulmonary oedema. The case illustrates the problems for clinicians where unrecognized cocaine abuse interferes with the diagnosis and management of a complicated pregnancy. In addition, we discuss the principles for the safe conduct of anaesthesia in the pregnant cocaine abuser. PMID:8942348

  12. Infrequent Illicit Methadone Use Among Stimulant-Using Patients in Methadone Maintenance Treatment Programs: A National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-Tzy; Blazer, Dan G.; Stitzer, Maxine L.; Patkar, Ashwin A.; Blaine, Jack D.

    2009-01-01

    We sought to determine the prevalence, patterns, and correlates of past-month illicit methadone use and history of regular illicit use among stimulant-using methadone maintenance treatment patients. We obtained self-reported information on illicit methadone use from 383 participants recruited from six community-based methadone maintenance programs. Overall, 1.6% of participants reported illicit use in the past month, and 4.7% reported a history of regular use. Younger age and history of outpatient psychological treatment were associated with increased odds of past-month illicit use. Illicit methadone use among patients in maintenance programs is infrequent; however, a number of factors may increase risk of illicit use. PMID:18612886

  13. The Developmental Outcome of Children Born to Heroin-Dependent Mothers, Raised at Home or Adopted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornoy, Asher; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Children born to heroin-dependent mothers (n=83) were compared to 76 children born to heroin-dependent fathers and to 3 control groups with and without environmental deprivation and health problems. Results found that developmental delays and behavioral disorders found among heroin-exposed children resulted primarily from severe environmental…

  14. Painkillers Often Gateway to Heroin for U.S. Teens: Survey

    MedlinePLUS

    ... news/fullstory_156443.html Painkillers Often Gateway to Heroin for U.S. Teens: Survey Heroin is cheaper, easier to obtain than narcotics like ... quarters of U.S. high school students who use heroin first tried narcotic painkillers, a new survey reveals. ...

  15. The Developmental Outcome of Children Born to Heroin-Dependent Mothers, Raised at Home or Adopted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornoy, Asher; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Children born to heroin-dependent mothers (n=83) were compared to 76 children born to heroin-dependent fathers and to 3 control groups with and without environmental deprivation and health problems. Results found that developmental delays and behavioral disorders found among heroin-exposed children resulted primarily from severe environmental

  16. Quantitative analysis of methadone and two major metabolites in hair by positive chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, D G; Nagasawa, P R; Gygi, S P; Foltz, R L; Rollins, D E

    1996-10-01

    A sensitive and specific method for the quantitative determination of D,L-methadone (MD) and its metabolites, D,L-2-ethyl-1,5-dimethyl-3, 3-diphenylpyrrolinium (EDDP) and D,L-2-ethyl-5-methyl-3, 3-diphenyl-1-pyrroline (EMDP), in hair has been developed. Deuterated internal standards of MD, EMDP, and EDDP were added to 20-mg hair samples and digested overnight at room temperature with 1N sodium hydroxide. Calibration standards containing known concentrations of MD, EMDP, and EDDP dried onto human hair were also digested. Digest solutions were extracted by a liquid-liquid extraction procedure and analyzed with splitless injection on a Finnigan MagnumTM ion trap mass spectrometer. Chromatographic separation was achieved with helium carrier gas on a DB-5MS-30M-0.25-micron capillary column. Positive chemicaionization was used with acetone as the reagent gas. The assay was linear from 0.5 ng/mg (MD and EDDP) or 1.0 ng/mg (EMDP) to 50.0 ng/mg of human hair with correlation coefficients greater than 0.99. Intra-assay and interassay coefficients of variation were determined to be less than 20% for all three analytes at 2.0 and 10.0 ng/mg of hair. Recovery was estimated to be greater than 70% (MD and EDDP) and 53% (EMDP) at 2.0 and 10.0 ng/mg of hair. The method has been applied to the analysis of both human and rat hair. Male long-Evans rats were shaved prior to dosing to obtain their drug-free hair. Animals were then administered 15 mg/kg MD by intraperitoneal injection daily for five days. Fourteen days after the first dose, hair was collected and analyzed for MD, EMDP, and EDDP. The mean plus standard error of the mean (SEM; n = 3) concentrations of MD and EDDP in pigmented hair were 31.1 ng/mg +/- 9.6 ng/mg and 8.6 +/- 2.4 ng/mg, respectively. EMDP was detected in the hair of one of three rats. In another experiment, hair was collected from two human subjects who had received long-term methadone therapy for the treatment of heroin addiction. Subject A received 60 mg of methadone daily for at least six months; subject B received 80 mg of methadone daily for at least six months. The hair concentrations of MD were 10.1 ng/mg and 21.0 ng/mg for Subjects A and B, respectively. The hair concentrations of EDDP were 0.5 ng/mg and 2.6 ng/mg for Subjects A and B, respectively. EMDP was not detected in the hair of these two subjects. This method is being used to evaluate the incorporation of MD, EMDP, and EDDP in human and rat hair in dose-response studies. PMID:8889670

  17. Business as usual: heroin distribution in the United States.

    PubMed

    McBride, R B

    1984-01-01

    This article criticizes the predominant analysis of heroin use as a social aberration and argues instead that the normal structure and functioning of U.S. capitalism generate both the market for the drug and the industry which supplies it. The structure of the distribution industry is much like those for comparable legal goods, but with distinctive features which provide reduced risk for dealers and long-term stability for the industry as a whole. The expansionary dynamic of the industry and the key role of syndicates in it are analyzed. The heroin industry is deeply integrated into the economy, and far-reaching social and economic change will be necessary if heroin use is to be significantly reduced. PMID:6500783

  18. [Therapeutic approaches to cocaine addiction].

    PubMed

    Karila, Laurent; Reynaud, Michel

    2009-06-20

    Recent advances in neurobiology, genetics, neuropsychology and brain imaging research have identified various physiopathological mechanisms implicated in cocaine addiction and suggested several promising pharmacological approaches. Clinical targets of the pharmacological treatments are cocaine-induced euphoria and craving. Currently, there is no specific pharmacological therapy with established efficacy for the treatment of cocaine dependence, nor is any medication approved by regulatory authorities for such treatment. However, recent controlled clinical trials have highlighted the promise of several medications, especially N-acetylcysteine, modafinil, topiramate, GABAergic agents, disulfiram, agonist replacement therapy (methylphenidate LP, d-amphetamine). Partial agonists at the dopamine D2 receptor and anticocaine vaccines are other promising treatment approaches. It is important to clearly differentiate the detoxification treatment and the relapse prevention treatment phases. PMID:19642440

  19. Clinical Signs and Symptoms and Laboratory Findings of Methadone Poisoning in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Nouri, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Poisoning accounts for about 7% of all accidents in children under 5 years and is implicated in over 5% of all childhood deaths in developing countries. Objectives: Due to the potential risks of methadone poisoning in children and increased cases of methadone poisoning among Iranian children, this study was conducted to investigate the clinical signs and symptoms and laboratory findings of methadone toxicity in children. Patients and Methods: The present retrospective, descriptive, cross-sectional study describes the clinical symptoms and signs and laboratory findings of methadone poisoning in children under 12 years old in Shahid Beheshti Hospital, Kashan, during the years 2009 to 2013. Results: Of 58 patients, 33 (56.9%) were male and 25 (43.1%) female (P = 0.294). The mean age of patients was 5.2 1.0 years. All the cases of poisoning happened with methadone syrup, due to unsafe keeping of methadone in mineral water bottles and containers of other drugs. Signs and symptoms included drowsiness (91.4 %), miosis (75.9%), vomiting (69.0%), ineffective breathing (any kind of breathing problem except apnea) (62.1%), apnea (53.4%), cyanosis (43.1%), seizure (8.6%), ataxia (6.9%) and delirium (3.4%). Conclusions: Keeping methadone in appropriate containers and warning methadone consumers about the dangerous side effects of its consumption and the symptoms of methadone poisoning in children may minimize the occurrence of this form of poisoning and its complications in children. PMID:26199683

  20. Methadone, monoamine oxidase, and depression: opioid distribution and acute effects on enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, C.A.; Kreek, M.J.; Raghunath, J.; Arns, P.

    1983-09-01

    Narcotic withdrawal is often accompanied by an atypical depression which responds to resumption of narcotics. It was hypothesized that methadone might exert its antidepressant effects through monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition. The current study examined /sub 3/H-methadone distribution in rat brain and effects on regional MAO activity with acute doses (2.5 mg/kg) which approximate those found during chronic methadone maintenance in man. Limbic areas (amygdala, basomedial hypothalamus, caudate-putamen, hippocampus, preoptic nucleus), as well as pituitary and liver were assayed for MAO activity and methadone concentration. MAO activities did not differ significantly in acute methadone or saline-treated cage-mates at 1 or 24 hr. The concentrations of methadone at 1 hr ranged between 17 and 223 ng/100 mg wet wt tissue in the preoptic nucleus and pituitary, respectively. No significant correlation was found between change in MAO activity (MAO methadone/MAO saline) and methadone concentration in any region at 1 or 24 hr. This study does not support the hypothesis that methadone acts as an antidepressant through MAO inhibition, at least not following acute administration of this exogenous opioid.

  1. Therapeutic challenges in cancer pain management: a systematic review of methadone.

    PubMed

    Good, Phillip; Afsharimani, Banafsheh; Movva, Ramya; Haywood, Alison; Khan, Sohil; Hardy, Janet

    2014-09-01

    The proven therapeutic efficacy of methadone in cancer pain is hindered by a challenging pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic profile, considerable interpatient variation, and increasing concern about the complexities of dosing. The objective of this study was to assess the evidence for the use of methadone in cancer pain management. The authors conducted a systematic literature search for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published post the 2007 Cochrane review of methadone in cancer pain. Trial quality was assessed using the Oxford Quality Scoring System and Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Of the 152 abstracts found, 4 were RCTs (272 participants). Two RCTs compared the efficacy and safety of methadone with placebo or active control and two investigated rotation to methadone from other opioids. The studies used different routes of administration, dosing, initiation, and titration of methadone and distinct pain scoring tools and did not address the issues raised by the Cochrane review. Methadone has an important role in the management of cancer pain, with many advantages including low cost, high oral bioavailability, rapid onset of action, once-daily dosing, and postulated benefits in difficult pain control scenarios. However, due to limited research in this area, methadone dosing remains a challenge, with vigilant dose initiation, adjustment, and monitoring required. There is a need for further studies using standardized methodology to evaluate the optimal dosing strategy of methadone, the effect on different types of pain, and the role of pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenomics in clinical outcomes. PMID:25102037

  2. Drug smuggling using clothing impregnated with cocaine.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Sen D; Power, John D

    2005-11-01

    A case study is presented where a woman travelling from South America to the Republic of Ireland was detained at Dublin Airport and articles of clothing she had in her luggage were found to be impregnated with cocaine. The study shows that the amount of powder recovered from the garments was approximately 14% of the total weight of the garments. The cocaine was in the form of cocaine hydrochloride and the purity was approximately 80%. An examination of the garments under filtered light highlighted the areas exposed to cocaine and indicated that the method of impregnation was by pouring liquid containing cocaine onto the clothing. PMID:16382839

  3. Brugada phenocopy in concomitant ethanol and heroin overdose.

    PubMed

    Rambod, Mehdi; Elhanafi, Sherif; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2015-01-01

    Brugada phenocopy describes conditions with Brugada-like ECG pattern but without true congenital Brugada syndrome. We report a case of 44-year-old man with no known medical history who presented with loss of consciousness. Toxicology screening was positive for opiates and high serum alcohol level. His initial ECG showed Brugada type 1 pattern which resolved after several hours of observation and treatment with continuous naloxone infusion. Patient regained his consciousness and disclosed heroin abuse and drinking alcohol. This case highlights the heroin overdose as a possible cause of Brugada phenocopy. PMID:24903622

  4. Cocaine use and the breastfeeding mother.

    PubMed

    Jones, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine is the second most commonly used illicit drug. Use in pregnancy and breastfeeding may have severe consequences for the baby due to its pharmacokinetic properties. Midwives need to be aware of the prolonged action of cocaine and be alert to the possibility of cocaine toxicity if a baby is excessively irritable and tachycardic. Euphoric highs are brief but breast milk and urine remain positive for long periods. Infant urine following exposure to cocaine via breast milk may remain positive for up to 60 hours. Mothers who snort cocaine should pump and dump breast milk for 24-48 hours. Passive inhalation of crack cocaine smoke may also result in infants with positive toxicology screens. Cocaine powder should never be applied to the nipples of breastfeeding mothers. PMID:26310088

  5. Intravenous Cocaine Priming Reinstates Cocaine-Induced Conditioned Place Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombas, Andres S.; Freeman, Kevin B.; Roma, Peter G.; Riley, Anthony L.

    2007-01-01

    Separate groups of rats underwent an unbiased conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure involving alternate pairings of distinct environments with intravenous (IV) injections of cocaine (0.75 mg/kg) or saline immediately or 15 min after injection. A subsequent extinction phase consisted of exposure to both conditioning environments preceded by…

  6. Tobacco use and quit attempts among methadone maintenance clients.

    PubMed Central

    Richter, K P; Gibson, C A; Ahluwalia, J S; Schmelzle, K H

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined tobacco use prevalence, types of tobacco used, interest in quitting, and prior quit attempts among persons in methadone maintenance treatment. METHODS: Counselors collected surveys from 84% (550 of 655) of all clients in a 4-county metropolitan area. RESULTS: Most clients (77%) smoked cigarettes. Of the 59 former tobacco users, only 6 reported using a cessation pharmacotherapy to quit. Three quarters of the current smokers had attempted to quit at least once, with an average of 5 attempts. Most smokers (80%) were "somewhat" or "very" interested in quitting. CONCLUSIONS: The quit ratio among methadone maintenance treatment clients was 12%, compared with 50% nationwide. To reduce morbidity and mortality, cessation interventions must be developed and disseminated. PMID:11211643

  7. Opioid switch to oral methadone in cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Mancini, I; Lossignol, D A; Body, J J

    2000-07-01

    The occurrence of undesirable side effects due to opioids (delirium, confusion, myoclonus, nausea, emesis) is one of the major complications in the management of pain, especially in chronic cancer pain states. Methadone, as an alternative to morphine, has been proposed in the control of opioid-induced toxicity. Methadone is a synthetic opioid, with mu and delta receptor activity, associated with the capacity to inhibit N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Questions have arisen concerning its equianalgesic ratio since its rediscovery over the past few years and are certainly related to its receptor interactions. Aspects of its pharmacology, indications, and switching modalities are discussed here. Opioid rotation is a new tool in the management of cancer pain, deserving more attention. PMID:10888415

  8. Risk Factors for Mortality and Endotracheal Intubation after Methadone Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Hassanian-Moghaddam, Hossein; Soltaninejad, Kambiz; Shadnia, Shahin; Kabir, Ali; Movahedi, Mitra; Mirafzal, Amirhossein

    2016-03-01

    This was a retrospective chart review to evaluate various risk factors associated with in-hospital mortality and intubation risk in acute methadone overdose. All patients admitted to an academic hospital in Tehran, Iran, during a 10-year period (2000-2009) constituted the study sample. Exclusion criteria were significant comorbidities and age under 18 years. Outcome variables were in-hospital mortality and being intubated during admission. A total of 802 patients were enrolled in the study. There were 15 (1.8%) deaths due to methadone overdose or its complications. The number of yearly admissions was 15 patients in 2000, 16 in 2001, 16 in 2002, 18 in 2003, 23 in 2004, 38 in 2005, 59 in 2006, 110 in 2007, 206 in 2008 and 301 in 2009. Based on logistic regression analysis, the most important independent variable predicting mortality was length of admission in toxicology ward [OR (95% CI): 1.6 (1.1-2.3)]. For the prediction of intubation, independent variables were Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 5-9 [OR (95% CI): 356.5 (9.8-12907.4)] in the emergency department (ED), miosis in the ED [356.9 (1.4-87872.5)] and respiratory rate in the ED [1.5 (1.1-2.1)]. Linear regression model for length of hospitalization showed patient age as the most important variable for prediction of this outcome. Despite a relatively low mortality rate, the increasing number of methadone-poisoned patients requires special attention to this common intoxication. Careful disposition of patients from ED to ordinary wards or intensive care units and also from higher to lower levels of care should be considered in methadone overdose. PMID:26301535

  9. A case of serotonin syndrome and mutism associated with methadone.

    PubMed

    Bush, Eric; Miller, Carol; Friedman, Irwin

    2006-12-01

    A patient was seen on the palliative care service at our institution who developed serotonin syndrome and mutism associated with methadone use. Serotonin syndrome is often described as a clinical triad of mental status changes, autonomic hyperactivity, and neuromuscular abnormalities, but not all of these findings are consistently present in all patients with the disorder. The incidence of the serotonin syndrome is thought to mirror the increasing number of proserotonergic agents being used in clinical practice. In 2002, the Toxic Exposure Surveillance System, which receives case descriptions from office-based practices, inpatient settings, and emergency departments, reported 26,733 incidences of exposure to selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) that caused significant toxic effects in 7349 persons and resulted in 93 deaths. Serotonin syndrome is not an idiopathic drug reaction; it is a predictable consequence of excess serotonergic agonism of central nervous system (CNS) receptors and peripheral serotonergic receptors. The myriad of symptoms with which serotonin syndrome may present is compounded by the fact that more than 85% of physicians are unaware of serotonin syndrome as a clinical diagnosis. Other SSRIs such as fluoxetine and fluvoxamine have been shown to increase methadone plasma concentrations in dependent patients. Although the exact mechanism is unknown, there are several pathways via which a significant interaction could occur. This would include the effects methadone has on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in addition to the impact of methadone on the cytochrome P450 enzyme system. The mainstay of treatment of serotonin syndrome is withdrawal of the offending agent and supportive care. These actions resulted in resolution of our patient's symptoms. Serotonin syndrome is becoming more common, and with the utilization of polypharmacy on many palliative care services should be considered as unifying differential diagnosis in the appropriate setting. PMID:17187532

  10. Crack Cocaine Injection Practices and HIV Risk: Findings From New York and Bridgeport

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, Stephen E.; Clatts, Michael C.; Goldsamt, Lloyd A.; Welle, Dorinda L.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the behavioral practices and health risks associated with preparing crack cocaine for injection. Using an ethno-epidemiological approach, injection drug users (n=38) were recruited between 1999 and 2000 from public settings in New York City and Bridgeport, Connecticut and responded to a semistructured interview focusing on crack injection initiation and their most recent crack injection. Study findings indicate that methods of preparing crack for injection were impacted by a transforming agent, heat applied to the cooker, heroin use, age of the injector, and geographic location of the injector. The findings suggest that crack injectors use a variety of methods to prepare crack, which may carry different risks for the transmission of bloodborne pathogens. In particular, crack injection may be an important factor in the current HIV epidemic. PMID:18079990

  11. Determination of methadone in exhaled breath condensate by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beck, Olof; Sandqvist, Sören; Eriksen, Paul; Franck, Johan; Palmskog, Göran

    2011-04-01

    Within the field of toxicology exhaled breath is used as specimen only for determination of alcohol. However, it was recently discovered that when using sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) technique, amphetamine, methamphetamine, and methadone are detectable in exhaled breath following intake by drug addicts. We therefore undertook to develop a method for determination of methadone in exhaled breath condensate from patients undergoing methadonemaintenance treatment. Exhaled breath condensate was collected from 14 patients after intake of the daily methadone dose. The exhaled breath condensate was collected for 10 min using an Ecoscreen instrument. After extraction of any trapped methadone from the condensate by solid-phase extraction, the final extract was analyzed by a combined LC-MS-MS method. Recovery of methadone from breath condensate in the solid-phase extraction was 104%, no significant matrix effects were observed, and the quantification using methadone-d(3) as internal standard was accurate (10% bias) and precise (coefficient of variation 6.2%). Methadone was indisputably identified by means of the MS technique in exhaled breath condensate from all 14 patients. Identification was based on monitoring two product ions in selected reaction monitoring mode with correct relative ratio (± 20%) and correct retention time. Excretion rates ranged from 23.6 to 275 pg/min. No methadone was detected in five control subjects (< 2 pg/min). This finding confirms that methadone is present in exhaled breath from patients in methadone treatment. Collection of exhaled breath specimen is likely to be complementary to other matrices presently in use in testing for drugs-of-abuse. PMID:21439147

  12. Treatment Retention among Patients Randomized to Buprenorphine/Naloxone Compared to Methadone in A Multi-site Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Saxon, Andrew J.; Huang, David; Hasson, Al; Thomas, Christie; Hillhouse, Maureen; Jacobs, Petra; Teruya, Cheryl; McLaughlin, Paul; Wiest, Katharina; Cohen, Allan; Ling, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Aims To examine patient and medication characteristics associated with retention and continued illicit opioid use in methadone (MET) versus buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP) treatment for opioid dependence. Design/Settings/Participants This secondary analysis included 1,267 opioid-dependent individuals participating in 9 opioid treatment programs between 2006 and 2009 and randomized to receive open-label BUP or MET for 24 weeks. Measurements The analyses included measures of patient characteristics at baseline (demographics; use of alcohol, cigarettes, and illicit drugs; self-rated mental and physical health), medication dose and urine drug screens during treatment, and treatment completion and days in treatment during the 24 week trial. Findings The treatment completion rate was 74% for MET vs. 46% for BUP (p<.01); the rate among MET participants increased to 80% when the maximum MET dose reached or exceeded 60mg/day. With BUP, the completion rate increased linearly with higher doses, reaching 60% with doses of 30–32mg/day. Of those remaining in treatment, positive opioid urine results were significantly lower (OR=0.63, 95%CI=0.52–0.76, p<.01) among BUP relative to MET participants during the first 9 weeks of treatment. Higher medication dose was related to lower opiate use, more so among BUP patients. A Cox proportional hazards model revealed factors associated with dropout: (1) BUP (vs. MET, HR=1.61, CI:1.20–2.15), (2) lower medication dose (<16mg for BUP, <60mg for MET; HR=3.09, CI:2.19–4.37), (3) the interaction of dose and treatment condition (those with higher BUP dose were 1.04 times more likely to drop out than those with lower MET dose, and (4) being younger, Hispanic, and using heroin or other substances during treatment. Conclusions Provision of methadone appears to be associated with better retention in treatment for opioid dependence than buprenorphine, as does use of provision of higher doses of both medications. Provision of buprenorphine is associated with lower continued use of illicit opioids. PMID:23961726

  13. Factors Associated with Methadone Treatment Duration: A Cox Regression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ching-Yi; Chao, En; Lee, Tony Szu-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    This study examined retention rates and associated predictors of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) duration among 128 newly admitted patients in Taiwan. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to obtain demographic and drug use history. Daily records of methadone taken and test results for HIV, HCV, and morphine toxicology were taken from a computerized medical registry. Cox regression analyses were performed to examine factors associated with MMT duration. MMT retention rates were 80.5%, 68.8%, 53.9%, and 41.4% for 3, 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. Excluding 38 patients incarcerated during the study period, retention rates were 81.1%, 73.3%, 61.1%, and 48.9% for 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, and 18 months, respectively. No participant seroconverted to HIV and 1 died during the 18-months follow-up. Results showed that being female, imprisonment, a longer distance from house to clinic, having a lower methadone dose after 30 days, being HCV positive, and in the New Taipei city program predicted early patient dropout. The findings suggest favorable MMT outcomes of HIV seroincidence and mortality. Results indicate that the need to minimize travel distance and to provide programs that meet womens requirements justify expansion of MMT clinics in Taiwan. PMID:25875531

  14. The First American Cocaine Epidemic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtwright, David T.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the wave of cocaine abuse that followed the drug's recommendation by the late nineteenth-century medical community as a cure all. Details drug addiction among ethnic and social groups at the turn of the century. Warns that drug epidemics have important social and legal consequences. Suggests legal pressure may alter the form of drug

  15. Inapparent pulmonary vascular disease in an ex-heroin user

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli Incalzi, R.; Ludovico Maini, C.; Giuliano Bonetti, M.; Campioni, P.; Pistelli, R.; Fuso, L.

    1986-04-01

    A severe pulmonary vascular derangement, usually reported in drug addicts, was diagnosed in a 28-year-old asymptomatic ex-heroin user by means of fortuitously performed pulmonary perfusion imaging. Neither physical findings nor pulmonary function tests, aroused suspicion of the diagnosis. A search for asymptomatic pulmonary vascular disease probably should be undertaken in drug addicts.

  16. Tracking Heroin Chic: The Abject Body Reconfigures the Rational Argument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harold, Christine L.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how a recent fashion trend known as "heroin chic" challenges conventional modes of argumentation. Considers how its popularization of abject, emaciated bodies presents an alternative to a logic of rationalism that grounds traditional argumentation. Discusses how by foregrounding corporeal performativity as a form of argument, the…

  17. Opioid Abstinence Reinforcement Delays Heroin Lapse during Buprenorphine Dose Tapering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwald, Mark K.

    2008-01-01

    A positive reinforcement contingency increased opioid abstinence during outpatient dose tapering (4, 2, then 0 mg/day during Weeks 1 through 3) in non-treatment-seeking heroin-dependent volunteers who had been maintained on buprenorphine (8 mg/day) during an inpatient research protocol. The control group (n = 12) received $4.00 for completing…

  18. Risk Factors for Attempting Suicide in Heroin Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Alec

    2010-01-01

    In order to examine risk factors for attempting suicide in heroin dependent patients, a group of 527 abstinent opiate dependent patients had a psychiatric interview and completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Patients who had or had never attempted suicide were compared on putative suicide risk factors. It was found that 207 of the 527…

  19. Heroin Addiction: Psychosocial Characteristics and Considerations for Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faherty, John K.

    This paper presents a review of relevant medical and psychological literature that addresses the psychological characteristics of heroin addiction and addicts: dependence (both physical and psychological); explanations of the phenomenon of addiction (both medical and behavioral); and other psychosocial views of causation including escapism,

  20. Understanding the Adolescent Actress: The True Adolescent Heroine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Susan

    1981-01-01

    Discusses three issues relevant to adolescent heroines in high school theater productions: the need to consider the role model presented by the character being portrayed; the need to focus on the sociodramatic issues of the production; and the need for consciousness-raising among teachers. (JMF)

  1. Species tree estimation and the historical biogeography of heroine cichlids.

    PubMed

    Hulsey, C Darrin; Keck, Benjamin P; Hollingsworth, Phillip R

    2011-01-01

    Heroine cichlids are major components of the fish faunas in both Central America and the Caribbean. To examine the evolutionary patterns of how cichlids colonized both of these regions, we reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships among 23 cichlid lineages. We used three phylogenetically novel nuclear markers (Dystropin b, Myomesin1, and Wnt7b) in combination with sequence data from seven other gene regions (Nd2, Rag1, Enc1, Sreb2, Ptr, Plagl2, and Zic1) to elucidate the species tree of these cichlids. The species examined represent major heroine lineages in South America, Central America, and the Greater Antilles. The individual gene trees of these groups were topologically quite discordant. Therefore, we combined the genetic partitions and inferred the species tree using both concatenation and a coalescent-based Bayesian method. The two resulting phylogenetic topologies were largely concordant but differed in two fundamental ways. First, more nodes in the concatenated tree were supported with substantial or 100% Bayesian posterior support than in the coalescent-based tree. Second, there was a minor, but biogeographically critical, topological difference between the concatenated and coalescent-based trees. Nevertheless, both analyses recovered topologies consistent with the Greater Antillean heroines being phylogenetically nested within the largely Central American heroine radiation. This study suggests that reconstructions of cichlid phylogeny and historical biogeography should account for the vagaries of individual gene histories. PMID:21112406

  2. Risk Factors for Attempting Suicide in Heroin Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Alec

    2010-01-01

    In order to examine risk factors for attempting suicide in heroin dependent patients, a group of 527 abstinent opiate dependent patients had a psychiatric interview and completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Patients who had or had never attempted suicide were compared on putative suicide risk factors. It was found that 207 of the 527

  3. Tracking Heroin Chic: The Abject Body Reconfigures the Rational Argument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harold, Christine L.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how a recent fashion trend known as "heroin chic" challenges conventional modes of argumentation. Considers how its popularization of abject, emaciated bodies presents an alternative to a logic of rationalism that grounds traditional argumentation. Discusses how by foregrounding corporeal performativity as a form of argument, the

  4. Bilateral borderzone brain infarctions in association with heroin abuse.

    PubMed

    Niehaus, L; Meyer, B U

    1998-10-01

    A 25-year-old drug abuser who developed an unusual pattern of cerebral ischemic lesions is presented. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral borderzone infarctions which were attributed to a heroin-associated vasculitis of the basal cerebral arteries. Under probatory corticosteroid medication the mild neurological deficits completely disappeared. PMID:9849803

  5. Patterns of abstinence or continued drug use among methadone maintenance patients and their relation to treatment retention.

    PubMed

    White, William L; Campbell, Michael D; Spencer, Robert D; Hoffman, Howard A; Crissman, Brian; DuPont, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy and effectiveness of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) in the medical management of opioid addiction has been well-established, but treatment outcomes are compromised by the continued use of licit and illicit drugs during MMT. The present study examined the relationship between in-treatment illicit drug use and retention and dropout of 604 MMT patients in Washington, D.C. Sixty-eight percent of patients did not test positive for an unprescribed drug during the study period. Of patients who tested positive for an illicit drug during the baseline period, 55% tested positive for cocaine, 44% for opiates, 23% for THC, 20% for benzodiazepines, 7% for PCP, and 4% for amphetamines. Those testing positive were three times more likely to leave treatment than those who did not test positive. Testing positive for one drug doubled the rate of attrition; testing positive for multiple drugs quadrupled the risk of attrition. Non-prescribed opioid or benzodiazepine use was a predictor of MMT dropout, but prescribed opioid or benzodiazepine use was not. Continued illicit drug use poses significant risk for subsequent premature termination of MMT. Assertive clinical management of continued illicit drug use could provide mechanisms to enhance MMT retention and long-term recovery outcomes. PMID:25052787

  6. GABRB2 Haplotype Association with Heroin Dependence in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yung Su; Yang, Mei; Mat, Wai-Kin; Tsang, Shui-Ying; Su, Zhonghua; Jiang, Xianfei; Ng, Siu-Kin; Liu, Siyu; Hu, Taobo; Pun, Frank; Liao, Yanhui; Tang, Jinsong; Chen, Xiaogang; Hao, Wei; Xue, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Substance dependence is a frequently observed comorbid disorder in schizophrenia, but little is known about genetic factors possibly shared between the two psychotic disorders. GABRB2, a schizophrenia candidate gene coding for GABAA receptor β2 subunit, is examined for possible association with heroin dependence in Han Chinese population. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GABRB2, namely rs6556547 (S1), rs1816071 (S3), rs18016072 (S5), and rs187269 (S29), previously associated with schizophrenia, were examined for their association with heroin dependence. Two additional SNPs, rs10051667 (S31) and rs967771 (S32), previously associated with alcohol dependence and bipolar disorder respectively, were also analyzed. The six SNPs were genotyped by direct sequencing of PCR amplicons of target regions for 564 heroin dependent individuals and 498 controls of Han Chinese origin. Interestingly, it was found that recombination between the haplotypes of all-derived-allele (H1; OR = 1.00) and all-ancestral-allele (H2; OR = 0.74) at S5-S29 junction generated two recombinants H3 (OR = 8.51) and H4 (OR = 5.58), both conferring high susceptibility to heroin dependence. Additional recombination between H2 and H3 haplotypes at S1-S3 junction resulted in a risk-conferring haplotype H5 (OR = 1.94x109). In contrast, recombination between H1 and H2 haplotypes at S3-S5 junction rescued the risk-conferring effect of recombination at S5-S29 junction, giving rise to the protective haplotype H6 (OR = 0.68). Risk-conferring effects of S1-S3 and S5-S29 crossovers and protective effects of S3-S5 crossover were seen in both pure heroin dependent and multiple substance dependence subgroups. In conclusion, significant association was found with haplotypes of the S1-S29 segment in GABRB2 for heroin dependence in Han Chinese population. Local recombination was an important determining factor for switching haplotypes between risk-conferring and protective statuses. The present study provide evidence for the schizophrenia candidate gene GABRB2 to play a role in heroin dependence, but replication of these findings is required. PMID:26561861

  7. Multiple faces of BDNF in cocaine addiction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Wolf, Marina E.

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been found to play roles in many types of plasticity including drug addiction. Here we focus on rodent studies over the past two decades that have demonstrated diverse roles of BDNF in models of cocaine addiction. First, we will provide an overview of studies showing that cocaine exposure alters (and generally increases) BDNF levels in reward-related regions including the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens, prefrontal cortex, and amygdala. Then we will review evidence that BDNF contributes to behavioral changes in animal models of cocaine addiction, focusing on conditioned place preference, behavioral sensitization, maintenance and reinstatement of self-administration, and incubation of cocaine craving. Last, we will review the role of BDNF in synaptic plasticity, particularly as it relates to plasticity of AMPA receptor transmission after cocaine exposure. We conclude that BDNF regulates cocaine-induced behaviors in a highly complex manner that varies depending on the brain region (and even among different cell types within the same brain region), the nature of cocaine exposure, and the addiction phase examined (e.g., acquisition vs maintenance; early vs late withdrawal). These complexities make BDNF a daunting therapeutic target for treating cocaine addiction. However, recent clinical evidence suggests that the serum BDNF level may serve as a biomarker in cocaine addicts to predict future relapse, providing an alternative direction for exploring BDNFs potential relevance to treating cocaine addiction. PMID:25449839

  8. Adverse health consequences of cocaine abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Cregler, L. L.

    1989-01-01

    Cocaine creates a strong physical addiction and is becoming recognized as one of the most dangerous illicit drugs abused today. The myth is that cocaine is harmless and nonaddictive. An estimated 30 million Americans have used cocaine, but the number may be as high as 40 million. Five to six million individuals are compulsive users. A review of the current literature revealed multiple reports of acute myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident with a temporal relation to cocaine use. Cocaine has also been associated with acute rupture of the aorta, cardiac arrhythmia, and sudden death. Cocaine has multisystem toxicity involving neurologic, psychiatric, obstetric, pulmonary, dermatologic, and gastrointestinal systems. The dopamine depletion hypothesis may explain why cocaine is repeatedly administered; cocaine produces a transient increase in synaptic dopamine. Alterations in dopamine neurotransmission may be responsible for the development of compulsive use patterns. When cocaine use becomes compulsive, psychosocial dysfunction, deviant behaviors, and a wide spectrum of social, financial, and family problems invariably result. Addiction, major medical complications, and death are true hazards of cocaine use. PMID:2657079

  9. Association Analysis of GABRB3 Promoter Variants with Heroin Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Hsiang; Huang, Chia-Chun; Liao, Ding-Lieh

    2014-01-01

    GABRB3 encoding the β3 subunit of GABAA receptor has been implicated in multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, including substance abuse. Previous studies reported that SNPs at the 5′ regulatory region of GABRB3 could regulate GABRB3 gene expression and associated with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE). The study aimed to investigate whether SNPs at the 5′ regulatory region of GABRB3 were associated with heroin dependence in our population. We first re-sequenced 1.5 kb of the 5′regulatory region of GABRB3 gene to examine the SNP profile in the genomic DNA of 365 control subjects. Then, we conducted a case-control association analysis between 576 subjects with heroin dependence (549 males, 27 females) and 886 controls (472 males, 414 females) by genotyping the rs4906902 as a tag SNP. We also conducted a reporter gene assay to assess the promoter activity of two major haplotypes derived from SNPs at this region. We detected 3 common SNPs (rs4906902, rs8179184 and rs20317) at this region that had strong pair-wise linkage disequilibrium. The C allele of rs4906902 was found to be associated with increased risk of heroin dependence (odds ratio:1.27, p = 0.002). Two major haplotypes (C-A-G and T-G-C) derived from these 3 SNPs accounted for 99% of this sample, and reporter gene activity assay showed that haplotype C-A-G that contained the C allele of the tag SNP rs4906902 had higher activity than haplotype T-G-C. Our data suggest that GABRB3 might be associated with heroin dependence, and increased expression of GABRB3 might contribute to the pathogenesis of heroin dependence. PMID:25025424

  10. Access to Care for Methadone Maintenance Patients in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hettema, Jennifer E.; Sorensen, James L.

    2009-01-01

    This policy commentary addresses a significant access to care issue that faces methadone maintenance patients seeking residential treatment in the United States. Methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) has demonstrated strong efficacy in the outpatient treatment of opiate dependence. However, many opiate dependent patients are also in need of more

  11. Children of Methadone-Maintained Mothers: Three-Year Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Helen L.; And Others

    The physical and neurobehavioral findings at 3 years of age for 39 children born to mothers on methadone- maintenance and 23 children born to drug-free comparison mothers are reported. The methadone children had a higher incidence of head circumferences less than the third percentile, nystagmus/strabismus, and otitis media. No differences were

  12. The Costs of Pursuing Accreditation for Methadone Treatment Sites: Results from a National Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarkin, Gary A.; Dunlap, Laura J.; Homsi, Ghada

    2006-01-01

    The use of accreditation has been widespread among medical care providers, but accreditation is relatively new to the drug abuse treatment field. This study presents estimates of the costs of pursuing accreditation for methadone treatment sites. Data are from 102 methadone treatment sites that underwent accreditation as part of the Center for

  13. The Glycosylation of AGP and Its Associations with the Binding to Methadone

    PubMed Central

    Behan, Jennifer L.; Cruickshank, Yvonne E.; Matthews-Smith, Gerri; Bruce, Malcolm; Smith, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Methadone remains the most common form of pharmacological therapy for opioid dependence; however, there is a lack of explanation for the reports of its relatively low success rate in achieving complete abstinence. One hypothesis is that in vivo binding of methadone to the plasma glycoprotein alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), to a degree dependent on the molecular structure, may render the drug inactive. This study sought to determine whether alterations present in the glycosylation pattern of AGP in patients undergoing various stages of methadone therapy (titration < two weeks, harm reduction < one year, long-term > one and a half years) could affect the affinity of the glycoprotein to bind methadone. The composition of AGP glycosylation was determined using high pH anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) and intrinsic fluorescence analysed to determine the extent of binding to methadone. The monosaccharides galactose and N-acetyl-glucosamine were elevated in all methadone treatment groups indicating alterations in AGP glycosylation. AGP from all patients receiving methadone therapy exhibited a greater degree of binding than the normal population. This suggests that analysing the glycosylation of AGP in patients receiving methadone may aid in determining whether the therapy is likely to be effective. PMID:23936770

  14. Contingent Take-Home Incentive: Effects on Drug Use of Methadone Maintenance Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stitzer, Maxine L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined contingent methadone take-home privileges for effectiveness in reducing supplemental drug use of methadone maintenance patients. Assigned 53 new intakes to begin receiving take-home privileges after 2 consecutive weeks of drug-free urines or to noncontingent procedure in which take-homes were delivered independently of urine results.…

  15. The Costs of Pursuing Accreditation for Methadone Treatment Sites: Results from a National Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarkin, Gary A.; Dunlap, Laura J.; Homsi, Ghada

    2006-01-01

    The use of accreditation has been widespread among medical care providers, but accreditation is relatively new to the drug abuse treatment field. This study presents estimates of the costs of pursuing accreditation for methadone treatment sites. Data are from 102 methadone treatment sites that underwent accreditation as part of the Center for…

  16. Dyads at Risk: Methadone-Maintained Women and Their Four-Month-Old Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeremy, Rita Jeruchimowicz; Bernstein, Victor J.

    1984-01-01

    Compares 17 methadone-exposed and 23 control four-month-old infants in interactions with their mothers. Results indicate that methadone is only one of several risk factors affecting interaction. Mothers rated poor in communication have poor psychosocial and psychological resources, and infants rated poor in communication showed problematic motor…

  17. Addict Descriptions of Therapeutic Community, Multimodality, and Methadone Maintenance Treatment Clients and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuker, Patricia B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Compared the Adjective Check List descriptions of addicts in treatment toward methadone maintenance, multimodality, and therapeutic community clients and program staff. Results indicate client pessimism regarding methadone maintenance. Results suggest addict opinions represent a valuable source for evaluating treatment approaches and identifying…

  18. Children of Methadone-Maintained Mothers: Three-Year Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Helen L.; And Others

    The physical and neurobehavioral findings at 3 years of age for 39 children born to mothers on methadone- maintenance and 23 children born to drug-free comparison mothers are reported. The methadone children had a higher incidence of head circumferences less than the third percentile, nystagmus/strabismus, and otitis media. No differences were…

  19. Developing Training and Employment Programs to Meet the Needs of Methadone Treatment Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Michael L.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Research on vocational services for methadone clients is reviewed, and preliminary results of an evaluation of a training and employment program for 249 methadone treatment clients in 3 community-based programs are presented. Results suggest the usefulness of vocational services in increasing training access and use. (SLD)

  20. Fatal Methadone Toxicity: Potential Role of CYP3A4 Genetic Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Richards-Waugh, Lauren L.; Primerano, Donald A.; Dementieva, Yulia; Kraner, James C.; Rankin, Gary O.

    2014-01-01

    Methadone is difficult to administer as a therapeutic agent because of a wide range of interindividual pharmacokinetics, likely due to genetic variability of the CYP450 enzymes responsible for metabolism to its principal metabolite 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP). CYP3A4 is one of the primary CYP450 isoforms responsible for the metabolism of methadone to EDDP in humans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of CYP3A4 genetic polymorphisms in accidental methadone fatalities. A study cohort consisting of 136 methadone-only and 92 combined methadone/benzodiazepine fatalities was selected from cases investigated at the West Virginia and Kentucky Offices of the Chief Medical Examiner. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped within the CYP3A4 gene. Observed allelic and genotypic frequencies were compared with expected frequencies obtained from The National Center for Biotechnology Information dbSNP database. SNPs rs2242480 and rs2740574 demonstrated an apparent enrichment within the methadone-only overdose fatalities compared with the control group and the general population. This enrichment was not apparent in the methadone/benzodiazepine cases for these two SNPs. Our findings indicate that there may be two or more SNPs on the CYP3A4 gene that cause or contribute to the methadone poor metabolizer phenotype. PMID:25217544