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Sample records for methadone morphine oxycodone

  1. Evaluation of ongoing oxycodone abuse among methadone-maintained patients.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kelly E; Sigmon, Stacey C; McGee, Mark R; Heil, Sarah H; Higgins, Stephen T

    2008-12-01

    Prevalence of prescription opioid abuse has increased dramatically in recent years in the United States generally, and a similar pattern of increasing prescription opioid use has also been noted among patients seeking treatment for opioid dependence. This study presents results from an internal quality assurance project conducted by an outpatient methadone maintenance (MM) treatment clinic which sought to examine the extent of ongoing oxycodone abuse among patients that might be going undetected with current urinalysis-testing methods. One hundred five MM patients provided 437 urine samples over a 6-week period. Samples were analyzed using the clinic's usual enzyme multiplied immunoassay test (EMIT) opiate assay (300 ng/ml opiate cutpoint) and a supplemental oxycodone test strip (100 ng/ml oxycodone cutpoint). The EMIT assay identified only 6% (20/437) of samples as positive for oxycodone, whereas the oxycodone test strip indicated that 19% (83/437) tested positive for recent oxycodone use. Inspection of patient characteristics revealed that oxycodone users were more likely to report a prescription opioid as their primary drug at intake, be in MM treatment for a significantly shorter duration, and provide significantly more opioid- and cocaine-positive urine samples. Overall, these data illustrate the potential importance of monitoring for ongoing oxycodone use in MM clinics. Although future efforts should examine this question using more rigorous experimental methods, findings from this initial project have implications for clinical issues such as evaluating patient stability in treatment, making medication-dosing decisions, and determining patient eligibility for methadone take-home privileges. PMID:18295434

  2. Evaluation of Ongoing Oxycodone Abuse among Methadone-Maintained Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kelly E.; Sigmon, Stacey C.; McGee, Mark R.; Heil, Sarah H; Higgins, Stephen T.

    2008-01-01

    Prevalence of prescription opioid abuse has increased dramatically in recent years in the United States generally, and a similar pattern of increasing prescription opioid use has also been noted among patients seeking treatment for opioid dependence. The current study presents results from an internal quality-assurance project conducted by an outpatient methadone-maintenance (MM) treatment clinic which sought to examine the extent of ongoing oxycodone abuse among patients that might be going undetected with current urinalysis testing methods. One-hundred and five MM patients provided 437 urine samples over a 6-week period. Samples were analyzed using the clinic’s usual enzyme multiplied immunoassay test (EMIT) opiate assay (300 ng/ml opiate cutpoint) and a supplemental oxycodone test strip (100 ng/ml oxycodone cutpoint). The EMIT assay identified only 6% (20/437) of samples as positive for oxycodone, while the oxycodone test strip indicated that 19% (83/437) tested positive for recent oxycodone use. Inspection of patient characteristics revealed that oxycodone users were more likely to report a prescription opioid as their primary drug at intake, be in MM treatment for a significantly shorter duration and provide significantly more opioid- and cocaine-positive urine samples. Overall, these data illustrate the potential importance of monitoring for ongoing oxycodone use in MM clinics. While future efforts should examine this question using more rigorous experimental methods, findings from this initial project have implications for clinical issues such as evaluating patient stability in treatment, making medication dosing decisions, and determining patient eligibility for methadone take-home privileges. PMID:18295434

  3. [Sustained-release Opioids: Morphine, Oxycodone and Tapentadol].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshika; Iseki, Masako

    2015-11-01

    Opioid analgesics are widely used for managing moderate to severe pain. In cancer pain management sustained-release opioids are used for continuous pain as well as immediate-release opioids for breakthrough pain. Sustained-release drugs have the advantage of stabilizing the blood concentration, although it takes some time to exert their effects. In Japan, the currently available oral sustained-release opioids include six types of sustained-release morphine (three are once-a-day formulations, while the rest are twice-a-day), one type of oxycodone and tapentadol. In this article, we will discuss the pharmacokinetic properties of MS Contin, Morphes, Kadian, P guard and Pacif as sustained-release morphine, Oxycontin as sustained-release oxycodone and Tapenta as sustained-release tapentadol. PMID:26689063

  4. Quality of life under oxycodone/naloxone, oxycodone, or morphine treatment for chronic low back pain in routine clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ueberall, Michael A; Eberhardt, Alice; Mueller-Schwefe, Gerhard HH

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the quality of life of patients with moderate-to-severe chronic low back pain under treatment with the WHO-step III opioids oxycodone/naloxone, oxycodone, or morphine in routine clinical practice. Study design Prospective, 12-week, randomized, open-label, blinded end-point study in 88 medical centers in Germany. Patients and methods A total of 901 patients requiring around-the-clock pain treatment with a WHO-step III opioid were randomized to either morphine, oxycodone, or oxycodone/naloxone (1:1:1). Changes from baseline to week 12 in quality of life were assessed using different validated tools (EuroQoL-5 Dimensions [EQ-5D], Short Form 12 [SF-12], quality of life impairment by pain inventory [QLIP]). Results EQ-5D weighted index scores significantly improved over the 12-week treatment period under all three opioids (P<0.001) with significantly greater improvements under oxycodone/naloxone (65.2% vs 49.6% for oxycodone and 48.2% for morphine, P<0.001). The proportion of patients without EQ-5D complaints was also significantly higher under oxycodone/naloxone (P<0.001). Although quality of life ratings with the QLIP inventory showed significant improvements in all the three treatment arms, improvements were significantly higher under oxycodone/naloxone than under oxycodone and morphine (P<0.001): 90.7% of all oxycodone/naloxone patients achieved ≥30% improvements in quality of life, 72.8% had ≥50%, and 33.2% ≥70% improvements. Similarly, both physical and mental SF-12 component scores showed significantly greater improvements under oxycodone/naloxone with both scores close to the German population norm after 12 weeks. Conclusion Treatment with morphine, oxycodone, or oxycodone/naloxone under routine daily practice conditions significantly improved state of health and quality of life of patients with moderate-to-severe low back pain over a 12-week treatment period. Comparison between the treatment groups showed significantly greater

  5. Switching Opioid-Dependent Patients From Methadone to Morphine: Safety, Tolerability, and Methadone Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Glue, Paul; Cape, Gavin; Tunnicliff, Donna; Lockhart, Michelle; Lam, Fred; Gray, Andrew; Hung, Noelyn; Hung, C Tak; Harland, Sarah; Devane, Jane; Howes, John; Weis, Holger; Friedhoff, Lawrence

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to switch patients established on methadone opioid substitution therapy (OST) to morphine over 1 week. Subjects established on daily methadone OST (mean dose 60 mg/day) were switched to morphine slow-release capsules, dosed at 4× the previous total daily methadone dose, for 6 days, then given morphine syrup dosed q3h. All 27 subjects enrolled in this study completed the switch from methadone to morphine. Opioid withdrawal symptoms (OWS) peaked within 12-24 hours of starting morphine, and 24/27 subjects required higher daily morphine doses (mean 5.2× multiple). Pharmacokinetic evaluation showed that 91% of methadone was cleared during this time, with a mean elimination half-life of 59 hours. The most frequent treatment-emergent non-OWS adverse events were headache, nausea, constipation, and neck pain. The method described here appears to be a safe and acceptable approach to switch subjects from methadone to morphine. PMID:26763764

  6. Co-administration of morphine and oxycodone vaccines reduces the distribution of 6-monoacetylmorphine and oxycodone to brain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pravetoni, M; Raleigh, MD; Le Naour, M; Tucker, AM; Harmon, TM; Jones, JM; Birnbaum, AK; Portoghese, PS; Pentel, PR

    2012-01-01

    Opioid conjugate vaccines have shown promise in animal models as a potential treatment for opioid addiction. Individual vaccines are quite specific and each targets only a limited number of structurally similar opioids. Since opioid users can switch or transition between opioids, we studied a bivalent immunization strategy of combining 2 vaccines that could target several of the most commonly abused opioids; heroin, oxycodone and their active metabolites. Morphine (M) and oxycodone (OXY) haptens were conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) through tetraglycine (Gly)4 linkers at the C6 position. Immunization of rats with M-KLH alone produced high titers of antibodies directed against heroin, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) and morphine. Immunization with OXY-KLH produced high titers of antibodies against oxycodone and oxymorphone. Immunization with the bivalent vaccine produced consistently high antibody titers against both immunogens. Bivalent vaccine antibody titers against the individual immunogens were higher than with the monovalent vaccines alone owing, at least in part, to cross-reactivity of the antibodies. Administration of a single concurrent intravenous dose of 6-MAM and oxycodone to rats immunized with the bivalent vaccine increased 6-MAM, morphine and oxycodone retention in serum and reduced the distribution of 6-MAM and oxycodone to brain. Vaccine efficacy correlated with serum antibody titers for both monovalent vaccines, alone or in combination. Efficacy of the individual vaccines was not compromised by their combined use. Consistent with the enhanced titers in the bivalent group, a trend toward enhanced pharmacokinetic efficacy with the bivalent vaccine was observed. These data support the possibility of co-administering two or more opioid vaccines concurrently to target multiple abusable opioids without compromising the immunogenicity or efficacy of the individual components. PMID:22583811

  7. Can coadministration of oxycodone and morphine produce analgesic synergy in humans? An experimental cold pain study

    PubMed Central

    Grach, Michael; Massalha, Wattan; Pud, Dorit; Adler, Rivka; Eisenberg, Elon

    2004-01-01

    Aims The coadministration of subantinociceptive doses of oxycodone with morphine has recently been shown to result in a synergistic antinociceptive effect in rats. The present study was aimed to investigate the possibility that coadministration of morphine and oxycodone can produce a similar synergistic effect in humans exposed to an experimental model of cold pressor test (CPT). Methods The enriched enrolment design was used to exclude ‘stoic’ and ‘placebo responders’ in a single-blind fashion. ‘Nonstoic’, placebo ‘nonresponder’ female volunteers (n = 30) were randomly assigned to receive 0.5 mg kg−1 oral morphine sulphate, 0.5 mg kg−1 oral oxycodone hydrochloride, and the combination of 0.25 mg kg−1 morphine sulphate with 0.25 mg kg−1 oxycodone hydrochloride, 1 week apart from each other, in a double-blind crossover design. Latency to pain onset (threshold), pain intensity (VAS), and pain tolerance (time until removal of the hand from the water) were measured six times over a 3-h period, subsequent to the administration of each medication, and were used to assess their antinociceptive effect. Results The combination produced a significantly higher effect on latency to pain onset than that of morphine alone [difference in mean postbaseline value 2.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48, 3.9; P = 0.01] but the effect was nonsignificantly smaller that that of oxycodone alone. Similarly, the effect of the combination on pain tolerance was significantly larger than that of morphine alone (combination difference 8.4; 95% CI 2.5, 14.3; P = 0.007), whereas oxycodone alone caused a nonsignificantly larger effect than that of the combination treatment. Comparisons of pain magnitude failed to show any significant differences between the three treatments. Conclusions These results indicate that at the doses tested, morphine and oxycodone do not produce synergistic antinociceptive effects in healthy humans exposed to the CPT. PMID:15327582

  8. Methadone Reverses Analgesic Tolerance Induced by Morphine Pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Posa, Luca; Accarie, Alison; Marie, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Opiates such as morphine are the most powerful analgesics, but their protracted use is restrained by the development of tolerance to analgesic effects. Recent works suggest that tolerance to morphine might be due to its inability to promote mu opioid receptor endocytosis, and the co-injection of morphine with a mu opioid receptor internalizing agonist like [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly-ol5]enkephalin reduces tolerance to morphine. So far, no studies have been conducted to evaluate the ability of methadone to reduce morphine tolerance in morphine-pretreated animals, a treatment sequence that could be encountered in opiate rotation protocol. We investigated the ability of methadone (a mu opioid receptor internalizing agonist used in therapy) to reverse morphine tolerance and the associated cellular mechanisms in the periaqueductal gray matter, a region involved in pain control. Methods: We measured analgesic response following a challenge dose of morphine in the hot plate test and investigated regulation of mu opioid receptor (coupling and endocytosis) and some cellular mechanisms involved in tolerance such as adenylate cyclase superactivation and changes in N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunits expression and phosphorylation state. Results: A chronic treatment with morphine promoted tolerance to its analgesic effects and was associated with a lack of mu opioid receptor endocytosis, adenylate cyclase overshoot, NR2A and NR2B downregulation, and phosphorylation of NR1. We reported that a methadone treatment in morphine-treated mice reversed morphine tolerance to analgesia by promoting mu opioid receptor endocytosis and blocking cellular mechanisms of tolerance. Conclusions: Our data might lead to rational strategies to tackle opiate tolerance in the frame of opiate rotation. PMID:26390873

  9. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Enhanced Analgesic Effect of Oxycodone Compared to Morphine in Chemotherapy-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Karine; Calvino, Bernard; Rivals, Isabelle; Marchand, Fabien; Dubacq, Sophie; McMahon, Stephen B.; Pezet, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Oxycodone is a μ-opioid receptor agonist, used for the treatment of a large variety of painful disorders. Several studies have reported that oxycodone is a more potent pain reliever than morphine, and that it improves the quality of life of patients. However, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the therapeutic action of these two opioids are only partially understood. The aim of this study was to define the molecular changes underlying the long-lasting analgesic effects of oxycodone and morphine in an animal model of peripheral neuropathy induced by a chemotherapic agent, vincristine. Using a behavioural approach, we show that oxycodone maintains an optimal analgesic effect after chronic treatment, whereas the effect of morphine dies down. In addition, using DNA microarray technology on dorsal root ganglia, we provide evidence that the long-term analgesic effect of oxycodone is due to an up-regulation in GABAB receptor expression in sensory neurons. These receptors are transported to their central terminals within the dorsal horn, and subsequently reinforce a presynaptic inhibition, since only the long-lasting (and not acute) anti-hyperalgesic effect of oxycodone was abolished by intrathecal administration of a GABAB receptor antagonist; in contrast, the morphine effect was unaffected. Our study demonstrates that the GABAB receptor is functionally required for the alleviating effect of oxycodone in neuropathic pain condition, thus providing new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the sustained analgesic action of oxycodone. PMID:24618941

  10. Molecular mechanisms underlying the enhanced analgesic effect of oxycodone compared to morphine in chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Karine; Calvino, Bernard; Rivals, Isabelle; Marchand, Fabien; Dubacq, Sophie; McMahon, Stephen B; Pezet, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Oxycodone is a μ-opioid receptor agonist, used for the treatment of a large variety of painful disorders. Several studies have reported that oxycodone is a more potent pain reliever than morphine, and that it improves the quality of life of patients. However, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the therapeutic action of these two opioids are only partially understood. The aim of this study was to define the molecular changes underlying the long-lasting analgesic effects of oxycodone and morphine in an animal model of peripheral neuropathy induced by a chemotherapic agent, vincristine. Using a behavioural approach, we show that oxycodone maintains an optimal analgesic effect after chronic treatment, whereas the effect of morphine dies down. In addition, using DNA microarray technology on dorsal root ganglia, we provide evidence that the long-term analgesic effect of oxycodone is due to an up-regulation in GABAB receptor expression in sensory neurons. These receptors are transported to their central terminals within the dorsal horn, and subsequently reinforce a presynaptic inhibition, since only the long-lasting (and not acute) anti-hyperalgesic effect of oxycodone was abolished by intrathecal administration of a GABAB receptor antagonist; in contrast, the morphine effect was unaffected. Our study demonstrates that the GABAB receptor is functionally required for the alleviating effect of oxycodone in neuropathic pain condition, thus providing new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the sustained analgesic action of oxycodone. PMID:24618941

  11. Oxycodone

    MedlinePlus

    ... this type of medication for at least one week. Oxycodone is in a class of medications called ... have stopped taking them within the past two weeks: isocarboxazid (Marplan), linezolid (Zyvox), methylene blue, phenelzine (Nardil), ...

  12. Oxycodone

    MedlinePlus

    ... tablets, extended-release capsules, and concentrated solution should only be used to treat people who are tolerant ( ... XR, others); aspirin (Percodan); and ibuprofen. This monograph only includes information about the use of oxycodone alone. ...

  13. Enhancement of tolerance development to morphine in rats prenatally exposed to morphine, methadone, and buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Abuse of addictive substances is a serious problem that has a significant impact on areas such as health, the economy, and public safety. Heroin use among young women of reproductive age has drawn much attention around the world. However, there is a lack of information on effects of prenatal exposure to opioids on their offspring. In this study, an animal model was established to study effects of prenatal exposure to opioids on offspring. Methods Female pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were sub-grouped to receive (1) vehicle, (2) 2-4 mg/kg morphine (1 mg/kg increment per week), (3) 7 mg/kg methadone, and (4) 3 mg/kg buprenorphine, subcutaneously, once or twice a day from E3 to E20. The experiments were conducted on animals 8-12 weeks old and with body weight between 250 and 350 g. Results Results showed that prenatal exposure to buprenorphine caused higher mortality than other tested substance groups. Although we observed a significantly lower increase in body weight in all of the opioid-administered dams, the birth weight of the offspring was not altered in all treated groups. Moreover, no obvious behavioral abnormality or body-weight difference was noted during the growing period (8-12 weeks) in all offspring. When the male offspring received morphine injection twice a day for 4 days, the prenatally opioid-exposed rats more quickly developed a tolerance to morphine (as shown by the tail-flick tests), most notably the prenatally buprenorphine-exposed offspring. However, the tolerance development to methadone or buprenorphine was not different in offspring exposed prenatally to methadone or buprenorphine, respectively, when compared with that of the vehicle controlled group. Similar results were also obtained in the female animals. Conclusions Animals prenatally exposed to morphine, methadone, or buprenorphine developed tolerance to morphine faster than their controlled mates. In our animal model, prenatal exposure to buprenorphine also resulted in higher

  14. Comparison of epidural oxycodone and epidural morphine for post-caesarean section analgesia: A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sng, Ban Leong; Kwok, Sarah Carol; Mathur, Deepak; Ithnin, Farida; Newton-Dunn, Clare; Assam, Pryseley Nkouibert; Sultana, Rehena; Sia, Alex Tiong Heng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Epidural morphine after caesarean section may cause moderate to severe pruritus in women. Epidural oxycodone has been shown in non-obstetric trials to reduce pruritus when compared to morphine. We hypothesised that epidural oxycodone may reduce pruritus after caesarean section. Methods: A randomised controlled trial was conducted in pregnant women at term who underwent caesarean section with combined spinal-epidural technique initiated with intrathecal fentanyl 15 μg. Women received either epidural morphine 3 mg or epidural oxycodone 3 mg via the epidural catheter after delivery. The primary outcome was the incidence of pruritus at 24 h after caesarean section. The secondary outcomes were the pruritus scores, treatment for post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV), pain scores and maternal satisfaction. Results: One hundred women were randomised (group oxycodone O = 50, morphine M = 50). There was no difference between Group O and M in the incidence of pruritus (n [%] 28 [56%] vs. 31 [62%], P = 0.68) and the worst pruritus scores (mean [standard deviation] 2.6 (2.8) vs. 3.3 [3.1], P = 0.23), respectively. Both groups had similar pain scores at rest (2.7 [2.3] vs. 2.0 [2.7], P = 0.16) and sitting up (5.0 [2.3] vs. 4.6 [2.4], P = 0.38) at 24 h. Pruritus scores were lower at 4–8, 8–12 and 12–24 h with oxycodone, but pain scores were higher. Both groups had a similar need for treatment of PONV and maternal satisfaction with analgesia. Conclusion: There was no difference in the incidence of pruritus at 24 h between epidural oxycodone and morphine. However, pruritus scores were lower with oxycodone between 4 and 24 h after surgery with higher pain scores in the same period. PMID:27053782

  15. Buprenorphine, methadone, and morphine treatment during pregnancy: behavioral effects on the offspring in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hwei-Hsien; Chiang, Yao-Chang; Yuan, Zung Fan; Kuo, Chung-Chih; Lai, Mei-Dan; Hung, Tsai-Wei; Ho, Ing-kang; Chen, Shao-Tsu

    2015-01-01

    Methadone and buprenorphine are widely used for treating people with opioid dependence, including pregnant women. Prenatal exposure to opioids has devastating effects on the development of human fetuses and may induce long-term physical and neurobehavioral changes during postnatal maturation. This study aimed at comparing the behavioral outcomes of young rats prenatally exposed to buprenorphine, methadone, and morphine. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were administered saline, morphine, methadone, and buprenorphine during embryonic days 3–20. The cognitive function, social interaction, anxiety-like behaviors, and locomotor activity of offsprings were examined by novel object recognition test, social interaction test, light–dark transition test, elevated plus-maze, and open-field test between 6 weeks and 10 weeks of age. Prenatal exposure to methadone and buprenorphine did not affect locomotor activity, but significantly impaired novel object recognition and social interaction in both male and female offsprings in the same manner as morphine. Although prenatal exposure to methadone or buprenorphine increased anxiety-like behaviors in the light–dark transition in both male and female offsprings, the effects were less pronounced as compared to that of morphine. Methadone affected elevated plus-maze in both sex, but buprenorphine only affected the female offsprings. These findings suggest that buprenorphine and methadone maintenance therapy for pregnant women, like morphine, produced detrimental effects on cognitive function and social behaviors, whereas the offsprings of such women might have a lower risk of developing anxiety disorders. PMID:25834439

  16. RAPID DOPAMINE TRANSMISSION WITHIN THE NUCLEUS ACCUMBENS DRAMATICALLY DIFFERS FOLLOWING MORPHINE AND OXYCODONE DELIVERY

    PubMed Central

    Mabrouk, Omar S.; Lovic, Vedran; Singer, Bryan F.; Kennedy, Robert T.; Aragona, Brandon J.

    2014-01-01

    While most drugs of abuse increase dopamine neurotransmission, rapid neurochemical measurements show that different drugs evoke distinct dopamine release patterns within the nucleus accumbens. Rapid changes in dopamine concentration following psychostimulant administration have been well studied; however, such changes have never been examined following opioid delivery. Here, we provide novel measures of rapid dopamine release following intravenous infusion of two opioids, morphine and oxycodone, in drug naïve rats using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry and rapid (1 min) microdialysis coupled with mass spectrometry. In addition to measuring rapid dopamine transmission, microdialysis HPLC-MS measures changes in GABA, glutamate, monoamines, monoamine metabolites, and several other neurotransmitters. Although both opioids increased dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, their patterns of drug-evoked dopamine transmission differed dramatically. Oxycodone evoked a robust and stable increase in dopamine concentration and a robust increase in the frequency and amplitude of phasic dopamine release events. Conversely, morphine evoked a brief (~ 1 min) increase in dopamine that was coincident with a surge in GABA concentration and then both transmitters returned to baseline levels. Thus, by providing rapid measures of neurotransmission, this study reveals previously unknown differences in opioid-induced neurotransmitter signaling. Investigating these differences may be essential for understanding how these two drugs of abuse could differentially usurp motivational circuitry and powerfully influence behavior. PMID:25208732

  17. Comparison of oxycodone and morphine on the proliferation, apoptosis and expression of related molecules in the A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Mi; Jin, Li; Li, Renqi; Zhu, Sihai; Ji, Muhuo; Li, Weiyan

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare the effects of oxycodone and morphine hydrochloride on the proliferation, apoptosis and migration of A549 lung cancer cells. A549 human lung cancer cells were cultured in vitro and treated with oxycodone or morphine at various concentrations (10, 20 and 40 µg/ml). Cell migration was determined using a wound healing assay, whereas apoptosis was detected using flow cytometry. Reverse transcription quantitative-polymerase chain reaction was performed in order to assess the apoptosis-related gene expression levels, including p53, B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax). The levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The expression levels of intercellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 were determined by immunofluorescence. In the present study, oxycodone and morphine induced apoptosis in A549 lung cancer cells with similar potency; however, >20 µg/ml oxycodone was more effective at inhibiting cell proliferation (P<0.05) and migration (P<0.05), as compared with morphine at the same concentration. Oxycodone induced a dose-dependent increase in the expression levels of p53 and Bax apoptosis-related genes, whereas it decreased the gene expression levels of Bcl-2. Furthermore, oxycodone decreased, whereas morphine increased, the expression levels of ICAM-1 in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, at 40 µg/ml, the expression levels of VEGF and uPA in the morphine group were significantly higher than those demonstrated in the oxycodone group (P<0.05). In conclusion, oxycodone was more effective in inhibiting the proliferation and migration of A549 lung cancer cells, as compared with morphine. PMID:27446244

  18. Comparison of a drug versus money and drug versus drug self-administration choice procedure with oxycodone and morphine in opioid addicts

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Sandra D; Metz, Verena E; Cooper, Ziva D; Kowalczyk, William J; Jones, Jermaine D; Sullivan, Maria A; Manubay, Jeanne M; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Smith, Mary E; Peyser, Deena; Saccone, Phillip A

    2014-01-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated effects of oral morphine (0, 45, 135 mg/70kg) and oral oxycodone (0, 15, 45 mg/70kg) in buprenorphine-maintained opioid addicts. Since a 3:1 morphine:oxycodone dose ratio had yielded equivalent subjective and physiological effects in non-dependent individuals, this ratio was used in the present study. Two self-administration laboratory procedures, i.e. a drug vs. money and a drug vs. drug procedure, were assessed. Study participants (N=12) lived in the hospital and were maintained on 4 mg/day sublingual buprenorphine. When participants chose between drug and money, money was preferred over all drug doses; only high-dose oxycodone was self-administered more than placebo. When participants chose between drug and drug, both drugs were chosen more than placebo, high doses of each drug were chosen over low doses, and high-dose oxycodone was preferred over high-dose morphine. The subjective, performance-impairing, and miotic effects of high-dose oxycodone were generally greater compared to high-dose morphine. The study demonstrated that a 3:1 dose ratio of morphine:oxycodone was not equipotent in buprenorphine-dependent subjects. Both self-administration procedures were effective for assessing the relative reinforcing effects of drugs; preference for one procedure should be driven by the specific research question of interest. PMID:23839029

  19. Comparison of a drug versus money and drug versus drug self-administration choice procedure with oxycodone and morphine in opioid addicts.

    PubMed

    Comer, Sandra D; Metz, Verena E; Cooper, Ziva D; Kowalczyk, William J; Jones, Jermaine D; Sullivan, Maria A; Manubay, Jeanne M; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Smith, Mary E; Peyser, Deena; Saccone, Phillip A

    2013-09-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated the effects of oral morphine (0, 45, 135 mg/70 kg) and oral oxycodone (0, 15, 45 mg/70 kg) on buprenorphine-maintained opioid addicts. As a 3: 1 morphine : oxycodone oral dose ratio yielded equivalent subjective and physiological effects in nondependent individuals, this ratio was used in the present study. Two self-administration laboratory procedures - that is, a drug versus money and a drug versus drug procedure - were assessed. Study participants (N=12) lived in the hospital and were maintained on 4 mg/day sublingual buprenorphine. When participants chose between drug and money, money was preferred over all drug doses; only high-dose oxycodone was self-administered more than placebo. When participants chose between drug and drug, both drugs were chosen more than placebo, high doses of each drug were chosen over low doses, and high-dose oxycodone was preferred over high-dose morphine. The subjective, performance-impairing, and miotic effects of high-dose oxycodone were generally greater than those of high-dose morphine. The study demonstrated that a 3: 1 oral dose ratio of morphine : oxycodone was not equipotent in buprenorphine-dependent individuals. Both self-administration procedures were effective for assessing the relative reinforcing effects of drugs; preference for one procedure should be driven by the specific research question of interest. PMID:23839029

  20. G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR3) channels play a primary role in the antinociceptive effect of oxycodone, but not morphine, at supraspinal sites

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Atsushi; Fujita, Masahide; Ono, Hiroko; Hongo, Yoshie; Kanbara, Tomoe; Ogawa, Koichi; Morioka, Yasuhide; Nishiyori, Atsushi; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Mori, Tomohisa; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Sakaguchi, Gaku; Kato, Akira; Hasegawa, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Oxycodone and morphine are μ-opioid receptor agonists prescribed to control moderate-to-severe pain. Previous studies suggested that these opioids exhibit different analgesic profiles. We hypothesized that distinct mechanisms mediate the differential effects of these two opioids and investigated the role of G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR3 also known as GIRK) channels in their antinociceptive effects. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Opioid-induced antinociceptive effects were assessed in mice, using the tail-flick test, by i.c.v. and intrathecal (i.t.) administration of morphine and oxycodone, alone and following inhibition of KIR3.1 channels with tertiapin-Q (30 pmol per mouse, i.c.v. and i.t.) and KIR3.1-specific siRNA. The antinociceptive effects of oxycodone and morphine were also examined after tertiapin-Q administration in the mouse femur bone cancer and neuropathic pain models. KEY RESULTS The antinociceptive effects of oxycodone, after both i.c.v. and i.t. administrations, were markedly attenuated by KIR3.1 channel inhibition. In contrast, the antinociceptive effects of i.c.v. morphine were unaffected, whereas those induced by i.t. morphine were attenuated, by KIR3.1 channel inhibition. In the two chronic pain models, the antinociceptive effects of s.c. oxycodone, but not morphine, were inhibited by supraspinal administration of tertiapin-Q. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS These results demonstrate that KIR3.1 channels play a primary role in the antinociceptive effects of oxycodone, but not those of morphine, at supraspinal sites and suggest that supraspinal KIR3.1 channels are responsible for the unique analgesic profile of oxycodone. PMID:24117458

  1. Azole antifungal inhibition of buprenorphine, methadone and oxycodone in vitro metabolism.

    PubMed

    Moody, David E; Liu, Fenyun; Fang, Wenfang B

    2015-06-01

    Opioid-related mortality rates have escalated. Drug interactions may increase blood concentrations of the opioid. We therefore used human liver microsomes (HLMs) and cDNA-expressed human cytochrome P450s (rCYPs) to study in vitro inhibition of buprenorphine metabolism to norbuprenorphine (CYP3A4 and 2C8), oxycodone metabolism to noroxycodone (CYP3A4 and 2C18) and oxymorphone (CYP2D6), and methadone metabolism to R- and S-2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP; CYP3A4 and 2B6). In this study, we have examined the inhibitory effect of 12 (mostly antifungal) azoles. These compounds have a wide range of solubility; to keep organic solvent ≤1%, there was an equally wide range of highest concentration tested (e.g., itraconazole 5 µM to fluconazole 1000 µM). Inhibitors were first incubated with HLMs at three concentrations with or without preincubation of inhibitor with reducing equivalents to also screen for time-dependent inhibition (TDI). Posaconazole displayed evidence of TDI; metronidazole and albendazole had no significant effect. Azoles were next screened at the highest achievable concentration for non-CYP3A4 pathways. IC50 values (µM) were determined for most CYP3A4 pathways (ranges) and other pathways as dictated by screen results: clotrimazole (0.30 - 0.35; others >30 µM); econazole (2.2 - 4.9; 2B6 R-EDDP - 9.5, S-EDDP - 6.8; 2C8 - 6.0; 2C18 - 1.0; 2D6 - 1.2); fluconazole (7.7 - 66; 2B6 - 313, 361; 2C8 - 1240; 2C18 - 17; 2D6 - 1000); itraconazole (2.5 to >5; others >5); ketoconazole (0.032 - 0.094; 2B6 - 12, 31; 2C8 - 78; 2C18 - 0.98; 2D6 - 182); miconazole (2.3 - 7.6; 2B6 - 2.8, 2.8; 2C8 - 5.3; 2C18 - 3.1; 2D6 - 5.9); posaconazole (3.4 - 20; 2C18 - 3.8; others >30); terconazole (0.48 to >10; 2C18 - 8.1; others >10) and voriconazole (0.40 - 15; 2B6 - 2.4, 2.5; 2C8 - 170; 2C18 - 13; 2D6 >300). Modeling based on estimated Ki values and plasma concentrations from the literature suggest that the orally administered azoles, particularly

  2. Effects of Venlafaxine & Methadone Alone and in Combination with Spontaneous Morphine withdrawal Syndrome & Pain Sensation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fadaei-Kenarsary, Meisam; Farbood, Yaghoob; Taghi Mansouri, Seyed Mohammad; Fathi Moghaddam, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Methadone has been used as a drug to detoxify opioid tolerance. Naloxane precipitated morphine withdrawal behaviours were attenuated by venlafaxine as an antidepressant. On the contrary, after detoxifying the opioids, spontaneous withdrawal syndrome may occur with pain sensitivity. Therefore the present study aimed to examine the effects of chronic methadone (70 mg/kg, in drinking water, 7 days), venlafaxine (80 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally, 7 days) and their combinations with the spontaneous morphine withdrawal syndrome and pain sensitivity. Methods: Twenty eight young male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: control, venlafaxine treated, methadone treated and venlafaxine + methadone treated. Morphine sulfate (10 mg/kg/day, subcutaneously, 4 days) was injected to all animals. Then primary withdrawal behaviours and tail flick test were performed. The test was then followed by methadone or its vehicle administration. Second intervention was venlafaxine or its vehicle injection. Then final withdrawal behaviours and tail flick test were performed. Results: Combination of chronic methadone substitution and venlafaxine administration, significantly reduced freezing behaviour of spontaneous morphine withdrawal syndrome (P<0.01, 379±144%). Chronic methadone administration (P<0.05, 35±8% difference with venlafaxine treated group) induced hyperalgesia. A positive correlation (P=0.001, +63%) was observed between the animals final freezing scores and their response latencies to the painful stimulus. Discussion: Combination of chronic methadone and venlafaxine administrations reduces freezing withdrawal behaviour. Further investigations on analgesic interventions are needed to overcome this hyperalgesia.

  3. Popliteal Vein Blood Sampling and the Postmortem Redistribution of Diazepam, Methadone, and Morphine.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Eric; Schmidt, Carl; Denooz, Raphael; Charlier, Corinne; Boxho, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Postmortem redistribution (PMR) refers to the site- and time-related blood drug concentration variations after death. We compared central blood (cardiac and subclavian) with peripheral blood (femoral and popliteal) concentrations of diazepam, methadone, and morphine. To our knowledge, popliteal blood has never been compared with other sites. Intracardiac blood (ICB), subclavian blood (SB), femoral blood (FB), and popliteal blood (PB) were sampled in 30 cases. To assess PMR, mean concentrations and ratios were compared. Influence of postmortem interval on mean ratios was also assessed. Results show that popliteal mean concentrations were lower than those for other sites for all three drugs, even lower than femoral blood; mean ratios suggested that the popliteal site was less subject to PMR, and estimated postmortem interval did not influence ratios except for diazepam and methadone FB/PB. In conclusion, our study is the first to explore the popliteal site and suggests that popliteal blood is less prone to postmortem redistribution. PMID:27364283

  4. Differential activation of the μ-opioid receptor by oxycodone and morphine in pain-related brain regions in a bone cancer pain model

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Minoru; Minami, Kazuhisa; Kanbara, Tomoe; Tomii, Takako; Nishiyori, Atsushi; Narita, Minoru; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Kato, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Bone cancer pain is chronic and often difficult to control with opioids. However, recent studies have shown that several opioids have distinct analgesic profiles in chronic pain. Experimental Approach To clarify the mechanisms underlying these distinct analgesic profiles, functional changes in the μ-opioid receptor were examined using a mouse femur bone cancer (FBC) model. Key Results In the FBC model, the Bmax of [3H]-DAMGO binding was reduced by 15–45% in the periaqueductal grey matter (PAG), region ventral to the PAG (vPAG), mediodorsal thalamus (mTH), ventral thalamus and spinal cord. Oxycodone (10−8–10−5 M) and morphine (10−8–10−5 M) activated [35S]-GTPγS binding, but the activation was significantly attenuated in the PAG, vPAG, mTH and spinal cord in the FBC model. Interestingly, the attenuation of oxycodone-induced [35S]-GTPγS binding was quite limited (9–26%) in comparison with that of morphine (46–65%) in the PAG, vPAG and mTH, but not in the spinal cord. Furthermore, i.c.v. oxycodone at doses of 0.02–1.0 μg per mouse clearly inhibited pain-related behaviours, such as guarding, limb-use abnormalities and allodynia-like behaviour in the FBC model mice, while i.c.v. morphine (0.05–2.0 μg per mouse) had only partial or little analgesic effect on limb-use abnormalities and allodynia-like behaviour. Conclusion and Implications These results show that μ-opioid receptor functions are attenuated in several pain-related regions in bone cancer in an agonist-dependent manner, and suggest that modification of the μ-opioid receptor is responsible for the distinct analgesic effect of oxycodone and morphine. PMID:22889192

  5. [Electrodermal activity in heroin addicts and patients with methadone and morphine substitution].

    PubMed

    Linzmayer, Leopold; Boeck, Gerda; Fischer, Gabriele

    2003-01-01

    In the present investigation we tried to answer the question whether differences between heroin-dependent patients (n = 26, age: M = 24.96, SD = 6.30 years), a methadone substitution group (n = 20, age: M = 30.92, SD = 8.21 years) and a morphine substitution group (n = 20, age: M = 33.25, SD = 4.59 years) and healthy normals (n = 31, age: M = 25.07, SD = 4.62 years) could be found by means of measurement of electrodermal activity (SC, SCR, habituation of the SCR). Concerning "basal" skin conductance reflecting sympathetic activity, no significant differences were obtained. The methadone substitution group showed slight shortened onset latencies (information processing). In the morphine substitution group as compared to the other groups a small increase of the amplitude was observed indicating a slight increase in cognitive emotional intensity of appraisal after presentation of an acoustic stimulus. This small changes could be mediated by adaptation processes of the vegetative nervous system to the opioid, which occur "below" of those neuronal networks connected directly with the emotional stimuli processing. Concerning the speed of habituation no significant differences between the groups could be obtained. This indicates that no psychovegetative attenuation could be observed. The morphine substitution group as compared to the other groups was characterized by a longer persistence and a small increase of the intensity of excitement. However these variables ranged within normal limits and did not reach the level of statistical significance. This could be mediated by the effects of the opioid on the vegetative nervous system. PMID:12658967

  6. Methadone

    MedlinePlus

    Methadone is used to relieve severe pain in people who are expected to need pain medication around ... stop taking or continue not taking the drugs. Methadone is in a class of medications called opiate ( ...

  7. Methadone, Morphine, or Oxycodone in Treating Pain in Patients With Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-11-09

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Pain; Precancerous Condition; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  8. The simultaneous determination of codeine, morphine, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, 6-acetylmorphine, and oxycodone in hair and oral fluid.

    PubMed

    Jones, Joseph; Tomlinson, Kimberly; Moore, Christine

    2002-04-01

    Recently, the abuse of prescription opiates as alternatives to heroin has become a national concern. The determination of a six-drug opiate panel, codeine, morphine, 6-acetylmorphine, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, and oxycodone, in hair and oral fluid using solid-phase extraction and capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is described. Oral fluid was obtained from the donor by insertion of absorptive collectors into the mouth. Hair was collected from the patient and powdered using stainless steel ball bearings in a mini bead-beater apparatus. Opiates present in the samples were extracted from a buffered, aqueous matrix using a solid-phase cartridge. The extracts were concentrated and the methoxime/BSTFA derivatives prepared in order to eliminate interference from the keto-opiates. The extracts were separated by GC-MS in electron impact mode. By utilizing methoxyamine, we were able to produce the methoxime derivatives required for single derivative production and chromatographically separate all six opiates. The routine analysis of these opiates in hair and oral fluid using GC-MS is described for the first time. PMID:11991534

  9. Perioperative dilemma: challenges of the management of a patient on mega doses of morphine and methadone.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Alan David; Alian, Aymen A; Vadivelu, Nalini; Chung, Keun Sam

    2014-01-01

    High doses of opioids are often needed in the management of cancer-related pain. A discussion of a patient's perioperative opioid management and mechanisms contributing to opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) are presented. In the present case report, a patient on high doses of opioids, including morphine and methadone, with severe worsening back pain and a history of increasing opioid requirements for the last 2 months due to metastatic leiomyosarcoma to the femur, spine, and neck is described. Use of high dose opioids is associated with numerous challenges, including tolerance. The successful management of this patient was multimodal and included the use of potent analgesics, N-methyl-D-aspartatereceptor antagonists, and the α-2 agonist clonidine. PMID:24604572

  10. Methadone but not morphine inhibits lubiprostone-stimulated Cl- currents in T84 intestinal cells and recombinant human ClC-2, but not CFTR Cl- currents.

    PubMed

    Cuppoletti, John; Chakrabarti, Jayati; Tewari, Kirti; Malinowska, Danuta H

    2013-05-01

    In clinical trials, methadone, but not morphine, appeared to prevent beneficial effects of lubiprostone, a ClC-2 Cl(-) channel activator, on opioid-induced constipation. Effects of methadone and morphine on lubiprostone-stimulated Cl(-) currents were measured by short circuit current (Isc) across T84 cells. Whole cell patch clamp of human ClC-2 (hClC-2) stably expressed in HEK293 cells and in a high expression cell line (HEK293EBNA) as well as human CFTR (hCFTR) stably expressed in HEK293 cells was used to study methadone and morphine effects on recombinant hClC-2 and hCFTR Cl(-) currents. Methadone but not morphine inhibited lubiprostone-stimulated Isc in T84 cells with half-maximal inhibition at 100 nM. Naloxone did not affect lubiprostone stimulation or methadone inhibition of Isc. Lubiprostone-stimulated Cl(-) currents in hClC-2/HEK293 cells, but not forskolin/IBMX-stimulated Cl(-) currents in hCFTR/HEK293 cells, were inhibited by methadone, but not morphine. HEK293EBNA cells expressing hClC-2 showed time-dependent, voltage-activated, CdCl2-inhibited Cl(-) currents in the absence (control) and the presence of lubiprostone. Methadone, but not morphine, inhibited control and lubiprostone-stimulated hClC-2 Cl(-) currents with half-maximal inhibition at 100 and 200-230 nM, respectively. Forskolin/IBMX-stimulated hClC-2 Cl(-) currents were also inhibited by methadone. Myristoylated protein kinase inhibitor (a specific PKA inhibitor) inhibited forskolin/IBMX- but not lubiprostone-stimulated hClC-2 Cl(-) currents. Methadone caused greater inhibition of lubiprostone-stimulated currents added before patching (66.1 %) compared with after patching (28.7 %). Methadone caused inhibition of lubiprostone-stimulated Cl(-) currents in T84 cells and control; lubiprostone- and forskolin/IBMX-stimulated recombinant hClC-2 Cl(-) currents may be the basis for reduced efficacy of lubiprostone in methadone-treated patients. PMID:22918821

  11. [Pupillary diameter and pupillary reactions in heroin dependent patients and in patients participating in a methadone and morphine replacement program].

    PubMed

    Linzmayer, L; Fischer, G; Grünberger, J

    1997-01-01

    The computer-assisted static and dynamic light evoked pupillometry (TV-pupillometer 1050, Whittaker Corp.) had been proved to be a sensitive procedure for assessment of the effect of psychoactive drugs. Therefore, this method was used in 26 heroin dependent patients (mean age 24.42 years), 20 methadone substituted patients (mean age 29.75), and 20 morphine-substituted patients (mean age 30.65 years) to answer the question whether there were no differences within the patient groups but significant differences between the patients and healthy normals. Indeed, pupillary diameter (vegetative activation) as well as relative change (pupillary reagibility) showed no significant differences between the heroin dependents, the methadone substitution group and the morphine substitution group. However concerning pupillary diameter and relative change the patient groups differed significantly from the healthy controls. Onset latency revealed no differences within the patient groups and between patient groups and healthy controls respectively. Thus the variable pupillary diameter and relative change could be used to assess the additional application of opiates in patients participating in a substitution program. PMID:9173676

  12. Physical compatibility of binary and ternary mixtures of morphine and methadone with other drugs for parenteral administration in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Destro, Massimo; Ottolini, Luca; Vicentini, Lorenza; Boschetti, Silvia

    2012-10-01

    The parenteral administration of combinations of drugs is often necessary in palliative medicine, particularly in the terminal stage of life, when patients are no longer able to take medication orally. The use of infusers to administer continuous subcutaneous infusions is a well-established practice in the palliative care setting and enables several drugs to be given simultaneously, avoiding the need for repeated administrations and the effects of peaks and troughs in the doses of medication. The method is also appreciated by patients and caregivers in the home care setting because the devices and infusion sites are easy to manage. Despite their frequent use, however, the mixtures of drugs adopted in clinical practice are sometimes not supported by reliable data concerning their chemical and physical compatibility. The present study investigates the chemical compatibility of binary mixtures (morphine with ketorolac) and the physical compatibility of binary (morphine or methadone with ketorolac) or ternary mixtures (morphine with ketorolac and/or haloperidol, and/or dexamethasone, and/or metoclopramide, and/or hyoscine butylbromide) with a view to reducing the aleatory nature of the empirical use of such combinations, thereby increasing their safety and clinical appropriateness. PMID:22252547

  13. Oxycodone controlled release in cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Biancofiore, Giuseppe

    2006-09-01

    Oral opioids are the treatment of choice for chronic cancer pain. Morphine is the strong opioid of choice for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer pain according to guidelines from the World Health Organization (WHO). This recommendation by the WHO was derived from availability, familiarity to clinicians, established effectiveness, simplicity of administration, and relative inexpensive cost. It was not based on proven therapeutic superiority over other options. Patients who experience inadequate pain relief or intolerable side effects with one opioid may often be successfully treated with another agent or with the same agent administered by a different route. Opioid rotation, or switching to an alternative opioid, helps some patients achieve better pain control with fewer associated adverse effects. Oxycodone is a mu-opioid receptor specific ligand, with clear agonist properties. It is an active potent opioid, which is in part a kappa-receptor agonist. Like morphine and other pure agonists, there is no known ceiling to the analgesic effects of oxycodone. The active metabolites of oxycodone (eg, oxymorphone) could be important in oxycodone-mediated analgesia. The main pharmacokinetic difference between oxycodone and morphine is in oral bioavailability. The bioavailability of oxycodone is >60% and the bioavailability of morphine is 20%. Controlled-release oxycodone is absorbed in a bi-exponential fashion. There is a rapid phase with a mean half-life of 37 min, accounting for 38% of the dose, and a slow phase with a half-life of 6.2 h, which accounts for the residual 62%. Oxycodone elimination is impaired by renal failure because there are both an increased volume of distribution and reduced clearance. A lot of studies prove that the efficacy of controlled-release oxycodone in cancer-pain control is at least the same as morphine, immediate-release oxycodone and hydromorphone. Its toxicity profile seems better than that of morphine. There are actually several

  14. The effect of chronic morphine or methadone exposure and withdrawal on clock gene expression in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus and AA-NAT activity in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Pačesová, D; Novotný, J; Bendová, Z

    2016-07-18

    The circadian rhythms of many behavioral and physiological functions are regulated by the major circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Long-term opiate addiction and drug withdrawal may affect circadian rhythmicity of various hormones or the sleep/activity pattern of many experimental subjects; however, limited research has been done on the long-term effects of sustained opiate administration on the intrinsic rhythmicity in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and pineal gland. Here we compared the effects of repeated daily treatment of rats with morphine or methadone and subsequent naloxone-precipitated withdrawal on the expression of the Per1, Per2, and Avp mRNAs in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and on arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase activity in the pineal gland. We revealed that 10-day administration and withdrawal of both these drugs failed to affect clock genes and Avp expression in the SCN. Our results indicate that opioid-induced changes in behavioral and physiological rhythms originate in brain structures downstream of the suprachiasmatic nucleus regulatory output pathway. Furthermore, we observed that acute withdrawal from methadone markedly extended the period of high night AA-NAT activity in the pineal gland. This suggests that withdrawal from methadone, a widely used drug for the treatment of opioid dependence, may have stronger impact on melatonin synthesis than withdrawal from morphine. PMID:27070740

  15. Role of oxycodone and oxycodone/naloxone in cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Leppert, Wojciech

    2010-01-01

    Oxycodone is a valued opioid analgesic, which may be administered either as the first strong opioid or when other strong opioids are ineffective. In case of insufficient analgesia and/or intense adverse effects such as sedation, hallucinations and nausea/vomiting a switch from another opioid to oxycodone might be beneficial. Oxycodone is administered to opioid-naive patients with severe pain and to patients who were unsuccessfully treated with weak opioids, namely tramadol, codeine and dihydrocodeine. Oxycodone effective analgesia may be attributed to its affinity to μ and possibly κ opioid receptors, rapid penetration through the blood-brain barrier and higher concentrations in brain than in plasma. Oxycodone displays high bioavailability after oral administration and may be better than morphine in patients with renal impairment due to the decreased production of active metabolites. Recently an oral controlled-release oxycodone formulation was introduced in Poland. Another new product that was launched recently is a combination of prolonged-release oxycodone with prolonged-release naloxone (oxycodone/naloxone tablets). The aim of this review is to outline the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, drug interactions, dosing rules, adverse effects, equianalgesic dose ratio with other opioids and clinical studies of oxycodone in patients with cancer pain. The potential role of oxycodone/naloxone in chronic pain management and its impact on the bowel function is also discussed. PMID:20884999

  16. Intravenous Methadone for Severe Cancer Pain: A Presentation of 10 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lossignol, D.; Libert, I.; Michel, B.; Rousseau, C.; Obiols-Portis, M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Methadone, a synthetic opioid agonist, is an effective alternative to strong opioids (morphine, hydromorphone, oxycodone, and buprenorphine) and is widely available as an oral formulation. Few data have been published so far on the use of intravenous (i.v.) methadone for the management of severe or refractory cancer pain. Methods. We followed 10 consecutives cancer patients with severe pain, treated with IV methadone. All had advanced disease and had already received strong opioids, some in association with ketamine. Pain was assessed at T0, T24 hours, and at the end of the treatment. Results. All patients benefited from the switch to IV methadone with a reduction of pain on VAS after 24 hours (median: 4/10; range 0–5) until the end of the treatment (all cases <3/10). The median starting dose was 100 mg/day (range 20–400) and the final dose remained stable with a median of 100 mg/day (range 27–700). The median duration of IV methadone was 11 days (range 2–59). No cardiac toxicity had been observed. Conclusions. IV methadone is an effective pain relieving alternative for the treatment of severe cancer pain, especially in refractory pain syndrome. Moreover, we did not observe any toxicity (neurological or cardiac) or any other major side effects and the treatment was overall well tolerated. More extensive comparative studies should be planned. PMID:27335869

  17. Comparative cardiac contractile actions of six narcotic analgesics: morphine, meperidine, pentazocine, fentanyl, methadone and l-alpha-acetylmethadol (LAAM).

    PubMed

    Rendig, S V; Amsterdam, E A; Henderson, G L; Mason, D T

    1980-10-01

    Cardiac muscle contractile responses to six narcotic analgesics (morphine, meperidine, pentazocine, fentanyl, methadone and l-alpha-acetylmethadol), at concentrations from 10(-8) to 10(-4) M, both in the presence and absence of the narcotic antagonist, naloxone, were studied in the isolated, isometric cat right ventricular papillary muscle preparation. Measurements of maximum developed tension (T), maximum rate of tension development (dT/dt) and time to peak tension indicated that no major changes in contractile function occurred with any narcotic at concentrations of 10(-8) to 10(-6) M except for small but significant (P < .05) increases in all three parameters at 10(-6) M fentanyl, and small but significant increases in dT/dt at 10(-8) to 10(-6) M meperidine. At 10(-5) M narcotic, dT/dt was significantly elevated in meperidine-treated muscles (+7%), but significantly reduced in muscles exposed to pentazocine (-8%) or l-alpha-acetylmethadol (-11%). For all six narcotics, the 10(-4) M drug concentration resulted in depression of contractile function that was often associated with nonresponsiveness to electrical stimulation. Pretreatment of muscles with naloxone (10(-4) M) did not prevent this reduction of contractile performance except at the highest concentration (10(-4) M) of meperidine. Following removal of drug, contractile performance improved to varying degrees (recovery to 72-97% of control T), except in l-alpha-acetylmethadol-treated muscles, in which there was no recovery of T. Isoproterenol (0.8 X 10(-7) M) elicited a positive inotropic response whether administered in the presence of 10(-4) M narcotic or following narcotic removal. We conclude that narcotic analgesics in high concentrations exert a direct myocardial depressant effect which is not prevented by naloxone and therefore is not mediated by interaction with opiate receptors. Rather, several effects, including myocardial depression, its reversibility by both drug removal and isoproterenol and

  18. Inhibition by morphine and morphine-like drugs of nicotine-induced emesis in cats.

    PubMed

    Beleslin, D B; Krstić, S K; Stefanović-Denić, K; Strbac, M; Mićić, D

    1981-05-01

    The effect of morphine, methadone and pethidine injected into the cerebral ventricle of the unanesthetized cat upon emesis produced by nicotine induced similarly was investigated. Morphine and morphine-like drugs depress or abolish the emetic effect of nicotine. The inhibitory effect of morphine, methadone and pethidine is observed after a transient emetic action of these drugs. The emetic and anti-emetic action of morphine, methadone and pethidine can perhaps be ascribed to an agonist/antagonist activity. Further, the possible site of inhibitory action of morphine and morphine-like drugs on the emesis produced by nicotine may be the area postrema of fourth ventricle. PMID:7248811

  19. Enhanced GABAergic synaptic transmission at VLPAG neurons and potent modulation by oxycodone in a bone cancer pain model

    PubMed Central

    Takasu, Keiko; Ogawa, Koichi; Nakamura, Atsushi; Kanbara, Tomoe; Ono, Hiroko; Tomii, Takako; Morioka, Yasuhide; Hasegawa, Minoru; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Mori, Tomohisa; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Sakaguchi, Gaku

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We demonstrated previously that oxycodone has potent antinociceptive effects at supraspinal sites. In this study, we investigated changes in neuronal function and antinociceptive mechanisms of oxycodone at ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (VLPAG) neurons, which are a major site of opioid action, in a femur bone cancer (FBC) model with bone cancer-related pain. Experimental Approach We characterized the supraspinal antinociceptive profiles of oxycodone and morphine on mechanical hypersensitivity in the FBC model. Based on the disinhibition mechanism underlying supraspinal opioid antinociception, the effects of oxycodone and morphine on GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in VLPAG neurons were evaluated in slices from the FBC model. Key Results The supraspinal antinociceptive effects of oxycodone, but not morphine, were abolished by blocking G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium1 (Kir3.1) channels. In slices from the FBC model, GABAergic synaptic transmission at VLPAG neurons was enhanced, as indicated by a leftward shift of the input–output relationship curve of evoked IPSCs, the increased paired-pulse facilitation and the enhancement of miniature IPSC frequency. Following treatment with oxycodone and morphine, IPSCs were reduced in the FBC model, and the inhibition of presynaptic GABA release by oxycodone, but not morphine was enhanced and dependent on Kir3.1 channels. Conclusion and Implications Our results demonstrate that Kir3.1 channels are important for supraspinal antinociception and presynaptic GABA release inhibition by oxycodone in the FBC model. Enhanced GABAergic synaptic transmission at VLPAG neurons in the FBC model is an important site of supraspinal antinociception by oxycodone via Kir3.1 channel activation. PMID:25521524

  20. Postoperative oxycodone toxicity in a patient with chronic pain and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Tran, Bryant W; Kohan, Lynn R; Vorenkamp, Kevin E

    2015-02-15

    We present this case to review the metabolism of oxycodone and the effects of end-stage renal disease on the elimination of oxycodone and its metabolites. A 42-year-old female with end-stage renal disease who was dependent on hemodialysis presented for left hamstring posterior capsule release. She had been receiving methadone for 2 years for chronic leg pain. On postoperative day 1, the patient's medication was changed from IV hydromorphone to oral oxycodone to treat breakthrough pain. By the next day, the patient was unarousable with notable respiratory depression. She did not fully recover after urgent hemodialysis but did have full recovery after receiving an IV naloxone infusion for 22 hours. Further study of the safety of oxycodone in hemodialysis patients is warranted. PMID:25689360

  1. Effect of morphine and morphine-like drugs on carbachol-induced fighting in cats.

    PubMed

    Krstić, S K; Stefanović-Denić, K; Beleslin, D B

    1982-08-01

    In the present experiments, morphine, methadone or pethidine was injected into the cerebral ventricle of the unanesthetized cat after fighting was induced with carbachol injected previously. The fighting evoked by carbachol was sensitive to the depressant action of morphine or pethidine but not to the depressant effect of methadone. The most likely explanation of the depressant effects of the former compounds is that they act on the postsynaptic receptors of central cholinergic neurons. PMID:6890210

  2. Synthetic substances with morphine-like effect

    PubMed Central

    Braenden, Olav J.; Eddy, Nathan B.; Halbach, H.

    1955-01-01

    For morphine-, morphinan-, pethidine-, methadone-, and dithienyl-butenylamine groups of analgesic compounds a systematic survey is given of how analgesic activity is quantitatively affected by alteration of the chemical constitution. Features common to the structural formulae of substances with morphine-like analgesic effect are pointed out. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 1(Contd.) PMID:13284565

  3. Methadone overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... strong painkiller. It is also used to treat heroin addiction. Methadone overdose occurs when someone accidentally or ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heroin Pain Relievers Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  4. Optimum Methadone Compliance Testing

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this analysis was to determine the diagnostic utility of oral fluid testing collected with the Intercept oral fluid collection device. Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Opioids (opiates or narcotics) are a class of drugs derived from the opium poppy plant that typically relieve pain and produce a euphoric feeling. Methadone is a long-acting synthetic opioid used to treat opioid dependence and chronic pain. It prevents symptoms of opioid withdrawal, reduces opioid cravings and blocks the euphoric effects of short-acting opioids such as heroin and morphine. Opioid dependence is associated with harms including an increased risk of exposure to Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C as well as other health, social and psychological crises. The goal of methadone treatment is harm reduction. Treatment with methadone for opioid dependence is often a long-term therapy. The Ontario College of Physicians and Surgeons estimates that there are currently 250 physicians qualified to prescribe methadone, and 15,500 people in methadone maintenance programs across Ontario. Drug testing is a clinical tool whose purpose is to provide objective meaningful information, which will reinforce positive behavioral changes in patients and guide further treatment needs. Such information includes knowledge of whether the patient is taking their methadone as prescribed and reducing or abstaining from using opioid and other drugs of abuse use. The results of drug testing can be used with behavior modification techniques (contingency management techniques) where positive reinforcements such as increased methadone take-home privileges, sustained employment or parole are granted for drug screens negative for opioid use, and negative reinforcement including loss of these privileges for drug screens positive for opioid used. Body fluids including blood, oral fluid, often referred to as saliva, and urine may contain metabolites and the

  5. Pain therapy with oxycodone/naloxone prolonged-release combination: case report.

    PubMed

    Błaszczyk, Feliks; Droń, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Pain afflicts patients suffering from many chronic diseases and is present in 80% of cases of patients with advanced cancer who suffer from persistent pain. The aim of the pain treatment is to achieve the maximum analgesic effect while minimizing side effects. The main analgesic agent - morphine is unfortunately a therapy associated with gastrointestinal side effects. It appears that the combination of oxycodone and naloxone available as Targin(®) (Mundipharma) is an alternative. The paper presents a case of a 45-year-old patient who was treated effectively with oxycodone/naloxone prolonged-release tablets. This treatment has proven to be effective in providing pain and constipation control. PMID:24592131

  6. Opioid Use and Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... study include codeine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, morphine, propoxyphene, meperidine, methadone, tramadol, hydromorphone, butorphanol, heroin, fentanyl, buprenorphine, nalbuphine, and diphenoxylate. Making Treatment Decisions When making treatment decisions just before or ...

  7. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of methadone enantiomers in hospice patients with cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Auret, Kirsten; Roger Goucke, C; Ilett, Kenneth F; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Boyd, Fiona; Oh, Teik E

    2006-06-01

    Racemic methadone is increasingly used to manage cancer pain. The authors studied 13 terminally ill patients with cancer pain, who underwent switching (rotation) from morphine to methadone. The relationship between initial morphine dose and final methadone dose, the pharmacokinetics of R- and S- methadone, and the degree of pain control and side effects were investigated. Preswitching serum morphine concentrations and second daily plasma concentrations of methadone were measured. The brief pain inventory (BPI) was used to assess pain every second day. "Worst pain" as measured by the BPI improved by >/=20% in 6 of the 13 patients. The mean morphine to methadone conversion ratio was 5.2 with wide interpatient variability (range 1.3 to 11). Average steady-state concentrations were 197 (98 to 379) mug/L and 272 (55 to 378) mug/L for R- and S-methadone, respectively. Mean population pharmacokinetic parameters for a 1-compartment model were 455 L and 338 L for apparent volume of distribution and 53.3 hours and 31.5 hours for half-life for R- and S- methadone, respectively. Bayesian estimates of apparent oral clearance for individual patients were 0.082 (0.052 to 0.112) L/kg/h and 0.117 (0.061 to 0.173) L/kg/h for R- and S- methadone, respectively (mean and 95% confidence interval). The low and variable clearance values generally resulted in slow achievement of steady-state concentrations over several days; inappropriately high plasma methadone levels occurred in 1 patient. Whereas optimal pain control was achieved in 46% of patients, there was no relationship with plasma concentrations of methadone. Best practice for methadone use in this patient group should include monitoring of both pain and methadone concentration. PMID:16778720

  8. Morphine Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Rectal morphine is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Morphine is in a class of medications called opiate ( ... Rectal morphine comes as a suppository to insert in the rectum. It is usually inserted every 4 hours. Use ...

  9. Topical methadone and meperidine analgesic synergy in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kolesnikov, Yuri A.; Oksman, Galina; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2010-01-01

    Topical analgesics have many potential advantages over systemic administration. Prior work has shown potent analgesic activity of a number of topical opioids in the radiant heat tailflick assay. The current study confirms the analgesic activity of morphine and extends it to two other mu opioids, methadone and meperidine. Combinations of topical morphine and lidocaine are synergistic. Similarly, the combination of methadone and lidocaine is synergistic. While there appeared to be some potentiation with the combination of meperidine and lidocaine, it did not achieve significance. Systemically, prior studies have shown that co-administration of morphine and methadone was synergistic. The combination of morphine and methadone was also synergistic when given topically. In contrast, the combination of morphine and meperidine was not synergistic systemically and it was not synergistic topically. Thus, the pharmacology of topical opioids mimics that seen with systemic administration. Their activity in the topical model supports their potential utility while the local limitation of their actions offers the possibility of a reduced side-effect profile. PMID:20433826

  10. [Opium (heroin * morphine)].

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Masayuki

    2010-08-01

    The number of people dependent on opiate drugs, including heroin, is still high, and these abused drugs are major social issues, both in the social science and medically. The mechanisms of physical dependence and withdrawal symptoms in laboratory animals are becoming clear; however, no useful method to detoxify abusers with opioid dependence in clinical situation has been established, and alternative therapy with methadone, used in Europe and America, cannot be used in Japan. Here, I will outline the global trend of opium abuse, including heroin and morphine, and summarize the problems of heroin abuse. PMID:20715484

  11. Neonatal abstinence syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... takes drugs such as heroin, codeine, oxycodone (Oxycontin), methadone or buprenorphine. These and other substances pass through ... babies with severe symptoms need medicines such as methadone and morphine to treat withdrawal symptoms. These babies ...

  12. Oxycodone accumulation in a hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Foral, Pamela A; Ineck, Joseph R; Nystrom, Kelly K

    2007-02-01

    Oxycodone and oxycodone-containing analgesics are often used for the relief of pain. In the presence of renal dysfunction, the half-life of oxycodone and metabolites can be prolonged. We describe the case of a 41-year-old chronic hemodialysis patient who received multiple doses of oxycodone/acetaminophen resulting in accumulation of the medication and consequent lethargy, hypotension and respiratory depression. These adverse effects were reversed with multiple bolus doses of naloxone, followed by a continuous infusion administered for 45 hours. Utilizing the Naranjo probability scale, the patient had a "probable" adverse drug reaction to the oxycodone. Oxycodone should be used with caution in patients with chronic renal failure. PMID:17330696

  13. Narcotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... heroin and pharmaceutical drugs like OxyContin ® , Vicodin ® , codeine, morphine, methadone, and fentanyl. Street names Big H, Black ... synthesized from naturally occurring opium products, such as morphine and codeine, and include heroin, oxycodone, hydrocodone, and ...

  14. Characterization of methadone as a β-arrestin-biased μ-opioid receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Seira; Mori, Tomohisa; Uzawa, Naoki; Arima, Takamichi; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Uchida, Masashi; Yawata, Ayaka; Narita, Michiko; Uezono, Yasuhito; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Background Methadone is a unique µ-opioid receptor agonist. Although several researchers have insisted that the pharmacological effects of methadone are mediated through the blockade of NMDA receptor, the underlying mechanism by which methadone exerts its distinct pharmacological effects compared to those of other µ-opioid receptor agonists is still controversial. In the present study, we further investigated the pharmacological profile of methadone compared to those of fentanyl and morphine as measured mainly by the discriminative stimulus effect and in vitro assays for NMDA receptor binding, µ-opioid receptor-internalization, and µ-opioid receptor-mediated β-arrestin recruitment. Results We found that fentanyl substituted for the discriminative stimulus effects of methadone, whereas a relatively high dose of morphine was required to substitute for the discriminative stimulus effects of methadone in rats. Under these conditions, the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 did not substitute for the discriminative stimulus effects of methadone. In association with its discriminative stimulus effect, methadone failed to displace the receptor binding of MK801 using mouse brain membrane. Methadone and fentanyl, but not morphine, induced potent µ-opioid receptor internalization accompanied by the strong recruitment of β-arrestin-2 in µ-opioid receptor-overexpressing cells. Conclusions These results suggest that methadone may, at least partly, produce its pharmacological effect as a β-arrestin-biased µ-opioid receptor agonist, similar to fentanyl, and NMDA receptor blockade is not the main contributor to the pharmacological profile of methadone. PMID:27317580

  15. Morphine Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve moderate to severe pain. Morphine extended-release tablets and capsules are only used to relieve severe ( ... use of other pain medications. Morphine extended-release tablets and capsules should not be used to treat ...

  16. Pain therapy with oxycodone/naloxone prolonged-release combination: case report

    PubMed Central

    Droń, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Pain afflicts patients suffering from many chronic diseases and is present in 80% of cases of patients with advanced cancer who suffer from persistent pain. The aim of the pain treatment is to achieve the maximum analgesic effect while minimizing side effects. The main analgesic agent – morphine is unfortunately a therapy associated with gastrointestinal side effects. It appears that the combination of oxycodone and naloxone available as Targin® (Mundipharma) is an alternative. The paper presents a case of a 45-year-old patient who was treated effectively with oxycodone/naloxone prolonged-release tablets. This treatment has proven to be effective in providing pain and constipation control. PMID:24592131

  17. Fatal methadone intoxication in an infant listed as a homicide.

    PubMed

    Bonsignore, Alessandro; Groppi, Angelo; Ventura, Francesco; De Stefano, Francesco; Palmiere, Cristian

    2016-09-01

    Voluntary methadone administration for the purpose of sedation eventually resulting in the infant's death is extremely infrequent, though it has been observed. In this report, we describe an autopsy case pertaining to a 32-month-old infant who was repeatedly exposed to methadone by his parents. Autopsy revealed a coarctation of the aorta with a focal stenosis located at the junction of the distal aortic arch and the descending aorta. Left ventricular hypertrophy was also observed. Both these findings were considered to not have played a role in the child's death. Methadone was detected in the femoral blood (0.633 mg/l), urine (5.25 mg/l), bile (2.64 mg/l), and gastric contents (1.08 mg). A segmental hair analysis showed the presence of methadone and morphine in both the proximal and distal portion of the lock. Methadone was also detected in nail samples. A segmental hair analysis performed on the younger brother of the deceased revealed the presence of methadone and morphine in both the proximal and distal segments, as well as the presence of 6-monoacetylmorphine exclusively in the distal portion. Though the parents denied any involvement in methadone administration or exposure for the purpose of sedation, the manner of death was listed as homicide. The case emphasizes the usefulness of hair analysis to identify threatening situations for the children of drug-dependent parents and possibly support measures by the authorities to recognize and intervene in these potentially fatal situations. PMID:26500092

  18. Use of Methadone for Prevention of Opioid Withdrawal in Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Sonia A; McGloin, Rumi; Pitfield, Alexander F; Carr, Roxane R

    2012-01-01

    Background Opioids are commonly administered to critically ill children for analgesia and sedation, but many patients experience opioid withdrawal upon discontinuation. The authors’ institution developed a protocol for using methadone to prevent opioid withdrawal in children who have received morphine by continuous IV infusion for 5 days or longer in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Objectives The primary objectives were to determine if opioids were tapered according to the protocol and to determine the conversion ratio for IV morphine to oral methadone that was used. Secondary objectives were to describe the methadone dosage used and the clinical outcomes, to evaluate adjustments to methadone dosing, and to report the incidence of adverse effects. Methods A retrospective analysis of charts was conducted for pediatric patients who had received morphine by continuous IV infusion for 5 days or longer followed by methadone in the PICU between May 2008 and August 2009. Validated scoring systems (the Withdrawal Assessment Tool and the State Behavioral Scale) were used to assess symptoms of withdrawal and degree of sedation, respectively. Results Forty-three patients were included in the study, with median age of 8 months (range 0.25–201 months). For 31 patients (72%), the protocol was not used, and there were no patients for whom the protocol was followed to completion. The median duration of weaning was 10 days (range 0–91 days). The conversion ratio for IV morphine to oral methadone was 1:0.78 for anticipated 5-day weaning and 1:0.98 for anticipated 10-day weaning. During the first 10 days of weaning, 18 patients (42%) experienced withdrawal symptoms. The methadone dose was increased for 11 (26%) of the 43 patients. Patients were sedated for a median of 1 day (range 0–9 days), were comfortable for a median of 6.5 days (range 1–64 days), and were agitated for a median of 2.5 days (range 0–23 days). Naloxone was required for 2 patients. Conclusions

  19. Changes to the daily pattern of methadone-related deaths in England and Wales, 1993-2003.

    PubMed

    Morgan, O W; Johnson, H; Rooney, C; Seagroatt, V; Griffiths, C

    2006-12-01

    Previous studies suggest that fatal poisoning deaths involving methadone occur more frequently on the weekends. We assessed changes in the daily pattern of mortality because of methadone poisoning following a review of drug misuse services in 1996 and publication of revised clinical guidelines in 1999. We also compared this to the daily pattern of deaths involving heroin/morphine. The Office for National Statistics provided data on all deaths in England and Wales between 1993 and 2003 for which methadone and heroin/morphine were mentioned on the coroner's certificate of death registration after inquest, with or without alcohol or other drugs. There were 3098 deaths involving methadone. The death rate increased up to 1997 and then declined. Initially, there was a marked excess of deaths occurring on Saturdays. The rate of decline was greatest for deaths occurring on Saturdays. As a result, the Saturday peak disappeared (P = 0.006). There were 6328 deaths involving heroin/morphine. No change in the daily pattern of heroin/morphine deaths was observed during the study period. Although the marked change in the epidemiology of methadone deaths coincided with recommendations for service redevelopment and clinical management of methadone treatment, the contribution of improved prescribing practice or treatment services is unclear. PMID:17060353

  20. Specific serum binding of morphine, levorphanol and heroin

    PubMed Central

    Herndon, B. L.; Baeder, D. H.; Ringle, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Effects of repeated subcutaneous pellet implantation of a series of narcotic drugs on the serum binding of [14C]morphine was studied in rabbits. Three of the compounds, morphine, heroin and levorphanol, elicited production of a morphine-binding globulin in the implanted rabbits. This serum response did not occur with several other compounds tested, including the potent analgesic methadone, and the narcotic antagonist naloxone. The time course of production of this globulin response, as well as the specificity of the binding for the drug that induced the response are both characteristic of an immunological reaction.

  1. Patterns of Care and Side Effects for Patients Prescribed Methadone for Treatment of Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Macey, Tara A.; Weimer, Melissa B.; Grimaldi, Elizabeth M.; Dobscha, Steven K.; Morasco, Benjamin J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This manuscript evaluates physician monitoring practices and incidence of cardiac side effects following initiation of methadone for treatment of chronic pain as compared to patients who began treatment for chronic pain with morphine sustained release (SR). Design We retrospectively reviewed medical record data on all new initiations of methadone and compared results of physician monitoring practices to patients with new initiations of morphine SR. A standardized chart tool was used to capture clinical data. Data related to health service utilization and clinical diagnoses were obtained from the VA clinical information system. Setting A single VA medical center in the Pacific Northwest. Patients Chronic pain patients prescribed methadone (n=92) or morphine (n=90) in the calendar year 2008. Results There was no difference between patients prescribed methadone versus patients prescribed morphine SR in the likelihood of receiving an electrocardiogram (ECG) prior to initiating medication (53% versus 54%) or in the year after opioid initiation (37% versus 40%). The two groups also did not differ in rates of developing prolonged QTc intervals (>450 ms) (11% versus 17%). Seventy-two percent of all patients discontinued their long-acting opioid regimens before 90 days due to adverse effects or insufficient pain relief. Conclusion Despite recommendations for standardized assessment and cardiac risk monitoring, few patients prescribed methadone received an ECG, and this occurred at a rate that did not differ from patients prescribed morphine SR. Patients discontinued both medications at high rates. Further research is needed to evaluate the clinical significance of QTc prolongation in patients treated with methadone. PMID:24353045

  2. Out-of-Hospital Mortality among Patients Receiving Methadone for Non-Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Wayne A.; Chung, Cecilia P.; Murray, Katherine T.; Cooper, William O.; Hall, Kathi; Stein, C. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Importance Growing methadone use in pain management has raised concerns regarding its safety relative to other long-acting opioids. Methadone may increase risk for both lethal respiratory depression related to accidental overdose and life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Objective To compare risk of out-of-hospital death in users of methadone for non-cancer pain to that for comparable users of sustained-release (SR) morphine. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Tennessee Medicaid, 1997 through 2009. Participants Cohort included current users of morphine SR or methadone 30–74 years of age without cancer or other life-threatening illness and not in a hospital or nursing home. At cohort entry, 32,742 and 6,014 had filled a prescription for morphine SR or methadone, respectively. The median age was 48 years, 58% were female, and comparable proportions had received cardiovascular, psychotropic, and other musculoskeletal medications. Nearly 90% of patients received the opioid for either back or other musculoskeletal pain. The median daily doses prescribed for morphine SR and methadone were 90mg and 40mg, respectively. Main Outcomes and Measures The primary study endpoint was out-of-hospital mortality, given that opioid-related deaths typically occur outside the hospital. Results There were 477 deaths during 28,699 person years of followup, or 166 deaths per 10,000 person-years. After control for study covariates, current methadone users had a 46% increased risk of death during followup, with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.46 (95% confidence interval 1.17–1.83, p = .0008), resulting in 72 (27–130) excess deaths per 10,000 person-years. Methadone users of doses ≤20mg/day, the lowest dose quartile, had increased risk (HR =1.59 [1.01–2.51], p = .0461) relative to a comparable dose of morphine SR (<60mg/day). Conclusions and Relevance The increased risk of death observed for users of methadone, even for low doses, supports recommendations that it

  3. Evaluation of poly-drug use in methadone-related fatalities using segmental hair analysis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Marie Katrine Klose; Johansen, Sys Stybe; Linnet, Kristian

    2015-03-01

    In Denmark, fatal poisoning among drug addicts is often related to methadone. The primary mechanism contributing to fatal methadone overdose is respiratory depression. Concurrent use of other central nervous system (CNS) depressants is suggested to heighten the potential for fatal methadone toxicity. Reduced tolerance due to a short-time abstinence period is also proposed to determine a risk for fatal overdose. The primary aims of this study were to investigate if concurrent use of CNS depressants or reduced tolerance were significant risk factors in methadone-related fatalities using segmental hair analysis. The study included 99 methadone-related fatalities collected in Denmark from 2008 to 2011, where both blood and hair were available. The cases were divided into three subgroups based on the cause of death; methadone poisoning (N=64), poly-drug poisoning (N=28) or methadone poisoning combined with fatal diseases (N=7). No significant differences between methadone concentrations in the subgroups were obtained in both blood and hair. The methadone blood concentrations were highly variable (0.015-5.3, median: 0.52mg/kg) and mainly within the concentration range detected in living methadone users. In hair, methadone was detected in 97 fatalities with concentrations ranging from 0.061 to 211ng/mg (median: 11ng/mg). In the remaining two cases, methadone was detected in blood but absent in hair specimens, suggesting that these two subjects were methadone-naive users. Extensive poly-drug use was observed in all three subgroups, both recently and within the last months prior to death. Especially, concurrent use of multiple benzodiazepines was prevalent among the deceased followed by the abuse of morphine, codeine, amphetamine, cannabis, cocaine and ethanol. By including quantitative segmental hair analysis, additional information on poly-drug use was obtained. Especially, 6-acetylmorphine was detected more frequently in hair specimens, indicating that regular abuse of

  4. The Methadone Illusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennard, Henry L.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    Methadone treatment for heroin addiction does not touch the roots of the drug problem" and to think that the use of another drug can solve the profound and complex task facing us is indeed an illusion." (Author/AL)

  5. Methadone for Pain Relief.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joseph; Sheth, Samir

    2016-06-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. In reply to a question, the authors discuss the use of methadone for pain management, outline how the body processes methadone, list interactions and side effects, and emphasize the importance of taking the medication as prescribed. PMID:27159280

  6. Opioid intoxication

    MedlinePlus

    ... use of opioid-based drugs. These include morphine, heroin, oxycodone, and synthetic (man-made) opioid narcotics. Prescription ... United States, the most commonly abused opioids are heroin and methadone. People who become addicted to these ...

  7. Methadone Treatment: Overview and Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, Lawrence; Tang, Beth Archibald

    This overview focuses on methadone treatment. Briefly, it describes the clinical uses of methadone for substance abuse treatment, explores dosage guidelines, and discusses counseling components. This overview also reviews research data on the application of methadone treatment to special populations, such as pregnant women, polydrug users, and…

  8. An update on oxycodone: lessons for death investigators in Australia.

    PubMed

    Pilgrim, Jennifer L; Yafistham, Sabrina Putrianita; Gaya, Sanjeev; Saar, Eva; Drummer, Olaf H

    2015-03-01

    Oxycodone is one of the most abused prescription drugs. Iatrogenic factors that lead to oxycodone-related death, such as mis-prescribing, present an opportunity for death prevention if identified early. This study investigated deaths involving oxycodone in Australia to explore potentially inappropriate prescribing and the coroner's investigation. The National Coronial Information System identified cases from 2001 to 2011 where oxycodone was detected by toxicological analysis. There were 806 oxycodone-related deaths, with a significant increase in the 11-year period, from 21 deaths in 2001, up almost sevenfold in 2011 (139 deaths). Most deaths were caused by combined drug toxicity (63.4%) or oxycodone toxicity alone (11.8%). Most individuals were male (59.1%), aged 35-44 years (26.7%), who died unintentionally (56.4%), with mental illness (52.1%) and/or a history of acute or chronic pain (46.2%). 312 cases (39%) described a legitimate prescription for oxycodone, of which most involved non-cancer related chronic pain. About three quarters of the indications were deemed appropriate. There were at least 43 different indications treated with oxycodone that were inappropriate. The majority of oxycodone-related cases involved minor to no description of the drugs involved (n = 600; 74.4%). A moderate description of oxycodone involvement was given in 162 cases (20.1%), while only 44 cases (5.5%) involved a thorough examination and recommendations from the coroners on oxycodone and other drugs involved in death. This study emphasized the need for medical practitioners to exercise caution when prescribing oxycodone and for coroners to provide more consistent and detailed information regarding drug use, in order to identify and implement preventive strategies. PMID:25403552

  9. Development and validation of a liquid chromatography mass spectrometry assay for the simultaneous quantification of methadone, cocaine, opiates and metabolites in human umbilical cord

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Ana; Concheiro, Marta; Shakleya, Diaa M.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    A liquid chromatography mass spectrometric selected reaction monitoring mode (SRM) method for methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), cocaine, benzoylecgonine (BE), 6-acetylmorphine, morphine and codeine quantification in human umbilical cord was developed and fully validated. Analytes were extracted from homogenized tissue (1 g) by solid phase extraction. Linearity was 2.5–500 ng/g, except for methadone (10–2000 ng/g). Method imprecision was <12.7%CV with analytical recovery 85.9–112.7%, extraction efficiency >59.2%, matrix effect 4.5–39.5%, process efficiency 48.6–92.6% and stability >84.6%. Analysis of an umbilical cord following controlled methadone administration and illicit drug use contained in ng/g, 40.3 morphine, 3.6 codeine, 442 BE, 186 methadone and 45.9 EDDP. PMID:19656745

  10. Analgesic efficacy of controlled-release oxycodone in postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, A; Olson, N Z; Colon, A; Rivera, J; Kaiko, R F; Fitzmartin, R D; Reder, R F; Goldenheim, P D

    1996-07-01

    The efficacy and safety of graded doses (10, 20, and 30 mg) of controlled-release (CR) oxycodone was compared with that of immediate-release (IR) oxycodone (15 mg), immediate-release oxycodone 10 mg in combination with acetaminophen 650 mg (APAP), and placebo in a single-dose, double-blind, randomized, parallel-group study. The participants, 182 inpatients experiencing moderate to severe pain after abdominal or gynecologic surgery, provided hourly ratings of pain intensity and relief for 12 hours after administration. All active treatments were significantly superior to placebo for many hourly measurements and for the sum of pain intensity differences (SPID) and total pain relief (TOTPAR). A dose response was found among the three levels of CR oxycodone for pain relief and peak pain intensity difference (PID), with the 20- and 30-mg doses being significantly better than the 10-mg dose. For all active treatments, peak PID and peak pain relief occurred approximately 2 to 4 hours after administration. The median time to onset of relief was 32 minutes for oxycodone plus APAP, 41 minutes for IR oxycodone, and 46 minutes for CR oxycodone 30 mg. Duration of pain relief showed that the 10-, 20-, and 30-mg doses of CR oxycodone had durations of action of 10 to 12 hours compared with IR oxycodone and oxycodone plus APAP (both approximately 7 hours). Typical adverse events, particularly somnolence, occurred in all active treatment groups. Treatment with CR oxycodone was safe and effective in this study, and its characteristics will be beneficial in the treatment of pain. PMID:8844441

  11. Morphine Tolerance as a Function of Ratio Schedule: Response Requirement or Unit Price?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Christine; Sigmon, Stacey C.; Pitts, Raymond C.; Dykstra, Linda A.

    2005-01-01

    Key pecking by 3 pigeons was maintained by a multiple fixed-ratio 10, fixed-ratio 30, fixed-ratio 90 schedule of food presentation. Components differed with respect to amount of reinforcement, such that the unit price was 10 responses per 1-s access to food. Acute administration of morphine, "l"-methadone, and cocaine dose-dependently decreased…

  12. Oxycodone with an opioid receptor antagonist: A review.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P; Goforth, Harold W

    2016-01-01

    The rationale for putting opioid antagonists with an agonist is to improve pain control, to reduce side effects, and/or to reduce abuse. The combination of prolonged release (PR) oxycodone and naloxone reduces constipation as demonstrated in multiple studies and has been designated a tamper-resistant opioid by the Food and Drug Administration. Bioequivalence of the combination product compared with PR oxycodone has not been established. Several of the pivotal studies provided suboptimal laxative support in the control arm of the randomized trials. Two noninferiority trials have demonstrated equivalent analgesia between PR oxycodone and the combination product at doses of less than 120 mg of oxycodone per day. There appears to be an analgesic ceiling above 80-120 mg of oxycodone per day. Safety monitoring during randomized trials was not been well described in published manuscripts. Benefits appear to be better for those with chronic noncancer pain compared with individuals with cancer when constipation was the primary outcome. PMID:26908305

  13. Methadone and prescription drug overdose.

    PubMed

    Hendrikson, Hollie; Hansen, Melissa

    2014-12-01

    (1) Methadone accounted for 2 percent of painkiller prescriptions and more than 30 percent of prescription painkiller deaths in 2009. (2) Data suggest that the rise in deaths from methadone overdose is not related to its use in treating drug abuse but, rather, to its use for pain management. (3) Preferred drug lists in most Medicaid programs identify methadone as a preferred drug for managing chronic pain, but most experts do no recommend it as a first choice. PMID:25556261

  14. Categorising methadone: Addiction and analgesia.

    PubMed

    Keane, Helen

    2013-11-01

    While methadone was first developed as an analgesic, and used for this purpose before it was adopted as a therapy for drug dependence, it is this latter use which has saturated its identity. Most of the literature and commentary on methadone discusses it in the context of methadone maintenance therapy (MMT). But one of the effects of the liberalization of opiate prescription for chronic pain which took place in the 1990s was the re-emergence of methadone as a painkiller. This article examines the relationship between methadone the painkiller and methadone the addiction treatment as it is constituted in recent medical research literature and treatment guidelines. It highlights the way medical discourse separates methadone into two substances with different effects depending on the problem that is being treated. Central to this separation is the classification of patients into addicts and non-addicts; and pain sufferers and non-pain sufferers. The article argues that despite this work of making and maintaining distinctions, the similarities in the way methadone is used and acts in these different medical contexts complicates these categories. The difficulties of keeping the 'two methadones' separate becomes most apparent in cases of MMT patients also being treated for chronic pain. PMID:23768774

  15. Relative abuse liability of prescription opioids compared to heroin in morphine-maintained heroin abusers

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Sandra D; Sullivan, Maria A; Whittington, Robert A; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Kowalczyk, William J

    2013-01-01

    Abuse of prescription opioid medications has increased dramatically in the U.S. during the past decade, as indicated by a variety of epidemiological sources. However, few studies have systematically examined the relative reinforcing effects of commonly abused opioid medications. The current double-blind, placebo-controlled inpatient study was designed to compare the effects of intravenously delivered fentanyl (0, 0.0625, 0.125, 0.187, and 0.250 mg/70 kg), oxycodone (0, 6.25, 12.5, 25, and 50 mg/70 kg), morphine (0, 6.25, 12.5, 25, and 50 mg/70 kg), buprenorphine (0, 0.125, 0.5, 2, and 8 mg/70 kg), and heroin (0, 3.125, 6.25, 12.5, and 25 mg/70 kg) in morphine-maintained heroin abusers (N=8 completers maintained on 120 mg per day oral morphine in divided doses [30 mg q.i.d.]). All of the participants received all of the drugs tested; drugs and doses were administered in non-systematic order. All of the drugs produced statistically significant, dose-related increases in positive subjective ratings, such as “I feel a good drug effect” and “I like the drug.” In general, the order of potency in producing these effects, from most to least potent, was: fentanyl > buprenorphine ≥ heroin > morphine = oxycodone. In contrast, buprenorphine was the only drug that produced statistically significant increases in ratings of “I feel a bad drug effect” and it was the only drug that was not self-administered above placebo levels at any dose tested. These data suggest that the abuse liability of buprenorphine in heroin-dependent individuals may be low, despite the fact that it produces increases in positive subjective ratings. The abuse liabilities of fentanyl, morphine, oxycodone, and heroin, however, appear to be similar under these experimental conditions. PMID:17581533

  16. A multicenter, primary-care-based, open-label study to assess the success of converting opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain to morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride extended-release capsules using a standardized conversion guide

    PubMed Central

    Setnik, Beatrice; Roland, Carl L; Sommerville, Kenneth W; Pixton, Glenn C; Berke, Robert; Calkins, Anne; Goli, Veeraindar

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the conversion of opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain to extended-release morphine sulfate with sequestered naltrexone hydrochloride (MSN) using a standardized conversion guide. Methods This open-label, single-arm study was conducted in 157 primary care centers in the United States. A total of 684 opioid-experienced adults with chronic moderate-to-severe pain were converted to oral administration of MSN from transdermal fentanyl and oral formulations of hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, oxycodone, oxymorphone, and other morphine products using a standardized conversion guide. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients achieving a stable MSN dose within a 6-week titration phase. Secondary endpoints included duration of time to stable dose, number of titration steps, safety and efficacy measures, and investigator assessment of conversion guide utility. Results Of the 684 patients, 51.3% were converted to a stable dose of MSN (95% confidence interval: 47.5%, 55.1%). The mean (standard deviation) number of days to stable dose was 20 (8.94), and number of titration steps to stable dose was 2.4 (1.37). The majority of adverse events were mild/moderate and consistent with opioid therapy. Mean pain scores at stable dose decreased from baseline. Investigators were generally satisfied with the conversion guide and, in 94% of cases, reported they would use it again. Conclusion Conversion to MSN treatment using the standardized MSN conversion guide was an attainable goal in approximately half of the population of opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain. Investigators found the guide to be a useful tool to assist conversion of opioid-experienced patients to MSN. PMID:26185466

  17. Ethanol Reversal of Tolerance to the Respiratory Depressant Effects of Morphine.

    PubMed

    Hill, Rob; Lyndon, Abi; Withey, Sarah; Roberts, Joanne; Kershaw, Yvonne; MacLachlan, John; Lingford-Hughes, Anne; Kelly, Eamonn; Bailey, Chris; Hickman, Matthew; Henderson, Graeme

    2016-02-01

    Opioids are the most common drugs associated with unintentional drug overdose. Death results from respiratory depression. Prolonged use of opioids results in the development of tolerance but the degree of tolerance is thought to vary between different effects of the drugs. Many opioid addicts regularly consume alcohol (ethanol), and post-mortem analyses of opioid overdose deaths have revealed an inverse correlation between blood morphine and ethanol levels. In the present study, we determined whether ethanol reduced tolerance to the respiratory depressant effects of opioids. Mice were treated with opioids (morphine, methadone, or buprenorphine) for up to 6 days. Respiration was measured in freely moving animals breathing 5% CO2 in air in plethysmograph chambers. Antinociception (analgesia) was measured as the latency to remove the tail from a thermal stimulus. Opioid tolerance was assessed by measuring the response to a challenge dose of morphine (10 mg/kg i.p.). Tolerance developed to the respiratory depressant effect of morphine but at a slower rate than tolerance to its antinociceptive effect. A low dose of ethanol (0.3 mg/kg) alone did not depress respiration but in prolonged morphine-treated animals respiratory depression was observed when ethanol was co-administered with the morphine challenge. Ethanol did not alter the brain levels of morphine. In contrast, in methadone- or buprenorphine-treated animals no respiratory depression was observed when ethanol was co-administered along with the morphine challenge. As heroin is converted to morphine in man, selective reversal of morphine tolerance by ethanol may be a contributory factor in heroin overdose deaths. PMID:26171718

  18. Ethanol Reversal of Tolerance to the Respiratory Depressant Effects of Morphine

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Rob; Lyndon, Abi; Withey, Sarah; Roberts, Joanne; Kershaw, Yvonne; MacLachlan, John; Lingford-Hughes, Anne; Kelly, Eamonn; Bailey, Chris; Hickman, Matthew; Henderson, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are the most common drugs associated with unintentional drug overdose. Death results from respiratory depression. Prolonged use of opioids results in the development of tolerance but the degree of tolerance is thought to vary between different effects of the drugs. Many opioid addicts regularly consume alcohol (ethanol), and post-mortem analyses of opioid overdose deaths have revealed an inverse correlation between blood morphine and ethanol levels. In the present study, we determined whether ethanol reduced tolerance to the respiratory depressant effects of opioids. Mice were treated with opioids (morphine, methadone, or buprenorphine) for up to 6 days. Respiration was measured in freely moving animals breathing 5% CO2 in air in plethysmograph chambers. Antinociception (analgesia) was measured as the latency to remove the tail from a thermal stimulus. Opioid tolerance was assessed by measuring the response to a challenge dose of morphine (10 mg/kg i.p.). Tolerance developed to the respiratory depressant effect of morphine but at a slower rate than tolerance to its antinociceptive effect. A low dose of ethanol (0.3 mg/kg) alone did not depress respiration but in prolonged morphine-treated animals respiratory depression was observed when ethanol was co-administered with the morphine challenge. Ethanol did not alter the brain levels of morphine. In contrast, in methadone- or buprenorphine-treated animals no respiratory depression was observed when ethanol was co-administered along with the morphine challenge. As heroin is converted to morphine in man, selective reversal of morphine tolerance by ethanol may be a contributory factor in heroin overdose deaths. PMID:26171718

  19. Evaluation of the analgesic effect of subcutaneous methadone after cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Jabalameli, Mitra; Kalantari, Forough

    2014-01-01

    Background: Inadequate pain control has a significant role in maternal and neonatal health in early post-partum period which interferes with breastfeeding and has a negative influence on child normal growth. The aim of this study is evaluation of subcutaneous methadone effectiveness on post-operative pain control. Materials and Methods: Double blind randomized prospective clinical trial involving 60 term pregnancy patients through 2008 to 2009 Undergo cesarean. Inclusion criteria: Prime gravid candidate of elective cesarean and spinal anesthesia class 1 or 2. Known case of drug allergy and methadone interaction, addiction, uncontrolled medical disease excluded. Case group injected 10 mg of subcutaneous methadone in the site of incision before final suture. Morphine was a pain reliever in follow up examination. Data include mean of pain, nausea and vomiting, MAP, etc., collected and analyzed by independent-T test and Man Whitney test. Results: Although mean usage of morphine between groups was not significant statistically but the mean pain severity (P value < 0.05) and mean satisfactory (P value = 0.02) was statistically significant between groups. Other parameters were not statistically significant. Conclusion: We suggest subcutaneous methadone as a safe pain reliever in post cesarean section patients. PMID:25337527

  20. Epidural methadone results in dose-dependent analgesia in cancer pain, further enhanced by epidural dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Lauretti, G R; Rizzo, C C; Mattos, A L; Rodrigues, S W

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to evaluate the role of epidural methadone-lidocaine in cancer pain combined or not to epidural dexamethasone. Methods: In all, 72 cancer patients, 32- to 67-year-old were randomized to six groups (n=12) and prospectively studied to examine analgesia and adverse effects for 3 weeks. Patients received single-dose protocol epidural test drugs: Control group (CG) received epidural 40-mg lidocaine diluted to 10-ml volume with saline. Dexamethasone group (DG) 40-mg lidocaine plus 10-mg dexamethasone. The 2.5MetG 2.5-mg epidural methadone with 40-mg lidocaine; the 5MetG, 5-mg epidural methadone plus 40-mg lidocaine, the 7.5MetG, 7.5-mg epidural methadone plus 40-mg lidocaine and finally the 7.5Met-DexG, 7.5-mg methadone with 40-mg lidocaine and 10-mg dexamethasone. Results: Groups CG, DG and 2.5MetG were similar regarding analgesia and side effects. Patients from 5MetG and 7.5MetG took 3±1 and 5±1 days, respectively, to restart oral morphine. Patients from 7.5MetDG took 14±2 to restart oral morphine (P<0.001). Daily somnolence and appetite improved in the 7.5MetDG during 2-week evaluation (P<0.005). Fatigue improved for both DG and 7.5MetDG during 2-week evaluation (P<0.005). By the third week of evaluation, all patients were similar. Conclusions: Epidural methadone plus lidocaine resulted in dose-dependent analgesia, further improved by epidural dexamethasone, which also improved fatigue. PMID:23322191

  1. Factors Associated with Methadone Treatment Duration: A Cox Regression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ching-Yi; Chao, En; Lee, Tony Szu-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    This study examined retention rates and associated predictors of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) duration among 128 newly admitted patients in Taiwan. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to obtain demographic and drug use history. Daily records of methadone taken and test results for HIV, HCV, and morphine toxicology were taken from a computerized medical registry. Cox regression analyses were performed to examine factors associated with MMT duration. MMT retention rates were 80.5%, 68.8%, 53.9%, and 41.4% for 3, 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. Excluding 38 patients incarcerated during the study period, retention rates were 81.1%, 73.3%, 61.1%, and 48.9% for 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, and 18 months, respectively. No participant seroconverted to HIV and 1 died during the 18-months follow-up. Results showed that being female, imprisonment, a longer distance from house to clinic, having a lower methadone dose after 30 days, being HCV positive, and in the New Taipei city program predicted early patient dropout. The findings suggest favorable MMT outcomes of HIV seroincidence and mortality. Results indicate that the need to minimize travel distance and to provide programs that meet women’s requirements justify expansion of MMT clinics in Taiwan. PMID:25875531

  2. Illicit Heroin and Methamphetamine Use among Methadone Maintenance Treatment Patients in Dehong Prefecture of Yunnan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Song; Ye, Runhua; Yang, Yuecheng; Wang, Jibao; Tang, Renhai; Gao, Meiyang; He, Na

    2015-01-01

    Objective Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) was introduced to China in 2004 to reduce the harm of injecting drug users (IDUs). However, little is known about continued drug use, especially methamphetamine (MAMP), among MMT patients. Methods A survey was conducted among patients attending five major MMT clinics in Dehong Prefecture in 2014 to investigate the heroin and MAMP use and their associated risk factors. Participants were administered with face-to-face interviews, and urine tests for morphine and MAMP. Results A total of 2,121 were eligible and participated in the study. Among them, 220 (10.4%) were only positive for morphine, 12.9% were only positive for MAMP, and 196 (9.2%) were positive for both morphine and MAMP. Compared with neither use of heroin nor MAMP during MMT, heroin use (not using MAMP) was associated with ethnicity, shorter duration of MMT, lower dose of methadone, and having had no more than two sex partners in the past year; MAMP use (not using heroin) was associated with ethnicity, longer duration of MMT, higher dose of methadone and being aged <30 years (vs. ≥50 years); use of both heroin and MAMP was associated with being Dai minority (vs. Han), a marital status of divorced or widowed, having used drugs for ≥10 years and shorter duration of MMT. Conclusion These findings indicate the complexity in the treatment of heroin users and underscore the importance in prescribing appropriate methadone dosages in order to reduce both heroin and MAMP use. PMID:26196394

  3. Morphine: Myths and Reality

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Families Take the Quiz Morphine: Myths and Reality February, 2013 The mere mention of “Morphine” can ... due to misinformation and lack of training. The reality is that Morphine (and other opiates that work ...

  4. Serotonin syndrome probably triggered by a morphine-phenelzine interaction.

    PubMed

    Mateo-Carrasco, Hector; Muñoz-Aguilera, Eva María; García-Torrecillas, Juan Manuel; Abu Al-Robb, Hiba

    2015-06-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a potentially life-threatening condition caused by excessive central and peripheral stimulation of serotonin brainstem receptors, usually triggered by inadvertent interactions between agents with serotonergic activity. Evidence supporting an association between nonserotonergic opiates, such as oxycodone or morphine, and serotonin syndrome is very limited and even contradictory. In this case report, we describe a patient who developed serotonergic-adverse effects likely precipitated by an interaction between morphine and phenelzine. A 57-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with complaints of increasing visual hallucinations, restlessness, photophobia, dizziness, neck stiffness, occipital headache, confusion, sweating, tachycardia, and nausea over the previous week. On admission, her blood pressure was 185/65 mm Hg, and clonus was noted in the lower extremities. The patient was hospitalized 10 days earlier for cellulitis of the left breast secondary to a left mastectomy 5 months earlier, and a short course of oral morphine was prescribed for pain control. Her routine medications consisted of aspirin, atorvastatin, bisoprolol, clopidogrel, gabapentin, omeprazole, phenelzine, and ramipril. Supportive measures were initiated on admission. Phenelzine and morphine were discontinued immediately, leading to a progressive resolution of symptoms over the next 48 hours. Phenelzine was restarted on discharge without further complications. Use of the Drug Interaction Probability Scale indicated a probable relationship (score of 6) between the patient's development of serotonin syndrome and the combination of morphine and phenelzine. The mechanism underlying this interaction, however, remains unclear and warrants further investigation. Clinicians should carefully weigh the risk and benefits of initiating morphine in patients taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors or any other serotonin-enhancing drugs. PMID:25903219

  5. Enhanced development of dispositional tolerance to methadone by desipramine given together with methadone

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.J.; Wang, R.I.H.

    1985-02-25

    Rats given 2-day oral administration of methadone (15 mg/kg, twice on day 1 and once on day 2) by gastric tube developed dispositional tolerance to methadone analgesia as demonstrated by a decrease in analgesic response and by an increase in methadone metabolism. The increased metabolism of methadone was evidenced by a decrease in brain concentration of /sup 14/C-methadone and increases in the percentages of total /sup 14/C in liver or urine as /sup 14/C-water-soluble metabolites (/sup 14/C-WSM) after the rats were challenged with a test dose of /sup 14/C-methadone. Two-day pretreatment with a combination of desipramine (DMI) (10 mg/kg, ip) and methadone (15 mg/kg, po) enhanced the development of dispositional tolerance to methadone analgesia which was evidenced by a greater decrease in the brain concentration of methadone and a greater increase in methadone metabolism as compared to those changes in rats pretreated with only methadone. Repeated treatment with DMI alone neither decreased the analgesic effect of methadone nor stimulated methadone metabolism. It is suggested that DMI given together with methadone promoted the induction of methadone metabolism in the liver by prolonging the enzyme-stimulating state of methadone, thus enhancing the development of dispositional tolerance to methadone. 20 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  6. Metabolism of Oxycodone in Human Hepatocytes from Different Age Groups and Prediction of Hepatic Plasma Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Korjamo, Timo; Tolonen, Ari; Ranta, Veli-Pekka; Turpeinen, Miia; Kokki, Hannu

    2012-01-01

    Oxycodone is commonly used to treat severe pain in adults and children. It is extensively metabolized in the liver in adults, but the maturation of metabolism is not well understood. Our aim was to study the metabolism of oxycodone in cryopreserved human hepatocytes from different age groups (3 days, 2 and 5 months, 4 years, adult pool) and predict hepatic plasma clearance of oxycodone using these data. Oxycodone (0.1, 1, and 10 μM) was incubated with hepatocytes for 4 h, and 1 μM oxycodone also with CYP3A inhibitor ketoconazole (1 μM). Oxycodone and noroxycodone concentrations were determined at several time points with liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. In vitro clearance of oxycodone was used to predict hepatic plasma clearance, using the well-stirred model and published physiological parameters. Noroxycodone was the major metabolite in all batches and ketoconazole inhibited the metabolism markedly in most cases. A clear correlation between in vitro oxycodone clearance and CYP3A4 activity was observed. The predicted hepatic plasma clearances were typically much lower than the published median total plasma clearance from pharmacokinetic studies. The data suggests that there are no children-specific metabolites of oxycodone. Moreover, CYP3A activity seems to be the major determinant in metabolic clearance of oxycodone regardless of age group or individual variability in hepatocyte batches. PMID:22291644

  7. Simultaneous Quantification of Methadone, Cocaine, Opiates, and Metabolites in Human Placenta by Liquid Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Ana; Concheiro, Marta; Shakleya, Diaa M.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    A validated method for quantifying methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine, cocaine, benzoylecgonine, 6-acetylmorphine, morphine, and codeine in human placenta by liquid chromatography–ion trap mass spectrometry is described. Specimens (1 g) were homogenized and subjected to solid-phase extraction. Chromatographic separation was performed on a Synergi Polar RP column with a gradient of 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile. The method was linear from 10 to 2000 ng/g for methadone and 2.5 to 500 ng/g for other analytes. Limits of detection were 0.25–2.5 ng/g, imprecisions < 9.1%CV, analytical recoveries 84.4–113.3%, extraction efficiencies > 46%, matrix effects −8.0–129.9%, and process efficiencies 24.2–201.0%. Method applicability was demonstrated by analysis of five placenta specimens from opioid-dependent women receiving methadone pharmacotherapy, with methadone doses ranging from 65 to 95 mg on the day of delivery. These are the first data on placenta concentrations of methadone and metabolites after controlled drug administration. Detection of other common drugs of abuse in placenta will also improve our knowledge of the usefulness of this matrix for detecting in utero drug exposure and studying disposition of drugs in the maternal-fetal dyad. PMID:19671243

  8. Drug Abuse: Methadone Becomes the Solution and the Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazell, Robert J.

    1973-01-01

    Methadone is used to divert heroin addicts from using stronger drugs. Rate of crimes committed by drug addicts has fallen considerably after putting them on methadone. Despite criticisms, methadone use seems to be encouraging for the future. (PS)

  9. A new therapeutic option for postoperative pain management with oxycodone HCI injection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Fentanyl is the most commonly used opioid analgesic in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) in Korea. IV oxycodone was approved for postoperative IV PCA by the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety of Korea in 2013. The approved dosage regimen for postoperative pain relief with IV oxycodone is IV bolus loading of 2 mg followed by PCA composed of demand boluses of 1 mg and no background infusion with an oxycodone concentration of 1 mg/ml. However, a simulation study indicated that the minimum effective analgesic concentration (MEAC, as indicated by relief of pain by administering rescue analgesics) of oxycodone was reached most quickly with a higher loading dose of 0.1 mg/kg and IV PCA with background infusion. Oxycodone is a therapeutic option as an analgesic for postoperative pain management. It is necessary to reduce the analgesic dose of oxycodone in elderly patients because metabolic clearance decreases with age. PMID:27274364

  10. A new therapeutic option for postoperative pain management with oxycodone HCI injection.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byung Moon

    2016-06-01

    Fentanyl is the most commonly used opioid analgesic in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) in Korea. IV oxycodone was approved for postoperative IV PCA by the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety of Korea in 2013. The approved dosage regimen for postoperative pain relief with IV oxycodone is IV bolus loading of 2 mg followed by PCA composed of demand boluses of 1 mg and no background infusion with an oxycodone concentration of 1 mg/ml. However, a simulation study indicated that the minimum effective analgesic concentration (MEAC, as indicated by relief of pain by administering rescue analgesics) of oxycodone was reached most quickly with a higher loading dose of 0.1 mg/kg and IV PCA with background infusion. Oxycodone is a therapeutic option as an analgesic for postoperative pain management. It is necessary to reduce the analgesic dose of oxycodone in elderly patients because metabolic clearance decreases with age. PMID:27274364

  11. Effects of methadone plus alcohol on cognitive performance in methadone-maintained volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Kleykamp, Bethea A.; Vandrey, Ryan G.; Bigelow, George E.; Strain, Eric C.; Mintzer, Miriam Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background Methadone maintenance patients (MMP) often abuse other drugs, including alcohol. The combined use of methadone and alcohol could impair performance and daily functioning. Objective To examine the effects of methadone in combination with alcohol, as well as acute increases in methadone, on performance outcomes. Method This double blind, double-dummy, crossover study included 8 opioid dependent participants stabilized on methadone. Participants completed 6 inpatient sessions corresponding to methadone (100% or 150% of daily dose) and beverage (placebo, 0.25 or 0.50 g/kg alcohol). Performance tasks were completed before and after drug administration. Area under the timecourse values were analyzed by a 2 (methadone dose) by 3 (alcohol dose) repeated measures analysis of variance. Results Main effects of methadone were observed for two attention outcomes, suggesting reduced accuracy and slowed responding at an elevated methadone dose. In addition, main effects of alcohol were observed for episodic memory (false alarms and response bias) suggesting more impulsive responding as alcohol dose increased. No robust interactions of methadone and alcohol were observed for any outcome. Conclusions Study findings indicate that an acute increase in methadone (150%) and a moderate dose of alcohol (2–3 drinks) can impair distinct aspects of performance, although no significant interactive effect between methadone and alcohol was found. Future studies with larger sample sizes, larger doses, and more clinically informative tasks could expand on the present findings and further explore the cognitive consequences of concurrent opioid and alcohol use. PMID:25584897

  12. User views on supervised methadone consumption.

    PubMed

    Stone, Elizabeth; Fletcher, Keron

    2003-03-01

    To assess the views of opiate-dependent individuals about supervised methadone consumption. Three groups of opinions were sought: (i). new patients referred for assessment and treatment, using rating scales; (ii). the consensus view of the Methadone Alliance (a national users' forum); and (iii). the consensus view of a local service users' forum. All three groups expressed the view that supervised consumption has an important place in methadone treatments. Users understand the need for daily supervision of methadone and are generally willing to accept it. Users' views provide support for the introduction of flexible methadone prescribing regimes incorporating supervised consumption. Privacy in pharmacies and the possibility of moving away from supervision are important elements in an acceptable programme. Supervised consumption is an important component of safe, effective and responsible methadone prescribing. PMID:12745415

  13. Morphine: Myths and Reality

    MedlinePlus

    ... ve heard that Morphine has lots of side effects, and I feel bad enough already.” All opiates can cause nausea, drowsiness and constipation. However, all side effects will generally stop after a few days, as ...

  14. ROLE OF MENINGEAL MAST CELLS IN INTRATHECAL MORPHINE EVOKED GRANULOMA FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Yaksh, Tony L.; Allen, Jeffery W.; Veesart, Samantha L.; Horais, Kjersti A; Malkmus, Shelle A.; Scadeng, Miriam; Steinauer, Joanne J.; Rossi, Steve S

    2013-01-01

    Background Intrathecal morphine forms granulomas that arise from the adjacent arachnoid membrane. We propose that these inflammatory cells exit the meningeal vasculature secondary to meningeal mast cell degranulation. Methods Three sets of experiments were accomplished in dogs. 1) Ex vivo Meningeal mast cell degranulation. Histamine release was measured ex vivo from canine dura incubated with opiates. 2) In vivo cutaneous mast cell degranulation. Flare areas on the dog abdomen were measured after subcutaneous opiates. 3) In vivo granuloma pharmacology. Dogs with lumbar intrathecal catheters received infusion of intrathecal saline or intrathecal morphine. Intrathecal morphine dogs received: i) No other treatment (Control); ii) Twice daily subcutaneous naltrexone; iii) Intrathecal co-infusion of cromolyn; or, iv) Twice daily subcutaneous cromolyn for the 24–28 day study course. Results 1) Morphine but not fentanyl evoked dural histamine release, which was blocked by cromolyn but not naloxone. 2) Wheal/flare was produced by subcutaneous morphine, methadone, hydromorphone, but not fentanyl, and was unaffected by naltrexone but prevented by cromolyn. 3) Granulomas occurred in all dogs receiving intrathecal morphine (15/15); subcutaneous naltrexone had no effect on granulomas (6/6), but was reduced by concurrent intrathecal cromolyn (0/5) or twice daily subcutaneous cromolyn (1 of 5). Conclusions The pharmacology of cutaneous/dural MC degranulation and intrathecal granulomas are comparable, not mediated by opioid receptors, and reduced by agents preventing MC degranulation. If an agent produces cutaneous MC degranulation at concentrations produced by intrathecal delivery, the agent may initiate granulomas. PMID:23426209

  15. Sex differences in responsiveness to the prescription opioid oxycodone in mice.

    PubMed

    Collins, Devon; Reed, Brian; Zhang, Yong; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2016-09-01

    Over-prescription and increased nonmedical use of oxycodone has become a major concern. Despite its increased use, preclinical data concerning oxycodone's effects are still limited, especially in rodent models. To address this, we examined oxycodone's effects on place preference, locomotor activation, corticosterone levels, and thermal analgesia across a range of doses (between 0.3 and 10mg/kg) in gonadally intact, adult male and female C57BL/6J mice. Males and females showed oxycodone-induced conditioned place preference and did not show significant between-sex differences in their place preference behavior. During both CPP conditioning sessions and open field assay, locomotor activity was increased by 1, 3, and 10mg/kg oxycodone in females and by 3 and 10mg/kg oxycodone in males. Plasma corticosterone levels were higher in females (compared to males) at baseline as well as following acute oxycodone injection and open field testing. The time course of oxycodone-induced analgesia was similar in males and females, however the total antinociceptive effect (AUC0-120min) was larger in males compared to females at the highest dose tested (10mg/kg). Taken together, these data suggest that male and female mice are modestly different in their responses to oxycodone. PMID:27316549

  16. The effect of sertraline on methadone plasma levels in methadone-maintenance patients.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, S P; Nunes, E V; Janal, M; Weber, L

    2000-01-01

    The authors examine methadone plasma levels in 31 depressed methadone-maintained opiate addicts enrolled in a 12-week placebo-controlled, double-blind study of sertraline. Between baseline and week 6, patients on sertraline showed a mean increase in methadone plasma level/dose (P/D) ratio of 26% (SD = 43%, range -32% to +118%), while patients on placebo showed a mean decrease of 16% (SD = 27%, range -62% to +50%). This difference was significant (p < 0.02). The sertraline and placebo groups did not differ in reported side effects or methadone dose adjustments. Between weeks 6 and 12, methadone P/D in the sertraline group decreased back towards baseline, and the treatment groups did not differ significantly at week 12. The results suggest sertraline may produce a modest increase in methadone serum levels over the first six weeks of treatment. Depression and anxiety disorders are common in methadone-maintained patients. Serotonin uptake inhibitors are attractive choices for treatment due to their low toxicity and low abuse potential, but these agents variously inhibit isoenzymes responsible for the metabolism of methadone. Clinicians treating depressed or anxious methadone patients with second-generation antidepressants should monitor for clinical signs of increased or decreased methadone levels and consider monitoring serum methadone levels. PMID:10914294

  17. 21 CFR 862.3620 - Methadone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Methadone test system. 862.3620 Section 862.3620....3620 Methadone test system. (a) Identification. A methadone test system is a device intended to measure methadone, an addictive narcotic pain-relieving drug, in serum and urine. Measurements obtained by...

  18. 21 CFR 862.3620 - Methadone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Methadone test system. 862.3620 Section 862.3620....3620 Methadone test system. (a) Identification. A methadone test system is a device intended to measure methadone, an addictive narcotic pain-relieving drug, in serum and urine. Measurements obtained by...

  19. 21 CFR 862.3620 - Methadone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Methadone test system. 862.3620 Section 862.3620....3620 Methadone test system. (a) Identification. A methadone test system is a device intended to measure methadone, an addictive narcotic pain-relieving drug, in serum and urine. Measurements obtained by...

  20. 21 CFR 862.3620 - Methadone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methadone test system. 862.3620 Section 862.3620....3620 Methadone test system. (a) Identification. A methadone test system is a device intended to measure methadone, an addictive narcotic pain-relieving drug, in serum and urine. Measurements obtained by...

  1. 21 CFR 862.3620 - Methadone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Methadone test system. 862.3620 Section 862.3620....3620 Methadone test system. (a) Identification. A methadone test system is a device intended to measure methadone, an addictive narcotic pain-relieving drug, in serum and urine. Measurements obtained by...

  2. Experience-Seeking Characteristics of Methadone Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Paul M.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Methadone clients scored higher than controls on measures reflecting boredom, desire for change and attraction to physically thrilling activities. Correlations of these measures with length of most recent dependency before treatment, time on program, and time since initial dependency suggest peculiarities of methadone clients antedated involvement…

  3. Methadone Medical Maintenance: An Early 21st-Century Perspective.

    PubMed

    Novick, David M; Salsitz, Edwin A; Joseph, Herman; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Methadone medical maintenance is the treatment of stable methadone-maintained patients in primary care physicians' offices under an exemption from federal methadone regulations. Reports from seven such programs in six states show high retention and low frequencies of illicit drug use. Patients and physicians indicate high levels of satisfaction. Although methadone maintenance has a long history of safety and efficacy, most methadone medical maintenance programs are no longer operating or accepting new patients. Federal regulations for standard methadone clinics allow some features of methadone medical maintenance, and advocacy for state approval of these changes is strongly recommended. PMID:26110221

  4. Bromfenac sodium, acetaminophen/oxycodone, ibuprofen, and placebo for relief of postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G H; Van Wagoner, J D; Brown, J; Cooper, S A

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this double-masked, parallel-group, multicenter, inpatient study was to compare bromfenac with an acetaminophen/oxycodone combination and ibuprofen in patients who had pain due to abdominal gynecologic surgery. In the 8-hour, single-dose phase, 238 patients received single oral doses of bromfenac (50 or 100 mg), acetaminophen 650 mg/oxycodone 10 mg, ibuprofen 400 mg, or placebo. In the multiple-dose phase, 204 patients received bromfenac, acetaminophen/oxycodone, or ibuprofen for up to 5 days. In the single-dose phase, both bromfenac doses produced peak analgesic responses equivalent to acetaminophen/oxycodone, but the responses to bromfenac were longer lasting. Bromfenac produced significantly better overall (8-hour) analgesic summed scores than acetaminophen/oxycodone. Ibuprofen was less efficacious than the other analgesics. The remedication rate was lower in both bromfenac groups than in the other treatment groups. The acetaminophen/oxycodone group reported more somnolence and vomiting. Single doses of bromfenac provided analgesia at least equivalent to that of the acetaminophen/oxycodone combination, with a longer duration of action. Both doses of bromfenac and acetaminophen/oxycodone were superior to ibuprofen in this study. PMID:9220215

  5. Oxycodone/Naloxone PR: A Review in Severe Refractory Restless Legs Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Frampton, James E

    2015-06-01

    An oral, fixed-dose combination of prolonged-release (PR) oxycodone with PR naloxone (Targin(®), Targiniq(®), Targinact(®); hereafter referred to as oxycodone/naloxone PR) is approved in Europe for the second-line symptomatic treatment of patients with severe to very severe idiopathic restless legs syndrome (RLS), after failure of dopaminergic therapy. Coadministration of naloxone represents a targeted approach to counteracting opioid-induced bowel dysfunction without compromising therapeutic efficacy; because of its very low oral bioavailability, naloxone blocks the action of oxycodone at opioid receptors locally in the gut. The efficacy of oxycodone/naloxone PR in patients with severe RLS inadequately controlled by previous (mainly dopaminergic) treatment has been demonstrated in RELOXYN, a 12-week, randomized, double-blind study with a 40-week open-label extension. In this pivotal study, oxycodone/naloxone PR significantly improved RLS symptoms compared with placebo from week 2 onwards; a beneficial effect of oxycodone/naloxone PR was maintained through 1 year of treatment. Furthermore, improvements in RLS symptoms in oxycodone/naloxone PR recipients were accompanied by similarly sustained improvements in disease-specific quality of life and subjective sleep variables. Oxycodone/naloxone PR was generally well tolerated, with a treatment-related adverse event profile (e.g. gastrointestinal disorders, CNS disorders, fatigue and pruritus) that was consistent with that expected for opioid therapy. Notably, there were no confirmed cases of augmentation among oxycodone/naloxone PR recipients throughout the course of the study. Results from the well-designed RELOXYN trial have thus demonstrated the value of oxycodone/naloxone PR as a second-line therapy for severe refractory RLS; further investigation of this combination product as a first-line treatment for severe RLS is now warranted. PMID:26135898

  6. Markers for detection of supplementation in narcotic programs--deuterium-labeled methadone.

    PubMed

    Hsia, J C; Tam, J C; Giles, H G; Leung, C C; Marcus, H; Marshman, J A; Leblanc, A E

    1976-08-01

    Specific deuterium labeling of methadone and use of gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy technique permits rapid and quanitative determination of the ratio of the labeled to unlabeled drug in body fluids. A trideuertiomethadone (methadone-d3) was shown to have exactly the same analgesic activity and toxicity in mice as methadone. The rates of absorption, distribution, and excretion of methadone-d3 and methadone were identical in rats. These observations suggest that methadone-d3 may be used as an in vivo marker for monitoring methadone intake of patients, and thus may improve the effectiveness of methadone treatment programs. PMID:941022

  7. Forensic Investigation of Methadone Concentrations in Deceased Breastfed Infants.

    PubMed

    Madadi, Parvaz; Kelly, Lauren E; Ross, Colin J; Kepron, Charis; Edwards, James N; Koren, Gideon

    2016-03-01

    There is a paucity of data to aid in assessing whether postmortem methadone findings in breastfed infants are clinically and/or toxicologically significant. Two cases are reported in which methadone was detected in deceased neonates whose mothers were enrolled in methadone maintenance programs and were breastfeeding. In addition to a complete autopsy and toxicological testing for alcohol, prescription medications, and drugs of abuse, pharmacogenetic analysis was performed for variants in genes related to methadone metabolism and response. In both cases, the postmortem methadone concentration measured in neonatal heart blood was higher than the maximum serum methadone concentration reported in living breastfed infants whose mothers were receiving methadone. However, additional analysis of antemortem blood indicated postmortem redistribution of methadone. Pharmacogenetic results were suggestive of a potential predisposition to methadone toxicity based on studies in adults; the significance of these findings in breastfed neonates requires further research. The medical cause of death was unascertained in both cases. PMID:26513313

  8. The combination of morphine and minocycline may be a good treatment for intractable post-herpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Suchang; Hui, Hui; Zhang, Deren; Xue, Yanzhi

    2010-12-01

    Post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) is a devastating complication of shingles. The treatment of PHN with traditional pharmaceutical agents has various side effects. Therefore, the treatment of intractable PHN is often very time consuming, mainly because the available treatments often lead to intolerable side effects before the efficient dose can be reached. Opioids such as morphine and oxycodone are the most widely used drugs for the alleviation for severe chronic pain. A number of high quality studies demonstrated that opioids are effective in relieving neuropathic pain including PHN. Yet concerns of misuse, abuse and tolerance of opioids have, however, severely influenced their contribution to neuropathic pain, especially the tolerance that resulted in a loss of drug effect or the necessity for escalating doses to produce pain relief. The glia cells, particularly microglia and astrocytes are thought to play an important role in central sensitization. It is known that activated microglia cells produce NO, cytokines, and cyclooxygenase. All of these chemicals regulate synaptic transmissions in the central nervous system. Additionally, glia modulations showed antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic properties in various experimental pain models. Minocycline, a semisynthetic, second-generation tetracycline can potently inhibit microglial activation and proliferation. Also, the growing body of recent evidence indicates that minocycline attenuates morphine tolerance in neuropathic mice with a mechanism related to microglia. The combination of morphine and minocycline has synergetic effect. This can prevent the development of intractable PHN and attenuate morphine antinociceptive tolerance and further improve the efficacy of morphine and therefore reducing its dosage and side effects. We thereby hypothesize that the combination of morphine and minocycline may produce a duel effect of morphine antinociceptive and minocycline selectively inhibiting the activation of microglia. PMID

  9. Pharmacokinetic Interaction between Voriconazole and Methadone at Steady State in Patients on Methadone Therapy▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Foster, Grover; LaBadie, Robert; Somoza, Eugene; Sharma, Amarnath

    2007-01-01

    This trial was aimed to estimate the pharmacokinetic interaction between voriconazole and methadone at steady state in male patients on methadone therapy and to characterize the safety and tolerability profile during the coadministration. Twenty-three patients on individualized methadone therapy (30 to 100 mg once daily) were enrolled into this randomized, patient- and investigator-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study. Methadone pharmacokinetic samples were collected from patients receiving methadone alone as the baseline before they were randomized to coadminister either 200 mg voriconazole twice daily (BID) (400-mg BID loading doses on the first day) (n = 16) or matching placebo (n = 7) for the next 5 days. Pharmacokinetic samples for methadone and voriconazole were collected on the last day of voriconazole dosing. The safety data were collected throughout the study. Voriconazole increased the steady-state exposure of pharmacologically active enantiomer (R)-methadone: the mean area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0-24) was increased by 47.2% (90% confidence intervals [CI]: 37.7%, 57.4%), and the mean peak concentration (Cmax) was increased by 30.7% (90% CI: 22.2%, 39.8%). The magnitude of increase in (S)-methadone exposure was greater than that of (R)-methadone: the AUC0-24 was increased by 103.4% (90% CI: 85.0%, 123.6%), and the Cmax was increased by 65.4% (90% CI: 52.6%, 79.2%). Methadone appeared to have no effect on the steady-state voriconazole pharmacokinetics compared to the historical data for voriconazole alone. Methadone patients receiving voriconazole showed no signs or symptoms of significant opioid withdrawal or overdose. Coadministration of 200 mg voriconazole BID with methadone was generally safe and well tolerated. Nevertheless, caution should be exercised when voriconazole is coadministered with methadone due to the increase in (R)-methadone exposure, which in turn may require a dose reduction of methadone. PMID

  10. ¹H NMR-based metabonomic analysis of brain in rats of morphine dependence and withdrawal intervention.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhengtao; Deng, Yi; Hu, Chunyan; Deng, Pengchi; Bu, Qian; Yan, Guangyan; Zhou, Jiaqing; Shao, Xue; Zhao, Jinxuan; Li, Yan; Zhu, Ruiming; Xu, Youzhi; Zhao, Yinglan; Cen, Xiaobo

    2012-05-16

    Metabolic consequences of morphine dependence and withdrawal intervention have not been well explored. In the present study, the metabolic changes in brain hippocampus, nucleus accumbens (NAc), prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatum of rats with morphine dependence and withdrawal intervention were explored by using ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance coupled with principal component analysis, partial least squares and orthogonal signal correction analysis. We found that the concentrations of neurotransmitters including glutamate, glutamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid changed differentially in hippocampus, NAc, PFC and striatum after repeated morphine treatment. Significant changes were also found in a number of cerebral metabolites including N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), lactic acid, creatine, myo-inositol and taurine. These findings indicate the profound disturbances of energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism and neurotransmitters caused by chronic morphine treatment. Interestingly, morphine-induced changes in lactic acid, creatine and NAA were clearly reversed by intervention of methadone or clonidine. Our study provides a comprehensive understanding of the metabolic alteration associated with morphine addiction and withdrawal therapy, which may help to develop new pharmacotherapies. PMID:22391120

  11. Methadone Maintenance as Law and Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyman, Florence

    1972-01-01

    Argues that substitution of methadone for heroin would not rehabilitate the drug addict, but it may be used as a method of tranquilizing a potentially troublesome ghetto and poor white population. (RJ)

  12. Managing acute withdrawal syndrome on patients with heroin and morphine addiction by acupuncture therapy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Po-kuang; Lu, Gabriel P; Lu, Dominic P; Lu, D P; Lu, Winston I

    2004-01-01

    Though there are articles and case reports about using acupuncture to detoxify and to break the narcotic addiction, few articles describe in the West about using acupuncture therapy to treat the emergence of acute withdrawal symptom due to heroin, opium, or morphine. Most often the method of treatment are using the methadone or benzodiazepine and phenoziazine drugs this article describes many years of clinical experience with non-drug approach to treat the acute withdrawal symptoms with acupuncture therapy. Unlike the drug approach, which usually has side effects, there is no adverse effect with acupuncture therapy. PMID:15807100

  13. Manifest and Latent Components in Methadone Maintenance: The Methadone Maintenance Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Charles H.

    1975-01-01

    This paper discusses various difficulties which arise when the staff of a methadone maintenance clinic must come to grips with the manifest and latent issues in service delivery. A solution is suggested which involves severing the tie between methadone and the behaviors which are reinforced by its use. (Author)

  14. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled and active-controlled study to assess the relative abuse potential of oxycodone HCl-niacin tablets compared with oxycodone alone in nondependent, recreational opioid users

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Lynn R; Rolleri, Robert L; Pixton, Glenn C; Sommerville, Kenneth W

    2012-01-01

    Background Abuse-deterrent formulations attempt to address public health and societal concerns regarding opioid abuse. Oxycodone HCl-niacin tablets combine oxycodone HCl with niacin and functional inactive excipients to create potential barriers to oral, intranasal, and intravenous abuse. This study compared the relative abuse potential of oral immediate-release oxycodone HCl-niacin with that of oral immediate-release oxycodone HCl and placebo in nondependent, recreational opioid users. Methods Forty-nine participants received oxycodone HCl-niacin 40/240 mg and 80/480 mg, oxycodone 40 mg and 80 mg, and placebo in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled and active-controlled, five-way crossover study. Primary endpoints based on a bipolar 100 mm visual analog scale for drug liking were area under effect curve (AUE0–1h, AUE0–2h, AUE0–3h), peak disliking, and effect at 0.5 hours post-dose (E0.5h). Other endpoints included take drug again assessment, overall drug liking, and pupillometry. Results There were statistically significant differences between oxycodone HCl-niacin and oxycodone HCl doses for all primary endpoints (P < 0.0001, all comparisons), suggesting reduced abuse potential with oxycodone HCl-niacin. Take drug again and overall drug liking showed greater liking of oxycodone alone. Oxycodone HCl-niacin 80/480 mg had consistently lower liking assessments than oxycodone HCl-niacin 40/240 mg, suggesting a dose-response to the aversive effects of niacin. Opioid-related adverse events were similar for equivalent oxycodone doses. The treatment-emergent adverse events most specifically associated with oxycodone HCl-niacin (ie, skin-burning sensation, warmth, and flushing) were consistent with the expected vasocutaneous effects of niacin. No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusion Oxycodone HCl-niacin tablets may, in a dose-dependent manner, decrease the potential for oral abuse of oxycodone without unexpected adverse events or clinically

  15. CYP2D6 Genotype Dependent Oxycodone Metabolism in Postoperative Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stamer, Ulrike M.; Zhang, Lan; Book, Malte; Lehmann, Lutz E.; Stuber, Frank; Musshoff, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Background The impact of polymorphic cytochrome P450 CYP2D6 enzyme on oxycodone's metabolism and clinical efficacy is currently being discussed. However, there are only spare data from postoperative settings. The hypothesis of this study is that genotype dependent CYP2D6 activity influences plasma concentrations of oxycodone and its metabolites and impacts analgesic consumption. Methods Patients received oxycodone 0.05 mg/kg before emerging from anesthesia and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for the subsequent 48 postoperative hours. Blood samples were drawn at 30, 90 and 180 minutes after the initial oxycodone dose. Plasma concentrations of oxycodone and its metabolites oxymorphone, noroxycodone and noroxymorphone were analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. CYP2D6 genotyping was performed and 121 patients were allocated to the following genotype groups: PM (poor metabolizer: no functionally active CYP2D6 allele), HZ/IM (heterozygous subjects, intermediate metabolizers with decreased CYP2D6 activity), EM (extensive metabolizers, normal CYP2D6 activity) and UM (ultrarapid metabolizers, increased CYP2D6 activity). Primary endpoint was the genotype dependent metabolite ratio of plasma concentrations oxymorphone/oxycodone. Secondary endpoint was the genotype dependent analgesic consumption with calculation of equianalgesic doses compared to the standard non-CYP dependent opioid piritramide. Results Metabolism differed between CYP2D6 genotypes. Mean (95%-CI) oxymophone/oxycodone ratios were 0.10 (0.02/0.19), 0.13 (0.11/0.16), 0.18 (0.16/0.20) and 0.28 (0.07/0.49) in PM, HZ/IM, EM and UM, respectively (p = 0.005). Oxycodone consumption up to the 12th hour was highest in PM (p = 0.005), resulting in lowest equianalgesic doses of piritramide versus oxycodone for PM (1.6 (1.4/1.8); EM and UM 2.2 (2.1/2.3); p<0.001). Pain scores did not differ between genotypes. Conclusions In this postoperative setting, the number of

  16. Methadone

    MedlinePlus

    ... fluvoxamine (Luvox); medications for glaucoma, irritable bowel disease, Parkinson's disease, ulcers, and urinary problems; certain medications for ... naltrexone (ReVia, Vivitrol, in Embeda); pentazocine (Talwin); phenobarbital; phenytoin (Dilantin, Phenytek); rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane, in Rifamate, in ...

  17. (1) H-nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomic analysis of brain in rhesus monkeys with morphine treatment and withdrawal intervention.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yi; Bu, Qian; Hu, Zhengtao; Deng, Pengchi; Yan, Guangyan; Duan, Jiachuan; Hu, Chunyan; Zhou, Jiaqing; Shao, Xue; Zhao, Jinxuan; Li, Yan; Zhu, Ruiming; Zhao, Yinglan; Cen, Xiaobo

    2012-11-01

    Comprehensive cerebral metabolites involved in morphine dependence have not been well explored. To gain a better understanding of morphine dependence and withdrawal therapy in a model highly related to humans, metabolic changes in brain hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) of rhesus monkeys were measured by (1) H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, coupled with partial least squares and orthogonal signal correction analysis. The results showed that concentrations of myoinositol (M-Ins) and taurine were significantly reduced, whereas lactic acid was increased in hippocampus and PFC of morphine-dependent monkeys. Phosphocholine and creatine increased in PFC but decreased in hippocampus after chronic treatment of morphine. Moreover, N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, glutathione, methionine, and homocysteic acid also changed in these brain regions. These results suggest that chronic morphine exposure causes profound disturbances of neurotransmitters, membrane, and energy metabolism in the brain. Notably, morphine-induced dysregulations in NAA, creatine, lactic acid, taurine, M-Ins, and phosphocholine were clearly reversed after intervention with methadone or clonidine. Our study highlights the potential of metabolic profiling to enhance our understanding of metabolite alteration and neurobiological actions associated with morphine addiction and withdrawal therapy in primates. PMID:22847893

  18. Methadone toxicity in a poisoning referral center

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Fatemeh; Yaraghi, Ahmad; Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad; Moudi, Maryam; Eizadi-Mood, Nastaran; Gheshlaghi, Farzad; Farajzadegan, Ziba

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Methadone poisoning can occur accidentally or intentionally for suicide or homicide purposes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiological and clinical manifestations of Methadone poisoning. Methods: A descriptive analytical study was performed from 2010 to 2012 in the poisoning emergency and clinical toxicology departments of Noor hospital affiliated with Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (Isfahan, Iran). All patients with Methadone poisoning within this period of time were investigated. Different variables were recorded in a checklist. Findings: A total of 385 patients were studied. About 85.7% had ingested only Methadone and 14.3% had ingested other medications with Methadone. Mean ± standard deviation of the age was 32.1 ± 15 years (range: 1-90). Most of the patients were male (76.4%). Nearly 40% of the patients were narcotic addicts, 25.5% were addicts under surveillance of Methadone maintenance therapy centers and 34.5% were non-addicts. Intentional poisoning was observed in most of the patients (57.7%). Most of the patients had a low level of consciousness on admission (58.2%). Respiratory depression and hypotension was observed in 35.6% and 12.7% of the cases as the most common symptoms. Regarding vital signs, there was a significant difference in respiratory rate on admission among different evaluated groups (P = 0.02). Length of hospital stay was 18.79 ± 0.72 h (range: 4-240 h, median: 15 h). About 57 patients (25.8%) from the intentionally poisoned patients and 19 patients (12.3%) from the unintentionally poisoned patients had a history of psychiatric disorder (P = 0.001). Most of the patients survived without complications. Conclusion: Addiction, age, gender, attempt to suicide and a history of psychiatric disorder were of the most important factors effective in Methadone poisoning, which should be considered in the public training and prevention of poisoning. PMID:24991620

  19. "Influence of methadone on clopidogrel in addicts on methadone maintenance therapy" Drug interaction between methadone and clopidogrel

    PubMed Central

    Fallah, Ferigol; Hamidikenari, Abolhasan; Sajadi, Seyed Navid; Sajadi, Seyed Rohollah; Shiran, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clopidogrel is a prodrug that converts in the liver to an active thiol metabolite, which irreversibly inhibits the platelet P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate receptor. It seems that methadone as CYP2C19 inhibitor affects ticlopidine activity in vivo. This study aimed to test the ability of methadone in changing ticlopidine pharmacokinetics. Methods: We conducted a case–control study in 10 subjects. The cases (5 subjects) in our study were addicts who were receiving methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) for preventing opium withdrawal symptoms. The control group were opiate users before starting MMT. In both groups, the patients received clopidogrel (75mg/day) for 5 days. On the 6th day, the subjects returned to the clinic, blood samples were taken up to 12 hours following clopidogrel dosing in case and control groups. Plasma concentration of clopidogrel was measured by GC-MAS. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel software to estimate PK parameters. Results: In this study, methadone decreased clopidogrel clearance by 25% and increased the AUC0-inf nearly 1.3 fold during the coadministration of clopidogrel as an antiplatelet drug. Conclusion: A significant decrease in the clearance of clopidogrel during the coadministration of methadone consistent with a decrease in clopidogrel conversion to its active metabolite and this may decrease its efficacy and may have life-threatening consequences for the patients undergoing clopidogerel maintenance therapy. PMID:27386066

  20. Contributing factors to methadone-related deaths in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Albion, Caroline; Shkrum, Michael; Cairns, James

    2010-12-01

    To identify factors contributing to methadone-related deaths in Ontario in 2004, demographic factors, methadone blood levels, evidence of concurrent drug use, the source of methadone (prescribed or illicit), and its contribution in exacerbating preexistent disease were studied to identify users at risk for methadone toxicity and death. This retrospective study reviewed postmortem data, autopsy reports, police reports, hospital data, and postmortem toxicological analyses available in the Ontario Chief Coroner's Information System. There were 54 cases with methadone detected in postmortem blood samples. Of total, 9 cases were not included in the study because of incomplete documentation. About 11 deaths were due to methadone toxicity alone; 25 deaths were due to combined methadone and other drug toxicity (notably cocaine and alcohol); 7 deaths were due to the exacerbation of a preexisting disease by methadone; 1 death was due to disease alone, and 1 death was due to trauma sustained in a motor vehicle collision. A significant number of methadone-related deaths were due to illicit methadone ingestion, which exceeded the opioid tolerance level. The source of methadone in these cases was unknown. Drug addicts, unaware of the hazard of consuming other illicit or prescription drugs concurrently, are at risk. This study demonstrated that methadone toxicity is enhanced by underlying disease, especially in individuals with underlying cardiac and pulmonary pathology. PMID:20081524

  1. Going Through the Changes: Methadone in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agar, Michael

    1977-01-01

    Methadone has been defined as an agent to draw addicts out of the street life into "straight" society. However, the complementary perspective of the streets sees methadone as a new, widely available drug to be integrated into a subculture previously dominated by heroin. This article discusses the adaptation to methadone and its implications. (NQ)

  2. Work Adjustment of the Methadone-Maintained Corporate Employee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yankowitz, Robert; Randell, Joan

    1977-01-01

    The work adjustment of 26 methadone-maintained corporate employees was evaluated. Results indicated: (a) relative to their nonmethadone-maintained coworkers, the methadone-maintained employees had comparable job performance and superior punctuality and attendance; and (b) the methadone-maintained skilled laborers were satisfied with their…

  3. Comparison of oxycodone and fentanyl for postoperative patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic gynecological surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joong-Ho; Lee, Chiu; Shin, Youngmin; Ban, Jong-Seouk; Lee, Ji-Hyang

    2015-01-01

    Background Opioids are widely used in boluses and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for postoperative pain control. In this study, we compared the effects of oxycodone and fentanyl on postoperative pain in patients with intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) after laparoscopic gynecological surgery. Methods Seventy-four patients undergoing elective total laparoscopic hysterectomy or laparoscopic myomectomy were randomly assigned to the administration of either fentanyl or oxycodone using IV-PCA (potency ratio 1 : 60). The cumulative dose administered in the patient-controlled mode during the initial 48 hours after the operation was measured. Patients were also assessed for postoperative pain severity, adverse effects, and patient satisfaction. Results No significant differences were observed in patient satisfaction with the analgesia during the postoperative period. Patients in the oxycodone group experienced significantly more dizziness compared to the fentanyl group. Patients in the oxycodone group showed significantly lower consumption of opioid in the patient-controlled mode (10.1 ± 8.5 ml vs. 16.6 ± 12.0 ml, P = 0.013). Conclusions Our data suggest that oxycodone and fentanyl demonstrated similar effects, and therefore oxycodone may be a good alternative to fentanyl in postoperative pain management. Further studies in various clinical settings will be needed to determine the adequate potency ratio. PMID:25844134

  4. Characterization of (+/-)-methadone uptake by rat lung.

    PubMed Central

    Chi, C H; Dixit, B N

    1977-01-01

    1. By use of a sensitive and specific fluorescence assay procedure it was shown that after subcutaneous administration to rats, (+/-)-methadone was concentrated in the lung. Lung to serum ratios ranging from 25 to 60 were obtained indicating that the rat lung tissue was capable of extracting (+/-)-methadone against a concentration gradient. 2. This phenomenon was investigated in vitro with rat lung slices incubated in Krebs-Ringer phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). The uptake was expressed in terms of tissue to medium concentration ratios (T/M ratio). 3. The principal observations were: (i) Studies on the time-course of the uptake showed that the T/M ratios of (+/-)-methadone increased rapidly during the first 60 min of incubation and then more slowly, with a plateau occurring at 180 min; (ii) The T/M ratio of (+/-)-methadone progressively increased from 9.5 to 17 as the pH of the incubation medium was varied from 6.2 to 7.5; (iii) When the concentration of (+/-)-methadone in the incubation medium was varied from 0.005 to 0.5 mM, the T/M ratio decreased rapidly suggesting self-saturation of the transport process. Beyond the medium concentration of 0.5 mM, the T/M ratio declined very slowly. 4. These results suggested that at low concentrations, (+/-)-methadone was transported predominantly by a self-saturable process while at higher concentrations it was transported by a process of simple diffusion. 5. At low concentrations (0.01 mM) the uptake of (+)-methadone was higher than that of (-)-isomer indicating stereo-specificity of the uptake process. The uptake of (+/-)-methadone at low concentration (0.01 mM) was significantly inhibited by low temperature, lack of O2, lack of glucose, lack of Na+ in the incubation medium, and by exposure of the tissue to high temperature (approximately 100 degrees C). The uptake was also inhibited by relatively high concentration of iodoacetate (1.0 mM) and of naloxone (1.0 mM). 6. Kinetic analysis of data showed that the diffusion constant

  5. [Fatal methadone poisoning of a child].

    PubMed

    Klupp, N; Risser, D; Stichenwirth, M; Hönigschnabl, S; Stimpfl, T; Bauer, G

    2000-04-21

    The substance methadone is used for substitution therapy since the 1960s in the U.S. Mainly because of the endemic spread of HIV-1 infections among intravenous drug abusers methadone was made legally available through medical prescription in Austria in 1987. Legal authorities today also allow the patient to take home the necessary daily consumption for weekends or public holidays. The drug is distributed as a watery solution in tiny bottles, which are fitted with an ordinary screw cap. This kind of distribution may, however, have fatal consequences. This is demonstrated in the following case of accidental poisoning of an infant: A two-year-old girl whose parents were both participating in the substitution scheme was found dead in her bed in Vienna in 1997. Forensic autopsy revealed a methadone concentration in the liver tissue of 640 ng/g. The criminal investigation determined that the girl had opened a bottle of methadone solution and subsequently had taken the drug. Considering the circumstances of this accident, from the medical point of view safety devices for the screw caps of the methadone bottles should be required by law, in order to avoid future accidental poisoning. PMID:10849943

  6. Profile of Clients Attending a Methadone Clinic

    PubMed Central

    JACOB, Sabrina Anne; MOHAMMED, Fauziah; HASSALI, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Client characteristics provide useful information for designing programs that target individuals with risk factors for substance use and for determining client retention. Therefore, this study examined the profiles of clients attending a methadone clinic. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of clients of a methadone clinic was conducted through a survey to obtain a profile of methadone clients. Results: Of the 51 patients who responded (response rate: 66.2%), the mean (SD) age at which they started substance use was 19.8 (5.1) years. Friends were cited as the most regular source of drugs (82.4%), and heroin was the most commonly used drug (98%). Daily substance use was reported by 72.5% of the respondents; 23.5% admitted to having stolen money to purchase drugs; 92.2% tried quitting substance use on their own and 98% stated that the main reason for registering at the clinic was that they wanted to stop their drug dependence. Approximately 60% of clients were receiving methadone doses of less than 60 mg/day. Conclusion: Heroin is still the most popular drug of abuse and most clients still receive methadone doses below the recommended level, despite evidence of poor patient retention rates associated with these low doses. PMID:25892951

  7. The Adverse Events of Oxycodone in Cancer-Related Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hu; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Lang; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Jin, Su-Han; Yue, Guo-Jun; Tian, Xu; Zhou, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The adverse events (AEs) of oxycodone in cancer-related pain were controversial, so we conducted a meta-analysis to determine it. PubMed, Embase, CBM, CNKI, WanFang database, The Cochrane library, Web of Science, and the reference of included studies were searched to recognize pertinent studies. Relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for all AEs were all extracted. The fixed-effects model was used to calculate pooled RRs and 95% CIs. Power calculation was performed using macro embedded in SAS software after all syntheses were completed. We identified 11 eligible trials involving 1211 patients: 604 patients included in oxycodone group and 607 patients involved in control group. Our quantitative analysis included 8 AEs, and the pooled analyses indicated that oxycodone compared with other opioids in cancer-related pain were not significantly decreased RRs of all AEs (dizziness RR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.69–1.30, Z = 0.35, P = 0.72; nausea RR = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.72–1.07, Z = 1.26, P = 0.21; vomiting RR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.70–1.15, Z = 0.9, P = 0.37; sleepiness RR = 0.86, 95% CI: 0.38–1.36, Z = 0.36, P = 0.72; constipation RR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.81–1.19, Z = 0.21, P = 0.83; anorexia RR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.58–1.62, Z = 0.11, P = 0.91; pruritus RR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.44–1.30, Z = 1.01, P = 0.31; dysuria RR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.07–1.62, Z = 1.36, P = 0.1)]. The subgroup analysis shown that Ox controlled-release (CR) had less sleepiness compared with MS-contin (Mc) CR (RR = 0.47, 95% CI: 0.25–0.90, P = 0.02). The power analysis suggests that all AEs have low statistical power. The present meta-analysis detected that no statistically significant difference were found among oxycodone and other opioids in all AEs, but Ox CR may had less sleepiness compared with Mc CR when subgroup analysis were conducted. PMID:27082588

  8. Body Composition Changes Associated With Methadone Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sadek, Gamal E.; Chiu, Simon; Cernovsky, Zack Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Methadone is associated with a statistically significant increase in BMI in the first 2 years of treatment. Objectives: To evaluate the changes of body composition (bone mass, % fat, % muscle mass, % water, and basal metabolic rate) related to this increase. Patients and Methods: Changes in body composition were monitored, via bioelectrical impedance, in 29 patients in methadone treatment for opiate dependency (age 18 to 44, mean = 29.3, SD = 7.0, 13 men, 16 women). Results: Within one year from admission to treatment, a statistically significant (t-tests, P < 0.05) increase was noted in their body mass index (BMI), % of body fat, average body mass, and average basal metabolic rate, and relative decrease in their % of muscle mass and % of bone mass. Neither absolute bone mass nor muscle mass changed significantly. Conclusions: Physicians involved in care of methadone patients should recommend dietary and lifestyle changes to improve their overall health. PMID:27162765

  9. Morphine withdrawal dramatically reduces lymphocytes in morphine-dependent macaques.

    PubMed

    Weed, Michael R; Carruth, Lucy M; Adams, Robert J; Ator, Nancy A; Hienz, Robert D

    2006-09-01

    The immune effects of chronic opiate exposure and/or opiate withdrawal are not well understood. The results of human studies with opiate abusers are variable and may not be able to control for important factors such as subjects' drug histories, health and nutritional status. Nonhuman primate models are necessary to control these important factors. A model of opiate dependence in macaques was developed to study the effects of opiate dependence and withdrawal on measures of immune function. Four pigtailed macaques drank a mixture of morphine (20 mg/kg/session) and orange-flavored drink every 6 h for several months. During stable morphine dependence, absolute numbers of neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes did not change relative to pre-morphine levels. However, there was a significant decrease in the absolute number and percentage of natural killer (NK) cells in morphine dependence. Either precipitated withdrawal or abstinence for 24 h resulted in behavioral withdrawal signs in all animals. Absolute lymphocyte counts decreased and absolute netrophil counts increased significantly in withdrawal, relative to levels during morphine dependence. Lymphocyte subset (CD4+, CD8+, CD20+) cells were also decreased in absolute numbers with little change in their percentage distributions. There was, however, a significant increase in the percentage of NK cells in withdrawal relative to levels during morphine dependence. This study demonstrates the usefulness of voluntary oral self-dosing procedures for maintaining morphine dependence in nonhuman primates and demonstrates that the morphine withdrawal syndrome includes large alterations in blood parameters of immune system function, including nearly 50% reduction in numbers of CD4+, CD8+ and CD20+ cells. PMID:18040802

  10. Methadone, Cocaine, Opiates and Metabolite Disposition in Umbilical Cord and Correlations to Maternal Methadone Dose and Neonatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Ana; Jones, Hendreé E.; Johnson, Rolley E.; Gray, Teresa R; Shakleya, Diaa M; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To explore methadone and 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) umbilical cord disposition, correlate with maternal methadone dose and neonatal outcomes, and evaluate the window of drug detection in umbilical cord of in utero illicit drug exposure. Methods Subjects, 19 opioid-dependent pregnant women from two clinical studies, one comparing methadone and buprenorphine pharmacotherapy for opioid-dependence treatment, and the second examining monetary reinforcement schedules to maintain drug abstinence. Correlations were calculated for methadone and EDDP umbilical cord concentrations and maternal methadone dose, and neonatal outcomes. Cocaine- and opiate-positive umbilical cord concentrations were compared to those in placenta and meconium, and urine specimens collected throughout gestation. Results Significant positive correlations were found for umbilical cord methadone concentrations and methadone mean daily dose, mean dose during the 3rd trimester and methadone cumulative daily dose. Umbilical cord EDDP concentrations and EDDP/methadone concentration ratios were positively correlated to newborn length, peak neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) score and time-to-peak NAS score. Methadone concentrations and EDDP/methadone ratios in umbilical cord and placenta were positively correlated. Meconium identified many more cocaine and opiate positive specimens than umbilical cord. Conclusion Umbilical cord methadone concentrations were correlated to methadone doses. Also, our results indicate that methadone and EDDP concentrations might help to predict NAS severity. Meconium proved to be more suitable than umbilical cord to detect in utero exposure to cocaine and opiates; however, umbilical cord could be useful when meconium is unavailable due to in utero or delayed expulsion. PMID:21743375

  11. Separate and combined psychopharmacological effects of alprazolam and oxycodone in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Zacny, James P.; Paice, Judith A.; Coalson, Dennis W.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are epidemiological data indicating that medical and/or nonmedical use of prescription opioids oftentimes involves concurrent use of other substances. One of those substances is benzodiazepines. It would be of relevance to characterize the effects of an opioid and a benzodiazepine when taken together to determine if measures related to abuse liability-related effects and psychomotor performance impairment are increased compared to when the drugs are taken alone. Methods Twenty volunteers participated in a crossover, randomized, double-blind study in which they received placebo, 0.5 mg alprazolam, 10mg oxycodone, and 0.5 mg alprazolam combined with 10mg oxycodone, all p.o. Subjective, psychomotor, and physiological measures were assessed during each of the four sessions. Results Oxycodone by itself increased drug liking and “take again” ratings relative to placebo, but these ratings were not increased when oxycodone was taken with alprazolam, which by itself did not increase either of these ratings. The two drugs in combination produced stronger effects (larger in magnitude or longer lasting) than when either was taken alone on a number of measures, including psychomotor performance impairment. Conclusions In healthy volunteers, abuse liability-related subjective effects of oxycodone were not enhanced by alprazolam. There was enhanced behavioral toxicity when the drugs were taken together, and thus, this is of significant concern from a public safety standpoint. PMID:22365897

  12. Employment Patterns of Methadone Maintenance Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloch, Harriet I.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of employment patterns of methadone maintenance clients had indicated that the majority were not employed at time of program admission. At time of evaluation, 70 percent of the sample were employed; 88 percent of these clients had previous work histories and brought marketable skills with them. (Author)

  13. Methadone Maintenance: The Addict's Family Recreated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartzman, John; Bokos, Peter

    1979-01-01

    A study of four methadone clinics, the addicts treated at these clinics, and their families, reveals basic dissonances in treatment ideology and professional-paraprofessional relationships which, combined with the addict's particular mode of functioning, make significant change in his behavior improbable. (Author)

  14. Opioids for cancer breakthrough pain: a pilot study reporting patient assessment of time to meaningful pain relief.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, Giovambattista

    2008-05-01

    Breakthrough pain is a common and distinct component of cancer pain that is usually managed with normal release opioids (also known as rescue medication) either before or soon after its onset. A prospective survey of hospice inpatients with breakthrough pain was undertaken to characterize their pain and then compare the time to onset of pain relief of their rescue medication. Patients presented with, on average, 1.7 different types of breakthrough pains (range, 1-4). The average number of breakthrough pains was four per day (range, 1-8), and the average duration of breakthrough pain was 35 minutes (range, 15-60); most occurred suddenly and unpredictably. Patients used morphine, oxycodone, hydromorphone, methadone, or oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate as rescue medication and the average time to meaningful pain relief following their administration was 31 minutes (range, 5-75). No difference was found between morphine, oxycodone, and hydromorphone. Methadone appeared to work faster than morphine (P<0.01) but no faster than oxycodone or hydromorphone, whereas oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate worked faster than morphine, oxycodone, hydromorphone, and methadone (P<0.001). PMID:18258412

  15. Relationship between plasma concentrations of the l-enantiomer of methadone and response to methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Meini, Milo; Moncini, Marco; Daini, Laura; Giarratana, Tania; Scaramelli, Daniela; Chericoni, Silvio; Stefanelli, Fabio; Rucci, Paola

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between the plasma concentration of l-methadone and response to methadone in real-world patients, in order to identify a minimum plasma concentration above which methadone treatment is effective. Ninety-four patients with opioid dependence under maintenance methadone treatment were consecutively recruited. Response was defined as negative urine analyses in the three weeks prior to the blood sampling. The percentage of participants with a plasma l-methadone concentration between 100 and 250 ng/ml was 54.2% among those with a methadone dosage ≥60 mg/day. Plasma l-methadone concentrations were significantly higher in patients with negative urine analyses compared with those with positive urine analyses (median 93 vs. 77 ng/ml, Mann-Whitney test, P<0.05). Above plasma l-methadone concentrations of 200 ng/ml no heroin use was reported and urine analyses were negative. Moreover, above concentrations of 250 ng/ml craving was absent. Examination of demographic correlates of treatment outcome indicated that older age, a stable job and being married were protective against the use of heroin. Mean plasma l-methadone concentration was significantly lower in patients who used cannabis compared with those who did not use cannabis, after adjusting for methadone dosage. In conclusion our results identify specific cut-offs for plasma l-methadone concentrations about which therapeutic response is observed and provide new evidence that therapeutic response is associated with patient׳s demographic characteristics. This underscores the need to monitor plasma methadone concentrations as part of Drug Addiction Services routine practice, in order to provide an objective framework for changing the methadone dosage. PMID:25891369

  16. Profile of extended-release oxycodone/acetaminophen for acute pain

    PubMed Central

    Bekhit, Mary Hanna

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a historical and pharmacological overview of a new opioid analgesic that boasts an extended-release (ER) formulation designed to provide both immediate and prolonged analgesia for up to 12 hours in patients who are experiencing acute pain. This novel medication, ER oxycodone/acetaminophen, competes with current US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved opioid formulations available on the market in that it offers two benefits concurrently: a prolonged duration of action, and multimodal analgesia through a combination of an opioid (oxycodone) with a nonopioid component. Current FDA-approved combination analgesics, such as Percocet (oxycodone/acetaminophen), are available solely in immediate-release (IR) formulations. PMID:26527898

  17. Oxycodone involvement in drug abuse deaths: a DAWN-based classification scheme applied to an oxycodone postmortem database containing over 1000 cases.

    PubMed

    Cone, Edward J; Fant, Reginald V; Rohay, Jeffrey M; Caplan, Yale H; Ballina, Mayra; Reder, Robert F; Spyker, Daniel; Haddox, J David

    2003-03-01

    An oxycodone postmortem database was created from 1243 solicited cases from Medical Examiner and Coroner (ME/C) offices in 23 states in the United States over the period from August 27, 1999, through January 17, 2002. The request for cases was specific to only those cases in which the ME/C opined that the death involved oxycodone. Each case was evaluated to determine the role of oxycodone and the specific drug product OxyContin tablets in the death. Oxycodone identification was based on toxicology testing, and OxyContin identification was based on evidence found at the scene, credible witness reports, or identification of tablets in gastrointestinal contents. A system of case categorization was developed for this study based on the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) system for reporting drug abuse mortality data in the United States, using the same standardized, well-understood terminology. Of the 1243 cases, 79 cases were incomplete and could not be evaluated. There were an additional 150 cases submitted in which oxycodone was not identified by the originating ME/C. Of the remaining 1014 cases, 919 (90.6%) were related to drug abuse, whereas 95 (9.4%) cases were categorized as not involving drug abuse. Only 30 (3.3%) of the drug abuse cases involved oxycodone as the single reported chemical entity; of these, 12 cases had OxyContin identified as a source of oxycodone. Of the 919 drug abuse cases, the vast majority (N = 889, 96.7%) were multiple drug abuse deaths in which there was at least one other plausible contributory drug in addition to oxycodone. The most prevalent drug combinations were oxycodone in combination with benzodiazepines, alcohol, cocaine, other narcotics, marijuana, or antidepressants. Using the DAWN definitions, drug abuse cases were further categorized as drug-induced or drug-related. A total of 851 (92.6%) cases met the criteria for classification as being drug-induced, and the remaining 68 (7.4%) cases were categorized as drug-related. Cause

  18. Methadone for Fun Sake… Kidneys Are at Stake!!!

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Sameer; Wankhedkar, Kashmira; Popis-Matejak, Beata; Baumstein, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Acute renal failure from rhabdomyolysis is a well-established clinical entity; however, rhabdomyolysis exclusively caused by the ingestion of methadone requiring hemodialysis is very uncommon. With a similar mechanism to opiates, methadone can cause rhabdomyolysis and further consequences. Given the increasing use of methadone as a therapy for opiate dependence, clinicians prescribing this medication should be aware of this life-threatening complication. PMID:25782567

  19. Morphine, morphine-6-glucuronide and morphine-3-glucuronide pharmacokinetics in newborn infants receiving diamorphine infusions.

    PubMed

    Barrett, D A; Barker, D P; Rutter, N; Pawula, M; Shaw, P N

    1996-06-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of morphine, morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) and morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) were studied in 19 ventilated newborn infants (24-41 weeks gestation) who were given a loading dose of 50 micrograms kg-1 or 200 micrograms kg-1 of diamorphine followed by an intravenous infusion of 15 micrograms kg-1 h-1 of diamorphine. Plasma concentrations of morphine, M3G and M6G were measured during the accrual to steady-state and at steady state of the diamorphine infusion. 2. Following both the 50 micrograms kg-1 or 200 micrograms kg-1 loading doses the mean steady-state plasma concentration (+/- s.d.) of morphine, M3G and M6G were 86 +/- 52 ng ml-1, 703 +/- 400 ng ml-1 and 48 +/- 28 ng ml-1 respectively and morphine clearance was found to be 4.6 +/- 3.2 ml min-1 kg-1. 3. M3G formation clearance was estimated to be 2.5 +/- 1.8 ml min-1 kg-1, and the formation clearance of M6G was estimated to be 0.46 +/- 0.32 ml min-1 kg-1. 4. M3G metabolite clearance was 0.46 +/- 0.60 ml min-1 kg-1, the elimination half-life was 11.1 +/- 11.3 h and the volume of distribution was 0.55 +/- 1.13 l kg-1. M6G metabolite clearance was 0.71 +/- 0.36 ml min-1 kg-1, the elimination half-life was 18.2 +/- 13.6 h and the volume of distribution was 1.03 +/- 0.88 l kg-1. 5. No significant effect of the loading dose (50 micrograms kg-1 or 200 micrograms kg-1) on the plasma morphine or metabolite concentrations or their derived pharmacokinetic parameters was found. 6. We were unable to identify correlations between gestational age of the infants and any of the determined pharmacokinetic parameters. 7. M3G: morphine and M6G: morphine steady-state plasma concentration ratios were 11.0 +/- 10.8 and 0.8 +/- 0.8, respectively. 8. The metabolism of morphine in neonates, in terms of the respective contributions of each glucuronide pathway, was similar to that in adults. PMID:8799518

  20. Methadone as a chemical weapon: two fatal cases involving babies.

    PubMed

    Kintz, Pascal; Villain, Marion; Dumestre-Toulet, Véronique; Capolaghi, Bernard; Cirimele, Vincent

    2005-12-01

    Methadone is largely used for the substitution management of opiate-dependent individuals but can also be easily found on the black market. The first cases involving repetitive sedation linked to the use of methadone and subsequent death of 2 babies are reported. At the autopsy, no particular morphologic changes were noted except for pulmonary and visceral congestion. There was no evidence of violence, and the pathologist in both cases found no needle marks. Toxicological analyses, as achieved by GC/MS, demonstrated both recent and repetitive methadone exposure. In case 1, a 14-month-old girl was found dead at home. Blood concentrations were 1071 and 148 ng/mL for methadone and EDDP, respectively. Hair (6 cm) tested positive at 1.91 and 0.82 ng/mg for methadone and EDDP, respectively. In case 2, a 5-month-old girl was taken to hospital in a pediatric unit for coma. Antemortem blood analysis demonstrated methadone exposure (142 ng/mL), and the baby was declared dead 12 days after admission. Hair analysis (5 cm) by segmentation was positive for methadone in the range 1.0 (root) to 21.3 ng/mg (end). The death of the babies was attributed to accidental asphyxia ina situation where methadone was considered as a chemical weapon. The mothers, who were the perpetrators in both cases, did not deny the use of methadone as a sedative drug. PMID:16404812

  1. Methadone-related deaths. A ten year overview.

    PubMed

    Vignali, Claudia; Stramesi, Cristiana; Morini, Luca; Pozzi, Fulvia; Groppi, Angelo

    2015-12-01

    Over the last 10 years we have registered in our district (about 500,000 inhabitants) 36 cases of fatal methadone poisoning, involving both patients on treatment and naive subjects: this is a significant increase of deaths due to methadone use, misuse or abuse compared with previous years. Twenty-four patients (66.7%) were on methadone maintenance programs for heroin detoxification, while 12 (33.3%) were taking the drug without a medical prescription. The average blood concentration of methadone in patients undergoing a maintenance program was 1.06 mg/L (0.21-3.37 mg/L), against 0.79 mg/L (0.2-3.15 mg/L) in those taking the non-prescribed drug. Since 111 heroin-related deaths were recorded in our district in the same period, the fact that there appear to be many methadone deaths (about a third of heroin-related deaths) cannot be overlooked. The aim of this work is to understand the possible reasons for such a large number of methadone-related deaths. On this subject, we have noticed that risks associated with methadone intake are often underestimated by clinicians prescribing the drug: sometimes methadone is prescribed without taking into account patient's tolerance to opiates, and a large number of subjects enrolled in methadone maintenance programs in Italy, have also been given take-home doses, thus increasing the risk of abuse and diversion. PMID:26360592

  2. Better retention of Malaysian opiate dependents treated with high dose methadone in methadone maintenance therapy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Methadone is a synthetic opiate mu receptor agonist that is widely used to substitute for illicit opiates in the management of opiate dependence. It helps prevent opiate users from injecting and sharing needles which are vehicles for the spread of HIV and other blood borne viruses. This study has the objective of determining the utility of daily methadone dose to predict retention rates and re-injecting behaviour among opiate dependents. Methods Subjects comprised opiate dependent individuals who met study criteria. They took methadone based on the Malaysian guidelines and were monitored according to the study protocols. At six months, data was collected for analyses. The sensitivity and specificity daily methadone doses to predict retention rates and re-injecting behaviour were evaluated. Results Sixty-four patients volunteered to participate but only 35 (54.69%) remained active and 29 (45.31%) were inactive at 6 months of treatment. Higher doses were significantly correlated with retention rate (p < 0.0001) and re-injecting behaviour (p < 0.001). Of those retained, 80.0% were on 80 mg or more methadone per day doses with 20.0% on receiving 40 mg -79 mg. Conclusions We concluded that a daily dose of at least 40 mg was required to retain patients in treatment and to prevent re-injecting behaviour. A dose of at least 80 mg per day was associated with best results. PMID:21167035

  3. Satisfaction With Methadone Among Heroin-Dependent Patients With Current Substance Use Disorders During Methadone Maintenance Treatment.

    PubMed

    Perez de Los Cobos, Jose; Trujols, Joan; Siñol, Núria; Duran-Sindreu, Santiago; Batlle, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) has long been used to treat heroin-dependent patients. However, satisfaction with methadone in this patient population is unknown. The aim of this cross-sectional case-control study was to evaluate satisfaction with methadone in heroin-dependent patients with current substance use disorders (SUDs). Cases included 152 methadone-maintained patients with current SUD, requiring inpatient detoxification treatment, and controls included 33 methadone-maintained patients in sustained full remission for SUD. Satisfaction with methadone as a medication to treat heroin addiction was measured by using the Scale to Assess Satisfaction with Medications for Addiction Treatment-methadone for heroin addiction (SASMAT-METHER). The SASMAT-METHER subscales assess the following domains: personal functioning and well-being, antiaddictive effect on heroin, and antiaddictive effect on other substances. Compared with patients with remitted SUD, patients with current SUD scored lower on all SASMAT-METHER assessments. In such patients, overall SASMAT-METHER scores were independently and negatively associated with downward desired adjustment of methadone dose and days of heroin use during last month; although various sets of factors were independently associated with each of the SASMAT-METHER subscales, the only determinant of dissatisfaction on all subscales was the desire for downward adjustment of methadone dose. In summary, MMT patients with current SUD are less satisfied with methadone than MMT patients with remitted SUD. In patients with current SUD, downward desired adjustment of methadone dose and days of heroin use during last month are independently associated with overall dissatisfaction with methadone. PMID:26825608

  4. Effects of amphetamine, morphine, and CP 55, 940 on Go/No-Go task performance in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Koek, Wouter; Gerak, Lisa R; France, Charles P

    2015-08-01

    In humans, impulsivity measured as false alarms in a Go/No-Go task is reportedly decreased by amphetamine and is not affected by oxycodone and delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol. To model these findings in animals, three rhesus monkeys were trained to perform a food-reinforced Go/No-Go task. In this task, amphetamine was found to decrease false alarms (i.e. responding during No-Go trials), but only at doses that also decreased hits (i.e. responding during Go trials). Morphine generally decreased hits but not false alarms. The cannabinoid receptor agonist CP 55, 940 decreased both false alarms and hits, but only at doses that also decreased the number of trials completed. Additional studies in animals and humans are necessary to delineate the conditions under which amphetamine and other psychoactive drugs affect impulsivity in Go/No-Go tasks. PMID:26061355

  5. Drug-drug interaction between oxycodone and adjuvant analgesics in blood-brain barrier transport and antinociceptive effect.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Yusuke; Okura, Takashi; Shimomura, Keita; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Deguchi, Yoshiharu

    2010-01-01

    To examine possible blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport interactions between oxycodone and adjuvant analgesics, we firstly screened various candidates in vitro using [(3)H]pyrilamine, a substrate of the oxycodone transporter, as a probe drug. The uptake of [(3)H]pyrilamine by conditionally immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cells (TR-BBB13) was inhibited by antidepressants (amitriptyline, imipramine, clomipramine, amoxapine, and fluvoxamine), antiarrhythmics (mexiletine, lidocaine, and flecainide), and ketamine. On the other hand, antiepileptics (carbamazepine, phenytoin, and clonazepam) and corticosteroids (dexamethasone and prednisolone) did not inhibit [(3)H]pyrilamine uptake, with the exception of sodium valproate. The uptake of oxycodone was significantly inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by amitriptyline, fluvoxamine and mexiletine with K(i) values of 13, 65, and 44 microM, respectively. These K(i) values are 5-300 times greater than the human therapeutic plasma concentrations. Finally, we evaluated in vivo interaction between oxycodone and amitriptyline in mice. Antinociceptive effects of oxycodone were increased by coadministration of amitriptyline. The oxycodone concentrations in plasma and brain were not changed by coadministration of amitriptyline. Overall, the results suggest that several adjuvant analgesics may interact with the BBB transport of oxycodone at relatively high concentrations. However, it is unlikely that there would be any significant interaction at therapeutically or pharmacologically relevant concentrations. PMID:19499573

  6. Pharmacotherapy in the Treatment of Addiction: Methadone

    PubMed Central

    Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Borg, Lisa; Ducat, Elizabeth; Ray, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment is the most widely available pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction and has been shown over a period of 40 years to be an effective and safe treatment. While women comprise approximately 40% of clients currently being treated in MMT programs, comparatively little research geared specifically toward this group has been published. This article begins with an overview of neurobiological studies on opioid addiction, including a discussion of gender differences, followed by a review of the pharmacology of methadone The authors then examine the particular needs and differences of women being treated in MMTs, including co-dependence with other substances, women’s health issues and psychosocial needs unique to this population. In conclusion, research shows that women have different substance abuse treatment needs in comparison to their male counterparts. One New York City MMT program that has attempted to address these differences is highlighted. PMID:20407977

  7. Minocycline suppresses morphine-induced respiratory depression, suppresses morphine-induced reward, and enhances systemic morphine-induced analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Mark R.; Northcutt, Alexis L.; Chao, Lindsey W.; Kearney, Jeffrey J.; Zhang, Yingning; Berkelhammer, Debra L.; Loram, Lisa C.; Rozeske, Robert R.; Bland, Sondra T.; Maier, Steven F.; Gleeson, Todd T.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent data suggest that opioids can activate immune-like cells of the central nervous system (glia). This opioid-induced glial activation is associated with decreased analgesia, owing to the release of proinflammatory mediators. Here we examine in rats whether the putative microglial inhibitor, minocycline, may affect morphine-induced respiratory depression and/or morphine-induced reward (conditioned place preference). Systemic co-administration of minocycline significantly attenuated morphine-induced reductions in tidal volume, minute volume, inspiratory force and expiratory force, but did not affect morphine-induced reductions in respiratory rate. Minocycline attenuation of respiratory depression was also paralleled with significant attenuation by minocycline of morphine-induced reductions in blood oxygen saturation. Minocycline also attenuated morphine conditioned place preference. Minocycline did not simply reduce all actions of morphine, as morphine analgesia was significantly potentiated by minocycline co-administration. Lastly, morphine dose-dependently increased cyclooxygenase-1 gene expression in a rat microglial cell line, an effect that was dose-dependently blocked by minocycline. Together, these data support that morphine can directly activate microglia in a minocycline-suppressible manner and suggest a pivotal role for minocycline-sensitive processes in the mechanisms of morphine-induced respiration depression, reward, and pain modulation. PMID:18706994

  8. Interim Methadone Treatment: Impact on Arrests

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Robert P.; Jaffe, Jerome H.; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Kinlock, Timothy W.; Gordon, Michael S.; Kelly, Sharon M.; Wilson, Monique E.; Ahmed, Ashraf

    2009-01-01

    AIMS This study examines the frequency and severity of arrest charges among heroin addicts randomly assigned to either interim methadone maintenance (IM) or to remain on a waiting list for methadone treatment. It was hypothesized that IM participants would have a: 1) lower number of arrests at 6 and 12 months and 2) lower mean crime severity scores at 6 and 12 months post-baseline. METHODS Available official arrest data were obtained for all 319 study participants for a period of 2 years before and after study enrollment. Crime severity ratings of charges were made using an established measure of crime severity. FINDINGS Participants randomly assigned to IM as compared to those on a waiting list had a significant reduction in number of arrests at 6 but not at 12 months from study enrollment. There were no significant differences in whether participants were arrested for a more severe crime but frequency of severe crime was relatively low in both groups. Additional post hoc analyses based on whether participants were in methadone treatment at 4 and 10 months after original random assignment to treatment condition revealed that those participants not in treatment at these follow-up assessment points were significantly more likely to be arrested and to have a higher mean crime severity rating at 12 and 24 months post-baseline assessment. CONCLUSIONS IM as compared to the waiting list condition, had a significant reduction in number of officially- recorded arrests from baseline to 6 months post-baseline. Those who were enrolled in methadone treatment at the 4 and 10 month follow-up assessment, regardless of initial assignment, had fewer arrests at 12 and 24 months post-baseline. PMID:19443133

  9. Survey of methadone-drug interactions among patients of methadone maintenance treatment program in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although methadone has been used for the maintenance treatment of opioid dependence for decades, it was not introduced in China or Taiwan until 2000s. Methadone-drug interactions (MDIs) have been shown to cause many adverse effects. However, such effects have not been scrutinized in the ethnic Chinese community. Methods The study was performed in two major hospitals in southern Taiwan. A total of 178 non-HIV patients aged ≥ 20 years who had participated in the Methadone Maintenance Treatment Program (MMTP) ≥ 1 month were recruited. An MDI is defined as concurrent use of drug(s) with methadone that may result in an increase or decrease of effectiveness and/or adverse effect of methadone. To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of MDIs, credible data sources, including the National Health Insurance (NHI) database, face-to-face interviews, medical records, and methadone computer databases, were linked for analysis. Socio-demographic and clinical factors associated with MDIs and co-medications were also examined. Results 128 (72%) MMTP patients took at least one medication. Clinically significant MDIs included withdrawal symptoms, which were found among MMTP patients co-administered with buprenorphine or tramadol; severe QTc prolongation effect, which might be associated with use of haloperidol or droperidol; and additive CNS and respiratory depression, which could result from use of methadone in combination with chlorpromazine or thioridazine. Past amphetamine use, co-infection with hepatitis C, and a longer retention in the MMTP were associated with increased odds of co-medication. Among patients with co-medication use, significant correlates of MDIs included the male gender and length of co-medication in the MMTP. Conclusions The results demonstrate clinical evidence of significant MDIs among MMTP patients. Clinicians should check the past medical history of MMTP clients carefully before prescribing medicines. Because combinations of

  10. Behavioral Flexibility and Response Selection Are Impaired after Limited Exposure to Oxycodone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seip-Cammack, Katharine M.; Shapiro, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral flexibility allows individuals to adapt to situations in which rewards and goals change. Potentially addictive drugs may impair flexible decision-making by altering brain mechanisms that compute reward expectancies, thereby facilitating maladaptive drug use. To investigate this hypothesis, we tested the effects of oxycodone exposure on…

  11. Comparison of the pharmacokinetics of oxycodone administered in three Percocet formulations.

    PubMed

    Gammaitoni, Arnold R; Davis, Matthew W

    2002-02-01

    This randomized, open-label, three-period crossover study compared the single-dose pharmacokinetics of three dose levels of oxycodone in combination with acetaminophen (5 mg/325 mg, 7.5 mg/500 mg, or 10 mg/650 mg) in healthy volunteers. Serial 24-hour blood samples were collectedfrom 23 fasting subjects after drug administration. The individual dose levels were evaluated on 3 different days, which were separated by washout periods of at least 7 days, in each subject. Oxycodone AUC(0-t), AUC(0-infinity), and Cmax were dose dependent, whereas tma and t(1/2) were not. The most frequently reported adverse events were dizziness, nausea, headache, pruritus, and vomiting. Most adverse events were mild, and all were self-limiting. Only dizziness occurred in a dose-related manner. Increasing dose levels of oxycodone/acetaminophen provides proportional increases in oxycodone Cmax and AUC. Adverse events were predictable based on the opioid pharmacologic actions of this agent. PMID:11831542

  12. Trends in Methadone Distribution for Pain Treatment, Methadone Diversion, and Overdose Deaths - United States, 2002-2014.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher M; Baldwin, Grant T; Manocchio, Teresa; White, Jessica O; Mack, Karin A

    2016-01-01

    Use of the prescription opioid methadone for treatment of pain, as opposed to treatment of opioid use disorder (e.g., addiction), has been identified as a contributor to the U.S. opioid overdose epidemic. Although methadone accounted for only 2% of opioid prescriptions in 2009 (1), it was involved in approximately 30% of overdose deaths. Beginning with 2006 warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), efforts to reduce methadone use for pain have accelerated (2,3). The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and CDC analyzed methadone distribution, reports of diversion (the transfer of legally manufactured methadone into illegal markets), and overdose deaths during 2002-2014. On average, the rate of grams of methadone distributed increased 25.1% per year during 2002-2006 and declined 3.2% per year during 2006-2013. Methadone-involved overdose deaths increased 22.1% per year during 2002-2006 and then declined 6.5% per year during 2006-2014. During 2002-2006, rates of methadone diversion increased 24.3% per year; during 2006-2009, the rate increased at a slower rate, and after 2009, the rate declined 12.8% per year through 2014. Across sex, most age groups, racial/ethnic populations, and U.S. Census regions, the methadone overdose death rate peaked during 2005-2007 and declined in subsequent years. There was no change among persons aged ≥65 years, and among persons aged 55-64 years the methadone overdose death rate continued to increase through 2014. Additional clinical and public health policy changes are needed to reduce harm associated with methadone use for pain, especially among persons aged ≥55 years. PMID:27387857

  13. Prenatal oxycodone exposure impairs spatial learning and/or memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Davis, Chris P; Franklin, La'tonya M; Johnson, Gabriel S; Schrott, Lisa M

    2010-09-01

    Recent changes in demographic patterns of drug use have resulted in the increased non-medical use of prescription opiates. These users are younger and more likely to be female, which has the potential for increasing rates of in utero exposure. Therefore, we developed a rat model that simulates a prescription opiate-dependent woman who becomes pregnant. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated for 30 days via oral gavage with ascending doses of oxycodone HCl up to a final dose of 15mg/kg/day, which was maintained during breeding and gestation. Controls were treated with water. The adult male offspring of these treated dams were tested on the radial arm maze, the Morris water maze (with a short and a long intertrial interval), and a spatial T-maze. Prenatal oxycodone exposure led to a deficit in the radial arm maze characterized by a greater number of reference memory errors, especially in the beginning of testing. In contrast, in the T-maze, prenatal oxycodone-exposed rats learned the task as well as well as the prenatal water controls. However, they had a modest deficit in retention of the task when assessed 5 days after acquisition training ended. For the Morris water maze, the intertrial interval affected the pattern of learning. While there was no deficit when the training had a short intertrial interval, when there was a long intertrial interval, prenatal oxycodone-exposed rats had poorer acquisition. The spatial learning deficit was characterized by and increased latency to find and a greater distance traveled to the platform in the prenatal oxycodone-exposed rats. These data were corroborated by analysis of the behavioral search strategy, which showed a decreased use of spatial strategies and an increase in non-spatial strategies, especially wall-hugging, in prenatal oxycodone-exposed rats as compared to prenatal water control rats on day 2 of acquisition. These results indicate that prenatal oxycodone exposure consistently impairs learning and memory in

  14. Factors Associated with Illegal Drug Use among Older Methadone Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The overall aims of this study are to describe the life stressors of, exposure to illegal drug use of, and illegal drug use by older methadone clients. Design and Methods. The current study focuses on a sub-sample of the larger administrative data of a methadone clinic that is limited to African American and White clients over the age of…

  15. Human Methadone Self-Administration and the Generalized Matching Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiga, Ralph; Maxwell, R. Stockton; Meisch, Richard A.; Grabowski, John

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined whether in humans the generalized matching law described the relation between relative responding and relative drug intake by humans under concurrent variable interval variable interval (conc VI VI) schedules of drug reinforcement. Methadone-maintained patients, stabilized on 80 mg per day of methadone, were recruited…

  16. Behavioral Treatments During Outpatient Methadone Maintenance: A Controlled Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, George; And Others

    The Treatment Evaluation Project was established to evaluate the feasibility of using behavioral treatment in conjunction with methadone maintenance to improve the effectiveness of methadone treatment. Over 100 outpatients were accepted into treatment and randomly assigned to one of four behavioral treatment modalities in addition to the usual…

  17. Methadone Diversion: Experiences and Issues. Services Research Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inciardi, James A.

    This report is a description of the phenomenon of methadone diversion as it exists now and places it in the context of prior research in this area. The intent here is to clarify issues around methadone diversion and to provide guidance to treatment administrators and program planners regarding efforts they can initiate to monitor this significant…

  18. Multimodality Approach to Methadone Treatment of Narcotic Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brill, Leon; Chambers, Carl D.

    1971-01-01

    This multimodality approach is geared primarily to the goal of abstinence. For addicts who cannot achieve this goal, methadone maintenance is suggested as the next step. The modalities described range from low-dose maintenance for clinic outpatients to intensive rehabilitation in a methadone maintenance residential center facility. (Author)

  19. Implosive Therapy Treatment of Heroin Addicts during Methadone Detoxification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirt, Michael; Greenfield, Heywood

    1979-01-01

    Examined effectiveness of implosive therapy with heroin addicts during detoxification from methadone. Treatment groups received 12 sessions of implosive therapy or eclectic counseling and were followed for a six-week period. The implosive therapy group were the only ones to significantly reduce their methadone level during treatment and follow-up.…

  20. Decreasing Methadone Dose Via Anxiety Reduction: A Treatment Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kushner, Marlene; And Others

    This manual describes a Relaxation-Information Presentation program based on the clinical observation that anxiety is a serious barrier to detoxification for many methadone clients, and on experimental evidence indicating that expectations may play a greater role in the discomfort experienced during detoxification than the actual methadone dose.…

  1. Development and validation of a solid-phase extraction gas chromatography–mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantification of methadone, heroin, cocaine and metabolites in sweat

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Bertrand R.; Barnes, Allan J.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Mura, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    A sensitive and specific method is presented to simultaneously quantify methadone, heroin, cocaine and metabolites in sweat. Drugs were eluted from sweat patches with sodium acetate buffer, followed by SPE and quantification by GC/MS with electron impact ionization and selected ion monitoring. Daily calibration for anhydroecgonine methyl ester, ecgonine methyl ester, cocaine, benzoylecgonine (BE), codeine, morphine, 6-acetylcodeine, 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), heroin (5–1000 ng/patch) and methadone (10–1000 ng/patch) achieved determination coefficients of >0.995, and calibrators quantified to within ±20% of the target concentrations. Extended calibration curves (1000–10,000 ng/patch) were constructed for methadone, cocaine, BE and 6AM by modifying injection techniques. Within (N=5) and between-run (N=20) imprecisions were calculated at six control levels across the dynamic ranges with coefficients of variation of <6.5%. Accuracies at these concentrations were ±11.9% of target. Heroin hydrolysis during specimen processing was <11%. This novel assay offers effective monitoring of drug exposure during drug treatment, workplace and criminal justice monitoring programs. PMID:18607576

  2. Development and validation of a solid-phase extraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantification of methadone, heroin, cocaine and metabolites in sweat.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Bertrand R; Barnes, Allan J; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Mura, Patrick; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2008-09-01

    A sensitive and specific method is presented to simultaneously quantify methadone, heroin, cocaine and metabolites in sweat. Drugs were eluted from sweat patches with sodium acetate buffer, followed by SPE and quantification by GC/MS with electron impact ionization and selected ion monitoring. Daily calibration for anhydroecgonine methyl ester, ecgonine methyl ester, cocaine, benzoylecgonine (BE), codeine, morphine, 6-acetylcodeine, 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), heroin (5-1000 ng/patch) and methadone (10-1000 ng/patch) achieved determination coefficients of >0.995, and calibrators quantified to within +/-20% of the target concentrations. Extended calibration curves (1000-10,000 ng/patch) were constructed for methadone, cocaine, BE and 6AM by modifying injection techniques. Within (N = 5) and between-run (N = 20) imprecisions were calculated at six control levels across the dynamic ranges with coefficients of variation of <6.5%. Accuracies at these concentrations were +/-11.9% of target. Heroin hydrolysis during specimen processing was <11%. This novel assay offers effective monitoring of drug exposure during drug treatment, workplace and criminal justice monitoring programs. PMID:18607576

  3. Prenatal Methadone Exposure, Meconium Biomarker Concentrations and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Teresa R.; Choo, Robin E.; Concheiro, Marta; Williams, Erica; Elko, Andrea; Jansson, Lauren M.; Jones, Hendrée E.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2010-01-01

    Aims Methadone is standard pharmacotherapy for opioid-dependent pregnant women, yet the relationship between maternal methadone dose and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) severity is still unclear. This research evaluated whether quantification of fetal methadone and drug exposure via meconium would reflect maternal dose and predict neonatal outcomes. Design Prospective clinical study Setting An urban drug treatment facility treating pregnant and post-partum women and their children Participants Forty-nine opioid-dependent pregnant women received 30–110 mg methadone daily. Measurements Maternal methadone dose, infant birth parameters and NAS assessments were extracted from medical records. Thrice-weekly urine specimens were screened for opioids and cocaine. Newborn meconium specimens were quantified for methadone, opioid, cocaine and tobacco biomarkers. Findings There was no relationship between meconium methadone concentrations, presence of opioids, cocaine and/or tobacco in meconium, maternal methadone dose or NAS severity. Opioid, cocaine and tobacco biomarkers also were found in 36.7, 38.7 and 81.1% of meconium specimens, respectively, and were associated with positive urine specimens in the third trimester. The presence of opioids other than methadone in meconium correlated with increased rates of preterm birth, longer infant hospital stays and decreased maternal time in drug treatment. Conclusions Methadone and its metabolite 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) concentrations in meconium did not predict infant birth parameters or NAS severity. Prospective urine testing defined meconium drug detection windows for opiates and cocaine as three months, rather than the currently accepted six months. The presence of opioids in meconium could be used as a biomarker for infants at elevated risk in the newborn period. PMID:20854338

  4. Simultaneous determination of opiates, methadone, buprenorphine and metabolites in human urine by superficially porous liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huei-Ru; Chen, Chin-Lun; Huang, Chieh-Liang; Chen, Shao-Tsu; Lua, Ahai-Chuang

    2013-04-15

    For monitoring compliance of methadone or buprenorphine maintenance patient, a method for the simultaneous determination of methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, opiates (morphine, codeine, 6-monoacetylmorphine) in urine by superficially porous liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated. After enzyme digestion and liquid-liquid extraction, reverse-phase separation was achieved in 5.2 min and quantification was performed by multiple reaction monitoring. Chromatographic separation was performed at 40 °C on a reversed phase Poroshell column with gradient elution. The mobile phase consisted of water and methanol, each containing 0.1% formic acid, at a flow rate of 0.32 mL/min. Intra-day and inter-day precision were less than 12.1% and accuracy was between -9.8% and 13.7%. Extraction efficiencies were more than 68%. Although ion suppression was detected, deuterated internal standards compensated for these effects. Carryover was minimal, less than 0.20%. All analytes were stable at room temperature for 16 h, 4 °C for 72 h, and after three freeze-thaw cycles. The assay also fulfilled compound identification criteria in accordance with the European Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. We analyzed 62 urine samples from patients received maintenance therapy and found that 54.8% of the patient samples tested were detected for morphine, codeine, or 6-monoacetylmorphine. This method provides a reliable and simultaneous quantification of opiates, maintenance drugs, and their metabolites in urine samples. It facilitates the routine monitoring in individuals prescribed the drug to ensure compliance and help therapeutic process. PMID:23507455

  5. [Driving fitness/driving capacity of patients treated with methadone].

    PubMed

    Hauri-Bionda, R; Bär, W; Friedrich-Koch, A

    1998-10-10

    To answer the question whether or not therapeutic methadone doses significantly reduce traffic-related performance of drivers on medically supervised methadone programmes, 34 methadone substitution patients, all of them volunteers, were subjected to a test series: the focus of the study was a psychophysical test battery consisting of 10 individual performance tests to assess essential functions with regard to driving ability, such as concentration, attention, reaction capability, memory, perception and sensorimotor coordination. In evaluating the results of the psychophysical tests, multiple drug use and subjective methadone influence at the time of the examination were taken into consideration but current methadone blood level was neglected. The results were compared to those of a control group. The methadone group (n = 34) consisted of 25 men and 9 women aged between 18 and 38. At the time of the study, the majority of the test persons (29) were on low dosage methadone maintenance (up to 60 mg/day). In the urine samples of approximately 2/3 of the test persons, evidence was found for multiple drug use together with other psychotropic substances, the most frequent (14) being cannabis metabolites. Referring to their driving practices, a mere 4 out of 29 drivers had not committed any driving offences. A comparison of the psychophysical performance of the whole methadone group (n = 34) with a control group demonstrated that the methadone substitution patients achieved rather lower results in almost all variables. These performance deficits were particularly conspicuous in sustained attention, sensorimotor coordination and reaction capability. 12 "methadone only" participants, i.e. methadone probands without any additional consumption of psychotropic substances showed-partly considerably-better performance than the methadone group as a whole and also achieved normal results in relation to the test norm. Nevertheless, once again, results tended to be of lower level in

  6. Comparison of the analgesic effect of patient-controlled oxycodone and fentanyl for pain management in patients undergoing colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyeo-Woon; Kang, Hyeon-Wook; Park, Chan-Hye; Choi, Byung-Hyun; Bang, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Soo-Han; Lee, Eun-Kyung; Choi, Byung-Moon; Noh, Gyu-Jeong

    2016-08-01

    Oxycodone is a μ-opioid receptor agonist and is generally indicated for the relief of moderate to severe pain. The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of patient-controlled oxycodone and fentanyl for postoperative pain in patients undergoing colorectal surgery. Patients scheduled to undergo elective colorectal surgery (n=82) were allocated to receive oxycodone (n=41, concentration of 1 mg/mL) or fentanyl (n=41, concentration of 15 μg/mL) for postoperative pain management. After the operation, pain using a numerical rating scale (NRS), delivery to demand ratio, infused dose of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), side effects, and sedation levels were evaluated. Median (25%-75%) cumulative PCA dose of oxycodone group at 48 hours (66.9, 58.4-83.7 mL) was significantly less than that of fentanyl group (80.0, 63.4-103.3 mL, P=.037). Six hours after surgery, the mean (SD) NRS scores of the oxycodone and fentanyl groups were 6.2 (2.4) and 6.8 (1.9), respectively (P=.216). The mean equianalgesic potency ratio of oxycodone to fentanyl was 55:1. The groups did not differ in postoperative nausea, vomiting, and level of sedation. Patient-controlled oxycodone provides similar effects for pain relief compared to patient-controlled fentanyl in spite of less cumulative PCA dose. Based on these results, oxycodone can be a useful alternative to fentanyl for PCA in patients after colorectal surgery. PMID:27128496

  7. The effects of CYP2D6 and CYP3A activities on the pharmacokinetics of immediate release oxycodone

    PubMed Central

    Samer, CF; Daali, Y; Wagner, M; Hopfgartner, G; Eap, CB; Rebsamen, MC; Rossier, MF; Hochstrasser, D; Dayer, P; Desmeules, JA

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: There is high interindividual variability in the activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes catalysing the oxidation of oxycodone [cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 and 3A], due to genetic polymorphisms and/or drug–drug interactions. The effects of CYP2D6 and/or CYP3A activity modulation on the pharmacokinetics of oxycodone remains poorly explored. Experimental approach: A randomized crossover double-blind placebo-controlled study was performed with 10 healthy volunteers genotyped for CYP2D6 [six extensive (EM), two deficient (PM/IM) and two ultrarapid metabolizers (UM)]. The volunteers randomly received on five different occasions: oxycodone 0.2 mg·kg−1 and placebo; oxycodone and quinidine (CYP2D6 inhibitor); oxycodone and ketoconazole (CYP3A inhibitor); oxycodone and quinidine+ketoconazole; placebo. Blood samples for plasma concentrations of oxycodone and metabolites (oxymorphone, noroxycodone and noroxymorphone) were collected for 24 h after dosing. Phenotyping for CYP2D6 (with dextromethorphan) and CYP3A (with midazolam) were assessed at each session. Key results: CYP2D6 activity was correlated with oxymorphone and noroxymorphone AUCs and Cmax (−0.71 < Spearman correlation coefficient ρs < −0.92). Oxymorphone Cmax was 62% and 75% lower in PM than EM and UM. Noroxymorphone Cmax reduction was even more pronounced (90%). In UM, oxymorphone and noroxymorphone concentrations increased whereas noroxycodone exposure was halved. Blocking CYP2D6 (with quinidine) reduced oxymorphone and noroxymorphone Cmax by 40% and 80%, and increased noroxycodone AUC∞ by 70%. Blocking CYP3A4 (with ketoconazole) tripled oxymorphone AUC∞ and reduced noroxycodone and noroxymorphone AUCs by 80%. Shunting to CYP2D6 pathway was observed after CYP3A4 inhibition. Conclusions and implications: Drug–drug interactions via CYP2D6 and CYP3A affected oxycodone pharmacokinetics and its magnitude depended on CYP2D6 genotype. PMID:20590587

  8. Attenuation of Withdrawal Signs, Blood Cortisol, and Glucose Level with Various Dosage Regimens of Morphine after Precipitated Withdrawal Syndrome in Mice.

    PubMed

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Sadeghi-Hashjin, Goudarz; Koohi, Mohammad Kazem; Karimian, Seyed Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Morphine withdrawal usually results in unsuccessful outcomes. Despite partial benefits from alternative substances such as methadone, its use may not lead to the desired result due to the lack of mental tranquility during the withdrawal period. In this study, by means of an animal model, morphine itself was used to manage morphine dependence. Forty mice were divided into 5 groups, in which 4 groups became dependent by increasing daily doses of morphine for 7 days (15-45 mg/kg). Afterwards, the animals received morphine for 14 days by either of the following regimens: Once daily 45 mg/kg (positive controls)Increasing the interval (each time 6 hours longer than the previous interval)Irregular interval in every 36, 12 and 24 hours until the 21(th) day12, 24, 36 hours decreasing doses (each time 2.5 mg/kg less than the former dosage). Negative controls received saline solution only. On day 22, total withdrawal index (TWI) was determined by injecting 3 mg/kg of naloxone. Thereafter, blood samples were taken for the measurement of cortisol and glucose levels. TWI significantly decreased in all test groups in comparison with the positive control animals (P<0.001). Cortisol levels significantly decreased when either the dosage or the administration frequencies were decreased on a regular and gradual basis (P<0.005). Blood glucose levels significantly decreased in animals that received decreasing doses of morphine (P<0.005). This study suggests that no other measures may be required in clinical practice except for changing the dosage regimen of morphine for the cessation of self-administration. PMID:26722146

  9. Morphine, morphine-6-glucuronide and morphine-3-glucuronide pharmacokinetics in newborn infants receiving diamorphine infusions

    PubMed Central

    BARRETT, D. A.; BARKER, D. P.; RUTTER, N.; PAWULA, M.; SHAW, P. N.

    1996-01-01

    1The pharmacokinetics of morphine, morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) and morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) were studied in 19 ventilated newborn infants(24–41 weeks gestation) who were given a loading dose of 50 μg kg−1 or 200 μg kg−1 of diamorphine followed by an intravenous infusion of 15 μg kg−1 h−1 of diamorphine. Plasma concentrations of morphine, M3G and M6G were measured during the accrual to steady-state and at steady state of the diamorphine infusion. 2Following both the 50 μg kg−1 or 200 μg kg−1 loading doses the mean steady-state plasma concentration (±s.d.) of morphine, M3G and M6G were 86±52 ng ml−1, 703±400 ng ml−1 and 48±28 ng ml−1 respectively and morphine clearance was found to be 4.6±3.2 ml min−1 kg−1. 3M3G formation clearance was estimated to be 2.5±1.8 ml min−1 kg−1, and the formation clearance of M6G was estimated to be 0.46±0.32 ml min−1 kg−1. 4M3G metabolite clearance was 0.46±0.60 ml min−1 kg−1, the elimination half-life was 11.1±11.3 h and the volume of distribution was 0.55±1.13 l kg−1. M6G metabolite clearance was 0.71±0.36 ml min−1 kg−1, the elimination half-life was 18.2±13.6 h and the volume of distribution was 1.03±0.88 l kg−1. 5No significant effect of the loading dose (50 μg kg−1 or 200 μg kg−1) on the plasma morphine or metabolite concentrations or their derived pharmacokinetic parameters was found. 6We were unable to identify correlations between gestational age of the infants and any of the determined pharmacokinetic parameters. 7M3G:morphine and M6G:morphine steady-state plasma concentration ratios were 11.0±10.8 and 0.8±0.8, respectively. 8The metabolism of morphine in neonates, in terms of the respective contributions of each glucuronide pathway, was similar to that in adults. PMID:8799518

  10. Effects of cold pressor pain on the abuse liability of intranasal oxycodone in male and female prescription opioid abusers

    PubMed Central

    Lofwall, Michelle R.; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Walsh, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Approximately 1.9 million persons in the U.S. have prescription opioid use disorders often with concomitant bodily pain, but systematic data on the impact of pain on abuse liability of opioids is lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine whether pain alters the intranasal abuse liability of oxycodone, a commonly prescribed and abused analgesic, in males and females. Methods Sporadic prescription opioid abusers (10 females, 10 males) participated in this mixed (between and within-subject), randomized inpatient study. Experimental sessions (n=6) tested intranasal placebo, oxycodone 15 or 30 mg/70 kg during cold pressor testing (CPT) and a warm water control. Observer- and subject-rated drug effect measures, analgesia, physiologic and cognitive effects were assessed. Results The CPT significantly increased blood pressure, heart rate, pain, stress, and “opiate desire” compared to the no-pain control but did not alter opioid liking, high or street value. Intranasal oxycodone produced effects within 10 minutes, significantly decreasing pain and significantly increasing subjective measures of abuse liability (e.g., high). Females had higher ratings of street value, high, and liking for one or both active doses. Conclusions The CPT was a reliably painful and stressful stimulus that did not diminish the abuse liability of intranasal Oxycodone®. Females were more sensitive to oxycodone on several abuse liability measures that warrant further follow-up. Snorting oxycodone rapidly produced psychoactive effects indicative of substantial abuse liability. PMID:22209386

  11. A systematic review of the cardiotoxicity of methadone

    PubMed Central

    Alinejad, Samira; Kazemi, Toba; Zamani, Nasim; Hoffman, Robert S.; Mehrpour, Omid

    2015-01-01

    Methadone is one of the most popular synthetic opioids in the world with some favorable properties making it useful both in the treatment of moderate to severe pain and for opioid addiction. Increased use of methadone has resulted in an increased prevalence of its toxicity, one aspect of which is cardiotoxicity. In this paper, we review the effects of methadone on the heart as well as cardiac concerns in some special situations such as pregnancy and childhood. Methods: We searched for the terms methadone, toxicity, poisoning, cardiotoxicity, heart, dysrhythmia, arrhythmia, QT interval prolongation, torsade de pointes, and Electrocardiogram (ECG) in bibliographical databases including TUMS digital library, PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar. This review includes relevant articles published between 2000 and 2013. The main cardiac effects of methadone include prolongation of QT interval and torsade de pointes. Other effects include changes in QT dispersion, pathological U waves, Taku-Tsubo syndrome (stress cardiomyopathy), Brugada-like syndrome, and coronary artery diseases. The aim of this paper is to inform physicians and health care staff about these adverse effects. Effectiveness of methadone in the treatment of pain and addiction should be weighed against these adverse effects and physicians should consider the ways to lessen such undesirable effects. This article presents some recommendations to prevent heart toxicity in methadone users. PMID:26869865

  12. Methadone dosing, heroin affordability, and the severity of addiction.

    PubMed Central

    Bach, P B; Lantos, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to track changes in US heroin prices from 1988 to 1995 and to determine whether changes in the affordability of heroin were associated with changes in the use of heroin by users seeking methadone treatment, as indexed by methadone dose levels. METHODS: Data on the price of heroin were from the Drug Enforcement Administration; data on methadone doses were from surveys conducted in 1988, 1990, and 1995 of 100 methadone maintenance centers. Multivariable models that controlled for time and city effects were used to ascertain whether clinics in cities where heroin was less expensive had patients receiving higher doses of methadone, which would suggest that these patients had relatively higher physiological levels of opiate addiction owing to increased heroin use. RESULTS: The amount of pure heroin contained in a $100 (US) purchase has increased on average 3-fold between 1988 and 1995. The average dose of methadone in clinics was positively associated with the affordability of local heroin (P < .01). CONCLUSIONS: When heroin prices fall, heroin addicts require more methadone (a heroin substitute) to stabilize their addiction--evidence that they are consuming more heroin. PMID:10224975

  13. Direct Injection LC-MS-MS Analysis of Opiates, Methamphetamine, Buprenorphine, Methadone and Their Metabolites in Oral Fluid from Substitution Therapy Patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsiu-Chuan; Lee, Hsi-Tzu; Hsu, Ya-Ching; Huang, Mei-Han; Liu, Ray H; Chen, Tai-Jui; Lin, Dong-Liang

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method was developed, validated and applied to simultaneous analysis of oral fluid samples for the following 10 analytes: methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, morphine, codeine, 6-acetylmorphine, 6-acetylcodeine, amphetamine, and methamphetamine. The oral fluid sample was briefly centrifuged and the supernatant was directly injected into the LC-MS-MS system operated under reverse-phase chromatography and electrospray ionization (ESI). Deuterated analogs of the analytes were adopted as the internal standards and found to be effective (except for buprenorphine) to compensate for potential matrix effects. Each analytical run took <10 min. Linearity range (r(2) > 0.99) established for buprenorphine and the other nine analytes were 5-100 and 1-100 ng/mL. Intra- and interday precision (% CV) ranges for the 10 analytes were 0.87-12.2% and 1.27-12.8%, while the corresponding accuracy (%) ranges were 91.8-113% and 91.9-111%. Limits of detection and quantitation established for these 10 analytes were in the ranges of 0.1-1.0 and 0.25-1.0 ng/mL (5 ng/mL for buprenorphine). The method was successfully applied to the analysis of 62 oral fluid specimens collected from patients participating in methadone and buprenorphine substitution therapy programs. Analytical results of methadone and buprenorphine were compared with data derived from GC-MS analysis and found to be compatible. Overall, the direct injection LC-MS-MS method performed well, permitting rapid analysis of oral fluid samples for simultaneous quantification of methadone, buprenorphine, opiate and amphetamine drug categories without extensive sample preparation steps. PMID:25935159

  14. Psychopathology and Urine Toxicology in Methadone Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sadek, Gamal; Cernovsky, Zack; Chiu, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Several studies reported high rates of psychiatric commorbidity among methadone patients. We examined the relationships of measures of psychopathology to outcomes of screening urine tests for cocaine, opiates, and benzodiazepines in a sample of 56 methadone patients. They also completed the Symptom Check List-90-Revised (SCL-90-R). The highest scales in the SCL-90-R profile of our patients were those indicating somatic discomfort, anger, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, and also obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms (scores above the 39th percentile). The only significant correlations between urine tests and SCL-90-R psychopathology were those involving benzodiazepines: patients with urine tests positive for benzodiazepines had lower social self-confidence (r=0.48), were more obsessive-compulsive (r=0.44), reported a higher level of anger (r=0.41), of phobic tendencies (r=40), of anxiety (r=0.39), and of paranoid tendencies (r=0.38), and also reported more frequent psychotic symptoms (r=0.43). PMID:26266026

  15. Combined administration of oxycodone/naloxone in chronic osteo-articular diseases pain therapy.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Palomba; Federica, Miralto; Annamaria, Vinciguerra; Fabiana, Salvato; Anna, Vaccarella

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study is the analysis of the beneficial impact of using opioid receptor antagonist associated to opioid analgesic on the quality of life in patients suffering from chronic non-cancer pain. We recruited 60 patients suffering from osteo-articular diseases who were randomized into two groups of treatment. The group A was treated with the association of opioid receptor antagonist and opioid agonist, represented by Oxycodone. The group B was treated with the opioid analgesics Oxycodone, transdermal Fentanil, and Hidromorphone, without the opioid antagonist. The end-points assessed were the duration of titration, the average reached dosage, the duration of the stability of dosage and the opioid-induced constipation (OIC) using the BFI. PMID:24809034

  16. 78 FR 23273 - Determination That the OXYCONTIN (Oxycodone Hydrochloride) Drug Products Covered by New Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has determined that OXYCONTIN (oxycodone hydrochloride) extended-release tablets (10 milligrams (mg), 15 mg, 20 mg, 30 mg, 40 mg, 60 mg, 80 mg, and 160 mg) approved under new drug application (NDA) 20-553 were withdrawn from sale for reasons of safety or effectiveness. The Agency will not accept or approve abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) for......

  17. Social influences on morphine sensitization in adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Hofford, Rebecca S; Roberts, Kris W; Wellman, Paul J; Eitan, Shoshana

    2010-08-01

    We recently observed that social interactions influence morphine responsiveness in adolescent males. Given sex-related differences in both social interactions and responses to morphine, the present study examines social influences on morphine sensitization in adolescent female mice. Four experimental groups were examined: (1) morphine-treated mice (twice daily, 10-40 mg/kg, s.c.) housed physically and visually separated from saline-treated mice ('morphine only'), (2) morphine-treated mice housed together with saline-treated mice ('morphine cage-mates (of saline)'), (3) saline-treated mice housed together with morphine-treated mice ('saline cage-mates (of morphine)'), and (4) saline-treated mice housed physically and visually separated from morphine-treated mice ('saline only'). Following the treatment period, mice were tested individually for their locomotor response to 20 mg/kg morphine (s.c.). There were no significant differences in morphine-induced hyper-locomotion between saline only and saline cage-mates (of morphine) female adolescent mice. Notably, morphine only mice exhibited significantly greater morphine sensitization as compared to morphine cage-mates (of saline). Thus, this study demonstrates social influences on morphine sensitization in adolescent females. Drug use during early adolescence is a key predictor of later drug abuse and dependence during adulthood. Thus, understanding the specific vulnerabilities to drug use in this age group may represent a first step in helping develop more effective treatment programs. PMID:20456874

  18. Absorption of morphine from a slow-release emulsion used to induce morphine dependence in rats.

    PubMed

    Salem, A; Hope, W

    1998-10-01

    This study was performed to measure absorption of morphine from the injection site following treatment of rats with slow-release emulsions formulated with morphine hydrochloride and morphine base. Samples of emulsion were collected from the injection site of halothane anesthetized animals at 24 and 48 h following emulsion treatment and concentrations of morphine remaining in the emulsion were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In another group of morphine-treated rats, at times equivalent to collecting samples of emulsion, the intensity of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal behaviors was monitored. Both morphine base- and hydrochloride-containing emulsions induced a high degree of physical dependence in animals treated over 48 h. Release of morphine from emulsions containing morphine base was slower than that from the hydrochloride formulations. In the 24-h morphine base-treated animals, approximately 45% was absorbed from the injection site as opposed to 99% in the 24-h morphine hydrochloride-treated animals. These results suggest that morphine base containing emulsions provide a more sustained exposure to the opioid. PMID:10334632

  19. Effect of preemptive analgesia with intravenous oxycodone in the patients undergoing laparoscopic resection of ovarian tumor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na; Wang, Yuantao; Pang, Lei; Wang, Jinguo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of preemptive intravenous oxycodone in the patients undergoing laparoscopic resection of ovarian tumor. Methods: Sixty ASA I or II patients undergoing elective laparoscopic resection of ovarian tumor were randomly allocated to one of two groups: Group O (n=30) received intravenous oxycodone (0.1 mg·kg-1) 10 minutes before surgery over 2 minutes, and Group N (n=30) received an equivalent volume of normal saline. All patients received a standardized general anesthesia. MBP and HR at the time of arrival of the operating room (T1), 5 min before pneumoperitoneum (T2), 5 minutes (T3), 10 minutes (T4), and 15 minutes after pneumoperitoneum (T5), and VAS scores at postoperative 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 hour were recorded. The tramadol consumption and side effects in 24 h after surgery were recorded. Results: VAS pain scores at 2, 4, 8 and 12 hour after operation were significantly lower in Group O (P<0.05). MBP and HR increased significantly due to pneumoperitoneum at T3, T4 and T5, compared with T1 and T2 within Group N, and were higher at T3, T4 and T5 in Group N than at the same time points in Group O. Tramadol consumption was statistically lower in Group O (P=0.0003). Conclusions: Preemptive intravenous oxycodone was an efficient and safe method to reduce intraoperative haemodynamic effect and postoperative pain. PMID:26101479

  20. Comparison of relative oxycodone consumption in surgical pleth index-guided analgesia versus conventional analgesia during sevoflurane anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Won, Young Ju; Lim, Byung Gun; Lee, So Hyun; Park, Sangwoo; Kim, Heezoo; Lee, Il Ok; Kong, Myoung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The surgical pleth index (SPI) is proposed for titration of analgesic drugs during general anesthesia. Several reports have investigated the effect of SPI on the consumption of opioids including remifentanil, fentanyl, and sufentanil during anesthesia, but there are no reports about oxycodone. We aimed to investigate intravenous oxycodone consumption between SPI-guided analgesia and conventional analgesia practices during sevoflurane anesthesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. Methods: Forty-five patients undergoing elective thyroidectomy were randomly assigned to an SPI group (SPI-guided analgesia group, n = 23) or a control group (conventional analgesia group, n = 22). Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane to achieve bispectral index values between 40 and 60. In the SPI group, oxycodone 1 mg was administered intravenously at SPI values over 50; in the control group, oxycodone 1 mg was administered intravenously at the occurrence of tachycardia or hypertension event. Intraoperative oxycodone consumption and extubation time were recorded. The number of hemodynamic and somatic movement events was recorded, as were postoperative pain and recovery scores. Results: Patients’ characteristics were comparable between the groups. Intraoperative oxycodone consumption in the SPI group was significantly lower than the control group (3.5 ± 2.4 vs 5.1 ± 2.4 mg; P = 0.012). Extubation time was significantly shorter in the SPI group (10.6 ± 3.5 vs 13.4 ± 4.6 min; P = 0.026). Hemodynamic and somatic movement events during anesthesia were comparable between the groups, as were numeric rating scales for pain and modified Aldrete scores at postanesthesia care unit. Conclusions: SPI-guided analgesia reduces intravenous oxycodone consumption and extubation time compared with conventional analgesia based on clinical parameters during sevoflurane anesthesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. PMID:27583920

  1. Effects of Acute and Repeated Administration of Oxycodone and Naloxone-Precipitated Withdrawal on Intracranial Self-Stimulation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wiebelhaus, Jason M; Walentiny, D Matthew; Beardsley, Patrick M

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of prescription opioid abuse and overdose, often led by oxycodone, continues to increase, producing twice as many overdose deaths as heroin. Surprisingly, preclinical reports relevant to oxycodone's abuse-related effects are relatively sparse considering its history and patient usage. The goal of this study was to characterize dose- and time-dependent effects of acute and repeated oxycodone administration in a frequency-rate intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure, an assay often predictive of drug-related reinforcing effects, in male Sprague-Dawley rats. We hypothesized that oxycodone would produce a biphasic profile of rate-increasing and rate-decreasing effects maintained by ICSS similar to μ-opioid receptor agonists. Oxycodone (0.03, 0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg, s.c.) produced dose- and time-dependent alterations on ICSS, with the predicted biphasic profile of rate-increasing effects at lower stimulation frequencies followed by rate-decreasing effects at higher frequencies. Peak effects were observed between 30 and 60 minutes, which were reversed by naloxone pretreatment (30 minutes). Tolerance to rate-decreasing effects was observed over a 5-day period when rats were treated with 1 mg/kg oxycodone twice a day. Subsequently, the dosing regimen was increased to 3 mg/kg twice a day over 10 days, although further marked tolerance did not develop. When then challenged with 10 mg/kg naloxone, a significant suppression below baseline levels of ICSS-maintained responding occurred indicative of dependence that recovered to baseline within 5 hours. The results of this study provide the first report of acute and chronic effects of oxycodone on responding maintained by ICSS presentation and the use of ICSS-maintained responding to characterize its tolerance and dependence effects. PMID:26491062

  2. Controlled-release oxycodone and naloxone in the treatment of chronic low back pain: A placebo-controlled, randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Cloutier, C; Taliano, J; O’Mahony, W; Csanadi, M; Cohen, G; Sutton, I; Sinclair, D; Awde, M; Henein, S; Robinson, L; Eisenhoffer, J; Piraino, PS; Harsanyi, Z; Michalko, KJ

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND For Canadian regulatory purposes, an analgesic study was required to complement previously completed, pivotal studies on bowel effects and analgesia associated with controlled-release (CR) oxycodone/CR naloxone. OBJECTIVES: To compare the analgesic efficacy and safety of CR oxycodone/CR naloxone versus placebo in patients with chronic low back pain. METHODS: Patients requiring opioid therapy underwent a two- to seven-day opioid washout before being randomly assigned to receive either 10 mg/5 mg CR oxycodone/CR naloxone or placebo every 12 h, titrated weekly according to efficacy and tolerability to 20 mg/10 mg, 30 mg/15 mg or 40 mg/20 mg every 12 h. After four weeks, patients crossed over to the alternative treatment for an additional four weeks. Acetaminophen/codeine (300 mg/30 mg every 4 h to 6 h as needed) was provided as rescue medication. RESULTS: Of the 83 randomized patients, 54 (65%) comprised the per-protocol population. According to per-protocol analysis, CR oxycodone/CR naloxone resulted in significantly lower mean (± SD) pain scores measured on a visual analogue scale (48.6±23.1 mm versus 55.9±25.4 mm; P=0.0296) and five-point ordinal pain intensity scores (2.1±0.8 versus 2.4±0.9; P=0.0415) compared with placebo. After the double-blinded phase, patients and investigators both preferred CR oxycodone/CR naloxone over placebo. These outcomes continued in the 79% of patients who chose to continue receiving CR oxycodone/CR naloxone in a six-month, open-label evaluation. CONCLUSIONS: In patients complying with treatment as per protocol, CR oxycodone/CR naloxone was effective for the management of chronic low back pain of moderate or severe intensity. PMID:23662289

  3. Cocaine abuse sharply reduced in an effective methadone maintenance program.

    PubMed

    Borg, L; Broe, D M; Ho, A; Kreek, M J

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive study of an urban methadone clinic with supervised urine analyses for illicit drugs was conducted over an 18 month period for a 133 patient cohort as they entered or remained in methadone maintenance for narcotic addiction. Overall retention during the study was 85%, with significantly (p < .05) higher daily methadone doses (mean 67.1 mg +/- 2.1) in those patients still in treatment at the end of the study. Predictably, illicit opioid use was dramatically reduced, to 10% as measured by urine toxicology in the last month of treatment. Moreover, significantly more patients stopped regular cocaine abuse (69%) than started using cocaine (10%, Fisher's exact test, p = .02). Thus, with effective methadone maintenance using adequate dosages, the majority of patients remain in treatment and reduce cocaine abuse as well as illicit opioid use, with implications for public health by reducing the spread of infectious diseases including hepatitis B, C, D and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). PMID:10631964

  4. Use of intramuscular methadone in managing intravenous drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Bezant, Edward Michael

    2014-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman was referred to the Acute Pain Team for their advice on how to manage her current pain, in light of her unique pre-admission medications. On questioning it was discovered that the patient was receiving 50 mg of intramuscular methadone daily, in the community. She was a former intravenous drug user who had been enrolled into a methadone substitution programme for 10 years and had been receiving her methadone intramuscularly for the past 6 years. It had been discovered that her addiction was not solely to opioids but, moreover, to the process of injecting as well. She was diagnosed with obsessive compulsive disorder, with a needle fixation, and started on the intramuscular methadone regimen on which she has maintained abstinence from heroin for 6 years. PMID:25414219

  5. Are empty methadone bottles empty? An analytic study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Methadone maintenance treatment is the most widely prescribed treatment for opiate dependence with proven benefits for patients. In naïve users or in case of recreational misuse, methadone can be a source of potentially lethal intoxications, resulting in fatal overdoses. A few cases of infantile intoxications have been described in the literature, some of which resulted in death. Nowadays, more than 50,000 bottles are used every day in France, most of which are thrown away in the bin. Relatives at home, especially children, can have access to these empty bottles. This study aims to determine whether the residual quantity of methadone in the bottles is associated with a risk of intoxication for someone who has a low tolerance to opiates, such as a child. Methods The methadone dosage left in a sample of 175 bottles recapped after use by the patients taking their maintenance treatment in an addiction treatment program centre was analysed during a 2-week period in March 2013. Results The mean residual quantity of methadone left in each bottle after use is 1.9 ± 1.8 mg and 3.3 ± 2.4 mg in the sample of 60 mg bottles. Conclusions There is a potential danger of accidental overdose with empty bottles of methadone syrup, especially for children. To take into account this hazard, several harm reduction strategies can be proposed, such as favouring the taking of the treatment within the delivery centres rather than the ‘take home’ doses, asking methadone users to bring back their used bottles, and raising patients’ awareness of the intoxication risks and the necessary everyday precautions. For stable patients with take home methadone, the use of capsules could be considered. PMID:24990630

  6. THE ACTION OF MORPHINE-LIKE DRUGS ON IMPULSE TRANSMISSION IN MAMMALIAN NERVE FIBRES.

    PubMed

    KOSTERLITZ, H W; WALLIS, D I

    1964-06-01

    Experiments on nerves in situ and on isolated nerves provide no evidence that morphine interferes with impulse transmission in myelinated or nonmyelinated nerve fibres. The concentrations used in experiments on isolated nerves were 10- to 100-times as high as those required to depress transmission at autonomic nerve-effector cell junctions. Examination of the resting membrane potential, the action potential and the positive after-potential, the conduction velocity, the time courses of the recovery of the size of the action potential and of the excitability after a conditioning stimulus, the ability of the axons to sustain repetitive activity and the posttetanic hyperpolarization gave no indication that morphine affects either the mechanisms involved in the initiation of the propagated impulse or those leading to restoration of the resting state after activity. Analgesic drugs, such as pethidine and methadone which have a local anaesthetic action, may cause a reversible decrease in the size of the compound action potential and in the conduction velocity of A-B and C fibres. PMID:14211680

  7. Delay of Morphine Tolerance by Palmitoylethanolamide

    PubMed Central

    Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Corti, Francesca; Micheli, Laura; Zanardelli, Matteo; Ghelardini, Carla

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the potency and efficacy of morphine, its clinical application for chronic persistent pain is limited by the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying morphine tolerance are complex and still unclear. Recently, the activation of glial cells and the release of glia-derived proinflammatory mediators have been suggested to play a role in the phenomenon. N-Palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) is an endogenous compound with antinociceptive effects able to reduce the glial activation. On this basis, 30 mg kg−1 PEA was subcutaneously daily administered in morphine treated rats (10 mg kg−1 intraperitoneally, daily). PEA treatment significantly attenuated the development of tolerance doubling the number of days of morphine antinociceptive efficacy in comparison to the vehicle + morphine group. PEA prevented both microglia and astrocyte cell number increase induced by morphine in the dorsal horn; on the contrary, the morphine-dependent increase of spinal TNF-α levels was not modified by PEA. Nevertheless, the immunohistochemical analysis revealed significantly higher TNF-α immunoreactivity in astrocytes of PEA-protected rats suggesting a PEA-mediated decrease of cytokine release from astrocyte. PEA intervenes in the nervous alterations that lead to the lack of morphine antinociceptive effects; a possible application of this endogenous compound in opioid-based therapies is suggested. PMID:25874232

  8. Medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction: methadone and buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Saxon, Andrew J; Hser, Yih-Ing; Woody, George; Ling, Walter

    2013-12-01

    Among agents for treatment of opioid addiction, methadone is a full mu-opioid receptor agonist, whereas buprenorphine is a partial agonist. Both are long-acting. Buprenorphine has a superior safety profile. Methadone is formulated for oral administration and buprenorphine for sublingual administration. A subdermal buprenorphine implant with a 6-month duration of action is being considered for approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Both medications reduce mortality rates and improve other outcomes. Data from a recent randomized controlled comparison of both medications (N = 1269) show better treatment retention with methadone but reduced illicit opioid use early in treatment with buprenorphine. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviors were measured using the Risk Behavior Survey at baseline, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks for study completers. In the 30 days prior to treatment entry, 14.4% of the completers randomized to treatment with buprenorphine (n = 340) and 14.1% of the completers randomized to methadone treatment (n = 391) shared needles. The percent sharing needles decreased to 2.4% for buprenorphine and 4.8 for methadone in the 30 days prior to Week 24 (p < 0.0001). In the 30 days prior to treatment entry, 6.8% of the completers randomized to buprenorphine and 8.2% of the completers randomized to methadone had multiple sexual partners, with only 5.2% and 5.1%, respectively, reporting multiple partners at Week 24 (p < 0.04). PMID:24436573

  9. Predictors of engagement in vocational counseling for methadone treatment patients.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Yeon; Magura, Stephen; Blankertz, Laura; Madison, Elizabeth; Spinelli, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Employment enhances the outcomes of substance dependency treatment. Unfortunately, although unemployed methadone treatment patients frequently state they are interested in a job, many fail to participate in vocational services when available. Unless patients become engaged, vocational services do not have an opportunity to be effective. This is the first study to explore a broad array of factors that may be associated with differential engagement in vocational services among methadone patients. The study was conducted in two methadone programs in New York City during 2001-2004. Unemployed methadone patients (n = 211) were voluntarily randomly assigned to either of two vocational counseling programs (standard vs. experimental) and followed for 6 months. The sample was 59% male, 75% minority group, aged 45 years on average, and in methadone treatment for 5 years on average. Being engaged in the vocational counseling programs was defined as five or more sessions with the counselor in the first 6 months after study entry. In multivariate analysis, the factors associated with higher engagement in vocational counseling were being non-Hispanic, having more education, a drug injection history, a crack use history, having chronic emotional/mental problems, better work attitudes, and assignment to the experimental vocational program. The results indicate that it is often the most "needy" unemployed methadone patients who become more engaged in vocational counseling. A vocational counseling model which emphasizes assertive outreach and attends to nonvocational clinical issues as well is more likely to engage patients. PMID:16798680

  10. Gender differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of methadone substitution therapy

    PubMed Central

    Graziani, Manuela; Nisticò, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Gender-related differences in the pharmacological effects of drug are an emerging topic. This review examines gender differences in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects of methadone, a long-acting opioid agonist that is prescribed as a treatment for opioid dependence and the management of chronic pain. Method: We performed a search in the Medline database from 1990 to 2014 in order to find published literature related to gender differences in pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of methadone. Results: None of the studies were carried out with the primary or secondary aim to identify any gender differences in the pharmacokinetic profile of methadone. Importantly; high inter-subjects variability in PK parameters was found also intra female population. The reported differences in volume of distribution could be ascribed to the physiological differences between men and women in body weight and composition, taking into account that the dose of methadone was established irrespective of body weight of patients (Peles and Adelson, 2006). On the other hand, the few studies present in literature found no gender difference in some direct pharmacodynamic parameters. Some reports have suggested that female gender is associated with an increased risk for long-QT-related cardiac arrhythmias in methadone maintenance subjects. Conclusion: Even though it may be too simplistic to expect variability only in one parameter to explain inter-individual variation in methadone response, we believe that a better knowledge of gender-related differences might have significant implications for better outcomes in opioid dependence substitution therapy in women. PMID:26106330

  11. Intrathecal morphine for post-thoracotomy pain.

    PubMed

    Gray, J R; Fromme, G A; Nauss, L A; Wang, J K; Ilstrup, D M

    1986-08-01

    We wished to investigate possible differences in the duration of postoperative analgesia and the incidence of respiratory depression after the intrathecal injection in the lumbar area of 10 micrograms/kg morphine in hypobaric and hyperbaric solution for relief of post-thoracotomy pain. Twenty-nine patients received morphine plus dextrose (hyperbaric) and 21 received morphine in preservative-free normal saline. The duration of analgesia was longer with the morphine in the normal saline group than in the hyperbaric group (P less than 0.04). One patient developed delayed respiratory depression. Our data support the use of morphine in normal saline mixtures for greater duration of analgesia after thoracic operations. PMID:3755305

  12. Slow drug delivery decreased total body clearance and altered bioavailability of immediate- and controlled-release oxycodone formulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Sun, Duxin; Palmisano, Maria; Zhou, Simon

    2016-02-01

    Oxycodone is a commonly used analgesic with a large body of pharmacokinetic data from various immediate-release or controlled-release formulations, under different administration routes, and in diverse populations. Longer terminal half-lives from extravascular administration as compared to IV administration have been attributed to flip-flop pharmacokinetics with the rate constant of absorption slower than elimination. However, PK parameters from the extravascular studies showed faster absorption than elimination. Sustained release formulations guided by the flip-flop concept produced mixed outcomes in formulation development and clinical studies. This research aims to develop a mechanistic knowledge of oxycodone ADME, and provide a consistent interpretation of diverging results and insight to guide further extended release development and optimize the clinical use of oxycodone. PK data of oxycodone in human studies were collected from literature and digitized. The PK data were analyzed using a new PK model with Weibull function to describe time-varying drug releases/ oral absorption, and elimination dependent upon drug input to the portal vein. The new and traditional PK models were coded in NONMEM. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to address the relationship between rates of drug release/absorption and PK profiles plus terminal half-lives. Traditional PK model could not be applied consistently to describe drug absorption and elimination of oxycodone. Errors were forced on absorption, elimination, or both parameters when IV and PO profiles were fitted separately. The new mechanistic PK model with Weibull function on absorption and slower total body clearance caused by slower absorption adequately describes the complex interplay between oxycodone absorption and elimination in vivo. Terminal phase of oxycodone PK profile was shown to reflect slower total body drug clearance due to slower drug release/absorption from oral formulations. Mechanistic PK models with

  13. 21 CFR 862.3640 - Morphine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Morphine test system. 862.3640 Section 862.3640....3640 Morphine test system. (a) Identification. A morphine test system is a device intended to measure morphine, an addictive narcotic pain-relieving drug, and its analogs in serum, urine, and gastric...

  14. 21 CFR 862.3640 - Morphine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Morphine test system. 862.3640 Section 862.3640....3640 Morphine test system. (a) Identification. A morphine test system is a device intended to measure morphine, an addictive narcotic pain-relieving drug, and its analogs in serum, urine, and gastric...

  15. 21 CFR 862.3640 - Morphine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Morphine test system. 862.3640 Section 862.3640....3640 Morphine test system. (a) Identification. A morphine test system is a device intended to measure morphine, an addictive narcotic pain-relieving drug, and its analogs in serum, urine, and gastric...

  16. Topical application of a novel oxycodone gel formulation (tocopheryl phosphate mixture) in a rat model of peripheral inflammatory pain produces localized pain relief without significant systemic exposure.

    PubMed

    Smith, Maree T; Wyse, Bruce D; Edwards, Stephen R; El-Tamimy, Mahmoud; Gaetano, Giacinto; Gavin, Paul

    2015-07-01

    This study was designed to assess the analgesic efficacy and systemic exposure of oxycodone administered topically in a novel tocopheryl phosphate mixture (TPM) gel formulation, to the inflamed hindpaws in a rat model of inflammatory pain. Unilateral hindpaw inflammation was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA). Mechanical hyperalgesia and hindpaw inflammation were assessed by measuring paw pressure thresholds and hindpaw volume, respectively, just prior to i.pl. FCA and again 5-6 days later. The analgesic effects of oxycodone administered topically (1 mg in TPM gel) or by i.pl. injection (50 μg), were assessed. Systemic oxycodone exposure was assessed over an 8-h postdosing interval following topical application. Skin permeation of oxycodone from the gel formulation was assessed in vitro using Franz diffusion cells. Oxycodone administered topically or by i.pl. injection produced significant (p < 0.05) analgesia in the inflamed hindpaws. Systemic oxycodone exposure was insignificant after topical dosing. The in vitro cumulative skin permeation of oxycodone was linearly related to the amount applied. Topical TPM/oxycodone gel formulations have the potential to alleviate moderate to severe inflammatory pain conditions with minimal systemic exposure, thereby avoiding central nervous system (CNS)-mediated adverse effects associated with oral administration of opioid analgesics. PMID:25995048

  17. Controlled release formulation of oxycodone in patients with moderate to severe chronic osteoarthritis: a critical review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Robert; Raffa, Robert B; Pergolizzi, Joseph V

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a physically and emotionally debilitating disease that predominantly affects the aging adult population. Current pharmacologic treatment options primarily consist of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and/or acetaminophen, but associated side effects, analgesic limitations, especially in the elderly, and the need for around-the-clock analgesia have led physicians to search for alternative analgesics. Opioids have shown effectiveness at mitigating both chronic cancer and noncancer pain, and their ability to be placed into controlled release (CR) formulations suggests that they may prove efficacious for OA patients. One formulation, oxycodone CR, has shown effectiveness in cancer pain patients and in some trials of noncancer low back pain. In this review, the objective was to synthesize the reported findings by researchers in this field and present an up-to-date look at the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of oxycodone CR in OA patients. Public literature databases were searched using specific keywords (eg, oxycodone CR) for studies assessing the efficacy and safety profile of oxycodone CR and its use in patients with OA. A total of eleven articles that matched the criteria were identified, which included three placebo-controlled trials, six comparative trials, one pharmacokinetic study in the elderly, and one long-term safety trial. Analysis of the studies revealed that oxycodone CR is reasonably efficacious, safe, and tolerable when used to manage moderate to severe chronic OA pain, with similar side effects to that of other opioids. PMID:22570559

  18. The combination of mitragynine and morphine prevents the development of morphine tolerance in mice.

    PubMed

    Fakurazi, Sharida; Rahman, Shamima Abdul; Hidayat, Mohamad Taufik; Ithnin, Hairuszah; Moklas, Mohamad Aris Mohd; Arulselvan, Palanisamy

    2013-01-01

    Mitragynine (MG) is the major active alkaloid found in Mitragyna speciosa Korth. In the present study, we investigated the enhancement of analgesic action of MG when combined with morphine and the effect of the combination on the development of tolerance towards morphine. Mice were administered intraperitoneally with a dose of MG (15 and 25 mg/kg b.wt) combined with morphine (5 mg/kg b.wt) respectively for 9 days. The antinociceptive effect was evaluated by a hot plate test. The protein expression of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cAMP response element binding (CREB) was analyzed by immunoblot. Toxicological parameters especially liver and kidney function tests were assessed after the combination treatment with MG and morphine. The concurrent administration of MG and morphine showed significant (p < 0.05) increase in latency time when compared to morphine alone group and the outstanding analgesic effects in the combination regimens were maintained until day 9. For the protein expression, there was a significant increment of cAMP and CREB levels (p < 0.05) in group treated with 5 mg/kg morphine but there was no significant change of these protein expressions when MG was combined with morphine. There was a significant changes in toxicological parameters of various treated groups. The combination treatment of MG and morphine effectively reduce the tolerance due to the chronic administration of morphine. PMID:23292329

  19. Day-to-day variations during clinical drug monitoring of morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine-6-glucuronide serum concentrations in cancer patients. A prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Klepstad, Pål; Hilton, Priscilla; Moen, Jorunn; Kaasa, Stein; Borchgrevink, Petter C; Zahlsen, Kolbjørn; Dale, Ola

    2004-01-01

    Background The feasibility of drug monitoring of serum concentrations of morphine, morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) and morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) during chronic morphine therapy is not established. One important factor relevant to drug monitoring is to what extent morphine, M6G and M3G serum concentrations fluctuate during stable morphine treatment. Methods We included twenty-nine patients admitted to a palliative care unit receiving oral morphine (n = 19) or continuous subcutaneous (sc) morphine infusions (n = 10). Serum concentrations of morphine, M6G and M3G were obtained at the same time on four consecutive days. If readmitted, the patients were followed for another trial period. Day-to-day variations in serum concentrations and ratios were determined by estimating the percent coefficient of variation (CV = (mean/SD) ×100). Results The patients' median morphine doses were 90 (range; 20–1460) mg/24 h and 135 (range; 30–440) mg/24 h during oral and sc administration, respectively. Intraindividual fluctuations of serum concentrations estimated by median coefficients of day-to-day variation were in the oral group for morphine 46%, for M6G 25% and for M3G 18%. The median coefficients of variation were lower in patients receiving continuous sc morphine infusions (morphine 10%, M6G 13%, M3G 9%). Conclusion These findings indicate that serum concentrations of morphine and morphine metabolites fluctuate. The fluctuations found in our study are not explained by changes in morphine doses, administration of other drugs or by time for collection of blood samples. As expected the day-to-day variation was lower in patients receiving continuous sc morphine infusions compared with patients receiving oral morphine. PMID:15461818

  20. The nature of methadone diversion in England: a Merseyside case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is a key element in treatment for opiate addiction; however concerns about the diversion of methadone remain. More current empirical data on methadone diversion are required. This research investigated the market for diverted methadone in Merseyside, UK, in order to provide a case study which can be transferred to other areas undertaking methadone maintenance treatment on a large scale. Methods Questionnaires were completed (in interview format) with 886 past year users of methadone recruited both in and out of prescribing agencies. Topic areas covered included current prescribing, obtaining and providing methadone, reasons for using illicit methadone and other drug use. Results Large proportions of participants had obtained illicit methadone for use in the past year with smaller proportions doing so in the past month. Proportions of participants buying and being given methadone were similar. Exchange of methadone primarily took place between friends and associates, with 'dealers' rarely involved. Gender, age, whether participant's methadone consumption was supervised and whether the aims of their treatment had been explained to them fully, influenced the extent to which participants were involved in diverting or using diverted methadone. Conclusion Methadone diversion is widespread although drug users generally do not make use of illicit methadone regularly (every month). The degree of altruism involved in the exchange of methadone does not negate the potential role of this action in overdose or the possibility of criminal justice action against individuals. Treatment agencies need to emphasise these risks whilst ensuring that treatment aims are effectively shared with clients to ensure adherence to treatment. PMID:22243982

  1. Morphine-theophylline interaction: antagonism or facilitation?

    PubMed Central

    Brailowsky, S.; Guerrero-Muñoz, F.; Luján, M.; Shkurovich, M.

    1981-01-01

    1 Morphine-theophylline interactions were investigated in both acute and narcotic-dependent preparations, in vitro and in vivo, using four different experimental models: LD50 doses of morphine and naloxone in the mouse; naloxone-induced contractions in the electrically-stimulated and opiate-dependent isolated ileum of the guinea-pig; naloxone-induced jumps in the mouse; an calcium uptake in synaptosomal preparations. 2 The LD50 of morphine was significantly increased by theophylline. 3 The lethal effect of theophylline was potentiated by pretreatment of the animals with naloxone. 4 Theophylline displayed protective effects in the inhibitory response to morphine and antagonism to the withdrawal response induced by naloxone in the electrically-stimulated isolated ileum of the guinea-pig. 5 The number of jumps induced by naloxone in morphine-dependent mice was significantly diminished by theophylline. 6 The inhibitory effect of morphine on the synaptosomal uptake of calcium was decreased by theophylline. 7 The effects of both morphine and theophylline on the cyclic nucleotides and the possible role of calcium in these actions are discussed. PMID:7272590

  2. Effect of morphine on synaptosomal Ca++ uptake.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Munoz, F; Cerreta, K V; Guerrero, M L; Way, E L

    1979-04-01

    The effect of morphine on the uptake of 45Ca++ was studied in synaptosomes from mouse brain using two procedures, centrifugation and filtration. The addition of morphine (1.7 x 10(-7) or 3.4 x 10(-7) M) reduced 45CA++ uptake by either technique, although the basal 45Ca++ uptake by the filtration method was approximately 7-fold higher than that by the centrifugation procedure. Similar effects were obtained after acute morphine treatment with 10 mg/kg s.c. Previous naloxone in vitro treatment (1.9 x 10(-8) M) or in vivo administration (2 mg/kg s.c.) reversed the morphine inhibition of the 45Ca++ uptake. On the other hand, after the animal was rendered tolerant and dependent by morphine pellet implantation, an enhancement of the synaptosomal 45Ca++ uptake was observed. It is concluded that changes in Ca++ fluxes in synaptosomes observed after acute and chronic morphine treatment may be involved with morphine pharmacological action related with analgesia, tolerance and physical dependence. PMID:571016

  3. Photoaffinity labeling of opioid receptor with morphine-7,8-oxide (morphine epoxide)

    SciTech Connect

    Takayanagi, I.; Shibata, R.; Miyata, N.; Hirobe, M.

    1982-05-01

    The opioid receptor mediating inhibitory action of morphine in the electrically stimulated guinea pig ileum was irreversibly photoinactivated by morphine epoxide (3 X 10(-6) M). Morphine epoxide (up to 3 X 10(-5) M) did not influence the responses of rat vas deferens (epsilon-receptor) or rabbit vas deferens (kappa-receptor) to electrical stimulation. Effective concentrations of morphine epoxide were much lower in the guinea pig ileum (mu-receptor) than in the mouse vas deference (delta-receptor). The inhibitory action of (Met)-enkephalin on the twitch responses of the rat vas deferens and mouse vas deferens to electrical stimulation were not influenced after irradiation in the presence of morphine epoxide (3 X 10(-6) M). Therefore, morphine epoxide is probably a useful probe for photoaffinity labeling of the mu-receptor in vitro.

  4. Abuse-related effects of µ-opioid analgesics in an assay of intracranial self-stimulation in rats: modulation by chronic morphine exposure.

    PubMed

    Altarifi, Ahmad A; Rice, Kenner C; Negus, S Stevens

    2013-09-01

    Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) is an operant procedure in which responding is maintained by electrical brain stimulation. Stimulation frequency can be varied rapidly to maintain a wide range of baseline response rates, and drugs' effects can be evaluated simultaneously on both low ICSS rates maintained by low stimulation frequencies and high ICSS rates maintained by high stimulation frequencies. ICSS 'facilitation' indicates drug-induced increases in low ICSS rates and is often considered an abuse-related effect, whereas ICSS 'depression' indicates decreases in high ICSS rates and may indicate abuse-limiting effects. This study examined the roles of µ-agonist efficacy and of previous µ-agonist exposure as determinants of µ-agonist effects on ICSS in rats with electrodes implanted into the medial forebrain bundle. The high-efficacy, intermediate-efficacy, and low-efficacy µ agonists methadone, fentanyl, and nalbuphine were tested during escalating regimens of morphine exposure (vehicle, 3.2, and 18 mg/kg/day). During vehicle treatment, methadone and fentanyl primarily depressed ICSS, whereas nalbuphine produced weak facilitation that was not dose dependent. Chronic morphine produced tolerance to ICSS depression and increased expression of ICSS facilitation. These results suggest that µ-agonist exposure increases the expression of abuse-related ICSS facilitation by µ agonists with a broad range of efficacies at µ receptors. PMID:23881045

  5. Methadone Maintenance: The Experience of Four Programs. The Drug Abuse Council Manuscript Series, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danaceau, Paul

    Methadone maintenance is a relatively new method for treating heroin addiction. Controversy and questions remain about the drug itself and its use of methadone. The author was engaged by The Drug Abuse Council to prepare these descriptions of four methadone programs and the accompanying summary. The evolution of these programs is examined, and the…

  6. Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy during Methadone Dose Reduction: Rationale, Treatment Description, and a Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stotts, Angela L.; Masuda, Akihiko; Wilson, Kelly

    2009-01-01

    Many clients who undergo methadone maintenance (MM) treatment for heroin and other opiate dependence prefer abstinence from methadone. Attempts at methadone detoxification are often unsuccessful, however, due to distressing physical as well as psychological symptoms. Outcomes from an MM client who voluntarily participated in an Acceptance and…

  7. Effect of environmental enrichment on physical and psychological dependence signs and voluntary morphine consumption in morphine-dependent and morphine-withdrawn rats.

    PubMed

    Hammami-Abrand Abadi, Arezoo; Miladi-Gorji, Hossein; Bigdeli, Imanollah

    2016-04-01

    This study was designed to examine the effect of environmental enrichment during morphine dependency and withdrawal on the severity of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal signs, anxiety, and depressive-like behaviors and voluntary morphine consumption in morphine-dependent rats. The rats were injected with bi-daily doses (10 mg/kg, 12 h intervals) of morphine for 14 days following rearing in a standard environment (SE) or enriched environment (EE) during the development of morphine dependence and withdrawal. Then, rats were tested for withdrawal signs after naloxone injection, anxiety (the elevated plus maze) and depression-related behavior (sucrose preference test), and voluntary consumption of morphine using a two-bottle choice paradigm, in morphine-dependent and morphine-withdrawn rats. The results showed that EE decreased naloxone-precipitated withdrawal signs, but not anxiety or sucrose preference during dependence on morphine. The EE-withdrawn rats showed an increase in the elevated plus maze open arm time and entries and higher levels of sucrose preference than SE rats. Voluntary consumption of morphine was lower in the EE-withdrawn rats than in the SE groups in the second period of drug intake. Thus, exposure to EE reduced the severity of morphine dependence and voluntary consumption of morphine, alongside reductions in anxiety and depression-related behavior in morphine-withdrawn rats. PMID:26397757

  8. Priapism Followed by Discontinuation of Methadone: A rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mostafavi, Seyed-Ali; Bidaki, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Priapism is defined by persistent, painful penile erection which occurs without sexual stimulation. Methadone is used as an analgesic and is also used in detoxification and maintenance protocol for opioid dependence treatment. Here we will report a case of a male with priapism after rapid discontinuation doses of methadone. Case presentation: The case was a young married male who referred to a psychiatry clinic due to long-time spontaneous erections. The patient had no history of mental disorders, trauma or sickle cell anemia. He used to smoke opium for five years and used methadone for four years at a dose of 17 cc daily, which he abruptly discontinued. Then he often experienced spontaneous and painful erections without physical or mental stimulation that caused him shame and embarrassment. Conclusion: In this case, chronology indicates that rapid discontinuation of methadone was possibly responsible for the occurrence of priapism. This may have happened due to a compensatory reaction to methadone side effect of erectile dysfunction, followed by its rapid withdrawal. PMID:26884791

  9. Inflammatory response in heroin addicts undergoing methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuan-Yu; Yang, Szu-Nian; Lin, Jyh-Chyang; Chang, Junn-Liang; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Lo, Wan-Yu

    2015-03-30

    Opioid addiction influences many physiological functions including reactions of the immune system. The objective of this study was to investigate the immune system function in heroin addicted patients undergoing methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) compared to healthy controls. We tested the cytokine production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α from a group of heroin addicts (n=34) and healthy controls (n=20). The results show that production of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 was significantly higher in the group of methadone-maintained patients than in the healthy control group. Plasma TNF-α and IL-6 levels were significantly correlated with the dairy methadone dosage administered, and the IL-1β level was significantly correlated with the duration of methadone maintenance treatment. These findings suggest that methadone maintenance treatment influences the immune system functions of opioid-dependent patients and may also induce long-term systemic inflammation. PMID:25660662

  10. A randomized trial of an interim methadone maintenance clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Yancovitz, S R; Des Jarlais, D C; Peyser, N P; Drew, E; Friedmann, P; Trigg, H L; Robinson, J W

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Interim methadone maintenance has been proposed as a method of providing clinically effective services to heroin addicts waiting for treatment in standard comprehensive methadone maintenance programs. METHODS. A clinic that provided initial medical evaluation, methadone medication, and AIDS education, but did not include formal drug abuse counseling or other social support services was established in New York City. A sample of 301 volunteer subjects recruited from the waiting list for treatment in the Beth Israel methadone program were randomly assigned to immediate entry into the interim clinic or a control group. RESULTS. There were no differences in initial levels of illicit drug use across the experimental and control groups. One-month urinalysis follow-up data showed a significant reduction in heroin use in the experimental group (from 63% positive at intake to 29% positive) with no change in the control group (62% to 60% positive). No significant change was observed in cocaine urinalyses (approximately 70% positive for both groups at intake and follow-up). A higher percentage of the experimental group were in treatment at 16-month follow-up (72% vs 56%). CONCLUSIONS. Limited services interim methadone maintenance can reduce heroin use among persons awaiting entry into comprehensive treatment and increase the percentage entering treatment. PMID:1659236

  11. Retention in methadone and buprenorphine treatment among African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Gryczynski, Jan; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Jaffe, Jerome H.; Kelly, Sharon M.; Myers, C. Patrick; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Olsen, Yngvild K.; Schwartz, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Methadone has been the most commonly used pharmacotherapy for the treatment of opioid dependence in U.S. public sector treatment, but availability of buprenorphine as an alternative medication continues to increase. Drawing data from two community-based clinical trials that were conducted nearly contemporaneously, this study examined retention in methadone vs. buprenorphine treatment over 6 months among urban African Americans receiving treatment in one of four publicly-funded programs (N= 478; 178 methadone; 300 buprenorphine). Adjusting for confounds related to medication selection, survival analysis revealed that buprenorphine patients are at substantially higher risk of dropout compared to methadone patients (HR= 2.43; p< .001). Buprenorphine’s retention disadvantage appears to be concentrated in the earlier phases of treatment (approximately the first 50 days), after which risk of subsequent dropout becomes similar for the two medications. These findings confirm a retention disparity between methadone and buprenorphine in this population, and suggest potential avenues for future research to enhance retention in buprenorphine treatment. PMID:23566446

  12. Intractable restless legs syndrome: role of prolonged-release oxycodone-naloxone.

    PubMed

    de Biase, Stefano; Valente, Mariarosaria; Gigli, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological disorder characterized by an irresistible urge to move the legs accompanied by uncomfortable sensations that occur at night or at time of rest. Pharmacological therapy should be limited to patients who suffer from clinically relevant symptoms. Chronic RLS is usually treated with either a dopamine agonist (pramipexole, ropinirole, rotigotine) or an α2δ calcium-channel ligand (gabapentin, gabapentin enacarbil, pregabalin). Augmentation is the main complication of long-term dopaminergic treatment, and frequently requires a reduction of current dopaminergic dose or a switch to non-dopaminergic medications. Opioids as monotherapy or add-on treatment should be considered when alternative satisfactory regimens are unavailable and the severity of symptoms warrants it. In a recent Phase III trial, oxycodone-naloxone prolonged release (PR) demonstrated a significant and sustained effect on patients with severe RLS inadequately controlled by previous treatments. The adverse-event profile was consistent with the safety profile of opioids. The most frequent adverse events were fatigue, constipation, nausea, headache, hyperhidrosis, somnolence, dry mouth, and pruritus. Adverse events were usually mild or moderate in intensity. No cases of augmentation were reported. Oxycodone-naloxone PR is approved for the second-line symptomatic treatment of adults with severe to very severe idiopathic RLS after failure of dopaminergic treatment. Further studies are needed to evaluate if oxycodone-naloxone PR is equally efficacious as a first-line treatment. Moreover, long-term comparative studies between opioids, dopaminergic drugs and α2δ ligands are needed. PMID:26966363

  13. The analgesic efficacy of etoricoxib compared with oxycodone/acetaminophen in an acute postoperative pain model: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Chang, David J; Desjardins, Paul J; King, Thomas R; Erb, Tara; Geba, Gregory P

    2004-09-01

    Our objective in this study was to compare the analgesic effects of etoricoxib and oxycodone/acetaminophen in a postoperative dental pain model. Patients experiencing moderate to severe pain after extraction of two or more third molars were randomized to single doses of etoricoxib 120 mg (n = 100), oxycodone/acetaminophen 10/650 mg (n = 100), or placebo (n = 25). The primary end-point was total pain relief over 6 h. Other end-points included patient global assessment of response to therapy; onset, peak, and duration of effect; and rescue opioid analgesic use. Active treatments were statistically significantly superior to placebo for all efficacy measures. Total pain relief over 6 h for etoricoxib was significantly more than for oxycodone/acetaminophen (P < 0.001). Patient global assessment of response to therapy at 6 and 24 h was superior for etoricoxib. Both drugs achieved rapid onset, although the time was faster for oxycodone/acetaminophen by 5 min. The peak effect was similar for both drugs. Compared with oxycodone/acetaminophen patients, etoricoxib patients experienced a longer analgesic duration, had a smaller percentage requiring rescue opioids during 6 and 24 h, and required less rescue analgesia during 6 and 24 h. Oxycodone/acetaminophen treatment resulted in more frequent adverse events (AEs), drug-related AEs, nausea, and vomiting compared with etoricoxib treatment. In conclusion, etoricoxib 120 mg provided superior overall efficacy compared with oxycodone/acetaminophen 10/650 mg and was associated with significantly fewer AEs. PMID:15333415

  14. Morphine is an arteriolar vasodilator in man

    PubMed Central

    Afshari, Reza; Maxwell, Simon R J; Webb, David J; Bateman, D Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    AIM The mechanisms of action of morphine on the arterial system are not well understood. The aim was to report forearm vascular responses, and their mediation, to intra-arterial morphine in healthy subjects. METHODS Three separate protocols were performed: (i) dose ranging; (ii) acute tolerance; (iii) randomized crossover mechanistic study on forearm blood flow (FBF) responses to intrabrachial infusion of morphine using venous occlusion plethysmography. Morphine was infused either alone (study 1 and 2), or with an antagonist: naloxone, combined histamine-1 and histamine-2 receptor blockade or during a nitric oxide clamp. RESULTS Morphine caused an increase in FBF at doses of 30 µg min−1[3.25 (0.26) ml min−1 100 ml−1][mean (SEM)] doubling at 100 µg min−1 to 5.23 (0.53) ml min−1 100 ml−1. Acute tolerance was not seen to 50 µg min−1 morphine, with increased FBF [3.96 (0.35) ml min−1 100 ml−1] (P = 0.003), throughout the 30-min infusion period. Vasodilatation was abolished by pretreatment with antihistamines (P = 0.008) and the nitric oxide clamp (P < 0.001), but not affected by naloxone. The maximum FBF with pretreatment with combined H1/H2 blockade was 3.06 (0.48) and 2.90 (0.17) ml min−1 100 ml−1 after 30 min, whereas with morphine alone it reached 4.3 (0.89) ml min−1 100 ml−1. CONCLUSIONS Intra-arterial infusion of morphine into the forearm circulation causes vasodilatation through local histamine-modulated nitric oxide release. Opioid receptor mechanisms need further exploration. PMID:19371311

  15. Assessment of Cognitive Functions in Methadone Maintenance Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mazhari, Shahrzad; Keshvari, Zeinab; Sabahi, Abdolreza; Mottaghian, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    Background Methadone maintenance has received little scientific attention regarding neurocognitive effects. This study is aimed to assess the neuropsychological performance of methadone maintenance patients (MMP) compared to those healthy controls. Methods Thirty-five MMP and 35 healthy controls, matched for age, gender, education and employment status, examined on a battery of tests aimed at assessing verbal fluency, executive functions, verbal memory, and working memory, using controlled oral word association test (COWAT), trial making test (TMT) Part A and B, Rey auditory verbal learning test (RAVLT), and backward digit span. Findings MMP performed significantly poorly than controls in cognitive domains of verbal fluency, executive function, and verbal memory. MMP did not exhibit impairment in working memory, and TMT Part A compared to controls. Conclusion These results suggest that methadone consumption induces significant cognitive impairment that could compromise drug-treatment outcomes in MMP. PMID:26885347

  16. Coexisting addiction and pain in people receiving methadone for addiction.

    PubMed

    St Marie, Barbara

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to examine the narratives of people who experience chronic pain (lasting 6 months or more) and were receiving methadone for the treatment of their opiate addiction through a major methadone clinic. This paper featured the pathway of how the participants developed chronic pain and addiction, and their beliefs of how prescription opioids would impact their addiction in the future. Thirty-four participants who experienced chronic pain and received methadone for treatment of opiate addiction were willing to tell the story of their experiences. The findings in three areas are presented: (a) whether participants experienced addiction first or pain first and how their exposures to addictive substances influenced their experiences, (b) the significance of recreational drug use and patterns of abuse behaviors leading to chronic pain, and (c) participants' experiences and beliefs about the potential for abuse of prescription opioid used for treatment of pain. PMID:23858068

  17. Coexisting Addiction and Pain in People Receiving Methadone for Addiction

    PubMed Central

    St. Marie, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to examine the narratives of people who experience chronic pain (lasting 6 months or more) and were receiving methadone for the treatment of their opiate addiction through a major methadone clinic. This paper featured the pathway of how the participants developed chronic pain and addiction, and their beliefs of how prescription opioids would impact their addiction in the future. Thirty-four participants who experienced chronic pain and received methadone for treatment of opiate addiction were willing to tell the story of their experiences. The findings in three areas are presented: (a) whether participants experienced addiction first or pain first and how their exposures to addictive substances influenced their experiences, (b) the significance of recreational drug use and patterns of abuse behaviors leading to chronic pain, and (c) participants’ experiences and beliefs about the potential for abuse of prescription opioid used for treatment of pain. PMID:23858068

  18. Simultaneous analysis of buprenorphine, methadone, cocaine, opiates and nicotine metabolites in sweat by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Concheiro, Marta; Shakleya, Diaa M; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-04-01

    A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for buprenorphine (BUP), norbuprenorphine (NBUP), methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), cocaine, benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester (EME), morphine, codeine, 6-acetylmorphine, heroin, 6-acetylcodeine, cotinine, and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine quantification in sweat was developed and comprehensively validated. Sweat patches were mixed with 6 mL acetate buffer at pH 4.5, and supernatant extracted with Strata-XC-cartridges. Reverse-phase separation was achieved with a gradient mobile phase of 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile in 15 min. Quantification was achieved by multiple reaction monitoring of two transitions per compound. The assay was a linear 1-1,000 ng/patch, except EME 5-1,000 ng/patch. Intra-, inter-day and total imprecision were <10.1%CV, analytical recovery 87.2-107.7%, extraction efficiency 35.3-160.9%, and process efficiency 25.5-91.7%. Ion suppression was detected for EME (-63.3%) and EDDP (-60.4%), and enhancement for NBUP (42.6%). Deuterated internal standards compensated for these effects. No carryover was detected, and all analytes were stable for 24 h at 22 °C, 72 h at 4 °C, and after three freeze/thaw cycles. The method was applied to weekly sweat patches from an opioid-dependent BUP-maintained pregnant woman; 75.0% of sweat patches were positive for BUP, 93.8% for cocaine, 37.5% for opiates, 6.3% for methadone and all for tobacco biomarkers. This method permits a fast and simultaneous quantification of 14 drugs and metabolites in sweat patches, with good selectivity and sensitivity. PMID:21125263

  19. Simultaneous analysis of buprenorphine, methadone, cocaine, opiates and nicotine metabolites in sweat by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Concheiro, Marta; Shakleya, Diaa M.

    2013-01-01

    A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for buprenorphine (BUP), norbuprenorphine (NBUP), methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), cocaine, benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester (EME), morphine, codeine, 6-acetylmorphine, heroin, 6-acetylcodeine, cotinine, and trans-3′-hydroxycotinine quantification in sweat was developed and comprehensively validated. Sweat patches were mixed with 6 mL acetate buffer at pH 4.5, and supernatant extracted with Strata-XC-cartridges. Reverse-phase separation was achieved with a gradient mobile phase of 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile in 15 min. Quantification was achieved by multiple reaction monitoring of two transitions per compound. The assay was a linear 1–1,000 ng/patch, except EME 5–1,000 ng/patch. Intra-, inter-day and total imprecision were <10.1%CV, analytical recovery 87.2–107.7%, extraction efficiency 35.3– 160.9%, and process efficiency 25.5–91.7%. Ion suppression was detected for EME (−63.3%) and EDDP (−60.4%), and enhancement for NBUP (42.6%). Deuterated internal standards compensated for these effects. No carryover was detected, and all analytes were stable for 24 h at 22 °C, 72 h at 4 °C, and after three freeze/thaw cycles. The method was applied to weekly sweat patches from an opioid-dependent BUP-maintained pregnant woman; 75.0% of sweat patches were positive for BUP, 93.8% for cocaine, 37.5% for opiates, 6.3% for methadone and all for tobacco biomarkers. This method permits a fast and simultaneous quantification of 14 drugs and metabolites in sweat patches, with good selectivity and sensitivity. PMID:21125263

  20. Using Poison Center Exposure Calls to Predict Methadone Poisoning Deaths

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Nabarun; Davis, Jonathan; Jonsson Funk, Michele; Dart, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose There are more drug overdose deaths in the Untied States than motor vehicle fatalities. Yet the US vital statistics reporting system is of limited value because the data are delayed by four years. Poison centers report data within an hour of the event, but previous studies suggested a small proportion of poisoning deaths are reported to poison centers (PC). In an era of improved electronic surveillance capabilities, exposure calls to PCs may be an alternate indicator of trends in overdose mortality. Methods We used PC call counts for methadone that were reported to the Researched Abuse, Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS®) System in 2006 and 2007. US death certificate data were used to identify deaths due to methadone. Linear regression was used to quantify the relationship of deaths and poison center calls. Results Compared to decedents, poison center callers tended to be younger, more often female, at home and less likely to require medical attention. A strong association was found with PC calls and methadone mortality (b = 0.88, se = 0.42, t = 9.5, df = 1, p<0.0001, R2 = 0.77). These findings were robust to large changes in a sensitivity analysis assessing the impact of underreporting of methadone overdose deaths. Conclusions Our results suggest that calls to poison centers for methadone are correlated with poisoning mortality as identified on death certificates. Calls received by poison centers may be used for timely surveillance of mortality due to methadone. In the midst of the prescription opioid overdose epidemic, electronic surveillance tools that report in real-time are powerful public health tools. PMID:22829925

  1. Methadone: six effects in search of a substance.

    PubMed

    Gomart, Emilie

    2002-02-01

    What is the difference between heroin and methadone? Is this difference one of interpretation, where an 'opiate-like' substance is 'labelled' differently through social processes that arbitrarily describe methadone as 'legal' and 'therapeutic', and heroin as 'illegal' and 'harmful'? To study the nature of this difference, I follow two experiments in the United States and in France of methadone substitution, where medical practices attempt to replace heroin by methadone, and thereby to reduce the user's (illegal) drug use. In these trials, the experimenters ask precisely this question. The question of the nature of the difference between the substance's actions is further illustrated by the comparison between the substitution trials: when the experimenters describe methadone differently in different places and times, do they 'interpret' the drug differently, or is the drug itself different? I show that far too many elements vary from trial to trial to say that the 'interpretation' of the substance is all that varies. In order to explore the variation in detail, then, I draw on works about 'performance', and on the actor-network 'theory of action': what heroin and methadone do, but also also the very way in which they 'pass into action', is what varies in each trial. In the end, this question about difference is a question about action. In each trial, there is not from the start one substance with fixed or vague properties which one can then interpret in various manners. 'Substance' does not contain inherent actions from the start ('properties'). Rather, following the experimenters, it is possible to say that 'effects' are primary and that only at the end of the trial do the experimenters laboriously 'find substance' to effects. PMID:12051261

  2. Morphine

    MedlinePlus

    ... breathing problems or other serious, life-threatening side effects. Tell your doctor if you are taking or plan to take any of the following medications: cimetidine (Tagamet); other narcotic pain medications; medications for anxiety, seizures, depression, mental illness, or nausea; muscle relaxants; ...

  3. Effectiveness of Relapse Prevention Cognitive-Behavioral Model in Opioid-Dependent Patients Participating in the Methadone Maintenance Treatment in Iran

    PubMed Central

    PASHAEI, Tahereh; SHOJAEIZADEH, Davoud; RAHIMI FOROUSHANI, Abbas; GHAZITABATABAE, Mahmoud; MOEENI, Maryam; RAJATI, Fatemeh; M RAZZAGHI, Emran

    2013-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the effectiveness of a relapse prevention cognitive-behavioral model, based on Marlatt treatment approach, in Opioid-dependent patients participating in the Methadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT) in Iran. Methods: The study consisted of 92 individuals treated with methadone in Iranian National Center of Addiction Studies (INCAS). Participants were randomized into two groups: educational intervention group (N=46) and control group (N=46). The intervention was comprised of 10 weekly 90 minute sessions, done during a period of 2.5 months based on the most high risk situations determined using Inventory Drug Taking Situation instrument. Relapse was defined as not showing up for MMT, drug use for at least 5 continuous days, and a positive urinary morphine test. Results: While, only 36.4% of the intervention group relapsed into drug use, 63.6% of the control group relapsed. The result of the logistic regressions showed that the odd ratio of the variable of intervention program for the entire follow up period was 0.43 (P<0.01). Further, the odd ratio of this variable in one month, three months, and 195 days after the therapy were 0.48 (P<.03), 0.31 (P<.02), and 0.13 (P<.02) respectively that revealed that on average, the probability of relapse among individuals in the intervention group was lower than patients in control group Conclusion: Relapse prevention model based on Marlatt treatment approach has an effective role in decreasing relapse rate. This model can be introduced as a complementary therapy in patients treated with methadone maintenance. PMID:26056645

  4. Quantitation of methadone enantiomers in humans using stable isotope-labeled (2H3)-, (2H5)-, and (2H8)Methadone

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Hachey, D.L.; Kreek, M.J.; Irving, C.S.; Klein, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    A new technique for simultaneous stereoselective kinetic studies of methadone enantiomers was developed using three deuterium-labeled forms of methadone and GLC-chemical-ionization mass spectrometry. A racemic mixture (1:1) of (R)-(-)-(2H5)methadone (l-form) and (S)-(R)-(2H3)methadone (d-form) was administered orally in place of a single daily dose of unlabeled (+/-)-(2H0)methadone in long-term maintenance patients. Racemic (+/-)-(2H8)methadone was used as an internal standard for the simultaneous quantitation of (2H0)-, (2H3)-, and (2H5)methadone in plasma and urine. A newly developed extraction procedure, using a short, disposable C18 reversed-phase cartridge and improved chemical-ionization procedures employing ammonia gas, resulted in significant reduction of the background impurities contributing to the ions used for isotopic abundance measurements. These improvements enabled the measurement of labeled plasma methadone levels for 120 hr following a single dose. This methodology was applied to the study of methadone kinetics in two patients; in both patients, the analgesically active l-enantiomer of the drug had a longer plasma elimination half-life and a smaller area under the plasma disappearance curve than did the inactive d-form.

  5. Ethnic and genetic factors in methadone pharmacokinetics: A population pharmacokinetic study☆

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Gavin; Lenz, Scott; Straka, Robert J.; Brundage, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment of opiate use disorders with methadone is complicated by wide interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics. To identify potentially contributing covariates in methadone pharmacokinetics, we used population pharmacokinetic modeling to estimate clearance (CL/F) and volume of distribution (V/F) for each methadone enantiomer in an ethnically diverse methadone maintained population. Methods Plasma levels of the opiate-active R-methadone and opiate-inactive S-methadone were measured in 206 methadone maintained subjects approximately two and twenty-three hours after a daily oral dose of racmethadone. A linear one-compartment population pharmacokinetic model with first-order conditional estimation with interaction (FOCE-I) was used to evaluate methadone CL/F and V/F. The influence of covariates on parameter estimates was evaluated using stepwise covariate modeling. Covariates included ethnicity, gender, weight, BMI, age, methadone dose, and 21 single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes implicated in methadone pharmacokinetics. Results In the final model, for each enantiomer, Hmong ethnicity reduced CL/F by approximately 30% and the rs2032582 (ABCB1 2677G > T/A) GG genotype was associated with a 20% reduction in CL/F. The presence of the rs3745274 minor allele (CYP2B6 515G > T) reduced CL/F by up to 20% for S-methadone only. A smaller effect of age was noted on CL/F for R-methadone. Conclusion This is the first report showing the influence of the rs2032582 and rs3745274 variants on methadone pharmacokinetics rather than simply dose requirements or plasma levels. Population pharmacokinetics is a valuable method for identifying the influences on methadone pharmacokinetic variability. PMID:25456329

  6. Trends in Controlled-Release Oxycodone (Oxycontin[R]) Prescribing among Medicaid Recipients in Kentucky, 1998-2002. Research Note

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havens, Jennifer R.; Talbert, Jeffrey C.; Walker, Robert; Leedham, Cynthia; Leukefeld, Carl G.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Prescription opioid abuse has emerged as a public health problem, particularly in rural America. Purpose: To examine temporal and geographic trends in rates of controlled-release oxycodone (OxyContin) prescribing for Kentucky Medicaid recipients. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis was completed in which the state was divided into 3…

  7. Pattern of QTc prolongation in Methadone Maintenance Therapy (MMT) subjects receiving different methadone dosages: A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad, Nasir; Abdul Jalal, Muhammad Irfan; Hassan, Azlie; Abdulkarim Ibrahim, Muslih; Salehuddin, Roslanuddin; Abu Bakar, Nor Hidayah

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare the QTc interval between low and high dose methadone groups and evaluate the pattern of QTc variation. Methods: This is a prospective cohort study conducted from December 2010 till August 2011 at Malaysian University of Science’s Hospital. Forty six subjects, grouped in high dose (>80mg) and low dose (<80mg) oral methadone, were followed-up at 4-weekly for QTc measurements. Relevant demographic and biochemical profiles were taken at intervals with concurrent QTc measurements. Results: No significant QTc differences between methadone dosage groups were found at Week 0 (434ms vs 444ms, p = 0.166) and week 8 (446.5ms vs 459ms, p = 0.076), but not at week 4(435ms vs 450ms, p = 0.029). However, there were significant associations between the groups with QTc prolongation at week 0 and 4 (OR 4.29(95% CI 1.01, 18.72) p=0.044 and OR 5.18 (95% CI 1.34, 20.06) p =0.013, respectively) but not at week 8 (OR 2.44 (95% CI 0.74, 8.01) p=0.139). On multivariate analysis, dose group was the sole significant factor for QTc prolongation for week 0 and 4 (p values 0.047 and 0.017, respectively), but not at week 8. Conclusion: High-dose methadone group is more likely to develop prolonged QTc than low-dose group. However, such effects were inconsistent and occurred even during chronic methadone therapy, mandating judicious QTc and serum methadone monitoring. PMID:24353706

  8. Pleiotrophin modulates morphine withdrawal but has no effects on morphine-conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Gramage, Esther; Vicente-Rodríguez, Marta; Herradón, Gonzalo

    2015-09-14

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a neurotrophic factor with important functions in addiction and neurodegenerative disorders. Morphine administration induces an increase in the expression of PTN and Midkine (MK), the only other member of this family of cytokines, in brain areas related with the addictive effects of drug of abuse, like the Ventral Tegmental Area or the hippocampus. In spite of previous studies showing that PTN modulates amphetamine and ethanol rewarding effects, and that PTN is involved in morphine-induced analgesia, it was still unknown if the rewarding effects of morphine may be regulated by endogenous PTN. Thus, we aim to study the role of PTN in the reward and physical dependence induced by morphine. We used the Conditioned Place Preference (CPP) paradigm in PTN genetically deficient (PTN-/-) and wild type (WT) mice to assess the rewarding effects of morphine in absence of endogenous PTN. Second, to study if PTN may be involved in morphine physical dependence, naloxone-precipitated withdrawal syndrome was induced in PTN-/- and WT morphine dependent mice. Although the increase in the time spent in the morphine-paired compartment after conditioning tended to be more pronounced in PTN-/- mice, statistical significance was not achieved. The data suggest that PTN does not exert an important role in morphine reward. However, our results clearly indicate that PTN-/- mice develop a more severe withdrawal syndrome than WT mice, characterized as a significant increase in the time standing and in the total incidences of forepaw licking, forepaw tremors, wet dog shake and writhing. The data presented here suggest that PTN is a novel genetic factor that plays a role in morphine withdrawal syndrome. PMID:26222257

  9. Effects of morphine on the disposition of ampicillin in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Garty, M; Hurwitz, A

    1985-01-01

    Morphine raised the levels of intravenously administered ampicillin in the plasma of mice. Despite higher ampicillin levels in plasma after administration of morphine, levels of this antibiotic in bile and urine were not elevated. After ligation of the common bile duct, ampicillin levels in plasma were elevated. Morphine caused a further rise in drug levels in plasma of duct-ligated mice. Ampicillin levels in plasma were higher in mice made anephric by prolonged ligation of their external urethras. In such animals, morphine also caused ampicillin levels in plasma to be even higher. These experiments suggest that morphine impairs both renal and hepatobiliary elimination of ampicillin. These effects of morphine were completely reversed by naloxone. In contrast to effects on intravenously administered ampicillin, morphine markedly reduced drug levels in plasma when ampicillin was given by gastric intubation. This resulted from delayed absorption because of retardation of gastric emptying by morphine. PMID:4073871

  10. Comparative Cognitive and Subjective Side Effects of Immediate Release Oxycodone in Healthy Middle Age and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cherrier, M.; Amory, J.; Ersek, M.; Risler, L.; Shen, D.

    2009-01-01

    This study measured the objective and subjective neurocognitive effects of a single 10mg dose of immediate-release oxycodone in healthy, older (>65 years) and middle age (35 – 55 years) adults who were not suffering from chronic or significant daily pain. Seventy-one participants completed two separate study days and were blind to medication condition (placebo, 10 mg oxycodone). Plasma oxycodone concentration peaked between 60 and 90 min post dose (p<0.01) and pupil size, an indication of physiological effects of the medication peaked at approximately 90 to 120 min post dose (p<0.01). Significant declines in simple and sustained attention, working memory and verbal memory were observed at one hour post dose compared to baseline for both age groups with a trend toward return to baseline by five hours post dose. For almost all cognitive measures there were no medication by age interaction effects, which indicates that the two age groups exhibited a similar responses to the medication challenge. This study suggests that for healthy older adults who are not suffering from chronic pain, neurocognitive and pharmacodynamic changes in response to a 10 mg dose of immediate release oxycodone are similar to those observed for middle age adults. Perspective Study findings indicate that the metabolism, neurocognitive effects, and physical side effects of oral oxycodone are similar for healthy middle-age and older adults. Therefore, clinicians should not avoid prescribing oral opioids to older adults based on the belief that older adults are at higher risk for side effects than younger adults. PMID:19729346

  11. Long-term effects of methadone maintenance treatment with different psychosocial intervention models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lirong; Wei, Xiaoli; Wang, Xueliang; Li, Jinsong; Li, Hengxin; Jia, Wei

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the long-term effects of different psychosocial intervention models in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) in Xi'an China. Patients from five MMT clinics were divided into three groups receiving MMT only, MMT with counseling psychology (CP) or MMT with contingency management (CM). A five-year follow-up was carried out with daily records of medication, monthly random urine morphine tests, and tests for anti-HIV and anti-HCV every six months. Drug use behavior was recorded six months after initial recruitment using a survey. Adjusted RRs and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using an unconditional logistic regression model or a Cox proportional hazard model. A total of 2662 patients were recruited with 797 in MMT, 985 in MMT with CP, and 880 in MMT with CM. Following six months of treatment, the injection rates of MMT with CP and MMT with CM groups were significantly lower than that of MMT (5.1% and 6.9% vs. 16.3%, x²  =  47.093 and 29.908, respectively; P<0.05). HIV incidences for MMT, MMT with CP and MMT with CM at the five year follow-up were 20.09, 0.00 and 10.02 per ten thousand person-years, respectively. HCV incidences were 18.35, 4.42 and 6.61 per hundred person-years, respectively, demonstrating that CP and CM were protective factors for HCV incidence (RR  =  0.209 and 0.414, with range of 0.146-0.300 and 0.298-0.574, respectively). MMT supplemented with CP or CM can reduce heroin use and related risk behaviors, thereby reducing the incidence of HIV and HCV. PMID:24498406

  12. Efficacy and tolerability of oral oxycodone and oxycodone/naloxone combination in opioid-naïve cancer patients: a propensity analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lazzari, Marzia; Greco, Maria Teresa; Marcassa, Claudio; Finocchi, Simona; Caldarulo, Clarissa; Corli, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Background World Health Organization step III opioids are required to relieve moderate-to-severe cancer pain; constipation is one of the most frequent opioid-induced side effects. A fixed combination, prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone (OXN), was developed with the aim of reducing opioid-related gastrointestinal side effects. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of prolonged-release oxycodone (OXY) alone to OXN in opioid-naïve cancer patients with moderate-to-severe pain. Methods Propensity analysis was utilized in this observational study, which evaluated the efficacy, safety, and quality of life. Results Out of the 210 patients recruited, 146 were matched using propensity scores and included in the comparative analysis. In both groups, pain intensity decreased by ≈3 points after 60 days, indicating comparable analgesic efficacy. Responder rates were similar between groups. Analgesia was achieved and maintained with similarly low and stable dosages over time (12.0–20.4 mg/d for OXY and 11.5–22.0 mg/d for OXN). Bowel Function Index (BFI) and laxative use per week improved from baseline at 30 days and 60 days in OXN recipients (−16, P<0.0001 and −3.5, P=0.02, respectively); BFI worsened in the OXY group. The overall incidence of drug-related adverse events was 28.9% in the OXY group and 8.2% in the OXN group (P<0.01); nausea and vomiting were two to five times less frequent with OXN. Quality of life improved to a significantly greater extent in patients receiving OXN compared to OXY (increase in Short Form-36 physical component score of 7.1 points vs 3.2 points, respectively; P<0.001). Conclusion In patients with chronic cancer pain, OXN provided analgesic effectiveness that is similar to OXY, with early and sustained benefits in tolerability. The relationship between responsiveness to OXN and clinical characteristics is currently being investigated. PMID:26586937

  13. Tandem DART™ MS Methods for Methadone Analysis in Unprocessed Urine.

    PubMed

    Beck, Rachel; Carter, Patrick; Shonsey, Erin; Graves, David

    2016-03-01

    Current methods of methadone analysis in untreated urine are traditionally limited to enzyme immunoassays (EIA) while confirmation techniques require specimen processing (i.e., sample clean-up) before analyzing by gas or liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS or LC-MS-MS). EIA and traditional confirmation techniques can be costly and, at times inefficient. As an alternative approach, we present Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART™) coupled with both time-of-flight and triple quadrupole linear ion trap (Q-TRAP™) mass spectrometers for screening and confirming methadone in untreated urine specimens. These approaches require neither expensive kits nor sample clean-up for analysis. More importantly, the total combined analysis time for both screening and confirmation methods was <5 min per sample; in contrast to the 3-5 day process required by traditional EIA, GC-MS and LC-MS-MS techniques. To examine the fundamental protocol and its applicability for routine drug screening, studies were performed that included limits of detection, precision, selectivity and specificity, sample recovery and stability and method robustness. The methods described in this report were determined to be highly specific and selective; allowing for detection of methadone at 250 ng/mL, consistent with cutoffs for current EIA techniques (300 ng/mL). The results reported here demonstrate the DART™ MS platform provides rapid and selective methadone analysis and the potential for providing savings of both time and resources compared with current analysis procedures. PMID:26590378

  14. Physician Peer Assessments for Compliance with Methadone Maintenance Treatment Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strike, Carol; Wenghofer, Elizabeth; Gnam, William; Hillier, Wade; Veldhuizen, Scott; Millson, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Medical associations and licensing bodies face pressure to implement quality assurance programs, but evidence-based models are lacking. To improve the quality of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT), the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario, Canada, conducts an innovative quality assurance program on the basis of peer…

  15. Counseling with Methadone Clients: A Review of Recent Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Robert J.; Powers, Henrietta B.

    1978-01-01

    A review of studies on counseling with methadone clients affirmed the importance of counseling services. Support was found for analytic therapy, T-group therapy, behavioral training, reality therapy, and family therapy. There was evidence of client resistance to group therapy. (Author)

  16. Attitudes of Employers toward Hiring Methadone Maintenance Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugliese, Anthony

    1978-01-01

    Results of this study indicate that at present employers are not ready to accept methadone maintained patients into their firms. The stigma placed on heroin addicts by employers is a very important issue when the treated patient tries to make it in the employment field. More employer education is needed. (Author)

  17. Cost Analysis of Training and Employment Services in Methadone Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Michael T.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A cost analysis is presented for developing a training and employment (TEP) program at four methadone treatment centers in a quasi-experimental pilot study. Average annual costs for TEP per client were derived. The methodology can be used in other projects to compare standard and TEP-enhanced substance-abuse treatment. (SLD)

  18. Integrating Fieldwork into Employment Counseling for Methadone-Treatment Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankertz, Laura; Spinelli, Michael; Magura, Stephen; Bali, Priti; Madison, Elizabeth M.; Staines, Graham L.; Horowitz, Emily; Guarino, Honoria; Grandy, Audrey; Fong, Chunki; Gomez, Augustin; Dimun, Amy; Friedman, Ellen

    2005-01-01

    An innovative employment counseling model, Customized Employment Supports, was developed for methadone-treatment patients, a population with historically low employment rates. The effectiveness of a key component of the model, "vocational fieldwork," the delivery of services in the community rather than only within the clinic, was assessed through…

  19. Changing Needle Practices in Community Outreach and Methadone Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsberg, Wendee M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This pretest/posttest study used two samples of injecting drug users (184 from street outreach and 103 from a methadone program) to assess drug use and human immunodeficiency virus risk practices. The improvement in risk behaviors at posttest suggests that intervention programs were agents of change. (SLD)

  20. Interaction of different antidepressants with acute and chronic methadone in mice, and possible clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Shaul; Barak, Yonatan; Hostovsky, Avner; Baratz-Goldstein, Renana; Volis, Ina; Rubovitch, Vardit; Pick, Chaim G

    2014-04-01

    We studied the interaction of a single dose of different antidepressant medications with a single (acute) dose or implanted mini-pump (chronic) methadone administration in mice, using the hotplate assay. For the acute experiment, subthreshold doses of six antidepressant drugs were administered separately with a single dose of methadone. The addition of a subthreshold dose of desipramine or clomipramine to methadone produced significant augmentation of the methadone effect with each drug (p < 0.05). Fluvoxamine given at a fixed subthreshold dose induced a synergistic effect only with a low methadone dose. Escitalopram, reboxetine and venlafaxine given separately, each at a fixed subthreshold dose, induced no interaction. Possible clinical implications of these findings are that while escitalopram, reboxetine and venlafaxine do not affect methadone's antinociception in mice and are safe to be given together with methadone when indicated, fluvoxamine, clomipramine and desipramine considerably augment methadone-induced effects and should be avoided in this population due to the risk of inducing opiate overdose. For the chromic experiment, when a subthreshold dose of either escitalopram, desipramine or clomipramine was injected to mice following 2 weeks of methadone administration with the mini-pump, none of the antidepressant drugs strengthened methadone's analgesic effect. Further studies are needed before possible clinical implications can be drawn. PMID:24057890

  1. Pharmacologic Evidence to Support Clinical Decision Making for Peripartum Methadone Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bogen, D. L.; Perel, J. M.; Helsel, J. C.; Hanusa, B. H.; Romkes, M.; Nukui, T.; Friedman, C. R.; Wisner, K. L.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Limited pharmacological data are available to guide methadone treatment during pregnancy and postpartum. Objectives Study goals were to: 1) Characterize changes in methadone dose across childbearing, 2) Determine enantiomer-specific methadone withdrawal kinetics from steady-state during late pregnancy, 3) Assess enantiomer-specific changes in methadone level/dose (L/D) ratios across childbearing, and 4) Explore relationships between CYP2B6, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 single nucleotide polymorphisms and maternal dose, plasma concentration and L/D. Methods Methadone dose changes and timed plasma samples were obtained for women on methadone (n=25) followed prospectively from third trimester of pregnancy to three months postpartum. Results Participants were primarily white, Medicaid insured and multiparous. All women increased their dose from first to end of second trimester (mean peak increase=23 mg/day); 71% of women increased from second trimester to delivery (mean peak increase=19 mg/day). Half took a higher dose 3 months postpartum than at delivery despite significantly larger clearance during late pregnancy. Third trimester enantiomer-specific methadone half-lives (range R-methadone 14.7-24.9 hours; S-methadone 8.02-18.9 hours) were about half of those reported in non-pregnant populations. In 3 women with weekly 24-hour methadone levels after delivery, L/D increased within 1-2 weeks after delivery. Women with the CYP2B6 Q172 variant GT genotype have consistently higher L/D values for S-methadone across both pregnancy and postpartum. Conclusions Most women require increases in methadone dose across pregnancy. Given the shorter half-life and larger clearances during pregnancy, many pregnant women may benefit from split methadone dosing. L/D increases quickly after delivery and doses should be lowered rapidly after delivery. PMID:22926004

  2. The bioavailability of morphine applied topically to cutaneous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Maria D C; Joel, Simon P; Zeppetella, Giovambattista

    2004-05-01

    A number of studies have reported the analgesic effect of morphine when applied topically to painful skin ulcers. It has been suggested that morphine may exert a local action, as opioid receptors have been demonstrated on peripheral nerve terminals. In this study, we investigated the bioavailability of topically applied morphine to cutaneous ulcers. Six hospice inpatients with skin ulcers were given morphine sulfate 10 mg in Intrasite gel topically and morphine sulfate 10 mg subcutaneously over 4 hours, at least 48 hours apart, in randomized order. Morphine, morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G), and morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) were determined in plasma using a specific HPLC method. In five patients morphine and its metabolites were undetectable when applied topically. In one patient (with the largest ulcer), morphine and M6G were detected. The calculated morphine and M6G bioavailability in this patient were 20% and 21%, respectively. M3G was also detected but was below the lower limit of quantitation. When applied topically to ulcers, morphine was not absorbed in the majority of patients, suggesting any analgesic effect would be mediated locally rather than systemically. However, in ulcers with a large surface area, systemic absorption may occur. PMID:15120772

  3. The effect of different durations of morphine exposure on mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons in morphine dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Weibo; Ma, Chunling; Qi, Qian; Liu, Lizhe; Bi, Haitao; Cong, Bin; Li, Yingmin

    2015-12-01

    Mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons are heavily involved in the development of drug dependence. Thyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis, plays an important role in the survival of dopaminergic neurons. Therefore, this study investigated TH changes in dopaminergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra (SN), as well as the morphine effects on dopaminergic neurons induced by different durations of morphine dependence. Models of morphine dependence were established in rats, and paraffin-embedded sections, immunohistochemistry and western blotting were used to observe the changes in the expression of TH protein. Fluoro-Jade B staining was used to detect degeneration and necrosis, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end-labeling (TUNEL) detected the apoptosis of mesencephalic dopaminergic nerve cells. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting showed that the number of TH positive cells and the protein levels in the VTA and SN were significantly decreased in the rats with a long period of morphine dependency. With prolonged morphine exposure, the dopaminergic nerve cells in the VTA and SN showed degeneration and necrosis, while apoptotic cells were not observed. The number of VTA and SN dopaminergic nerve cells decreased with increasing periods of morphine dependence, which was most likely attributable to the degeneration and necrosis of nerve cells induced by morphine toxicity. PMID:26386147

  4. Implementing methadone maintenance treatment in prisons in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Wickersham, Jeffrey A; Marcus, Ruthanne; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Zahari, Muhammad Muhsin

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Problem In Malaysia, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is highly concentrated among people who inject opioids. For this reason, the country undertook a three-phase roll-out of a methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) programme. In Phase 3, described in this paper, MMT was implemented within prisons and retention in care was assessed. Approach After developing standard operating procedures and agreement between its Prisons Department and Ministry of Health, Malaysia established pilot MMT programmes in two prisons in the states of Kelantan (2008) and Selangor (2009) – those with the highest proportions of HIV-infected prisoners. Community-based MMT programmes were also established in Malaysia to integrate treatment activities after prisoners’ release. Local setting Having failed to reduce the incidence of HIV infection, in 2005 Malaysia embarked on a harm reduction strategy. Relevant changes Standard operating procedures were modified to: (i) escalate the dose of methadone more slowly; (ii) provide ongoing education and training for medical and correctional staff and inmates; (iii) increase the duration of methadone treatment before releasing prisoners; (iv) reinforce linkages with community MMT programmes after prisoners’ release; (v) screen for and treat tuberculosis; (vi) escalate the dose of methadone during treatment for HIV infection and tuberculosis; and (vii) optimize the daily oral dose of methadone (> 80 mg) before releasing prisoners. Lessons learnt Prison-based MMT programmes can be effectively implemented but require adequate dosing and measures are needed to improve communication between prison and police authorities, prevent police harassment of MMT clients after their release, and improve systems for tracking release dates. PMID:23554524

  5. Reformulation of controlled-release oxycodone and pharmacy dispensing patterns near the US–Canada border

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Tara; Paterson, J Michael; Juurlink, David N; Dhalla, Irfan A; Mamdani, Muhammad M

    2012-01-01

    Background In August 2010, a tamper-resistant formulation of controlled-release oxycodone (OxyContin-OP) was introduced in the United States but not in Canada. Our objective was to determine whether introduction of OxyContin-OP in the United States influenced prescription volumes for the original controlled-release oxycodone formulation (OxyContin) at Canadian pharmacies near the international border. Methods We conducted a population-based, serial, cross-sectional study of prescriptions dispensed from pharmacies in the 3 cities with the highest volume of US–Canada border crossings in Ontario: Niagara Falls, Windsor and Sarnia. We analyzed data on all outpatient prescriptions for OxyContin dispensed by Canadian pharmacies near each border crossing between 2010 Apr. 1 and 2012 Feb. 29. We calculated and compared monthly prescription rates, adjusted per 1000 population and stratified by tablet strength. Results The number of tablets dispensed near 4 border crossings in the 3 Canadian cities remained stable over the study period. However, the rate of dispensing at pharmacies near the Detroit–Windsor Tunnel increased roughly 4-fold between August 2010 and February 2011, from 505 to 1969 tablets per 1000 population. By April 2011, following warnings to prescribers and pharmacies regarding drug-seeking behaviour, the dispensing rate declined to 1683 tablets per 1000 population in this area. By November 2011, the rate had returned to levels observed in early 2010. Our analyses suggest that 242 075 excess OxyContin tablets were dispensed near the Detroit–Windsor Tunnel between August 2010 and October 2011. Conclusions Prescribing of the original formulation of controlled-release oxycodone rose substantially near a major international border crossing following the introduction of a tamper-resistant formulation in the United States. It is possible that the restriction of this finding to the area surrounding the Detroit–Windsor Tunnel reflects specific

  6. Methadone-induced Damage to White Matter Integrity in Methadone Maintenance Patients: A Longitudinal Self-control DTI Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Li, Qiang; Wang, Yarong; Zhu, Jia; Ye, Jianjun; Yan, Xuejiao; Li, Yongbin; Chen, Jiajie; Liu, Jierong; Li, Zhe; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yijun

    2016-01-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) can induce impairments in brain function and structure, despite its clinical effectiveness. However, the effect of chronic MMT on brain white matter (WM) is not fully known. Thirty-three MMT patients underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) twice – at the start of the study (Scan1) and one year later (Scan2). Tract-based spatial statistics were used to investigate changes in fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD) between the two scans. The correlations between DTI indices and methadone consumption and neuropsychological status were analysed. We found significantly decreased FA, decreased AD and increased RD in Scan2 in extensive WM regions; overlapping regions were found in the left posterior limb and the retrolenticular part of internal capsule, superior and posterior corona radiata, bilateral external capsule and the right superior longitudinal fasciculus. In addition, the change of FA in the overlapping regions was positively correlated with the accumulated dosage of methadone use, the RD value in Scan2 and non-planning impulsiveness (NPI) measured at follow-up. The results suggest that methadone has damaging effects on WM integrity. The dose-dependent pattern and characteristics of the impairment may suggest new strategies for MMT. PMID:26794650

  7. Efficacy and safety of combined prolonged-release oxycodone and naloxone in the management of moderate/severe chronic non-malignant pain: results of a prospectively designed pooled analysis of two randomised, double-blind clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Two randomised 12-week, double-blind, parallel-group, multicenter studies comparing oxycodone PR/naloxone PR and oxycodone PR alone on symptoms of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in patients with moderate/severe non-malignant pain have been conducted. Methods These studies were prospectively designed to be pooled and the primary outcome measure of the pooled data analysis was to demonstrate non-inferiority in 12-week analgesic efficacy of oxycodone PR/naloxone PR versus oxycodone PR alone. Patients with opioid-induced constipation were switched to oxycodone PR and then randomised to fixed doses of oxycodone PR/naloxone PR (n = 292) or oxycodone PR (n = 295) for 12 weeks (20-80 mg/day). Results No statistically significant differences in analgesic efficacy were observed for the two treatments (p = 0.3197; non-inferiority p < 0.0001; 95% CI -0.07, 0.23) and there was no statistically significant difference in frequency of analgesic rescue medication use. Improvements in Bowel Function Index score were observed for oxycodone PR/naloxone PR by Week 1 and at every subsequent time point (-15.1; p < 0.0001; 95% CI -17.3, -13.0). AE incidence was similar for both groups (61.0% and 57.3% of patients with oxycodone PR/naloxone PR and oxycodone PR alone, respectively). Conclusions Results of this pooled analysis confirm that oxycodone PR/naloxone PR provides effective analgesia and suggest that oxycodone PR/naloxone PR improves bowel function without compromising analgesic efficacy. Trial registration numbers ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00412100 and NCT00412152 PMID:20920236

  8. Infrequent Illicit Methadone Use Among Stimulant-Using Patients in Methadone Maintenance Treatment Programs: A National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-Tzy; Blazer, Dan G.; Stitzer, Maxine L.; Patkar, Ashwin A.; Blaine, Jack D.

    2009-01-01

    We sought to determine the prevalence, patterns, and correlates of past-month illicit methadone use and history of regular illicit use among stimulant-using methadone maintenance treatment patients. We obtained self-reported information on illicit methadone use from 383 participants recruited from six community-based methadone maintenance programs. Overall, 1.6% of participants reported illicit use in the past month, and 4.7% reported a history of regular use. Younger age and history of outpatient psychological treatment were associated with increased odds of past-month illicit use. Illicit methadone use among patients in maintenance programs is infrequent; however, a number of factors may increase risk of illicit use. PMID:18612886

  9. Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy during Methadone Dose Reduction: Rationale, Treatment Description, and a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Stotts, Angela L.; Masuda, Akihiko; Wilson, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Many clients who undergo methadone maintenance (MM) treatment for heroin and other opiate dependence prefer abstinence from methadone. Attempts at methadone detoxification are often unsuccessful, however, due to distressing physical as well as psychological symptoms. Outcomes from a MM client who voluntarily participated in an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) – based methadone detoxification program are presented. The program consisted of a 1-month stabilization and 5-month gradual methadone dose reduction period, combined with weekly individual ACT sessions. Urine samples were collected twice weekly to assess for use of illicit drugs. The participant successfully completed the program and had favorable drug use outcomes during the course of treatment, and at the one-month and one-year follow-ups. Innovative behavior therapies, such as ACT, that focus on acceptance of the inevitable distress associated with opiate withdrawal may improve methadone detoxification outcomes. PMID:20628479

  10. Synthetic substances with morphine-like effect

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Nathan B.; Halbach, H.; Braenden, Olav J.

    1957-01-01

    A review of effects in man of morphine-like drugs which have been brought under international narcotics control is presented in the form of individual monographs. These are based on controlled observations with quantitative data and significant reports of results obtained in medical practice. In a summarizing section, the drugs are compared with respect to effectiveness, side-effects and addiction liability. Morphine-like drugs of natural and synthetic origin now cover a wide range of potency (analgesic, antitussive), not necessarily paralleled by incidence of side-effects or addiction liability. PMID:13511135

  11. Incarcerated intravenous heroin users: Predictors of post-release utilization of methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huang-Chi; Wang, Peng-Wei; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Tsai, Jih-Jin; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Incarcerated intravenous heroin users have more problematic patterns of heroin use, but are less likely to access methadone maintenance treatment by their own initiative than heroin users in the community. The present study examined predictors for receiving methadone maintenance treatment post-release among incarcerated intravenous heroin users within a 24-month period. This cohort study recruited 315 incarcerated intravenous heroin users detained in 4 prisons in southern Taiwan and followed up within the 24-month period post-release. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was applied to determine the predictive effects of sociodemographic and drug-use characteristics, attitude toward methadone maintenance treatment, human immunodeficiency virus serostatus, perceived family support, and depression for access to methadone maintenance treatment after release. There were 295 (93.7%) incarcerated intravenous heroin users released that entered the follow-up phase of the study. During the 24-month follow-up period, 50.8% of them received methadone maintenance treatment. After controlling for the effects of the detainment period before and after recruitment by Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, incarcerated intravenous heroin users who had positive human immunodeficiency virus serostatus (HR = 2.85, 95% CI = 1.80-4.52, p < .001) and had ever received methadone maintenance treatment before committal (HR = 1.94, 95% CI = 1.23-3.05, p < .01) were more likely to enter methadone maintenance treatment within the 24-month follow-up period. Positive human immunodeficiency virus serostatus with fully subsidized treatment and previous methadone maintenance treatment experiences predicted access of methadone maintenance treatment post-release. Strategies for getting familiar with methadone maintenance treatment during detainment, including providing methadone maintenance treatment prior to release and lowering the economic burden of receiving treatment, may

  12. Ketoprofen, acetaminophen plus oxycodone, and acetaminophen in the relief of postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, A; Olson, N Z; Zighelboim, I; De Castro, A

    1993-11-01

    Ketoprofen (Orudis) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that is currently approved in the United States for the management of mild to moderate pain. The objective of this trial was to determine the effectiveness of orally administered ketoprofen in the management of severe postoperative pain. This randomized, double-blind parallel study compared the efficacy and safety of single doses of 100 mg or 50 mg ketoprofen, the combination of 650 mg acetaminophen plus 10 mg oxycodone hydrochloride, 650 mg acetaminophen, or placebo in 240 patients with severe postoperative pain after cesarean section. Analgesia for the first dose was assessed over an 8-hour period. Multiple doses of 100 mg or 50 mg ketoprofen and the combination at half the dose (325 mg acetaminophen plus 5 mg oxycodone) were also assessed for up to 7 days. The 100 and 50 mg doses of ketoprofen and the combination were statistically superior to acetaminophen and placebo for many analgesic measures. A dose response was observed between the two doses of ketoprofen, with the 100 mg dose providing significantly greater analgesia over the lower dose. Ketoprofen, 100 mg, was at least as effective as the combination and its effects lasted longer, with the exception of hour 1 when the combination was superior. Remedication time for the group receiving 100 mg ketoprofen was significantly longer than for the other treatment groups. Significantly more patients who took repeated doses of the combination (84%) than those who took either dose of ketoprofen (70%) had adverse effects. Ketoprofen at both dose levels was shown to be effective, long-lasting, and well tolerated, and it should be considered as a viable option for the management of moderate to severe postoperative pain. PMID:8222498

  13. Oxycodone/Naloxone: role in chronic pain management, opioid-induced constipation, and abuse deterrence.

    PubMed

    DePriest, Anne Z; Miller, Katie

    2014-06-01

    The use of opioids in the treatment of chronic pain is widespread; the prevalence of specific opioids varies from country to country and depends on product availability, national formulary systems, and provider preferences. Patients often receive opioids for legitimate treatment of pain conditions, but on the opposite side of the spectrum, nonmedical use of opioids is a significant public health concern. Opioids are associated with several side effects, and constipation is the most commonly reported and persistent symptom. Unlike some adverse effects associated with opioid use, tolerance does not develop to constipation. Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is the most prevalent patient complaint associated with opioid use and has been associated with declines in various quality of life measures. OIC can be extremely difficult for patients to tolerate and may prompt patients to decrease or discontinue opioid treatment. Current management strategies for OIC are often insufficient. A prolonged-release formulation of oxycodone/naloxone (OXN) has been investigated for the treatment of nonmalignant and cancer pain and mitigation of OIC, and evidence is largely favorable. Studies have demonstrated the capability of OXN to alleviate OIC while maintaining pain control comparable to oxycodone-only regimens. There is insufficient evidence for OXN efficacy for patients with mild OIC or patients maintained on high doses of opioids, and use in these populations is controversial. The reduction of costs associated with OIC may provide overall cost effectiveness with OXN. Additionally, the presence of naloxone may deter abuse/misuse by those seeking to misuse the formulation by modes of administration other than oral ingestion. Most studies to date have occurred in European countries, and phase 3 trials continue in the United States. This review will include current therapeutic options for pain and constipation, unique characteristics of OXN, evidence related to use of OXN and its

  14. Morphine Promotes Tumor Angiogenesis and Increases Breast Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bimonte, Sabrina; Barbieri, Antonio; Palma, Giuseppe; Luciano, Antonio; Cuomo, Arturo; Arra, Claudio; Izzo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Morphine is considered a highly potent analgesic agent used to relieve suffering of patients with cancer. Several in vitro and in vivo studies showed that morphine also modulates angiogenesis and regulates tumour cell growth. Unfortunately, the results obtained by these studies are still contradictory. In order to better dissect the role of morphine in cancer cell growth and angiogenesis we performed in vitro studies on ER-negative human breast carcinoma cells, MDA.MB231 and in vivo studies on heterotopic mouse model of human triple negative breast cancer, TNBC. We demonstrated that morphine in vitro enhanced the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of MDA.MB231 cells. In vivo studies performed on xenograft mouse model of TNBC revealed that tumours of mice treated with morphine were larger than those observed in other groups. Moreover, morphine was able to enhance the neoangiogenesis. Our data showed that morphine at clinical relevant doses promotes angiogenesis and increases breast cancer progression. PMID:26064880

  15. The role of morphine glucuronides in cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, S

    1999-03-01

    Morphine metabolites are involved in various ways in determining the complex effects of morphine, both favourable and adverse, and may complicate the clinical use of morphine in the treatment of cancer pain. The production and effects of the principal morphine metabolites, morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine-6-glucuronide, in both normal and pathological states have been reviewed in the current literature. Therapeutic implications are also reviewed on the basis of experimental and clinical reports. The presence of these metabolites should be recognized in the chronic treatment of cancer pain with morphine, especially in the presence of renal impairment, and should be considered to have an important influence on opioid responsiveness, defined as a balance between the achievement of an optimal analgesia and the occurrence of adverse effects. PMID:10474692

  16. Contingency contracting and systematic desensitization for heroin addicts in methadone maintenance programs.

    PubMed

    Piane, G

    2000-01-01

    The use and effectiveness of contingency contracting and systematic desensitization with heroin addicts being treated in methadone maintenance programs are discussed. Both behavior therapies can be practically implemented in methadone maintenance programs to supplement methadone pharmacotherapy. Contingency contracting has been effectively employed to reduce illicit drug use and to manage patients in the clinic. Systematic desensitization has less effect on actual heroin usage yet effectively reduces the fear of withdrawal and general anxiety, while improving self-image, assertiveness, and adjustment in the community. A clinic protocol that incorporates all three therapies-methadone maintenance, contingency contracting, and systematic desensitization-is proposed. PMID:11061683

  17. Methadone, monoamine oxidase, and depression: opioid distribution and acute effects on enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, C.A.; Kreek, M.J.; Raghunath, J.; Arns, P.

    1983-09-01

    Narcotic withdrawal is often accompanied by an atypical depression which responds to resumption of narcotics. It was hypothesized that methadone might exert its antidepressant effects through monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition. The current study examined /sub 3/H-methadone distribution in rat brain and effects on regional MAO activity with acute doses (2.5 mg/kg) which approximate those found during chronic methadone maintenance in man. Limbic areas (amygdala, basomedial hypothalamus, caudate-putamen, hippocampus, preoptic nucleus), as well as pituitary and liver were assayed for MAO activity and methadone concentration. MAO activities did not differ significantly in acute methadone or saline-treated cage-mates at 1 or 24 hr. The concentrations of methadone at 1 hr ranged between 17 and 223 ng/100 mg wet wt tissue in the preoptic nucleus and pituitary, respectively. No significant correlation was found between change in MAO activity (MAO methadone/MAO saline) and methadone concentration in any region at 1 or 24 hr. This study does not support the hypothesis that methadone acts as an antidepressant through MAO inhibition, at least not following acute administration of this exogenous opioid.

  18. Ellagic acid enhances morphine analgesia and attenuates the development of morphine tolerance and dependence in mice.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Mohammad Taghi; Naghizadeh, Bahareh; Ghorbanzadeh, Behnam

    2014-10-15

    According to our previous study, ellagic acid has both dose-related central and peripheral antinociceptive effect through the opioidergic and l-arginine-NO-cGMP-ATP sensitive K(+) channel pathways. In the present study, the systemic antinociceptive effects of ellagic acid in animal models of pain, and functional interactions between ellagic acid and morphine in terms of analgesia, tolerance and dependence were investigated. Ellagic acid (1-30mg/kg; i.p.) showed significant and dose-dependent antinociceptive effects in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Intraperitoneal ellagic acid acutely interacted with morphine analgesia in a synergistic manner in this assay. Ellagic acid (1-10mg/kg; i.p.) also exerted analgesic activity in the hot-plate test. Pre-treatment with naloxone (1mg/kg; i.p.) significantly reversed ellagic acid, morphine as well as ellagic acid-morphine combination-induced antinociceptin in these two tests. More importantly, when co-administered with morphine, ellagic acid (1-10mg/kg) effectively blocked the development of tolerance to morphine analgesia in the hot-plate test. Likewise, ellagic acid dose-dependently prevented naloxone-precipitated withdrawal signs including jumping and weight loss. Ellagic acid treatment (1-30mg/kg; i.p.) had no significant effect on the locomotion activity of animals using open-field task. Therefore, these results showed that ellagic acid has notable systemic antinociceptive activity for both tonic and phasic pain models. Altogether, ellagic acid might be used in pain relief alone or in combination with opioid drugs because of enhancing morphine analgesia and preventing morphine-induced tolerance to analgesia and dependence. PMID:25179576

  19. Morphine effects on gentamicin disposition and toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, A; Garty, M; Ben-Zvi, Z

    1988-05-01

    Morphine has been shown to reduce renal and hepatic clearance of several xenobiotics in rodents. After iv administration of gentamicin, 10 to 30 mg/kg, its plasma levels were elevated in mice given morphine, 20 mg/kg sc. Plasma clearance of gentamicin was nearly halved by morphine, due primarily to lowering of the elimination constant of gentamicin from 0.03 to 0.02 min-1 (p less than 0.01). Morphine also significantly reduced urine levels of gentamicin and urine volume. In mice given naloxone, 2 mg/kg sc, morphine did not significantly raise plasma levels of gentamicin nor reduce its elimination into urine. Mice were made tolerant by morphine administration for 9 days at ascending doses to 100 mg/kg twice daily. An acute challenge with morphine, 20 mg/kg, was less effective in raising plasma levels of gentamicin or lowering its urinary elimination in tolerant mice than after chronic saline treatment. Partial tolerance to acutely administered morphine and reversal of morphine effects by naloxone suggest opioid receptor-mediated reduction of glomerular filtration by morphine in mice. Despite marked elevation of plasma gentamicin levels in morphine-treated mice, narcotic administration did not significantly increase the acute toxicity of a single dose of gentamicin. LD50 of acutely administered iv gentamicin was 51.6 mg/kg after saline and 45.3 mg/kg after treatment with morphine, 20 mg/kg sc. However, this dose of morphine enhanced the lethality of intravenously infused gentamicin. Morphine administration significantly reduced the dose of infused gentamicin needed to achieve the critical lethal plasma level. PMID:3368920

  20. Investigation of structure, vibrational and NMR spectra of oxycodone and naltrexone: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakol, Hossein; Esfandyari, Maryam; Taheri, Salman; Heydari, Akbar

    2011-08-01

    In this work, two important opioid antagonists, naltrexone and oxycodone, were prepared from thebaine and were characterized by IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Moreover, computational NMR and IR parameters were obtained using density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory. Complete NMR and vibrational assignment were carried out using the observed and calculated spectra. The IR frequencies and NMR chemical shifts, determined experimentally, were compared with those obtained theoretically from DFT calculations, showed good agreements. The RMS errors observed between experimental and calculated data for the IR absorptions are 85 and 105 cm -1, for the 1H NMR peaks are 0.87 and 0.17 ppm and for those of 13C NMR are 5.6 and 5.3 ppm, respectively for naltrexone and oxycodone.

  1. Optical properties of aqueous morphine solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Pavel E.; Gracheva, Anna A.; Zlobin, Vladimir A.; Nazarov, Georgy V.; Kuznetsova, Nina B.; Rogacheva, Svetlana M.

    2003-10-01

    We have studied morphine action on mobility and structure of water by means of fluorescent investigations and light scattering analysis. Wave-like concentration dependences have been plotted in the both cases. Theoretical description of the discovered effect has been made based on the formalism of N.N.Bogolubov.

  2. Nebulized morphine in the palliation of dyspnoea.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, G

    1997-07-01

    Seventeen terminally ill cancer patients with primary or secondary intrathoracic malignancy complaining of breathlessness were treated with nebulized morphine in doses of 20 mg 4-hourly for 48 h. The effect on dyspnoea was evaluated using the Dyspnoea Assessment Questionnaire. Most patients felt less dyspnoeic after 24 h; the effect was maintained, but not improved upon, after 48 h. PMID:9373577

  3. Mice with neuropathic pain exhibit morphine tolerance due to a decrease in the morphine concentration in the brain.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Wataru; Kaneta, Mitsumasa; Nagae, Marina; Yuzuhara, Ami; Li, Xin; Suzuki, Haruka; Hanagata, Mika; Kitaoka, Satoshi; Suto, Wataru; Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Kon, Risako; Miyashita, Kazuhiko; Masukawa, Daiki; Ikarashi, Nobutomo; Narita, Minoru; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2016-09-20

    The chronic administration of morphine to patients with neuropathic pain results in the development of a gradual tolerance to morphine. Although the detailed mechanism of this effect has not yet been elucidated, one of the known causes is a decrease in μ-opioid receptor function with regard to the active metabolite of morphine, M-6-G(morphine-6-glucuronide), in the ventrotegmental area of the midbrain. In this study, the relationship between the concentration of morphine in the brain and its analgesic effect was examined after the administration of morphine in the presence of neuropathic pain. Morphine was orally administered to mice with neuropathic pain, and the relationship between morphine's analgesic effect and its concentration in the brain was analysed. In addition, the expression levels of the conjugation enzyme, UGT2B (uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase), which has morphine as its substrate, and P-gp, which is a transporter involved in morphine excretion, were examined. In mice with neuropathic pain, the concentration of morphine in the brain was significantly decreased, and a correlation was found between this decrease and the decrease in the analgesic effect. It was considered possible that this decrease in the brain morphine concentration may be due to an increase in the expression level of P-gp in the small intestine and to an increase in the expression level and binding activity of UGT2B in the liver. The results of this study suggest the possibility that a sufficient analgesic effect may not be obtained when morphine is administered in the presence of neuropathic pain due to a decrease in the total amount of morphine and M-6-G that reach the brain. PMID:27102159

  4. Stability and Analgesic Efficacy of Di-acetyl Morphine (Diamorphine) Compared with Morphine in Implanted Intrathecal Pumps In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Jon H; Palfrey, Stephen M; Rayen, Arasu; Southall, Jane L; Labib, Maurad H

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate di-acetyl morphine as an alternative opioid analgesic for use in implanted intrathecal drug delivery systems because of its greater solubility through evaluation of its stability in vivo and analgesic efficacy in the period between pump refills. Contents of intrathecal drug delivery system reservoirs (SynchroMed, Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN) that had been filled with di-acetyl morphine dissolved in saline (21), bupivacaine (9), or in both bupivacaine and clonidine (19) were sampled in vivo between 1 and 125 days after refill. The samples were assayed for di-acetyl morphine and its breakdown products by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography. Prospective daily numerical pain scores between pump refills, using 11-point Likert scales, on 24 patients with implanted SynchroMed pumps (12 delivering di-acetyl morphine in saline, 12 were delivering morphine in saline) were collected. Results showed that di-acetyl morphine immediately started to decay to mono-acetyl morphine in implanted Synchromed pumps with half-life of 50 days. Mono-acetyl morphine decayed to morphine with a maxima estimated at 125 days. There was no clinically significant change in average weekly pain scores for up to ten weeks in either group (range, 2.5 to 2.8 for diamorphine and 2.7 to 3.1 for morphine) (2-way repeated ANOVA, F(9,220) = 0.98, n.s.). We conclude that di-acetyl morphine and its breakdown products, 6 mono-acetyl morphine and morphine, provide similar analgesia to morphine alone when administered by intrathecal pump for a period of at least ten weeks and may be a useful alternative when a more soluble agent is favored. PMID:22151270

  5. Probable metabolic interaction between methadone and fluvoxamine in addict patients.

    PubMed

    Bertschy, G; Baumann, P; Eap, C B; Baettig, D

    1994-02-01

    We report five cases where fluvoxamine (FLVX) was added to maintenance treatment with methadone (MTD) in addict patients with affective disorders. In view of the implication of FLVX in several metabolic drug interactions, MTD plasma levels were measured before and after treatment with FLVX. A slight increase (approximately 20% of the MTD plasma level/dose ratio) occurred in two cases. In the remaining three patients, the interaction was more pronounced (40-100% increase of the MTD plasma level/dose ratio), with clinical manifestations of opiate withdrawal after stopping FLVX therapy in one case. Caution is needed when starting or stopping treatment with FLVX in patients receiving maintenance treatment with methadone. PMID:8160253

  6. Pooled post hoc analysis of population pharmacokinetics of oxycodone and acetaminophen following a single oral dose of biphasic immediate-release/extended-release oxycodone/acetaminophen tablets

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Ryan M; Morton, Terri; Devarakonda, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    This analysis evaluated the single-dose population pharmacokinetics (PK) of biphasic immediate-release (IR)/extended-release (ER) oxycodone (OC)/acetaminophen (APAP) 7.5/325 mg tablets administered under fasted conditions and the effects of a meal on their single-dose population PK. Data were pooled from four randomized, single-dose crossover trials enrolling healthy adult (18–55 years old) participants (three trials) and nondependent recreational users of prescription opioids (one trial) with a body weight of ≥59 kg. Participants received IR/ER OC/APAP 7.5/325 mg tablets in single doses of 7.5/325 mg (one tablet), 15/650 mg (two tablets), or 30/1,300 mg (four tablets) under fasted or fed conditions. Six variables were examined: sex, race, age, weight, height, and body mass index. Single-dose population PK was analyzed using first-order conditional estimation methods. A total of 151 participants were included in the analysis under fasted conditions, and 31 participants were included in the fed analysis. Under fasted conditions, a 10% change in body weight was accompanied by ~7.5% change in total body clearance (CL/F) and volume of distribution (V/F) of OC and APAP. Black participants had 17.3% lower CL/F and a 16.9% lower V/F of OC compared with white participants. Under fed conditions, the absorption rate constant of OC and APAP decreased significantly, although there was no effect on CL/F and V/F. Considering that the recommended dose for IR/ER OC/APAP 7.5/325 mg tablets is two tablets every 12 hours, adjustments of <50% are not clinically relevant. Dose adjustment may be necessary for large deviations from average body weight, but the small PK effects associated with race and consumption of a meal are not clinically relevant. PMID:26316698

  7. Pooled post hoc analysis of population pharmacokinetics of oxycodone and acetaminophen following a single oral dose of biphasic immediate-release/extended-release oxycodone/acetaminophen tablets.

    PubMed

    Franke, Ryan M; Morton, Terri; Devarakonda, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    This analysis evaluated the single-dose population pharmacokinetics (PK) of biphasic immediate-release (IR)/extended-release (ER) oxycodone (OC)/acetaminophen (APAP) 7.5/325 mg tablets administered under fasted conditions and the effects of a meal on their single-dose population PK. Data were pooled from four randomized, single-dose crossover trials enrolling healthy adult (18-55 years old) participants (three trials) and nondependent recreational users of prescription opioids (one trial) with a body weight of ≥59 kg. Participants received IR/ER OC/APAP 7.5/325 mg tablets in single doses of 7.5/325 mg (one tablet), 15/650 mg (two tablets), or 30/1,300 mg (four tablets) under fasted or fed conditions. Six variables were examined: sex, race, age, weight, height, and body mass index. Single-dose population PK was analyzed using first-order conditional estimation methods. A total of 151 participants were included in the analysis under fasted conditions, and 31 participants were included in the fed analysis. Under fasted conditions, a 10% change in body weight was accompanied by ~7.5% change in total body clearance (CL/F) and volume of distribution (V/F) of OC and APAP. Black participants had 17.3% lower CL/F and a 16.9% lower V/F of OC compared with white participants. Under fed conditions, the absorption rate constant of OC and APAP decreased significantly, although there was no effect on CL/F and V/F. Considering that the recommended dose for IR/ER OC/APAP 7.5/325 mg tablets is two tablets every 12 hours, adjustments of <50% are not clinically relevant. Dose adjustment may be necessary for large deviations from average body weight, but the small PK effects associated with race and consumption of a meal are not clinically relevant. PMID:26316698

  8. Onsite QTc interval screening for patients in methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Fareed, Ayman; Vayalapalli, Sreedevi; Byrd-Sellers, Johnita; Casarella, Jennifer; Drexler, Karen; Amar, Richard; Smith-Cox, Jocelyn; Lutchman, Tamara Shaw

    2010-01-01

    To improve the electrocardiogram screening process and early detection of patients at high risk for cardiac arrhythmias, the authors created a model in their clinic where they provided an onsite electrocardiogram screening that might be feasible and practical. The authors then performed a retrospective chart review to access the efficacy and feasibility of their new onsite procedure in identifying methadone maintained patients at high risk for cardiac arrhythmias. Records from all patients who are currently or had previously been maintained on methadone in the methadone maintenance program at the Atlanta VA Medical Center between 2002 and 2009 were evaluated. Of the 140 patients treated at the clinic between 2002 and 2009, 85 were excluded from the study because they had been treated as guests (had been in treatment in other clinics but received methadone dosing temporarily from our clinic), were treated in the clinic for less than 6 months, or dropped out of treatment. Thus, 55 patient charts were selected for review. Most patients (95%) received baseline and annual electrocardiogram screening. The average baseline QTc was (417 +/- 30) and most recent QTc (442 +/- 25). This QTc prolongation from baseline showed statistical significance (P < .0001). Sixty-seven percent of patients had statistically significant QTc prolongation from baseline but was less than 450 ms (mean: 428 +/- 16, P = .008). Twenty-seven percent of patients had statistically significant QTc prolongation from baseline of more 450 ms but was less than 500 ms (mean: 460 +/- 8, P < .0001). Six percent of patients had statistically significant QTc prolongation from baseline of more 500 ms (mean: 503 +/- 1.15, P = .027). Recent cocaine use was the only individual variable that showed statistically significant correlation with QTc prolongation (F = 6.98, P = .01). The authors demonstrated in this study that providing an onsite electrocardiogram screening with a focus on patient education and limiting

  9. Determination of Oxycodone, Noroxycodone and Oxymorphone by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography–Electrospray Ionization-Tandem Mass Spectrometry in Human Matrices: In vivo and In vitro Applications

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Wenfang B.; Lofwall, Michelle R.; Walsh, Sharon L.; Moody, David E.

    2013-01-01

    The opioid analgesic oxycodone is widely abused and increasingly associated with overdose deaths. A sensitive analytical method was developed for oxycodone and its metabolites, noroxycodone and oxymorphone, in human plasma, urine (±enzymatic hydrolysis at 50°C for 16 h) and liver microsomes (HLMs). Liquid–liquid extraction was followed by high-performance liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. The calibration range was 0.2–250 ng/mL for plasma and HLM and 10–5000 ng/mL for urine. Intra- and interrun accuracies were within 13.3% of target; precisions were within 12.8% for all matrices. Recoveries from plasma were: oxycodone, 75.6%; noroxycodone, 37.4% and oxymorphone, 18.2%. Analytes exhibited room temperature stability in plasma and urine up to 24 h, and freeze–thaw stability in plasma up to three cycles. In 24-h hydrolyzed urine from subjects administered intranasal oxycodone (30 mg/70 kg, n = 5), mean concentrations (ng/mL) and % daily doses excreted were: oxycodone, 1150, 6.53%; noroxycodone, 1330, 7.81% and oxymorphone, 3000, 17.1%. Oxycodone incubated with HLM produced more noroxycodone than oxymorphone. With a panel of recombinant human cytochrome P450s (CYPs), CYP2C18 and CYP3A4 produced the most noroxycodone, whereas CYP2D6 produced the most oxymorphone. These results demonstrate a new method suitable for both in vivo and in vitro metabolism and pharmacokinetic studies of oxycodone. PMID:23743505

  10. Genetic polymorphisms and drug interactions modulating CYP2D6 and CYP3A activities have a major effect on oxycodone analgesic efficacy and safety

    PubMed Central

    Samer, CF; Daali, Y; Wagner, M; Hopfgartner, G; Eap, CB; Rebsamen, MC; Rossier, MF; Hochstrasser, D; Dayer, P; Desmeules, JA

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: The major drug-metabolizing enzymes for the oxidation of oxycodone are CYP2D6 and CYP3A. A high interindividual variability in the activity of these enzymes because of genetic polymorphisms and/or drug–drug interactions is well established. The possible role of an active metabolite in the pharmacodynamics of oxycodone has been questioned and the importance of CYP3A-mediated effects on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oxycodone has been poorly explored. Experimental approach: We conducted a randomized crossover (five arms) double-blind placebo-controlled study in 10 healthy volunteers genotyped for CYP2D6. Oral oxycodone (0.2 mg·kg−1) was given alone or after inhibition of CYP2D6 (with quinidine) and/or of CYP3A (with ketoconazole). Experimental pain (cold pressor test, electrical stimulation, thermode), pupil size, psychomotor effects and toxicity were assessed. Key results: CYP2D6 activity was correlated with oxycodone experimental pain assessment. CYP2D6 ultra-rapid metabolizers experienced increased pharmacodynamic effects, whereas cold pressor test and pupil size were unchanged in CYP2D6 poor metabolizers, relative to extensive metabolizers. CYP2D6 blockade reduced subjective pain threshold (SPT) for oxycodone by 30% and the response was similar to placebo. CYP3A4 blockade had a major effect on all pharmacodynamic assessments and SPT increased by 15%. Oxymorphone Cmax was correlated with SPT assessment (ρS= 0.7) and the only independent positive predictor of SPT. Side-effects were observed after CYP3A4 blockade and/or in CYP2D6 ultra-rapid metabolizers. Conclusions and implications: The modulation of CYP2D6 and CYP3A activities had clear effects on oxycodone pharmacodynamics and these effects were dependent on CYP2D6 genetic polymorphism. PMID:20590588

  11. Sex differences in locomotor effects of morphine in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Craft, Rebecca M.; Clark, James L.; Hart, Stephen P.; Pinckney, Megan K.

    2007-01-01

    Sex differences in reinforcing, analgesic and other effects of opioids have been demonstrated; however, the extent to which sex differences in motoric effects of opioids contribute to apparent sex differences in their primary effects is not known. The goal of this study was to compare the effects of the prototypic mu opioid agonist morphine on locomotor activity in male vs. female rats. Saline or morphine (1-10 mg/kg) was administered s.c. to adult Sprague-Dawley rats, which were placed into a photobeam apparatus for 3-5 hr to measure activity. Modulation of morphine's effects by gonadal hormones and by handling (either during the test session or for 4 days before the test session) were examined. Morphine initially suppressed and later increased locomotor activity in both sexes relative to their saline-injected controls, but males were more sensitive than females to the initial locomotor suppressant effect of morphine. Intermittent, brief handling during the 3-hr test session blunted morphine-induced locomotor activation in both sexes. Females in proestrus were the most sensitive to morphine's locomotor-stimulant effect, with females in estrus showing the least response to morphine. Gonadectomized (GDX) males with or without testosterone were equally sensitive to morphine's effects, whereas GDX females treated with estradiol showed a blunted response to morphine's effects, similar to intact females in estrus. Brief handling on each of 4 consecutive days pre-test attenuated morphine's locomotor suppressant effect in males but had no effect in females, thereby eliminating the sex difference. These data suggest that sex differences in morphine's effects on locomotor activity can be attributed to gonadal hormones in females, and to differential stress-induced modulation of morphine's effects in males vs. females. PMID:17217999

  12. Methadone treatment, bruxism, and temporomandibular disorders among male prisoners.

    PubMed

    Enguelberg-Gabbay, Judith V; Schapir, Lior; Israeli, Yair; Hermesh, Haggai; Weizman, Abraham; Winocur, Ephraim

    2016-06-01

    There is little information on bruxism related to illicit drug use. Prolonged drug use may damage the stomatognathic system via oral motor overactivity. The aim of the present study was to compare the rates of bruxism and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) between prisoners with and without drug-use disorders, to evaluate the association between methadone treatment and bruxism and to assess the possible relationship between bruxism and pain. The sample included 152 male prisoners, 69 of whom were drug users maintained on methadone. All prisoners were examined by an experienced dentist and completed a questionnaire on their oral habits, with the aim of detecting signs or symptoms of TMD and/or bruxism. Additional data were collected from medical files. The prevalence of sleep bruxism and awake bruxism, but not of TMDs, was significantly higher among drug-user than non-drug user prisoners (52.2% vs. 34.9% for sleep bruxism, 59.7% vs. 30.1% for awake bruxism, and 46.3% vs. 25.6% for TMDs, respectively). Participants with awake bruxism were statistically more sensitive to muscle palpation compared with participants with sleep bruxism [rating scores (mean ± SD): 0.32 ± 0.21 vs. 0.19 ± 0.28, respectively]. An association was found between sleep bruxism and awake bruxism. It seems that there is a direct or an indirect association between methadone maintenance treatment and sleep bruxism or awake bruxism in male prisoners. PMID:27041534

  13. Role of kappa and delta opioid receptors in mediating morphine-induced antinociception in morphine tolerant infant rats

    PubMed Central

    Stoller, Dawn C.; Sim-Selley, Laura J.; Smith, Forrest L.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously noted that the antinociceptive efficacy of morphine was significantly decreased in rat pups chronically infused with morphine from implanted osmotic minipumps. In this study, morphine was fully efficacious (i.e., 100% maximum possible effect, %MPE) in the 52 ºC tail-immersion test after a 72-h infusion from implanted saline-filled osmotic minipumps. However, administration of up to 1000 mg/kg s.c. morphine failed to elicit greater than a 27% MPE in rats infused with morphine at 2 mg/kg/h. Morphine was more efficacious when the water bath temperature was decreased to 49 ºC. Experiments were conducted to determine the mechanisms whereby chronic morphine administration leads to a decrease in antinociceptive efficacy. The kappa-opioid antagonist nor-binalorphimine completely blocked the antinociceptive effects of morphine in morphine-infused rat pups. The kappa agonist U50,488 elicited antinociception however, the requirement to use higher doses in morphine- than saline-infused rats indicates that kappa cross-tolerance was present. Thus, in tolerant rats the antinociceptive effects of high doses of morphine appear to be mediated through kappa-opioid receptors. The delta-opioid antagonist naltrindole was inactive in both treatment groups. DAMGO-stimulated [35S]GTPγS and [3H]naloxone binding reveal that the anatomical distribution of the mu-opioid receptor was consistent with that of the adult rat brain. In adult rats, the mu-opioid receptor is desensitized during morphine tolerance. However, desensitization was not evident in P17 rats based on the lack of significant decreases in [35S]GTPγS binding. Furthermore, [3H]naloxone binding indicated a lack of mu receptor downregulation in morphine-tolerant rat pups. PMID:17300766

  14. Methadone as an analgesic: a review of the risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Terpening, Chris M; Johnson, W Michael

    2007-01-01

    While methadone has been available for over 50 years, its use in opiate dependence has overshadowed its use as an analgesic. Within the last 10-15 years, though, methadone has been increasingly used to manage neuoropathic pain and cancer pain, but its use is causing an alarming number of deaths in the U.S. Last June, The Charleston Gazette ran a series titled "The Killer Cure" by Scott Finn and Tara Tuckwiller that found that the number of Americans whose deaths were caused by methadone rose from 790 in 1999 to 2,992 in 2003. The series also reported other statistics from the National Center for Health Statistics that revealed that West Virginia ranked first per capita in methadone overdose deaths, and that methadone was more likely involved in overdose deaths than any other prescription drug. Methadone has several unique properties that can be beneficial in the treatment of neuropathic pain and cancer pain unresponsive to other opioids, but some of these properties make it very dangerous and difficult to prescribe properly. As a result of these factors, methadone should not be the first-choice drug for pain and it should not be used in opioid-naive patients. The goal of this article is to provide a review of the properties and protocols for safe prescribing of methadone to help physicians recognize situations where this drug offers the greatest advantage as an analgesic. PMID:17432310

  15. Children of Methadone-Maintained Mothers: Three-Year Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Helen L.; And Others

    The physical and neurobehavioral findings at 3 years of age for 39 children born to mothers on methadone- maintenance and 23 children born to drug-free comparison mothers are reported. The methadone children had a higher incidence of head circumferences less than the third percentile, nystagmus/strabismus, and otitis media. No differences were…

  16. Dyads at Risk: Methadone-Maintained Women and Their Four-Month-Old Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeremy, Rita Jeruchimowicz; Bernstein, Victor J.

    1984-01-01

    Compares 17 methadone-exposed and 23 control four-month-old infants in interactions with their mothers. Results indicate that methadone is only one of several risk factors affecting interaction. Mothers rated poor in communication have poor psychosocial and psychological resources, and infants rated poor in communication showed problematic motor…

  17. Contingent Take-Home Incentive: Effects on Drug Use of Methadone Maintenance Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stitzer, Maxine L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined contingent methadone take-home privileges for effectiveness in reducing supplemental drug use of methadone maintenance patients. Assigned 53 new intakes to begin receiving take-home privileges after 2 consecutive weeks of drug-free urines or to noncontingent procedure in which take-homes were delivered independently of urine results.…

  18. A 12-month controlled trial of methadone medical maintenance integrated into an adaptive treatment model.

    PubMed

    King, Van L; Kidorf, Michael S; Stoller, Kenneth B; Schwartz, Robert; Kolodner, Kenneth; Brooner, Robert K

    2006-12-01

    Methadone medical maintenance (MMM) reduces the reporting schedule for stable and well-functioning methadone maintenance patients to once a month, with counseling provided by medical staff. We report on the 12-month outcomes of 92 highly stable methadone maintenance patients randomly assigned to one of three study conditions: routine care, MMM at the methadone maintenance program, and MMM at a physician's office. Methadone medical maintenance patients received a 28-day supply of methadone, whereas routine care patients received five or six take-home methadone doses each week. All patients performed a medication recall once a month and submitted two urine samples each month. An adaptive stepped-care system of treatment intensification was used for patients who failed recall or who had drug-positive urine specimens. Seventy-seven patients completed the 12-month study period. Dropout was caused primarily by problems with handling methadone and disliking the recall frequency. There were low rates of drug use or failed medication recall. Treatment satisfaction was high in all groups, but the MMM patients initiated more new employment or family/social activities than did routine care patients over the study period. The stepped-care approach was well tolerated and matched patients to an appropriate step of service within a continuum of treatment intensity. PMID:17084792

  19. "Living with the dirty secret": problems of disclosure for methadone maintenance clients.

    PubMed

    Murphy, S; Irwin, J

    1992-01-01

    This article focuses on the management of stigma by methadone maintenance patients. It explores (1) the consequences of this persistent stigma, which necessitates the need for secrecy, (2) the adaptations made in order to successfully "pass as normal," and (3) the contexts in which methadone-maintained individuals decide to disclose their stigmatized status. The data reported and analyzed were gathered between 1980 and 1989 during a series of studies funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The three studies--"Women on Methadone," "Getting Off Methadone," and "Alameda County Methadone Study"--utilized qualitative, in-depth interviews and ethnographic sampling techniques, primarily chain referral sampling. After ten years of interviewing women and men in various stages of their methadone maintenance careers, recurring themes emerged, one of which was that being a methadone patient is a marginal identity; not quite junkie, not quite conventional. Clients' efforts to manage this stigmatized identity were often shrouded in anguish and secrecy. Methadone patients were in a kind of identity limbo; a holding pattern between two extremely different social worlds. They were trying to effect an identity transformation; however, in many circumstances they were still associated with and defined by their "dirty secret." PMID:1432404

  20. The Costs of Pursuing Accreditation for Methadone Treatment Sites: Results from a National Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarkin, Gary A.; Dunlap, Laura J.; Homsi, Ghada

    2006-01-01

    The use of accreditation has been widespread among medical care providers, but accreditation is relatively new to the drug abuse treatment field. This study presents estimates of the costs of pursuing accreditation for methadone treatment sites. Data are from 102 methadone treatment sites that underwent accreditation as part of the Center for…

  1. Developing Training and Employment Programs to Meet the Needs of Methadone Treatment Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Michael L.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Research on vocational services for methadone clients is reviewed, and preliminary results of an evaluation of a training and employment program for 249 methadone treatment clients in 3 community-based programs are presented. Results suggest the usefulness of vocational services in increasing training access and use. (SLD)

  2. Access to Care for Methadone Maintenance Patients in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hettema, Jennifer E.; Sorensen, James L.

    2009-01-01

    This policy commentary addresses a significant access to care issue that faces methadone maintenance patients seeking residential treatment in the United States. Methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) has demonstrated strong efficacy in the outpatient treatment of opiate dependence. However, many opiate dependent patients are also in need of more…

  3. Addict Descriptions of Therapeutic Community, Multimodality, and Methadone Maintenance Treatment Clients and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuker, Patricia B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Compared the Adjective Check List descriptions of addicts in treatment toward methadone maintenance, multimodality, and therapeutic community clients and program staff. Results indicate client pessimism regarding methadone maintenance. Results suggest addict opinions represent a valuable source for evaluating treatment approaches and identifying…

  4. Evaluation of Drug Abuse Treatment: A Repeated Measures Design Assessing Methadone Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hser, Yih-Ing; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A repeated measures design was used to evaluate methadone maintenance (MM) treatment effects for 720 heroin addicts who entered MM in Southern California in 1971-1978. Compared to pretreatment measures, results show significant improvement for methadone users. Level of improvement was affected by sex, ethnicity, and treatment duration. (TJH)

  5. Regulation of Gene Expression in Brain Tissues of Rats Repeatedly Treated by the Highly Abused Opioid Agonist, Oxycodone: Microarray Profiling and Gene Mapping Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Hazem E.; Myers, Alan L.; Lee, Insong J.; Chen, Hegang; Coop, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Although oxycodone is the most often used opioid agonist, it remains one of the most understudied drugs. We used microarray analysis to better understand the global changes in gene expression in brain tissues of rats repeatedly treated with oxycodone. Many genes were significantly regulated by oxycodone (e.g., Fkbp5, Per2, Rt1.Dα, Slc16a1, and Abcg2). Validation of the microarray data by quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) indicated that there was a strong significant correlation (r = 0.979, p < 0.0000001) between the Q-PCR and the microarray data. Using MetaCore (a computational platform), many biological processes were identified [e.g., organic anion transport (p = 7.251 × 10−4) and regulation of immune response (p = 5.090 × 10−4)]. Among the regulated genes, Abcg2 mRNA was up-regulated by 2.1-fold, which was further confirmed by immunoblotting (1.8-fold up-regulation). Testing the Abcg2 affinity status of oxycodone using an Abcg2 ATPase assay suggests that oxycodone behaves as an Abcg2 substrate only at higher concentrations (≥500 μM). Furthermore, brain uptake studies demonstrated that oxycodone-induced Abcg2 up-regulation resulted in a significant (p < 0.05) decrease (∼2-fold) in brain/plasma ratios of mitoxantrone. These results highlight markers/mediators of neuronal responses and identify regulatory pathways involved in the pharmacological action of oxycodone. These results also identify genes that potentially modulate tolerance, dependence, immune response, and drug-drug interactions. Finally, our findings suggest that oxycodone-induced up-regulation of Abcg2 enhanced the efflux of the Abcg2 substrate, mitoxantrone, limiting its brain accumulation and resulting in an undesirable drug-drug interaction. Extrapolating these results to other Abcg2 substrates (e.g., daunorubicin and doxorubicin) indicates that the brain uptake of these agents may be affected if they are administered concomitantly with oxycodone. PMID:19786507

  6. Morphine Enhances Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Replicon Expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Zhang, Ting; Douglas, Steven D.; Lai, Jian-Ping; Xiao, Wei-Dong; Pleasure, David E.; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2003-01-01

    Little information is available regarding whether substance abuse enhances hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication and promotes HCV disease progression. We investigated whether morphine alters HCV mRNA expression in HCV replicon-containing liver cells. Morphine significantly increased HCV mRNA expression, an effect which could be abolished by either of the opioid receptor antagonists, naltrexone or β-funaltrexamine. Investigation of the mechanism responsible for this enhancement of HCV replicon expression demonstrated that morphine activated NF-κB promoter and that caffeic acid phenethyl ester, a specific inhibitor of the activation of NF-κB, blocked morphine-activated HCV RNA expression. In addition, morphine compromised the anti-HCV effect of interferon alpha (IFN-α). Our in vitro data indicate that morphine may play an important role as a positive regulator of HCV replication in human hepatic cells and may compromise IFN-α therapy. PMID:12937158

  7. Aloe vera Aqueous Extract Effect on Morphine Withdrawal Syndrome in Morphine-Dependent Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shahraki, Mohammad Reza; Mirshekari, Hamideh; Sabri, Azame

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aloe vera is a medicinal herb used as an anti-inflammatory and sedative agent. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the effect of Aloe vera aqueous extract on morphine withdrawal symptoms in morphine-dependent female rats. Patients and Methods: The current research was performed on 40 female Wista-Albino rats which were made dependent on morphine using Houshyar protocol and were randomly divided into five groups (A, B, C, D, and E). Group A did not receive any agent in the period of handling but other groups (B, C, D and E) received 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg of Aloe vera aqueous extract by gavage, three times daily for a week, respectively. Withdrawal symptoms, stool form, agitation, disparity, floppy eyelids, and body mass variations were checked for 10 days. The obtained data were analyzed using SPSS v.11 software, and Friedman, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney statistical tests. Statistical difference was considered significant (P < 0.05). Results: The results of the present study showed that agitation, disparity, and floppy eyelids in group E were significantly higher than those of others groups; however, these symptoms in group C were significantly lower than those of the other groups. Conclusions: The results of the present study revealed that the Aloe vera aqueous extract had various effects on morphine withdrawal syndrome in morphine-dependent female rats . PMID:25593890

  8. Incarceration and opioid withdrawal: the experiences of methadone patients and out-of-treatment heroin users.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Kelly, Sharon M; Brown, Barry S; Reisinger, Heather Schacht; Peterson, James A; Ruhf, Adrienne; Agar, Michael H; Schwartz, Robert P

    2009-06-01

    Both heroin-addicted individuals and methadone maintenance patients are likely to face untreated opioid withdrawal while incarcerated. Limited research exists concerning the withdrawal experiences of addicted inmates and their impact on individuals' attitudes and plans concerning drug abuse treatment. In the present study, 53 opioid dependent adults (32 in methadone treatment and 21 out of treatment) were interviewed in an ethnographic investigation of withdrawal experiences during incarceration. When treatment for opioid withdrawal was unavailable, detoxification experiences were usually described as negative and were often associated with a variety of unhealthy behaviors designed to relieve withdrawal symptoms. Negative methadone withdrawal experiences also negatively influenced participants' receptivity to seeking methadone treatment upon release. A minority of participants took a positive view of their withdrawal experience and saw it as an opportunity to detox from heroin or discontinue methadone. Findings support the importance of providing appropriate opioid detoxification and/or maintenance therapy to opioid-dependent inmates. PMID:19705676

  9. Metabolism and pharmacokinetics of morphine in neonates: A review

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, Gian Maria

    2016-01-01

    Morphine is an agonist of the µ and k receptors, whose activation results in analgesia. Morphine-like agonists act through the µ opioid receptors to cause pain relief, sedation, euphoria and respiratory depression. Morphine is glucuronidated and sulfated at positions 3 and 6; the plasma concentration ratios correlate positively with birth weight, which probably reflects increased liver weight with increasing birth weight. Moreover, morphine clearance correlates positively with gestational age and birth weight. Steady-state morphine plasma concentrations are achieved after 24-48 hours of infusion, but the glucuronide metabolite plasma concentrations do not reach steady state before 60 hours. The morphine-3-glucuronide metabolite has lower clearance, a shorter half-life and a smaller distribution volume compared with the morphine-6 metabolite, which is the most active morphine-like agonist. Ordinary doses cause constipation, urinary retention and respiratory depression. Neonatal pain relief may require a blood level of approximately 120 ng/ml, whereas lower levels (20-40 ng/ml) seem adequate for children. A bibliographic search was performed using the PubMed database and the keywords “morphine metabolism neonate” and “morphine pharmacokinetics neonate”. The initial and final cutoff points were January 1990 and September 2015, respectively. The results indicate that morphine is extensively glucuronidated and sulfated at positions 3 and 6, and that the glucuronidation rate is lower in younger neonates compared with older infants. Although much is known about morphine in neonates, further research will be required to ensure that recommended therapeutic doses for analgesia in neonates are evidence based.

  10. Blockade of tolerance to morphine analgesia by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Misra, A L; Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L

    1989-07-01

    Tolerance to morphine analgesia was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by s.c. implantation of a morphine base pellet (75 mg) on the first and second day and determining the magnitude of tolerance 72 h after the first implant by s.c. injection of a test dose of morphine (5 mg/kg). Implantation of a cocaine hydrochloride pellet (25 mg), concurrently with morphine pellets or of a cocaine hydrochloride (50 mg) pellet after the development of tolerance, blocked both the development and expression of morphine analgesic tolerance. In morphine-pelleted animals pretreatment for 3 days with desipramine or zimelidine or phenoxybenzamine but not haloperidol produced no significant morphine tolerance. Pretreatment with a combination of desipramine and zimelidine, however, was as effective as cocaine in blocking morphine tolerance. Alpha-Methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester counteracted the effect of cocaine in blocking morphine tolerance and potentiated the tolerance development. Blockade of morphine tolerance by cocaine was reinforced and facilitated by pretreatment with fenfluramine or p-chlorophenylalanine ethyl ester and to a lesser extent by clonidine and haloperidol. Acute administration of fenfluramine or zimelidine or a combination of desipramine and zimelidine or alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester or p-chlorophenylalanine ethyl ester did not significantly affect morphine analgesia. The study suggests an important role of the concomitant depletion of both central noradrenaline and serotonin in the blockade of morphine tolerance by cocaine and stresses the importance of the counter-balancing functional relationship between these two neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. PMID:2780065

  11. Valproate attenuates the development of morphine antinociceptive tolerance.

    PubMed

    Dobashi, Tamae; Tanabe, Serabi; Jin, Hisayo; Nishino, Takashi; Aoe, Tomohiko

    2010-11-19

    Morphine is a potent opioid analgesic. Repeated administration of morphine induces tolerance, thus reducing the effectiveness of analgesic treatment. Although some adjuvant analgesics can increase morphine analgesia, the precise molecular mechanism behind their effects remains unclear. Opioids bind to the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Morphine tolerance may be derived from alterations in the intracellular signal transduction after MOR activation. Chronic morphine treatment activates glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), whose inhibition diminishes morphine tolerance. Valproate is widely prescribed as an anticonvulsant and a mood stabilizer for bipolar disorders because it increases the amount of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the central nervous system. Although the activation of GABAergic neurons may be responsible for the chief pharmacologic effect of valproate, recent studies have shown that valproate also suppresses GSK3β activity. We examined the effect of valproate on the development of morphine antinociceptive tolerance in a mouse model of thermal injury. Mice were treated with morphine alone or with morphine and valproate twice daily for 5 days. The resulting antinociceptive effects were assessed using a hot plate test. While mice treated with morphine developed tolerance, co-administration of valproate attenuated the development of tolerance and impaired the activation of GSK3β in mice brains. Valproate alone did not show analgesic effects; nevertheless, it functioned as an adjuvant analgesic to prevent the development of morphine tolerance. These results suggest that the modulation of GSK3β activity by valproate may be useful and may play a role in the prevention of morphine tolerance. PMID:20816918

  12. Buprenorphine-based regimens and methadone for the medical management of opioid dependence: selecting the appropriate drug for treatment.

    PubMed

    Maremmani, Icro; Gerra, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    Maintenance therapy with methadone or buprenorphine-based regimens reduces opioid dependence and associated harms. The perception that methadone is more effective than buprenorphine for maintenance treatment has been based on low buprenorphine doses and excessively slow induction regimens used in early buprenorphine trials. Subsequent studies show that the efficacy of buprenorphine sublingual tablet (Subutex®) or buprenorphine/naloxone sublingual tablet (Suboxone®) is equivalent to that of methadone when sufficient buprenorphine doses, rapid induction, and flexible dosing are used. Although methadone remains an essential maintenance therapy option, buprenorphine-based regimens increase access to care and provide safer, more appropriate treatment than methadone for some patients. PMID:20958853

  13. Effect of morphine on PC12 cells with molecular radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chen; Yu, Xiaoli; Lu, Jiuyi; Zhang, Chunyang; Jin, Lei; Ma, Hui; Zhang, Dacheng; Chen, Die Yan

    2000-10-01

    Molecular Radar (MR) is a new method to detect biological processes in living cells at the level of molecular, it is also the newest means to get intracellular information. In this paper we study the effect of morphine on PC12 cells using MR. The results show that the effect of morphine on PC12 cells is time- and concentration-dependent. Morphine treating for short time induces the increase and fluctuation of intracellular (CA2+), while morphine treating for long time induces chromatin condensation, loss of mitochondria membrane potential apoptosis.

  14. Antinatriuretic effect of acute morphine administration in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Walker, L A; Murphy, J C

    1984-05-01

    The renal response to the acute administration of morphine was examined in conscious, chronically catheterized, nonhydrated rats. After control clearance periods, morphine sulfate was injected i.v. at 4 mg/kg followed by an infusion of 2 mg/kg X hr. Morphine caused an increase in urine flow which was variable in magnitude and duration. The initial diuresis was not maintained despite continued morphine administration and replacement of lost fluid. Compared to vehicle treatment morphine also induced marked sodium and chloride retention which was sustained throughout the 2-hr infusion period. There were no changes in blood pressure or heart during the clearance periods, although an initial transient hypotension and bradycardia were observed with morphine injection. There were no changes in glomerular filtration rate which could account for the antinatriuresis. Naloxone pretreatment blocked all of the observed renal responses. The results indicate that morphine exerts its effects on electrolyte excretion by enhancing renal tubular sodium or chloride reabsorption rather than changes in systemic hemodynamics or glomerular filtration rate. In a separate series of experiments, urine osmolality, osmolar clearance and free water clearance were estimated. All rats receiving morphine transiently excreted a hypotonic urine (minimum 183 +/- 23 mOsmol/kg of H2O) with a reduction in osmolar clearance and a sharp increase in free water clearance. These findings are consistent with a temporary inhibition of vasopressin release by morphine. PMID:6716265

  15. Synergy between the antinociceptive effects of morphine and NSAIDs.

    PubMed

    Miranda, H F; Silva, E; Pinardi, G

    2004-05-01

    The intraperitoneal administration of morphine, diclofenac, ketoprofen, meloxicam, metamizol, paracetamol and piroxicam induced dose-dependent antinociception in mice tested with the acetic acid writhing test. The isobolographic analysis of the simultaneous intraperitoneal administration of fractions of the ED50's of morphine with each nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) demonstrated the existence of a supra-additive interaction (synergy). The selective antagonist of micro -opioid receptors naltrexone partially reversed the supra-additive interactions to additive interactions; however, the combinations of morphine/metamizol and morphine/paracetamol were completely antagonized, resulting in subadditive interactions. The selective antagonist of delta-opioid receptors naltrindole failed to significantly attenuate the combinations of morphine with ketoprofen, meloxicam and piroxicam, but decreased the activity of the combinations of morphine with diclofenac, metamizol and paracetamol, transforming the interactions from supra-additive to additive. Nor-binaltorphimine was used to evaluate the involvement of kappa-opioid receptors. Nor-binaltorphimine did not modify the supra-additive interaction of morphine and NSAIDs and the additive interaction of the co-administration of morphine and metamizol. The synergy between morphine and NSAIDs could be related to different pathways of pain transmission, probably related to the different intracellular signal transduction mechanisms of action of opioid and non-opioid agents. PMID:15213733

  16. Parkinson's disease, L-DOPA, and endogenous morphine: a revisit.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Mantione, Kirk J; Králíčková, Milena; Ptacek, Radek; Kuzelova, Hana; Esch, Tobias; Kream, Richard M

    2012-08-01

    Clinical observations stemming from widespread employment of restorative L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) therapy for management of dyskinesia in Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients implicate a regulatory role for endogenous morphine in central nervous system dopamine neurotransmission. Reciprocally, it appears that restorative L-DOPA administration has provided us with a compelling in vivo pharmacological model for targeting peripheral sites involved in endogenous morphine expression in human subjects. The biological activities underlying endogenous morphine expression and its interaction with its major precursor dopamine strongly suggest that endogenous morphine systems are reciprocally dysregulated in PD. These critical issues are examined from historical and current perspectives within our short review. PMID:22847214

  17. The impact of cocaine and heroin on the placental transfer of methadone

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Antoine; Obrist, Cristina; Wenzinger, Silvana; von Mandach, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    Background Methadone is the therapeutic agent of choice for the treatment of opiate addiction in pregnancy. The co-consumption (heroin, cocaine) which may influence the effects of methadone is frequent. Therefore, the impact of cocaine and heroin on the placental transfer of methadone and the placental tissue was investigated under in vitro conditions. Methods Placentae (n = 24) were ex-vivo perfused with medium (m) (control, n = 6), m plus methadone (n = 6), m plus methadone and cocaine (n = 6) or m plus methadone and heroin (n = 6). Placental functionality parameters like antipyrine permeability, glucose consumption, lactate production, hormone production (hCG and leptin), microparticles release and the expression of P-glycoprotein were analysed. Results Methadone accumulated in placental tissue. Methadone alone decreased the transfer of antipyrine from 0.60 +/- 0.07 to 0.50 +/- 0.06 (fetal/maternal ratio, mean +/- SD, P < 0.01), whereas the combination with cocaine or heroin increased it (0.56 +/- 0.08 to 0.68 +/- 0.13, P = 0.03 and 0.58 +/- 0.21 to 0.71 +/- 0.24; P = 0.18). Microparticles (MPs) released from syncytiotrophoblast into maternal circuit increased by 30% after cocaine or heroin (P < 0.05) and the expression of P-glycoprotein in the tissue increased by ≥ 49% after any drug (P < 0.05). All other measured parameters did not show any significant effect when methadone was combined with cocaine or heroine. Conclusion The combination of cocaine or heroin with methadone increase antipyrine permeability. Changes of MPs resemble findings seen in oxidative stress of syncytiotrophoblast. PMID:19519880

  18. Comparative rewarding properties of morphine and butorphanol.

    PubMed

    Mamoon, A M; Barnes, A M; Ho, I K; Hoskins, B

    1995-01-01

    Because butorphanol (Stadol), a synthetic morphinan compound, has been demonstrated in our laboratories to produce physical dependence and withdrawal symptoms in rats, we have hypothesized that butorphanol has rewarding properties indicative of abuse potential. To test this hypothesis, the effects of equimolar doses of butorphanol tartrate (0.5-5.0 micrograms) and morphine sulfate (0.8-8.0 micrograms) were assessed in inbred Lewis male rats using the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. Unilateral microinjections (1 microl/inj) of saline or opioids were made into the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Microinjections of saline to controls were associated with both sides of modified Skinner boxes, whereas opioid injections were associated only with the white chambers (less preferred side to the naive animals). Opioids were administered alternating with saline in the drug-treated animals on alternating days. During eight conditioning sessions the rats learned to associate light and dark sides of the Skinner boxes with microinjections of opioids or saline, respectively. Although all doses of morphine induced significant preference over saline, only the higher doses of butorphanol (2.0-5.0 micrograms) produced significant conditioned place preference for the sides of the chambers associated with the drugs. These results suggest that, like morphine which is widely abused, butorphanol also has rewarding properties, and, therefore, further investigations regarding its abuse potential are necessary. PMID:8665275

  19. Respiratory depression following morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, P I; Joel, S P; John, L; Wedzicha, J A; Maclean, M; Slevin, M L

    1995-01-01

    1. Morphine 6-glucuronide (M6G) is a metabolite of morphine with analgesic activity. A double-blind, randomised comparison of the effects of morphine and M6G on respiratory function was carried out in 10 normal subjects after i.v. morphine (10 mg 70 kg-1) or M6G (1, 3.3 and 5 mg 70 kg-1). Analgesic potency was also assessed using an ischaemic pain test and other toxic effects were monitored. 2. Following morphine there was a significant increase in arterial PCO2, as measured by blood gases 45 min post dose (0.54 +/- 0.24 (s.d.) kPa, P < 0.001), and in transcutaneous PCO2 from 15 min post dose until the end of the study period (4 h), whereas blood gas and transcutaneous PCO2 were unchanged after M6G at 1.0, 3.3 and 5.0 mg 70 kg-1. This increased PCO2 following morphine was associated with an increase in expired CO2 concentration (FECO2) (0.20 +/- 0.14% expired air at 15 min post dose, P = 0.002), compared with small but significant reductions in FECO2 following morphine 6-glucuronide (-0.15 +/- 0.17% at 1 mg 70 kg-1 P = 0.030, -0.14 +/- 0.15% at 3.3 mg 70 kg-1 P = 0.017, -0.18 +/- 0.11% at 5 mg 70 kg-1 P = 0.024). Maximum transcutaneous PCO2 was significantly increased after morphine (0.63 +/- 0.28 kPa P = 0.009), but was not changed after M6G at 1 mg (0.10 +/- 0.34 kPa P = 0.11) 3.3 mg (0.06 +/- 0.37 kPa P = 0.34) or 5 mg (0.26 +/- 0.07 kPa P = 0.10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8562297

  20. Intranasal administration of crushed ALO-02 (extended-release oxycodone with sequestered naltrexone): A randomized, controlled abuse-potential study in nondependent recreational opioid users.

    PubMed

    Setnik, Beatrice; Bramson, Candace; Bass, Almasa; Levy-Cooperman, Naama; Malhotra, Bimal; Matschke, Kyle; Sommerville, Kenneth W; Wolfram, Gernot; Geoffroy, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    ALO-02 is an abuse-deterrent formulation consisting of capsules filled with pellets of extended-release oxycodone surrounding sequestered naltrexone. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-/active-controlled, 4-way crossover study examined the abuse potential of crushed ALO-02 administered intranasally to healthy, nondependent, recreational opioid users. Following drug discrimination and naloxone challenge, eligible participants (n = 32) entered a 4-way crossover treatment phase: crushed single dose of 1 of 2 placebos, ALO-02 30 mg/3.6 mg (oxycodone/naltrexone) or oxycodone immediate-release (IR) 30 mg. Primary end points were Drug Liking and High, measured on visual analog scales (VAS) summarized as maximum effect (Emax ) and effect occurring over 2 hours postdose (AUE0-2  h ). Crushed ALO-02 resulted in significantly lower scores versus oxycodone IR on Drug Liking (Emax , 60.5 vs 92.8; AUE0-2  h , 105.4 vs 160.0, respectively) and High (Emax , 25.2 vs 86.9; AUE0-2  h , 27.1 vs 136.4, respectively; n = 28; P < .0001). Adverse events occurred most frequently with oxycodone IR, followed by ALO-02, then placebo, and were considered mild and consistent with opioid therapy. Crushed ALO-02 administered intranasally to nondependent recreational opioid users resulted in significantly lower scores on Drug Liking/High VAS and other positive subjective measures versus crushed oxycodone IR, suggesting less abuse potential. Demonstration of actual abuse deterrence in the real world requires further research. PMID:26011742

  1. Barriers to Telephone Quitline Use Among Methadone-Maintained Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Judith L.; Segal, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Drug users have high rates of tobacco use and tobacco-related disease. Telephone quitlines promote smoking cessation, but their reach among drug users is unknown. We thus aimed to assess utilization of and barriers to telephone quitlines among methadone-maintained smokers. Methods: Subjects were opioid-dependent smokers in Bronx, New York, methadone treatment programs who were enrolled in a clinical trial of varenicline. All subjects were offered referral to a free, proactive quitline. We examined quitline records, surveyed barriers to quitline use, and queried reasons for declining referral. Results: Of the 112 subjects enrolled, 47% were male, 54% were Hispanic, and 28% were Black. All subjects were offered referral, and 25 (22% of study participants) utilized the quitline. Quitline utilizers (vs. nonutilizers) were significantly more likely to have landline phone service (72 vs. 42%, p = .01), interest in quitline participation (92 vs. 62%, p < .01), and willingness to receive calls (96 vs. 76%, p = .02). Nonutilizers were significantly more likely to report cell phone service lapse (38 vs. 14%, p = .04), and difficulty charging cell phones (19 vs. 0%, p = .02). Reasons for quitline refusal included: (a) skepticism of quitline efficacy; (b) aversion to telephone communication; (c) competing life demands (e.g., drug treatment, shelter); and (d) problems with cell phone service or minutes. Conclusions: Despite several limitations to quitline access among methadone-maintained smokers, routine quitline referral was associated with 22% utilization. To expand provision of smoking cessation treatment to opioid-dependent smokers, interventions to promote routine quitline referral in substance abuse treatment programs warrant investigation. PMID:26180217

  2. Treatment of Failed Back Surgery Syndrome in a Forty-Three-Year-Old Man With High-Dose Oxycodone/Naloxone

    PubMed Central

    Bujedo, Borja Mugabure

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is an increasing cause of chronic pain in most countries. This poses high costs to both patients and National Health Organizations. Case Presentation: In this report, multimodal pain management based on daily high-dose oxycodone/naloxone (OXN 180/90 mg) led to reduced patient's pain score and improved quality of life. Conclusions: Oxycodone/naloxone can be a good alternative for the management of FBSS when other interventional or pharmacologic strategies have failed. In this case report, higher doses than those recommended as a maximum daily ceiling (80/40 mg) were safely used in one selected patient with noncancer severe pain. PMID:25893186

  3. Nurse case management program of chronic pain patients treated with methadone.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Louise; Pereira, John Xavier; Shir, Yoram

    2007-09-01

    Methadone treatment in chronic pain patients is still limited owing to misconceptions about addiction, safety, and its unique pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Nevertheless, patients with chronic noncancer pain are frequently treated with methadone at our Pain Centre either as the first opioid of choice, for specific pain conditions, or as a second-line opioid in patients developing tolerance or intractable side effects with other opioids. The aim of this study was to examine whether a nurse case management program of chronic pain patients treated with methadone is feasible and safe in trying to improve patients' care in an ambulatory setting. This program consisted of three phases: initial primary education session, telephone follow-up during methadone titration, and a subsequent maintenance period. The nurse case manager functioned autonomously and when required reported to and consulted the physician. The study included 75 subjects and was done over a nine-month period by completing follow-up questionnaires for every call. Of a total of 194 recorded calls, 41% were unscheduled. Forty-four percent of phone calls resulted in a methadone increase and 11% led to a decrease or cessation of methadone. No patients developed serious morbidity or mortality. Fifty-seven percent of patients were either satisfied or very satisfied with their treatment. A nurse-led case management program of methadone in chronic pain patients can improve patient care in an ambulatory setting. PMID:17723930

  4. False-positive methadone urine drug screen in a patient treated with quetiapine.

    PubMed

    Lasić, Davor; Uglesić, Boran; Zuljan-Cvitanović, Marija; Supe-Domić, Daniela; Uglesić, Lovro

    2012-06-01

    We present a case of T.M. admitted to University Department of Psychiatry, Split University Hospital Center, in Croatia, because of the acute psychotic reaction (F23.9). The patient's urine tested positive for methadone without a history of methadone ingestion. Urine drug screen was performed with the COBAS Integra Methadone II test kit (kinetic interaction of microparticles in solution /KIMS/ methodology) by Roche. Drugs that have been shown to cross-react with methadone feature a tricyclic structure with a sulfur and nitrogen atom in the middle ring, which is common for both quetiapine and methadone. Therefore, it is plausible that this structural similarity between quetiapine and methadone could underlie the cross-reactivity on methadone drug screen. Besides quetiapine, a number of routinely prescribed medications have been associated with triggering false-positive urine drug screen results. Verification of the test results with a different screening test or additional analytical tests should be performed to avoid adverse consequences for the patients. PMID:23115954

  5. Determining Smoking Cessation Related Information, Motivation, and Behavioral Skills among Opiate Dependent Smokers in Methadone Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cooperman, Nina A.; Richter, Kimber P.; Bernstein, Steven L.; Steinberg, Marc L.; Williams, Jill M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Over 80% of people in methadone treatment smoke cigarettes, and existing smoking cessation interventions have been minimally effective. Objective To develop an Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) Model of behavior change based smoking cessation intervention for methadone maintained smokers, we examined smoking cessation related information, motivation, and behavioral skills in this population. Methods Current or former smokers in methadone treatment (n=35) participated in focus groups. Ten methadone clinic counselors participated in an individual interview. A content analysis was conducted using deductive and inductive approaches. Results Commonly known information, motivation, and behavioral skills factors related to smoking cessation were described. These factors included: the health effects of smoking and treatment options for quitting (information); pregnancy and cost of cigarettes (motivators); and coping with emotions, finding social support, and pharmacotherapy adherence (behavioral skills). Information, motivation, and behavioral skills factors specific to methadone maintained smokers were also described. These factors included: the relationship between quitting smoking and drug relapse (information), the belief that smoking is the same as using drugs (motivator); and coping with methadone clinic culture and applying skills used to quit drugs to quitting smoking (behavioral skills). Information, motivation, and behavioral skills strengths and deficits varied by individual. Conclusions Methadone maintained smokers could benefit from research on an IMB Model based smoking cessation intervention that is individualized, addresses IMB factors common among all smokers, and also addresses IMB factors unique to this population. PMID:25559697

  6. Effectiveness of Methadone Maintenance Therapy and Improvement in Quality of Life Following a Decade of Implementation.

    PubMed

    Teoh Bing Fei, Joni; Yee, Anne; Habil, Mohamad Hussain Bin; Danaee, Mahmoud

    2016-10-01

    Methadone maintenance therapy has been found to be an effective harm reduction treatment for opioid use disorder. However evidence of its benefits over a longer duration of treatment is limited as most studies focus on its short term benefits. As methadone maintenance therapy reaches a decade since its implementation in Malaysia, this study sought to examine the effectiveness of methadone treatment, change in quality of life among patients since entry to methadone treatment, as well as factors predicting the magnitude of change in quality of life. This study found that methadone maintenance therapy was effective in reducing heroin use, injecting practices and crime, and in improving in social functioning and physical symptoms, but not in reducing sex-related HIV risk-taking behavior. Though patients had a significantly better quality of life at follow-up than at entry to methadone maintenance therapy, the improvement in quality of life was not significantly greater as the duration of treatment increased. Age above 50 years old, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive status and physical symptoms predicted a poorer improvement in quality of life between baseline and follow-up. On the other hand, patients with hepatitis B showed a greater improvement in quality of life in the social relationships domain compared to patients without hepatitis B. In conclusion, methadone maintenance therapy is an effective treatment for opioid use disorder and improves quality of life but its benefits in further improving quality of life beyond a decade of treatment need further evaluation. PMID:27568510

  7. Methadone ameliorates multiple-low-dose streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Amirshahrokhi, K.; Dehpour, A.R.; Hadjati, J.; Sotoudeh, M.; Ghazi-Khansari, M.

    2008-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation of pancreatic islets and destruction of {beta} cells by the immune system. Opioids have been shown to modulate a number of immune functions, including T helper 1 (Th1) and T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines. The immunosuppressive effect of long-term administration of opioids has been demonstrated both in animal models and humans. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of methadone, a {mu}-opioid receptor agonist, on type 1 diabetes. Administration of multiple low doses of streptozotocin (STZ) (MLDS) (40mg/kg intraperitoneally for 5 consecutive days) to mice resulted in autoimmune diabetes. Mice were treated with methadone (10mg/kg/day subcutaneously) for 24days. Blood glucose, insulin and pancreatic cytokine levels were measured. Chronic methadone treatment significantly reduced hyperglycemia and incidence of diabetes, and restored pancreatic insulin secretion in the MLDS model. The protective effect of methadone can be overcome by pretreatment with naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist. Also, methadone treatment decreased the proinflammatory Th1 cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1{beta}, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and interferon-{gamma}] and increased anti-inflammatory Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Histopathological observations indicated that STZ-mediated destruction of {beta} cells was attenuated by methadone treatment. It seems that methadone as an opioid agonist may have a protective effect against destruction of {beta} cells and insulitis in the MLDS model of type 1 diabetes.

  8. A Preclinical Physiological Assay to Test Modulation of Knee Joint Pain in the Spinal Cord: Effects of Oxycodone and Naproxen

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Jason A.; Stanley, Phil; Gore, Katrina; Turner, Jamie; Dias, Rebecca; Rees, Huw

    2014-01-01

    Sensory processing in the spinal cord during disease states can reveal mechanisms for novel treatments, yet very little is known about pain processing at this level in the most commonly used animal models of articular pain. Here we report a test of the prediction that two clinically effective compounds, naproxen (an NSAID) and oxycodone (an opiate), are efficacious in reducing the response of spinal dorsal horn neurons to noxious knee joint rotation in the monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) sensitized rat. The overall objective for these experiments was to develop a high quality in vivo electrophysiology assay to confidently test novel compounds for efficacy against pain. Given the recent calls for improved preclinical experimental quality we also developed and implemented an Assay Capability Tool to determine the quality of our assay and ensure the quality of our results. Spinal dorsal horn neurons receiving input from the hind limb knee joint were recorded in anesthetized rats 14 days after they were sensitized with 1 mg of MIA. Intravenous administered oxycodone and naproxen were each tested separately for their effects on phasic, tonic, ongoing and afterdischarge action potential counts in response to innocuous and noxious knee joint rotation. Oxycodone reduced tonic spike counts more than the other measures, doing so by up to 85%. Tonic counts were therefore designated the primary endpoint when testing naproxen which reduced counts by up to 81%. Both reductions occurred at doses consistent with clinically effective doses for osteoarthritis. These results demonstrate that clinically effective doses of standard treatments for osteoarthritis reduce pain processing measured at the level of the spinal cord for two different mechanisms. The Assay Capability Tool helped to guide experimental design leading to a high quality and robust preclinical assay to use in discovering novel treatments for pain. PMID:25157947

  9. Identification of new oxycodone metabolites in human urine by capillary electrophoresis-multiple-stage ion-trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baldacci, A; Caslavska, J; Wey, A B; Thormann, W

    2004-10-01

    Capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization multiple-stage ion-trap mass spectrometry (CE-MSn) and computer simulation of fragmentation are demonstrated to be effective tools to detect and identify phase I and phase II metabolites of oxycodone (OCOD) in human urine. OCOD is a strong analgesic used for the management of moderate to severe mainly postoperative or cancer-related pain whose metabolism in man is largely unknown. Using an aqueous pH 9 ammonium acetate buffer and CE-MSn (n < or = 5), OCOD and its phase I metabolites produced by O-demethylation, N-demethylation, 6-ketoreduction and N-oxidation (such as oxymorphone, noroxycodone, noroxymorphone, 6-oxycodol, nor-6-oxycodol, oxycodone-N-oxide and 6-oxycodol-N-oxide) and phase II conjugates with glucuronic acid of several of these compounds could be detected in alkaline solid-phase extracts of a patient urine that was collected during a pharmacotherapy episode with daily ingestion of 240-320 mg of OCOD chloride. The data for three known OCOD metabolites for which the standards had to be synthesized in-house, 6-oxycodol, nor-6-oxycodol and oxycodone-N-oxide, were employed to identify two new metabolites, the N-oxidized derivative of 6-oxycodol and an O-glucuronide of this compound. CE-MSn and computer simulation of fragmentation also led to the identification of the N-glucuronide of noroxymorphone, another novel OCOD metabolite for which no standard compound or mass spectra library data were available. PMID:15532584

  10. Increased probability of GABA release during withdrawal from morphine.

    PubMed

    Bonci, A; Williams, J T

    1997-01-15

    Opioid receptors located on interneurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) inhibit GABA(A)-mediated synaptic transmission to dopamine projection neurons. The resulting disinhibition of dopamine cells in the VTA is thought to play a pivotal role in drug abuse; however, little is known about how this GABAA synapse is affected after chronic morphine treatment. The regulation of GABA release during acute withdrawal from morphine was studied in slices from animals treated for 6-7 d with morphine. Slices containing the VTA were prepared and maintained in morphine-free solutions, and GABAA IPSCs were recorded from dopamine cells. The amplitude of evoked IPSCs and the frequency of spontaneous miniature IPSCs measured in slices from morphine-treated guinea pigs were greater than placebo-treated controls. In addition, activation of adenylyl cyclase, with forskolin, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase, with Sp-cAMPS, caused a larger increase in IPSCs in slices from morphine-treated animals. Conversely, the kinase inhibitors staurosporine and Rp-CPT-cAMPS decreased GABA IPSCs to a greater extent after drug treatment. The results indicate that the probability of GABA release was increased during withdrawal from chronic morphine treatment and that this effect resulted from an upregulation of the cAMP-dependent cascade. Increased transmitter release from opioid-sensitive synapses during acute withdrawal may be one adaptive mechanism that results from prolonged morphine treatment. PMID:8987801

  11. Tests for addiction (chronic intoxication) of morphine type

    PubMed Central

    Halbach, H.; Eddy, Nathan B.

    1963-01-01

    A survey is presented of laboratory and clinical methods for the determination of addiction liability of substances with morphine-like effects. Since physical dependence is the outstanding pharmacological criterion of addiction of morphine type, the procedures for its qualitative and quantitative assessment are described in detail. PMID:13952049

  12. Cholera toxin effects on body temperature changes induced by morphine.

    PubMed

    Basilico, L; Parenti, M; Fumagalli, A; Parolaro, D; Giagnoni, G

    1997-03-01

    The present study evaluates the influence of cholera toxin and its B-subunit on thermic responses to morphine in the rats. The holotoxin (1 microg/rat) and the B-subunit (5 microg) were administered ICV and three days later rats were challenged ICV with morphine and tested for changes of body temperature. Cholera toxin, but not its B-subunit, modified the time course of the hyperthermic response induced by a low dose of morphine (2.5 microg), converted the hypothermia due to a higher dose of morphine (18 microg) to a consistent hyperthermia and only partially reduced the greater hypothermia induced by 36 microg of morphine. Cholera toxin-induced modifications of thermic responses to morphine were paralleled with a decreased Gs(alpha) immunoreactivity and a reduced ability for the toxin to catalyse the "in vitro" ADP-ribosylation of Gs(alpha) in hypothalamic membranes. In contrast, at the same time when morphine-induced effects on body temperature were assessed, no changes in pertussis toxin-mediated ADP-ribosylation of Gi(alpha)/Go(alpha), or basal adenylate cyclase activity, or binding of mu-opioid receptor selective ligand [3H]-DAMGO were observed in hypothalamic areas from rats treated with cholera toxin. These findings suggest that adaptative events secondary to prolonged activation of Gs(alpha) play a role in the modifications of thermic responses to morphine induced by CTX. PMID:9077589

  13. There is no age limit for methadone: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Data from the US indicates that methadone-maintained populations are aging, with an increase of patients aged 50 or older. Data from European methadone populations is sparse. This retrospective cohort study sought to evaluate the age trends and related developments in the methadone population of Basel-City, Switzerland. Methods The study included methadone patients between April 1, 1995 and March 31, 2003. Anonymized data was taken from the methadone register of Basel-City. For analysis of age distributions, patient samples were split into four age categories from '20-29 years' to '50 years and over'. Cross-sectional comparisons were performed using patient samples of 1996 and 2003. Results Analysis showed a significant increase in older patients between 1996 and 2003 (p < 0.001). During that period, the percentage of patients aged 50 and over rose almost tenfold, while the proportion of patients aged under 30 dropped significantly from 52.8% to 12.3%. The average methadone dose (p < 0.001) and the 1-year retention rate (p < 0.001) also increased significantly. Conclusions Findings point to clear trends in aging of methadone patients in Basel-City which are comparable, although less pronounced, to developments among US methadone populations. Many unanswered questions on medical, psychosocial and health economic consequences remain as the needs of older patients have not yet been evaluated extensively. However, older methadone patients, just as any other patients, should be accorded treatment appropriate to their medical condition and needs. Particular attention should be paid to adequate solutions for persons in need of care. PMID:21592331

  14. Analgesic efficacy of morphine applied topically to painful ulcers.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, Giovambattista; Paul, James; Ribeiro, Maria D C

    2003-06-01

    The analgesic effects of morphine applied topically to painful ulcers was assessed in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover pilot study of five patients with painful sacral sores. Patients were treated for two days with either 10 mg morphine sulfate or placebo (water for injection) applied topically to the ulcer. After a two-day wash-out period, patients were crossed over for a further two days of the alternative treatment. Patients were asked to rate analgesia using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and to document any local or systemic adverse effects. All patients reported lower VAS scores with morphine compared to placebo and no local or systemic adverse events attributable to morphine were noted by either patients or nursing staff. This pilot study suggests that morphine applied topically is an effective method of producing local analgesia, well tolerated by patients, and not associated with systemic adverse effects. PMID:12782436

  15. Primary sensory neurones and naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal.

    PubMed Central

    Donnerer, J.

    1989-01-01

    1. The C-fibre-evoked depressor reflex following i.a. injection of capsaicin and the wiping movements following chemical irritation of the cornea by capsaicin were both found to be augmented in the naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal phase. 2. The in vitro capsaicin-evoked release of substance P from central terminals of C-fibre afferents in the spinal cord was decreased in morphine-treated rats. Following naloxone, the release in the morphine-treated group was as large as in the control group. 3. The C-fibre mediated plasma extravasation in the rat paw after naloxone was found to be the same in morphine-treated and control rats. 4. It is concluded that C-fibre-evoked reflex reactions are augmented during morphine withdrawal, but that the mechanisms responsible are either located postsynaptically to the primary sensory neurone or further centrally. PMID:2472843

  16. Symptoms discriminating between heroin addicts seeking ambulatory detoxification or methadone maintenance.

    PubMed

    Steer, R A

    1982-08-01

    The self-report symptom inventory, SCL-90-R, was administered to 240 heroin addicts seeking ambulatory detoxification and 240 requesting methadone maintenance. Controlling for age, a stepwise discriminant analysis employing a backward elimination model was performed with the SCL-90-R's nine symptom factors to determine if the addicts described different levels of symptomatology. Interpersonal sensitivity and depression differentiated between the two groups; the ambulatory detoxification patients were more depressed and described less interpersonal sensitivity than the methadone maintenance patients. The results supported the contention that heroin addicts seeking ambulatory detoxification or methadone maintenance may display different symptoms. PMID:7128452

  17. Morphine Liposomal--SkyePharma: C 0401, D 0401, morphine--DepoFoam, SKY 0401.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    The SkyePharma PLC subsidiary SkyePharma Inc. (formerly DepoTech) is developing a sustained-release formulation of morphine sulphate [DepoMorphine, C 0401, D 0401, SKY 0401] using its DepoFoam proprietary drug delivery technology. It is intended for epidural administration in the treatment of acute postoperative pain. DepoFoam consists of microscopic spherical particles with internal aqueous chambers separated by lipid membranes containing the encapsulated drug. DepoFoam particles are synthetic replicas of natural lipids that are biodegradable and biocompatible. DepoFoam can be administered subcutaneously, intramuscularly and intrathecally. In December 2002, SkyePharma and Endo Pharmaceuticals signed a development and commercialisation agreement providing Endo Pharmaceuticals with exclusive marketing and distribution rights in the US and Canada for Depomorphine and another product, Propofol IDD-D trade mark, with options for other development products. Under the terms of the agreement, SkyePharma will receive an upfront payment and may receive further milestone payments. Skye-Pharma will also receive a share of each product's sales revenue. SkyePharma is responsible for clinical development towards the US FDA approval and for product manufacture and associated costs. Following the approval, SkyePharma will as act as a supplier, while Endo will market each product in the US and Canada. SkyePharma has received 30 million US dollars from Paul Capital Partners, a US private equity group, to develop DepoMorphine. This capital will enable SkyePharma to fund phase III clinical trials without raising extra funds. Paul Capital will have rights to 15% of any revenues from DepoMorphine until 2014, and also receive some royalties on three other SkyePharma products. However, if DepoMorphine fails in clinical trials or is declined for registration, Paul Capital will not be compensated for the investment. SkyePharma expect to conclude a European license by the end of 2003, and

  18. Self-intoxication with morphine obtained from an infusion pump.

    PubMed

    Gock, S B; Wong, S H; Stormo, K A; Jentzen, J M

    1999-01-01

    A 36-year-old Caucasian male was found unresponsive by his wife. He had white foam around his mouth and was pronounced dead shortly thereafter. He had a history of back pain and was treated with intrathecal morphine because of his previous addiction to oral opiate medications. Because of crimping of the pump catheter, it was replaced 4 days before his death. Toxicological findings included urine screen positive for amitriptyline, nortriptyline, opiates, hydrocodone metabolites, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, caffeine, nicotine, and metabolite. Drug concentrations were as follows: blood, 0.260 mg/L amitriptyline, 0.160 mg/L nortriptyline, 0.460 mg/L unconjugated morphine, and 0.624 mg/L total morphine; vitreous humor, 0.034 mg/L unconjugated morphine and 0.080 mg/L total morphine; and cerebrospinal fluid, 0.099 mg/L unconjugated morphine and 0.095 mg/L total morphine. Shortly after death, the volume of the residual pump reservoir was only 8 mL instead of the expected 17 mL. Testing by the FDA showed that the pump was functional. The residual content of the pump accounted for only 230 mg instead of the expected 488 mg. The high blood-morphine concentrations did not correlate with the intrathecal infusion dose. The symptoms were consistent with opiate overdose, possibly by injection of morphine withdrawn from the pump reservoir. The cause of death was determined to be fatal morphine self-intoxication, and the manner of death was accidental. This case is intended to alert regulatory agencies, pain management health professionals, pathologists, and toxicologists to the abuse potential of one of the newer analgesic-delivery systems. PMID:10192419

  19. Dopamine-dependent responses to morphine depend on glucocorticoid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Marinelli, Michela; Aouizerate, Bruno; Barrot, Michel; Le Moal, Michel; Piazza, Pier Vincenzo

    1998-01-01

    Previous work has shown that glucocorticoid hormones facilitate the behavioral and dopaminergic effects of morphine. In this study we examined the possible role in these effects of the two central corticosteroid receptor types: mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). To accomplish this, specific antagonists of these receptors were infused intracerebroventricularly and 2 hr later we measured: (i) locomotor activity induced by a systemic injection of morphine (2 mg/kg); (ii) locomotor activity induced by an infusion of morphine (1 μg per side) into the ventral tegmental area, which is a dopamine-dependent behavioral response to morphine; (iii) morphine-induced dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, a dopaminergic projection site mediating the locomotor and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse. Blockade of MRs by spironolactone had no significant effects on locomotion induced by systemic morphine. In contrast, blockade of GRs by either RU38486 or RU39305, which is devoid of antiprogesterone effects, reduced the locomotor response to morphine, and this effect was dose dependent. GR antagonists also reduced the locomotor response to intraventral tegmental area morphine as well as the basal and morphine-induced increase in accumbens dopamine, as measured by microdialysis in freely moving rats. In contrast, spironolactone did not modify dopamine release. In conclusion, glucocorticoids, via GRs, facilitate the dopamine-dependent behavioral effects of morphine, probably by facilitating dopamine release. The possibility of decreasing the behavioral and dopaminergic effects of opioids by an acute administration of GR antagonists may open new therapeutic strategies for treatment of drug addiction. PMID:9636221

  20. Postmortem redistribution of the heroin metabolites morphine and morphine-3-glucuronide in rabbits over 24 h.

    PubMed

    Maskell, Peter D; Albeishy, Mohammed; De Paoli, Giorgia; Wilson, Nathan E; Seetohul, L Nitin

    2016-03-01

    The interpretation of postmortem drug levels is complicated by changes in drug blood levels in the postmortem period, a phenomena known as postmortem drug redistribution. We investigated the postmortem redistribution of the heroin metabolites morphine and morphine-3-glucuronide in a rabbit model. Heroin (1 mg/kg) was injected into anesthetised rabbit; after 1 h, an auricular vein blood sample was taken and the rabbit was euthanised. Following death rabbits were placed in a supine position at room temperature and divided into three groups namely (1) immediate autopsy, (2) autopsy after 30 minutes and (3) autopsy 24 h after death. Various samples which included femoral blood, cardiac blood, lung, liver, kidney, vitreous humour, subcutaneous and abdominal fat, liver, bone marrow and skeletal muscle were taken. The samples were analysed with a validated LC-MS/MS method. It was observed that within minutes there was a significant increase in free morphine postmortem femoral blood concentration compared to the antemortem sample (0.01 ± 0.01 to 0.05 ± 0.02 mg/L).Various other changes in free morphine and metabolite concentrations were observed during the course of the experiment in various tissues. Principal component analysis was used to investigate possible correlations between free morphine in the various samples. Some correlations were observed but gave poor predictions (>20 % error) when back calculating. The results suggest that rabbits are a good model for further studies of postmortem redistribution but that further study and understanding of the phenomena is required before accurate predictions of the blood concentration at the time of death are possible. PMID:25863436

  1. Postoperative morphine requirements, nausea and vomiting following anaesthesia for tonsillectomy. Comparison of intravenous morphine and non-opioid analgesic techniques.

    PubMed

    Mather, S J; Peutrell, J M

    1995-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to be as effective as opioid analgesia following tonsillectomy in children. Opioids are still frequently used but tonsillectomy is associated with a high incidence of vomiting. This study has attempted to assess postoperative analgesic consumption and nausea and vomiting after general anaesthesia for tonsillectomy using either paracetamol premedication, paracetamol plus a NSAID or intravenous morphine to provide postoperative analgesia. Some children required a rescue dose of morphine in the recovery room, including some who had received intravenous morphine at induction. Least supplementary morphine was required by those who had received paracetamol plus ketorolac. Postoperative nausea and vomiting was significantly less in the two groups which were not given intraoperative morphine. The number of vomiting incidents was also much less. We conclude that the preoperative administration of paracetamol alone provides satisfactory analgesia in many children but that supplementary analgesia is still required for some. PMID:7489439

  2. Potentiation of morphine analgesia by caffeine.

    PubMed Central

    Misra, A. L.; Pontani, R. B.; Vadlamani, N. L.

    1985-01-01

    Significant potentiation of morphine (5 mg kg-1 s.c. or 1 mg kg-1 i.v.) analgesia (tail-withdrawal reflex at 55 degrees C) was observed in caffeine-treated (100 mg kg-1 i.p.) rats as compared to the control group and lower doses of caffeine (2mg kg-1 i.p.) did not show this effect. Potentiated analgesia was reversed by naloxone. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors appear to be involved in part in this potentiation. PMID:4005485

  3. Potentiation of morphine analgesia by caffeine.

    PubMed

    Misra, A L; Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L

    1985-04-01

    Significant potentiation of morphine (5 mg kg-1 s.c. or 1 mg kg-1 i.v.) analgesia (tail-withdrawal reflex at 55 degrees C) was observed in caffeine-treated (100 mg kg-1 i.p.) rats as compared to the control group and lower doses of caffeine (2mg kg-1 i.p.) did not show this effect. Potentiated analgesia was reversed by naloxone. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors appear to be involved in part in this potentiation. PMID:4005485

  4. [Controlled release oxycodone--a new option in the treatment of severe and very severe pain. Review of studies on neuropathic, physical activity-related and postoperative pain].

    PubMed

    Stiehl, M

    2004-08-01

    Opioids are used not only in the treatment of cancer pain, but also pain of non-malignant genesis. In recent years, the efficacy of controlled release (CR) oxycodone in the treatment of the above-mentioned types of pain has been investigated in a number of clinical studies. The present article reviews the clinical studies that have been already published. Thanks to its outstanding pharmacological and pharmacodynamic properties, CR oxycodone is fast acting and brings about long lasting pain relief, coupled with benefits for physical and mental activities. This results in a significant quality-of-life improvement. Oral therapy with CR oxycodone is safe and can be precisely controlled. Since there are no clinical relevant metabolites, there is no danger of accumulation in patients with renal infarction due to these metabolites. Side effects are those typical for opioids, and are readily manageable. CR oxycodone is a good alternative in the treatment of non-cancer pain and can be recommended as first-line treatment for the above-mentioned indications. PMID:16739361

  5. Use of hair testing to determine methadone exposure in pediatric deaths.

    PubMed

    Tournel, Gilles; Pollard, Jocelyn; Humbert, Luc; Wiart, Jean-François; Hédouin, Valéry; Allorge, Delphine

    2014-09-01

    A case of death attributed to methadone acute poisoning in an infant aged 11 months is reported. A sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) was suspected, whereas a traumatic cause of death was excluded regarding autopsy findings. Specimens were submitted to a large toxicological analysis, which included ethanol measurement by HS-GC-FID, a targeted screening for drugs of abuse and various prescription drug classes followed by quantification using UPLC-MS/MS methods. Methadone and its metabolite (EDDP) were detected in all the tested fluids, as well as in hair, with a blood concentration of methadone considered as lethal for children (73 ng/mL). The cause of death was determined to be acute "methadone poisoning", and the manner of death was "accidental". A discussion of the case circumstances, the difficulties with the interpretation of toxicological findings in children (blood concentration and hair testing), and the origin of exposure are discussed. PMID:24588273

  6. QT Interval Screening in Methadone Maintenance Treatment: Report of a SAMHSA Expert Panel

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Judith A.; Campbell, Anthony; Killip, Thomas; Kotz, Margaret; Krantz, Mori J.; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; McCarroll, Brian A.; Mehta, Davendra; Payte, J. Thomas; Stimmel, Barry; Taylor, Trusandra; Wilford, Bonnie B.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to enhance patient safety in Opioid Treatment Programs (OTPs), the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) convened a multi-disciplinary Expert Panel on the Cardiac Effects of Methadone. Panel members reviewed the literature, regulatory actions, professional guidances, and OTPs’ experiences regarding adverse cardiac events associated with methadone. The Panel concluded that, to the extent possible, every OTP should have a universal Cardiac Risk Management Plan (incorporating clinical assessment, ECG assessment, risk stratification, and prevention of drug interactions) for all patients, and should strongly consider patient-specific risk minimization strategies (such as careful patient monitoring, obtaining ECGs as indicated by a particular patient’s risk profile, and adjusting the methadone dose as needed) for patients with identified risk factors for adverse cardiac events. The Panel also suggested specific modifications to informed consent documents, patient education, staff education, and methadone protocols. PMID:22026519

  7. Methadone effects on brain functioning and type A and B CNV shapes.

    PubMed

    Tecce, J J; Cole, J O; Mayer, J; Lewis, D C

    1979-09-01

    Twelve male outpatients participating in a methadone maintenance treatment program were evaluated for the effects of acute administration of methadone on brain functioning (contingent negative variation or CNV), attention performance (reaction time and continuous performance test), and psychophysiological activity (heart rate and eye blink rate). Individual differences in response to methadone were assessed by classifying patients into two groups on the basis of basal CNV shapes: Type A (quick rise time) and type B (slow rise time). Methadone produced a pattern of increased electrical brain activity (CNV) and enhanced attention performance in type B patients and elevated heart rate and lowered eye blink rate in type A subjects. Results are interpreted in terms of the distraction-arousal and the eye blink-hedonia hypotheses. PMID:116287

  8. Sex effects in cocaine using methadone patients randomized to contingency management interventions

    PubMed Central

    Burch, Ashley E.; Rash, Carla J.; Petry, Nancy M.

    2015-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) is an effective treatment for promoting cocaine abstinence in patients receiving methadone maintenance. However, few studies have examined the effect of sex on treatment outcomes in this population. This study evaluated the impact of sex on longest duration of abstinence (LDA) and percent negative urine samples in 323 cocaine-using methadone patients from four randomized clinical trials comparing CM to standard methadone care. Overall, women had better treatment outcomes compared to men, demonstrated by an increase in both LDA and percentages of negative samples. Patients receiving CM also had significantly higher LDA and percentages of negative samples compared to patients receiving standard care, but sex by treatment condition effects were not significant. These data suggest that cocaine using methadone patients who are women have better substance use outcomes than men in interventions that regularly monitor cocaine use, and CM is equally efficacious regardless of sex. PMID:26237326

  9. Methadone continuation versus forced withdrawal on incarceration in a combined US prison and jail: a randomised, open-label trial

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Josiah D; McKenzie, Michelle; Larney, Sarah; Wong, John B; Tran, Liem; Clarke, Jennifer; Noska, Amanda; Reddy, Manasa; Zaller, Nickolas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Methadone is an effective treatment for opioid dependence. When people who are receiving methadone maintenance treatment for opioid dependence are incarcerated in prison or jail, most US correctional facilities discontinue their methadone treatment, either gradually, or more often, abruptly. This discontinuation can cause uncomfortable symptoms of withdrawal and renders prisoners susceptible to relapse and overdose on release. We aimed to study the effect of forced withdrawal from methadone upon incarceration on individuals’ risk behaviours and engagement with post-release treatment programmes. Methods In this randomised, open-label trial, we randomly assigned (1:1) inmates of the Rhode Island Department of Corrections (RI, USA) who were enrolled in a methadone maintenance-treatment programme in the community at the time of arrest and wanted to remain on methadone treatment during incarceration and on release, to either continuation of their methadone treatment or to usual care—forced tapered withdrawal from methadone. Participants could be included in the study only if their incarceration would be more than 1 week but less than 6 months. We did the random assignments with a computer-generated random permutation, and urn randomisation procedures to stratify participants by sex and race. Participants in the continued-methadone group were maintained on their methadone dose at the time of their incarceration (with dose adjustments as clinically indicated). Patients in the forced-withdrawal group followed the institution’s standard withdrawal protocol of receiving methadone for 1 week at the dose at the time of their incarceration, then a tapered withdrawal regimen (for those on a starting dose >100 mg, the dose was reduced by 5 mg per day to 100 mg, then reduced by 3 mg per day to 0 mg; for those on a starting dose ≤100 mg, the dose was reduced by 3 mg per day to 0 mg). The main outcomes were engagement with a methadone maintenance

  10. Micturition in naive and morphine-dependent rats.

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, F. G.

    1986-01-01

    Voiding responses were recorded in conscious water-loaded rats. Morphine sulphate (5 mg kg-1) elevated the volume threshold for micturition (MV); the group mean MV of 16 rats after morphine was 40% larger than control. Micturition was nevertheless complete since no urine remained in the bladder afterwards. The implantation of 2 or 4 morphine-base pellets (150 or 300 mg morphine) elevated for 12 days the MV in water-loaded rats. On the 3rd to the 10th day following implantation the group mean was approximately twice that of untreated controls. After micturition was over no residual urine was found in the bladder. Within 3 days the rats became tolerant to the antinociceptive action of the morphine-base pellets but little apparent tolerance developed to their action on micturition. On the 1st day after the pellets were removed, the mean MV was reduced. When withdrawal was precipitated by the administration of naloxone the MV was often too small to measure. This component of a withdrawal syndrome could be elicited in the rats throughout the 12 days of morphine pellet implantation. The administration of 20 mg kg-1 morphine sulphate to anaesthetized rats did not decrease the contractions of the urinary bladder to repetitive stimulation of its motor nerves at 1 and 20 Hz. PMID:3708205

  11. Morphine versus Hydromorphone: Does Choice of Opioid Influence Outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Gulur, Padma; Koury, Katharine; Arnstein, Paul; Lee, Hang; McCarthy, Patricia; Coley, Christopher; Mort, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Morphine has traditionally been considered the first line agent for analgesia in hospitals; however, in the last few years there has been a shift towards the use of hydromorphone as a first line agent. We conducted a hospital population based observational study to evaluate the increasing use of hydromorphone over morphine in both medical and surgical populations. Additionally, we assessed the effect of this trend on three key outcomes, including adverse events, length of stay, and readmission rates. We evaluated data from the University Health Systems Consortium. Data from 38 hospitals from October 2010 to September 2013 was analyzed for patients treated with either hydromorphone or morphine. The use of morphine steadily decreased while use of hydromorphone increased in both medical and surgical groups. Rescue drugs were used more frequently in patients treated with hydromorphone in comparison to patients treated with morphine (p < 0.01). Patients receiving morphine tended to stay in the hospital for almost one day longer than patients receiving hydromorphone. However, 30-day all cause readmission rates were significantly higher in patients treated with hydromorphone (p < 0.01). Our study highlights that the choice of hydromorphone versus morphine may influence outcomes. There are implications related to resource utilization and these outcomes. PMID:26609431

  12. Morphine tolerance offers protection from radiogenic performance deficits

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.; Stevens, K.E.; Burrows, J.M.; White, G.A.; Gibbs, G.L.

    1983-02-01

    When rats are exposed to a sufficiently large dose of ionizing radiation they exhibit lethargy, hypokinesia, and deficits in performance. These and other behavioral changes parallel those often observed in this species after a large dose of morphine. Since the release of endogenous opiates has been implicated in some stress reactions, we sought to determine if they might play a part in radiogenic behavioral deficits. Rats were trained to criterion on a signaled avoidance task. Some subjects were then implanted with a pellet containing 75 mg of morphine. Other animals received placebo implants. Over a number of days, morphine tolerance was evaluated by measurement of body temperature changes. Prior to 2500 rad /sup 60/Co exposure or sham irradiation, morphine (or placebo) pellets were removed. Twenty-four hours later rats were retested to assess their performance on the avoidance task. Morphine-tolerant subjects performed significantly better than the irradiated placebo-implanted group and no differently than morphine-tolerant/sham-irradiated animals. Morphine tolerance seems to provide a degree of behavioral radiation resistance. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that endogenous opiate hyperexcretion may play some part in the behavioral deficits often observed after irradiation.

  13. Endogenous Cholinergic Neurotransmission Contributes to Behavioral Sensitization to Morphine

    PubMed Central

    Bajic, Dusica; Soiza-Reilly, Mariano; Spalding, Allegra L.; Berde, Charles B.; Commons, Kathryn G.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroplasticity in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system is critical for behavioral adaptations associated with opioid reward and addiction. These processes may be influenced by cholinergic transmission arising from the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDTg), a main source of acetylcholine to mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons. To examine this possibility we asked if chronic systemic morphine administration affects expression of genes in ventral and ventrolateral periaqueductal gray at the level of the LDTg using rtPCR. Specifically, we examined gene expression changes in the area of interest using Neurotransmitters and Receptors PCR array between chronic morphine and saline control groups. Analysis suggested that chronic morphine administration led to changes in expression of genes associated, in part, with cholinergic neurotransmission. Furthermore, using a quantitative immunofluorescent technique, we found that chronic morphine treatment produced a significant increase in immunolabeling of the cholinergic marker (vesicular acetylcholine transporter) in neurons of the LDTg. Finally, systemic administration of the nonselective and noncompetitive neuronal nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine (0.5 or 2 mg/kg) dose-dependently blocked the expression, and to a lesser extent the development, of locomotor sensitization. The same treatment had no effect on acute morphine antinociception, antinociceptive tolerance or dependence to chronic morphine. Taken together, the results suggest that endogenous nicotinic cholinergic neurotransmission selectively contributes to behavioral sensitization to morphine and this process may, in part, involve cholinergic neurons within the LDTg. PMID:25647082

  14. Predictors of Attrition from a National Sample of Methadone Maintenance Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mancino, Michael; Curran, Geoffrey; Han, Xiaotong; Allee, Elise; Humphreys, Keith; Booth, Brenda M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Methadone substitution therapy is an effective harm reduction treatment method for opioid dependent persons. Ability to retain patients in methadone treatment is an accepted predictor of treatment outcomes. Objectives The current study evaluates the roles of psychiatric comorbidity, medical comorbidity, and sociodemographic characteristics as predictors of retention in methadone treatment utilizing retrospective analysis of data from a nationwide sample of patients in methadone treatment in the VA. Methods Data were gathered using the VA’s national health services use database. A cohort of veterans with a new episode of “opiate substitution” in fiscal year 1999 was identified, and their continuous service use was tracked through fiscal year 2002. The sample included a total of 2,363 patients in 23 VA medical centers. Survival analysis was used to explore factors associated with retention in methadone treatment. Results Younger age, having a serious mental illness, being African American, or having race recorded as unknown were associated with lower rates of retention in methadone treatment programs in this population of veterans (controlling for site). Conclusion Given that extended methadone treatment is associated with improved outcomes while patients remain in treatment, more longitudinal studies using primary data collection are needed to fully explore factors related to retention. For the VA population specifically, further research is necessary to fully understand the relationship between race/ethnicity and treatment retention. Scientific Significance This is the first retention study the authors are aware of that utilizes data from a nationwide, multisite, population of participants in methadone treatment. PMID:20465373

  15. Highly selective electrode for potentiometric analysis of methadone in biological fluids and pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Ardeshiri, Moslem; Jalali, Fahimeh

    2016-06-01

    In order to develop a fast and simple procedure for methadone analysis in biological fluids, a graphite paste electrode (GPE) was modified with the ion-pair of methadone-phosphotungstic acid, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Optimized composition of the electrode with respect to graphite powder:paraffin oil:MWCNTs:ion pair, was 58:30:8:4 (w/w%). The electrode showed a near-Nernstian slope of 58.9 ± 0.3 mV/decade for methadone in a wide linear range of 1.0 × 10(-8)-4.6 × 10(-3)M, with a detection limit of 1.0 × 10(-8)M. The electrode response was independent of pH in the range of 5-11, with a fast response time (~4s) at 25 °C. The sensor showed high selectivity and was successfully applied to the determination of sub-micromolar concentrations of methadone in human blood serum and urine samples, with recoveries in the range of 95-99.8%. The average recovery of methadone from tablets (5 mg/tablet) by using the proposed method was 98%. The life time of the modified electrode was more than 5 months, due to the characteristic of GPE which can be cut off and fresh electrode surface be available. A titration procedure was performed for methadone analysis by using phosphotungstic acid, as titrating agent, which showed an accurate end point and 1:1 stoichiometry for the ion-pair formed (methadone:phosphotungstic acid). The simple and rapid procedure as well as excellent detection limit and selectivity are some of the advantages of the proposed sensor for methadone. PMID:27040192

  16. A Study of Methadone-Poisoned Children Referred to Hamadan’s Besat Hospital/Iran

    PubMed Central

    BAZMAMOUN, Hassan; FAYYAZi, Afshin; KHAJEH, Ali; SABZEHEI, Mohammad Kazem; KHEZRIAN, Fuzieh

    2014-01-01

    Objective Increasing use of methadone in withdrawal programs has increased methadone poisoning in children. This research aimed to study the causes of incidence of poisoning in children and its side-effects. Materials & Methods In this research, The hospital records of all methadone-poisoned children referred to Hamadan’s Be’sat Hospital from June 2007 to March 2013, were studied. Children with a definite history of methadone use or proven existence of methadone in their urine, were studied. Results During 5 years, 62 children with the mean age of 53.24±29.50 months were hospitalized due to methadone use. There was a significant relationship between delayed referral to hospital and increased bradypnea. According to their history, 25.8% and 58.1% of the children had been poisoned by methadone tablet and syrup, respectively. The most common initial complaint expressed by parents, was decreased consciousness (85.5%). During the initial examination, decreased consciousness, meiosis, and respiratory depression were observed in 91.9%, 82.3%, and 69.4% of the cases, respectively. Nine patients required mechanical ventilation. There was a significant relationship between the need for mechanical ventilation and seizure with initial symptom of emesis. There were two cases of death (3.2%), both of which were secondary to prolonged hypoxia and brain death. There was a significant relationship between poor patient prognosis (death) and presence of cyanosis in early symptoms, seizure, hypotension, duration of decreased consciousness, and duration of mechanical ventilation. Conclusion This research indicated that the occurrence of seizure, hypotension, and cyanosis in the early stages of poisoning is associated with an increased risk of side effects and death and are serious warning signs. Early diagnosis and intervention can improve outcomes of methadone-poisoned children. PMID:24949049

  17. Effect of prenatal methadone on reinstated behavioral sensitization induced by methamphetamine in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chih-Shung; Lee, Yih-Jing; Chiang, Yao-Chang; Fan, Lir-Wan; Ho, Ing-Kang; Tien, Lu-Tai

    2014-01-01

    It has been known that methadone maintenance treatment is the standard treatment of choice for pregnant opiate addicts. However, there are few data on newborn outcomes especially in the cross talk with other addictive agents. The present study was to investigate the effect of prenatal exposure to methadone on methamphetamine (METH)-induced behavioral sensitization as an indicator of drug addiction in later life. Pregnant rats received saline or methadone (7 mg/kg, s.c.) twice daily from E3 to E20. To induce behavioral sensitization, offspring (5 weeks old) were treated with METH (1mg/kg, i.p.) or saline once daily for 5 consecutive days. Ninety-six hours (day 9) after the 5th treatment with METH or saline, animals received a single dose of METH (1mg/kg, i.p.) or saline to induce the reinstated behavioral sensitization. Prenatal methadone treatment enhanced the level of development of locomotor behavioral sensitization to METH administration in adolescent rats. Prenatal methadone treatment also enhanced the reinstated locomotor behavioral sensitization in adolescent rats after the administration had ceased for 96 h. These results indicate that prenatal methadone exposure produces a persistent lesion in the dopaminergic system, as indicated by enhanced METH-induced locomotor behavioral sensitization (before drug abstinence) and reinstated locomotor behavioral sensitization (after short term drug abstinence) in adolescent rats. These findings show that prenatal methadone exposure may enhance susceptibility to the development of drug addiction in later life. This could provide a reference for drug usage such as methamphetamine in their offspring of pregnant woman who are treating with methadone. PMID:24157336

  18. Route of administration for illicit prescription opioids: a comparison of rural and urban drug users

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nonmedical prescription opioid use has emerged as a major public health concern in recent years, particularly in rural Appalachia. Little is known about the routes of administration (ROA) involved in nonmedical prescription opioid use among rural and urban drug users. The purpose of this study was to describe rural-urban differences in ROA for nonmedical prescription opioid use. Methods A purposive sample of 212 prescription drug users was recruited from a rural Appalachian county (n = 101) and a major metropolitan area (n = 111) in Kentucky. Consenting participants were given an interviewer-administered questionnaire examining sociodemographics, psychiatric disorders, and self-reported nonmedical use and ROA (swallowing, snorting, injecting) for the following prescription drugs: buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, OxyContin® and other oxycodone. Results Among urban participants, swallowing was the most common ROA, contrasting sharply with substance-specific variation in ROA among rural participants. Among rural participants, snorting was the most frequent ROA for hydrocodone, methadone, OxyContin®, and oxycodone, while injection was most common for hydromorphone and morphine. In age-, gender-, and race-adjusted analyses, rural participants had significantly higher odds of snorting hydrocodone, OxyContin®, and oxycodone than urban participants. Urban participants had significantly higher odds of swallowing hydrocodone and oxycodone than did rural participants. Notably, among rural participants, 67% of hydromorphone users and 63% of morphine users had injected the drugs. Conclusions Alternative ROA are common among rural drug users. This finding has implications for rural substance abuse treatment and harm reduction, in which interventions should incorporate methods to prevent and reduce route-specific health complications of drug use. PMID:20950455

  19. Gene expression following acute morphine administration.

    PubMed

    Loguinov, A V; Anderson, L M; Crosby, G J; Yukhananov, R Y

    2001-08-28

    The long-term response to neurotropic drugs depends on drug-induced neuroplasticity and underlying changes in gene expression. However, alterations in neuronal gene expression can be observed even following single injection. To investigate the extent of these changes, gene expression in the medial striatum and lumbar part of the spinal cord was monitored by cDNA microarray following single injection of morphine. Using robust and resistant linear regression (MM-estimator) with simultaneous prediction confidence intervals, we detected differentially expressed genes. By combining the results with cluster analysis, we have found that a single morphine injection alters expression of two major groups of genes, for proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration and for cytoskeleton-related proteins. RNAs for these proteins were mostly downregulated both in the medial striatum and in lumbar part of the spinal cord. These transitory changes were prevented by coadministration of the opioid antagonist naloxone. Data indicate that microarray analysis by itself is useful in describing the effect of well-known substances on the nervous system and provides sufficient information to propose a potentially novel pathway mediating its activity. PMID:11526201

  20. Tolerance to hyperthermia produced by morphine in rat.

    PubMed

    Mucha, R F; Kalant, H; Kim, C

    1987-01-01

    The present study addressed the prevailing notion that the rat develops tolerance only to the hypothermic effect of morphine and not to its hyperthermic effect. Rectal temperatures were measured at different intervals after various test doses of morphine in rats that had been rendered tolerant to morphine antinociception, by daily intraperitoneal injections of 0, 20, or 200 mg/kg morphine, and dependent, as seen by naloxone-produced loss of body weight. The well-known tolerance to the hypothermic effect was confirmed by changes in the dose-response curves for latency to peak hyperthermic response. In the falling arm of the test dose time/effect curve, consistent, clear decreases in morphine hyperthermia were seen. These decreases were proportional to the chronic treatment dose, and occurred in a normal test environment, where acute hypothermic effects were produced by morphine at short test intervals, and in a warm test environment, where no hypothermia was seen. Similar effects were noted when the data were analyzed in terms of area under the time/effect curve for hyperthermia. In the morphine-treated animals, decreased hyperthermia was seen despite serum morphine levels at the time of testing being up to twice as high as those in control rats. It was concluded that substantial tolerance develops to hyperthermia produced by opiates in rats. The previous difficulty in seeing this effect is discussed in regard to the probability that, in naive rats, the effect of morphine shortly after administration of a test dose reflects a summation of two opposing, acute thermic effects. The findings challenge the view that tolerance develops only to the depressant, and not to the excitatory, effects of opiates. PMID:3114798

  1. The relative risk of fatal poisoning by methadone or buprenorphine within the wider population of England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    Marteau, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the population-wide overdose risk emerging from the prescription of methadone and buprenorphine for opioid substitution treatment in England and Wales. Design Retrospective administrative data study. Setting National databases for England and Wales. Participants/cases Drug-related mortality data were drawn from the Office for National Statistics, and prescription data for methadone and buprenorphine were obtained from the National Health Service for the years 2007–2012. During this 6-year period, a total of 2366 methadone-related deaths and 52 buprenorphine-related deaths were registered, corresponding to 17 333 163 methadone and 2 602 374 buprenorphine prescriptions issued. The analysis encompassed poisoning deaths among members of the wider population of England and Wales who consumed, but were not prescribed these medications, in addition to patients prescribed methadone or buprenorphine. Main outcome measures Mortality risk: substance-specific overdose rate per 1000 prescriptions issued; relative risk ratio of methadone in relation to buprenorphine. Results During the years 2007–2012, the pooled overdose death rate was 0.137/1000 prescriptions of methadone, compared to 0.022/1000 prescriptions of buprenorphine (including buprenorphine-naloxone). The analysis generated a relative risk ratio of 6.23 (95% CI 4.79 to 8.10) of methadone in relation to buprenorphine. UK Borders Agency data were taken into consideration and revealed that only negligible amounts of methadone and buprenorphine were seized on entering UK territory between 2007 and 2012, suggesting domestic diversion. Conclusions Our analysis of the relative safety of buprenorphine and methadone for opioid substitution treatment reveals that buprenorphine is six times safer than methadone with regard to overdose risk among the general population. Clinicians should be aware of the increased risk of prescribing methadone, and tighter regulations are needed to prevent its

  2. Patient Perspectives on Choosing Buprenorphine over Methadone in an Urban Equal Access System

    PubMed Central

    Gryczynski, Jan; Jaffe, Jerome H.; Schwartz, Robert P.; Dušek, Kristi A.; Gugsa, Nishan; Monroe, Cristin L.; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Olsen, Yngvild K.; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent policy initiatives in Baltimore City, MD significantly reduced access disparities between methadone and buprenorphine in the publicly-funded treatment sector. Objectives This study examines reasons for choosing buprenorphine over methadone among patients with access to both medications. Methods This study was embedded within a larger clinical trial conducted at two outpatient substance abuse treatment programs offering buprenorphine. Qualitative and quantitative data on treatment choice were collected for new patients starting buprenorphine treatment (n=80). The sample consisted of predominantly urban African American (94%) heroin users who had prior experience with non-prescribed street buprenorphine (85%) and opioid agonist treatment (68%). Qualitative data were transcribed and coded for themes, while quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive and bivariate statistics. Results Participants typically conveyed their choice of buprenorphine treatment as a decision against methadone. Buprenorphine was perceived as a helpful medication while methadone was perceived as a harmful narcotic with multiple unwanted physical effects. Positive experiences with non-prescribed “street buprenorphine” were a central factor in participants’ decisions to seek buprenorphine treatment. Conclusions Differences in service structure between methadone and buprenorphine did not strongly influence treatment-seeking decisions in this sample. Personal experiences with medications and the street narrative surrounding them play an important role in treatment selection decisions. Scientific Significance This study characterizes important decision factors that underlie patients’ selection of buprenorphine over methadone treatment. PMID:23617873

  3. Predisposing Factors for Methadone Poisoning in Children Hospitalized at Kerman Afzalipour Hospital, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hosseininasab, Ali; Vahidi, Aliasghar; Bagheri-Charouk, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Methadone is a synthetic opioid that has been used to relieve severe pain in addiction withdrawal. Unfortunately, due to non-standard supply and storage, the incidence of poisoning and deaths caused by this drug is increasing daily. The purpose of this study was to determine the underlying causes of methadone poisoning in children admitted to Kerman Afzalipour Hospital, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during 2012. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed on 105 children diagnosed with methadone poisoning and admitted to the pediatric emergency ward at Kerman Afzalipour Hospital. The required information was recorded through interviews with parents, patient examination, and if necessary telephone calls with the parents. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. Findings Mean age of children was 3.9 ± 2.4 years and 59.0% of them were boys. Most parents had a high school diploma or a lower level of education. In all cases, a family member or relative, or at least one person in a party they attended was an addict. In most cases, methadone was fed to the child by mistake instead of water or other drugs. Parental substance abuse, employment status, and family income were significantly associated with methadone poisoning. Conclusion Training of methadone storage in individuals who need to use this drug can help to prevent accidental ingestion and poisoning of children. PMID:27274794

  4. Correlates of illicit methadone use in New York City: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Ompad, Danielle C; Fuller, Crystal M; Chan, Christina A; Frye, Victoria; Vlahov, David; Galea, Sandro

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite growing concern about illicit methadone use in the US and other countries, there is little data about the prevalence and correlates of methadone use in large urban areas. We assessed the prevalence and examined correlates of lifetime and recent illicit methadone use in New York City (NYC). Methods 1,415 heroin, crack, and cocaine users aged 15–40 years were recruited in NYC between 2000 and 2004 to complete interviewer-administered questionnaires. Results In multivariable logistic regression, non-injection drug users who used illicit methadone were more likely to be heroin dependent, less than daily methamphetamine users and to have a heroin using sex partner in the last two months. Injection drug users who used illicit methadone were more likely to use heroin daily, share injection paraphernalia and less likely to have been in a detoxification program and to have not used marijuana in the last six months. Conclusion The results overall suggest that illicit (or street) methadone use is likely not a primary drug of choice, but is instead more common in concert with other illicit drug use. PMID:18957116

  5. Laeve-[1-3H]Methadone disposition in tolerant dogs.

    PubMed

    Misra, A L; Bloch, R; Vadlamani, N L; Mulé, S J

    1975-04-01

    1. Following a subcutaneous dose (4mg/kg) of [3H]methadone, peak levels of drug occurred in plasma, tissues and selected areas of the central nervous system (CNS) 2h after injection in both non-tolerant and tolerant dogs. Highest concentrations of methadone were attained in bile and lung compared to other tissues. 2. Levels of methadone in plasma, tissue and CNS of tolerant and non-tolerant animals were not markedly different up to 8h after injection, but a much faster rate of egression of free drug (lower t1/2) was observed subsequently in tolerant dogs. 3. Peak levels of methadone in various areas of the CNS ranged between 2-7 (spinal cord) to 3-6 (thalamus) mug/g in non-tolerant and 3-0 -rebellum) to 4-1 (thalamus) mug/g in tolerant dogs 2h after injection. No marked accumulation of methadone occurred in selected areas of the CNS in spite of the persistence of drug in these areas. 4. The plasma protein electrophoretic profiles did not differ between control, non-tolerant and tolerant dogs. 5. Similar qualitative patterns of metabolites were observed in non-tolerant and tolerant dogs and the development of tolerance did not appear to modify the metabolic pathways of methadone. PMID:1154803

  6. Effects of morphine and naloxone on feline colonic transit

    SciTech Connect

    Krevsky, B.; Libster, B.; Maurer, A.H.; Chase, B.J.; Fisher, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of endogenous and exogenous opioid substances on feline colonic transit were evaluated using colonic transit scintigraphy. Naloxone accelerated emptying of the cecum and ascending colon, and filling of the transverse colon. Endogenous opioid peptides thus appear to play a significant role in the regulation of colonic transit. At a moderate dose of morphine cecum and ascending colon transit was accelerated, while at a larger dose morphine had no effect. Since naloxone, a relatively nonspecific opioid antagonist, and morphine, a principally mu opioid receptor agonist, both accelerate proximal colonic transit, a decelerating role for at least one of the other opioid receptors is inferred.

  7. Cholescintigraphy in acute cholecystitis: use of intravenous morphine

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, D.; Shi, E.C.; McLean, R.G.; Hoschl, R.; Murray, I.P.C.; Ham, J.M.

    1984-04-01

    Conventional cholescintigraphy (60 patients) and a modified protocol (59 patients) were compared in 74 females and 45 males with acute cholecystitis. In the modified protocol, intravenous morphine was administered whenever the gallbladder was not seen 40 minutes after injection of Tc-99m-pyroxylidene-glutamate. Accuracy was 98% with morphine, compared with 88% for the conventional protocol; specificity improved from 83% to 100% with no loss of sensitivity. Low doses of morphine are well tolerated and can result in a highly accurate diagnosis of acute cholecystitis without the need for delayed imaging.

  8. Recent Advances in the Synthesis of Morphine and Related Alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chida, Noritaka

    Morphine, an alkaloid isolated from the opium poppy, has been widely used as an analgesic, and has been a fascinating synthetic target of organic chemists. After the first total synthesis reported in 1952, a number of synthetic studies toward morphine have been reported, and findings obtained in such studies have greatly contributed to the progress of synthetic organic chemistry as well as medicinal chemistry. This review provides an overview of recent studies toward the total synthesis of morphine and related alkaloids. Work reported in the literature since 2004 will be reviewed.

  9. Stress antagonizes morphine-induced analgesia in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, J.; Shannon, L.; Heybach, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Exposure to restraint stress resulted in antagonism of the analgesic effect of administered morphine in adult male rats. This antagonism of morphine-induced analgesia by restraint stress was not affected by adrenalectomy one day prior to testing, suggesting that stress-induced secretion of corticosteroids is not critical to this antagonism. In addition, parenteral administration of exogenous adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) mimicked the effect of stress in antagonizing morphine's analgesic efficacy. The hypothesis that ACTH is an endogenous opiate antagonist involved in modulating pain sensitivity is supported.

  10. The effects of morphine and morphine conditioned context on 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalisation in rats.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Adam; Taracha, Ewa; Szyndler, Janusz; Krząścik, Paweł; Lehner, Małgorzata; Maciejak, Piotr; Skórzewska, Anna; Płaźnik, Adam

    2012-04-15

    The 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalisations (USVs) that are emitted by rats are dependent on activity of dopaminergic neurons projecting from the ventral tegmental area to the limbic and cortical structures. According to many experimental data, emission of the 50 kHz USV reflects a positive emotional state. The appetitive calls are also emitted in response to the administration of drugs of abuse, e.g., cocaine or amphetamine (AMPH), or in a reply to a positively conditioned context. However, there is no strong evidence in the literature that morphine can also modulate 50 kHz USVs. The aim of this paper is to study the effects of morphine and morphine-conditioned context on 50 kHz USVs, using spontaneously or drug-modulated 50 kHz USVs. Our results showed that acute administration of morphine to rats after withdrawal period inhibited the emission of 50 kHz USVs. The stimulating effect of morphine-conditioned context on 50 kHz USVs appeared on the post-withdrawal challenge day immediately before drug injection, 14 days after the last episode of morphine-induced context conditioning. The context-induced 50 kHz USVs can be used as a sensitive test for drug dependency. The current study also shows that 50 kHz USVs can be useful tool for studying the mechanisms of long lasting central effects of morphine. PMID:22326697

  11. Contribution of Cytochrome P450 and ABCB1 Genetic Variability on Methadone Pharmacokinetics, Dose Requirements, and Response

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Francina; de la Torre, Rafael; Díaz, Laura; Pastor, Antonio; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Pizarro, Nieves; Khymenets, Olha; Farré, Magí; Torrens, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Although the efficacy of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) in opioid dependence disorder has been well established, the influence of methadone pharmacokinetics in dose requirement and clinical outcome remains controversial. The aim of this study is to analyze methadone dosage in responder and nonresponder patients considering pharmacogenetic and pharmacokinetic factors that may contribute to dosage adequacy. Opioid dependence patients (meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, [4th Edition] criteria) from a MMT community program were recruited. Patients were clinically assessed and blood samples were obtained to determine plasma concentrations of (R,S)-, (R) and (S)- methadone and to study allelic variants of genes encoding CYP3A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and P-glycoprotein. Responders and nonresponders were defined by illicit opioid consumption detected in random urinalysis. The final sample consisted in 105 opioid dependent patients of Caucasian origin. Responder patients received higher doses of methadone and have been included into treatment for a longer period. No differences were found in terms of genotype frequencies between groups. Only CYP2D6 metabolizing phenotype differences were found in outcome status, methadone dose requirements, and plasma concentrations, being higher in the ultrarapid metabolizers. No other differences were found between phenotype and responder status, methadone dose requirements, neither in methadone plasma concentrations. Pharmacokinetic factors could explain some but not all differences in MMT outcome and methadone dose requirements. PMID:21589866

  12. Rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial of varenicline directly observed therapy delivered in methadone clinics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tobacco cessation medication adherence is one of the few factors shown to improve smoking cessation rates among methadone-maintained smokers, but interventions to improve adherence to smoking cessation medications have not yet been tested among methadone treatment patients. Methadone clinic-based, directly observed therapy (DOT) programs for HIV and tuberculosis improve adherence and clinical outcomes, but have not been evaluated for smoking cessation. We describe a randomized controlled trial to evaluate whether a methadone clinic-based, directly observed varenicline therapy program increases adherence and tobacco abstinence among opioid-dependent drug users receiving methadone treatment. Methods/Design We plan to enroll 100 methadone-maintained smokers and randomize them to directly observed varenicline dispensed with daily methadone doses or treatment as usual (self-administered varenicline) for 12 weeks. Our outcome measures are: 1) pill count adherence and 2) carbon monoxide-verified tobacco abstinence. We will assess differences in adherence and abstinence between the two treatment arms using repeated measures models. Discussion This trial will allow for rigorous evaluation of the efficacy of methadone clinic-based, directly observed varenicline for improving adherence and smoking cessation outcomes. This detailed description of trial methodology can serve as a template for the development of future DOT programs and can guide protocols for studies among opioid-dependent smokers receiving methadone treatment. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT01378858 PMID:24928218

  13. Forced withdrawal from methadone maintenance therapy in criminal justice settings: a critical treatment barrier in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jeannia J; Zaller, Nickolas D; Yokell, Michael A; Bazazi, Alexander R; Rich, Josiah D

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization classifies methadone as an essential medicine, yet methadone maintenance therapy remains widely unavailable in criminal justice settings throughout the United States. Methadone maintenance therapy is often terminated at the time of incarceration, with inmates forced to withdraw from this evidence-based therapy. We assessed whether these forced withdrawal policies deter opioid-dependent individuals in the community from engaging methadone maintenance therapy in two states that routinely force inmates to withdraw from methadone (N = 205). Nearly half of all participants reported that concern regarding forced methadone withdrawal during incarceration deterred them engaging methadone maintenance therapy in the community. Participants in the state where more severe methadone withdrawal procedures are used during incarceration were more likely to report concern regarding forced withdrawal as a treatment deterrent. Methadone withdrawal policies in the criminal justice system may be a broader treatment deterrent for opioid-dependent individuals than previously realized. Redressing this treatment barrier is both a health and human rights imperative. PMID:23433809

  14. Intra-administration associations and withdrawal symptoms: morphine-elicited morphine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Robert V; Siegel, Shepard

    2004-02-01

    On the basis of a conditioning analysis, some drug "withdrawal symptoms" are conditional responses elicited by stimuli paired with the drug effect. Prior demonstrations of conditional elicitation of withdrawal symptoms evaluated the role of environmental cues; however, pharmacological cues also typically signal a drug effect. Within each administration, early drug onset cues (DOCs) may become associated with the later, larger drug effect (intra-administration associations). This experiment evaluated the contribution of intra-administration associations to withdrawal symptoms. The results indicated that (a). 5 mg/kg morphine elicited behavioral and thermic withdrawal symptoms in rats previously injected on a number of occasions with 50 mg/kg morphine and that (b). DOC-elicited withdrawal symptoms are not a sensitized response to the opiate but rather an associative phenomenon. PMID:14769091

  15. Development after prenatal exposure to cocaine, heroin and methadone.

    PubMed

    van Baar, A L; Soepatmi, S; Gunning, W B; Akkerhuis, G W

    1994-11-01

    In Amsterdam a longitudinal, prospective and multidisciplinary study on the development of infants of drug-dependent mothers (IDDM) was started in 1983: 35 IDDM and 35 reference infants were originally enrolled. The drug-dependent women had used combinations of methadone, heroin, cocaine and other drugs during pregnancy. Of the IDDM, 80% had to be treated pharmaceutically for neonatal abstinence symptoms (NAS). Physical, neurological, cognitive and the socio-emotional development of the children were studied regularly from birth until 5.5 years of age. Differences between the reference group and the IDDM were found most clearly in cognitive development. The IDDM also had more behavioural problems at some of the ages studied. No group differences were seen in motor development. So far the results of the study show that IDDM and their caregivers need extra support in order to improve early communication and the children's cognitive development. PMID:7531042

  16. Methodology for the Randomised Injecting Opioid Treatment Trial (RIOTT): evaluating injectable methadone and injectable heroin treatment versus optimised oral methadone treatment in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Lintzeris, Nicholas; Strang, John; Metrebian, Nicola; Byford, Sarah; Hallam, Christopher; Lee, Sally; Zador, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    Whilst unsupervised injectable methadone and diamorphine treatment has been part of the British treatment system for decades, the numbers receiving injectable opioid treatment (IOT) has been steadily diminishing in recent years. In contrast, there has been a recent expansion of supervised injectable diamorphine programs under trial conditions in a number of European and North American cities, although the evidence regarding the safety, efficacy and cost effectiveness of this treatment approach remains equivocal. Recent British clinical guidance indicates that IOT should be a second-line treatment for those patients in high-quality oral methadone treatment who continue to regularly inject heroin, and that treatment be initiated in newly-developed supervised injecting clinics. The Randomised Injectable Opioid Treatment Trial (RIOTT) is a multisite, prospective open-label randomised controlled trial (RCT) examining the role of treatment with injected opioids (methadone and heroin) for the management of heroin dependence in patients not responding to conventional substitution treatment. Specifically, the study examines whether efforts should be made to optimise methadone treatment for such patients (e.g. regular attendance, supervised dosing, high oral doses, access to psychosocial services), or whether such patients should be treated with injected methadone or heroin. Eligible patients (in oral substitution treatment and injecting illicit heroin on a regular basis) are randomised to one of three conditions: (1) optimized oral methadone treatment (Control group); (2) injected methadone treatment; or (3) injected heroin treatment (with access to oral methadone doses). Subjects are followed up for 6-months, with between-group comparisons on an intention-to-treat basis across a range of outcome measures. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients who discontinue regular illicit heroin use (operationalised as providing >50% urine drug screens negative for markers of

  17. Increased brain uptake of morphine in the presence of the antihistamine tripelennamine.

    PubMed

    Vadlamani, N L; Pontani, R B; Misra, A L

    1984-01-01

    Disposition of [6 3H (N)]morphine in plasma, brain and liver of rats was studied 15 min after intravenous injection of either a 2 mg kg-1 dose of morphine or a combination of the same dose of morphine with a 6 mg kg-1 dose of tripelennamine. The concentrations of morphine in brain and the brain to plasma morphine ratios in animals receiving the combination of drugs concurrently were significantly higher than those in the control morphine group. No significant differences were seen in the morphine or morphine metabolite concentrations in plasma and liver or liver to plasma morphine concentration ratios in the 2 groups. Data suggest that pharmacokinetic factors play a role in the potentiation of opiate effects by antihistamine on concurrent i.v. administration of the two drugs. PMID:6141270

  18. PolyMorphine: an innovative biodegradable polymer drug for extended pain relief

    PubMed Central

    Rosario-Meléndez, Roselin; Harris, Carolyn L.; Delgado-Rivera, Roberto; Yu, Lei; Uhrich, Kathryn E.

    2012-01-01

    Morphine, a potent narcotic analgesic used for the treatment of acute and chronic pain, was chemically incorporated into a poly(anhydride-ester) backbone. The polymer termed “PolyMorphine”, was designed to degrade hydrolytically releasing morphine in a controlled manner to ultimately provide analgesia for an extended time period. PolyMorphine was synthesized via melt-condensation polymerization and its structure was characterized using proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, and infrared spectroscopy. The weight-average molecular weight and the thermal properties were determined. The hydrolytic degradation pathway of the polymer was determined by in vitro studies, showing that free morphine is released. In vitro cytocompatibility studies demonstrated that PolyMorphine is non-cytotoxic towards fibroblasts. In vivo studies using mice showed that PolyMorphine provides analgesia for 3 days, 20 times the analgesic window of free morphine. The animals retained full responsiveness to morphine after being subjected to an acute morphine challenge. PMID:22877734

  19. METHADONE INITIATION AND ROTATION IN THE OUTPATIENT SETTING FOR PATIENTS WITH CANCER PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Henrique A.; de la Cruz, Maxine; El Osta, Badi; Li, Zhijun; Calderon, Bianca; Palmer, J. Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Background Methadone is an effective and inexpensive opioid for cancer pain treatment. It has been reported as difficult to use in the outpatient setting due to its variable relative potency and long half-life. The purpose of this study was to determine the outcome of methadone initiation or rotation for cancer pain treatment in outpatient settings. Methods Chart review of 189 consecutive patients who underwent methadone initiation or rotation in our palliative care outpatient center. Data were collected regarding demographic and clinical characteristics, symptoms, and opioid side effects at baseline and for 2 follow up visits(F1,F2). Failure was defined as methadone discontinuation by the palliative care physician or patient's hospitalization for uncontrolled pain or methadone-related side effects at F1. Results 100(53%) initiations and 89(47%) rotations were conducted. Success rates for methadone initiation and rotation were 82/89(92%) and 85/100(84%) respectively. Mean(standard deviation) age was 60(11) years. 100(53%) patients were female, 138(73%) white, 182(96%) had solid cancers. The main reason for rotation was pain (65/89 patients, 47%). Median(interquartile range, IR) pain scores (Edmonton Symptom Assessment System/0–10) were 6(5–8), 4(3–6), and 3(2–5) at baseline, F1, and F2, respectively(p<0.0001). Median(IR) daily methadone dose for initiation and rotation was 10(5–15)mg and 15(10–30)mg at F1(p<0.0001) and 10(8–15)mg and 18(10–30)mg at F2(p<0.0001), respectively. Constipation and nausea improved (p<0.005) after initiation/rotation to methadone. Frequency of sedation, hallucinations, myoclonus, and delirium did not increase after initiation/rotation to methadone. Conclusions Outpatient methadone initiation and rotation for cancer pain treatment were safe, with high success rate and low side effect profile. PMID:19924788

  20. Sexual Dysfunction in Men Receiving Methadone Maintenance Treatment: Clinical History and Psychobiological Correlates.

    PubMed

    Gerra, Gilberto; Manfredini, Matteo; Somaini, Lorenzo; Maremmani, Icro; Leonardi, Claudio; Donnini, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    A variety of studies evidenced a relationship between drug use disorders and sexual dysfunction. In particular, heroin and opioid agonist medications to treat heroin dependence have been found to be associated with erectile dysfunction and reduced libido. Controversial findings also indicate the possibility of factors other than the pharmacological effects of opioid drugs concurring to sexual dysfunction. With the present study, we investigated the link between sexual dysfunction and long-term exposure to opioid receptor stimulation (heroin dependence, methadone maintenance treatment, methadone dosage), the potentially related hormonal changes reflecting hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis function and prolactin (PRL) pituitary release, the role of adverse childhood experiences in the clinical history and the concomitant symptoms of comorbid mental health disorders in contributing to sexual problems. Forty male patients participating in a long-term methadone treatment program were included in the present study and compared with 40 healthy control subjects who never used drugs nor abused alcohol. All patients and controls were submitted to the Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale (ASEX), Child Experiences of Care and Abuse-Questionnaire (CECA-Q) and the Symptom Check List-90 Scale. A blood sample for testosterone and PRL assays was collected. Methadone dosages were recorded among heroin-dependent patients on maintenance treatment. Methadone patients scored significantly higher than controls on the 5-item rating ASEX scale, on CECA-Q and on Symptoms Check List 90 (SCL 90) scale. Testosterone plasma levels were significantly lower and PRL levels significantly higher in methadone patients with respect to the healthy control group. ASEX scores reflecting sexual dysfunction were directly and significantly correlated with CECA-Q neglect scores and SCL 90 psychiatric symptoms total score. The linear regression model, when applied only to addicted patients, showed that

  1. High-throughput simultaneous analysis of buprenorphine, methadone, cocaine, opiates, nicotine, and metabolites in oral fluid by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Concheiro, Marta; Gray, Teresa R; Shakleya, Diaa M; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2010-09-01

    A method for simultaneous determination of buprenorphine (BUP), norbuprenorphine (NBUP), methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), cocaine, benzoylecgonine (BE), ecgonine methyl ester (EME), anhydroecgonine methyl ester (AEME), morphine, codeine, 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), heroin, 6-acetylcodeine (6AC), nicotine, cotinine, and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine (OH-cotinine) by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in oral fluid (OF) was developed and extensively validated. Acetonitrile (800 μL) and OF (250 μL) were added to a 96-well Isolute-PPT+protein precipitation plate. Reverse-phase separation was achieved in 16 min and quantification was performed by multiple reaction monitoring. The assay was linear from 0.5 or 1 to 500 μg/L. Intraday, interday, and total imprecision were less than 13% (n = 20), analytical recovery was 92-114% (n = 20), extraction efficiencies were more than 77% (n = 5), and process efficiencies were more than 45% (n = 5). Although ion suppression was detected for EME, cocaine, morphine, 6AC, and heroin (less than 56%) and enhancement was detected for BE and nicotine (less than 316%), deuterated internal standards compensated for these effects. The method was sensitive (limit of detection 0.2-0.8 μg/L) and specific (no interferences) except that 3-hydroxy-4-methoxyamphetamine interfered with AEME. No carryover was detected, and all analytes were stable for 24 h at 22 °C, for 72 h at 4 °C, and after three freeze-thaw cycles, except cocaine, 6AC, and heroin (22-97% loss). The method was applied to 41 OF specimens collected throughout pregnancy with a Salivette® OF collection device from an opioid-dependent BUP-maintained pregnant woman. BUP ranged from 0 to 7,400 μg/L, NBUP from 0 to 71 μg/L, methadone from 0 to 3 μg/L, nicotine from 32 to 5,020 μg/L, cotinine from 125 to 508 μg/L, OH-cotinine from 11 to 51 μg/L, cocaine from 0 to 419 μg/L, BE from 0 to 351 μg/L, EME from 0 to 286

  2. High-throughput simultaneous analysis of buprenorphine, methadone, cocaine, opiates, nicotine, and metabolites in oral fluid by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Concheiro, Marta; Gray, Teresa R.; Shakleya, Diaa M.

    2011-01-01

    A method for simultaneous determination of buprenorphine (BUP), norbuprenorphine (NBUP), methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), cocaine, benzoylecgonine (BE), ecgonine methyl ester (EME), anhydroecgonine methyl ester (AEME), morphine, codeine, 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), heroin, 6-acetylcodeine (6AC), nicotine, cotinine, and trans-3′-hydroxycotinine (OH-cotinine) by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in oral fluid (OF) was developed and extensively validated. Acetonitrile (800 μL) and OF (250 μL) were added to a 96-well Isolute-PPT+protein precipitation plate. Reverse-phase separation was achieved in 16 min and quantification was performed by multiple reaction monitoring. The assay was linear from 0.5 or 1 to 500 μg/L. Intraday, interday, and total imprecision were less than 13% (n=20), analytical recovery was 92–114% (n= 20), extraction efficiencies were more than 77% (n=5), and process efficiencies were more than 45% (n=5). Although ion suppression was detected for EME, cocaine, morphine, 6AC, and heroin (less than 56%) and enhancement was detected for BE and nicotine (less than 316%), deuterated internal standards compensated for these effects. The method was sensitive (limit of detection 0.2–0.8 μg/L) and specific (no interferences) except that 3-hydroxy-4-methoxyamphetamine interfered with AEME. No carryover was detected, and all analytes were stable for 24 h at 22 °C, for 72 h at 4 °C, and after three freeze–thaw cycles, except cocaine, 6AC, and heroin (22–97% loss). The method was applied to 41 OF specimens collected throughout pregnancy with a Salivette® OF collection device from an opioid-dependent BUP-maintained pregnant woman. BUP ranged from 0 to 7,400 μg/L, NBUP from 0 to 71 μg/L, methadone from 0 to 3 μg/L, nicotine from 32 to 5,020 μg/L, cotinine from 125 to 508 μg/L, OH-cotinine from 11 to 51 μg/L, cocaine from 0 to 419 μg/L, BE from 0 to 351 μg/L, EME from 0 to 286 μg/L, AEME from 0 to

  3. Effect of postoperative extradural morphine on lower urinary tract function.

    PubMed

    Husted, S; Djurhuus, J C; Husegaard, H C; Jepsen, J; Mortensen, J

    1985-02-01

    The effect of postoperative extradurally administered morphine on lower urinary tract function was studied in female patients undergoing uterine surgery. Urodynamic measurements were made on the day before and on the day after the operation, using a DISA 2-channel carbon dioxide (CO2) cystomictrograph. In ten patients without postoperative urinary retention no changes in cystometry were found during morphine administration, while two patients who developed acute urinary retention had a marked increase in bladder capacity and of detrusor pressure. In contrast, the urethral pressure profile was unchanged in both groups of patients. Intravenously administered naloxone tended to normalize the bladder capacity in the patients with urinary retention. These findings seem to indicate a marked effect in some patients of extradurally administered morphine and the acute urinary retention, following morphine administration, may be treated with naloxone. PMID:3976331

  4. Stability of morphine sulphate and diamorphine hydrochloride in intrasite gel.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, Giovambattista; Joel, Simon P; Ribeiro, Maria D C

    2005-03-01

    Several studies have reported that opioids applied topically to painful ulcers produce an analgesic effect. It is unknown whether these opioids (usually mixed with hydrogels) are stable and, if so, for how long. We investigated the stability of morphine sulphate and diamorphine hydrochloride, each mixed with intrasite gel at a concentration of 1.25 mg/mL. Samples were prepared in the laboratory and then stored in plastic containers in the dark, at room temperature, in conditions of normal day/night at room temperature, and at 4 degrees C. Aliquots were collected from each container over a 28-day period and analysed using HPLC. No known degradation products were measured in the morphine-intrasite gel mixture stored for up to 28 days, irrespective of the temperature and whether or not samples were exposed to light, suggesting that morphine remains stable. Diamorphine, breaks down to morphine and no other degradation products are measurable. PMID:15810752

  5. Attenuation of morphine tolerance and dependence by thymoquinone in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Parvardeh, Siavash; Masoudi, Alireza; Moghimi, Mahsa; Mahboobifard, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Dependence and tolerance are major restricting factors in the clinical use of opioid analgesics. In the present study, the effects of thymoquinone, the major constituent of Nigella sativa seeds, on morphine dependence and tolerance were investigated in mice. Materials and Methods: Male adult NMRI mice were made tolerant and dependent by repeated injections of morphine (50, 50, and 75 mg/kg, i.p. on 9 a.m., 1 p.m., and 5 p.m., respectively) during a 3-day administration schedule. The hot-plate test was used to assess tolerance to the analgesic effects of morphine. Naloxone (2 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected to precipitate withdrawal syndrome in order to assess the morphine dependence. To evaluate the effects of thymoquinone on tolerance and dependence to morphine, different single or repeated doses of thymoquinone were administered in mice. Rotarod was used to assess the motor coordination. Results: Administration of single or repeated doses of thymoquinone (20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly decreased the number of jumps in morphine dependent animals. Repeated administration of thymoquinone (20 and 40 mg/kg, for 3 days) and also single injection of thymoquinone (40 mg/kg, on the fourth day) attenuated tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine. None of the thymoquinone doses (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg) produced any antinociceptive effects on their own. Motor coordination of animals was impaired by the high dose of thymoquinone (40 mg/kg). Conclusion: Based on these results, it can be concluded that thymoquinone prevents the development of tolerance and dependence to morphine. PMID:27247922

  6. Dipeptides delay the onset of morphine withdrawal in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kovács, G L; Szontágh, L; Baláspiri, L; Telegdy, G

    1984-01-01

    The effect of dipeptides was studied on naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal in the mouse. In accordance with previous data, s.c. treatment with Z-prolyl-D-leucine delayed the onset of withdrawal jumpings . Replacement of L-proline by L-glutamate or L-pyroglutamate resulted in dipeptides which were more potent in morphine withdrawal than was Z-prolyl-D-leucine. PMID:6540034

  7. Temporal effects of topical morphine application on cutaneous wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Rook, Jerri M.; Hasan, Wohaib; McCarson, Kenneth E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that topical administration of exogenous opioid drugs impairs wound healing by inhibiting the peripheral release of neuropeptides, thereby inhibiting neurogenic inflammation. This delay is immediate and peaks during the first days of wound closure. This study examined the effects of topical morphine treatment in a cutaneous wound healing model in the rat. Methods Full-thickness 4mm diameter wounds were placed on the periscapular region of rats that subsequently received twice-daily topical applications of IntraSite Gel (Smith+Nephew, Hull, United Kingdom) alone or gel infused with 5 mM morphine sulfate on days 0–3 or 4–10 post-wounding or throughout the time course. Wound tissue was taken on days 1, 3, 5, 8, and 18 post-wounding and immunostained for myofibroblast and macrophage markers or stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Results Delays in wound closure observed during morphine application on days 0–3 post-wounding mimicked those seen in wounds treated with morphine throughout the entire healing process. However, no significant delays in closure were seen in wounds treated with morphine beginning on day 4 post-wounding. Treatment of wounds with morphine significantly reduced the number of myofibroblasts and macrophages in the closing wound. Additionally, morphine application resulted in decreases in skin thickness and an increase in residual scar tissue in healed skin. Conclusions These findings demonstrate the time-dependent and persistent nature of the detrimental effects of topical morphine on cutaneous wound healing. The data identify specific limitations that could be ameliorated to optimize topical opioid administration as an analgesic therapeutic strategy in the treatment of painful cutaneous wounds. PMID:18580183

  8. Persistent Pain Model Reveals Sex Difference in Morphine Potency

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoya; Traub, Richard J.; Murphy, Anne Z.

    2010-01-01

    Central or systemic administration of agonists directed at the mu or delta opiate receptors generally produce a greater degree of analgesia in males than in females. To date, the majority of studies examining sex based differences in opioid analgesia have employed acute noxious stimuli (i.e. tail-flick and hot plate test); thus, the potential dimorphic response of centrally acting opiates in the alleviation of persistent inflammatory pain is not well established. In the present study, right hindpaw withdrawal latency (PWL) to radiant thermal stimuli was measured in intact male and cycling female Sprague-Dawley rats before and after unilateral hindpaw injection of the inflammatory agent complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA). Control animals received intraplantar injection of saline. Twenty four hours after CFA or saline injection, animals received either saline or morphine bisulfate (0.5 – 15 mg/kg; s.c.). Separate groups of control or inflamed animals were tested on their responsiveness to morphine at 7, 14 and 21 days post-CFA or saline. No sex differences were noted for baseline PWLs, and females displayed slightly less thermal hyperalgesia at 24 hrs post-CFA. At all morphine doses administered, both the antihyperalgesic effects of morphine in the inflamed animals, and the antinociceptive effects of morphine in control animals, were significantly greater in males in comparison to females. Similarly, in males, the antihyperalgesic effects of morphine increased significantly at 7–21 days post-CFA; no significant shift in morphine potency was noted for females. These studies demonstrate sex-based differences in the effects of morphine on thermal hyperalgesia in a model of persistent inflammatory pain. PMID:16497818

  9. Epidural morphine for outpatients with severe anginal pain.

    PubMed Central

    Clemensen, S E; Thayssen, P; Hole, P

    1987-01-01

    Seven patients who had chronic coronary artery disease and had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery still suffered from anginal attacks several times daily despite optimal medical treatment. An epidural system of analgesia was implanted subcutaneously and treatment with epidural morphine started. The morphine was administered by the patients themselves or members of their family. During a median observation time of four months (range three to 11) all patients were free of pain while receiving this treatment. Images p476-a PMID:2435345

  10. Morphine withdrawal, treatments 1900-30.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, M T

    1999-03-01

    The treatments used between 1900 and 1930 for morphine withdrawal are discussed. The accounts are mainly taken from contemporary textbooks which contain fascinating descriptions of their authors' preferred methods and criticisms of regimes given by other therapists. Delirium, produced by atropine or similar substances, is advocated to cover withdrawal symptoms. The present paper draws parallels with current issues, e.g. withdrawal of opiate under cover of general anaesthesia, follow-up studies and cost-benefit analyses. The particular problems of addicted doctors in 1900-1930 are addressed as are the comparisons then made with non-medically qualified addicts. It is important we keep in mind past mistakes and over-valued ideas so as to reduce any similarly misplaced optimism in our current treatment options. PMID:11623818

  11. Effect of chronic morphine administration on circulating dendritic cells in SIV-infected rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, William D; Wagner, Wendeline; Lewis, Mark G; Fan, Xiaoxuan; Rappaport, Jay; Rogers, Thomas J

    2016-06-15

    We studied the effect of chronic morphine administration on the circulating dendritic cell population dynamics associated with SIV infection using rhesus macaques. Animals were either first infected with SIV and then given chronic morphine, or visa versa. SIV infection increased the numbers of myeloid DCs (mDCs), but morphine treatment attenuated this mDC expansion. In contrast, morphine increased the numbers of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in SIV-infected animals. Finally, chronic morphine administration (no SIV) transiently increased the numbers of circulating pDCs. These results show that chronic morphine induces a significant alteration in the available circulating levels of critical antigen-presenting cells. PMID:27235346

  12. Protective effect of crocin on liver toxicity induced by morphine

    PubMed Central

    Salahshoor, Mohammad Reza; khashiadeh, Mojtaba; Roshankhah, Shiva; Kakabaraei, Seyran; Jalili, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Crocin, a bioactive molecule of saffron can be purely isolated from the saffron extract. It has different pharmacological effects such as antioxidant and anticancer activities. Morphine is an opioid analgesic drug. It is mainly metabolized in liver and causes devastating effects. It can increase the generation of free radicals. This study was designed to evaluate the protective role of crocin against morphine-induced toxicity in the mouse liver. In this study, various doses of crocin (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg) and crocin plus morphine were administered interaperitoneally once daily to 48 male mice for 20 consecutive days. These mice were randomly assigned to 8 groups of 6 each. The liver weight and histology, aspartate amino transferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and serum nitric oxide levels were studied. The results indicated that morphine administration significantly decreased liver weight and increased the mean diameter of hepatocyte, central hepatic vein diameters, liver enzyme levels, and blood serum nitric oxide level compared to saline group (P<0.05). However, crocin administration significantly boosted liver weight and decreased the mean diameter of hepatocyte, central hepatic vein, liver enzymes and nitric oxide levels in all groups compared to the group received morphine alone (P<0.05). It seems that crocin administration could protect the liver damage induced by morphine. The antioxidant effect of crocin may be a major reason for its positive impact on liver parameters. PMID:27168751

  13. Regional cerebral glucose utilization during morphine withdrawal in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Wooten, G F; DiStefano, P; Collins, R C

    1982-01-01

    Regional cerebral glucose utilization was studied by 2-deoxy[14C]glucose autoradiography in morphine-dependent rats and during naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal. In morphine-dependent rats, glucose utilization was increased compared with naive controls uniformly (23-54%) in hippocampus, dentate gyrus, and subiculum and reduced in frontal cortex, striatum, anterior ventral thalamus, and medial habenular nucleus. On precipitation of morphine withdrawal by subcutaneous administration of naloxone at 0.5 mg/kg to morphine-dependent rats, glucose utilization was increased in the central nucleus of amygdala (51%), lateral mammillary nucleus (40%), lateral habenular nucleus (39%), medial mammillary nucleus (35%), and medial septal nucleus (35%) (all, P less than 0.01). Significant increases also occurred in several other limbic structures including interpeduncular nucleus, anterior medial and ventral thalamic nuclei, and lateral septal nucleus. Knowledge of the functional cerebral anatomy of the morphine-withdrawal syndrome should facilitate studies directed toward understanding the molecular mechanisms of opiate withdrawal. Images PMID:6954484

  14. Mitragynine Attenuates Withdrawal Syndrome in Morphine-Withdrawn Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Beng-Siang; Amar Jamil, Mohd Fadzly; Adenan, Mohamad Ilham; Chong Shu-Chien, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    A major obstacle in treating drug addiction is the severity of opiate withdrawal syndrome, which can lead to unwanted relapse. Mitragynine is the major alkaloid compound found in leaves of Mitragyna speciosa, a plant widely used by opiate addicts to mitigate the harshness of drug withdrawal. A series of experiments was conducted to investigate the effect of mitragynine on anxiety behavior, cortisol level and expression of stress pathway related genes in zebrafish undergoing morphine withdrawal phase. Adult zebrafish were subjected to two weeks chronic morphine exposure at 1.5 mg/L, followed by withdrawal for 24 hours prior to tests. Using the novel tank diving tests, we first showed that morphine-withdrawn zebrafish display anxiety-related swimming behaviors such as decreased exploratory behavior and increased erratic movement. Morphine withdrawal also elevated whole-body cortisol levels, which confirms the phenotypic stress-like behaviors. Exposing morphine-withdrawn fish to mitragynine however attenuates majority of the stress-related swimming behaviors and concomitantly lower whole-body cortisol level. Using real-time PCR gene expression analysis, we also showed that mitragynine reduces the mRNA expression of corticotropin releasing factor receptors and prodynorphin in zebrafish brain during morphine withdrawal phase, revealing for the first time a possible link between mitragynine's ability to attenuate anxiety during opiate withdrawal with the stress-related corticotropin pathway. PMID:22205946

  15. Protective effect of crocin on liver toxicity induced by morphine.

    PubMed

    Salahshoor, Mohammad Reza; Khashiadeh, Mojtaba; Roshankhah, Shiva; Kakabaraei, Seyran; Jalili, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Crocin, a bioactive molecule of saffron can be purely isolated from the saffron extract. It has different pharmacological effects such as antioxidant and anticancer activities. Morphine is an opioid analgesic drug. It is mainly metabolized in liver and causes devastating effects. It can increase the generation of free radicals. This study was designed to evaluate the protective role of crocin against morphine-induced toxicity in the mouse liver. In this study, various doses of crocin (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg) and crocin plus morphine were administered interaperitoneally once daily to 48 male mice for 20 consecutive days. These mice were randomly assigned to 8 groups of 6 each. The liver weight and histology, aspartate amino transferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and serum nitric oxide levels were studied. The results indicated that morphine administration significantly decreased liver weight and increased the mean diameter of hepatocyte, central hepatic vein diameters, liver enzyme levels, and blood serum nitric oxide level compared to saline group (P<0.05). However, crocin administration significantly boosted liver weight and decreased the mean diameter of hepatocyte, central hepatic vein, liver enzymes and nitric oxide levels in all groups compared to the group received morphine alone (P<0.05). It seems that crocin administration could protect the liver damage induced by morphine. The antioxidant effect of crocin may be a major reason for its positive impact on liver parameters. PMID:27168751

  16. Mitragynine attenuates withdrawal syndrome in morphine-withdrawn zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Khor, Beng-Siang; Jamil, Mohd Fadzly Amar; Adenan, Mohamad Ilham; Shu-Chien, Alexander Chong

    2011-01-01

    A major obstacle in treating drug addiction is the severity of opiate withdrawal syndrome, which can lead to unwanted relapse. Mitragynine is the major alkaloid compound found in leaves of Mitragyna speciosa, a plant widely used by opiate addicts to mitigate the harshness of drug withdrawal. A series of experiments was conducted to investigate the effect of mitragynine on anxiety behavior, cortisol level and expression of stress pathway related genes in zebrafish undergoing morphine withdrawal phase. Adult zebrafish were subjected to two weeks chronic morphine exposure at 1.5 mg/L, followed by withdrawal for 24 hours prior to tests. Using the novel tank diving tests, we first showed that morphine-withdrawn zebrafish display anxiety-related swimming behaviors such as decreased exploratory behavior and increased erratic movement. Morphine withdrawal also elevated whole-body cortisol levels, which confirms the phenotypic stress-like behaviors. Exposing morphine-withdrawn fish to mitragynine however attenuates majority of the stress-related swimming behaviors and concomitantly lower whole-body cortisol level. Using real-time PCR gene expression analysis, we also showed that mitragynine reduces the mRNA expression of corticotropin releasing factor receptors and prodynorphin in zebrafish brain during morphine withdrawal phase, revealing for the first time a possible link between mitragynine's ability to attenuate anxiety during opiate withdrawal with the stress-related corticotropin pathway. PMID:22205946

  17. Impacts of morphine addiction on spermatogenesis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Takzare, Nasrin; Samizadeh, Esmaeil; Shoar, Saeed; Majidi Zolbin, Masoumeh; Naderan, Mohammad; Lashkari, Ali; Bakhtiarian, Azam

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are numerous investigations on wide range of issues that disrupt regulatory spermatogenesis, individuals who are exposed to drug abuse faced infertility and immature spermatogenesis. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the addiction effects of morphine and its derivatives on rats spermatogenesis. Materials and Methods: 40 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 equal groups, which were exposed either with intravenous morphine, naloxone, naloxone and morphine, sham (with normal saline injection) and a control group without infusion. Spermatogenesis was assessed after three months via histological sections with hematoxylin and eosin staining, using a light microscope based on measurement of spermatogonia, spermatocyte, spermatid, and spermatozoa. Results: Those rats that received opioids had changes in spermatogenesis function. The population of spermatogenesis cycle cells at spermatogonia, spermatocyte, spermatid, and spermatozoa stages was significantly decreased in those rats that received opioid in comparison to the control group (p<0.05). Histological studies revealed that changes in different groups of opioid application might affect sperm formation. Sperm count in morphine group was (0±0) and in naloxone group, naloxone+morphine, sham and control were 235±3.77, 220±3.81, 247.12±6.10 and 250±6.54, respectively (p<0.001). Conclusion: Morphine could affect all spermatogenesis stages. PMID:27326414

  18. Endogenous morphine: up-to-date review 2011.

    PubMed

    Stefano, G B; Ptáček, R; Kuželová, H; Kream, R M

    2012-01-01

    Positive evolutionary pressure has apparently preserved the ability to synthesize chemically authentic morphine, albeit in homeopathic concentrations, throughout animal phyla. Despite the establishment of a progressively rigorous and mechanistically focused historical literature extending from the mid 1970s to the mid 1980s that supported the expression of chemically authentic morphine by animal cellular and organ systems, prejudicial scepticism and early dismissal by scientists and clinicians most often obscured widespread acceptance of the biological importance and medical implications of endogenous morphine. The current critical paper presents and evaluates key recent coordinated studies in endogenous morphine research, highlighting those that have advanced our understanding of the functional roles of cognate alkaloid-selective μ(3) and μ(4) opiate receptors. We propose that the expression of endogenous morphine by animal and human cells is designed to mediate homeopathic regulation of metabolic activity via activation of cognate μ(3) and μ(4) receptors that serve as transductive conduits for shortcircuit Ca(++) fluxes. The implications of endogenous morphine coupling to nitric oxide regulation of mitochondrial function, with special reference to the cardiovascular system, are now formulated after many years of neglect. PMID:22578954

  19. Retention rate and illicit opioid use during methadone maintenance interventions: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Farré, Magí; Mas, Anna; Torrens, Marta; Moreno, Victor; Camí, Jordi

    2002-02-01

    The efficacy of methadone maintenance in opioid addiction was assessed in terms of programme retention rate and reduction of illicit opioid use by means of a meta-analysis of randomised, controlled and double blind clinical trials. The results were compared with interventions using buprenorphine and levo-acetylmethadol (LAAM). Trials were identified from the PubMed database from 1966 to December 1999 using the major medical subject headings 'methadone' and 'randomised controlled trial'. Data for a total of 1944 opioid-dependent patients from 13 studies were analysed. Sixty-four percent of patients received methadone, administered either as fixed or adjusted doses. Thus, 890 patients received > or = 50 mg/day (high dose group) and 392 were given < 50 mg/day (low dose group). Of 662 controls, 131 received placebo, 350 buprenorphine (265 at doses > or = 8 mg/day and 85 at doses < 8 mg/day) and 181 LAAM. High doses of methadone were more effective than low doses in the reduction of illicit opioid use (odds ratio [OR] 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.26--2.36). High doses of methadone were significantly more effective than low doses of buprenorphine (< 8 mg/day) for retention rates and illicit opioid use, but similar to high doses of buprenorphine (> or = 8 mg/day) for both parameters. Patients treated with LAAM had more risk of failure of retention than those receiving high doses of methadone (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.32--2.78). It is proposed that in agonist-maintenance programmes, oral methadone at doses of 50 mg/day or higher is the drug of choice for opioid dependence. PMID:11841899

  20. Attitudes toward Methadone among Out-of-Treatment Minority Injection Drug Users: Implications for Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Zaller, Nickolas D.; Bazazi, Alexander R.; Velazquez, Lavinia; Rich, Josiah D.

    2009-01-01

    Injection drug use (IDU) continues to be a significant public health issue in the U.S. and internationally, and there is evidence to suggest that the burden of injection drug use and associated morbidity and mortality falls disproportionately on minority communities. IDU is responsible for a significant portion of new and existing HIV/AIDS cases in many parts of the world. In the U.S., the prevalence of HIV and hepatitis C virus is higher among populations of African-American and Latino injection drug users (IDUs) than among white IDUs. Methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) has been demonstrated to effectively reduce opiate use, HIV risk behaviors and transmission, general mortality and criminal behavior, but opiate-dependent minorities are less likely to access MMT than whites. A better understanding of the obstacles minority IDUs face accessing treatment is needed to engage racial and ethnic disparities in IDU as well as drug-related morbidity and mortality. In this study, we explore knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about methadone among 53 out-of-treatment Latino and African-American IDUs in Providence, RI. Our findings suggest that negative perceptions of methadone persist among racial and ethnic minority IDUs in Providence, including beliefs that methadone is detrimental to health and that people should attempt to discontinue methadone treatment. Additional potential obstacles to entering methadone therapy include cost and the difficulty of regularly attending a methadone clinic as well as the belief that an individual on MMT is not abstinent from drugs. Substance use researchers and treatment professionals should engage minority communities, particularly Latino communities, in order to better understand the treatment needs of a diverse population, develop culturally appropriate MMT programs, and raise awareness of the benefits of MMT. PMID:19440415

  1. Pain control with morphine: Evaluation of prescriptions for oral morphine for outpatients at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre.

    PubMed

    Nuessle, S; Gray, A; Lambert, G; Boyar, A; Ba-Hatheq, A; Adloni, S; Al Khayyal, M

    1996-07-01

    With the rapid improvement in living standards and health care delivery in Saudi Arabia, people are expected to live longer, patterns of illness will change, and the chronic illnesses which now dominate medical care in the West will develop here. Among these is cancer, which is already the third most common cause of death in Bahrain and Kuwait. Many cancer patients experience considerable distress, particularly pain. Management of symptoms in advanced cancer is now a medical and nursing specialty called palliative care. The most common and most feared symptom in advanced cancer is pain, which can only be effectively relieved with morphine in 60% of such patients. Prescribing narcotics such as morphine for cancer pain in Saudi Arabia has been severely restricted legally because of the fear of addiction, but there is no evidence that the medicinal use of morphine for treating cancer pain causes addiction. This paper describes a review carried out at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, one of the few centers in the Kingdom that can prescribe morphine to outpatients, to review the appropriateness and effectiveness of morphine usage, and to monitor any misuse. The review confirms that morphine usage was appropriate and effective, but that procurement of adequate narcotic supplies from year to year causes severe problems due to the stringency of both national and international regulations. Also, better monitoring of patients on morphine and recording of their level of pain control is required. In general, this survey shows that morphine usage in this hospital is appropriate and that limitations on supplies could be improved by changes to the Ministry of Health regulations. PMID:17372444

  2. Combined morphine-bupivacaine caudals for reconstructive penile surgery in children: systemic absorption of morphine and postoperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Wolf, A R; Hughes, D; Hobbs, A J; Prys-Roberts, C

    1991-02-01

    We wished to determine if the addition of a small dose of morphine (0.05 mg.kg-1) to a caudal solution of 0.25% bupivacaine could extend the duration of analgesia after major reconstructive penile surgery and also to measure the systemic absorption of morphine after caudal injection. Thirty children undergoing reconstructive penile surgery received a caudal injection of 0.25% bupivacaine 0.75 ml.kg-1 with or without morphine 0.05 mg.kg-1. All patients awoke pain-free, but eight of the fifteen patients receiving bupivacaine alone required supplementary injections of opioid postoperatively, whereas none of the patients receiving the bupivacaine-morphine mixture required additional opioids. The incidence of side-effects was similar for the two groups. Morphine was absorbed rapidly after caudal injection to reach a peak plasma level of 21.2 (+/- 4.8) ng.ml-1 at ten minutes and then fell to 10.1 (+/- 3.8) ng.ml-1 at one hour and 4.1 (+/- 2.6) ng.ml-1 at three hours. These levels are low compared with plasma levels associated with systemic analgesia. We conclude that the extended duration of analgesia from morphine 0.05 mg/kg given caudally is due at least in part to specific spinal analgesia. PMID:2012289

  3. Trans-stilbene oxide administration increased hepatic glucuronidation of morphine but decreased biliary excretion of morphine glucuronide in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrman-Lane, C.; Fujimoto, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    The effect of the inducing agent trans-stilbene oxide (TSO) on the metabolism and biliary excretion of (/sup 14/C)morphine was studied in the isolated in situ perfused rat liver. After administration of morphine by intraportal injection or by the segmented retrograde intrabiliary injection technique, the TSO-treated group showed a marked decrease in the biliary recovery of morphine as its glucuronide conjugate (morphine-3-glucuronide (MG)). However, recovery of MG in the venous outflow of the single pass perfusate was greatly increased. These findings suggested that TSO treatment enhanced the formation of MG from morphine and changed the primary route of hepatic elimination of MG. TSO treatment also decreased the excretion of morphine (as MG) in the bile of anesthetized renal-ligated rats. This decreased biliary function required several days to develop and appeared closely associated with the inductive effect of TSO. After i.v. administration of (/sup 14/C)MG itself, biliary recovery was also markedly decreased in TSO-treated rats. It is postulated that the effect of the TSO treatment led to either a decrease in canalicular transport of MG into bile or an increase in the efficiency of transfer of MG to the blood at the sinusoidal side of the hepatocyte. Regardless of the mechanism, the results indicate the need to study compartmentalization of drug transport and metabolism functions.

  4. "I Kicked the Hard Way. I Got Incarcerated." Withdrawal from Methadone During Incarceration and Subsequent Aversion to Medication Assisted Treatments.

    PubMed

    Maradiaga, Jeronimo A; Nahvi, Shadi; Cunningham, Chinazo O; Sanchez, Jennifer; Fox, Aaron D

    2016-03-01

    Incarceration is a common experience for individuals with opioid use disorder, including those receiving medication assisted treatments (MAT), such as buprenorphine or methadone. In the United States, MAT is rarely available during incarceration. We were interested in whether challenges with methadone maintenance treatment during incarceration affected subsequent attitudes toward MAT following release. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 21 formerly incarcerated individuals with opioid use disorder in community substance abuse treatment settings. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Themes that emerged upon iterative readings of transcripts were discussed by the research team. The three main themes relating to methadone were: 1) rapid dose reduction during incarceration; 2) discontinuity of methadone during incarceration; and 3) post incarceration aversion to methadone. Participants who received methadone maintenance treatment prior to incarceration reported severe and prolonged withdrawal symptoms from rapid dose reductions or disruption of their methadone treatment during incarceration. The severe withdrawal during incarceration contributed to a subsequent aversion to methadone and adversely affected future decisions regarding reengagement in MAT. Though MAT is the most efficacious treatment for opioid use disorder, current penal policy, which typically requires cessation of MAT during incarceration, may dissuade individuals with opioid use disorder from considering and engaging in MAT after release from incarceration. PMID:26747509

  5. Directly administered antiretroviral therapy: pilot study of a structural intervention in methadone maintenance.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, James L; Haug, Nancy A; Larios, Sandra; Gruber, Valerie A; Tulsky, Jacqueline; Powelson, Elisabeth; Logan, Deborah P; Shapiro, Bradley

    2012-12-01

    Devising interventions to provide integrated treatment for addiction and medical problems is an urgent issue. This study piloted a structural intervention, Directly Administered Antiretroviral Therapy (DAART), to assist methadone-maintenance patients in HIV medication adherence. Twenty-four participants received: (1) antiretroviral medications at the methadone clinic daily before receiving their methadone; (2) take-home antiretroviral medication for days they were not scheduled to attend the methadone clinic, and (3) brief adherence counseling to address adherence barriers. DAART lasted 24 weeks, with a planned step-down to twice-weekly administration in weeks 25-36, followed by self-administration in weeks 37-48. Retention rates at weeks 24, 36, and 48 were 83, 92, and 75% respectively. DAART was associated with improvement in the proportion of participants achieving viral suppression as well as with high medication adherence rates (clinic-verified; 85% and self-reported 97%) during the active intervention phase. DAART was effective as an intervention but did not promote transition to self-administration. This study demonstrates that DAART is adaptable and simple enough to be implemented into methadone treatment programs interested in providing HIV adherence services. PMID:23007110

  6. Disciplining addictions: the bio-politics of methadone and heroin in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bourgois, P

    2000-06-01

    Biomedical understanding of methadone as a magic-bullet pharmacological block to the euphoric effects of heroin is inconsistent with epidemiological and clinical data. An ethnographic perspective on the ways street-based heroin addicts experience methadone reveals the quagmire of power relations that shape drug treatment in the United States. The phenomenon of the methadone clinic is an unhappy compromise between competing discourses: A criminalizing morality versus a medicalizing model of addiction-as-a-brain-disease. Treatment in this context becomes a hostile exercise in disciplining the unruly misuses of pleasure and in controlling economically unproductive bodies. Most of the biomedical and epidemiological research literature on methadone obscures these power dynamics by technocratically debating dosage titrations in a social vacuum. A foucaultian critique of the interplay between power and knowledge might dismiss debates over the Swiss experiments with heroin prescription as merely one more version of biopower disciplining unworthy bodies. Foucault's ill-defined concept of the specific intellectual as someone who confronts power relations on a practical technical level, however, suggests there can be a role for political as well as theoretical engagement with debates in the field of applied substance abuse treatment. Meanwhile, too many heroin addicts who are prescribed methadone in the United States suffer negative side effects that range from an accentuated craving for polydrug abuse to a paralyzing sense of impotence and physical and emotional discomfort. PMID:10885786

  7. Buprenorphine and methadone maintenance treatment of heroin addicts preserves immune function.

    PubMed

    Sacerdote, Paola; Franchi, Silvia; Gerra, Gilberto; Leccese, Vincenzo; Panerai, Alberto E; Somaini, Lorenzo

    2008-05-01

    Opiate addiction influences many physiological functions including immune responses. The objective of this study was to investigate the immune system function in heroin addicted patients submitted to methadone or buprenorphine maintenance treatment compared to untreated heroin addicts and healthy controls. Four groups were studied: group A included nine heroin addicted subjects, who were still injecting heroin; groups B and C were composed of 12 patients previously addicted to heroin, being treated with methadone (mean dosage 58+/-12.7 mg/day) or buprenorphine (mean dose 9.3+/-2.3mg/day) since at least 6 months; group D was composed of 15 sex and age matched healthy controls. Lymphoproliferation and peripheral mononuclear cell cultures production of the Th1 cytokines IL-2 and IFN-gamma, the Th2 cytokine IL-4, and of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha were evaluated in all the patients and controls. PHA-lymphoproliferation was lower in untreated heroin addicts than in controls, while it was normal in methadone and buprenorphine treated patients. An altered Th1/Th2 balance, characterized by reduced IL-4, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha but normal IL-2 levels, was present in untreated heroin addicted subjects, while the Th1/Th2 balance was well conserved in the methadone and buprenorphine groups. These findings suggest that the immune system abnormalities in heroin addicted patients can be restored to almost normal values by controlled treatment with methadone and buprenorphine. PMID:18294814

  8. A fatality due to an accidental methadone substitution in a dental cocktail.

    PubMed

    Kupiec, Thomas C; Kemp, Philip; Raj, Vishnu; Kemp, Jesse

    2011-09-01

    A 6-year-old male child was scheduled for a dental procedure requiring conscious sedation. Prior to the procedure, the child was administered a dental cocktail containing chloral hydrate, hydroxyzine, and methadone. After returning from the dentist, the child appeared groggy and was allowed to sleep. A few hours later, he was found unresponsive, and following resuscitation attempts at a local medical center, he was pronounced dead. Toxicological analyses of femoral blood indicated the presence of hydroxyzine at less than 0.54 μg/mL, trichloroethanol (TCE) at 8.3 μg/mL, and methadone at 0.51 μg/mL. No meperidine was detected. The cause of death was reported to be due to the toxic effects of methadone. The toxicological analysis was corroborated by the analysis of the contents of the dental cocktail, which revealed the presence of hydroxyzine, chloral hydrate, and methadone. Residue from a control sample obtained from the same pharmacy, but administered to a different subject, was found to contain hydroxyzine, chloral hydrate, and meperidine. This report represents the first known fatality due to accidental substitution of methadone in a dental cocktail. PMID:21871161

  9. Uses of diverted methadone and buprenorphine by opioid-addicted individuals in Baltimore, Maryland

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Kelly, Sharon M.; Brown, Barry S.; Reisinger, Heather Schacht; Peterson, James A.; Ruhf, Adrienne; Agar, Michael H.; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Schwartz, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the uses of diverted methadone and buprenorphine among opiate-addicted individuals recruited from new admissions to methadone programs and from out-of-treatment individuals recruited from the streets. Self-report data regarding diversion were obtained from surveys and semi-structured qualitative interviews. Approximately 16% (n=84) of the total sample (N=515) reported using diverted (street) methadone 2–3 times per week for six months or more, and for an average of 7.8 days (SD=10.3) within the past month. The group reporting lifetime use of diverted methadone as compared to the group that did not report such use was less likely to use heroin and cocaine in the 30 days prior to admission (ps < .01) and had lower ASI Drug Composite scores (p < .05). Participants in our qualitative sub-sample (n=22) indicated that street methadone was more widely used than street buprenorphine and that both drugs were largely used as self-medication for detoxification and withdrawal symptoms. Participants reported using low dosages and no injection of either medication was reported. PMID:19874152

  10. Neonatal outcomes following in utero exposure to buprenorphine/naloxone or methadone

    PubMed Central

    Gawronski, Kristen M; Prasad, Mona R; Backes, Carl R; Lehman, K Joy; Gardner, Debra K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To study neonatal outcomes following buprenorphine/naloxone and methadone exposure during pregnancy. Methods: This study is a retrospective review of clinical and demographic information of 58 infants whose mothers were treated with buprenorphine/naloxone and 92 infants whose mothers were treated with methadone for opioid dependence during pregnancy. Results: Gestational age, birth weight, prematurity, admission to neonatal intensive care unit, and length of stay were similar between both groups of infants. Neonatal abstinence syndrome occurred less frequently among infants of mothers treated with buprenorphine/naloxone than those treated with methadone (64% and 80%, respectively, p = 0.03). All infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome were treated postnatally with methadone. There was a trend toward shorter duration of treatment and lower cumulative dosages of methadone among the buprenorphine/naloxone–exposed infants. Conclusions: No apparent significant adverse neonatal outcomes were detected following treatment with either maintenance medication; however, further prospective research is necessary to examine the safety and efficacy of buprenorphine/naloxone in pregnancy and its effects on the neonate. PMID:26770721

  11. Methadone, QTc prolongation and torsades de pointes: Current concepts, management and a hidden twist in the tale?

    PubMed Central

    Mujtaba, Sobia; Romero, Jorge; Taub, Cynthia C.

    2013-01-01

    Methadone is a drug that has found widespread utility in the management of opioid addiction and pain. Along with its popularity, methadone has also earned an infamous reputation for causing prolongation of the QT interval and an increased risk of torsades de pointes. In this article we will give a brief overview of the long QT syndromes, followed by an in-depth look at the current pathophysiologic mechanisms of methadone induced QT prolongation, a review of the existing literature and the current concepts regarding the prevention and management of methadone induced torsades de pointes. In addition, we explore the idea and implications of a genetic link between methadone induced prolongation of the QT interval and torsades de pointes. PMID:24653586

  12. Purification and characterization of guinea pig liver morphine 6-dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Yamano, S; Kageura, E; Ishida, T; Toki, S

    1985-05-10

    Morphine 6-dehydrogenase, which catalyzes the dehydrogenation of morphine to morphinone, has been purified about 440-fold from the soluble fraction of guinea pig liver with a yield of 38%. The purified enzyme was a homogeneous protein on polyacrylamide gel disc electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. The molecular weight and isoelectric point of the enzyme were 29,000 and 7.6, respectively. The enzyme utilizes both NAD and NADP as a cofactor, and the Km values were 0.12 mM for NAD and 0.42 mM for NADP. The Vmax values for morphine were 588 milliunits/mg of protein (with NAD) and 1600 milliunits/mg of protein (with NADP). The Km values for morphine were 0.12 mM (with NAD) and 0.49 mM (with NADP). The enzyme also exhibited activity for morphine-related compounds: nalorphine, normorphine, codeine, and ethylmorphine; however, 7,8-saturated congeners such as dihydromorphine and dihydrocodeine were poor substrates. The enzyme was inactivated by removal of 2-mercaptoethanol from the enzyme solution. The inactivated enzyme was rapidly recovered by the addition of 2-mercaptoethanol. Phenylarsine oxide and CdCl2 (dithiol modifiers) inhibited competitively toward cofactor binding and noncompetitively toward morphine binding. These results suggest that the enzyme possesses the essential thiol groups, probably vicinal dithiol, at or near the cofactor-binding site. Using the partially purified enzyme, 8-(2-hydroxyethylthio)dihydromorphinone was isolated as the product and identified by UV, mass, and NMR spectra. It was confirmed that morphinone proposed as the dehydrogenation product was nonenzymatically and covalently bound to 2-mercaptoethanol. Accordingly, the isolated morphinone-2-mercaptoethanol conjugate must be formed by two steps: enzymatic production of morphinone from morphine and then nonenzymatic binding of 2-mercaptoethanol to morphinone. PMID:2580834

  13. The Effect of Acute and Chronic Morphine on Some Blood Biochemical Parameters in an Inflammatory Condition in Gonadectomized Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chahkandi, Mohadeseh; Askari, Nayerreh; Asadikaram, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Background Opiates affect blood factors as well as pain and inflammation in a gender-dependent manner. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of morphine on serum glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, and urea in gonadectomized and inflammation conditions. Methods Animals were divided as follows: control group, carrageenan and chronic morphine recipients, acute morphine recipients, chronic morphine recipients, carrageenan recipients, acute morphine and carrageenan recipients, gonadectomized group, gonadectomized recipients of carrageenan, gonadectomized recipients of morphine, gonadectomized recipients of chronic morphine, gonadectomized recipients of carrageenan and chronic morphine, gonadectomized recipients of acute morphine and carrageenan. Findings Our results have shown that acute and chronic morphine elevates blood glucose level in the acute and chronic morphine group. Cholesterol level has shown to be increasing in the morphine and carrageenan recipient group compared with a group which merely received morphine. Triglyceride has shown to be decreasing in acute and chronic morphine recipient group compared with control group. A significant increase in serum urea was observed in acute and chronic morphine recipients compared with the carrageenan recipient group. Conclusion Morphine alters the serum glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, and urea in the normal and inflammatory conditions differently, hence, this finding should be considered in the patients who use morphine as a relief of pain, especially in an inflammatory condition. PMID:26885349

  14. Extended-release morphine sulfate in treatment of severe acute and chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Balch, Robert J; Trescot, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Morphine is the archetypal opioid analgesic. Because it is a short-acting opioid, its use has been limited to the management of acute pain. The development of extended-release formulations have resulted in the increased utilization of morphine in chronic pain conditions. This review documents the history of morphine use in pain treatment, and describes the metabolism, pharmacodynamics, formulations, and efficacy of the currently available extended-release morphine medications. PMID:21197323

  15. Development of a sensitive method for the determination of oxycodone and its major metabolites noroxycodone and oxymorphone in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gaudette, Fleur; Sirhan-Daneau, Andréa; St-Onge, Maude; Turgeon, Jacques; Michaud, Veronique

    2016-01-01

    Oxycodone is an opioid agonist largely prescribed for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. Variability in analgesic efficacy could be explained by inter-subject variations in plasma levels of parent drug and its active metabolite, oxymorphone. For this purpose it is necessary to develop and validate a sensitive and selective analytical method for the quantification of oxycodone and its major metabolites, noroxycodone and oxymorphone, in human plasma. The analytical method consisted of a liquid-liquid extraction procedure followed by a high performance liquid chromatography with heated assisted electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-HESI-MS/MS). The chromatographic separation was achieved using gradient elution with a mobile phase consisting of ethanol and 10mM ammonium acetate on a Synergi MAX-RP analytical column (150×2mm, 4μm) protected by a security guard cartridge (C12 4×2mm) at a flow rate of 300μL/min.The calibration functions are linear in the range of 300-50,000pg/mL for oxycodone and noroxycodone and 50 to 10 000pg/mL for oxymorphone. Intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations are less than 5.5% and 6.4%, respectively for all analytes. The limit of detection was 30pg/mL for all analytes. We introduce a new HPLC-HESI-MS/MS sensitive and specific analytical method capable to simultaneously quantify oxycodone, noroxycodone and oxymorphone, in human plasma, and suitable for the conduct of pharmacokinetic studies after a single dose administration of the parent compound. PMID:26655109

  16. Buprenorphine vs methadone treatment: A review of evidence in both developed and developing worlds

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, Paul J; Remski, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Heroin dependence is a major health and social problem associated with increased morbidity and mortality that adversely affects social circumstances, productivity, and healthcare and law enforcement costs. In the UK and many other Western countries, both methadone and buprenorphine are recommended by the relevant agencies for detoxification from heroin and for opioid maintenance therapy. However, despite obvious benefits due to its unique pharmacotherapy (eg, greatly reduced risk of overdose), buprenorphine has largely failed to overtake methadone in managing opioid addiction. The experience from the developing world (based on data from India) is similar. In this article we compare the advantages and disadvantages of the use methadone and buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid addiction from both a developed and developing world perspective; and explore some of the reasons why buprenorphine has not fulfilled the expectations predicted by many in the addictions field. PMID:22346191

  17. Auditory event-related potentials in methadone substituted opiate users.

    PubMed

    Wang, Grace Y; Kydd, Robert; Russell, Bruce R

    2015-09-01

    The effects of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) on neurophysiological function are unclear. Using an auditory oddball paradigm, event-related potential (ERP) amplitudes and latencies were measured in 32 patients undertaking MMT, 17 opiate users who were addicted but not receiving substitution treatment and 25 healthy control subjects. Compared with healthy control subjects, the MMT and opiate user groups showed an increased P200 amplitude in response to target stimuli. The opiate user group also exhibited a decreased amplitude and an increased latency of N200, and a greater number of task-related errors than either healthy control subjects or patients undertaking MMT. There were no significant group differences in the P300 amplitude. However, it is noteworthy that the frontal P300 amplitude of the MMT group was greater than that of opiate users or healthy controls. Our findings suggest that altered sensory information processing associated with a history of opiate use remains in patients undertaking MMT. However, there are less marked ERP abnormalities in those receiving MMT than in active opiate users. The deficits in information processing associated with illicit opiate use are likely to be reduced during MMT. PMID:26038111

  18. Colocating buprenorphine with methadone maintenance and outpatient chemical dependency services.

    PubMed

    Whitley, Susan D; Kunins, Hillary V; Arnsten, Julia H; Gourevitch, Marc N

    2007-07-01

    Buprenorphine may be used to treat opioid dependence in office-based settings, but treatment models are needed to ensure access to psychosocial services needed by many patients. We describe a novel buprenorphine treatment program colocated with methadone maintenance and outpatient chemical dependency services. We conducted a retrospective chart review of the first 40 consecutive patients initiating buprenorphine treatment in this program to determine characteristics associated with treatment retention. Exclusion criteria were current alcohol or benzodiazepine dependence. Secondary drug users and patients who were psychiatrically or medically ill were included. At 6 months, 60% (n = 24) were retained, 13% (n = 5) tested positive for opiates, and 25% (n = 10) tested positive for secondary substances. Patients who were older (odds ratio [OR] per year of age = 1.1, confidence interval [CI] = 1.0-1.2) and those who were employed (OR = 9.8, CI = 1.8-53.1) were more likely to remain in treatment, but other variables were not associated with retention. Our experience demonstrates that buprenorphine can be successfully integrated into outpatient substance abuse treatment. PMID:17588493

  19. Poor Man's Methadone: A Case Report of Loperamide Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dierksen, Jennifer; Gonsoulin, Morna; Walterscheid, Jeffrey P

    2015-12-01

    Loperamide, a common over-the-counter antidiarrheal drug and opioid derivative, is formulated to act upon intestinal opioid receptors. However, at high doses, loperamide crosses the blood-brain barrier and reaches central opioid receptors in the brain, leading to central opiate effects including euphoria and respiratory depression. We report the case of a young man found dead in his residence with a known history of drug abuse. At autopsy, the only significant findings were a distended bladder and bloody oral purge. Drug screening found nontoxic levels of alprazolam, fluoxetine, and marijuana metabolites. Liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry found an unusual set of split isotope peaks consistent with chlorine. On the basis of autopsy and toxicological findings, loperamide toxicity was suspected because of its opioid properties and molecular formula containing chlorine. A sample of loperamide was analyzed by liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry, resulting in a matching mass and retention time to the decedent's sample. Subsequently, quantitative testing detected 63 ng/mL of loperamide or more than 6 times of therapeutic peak concentration. Cause of death was determined as "toxic effects of loperamide with fluoxetine and alprazolam." Because of its opioid effects and easy accessibility, loperamide is known as "poor man's methadone" and may go undetected at medical and forensic drug screening. PMID:26355852

  20. Treatment effectiveness for legally coerced versus voluntary methadone maintenance clients.

    PubMed

    Brecht, M L; Anglin, M D; Wang, J C

    1993-01-01

    Analyses examined whether addicts reporting themselves coerced into drug abuse treatment by actions of the criminal justice system differed from voluntary admissions in their response to treatment, and whether such responsiveness varied across gender or ethnicity. Six hundred eighteen methadone maintenance clients admitted to programs in six southern California counties were categorized into high, moderate, and low legal coercion levels. Multivariate analysis of variance procedures for repeated measures (before, during, and after initial treatment episode) were used to test relevant hypotheses. Dependent variables included criminal justice system contact, criminal activities, drug and alcohol involvement, and measures of social functioning. Few differences within any measured domain were found among the three groups. All groups were similar in showing substantial improvement in levels of narcotics use, criminal activities, and most other behaviors during treatment with some regression in these behaviors posttreatment. Results support legal coercion as a valid motivation for treatment entry; those coerced into treatment respond in ways similar to voluntary admissions regardless of gender or ethnicity. PMID:8438834

  1. Can a 12-step program work in methadone maintenance treatment?

    PubMed

    Ronel, Natti; Gueta, Keren; Abramsohn, Yali; Caspi, Nir; Adelson, Miriam

    2011-10-01

    Three consecutive, professionally led (as opposed to self-help) groups following the 12-step program (TSP) were integrated into a methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) program that included 32 heroin-addicted individuals in recovery. This report describes our experience in meeting the challenges that arose and our conclusions regarding the therapeutic potential of this integration. A professional therapeutic staff guided the groups. In-depth interviews of 10 participants and the reflections of the group leaders provided data for learning about the groups' experience. Initially the participants rejected the concepts of Step 1, powerlessness and unmanageability of life. The assimilation of Step 4 (defining character defect) also aroused some resistance. The participants eventually adopted the pragmatic aspects of TSP, including its terminology. The establishment of a common language of recovery helped to create group coherence and a sense of belonging, and helped to meet the needs of those who felt stigmatized by both the nonaddicted and addicted population undergoing nonmethadone recovery. TSP could be adapted to various aspects of daily life, produced a sense of self-efficacy, and stimulated motivation for change. Therapeutic implications are discussed. PMID:20921264

  2. The trajectory of methadone maintenance treatment in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Ambekar, Atul; Rao, Ravindra; Pun, Anan; Kumar, Suresh; Kishore, Kunal

    2013-11-01

    There are about 28,500 people who inject drugs (PWID) in Nepal and HIV prevalence among this group is high. Nepal introduced harm reduction services for PWID much earlier than other countries in South Asia. Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) was first introduced in Nepal in 1994. This initial small scale MMT programme was closed in 2002 but reopened in 2007 as an emergency HIV prevention response. It has since been scaled up to include three MMT clinics and continuation of MMT is supported by the Ministry of Home Affairs (MOHA; the nodal ministry for drug supply reduction activities) and has been endorsed in the recent National Narcotics policy. Pressure from drug user groups has also helped its reintroduction. Interestingly, these developments have taken place during a period of political instability in Nepal, with the help of strong advocacy from multiple stakeholders. The MMT programme has also had to face resistance from those who were running drug treatment centres. Despite overcoming such troubles, the MMT programme faces a number of challenges. Coverage of MMT is low and high-risk injecting and sexual behaviour among PWID continues. The finance for MMT is largely from external donors and these donations have become scarce with the current global economic problems. With a multitude of developmental challenges for Nepal, the position of MMT in the national priority list is uncertain. Ownership of the programme by government, a cost-effective national MMT scale up plan and rigorous monitoring of its implementation is needed. PMID:23845916

  3. Patterns of Drug Use and Expectations in Methadone Patients

    PubMed Central

    Joe, George W.; Flynn, Patrick M.; Broome, Kirk M.; Simpson, D. Dwayne

    2007-01-01

    Expectations about future behavior have been shown to have a positive relationship with subsequent behavior. For patients in drug treatment, recovery should manifest changes in drug use and in cognitive perceptions of being able to refrain from use. The present study identified latent patterns of the longitudinal relationship between drug use expectation and illegal drug use during treatment. Latent variable mixture modeling identified three patterns of change over successive 3-month intervals during treatment: Improvers (48%), Decliners (33%), and Continuing Users (19%). The sample consisted of 497 patients in community-based outpatient methadone treatment. The utility of the latent patterns was shown through their relationship to treatment engagement, where Continuing Users had lower counseling rapport and time in treatment. These latent patterns also differed on drug use measures at follow-up. Additional analyses of expectations with measures of opioid use, cocaine use, or criminality yielded similar latent patterns. Expectations about future drug use were found to be a useful measure of cognitive change corresponding to drug use change. Its potential as a brief treatment management tool is noted. PMID:17218066

  4. Sustained safety and efficacy of once-daily hydromorphone extended-release (OROS® hydromorphone ER) compared with twice-daily oxycodone controlled-release over 52 weeks in patients with moderate to severe chronic noncancer pain.

    PubMed

    Richarz, Ute; Waechter, Sandra; Sabatowski, Rainer; Szczepanski, Leszek; Binsfeld, Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    Once-daily hydromorphone extended-release (OROS(®) hydromorphone ER) and oxycodone controlled-release (CR) are semisynthetic, ER opioid analgesics with established efficacy. An open-label, randomized, 24-week, parallel group, flexible-dose study demonstrated noninferiority of OROS hydromorphone ER vs. twice-daily oxycodone CR in patients with chronic noncancer pain. In total, 112 patients were enrolled in a 28-week, open-label extension study; 60 patients received OROS hydromorphone ER and 52 received oxycodone CR. The primary efficacy measure was the change from baseline to Weeks 38 and 52 in Brief Pain Inventory item "pain right now." Global assessments of efficacy, dosing convenience, and tolerability were secondary endpoints. Mean change in "pain right now" from baseline to Week 38 was -3.0 (OROS hydromorphone ER) vs. -2.8 (oxycodone CR), and from baseline to Week 52 was -2.9 vs. -2.8; these changes were similar to the changes in the core phase (-2.1 vs. -2.1). Similar improvements were demonstrated for secondary assessments, including pain, pain interference, and quality of life. At Week 52, global assessment of efficacy was rated as "very good" or "good" by the majority of patients (OROS hydromorphone ER, 91.7%; oxycodone CR, 86.5%). More patients in the OROS hydromorphone ER group (35.0% vs. 21.2%) assessed mode of drug intake as "very convenient." The majority of patients receiving OROS hydromorphone ER (88.3%) and oxycodone CR (88.5%) rated tolerability as "good" or "very good" at Week 52; few patients discontinued treatment because of an adverse event (1.6% vs. 0.4%, respectively). The effectiveness of OROS hydromorphone ER and oxycodone CR was maintained through 1 year. PMID:22510252

  5. Reversal of morphine analgesic tolerance by ethanol in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Hull, L C; Gabra, B H; Bailey, C P; Henderson, G; Dewey, W L

    2013-06-01

    The chronic use of opioids in humans, accompanied by the development of tolerance, is a dangerous phenomenon in its own right. However, chronic opioid use is often made more dangerous by the coconsumption of other substances. It has been observed that the blood level of opioids in postmortem analyses of addicts, who consumed ethanol along with the opioid, was much less than that observed in individuals who died from opioids alone. This relationship between ethanol and opioids led us to investigate the hypothesis that ethanol alters tolerance to opioids. In the present study, we report that ethanol significantly and dose-dependently reduced the antinociceptive tolerance produced by morphine and the cross-tolerance between [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) and morphine in the mouse tail-flick test. The reversal of morphine tolerance was partially blocked by both the gamma receptor blocker bicuculline and by the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(B) receptor blocker phaclofen and the administration of both inhibitors completely reversed the effects of ethanol on morphine tolerance. Diazepam, like ethanol, decreased morphine tolerance. However, this inhibition was reversed by the GABA(A) antagonist bicuculline but not by the GABA(B) antagonist phaclofen. These findings have important implications for individuals who abuse opioids and ethanol as well as suggest a mechanism to reduce the amount of opioid needed in chronic pain treatment. PMID:23528610

  6. Reversal of Morphine Analgesic Tolerance by Ethanol in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hull, L. C.; Gabra, B. H.; Bailey, C. P.; Henderson, G.

    2013-01-01

    The chronic use of opioids in humans, accompanied by the development of tolerance, is a dangerous phenomenon in its own right. However, chronic opioid use is often made more dangerous by the coconsumption of other substances. It has been observed that the blood level of opioids in postmortem analyses of addicts, who consumed ethanol along with the opioid, was much less than that observed in individuals who died from opioids alone. This relationship between ethanol and opioids led us to investigate the hypothesis that ethanol alters tolerance to opioids. In the present study, we report that ethanol significantly and dose-dependently reduced the antinociceptive tolerance produced by morphine and the cross-tolerance between [d-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) and morphine in the mouse tail-flick test. The reversal of morphine tolerance was partially blocked by both the gamma receptor blocker bicuculline and by the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptor blocker phaclofen and the administration of both inhibitors completely reversed the effects of ethanol on morphine tolerance. Diazepam, like ethanol, decreased morphine tolerance. However, this inhibition was reversed by the GABAA antagonist bicuculline but not by the GABAB antagonist phaclofen. These findings have important implications for individuals who abuse opioids and ethanol as well as suggest a mechanism to reduce the amount of opioid needed in chronic pain treatment. PMID:23528610

  7. Morphine treatment alters nucleotidase activities in rat blood serum

    PubMed Central

    Rozisky, Joanna Ripoll; Nonose, Yasmine; Laste, Gabriela; dos Santos, Vinicius Souza; de Macedo, Isabel Cristina; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Caumo, Wolnei; Torres, Iraci LS

    2012-01-01

    Morphine has been widely used in neonatal pain management. However, this treatment may produce adaptive changes in several physiologic systems. Our laboratory has demonstrated that morphine treatment in neonate rats alters nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) activity and gene expression in central nervous system structures. Considering the relationship between the opioid and purinergic systems, our aim was to verify whether treatment with morphine from postnatal days 8 (P8) through 14 (P14) at a dose of 5 µg per day alters NTPDase and 5′-nucleotidase activities in rat serum over the short, medium, and long terms. After the in vivo assay, the morphine group showed increased hydrolysis of all nucleotides at P30, and a decrease in adenosine 5′-diphosphate hydrolysis at P60. Moreover, we found that nucleotidase activities change with age; adenosine 5′-triphosphate hydrolysis activity was lower at P16, and adenosine 5′-monophosphate hydrolysis activity was higher at P60. These changes are very important because these enzymes are the main regulators of blood nucleotide levels and, consequently, nucleotide signaling. Our findings showed that in vivo morphine treatment alters nucleotide hydrolysis in rat blood serum, suggesting that purine homeostasis can be influenced by opioid treatment during the neonatal period.

  8. Effect of morphine on sympathetic nerve activity in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Jason R.; Sauder, Charity L.; Ray, Chester A.

    2002-01-01

    There are conflicting reports for the role of endogenous opioids on sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to exercise in humans. A number of studies have utilized naloxone (an opioid-receptor antagonist) to investigate the effect of opioids during exercise. In the present study, we examined the effect of morphine (an opioid-receptor agonist) on sympathetic and cardiovascular responses at rest and during isometric handgrip (IHG). Eleven subjects performed 2 min of IHG (30% maximum) followed by 2 min of postexercise muscle ischemia (PEMI) before and after systemic infusion of morphine (0.075 mg/kg loading dose + 1 mg/h maintenance) or placebo (saline) in double-blinded experiments on separate days. Morphine increased resting muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; 17 +/- 2 to 22 +/- 2 bursts/min; P < 0.01) and increased mean arterial pressure (MAP; 87 +/- 2 to 91 +/- 2 mmHg; P < 0.02), but it decreased heart rate (HR; 61 +/- 4 to 59 +/- 3; P < 0.01). However, IHG elicited similar increases for MSNA, MAP, and HR between the control and morphine trial (drug x exercise interaction = not significant). Moreover, responses to PEMI were not different. Placebo had no effect on resting, IHG, and PEMI responses. We conclude that morphine modulates cardiovascular and sympathetic responses at rest but not during isometric exercise.

  9. Fangchinoline inhibited the antinociceptive effect of morphine in mice.

    PubMed

    Fang, L H; Zhang, Y H; Ku, B S

    2005-03-01

    Fangchinoline (FAN), a non-specific calcium antagonist, is a major alkaloidal component of the creeper Stephania tetrandra S. Moore (or fenfangji). It has been shown to possess antagonistic activity on morphine-induced antinociception in mice. This study was undertaken to assess the antagonistic mechanism. The results demonstrated that FAN (IP) attenuated morphine (SC)-induced antinociception in a dose-dependent manner with significant effect at doses of 30 and 60mg/kg body wt. (IP) in the tail-flick test but not the tail-pinch tests, carried out in mice. This antagonism was abolished by pretreatment with a serotonin precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP, IP), but not by pretreatment with a noradrenaline precursor, L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA, IP) in the tail-flick test. On the other hand, the development of morphine-induced analgesic tolerance was not prevented by FAN. These results suggest that the serotonergic pathway may be involved in the antagonism of morphine-induced antinociception by FAN and, in agreement with other reports, also indicates the possible dissociation of the morphine analgesic effect from its tolerance-development mechanism. PMID:15830839

  10. Promethazine Misuse among Methadone Maintenance Patients and Community-Based Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Brad J.; Lynch, Kara L.; Toochinda, Tab; Lutnick, Alexandra; Cheng, Helen Y.; Kral, Alex H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Promethazine has been reported to be misused in conjunction with opioids in several settings. Promethazine misuse by itself or in conjunction with opioids may have serious adverse health effects. To date, no prevalence data for the nonmedical use of promethazine has been reported. This study examines the prevalence and correlates of promethazine use in two different populations in San Francisco, California, USA: methadone maintenance clinic patients and community-based injection drug users (IDUs). Methods We analyzed urine samples for the presence of promethazine and reviewed the clinical records for 334 methadone maintenance patients at the county methadone clinic. Separately, we used targeted sampling methods to recruit and survey 139 community-based opioid IDUs about their use of promethazine. We assessed prevalence and factors associated with promethazine use with bivariate and multivariate statistics. Results The prevalence of promethazine positive urine samples among the methadone maintenance patients was 26 percent. Only 15 percent of promethazine positive patients had an active prescription for promethazine. Among IDUs reporting injection of opiates in the community-based survey, 17 percent reported having used promethazine in the past month; 24 percent of the IDUs who reported being enrolled in methadone treatment reported using promethazine in the past month. Conclusions The finding that one quarter of methadone maintenance patients in a clinic or recruited in community settings have recently used promethazine provides compelling evidence of significant nonmedical use of promethazine in this patient population. Further research is needed to establish the extent and nature of nonmedical use of promethazine. PMID:23385449

  11. Methadone dose in heroin-dependent patients: role of clinical factors, comedications, genetic polymorphisms and enzyme activity

    PubMed Central

    Mouly, Stéphane; Bloch, Vanessa; Peoc'h, Katell; Houze, Pascal; Labat, Laurence; Ksouda, Kamilia; Simoneau, Guy; Declèves, Xavier; Bergmann, Jean Francois; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Vorspan, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Aims Methadone is characterized by wide intersubject variability regarding the dose needed to obtain full therapeutic response. We assessed the influence of sociodemographic, ethnic, clinical, metabolic and genotypic variables on methadone maintenance dose requirement in opioid-dependent responder patients. Methods Eighty-one stable patients (60 men and 21 women, 43.7 ± 8.1 years old, 63.1 ± 50.9 mg day−1 methadone), divided into quartiles with respect to the median daily dose, were enrolled and underwent clinical examination, treatment history and determination of liver/intestinal cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 activity measured by the midazolam test, R,S-methadone trough concentration and clinically significant polymorphisms of the OPRM1, DRD2, COMT, ABCB1, CYP2B6, CYP3A5, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 genes. Results Methadone maintenance dose was correlated to the highest dose ever used (r2 = 0.57, P < 0.0001). Fractioned methadone intake (odds ratio 4.87, 95% confidence interval 1.27–18.6, P = 0.02), bodyweight (odds ratio 1.57, 95% confidence interval 1.01–2.44, P = 0.04), history of cocaine dependence (80 vs. 44 mg day−1 in never-addict patients, P = 0.005) and ethnicity (Asian > Caucasian > African, P = 0.04) were independently associated with high-dose methadone in multiple regression analysis. A modest correlation was observed between liver/intestinal CYP3A4 activity and methadone dose at steady state (Spearman rank correlation coefficient [rs] = 0.21, P = 0.06) but not with highest dose ever used (rs = 0.15, P = 0.18) or dose-normalized R,S-methadone trough concentrations (rs = −0.05, P = 0.64). Concomitant CYP3A4 inhibitors only affected the relationship between methadone dose and R,S-methadone trough concentration. None of the genetic polymorphisms explored was predictive of the methadone maintenance dose. Conclusions Methadone maintenance dose was predicted by sociodemographic and clinical variables rather than genetic polymorphisms or liver/intestinal CYP

  12. Methadone Maintenance for HIV Positive and HIV Negative Patients in Kyiv: Acceptability and Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Dvoriak, Sergii; Karachevsky, Andrey; Chhatre, Sumedha; Booth, Robert; Metzger, David; Schumacher, Joseph; Chychula, Nina; Pecoraro, Anna; Woody, George

    2014-01-01

    Background With up to 40% of opioid injectors infected with HIV, Ukraine has one of the most concentrated HIV epidemics in the world, mainly due to unsterile injection practices and a historical absence of effective prevention services. Harm reduction programs, including syringe exchange and a small buprenorphine treatment program, were introduced in 2004 and methadone maintenance was allowed in 2007. Despite an initial expansion, by 2009, only 3221 injectors were receiving methadone treatment. A growing body of research on methadone maintenance has found high retention rates with reduction in opioid use and HIV risk behaviors. We report on the acceptability and initial outcome of methadone treatment as a function of HIV status, an issue that has not yet been reported for injectors in Ukraine. Methods Longitudinal observational study of a 12-week course of methadone treatment in 25 HIV+ and 25 HIV− opioid addicted individuals recruited from a harm reduction program and the city AIDS Center. Drug use and HIV risk were assessed at baseline and weeks 4, 8, 12 and 20; all patients were offered continued methadone maintenance in the Kyiv city program at the end of 12 weeks. Results Fifty-four individuals were asked if they were interested in the study and 50, demographically similar to other samples of opioid addicted Ukrainians, agreed to participate. Two died of non-study related causes; the other 48 completed assessments at weeks 4, 8 and 12, and 47 completed followups at week 20. Significant reductions were seen in use of heroin (p<. 0001), other opiates/analgesics (p< 0.0001), and HIV risk behaviors (drug, sex, total; all p <0.0001). All 48 patients chose to continue methadone after the 12-weeks of study medication ended. Unlike most opioid treatment studies, sexual risk was somewhat higher than injecting risk at study intake. Conclusions Methadone maintenance was well accepted by HIV+ and HIV− opioid dependent individuals and has the potential for significant

  13. [Neuroleptic therapy of comorbid narcotic dependent patients in ambulatory methadone maintenance].

    PubMed

    Unglaub, Willi; Kandel, Michael; Zenner, Dirk; Wodarz, Norbert; Klein, Helmfried

    2003-05-01

    Methadon maintenance therapy with opiate addicts who suffer from a comorbid schizophrenia in an outpatient treatment setting of a psychiatric hospital is described. We examined five patients looking for periods of inpatient treatment, drug free urine tests, social integration and illegal activities before and after neuroleptic treatment. In comparison with standard neuroleptics patients show under the therapy with atypical neuroleptics better outcome in drug urine tests especially concerning cannabis and benzodiazepines. According to these findings, the best improvements seem to occur with a combination of methadone and clozapine. PMID:14509056

  14. Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine among adolescents and young adults in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine has been described as a growing problem in Sweden in recent years, and has been associated with an increased drug-related mortality. Critics claim that the substances have become popular among adolescents and that they function as a gateway to heroin use. The aim of this study is to investigate, firstly, the extent to which illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine occurs among adolescents and young adults in Sweden, and secondly, at what stage in a user’s drug career these substances tend to appear. Methods The study is based on surveys and structured interviews on drug use among various populations of young people, in addition to qualitative interviews with 86 informants who, in their professional capacity, encounter adolescents or young adults who are using illicit drugs. Results Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is rare among young people in Sweden. According to high school surveys, less than 0.1% have tried these substances. Among young drug users in general, few have tried the substances, and there is nothing to indicate that they act as gateway drugs. Among adolescents and young adults with severe drug problems, however, the illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is more common (54% in a compulsory care sample). These substances normally enter the drug career late, and few use them as their main drug of choice. Other prescription drugs, like benzodiazepines and tramadol, are used by adolescents to a far greater extent. Diversion and illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is not seen as a serious problem by the professionals interviewed. A general view is that the substances are mainly used by people with a heroin or polydrug addiction, often for “self-medication” purposes. However, several informants express concern that methadone and buprenorphine may cause fatalities among young drug users without an opioid tolerance. Conclusions Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine among

  15. Pathological gambling and treatment outcomes for adults age 50 or older in methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Engel, Rafael J; Rosen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of pathological gambling to negative treatment outcomes for methadone maintenance patients aged 50 or older. The study included 130 methadone maintenance patients. Pathological gambling was determined using the Lie-Bet, a screen for pathological gambling; the outcomes were remaining in treatment and negative urine screens for drug use. Twenty percent of the sample identified as pathological gamblers. Pathological gambling was unrelated to remaining in treatment or negative urine screens. Although pathological gambling had no adverse influence on these treatment outcomes, the prevalence of pathological gambling suggests that screening for it may provide insights about other concerns. PMID:25202832

  16. Methadone maintenance treatment versus methadone maintenance treatment plus auricular acupuncture: impacts on patient satisfaction and coping mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lua, Pei Lin; Talib, Nor Samira; Ismail, Zabidah

    2013-12-01

    This study intended to (1) describe the baseline patient satisfaction level and preferred coping strategies and (2) assess patient satisfaction and coping mechanisms pre- and postintervention. Patients on methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) in Terengganu, Malaysia, were randomized into either MMT or MMT plus auricular acupuncture (MMT + AA) groups. All received the standard MMT, while participants on MMT + AA underwent concurrent AA session thrice weekly for 2 months (each session = 30 minutes). Data analysis was carried out using SPSS 16.0, employing descriptive and nonparametric statistics. Participations were received from 97 eligible male patients (median age = 36.0 years; Malay = 97.9%). After screening for dropouts, only 69 patients were considered for subsequent analysis (MMT = 40; MMT + AA = 29). At preintervention, both groups did not differ significantly in the parameters investigated. During postintervention, no significant difference was detected for satisfaction level but coping-wise, substance use was significantly and frequently adopted by MMT + AA patients compared to MMT respondents (P < .05). On separate analysis, those who received MMT alone adopted active coping, venting, and self-blame significantly more frequently postintervention (P < .05). Nevertheless, no significant difference for coping styles of MMT + AA patients was exhibited over time (P >.05). The addition of AA therapy into the standard MMT treatment did not seem to influence patient satisfaction and their coping ways. PMID:23764566

  17. Interaction of prenatal stress and morphine alters prolactin and seizure in rat pups.

    PubMed

    Saboory, Ehsan; Ebrahimi, Loghman; Roshan-Milani, Shiva; Hashemi, Paria

    2015-10-01

    Prenatal exposure to stress and morphine has complicated effects on epileptic seizure. In the present study, effect of prenatal forced-swim stress and morphine co-administration on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) induced epileptic behaviors and prolactin blood level (PBL) was investigated in rat offspring. Pregnant Wistar rats were divided to four groups of control-saline, control-morphine, stressed-saline and stressed-morphine. In the stressed group, pregnant rats were placed in 25°C water on gestation days 17, 18 and 19 (GD17, GD18 and GD19) for 30 min. In the morphine/saline group, pregnant rats received morphine (10, 12 and 15 mg/kg, IP, on GD17, GD18 and GD19, respectively) or saline (1 ml, IP). In the morphine/saline-stressed group, the rats received morphine or saline and then exposed to stress. On postnatal days 6 and 15 (P6 and P15), blood samples were obtained and PBL was determined. At P15 and P25, the rest of the pups was injected with PTZ to induce seizure. Then, epileptic behaviors of each rat were observed individually. Latency of first convulsion decreased in control-morphine and stressed-saline groups while increased in stressed-morphine rats compared to control-saline group on P15 (P=0.04). Number of tonic-clonic seizures significantly increased in control-morphine and stressed-saline rats compared to control-saline group at P15 (P=0.02). PBL increased in stressed-saline, control-morphine and stress-morphine groups compared to control-saline rats. It can be concluded that prenatal exposure of rats to forced-swim stress and morphine changed their susceptibility to PTZ-induced seizure and PBL during infancy and prepubertal period. Co-administration of morphine attenuated effect of stress on epileptic behaviors. PMID:26056076

  18. Harpagophytum procumbens extract potentiates morphine antinociception in neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Parenti, Carmela; Aricò, Giuseppina; Pennisi, Marzio; Venditti, Alessandro; Scoto, Giovanna M

    2016-06-01

    The association of opioids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, to enhance pain relief and reduce the development of side effects, has been demonstrated. Given many reports concerning the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Harpagophytum procumbens extracts, the aim of our study was to investigate the advantage of a co-administration of a subanalgesic dose of morphine preceded by a low dose of H. procumbens to verify this therapeutically useful association in a neuropathic pain model. Time course, registered with the association of the natural extract, at a dose that does not induce an antinociceptive effect, followed by a subanalgesic dose of morphine showed a well-defined antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effect, suggesting a synergism as a result of the two-drug association. H. procumbens cooperates synergistically with morphine in resolving hyperalgesia and allodynia, two typical symptoms of neuropathic pain. The results support the strategy of using an adjuvant drug to improve opioid analgesic efficacy. PMID:26189616

  19. Quaternary naltrexone reverses radiogenic and morphine-induced locomotor hyperactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.; Stevens, K.E.; Galbraith, J.A.; White, G.A.; Gibbs, G.L.

    1984-04-01

    The present study attempted to determine the relative role of the peripheral and central nervous system in the production of morphine-induced or radiation-induced locomotor hyperactivity of the mouse. Toward this end, we used a quaternary derivative of an opiate antagonist (naltrexone methobromide), which presumably does not cross the blood-brain barrier. Quaternary naltrexone was used to challenge the stereotypic locomotor response observed in these mice after either an i.p. injection of morphine or exposure to 1500 rads /sup 60/Co. The quaternary derivative of naltrexone reversed the locomotor hyperactivity normally observed in the C57BL/6J mouse after an injection of morphine. It also significantly attenuated radiation-induced locomotion. The data reported here support the hypothesis of endorphin involvement in radiation-induced and radiogenic behaviors. However, these conclusions are contingent upon further research which more fully evaluates naltrexone methobromide's capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier.

  20. Potentiation of morphine analgesia by subanesthetic doses of pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L; Misra, A L

    1985-03-01

    Pentobarbital pretreatment reportedly either inhibits, enhances or has no effect on morphine analgesia. The effect of subanesthetic doses of sodium pentobarbital (8-12 mg kg-1, SC) delivered via a delivery system on analgesia of morphine (5 mg kg-1, SC or 1 mg kg-1, IV) acutely administered 45 min after the sodium pentobarbital pellet implantation was assessed using the warm water (55 degrees C)-induced tail-withdrawal reflex in male Wistar rats. Significant potentiation of morphine analgesia was observed in sodium pentobarbital as compared to the placebo-pelleted animals. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors were not involved in this potentiation, which was possibly due to the activation of the descending inhibitory control pathways of nociceptive spinal tail-withdrawal reflex by a combined interaction of two drugs at spinal and supraspinal sites of action, that mediate opiate antinociception. PMID:3991755

  1. Alterations of adenosine A1 receptors in morphine dependence.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Leite-Morris, K A; Sears, M T

    1994-09-19

    The possibility that central adenosine A1 and A2a receptors mediate opiate dependence was examined in morphine-treated mice using radioligand binding methods. Mice treated with morphine for 72 h demonstrated significant increases in naloxone precipitated abstinence behaviors of jumping, wet-dog shakes, teeth chattering, forepaw trends, forepaw tremors and diarrhea compared to vehicle-treated mice. Increased concentrations of cortical adenosine A1 receptor sites, but not striatal adenosine A2a sites, were found in saturation binding studies from morphine-dependent mice. Decreases in cortical A1 agonist binding affinity values along with increases in agonist binding sites were demonstrated in competition binding studies. These results suggest that adaptive changes of upregulation and sensitization of adenosine A1 receptors play a role in mediating the opiate abstinence syndrome. PMID:7820640

  2. Appropriateness of methadone maintenance treatment for opiate addiction: evaluation by an expert panel.

    PubMed

    Vader, John-Paul; Hämmig, Robert; Besson, Jacques; Eastus, Christopher; Eggenberger, Christina; Burnand, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    With some 30,000 dependent persons, opiate addiction constitutes a major public health problem in Switzerland. The Swiss Federal Office of Public Health (FOPH) has long played a leading role in the prevention and treatment of opiate addiction and in research on effective means of containing the epidemic of opiate addiction and its consequences. Major milestones on that path have been the successive "Methadone reports" published by that Office and providing guidance on the care of opiate addiction with substitution treatment. In view of updating the recommendations for the appropriateness of substitution treatment for opiate addiction, in particular for the prescription of methadone, the FOPH commissioned a multi-component project involving the following elements. A survey of current attitudes and practices in Switzerland related to opiate substitution treatment Review of Swiss literature on methadone substitution treatment Review of international literature on methadone substitution treatment National Methadone Substitution Conference Multidisciplinary expert panel to evaluate the appropriateness of substitution treatment. The present report documents the process and summarises the results of the latter element above. The RAND appropriateness method (RAM) was used to distil from literature-based evidence and systematically formulated expert opinion, areas where consensus exist on the appropriateness (or inappropriateness) of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) and areas where disagreement or uncertainty persist and which should be further pursued. The major areas which were addressed by this report are Initial assessment of candidates for MMT Appropriate settings for initiation of MMT (general and special cases) Appropriateness of methadone supportive therapy Co-treatments and accompanying measures Dosage schedules and pharmacokinetic testing Withdrawal from MMT Miscellaneous questions Appropriateness of other (non-methadone) substitution treatment Summary

  3. Metabolism and Disposition of Prescription Opioids: A Review.

    PubMed

    DePriest, A Z; Puet, B L; Holt, A C; Roberts, A; Cone, E J

    2015-07-01

    Opioid analgesics are commonly prescribed for acute and chronic pain, but are subject to abuse. Consequently, toxicology testing programs are frequently implemented for both forensic and clinical applications. Understanding opioid metabolism and disposition is essential for assessing risk of toxicity and, in some cases, providing additional information regarding risk of therapeutic failure. Opioids significantly metabolized by the cytochromeP450 (CYP450) enzyme system maybe subjectto drug-drug interactions, including codeine, hydrocodone, oxycodone, fentanyl, meperidine, methadone, buprenorphine, and tramadol. CYP2D6 metabolism is polymorphic, and pharmacogenetic testing has been investigated for codeine, tramadol, oxycodone, and hydrocodone. CYP2B6 pharmacogenetic testing of methadone may reduce the risk of cardiac toxicity associated with the S-enantiomer. Opioids metabolized primarily by uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronsyltransferase (UGT) enzymes include morphine, hydromorphone, dihydrocodeine, oxymorphone, levorphanol, and tapentadol. Parent and metabolite disposition is described for blood, oral fluid, and urine. Parent drug is most commonly detected in blood and oral fluid, whereas metabolites typically predominate in urine. Oral fluid/blood ratios exceed 1 for most opioids, making this an excellent alternative matrix for testing of this drug class. Metabolites of codeine, hydrocodone, and oxycodone are commercially available, and knowledge of metabolism is necessary for correct interpretation. PMID:26227254

  4. Analgesic tolerance to morphine is regulated by PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    de Guglielmo, Giordano; Kallupi, Marsida; Scuppa, Giulia; Stopponi, Serena; Demopulos, Gregory; Gaitanaris, George; Ciccocioppo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Opioid drugs are potent analgesics. However, their chronic use leads to the rapid development of tolerance to their analgesic effects and subsequent increase of significant side effects, including drug dependence and addiction. Here, we investigated the role of PPARγ in the development of analgesic tolerance to morphine in mice. Experimental Approach We monitored analgesia on alternate days using the tail immersion test. Key Results Daily administration of morphine (30 mg·kg−1, bid) resulted in the rapid development of tolerance to thermal analgesia. Co-administration of pioglitazone (10 and 30 mg·kg−1, bid) significantly attenuated the development and expression of tolerance. However, pretreatment with GW-9662 (5 mg·kg−1, bid), a selective PPARγ antagonist, completely abolished this effect. Injection of GW-9662 and a lower dose of morphine (15 mg·kg−1, bid) accelerated the development of tolerance to its antinociceptive effect. Subsequently, we found that conditional neuronal PPARγ knockout (KO) mice develop a more rapid and pronounced tolerance to morphine antinociception compared with wild-type (WT) controls. Moreover, in PPARγ KO mice, pioglitazone was no longer able to prevent the development of morphine tolerance. Conclusions and Implications Overall, our results demonstrate that PPARγ plays a tonic role in the modulation of morphine tolerance, and its pharmacological activation may help to reduce its development. These findings provide new information about the role of neuronal PPARγ and suggest that combining PPARγ agonists with opioid analgesics may reduce the development of tolerance and possibly attenuate the potential for opioid abuse. PMID:25048682

  5. Sensitivity of quantitative sensory models to morphine analgesia in humans

    PubMed Central

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brock, Christina; Sverrisdóttir, Eva; Larsen, Isabelle Myriam; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Opioid analgesia can be explored with quantitative sensory testing, but most investigations have used models of phasic pain, and such brief stimuli may be limited in the ability to faithfully simulate natural and clinical painful experiences. Therefore, identification of appropriate experimental pain models is critical for our understanding of opioid effects with the potential to improve treatment. Objectives The aim was to explore and compare various pain models to morphine analgesia in healthy volunteers. Methods The study was a double-blind, randomized, two-way crossover study. Thirty-nine healthy participants were included and received morphine 30 mg (2 mg/mL) as oral solution or placebo. To cover both tonic and phasic stimulations, a comprehensive multi-modal, multi-tissue pain-testing program was performed. Results Tonic experimental pain models were sensitive to morphine analgesia compared to placebo: muscle pressure (F=4.87, P=0.03), bone pressure (F=3.98, P=0.05), rectal pressure (F=4.25, P=0.04), and the cold pressor test (F=25.3, P<0.001). Compared to placebo, morphine increased tolerance to muscle stimulation by 14.07%; bone stimulation by 9.72%; rectal mechanical stimulation by 20.40%, and reduced pain reported during the cold pressor test by 9.14%. In contrast, the more phasic experimental pain models were not sensitive to morphine analgesia: skin heat, rectal electrical stimulation, or rectal heat stimulation (all P>0.05). Conclusion Pain models with deep tonic stimulation including C fiber activation and and/or endogenous pain modulation were more sensitive to morphine analgesia. To avoid false negative results in future studies, we recommend inclusion of reproducible tonic pain models in deep tissues, mimicking clinical pain to a higher degree. PMID:25525384

  6. Morphine, pethidine and buprenorphine disposition in the cat.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P M; Robertson, S A; Dixon, M J; Ruprah, M; Sear, J W; Lascelles, B D; Waters, C; Bloomfield, M

    2001-12-01

    Pharmacokinetics of morphine, buprenorphine and pethidine were determined in 10 cats. Six cats received morphine (0.2 mg/kg) intravenously and four intramuscularly. Five received buprenorphine (0.01 mg/kg) intravenously and six intramuscularly. Six received pethidine (5 mg/kg) intramuscularly. Jugular venous blood samples were collected at time points to 24 h, and plasma morphine concentrations were measured by high performance liquid chromatograpy (HPLC), buprenorphine by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and pethidine by gas chromatography. Our data for morphine show elimination half-life (t1/2el) 76.3 min intravenous (i.v.) and 93.6 min intramuscular (i.m.); mean residence time (MRT) 105.0 and 120.5 min; clearance (Clp) 24.1 and 13.9 mL/kg/min; and volume of distribution (V(dss)) 2.6 and 1.7 L/kg, respectively. Comparable data for buprenorphine are t1/2el 416.8 and 380.2 min; MRT 417.6 and 409.8 min; Clp 16.7 and 23.7 mL/kg/min; and V(dss) 7.1 and 8.9 L/kg. For i.m. pethidine, t1/2el 216.4 min; MRT 307.5 min; Clp 20.8 mL/kg/min and V(dss) 5.2 L/kg. For i.m. dosing, the tmax for morphine, buprenorphine and pethidine were 15, 3 and 10 min, respectively. The pharmacokinetics of the three opioids in cats are broadly comparable with those of the dog, although there is a suggestion that the cat may clear morphine more slowly. PMID:11903869

  7. Morphine Increases Acetylcholine Release in the Trigeminal Nuclear Complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhenghong; Bowman, Heather R.; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: The trigeminal nuclear complex (V) contains cholinergic neurons and includes the principal sensory trigeminal nucleus (PSTN) which receives sensory input from the face and jaw, and the trigeminal motor nucleus (MoV) which innervates the muscles of mastication. Pain associated with pathologies of V is often managed with opioids but no studies have characterized the effect of opioids on acetylcholine (ACh) release in PSTN and MoV. Opioids can increase or decrease ACh release in brainstem nuclei. Therefore, the present experiments tested the 2-tailed hypothesis that microdialysis delivery of opioids to the PSTN and MoV significantly alters ACh release. Design: Using a within-subjects design and isoflurane-anesthetized Wistar rats (n = 53), ACh release in PSTN during microdialysis with Ringer's solution (control) was compared to ACh release during dialysis delivery of the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin, muscarinic agonist bethanechol, opioid agonist morphine, mu opioid agonist DAMGO, antagonists for mu (naloxone) and kappa (nor-binaltorphimine; nor-BNI) opioid receptors, and GABAA antagonist bicuculline. Measurements and Results: Tetrodotoxin decreased ACh, confirming action potential-dependent ACh release. Bethanechol and morphine caused a concentration-dependent increase in PSTN ACh release. The morphine-induced increase in ACh release was blocked by nor-BNI but not by naloxone. Bicuculline delivered to the PSTN also increased ACh release. ACh release in the MoV was increased by morphine, and this increase was not blocked by naloxone or nor-BNI. Conclusions: These data comprise the first direct measures of ACh release in PSTN and MoV and suggest synaptic disinhibition as one possible mechanism by which morphine increases ACh release in the trigeminal nuclei. Citation: Zhu Z; Bowman HR; Baghdoyan HA; Lydic R. Morphine increases acetylcholine release in the trigeminal nuclear complex. SLEEP 2008;31(12):1629–1637. PMID:19090318

  8. Effect of cinitapride in isolated ileum obtained from guinea-pigs treated with morphine.

    PubMed

    Colado, M I; Alfaro, M J; del Val, V L; Martín, M I

    1991-01-01

    1. Cinitapride enhanced the contractile response induced by electrical stimulation in the guinea-pig myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle strip preparations. 2. The contractile force was significantly increased in strips pretreated with morphine "in vitro" and in tolerant strips. 3. However when tissues were obtained from tolerant guinea-pigs and morphine was not added to the organ bath (morphine-abstinence), the cinitapride effect was significantly decreased. 4. Although further work is required to explain the changes in the effect of cinitapride after acute morphine treatment and in morphine tolerant tissues, the changes observed suggest that some of the cinitapride effects could be linked with the peripheral opioid system. PMID:1662171

  9. Abuse risks and routes of administration of different prescription opioid compounds and formulations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Evaluation of tamper resistant formulations (TRFs) and classwide Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS) for prescription opioid analgesics will require baseline descriptions of abuse patterns of existing opioid analgesics, including the relative risk of abuse of existing prescription opioids and characteristic patterns of abuse by alternate routes of administration (ROAs). This article presents, for one population at high risk for abuse of prescription opioids, the unadjusted relative risk of abuse of hydrocodone, immediate release (IR) and extended release (ER) oxycodone, methadone, IR and ER morphine, hydromorphone, IR and ER fentanyl, IR and ER oxymorphone. How relative risks change when adjusted for prescription volume of the products was examined along with patterns of abuse via ROAs for the products. Methods Using data on prescription opioid abuse and ROAs used from 2009 Addiction Severity Index-Multimedia Version (ASI-MV®) Connect assessments of 59,792 patients entering treatment for substance use disorders at 464 treatment facilities in 34 states and prescription volume data from SDI Health LLC, unadjusted and adjusted risk for abuse were estimated using log-binomial regression models. A random effects binary logistic regression model estimated the predicted probabilities of abusing a product by one of five ROAs, intended ROA (i.e., swallowing whole), snorting, injection, chewing, and other. Results Unadjusted relative risk of abuse for the 11 compound/formulations determined hydrocodone and IR oxycodone to be most highly abused while IR oxymorphone and IR fentanyl were least often abused. Adjusting for prescription volume suggested hydrocodone and IR oxycodone were least often abused on a prescription-by-prescription basis. Methadone and morphine, especially IR morphine, showed increases in relative risk of abuse. Examination of the data without methadone revealed ER oxycodone as the drug with greatest risk after adjusting for

  10. Gas-liquid chromatographic determination of morphine, heroin, and cocaine.

    PubMed

    Prager, M J; Harrington, S M; Governo, T F

    1979-03-01

    Morphine, heroin, and cocaine are quantitatively determined with the same gas-liquid chromatographic system. The compounds are separated on a 6 ft X 2 mm id glass column packed with a 1:1 mixture of 5% SE-30 on 80--100 mesh Chromosorb W and 3% OV-17 on 80--100 mesh Varaport 30. The column is temperature-programmed. Flame ionization detector responses are measured with a computer-based data system. Heroin and cocaine are chromatographed directly; morphine is derivatized first. The procedure was evaluated with previously analyzed commercial and forensic samples. Accuracy and precision were 5 and 3%, respectively. PMID:447602

  11. Effects of opioids in morphine-treated pigeons trained to discriminate among morphine, the low-efficacy agonist nalbuphine, and saline.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ellen A; Picker, Mitchell J; Granger, Arthur; Dykstra, Linda A

    2004-07-01

    In opioid-dependent subjects, the low-efficacy mu agonist nalbuphine generally precipitates withdrawal or withdrawal-like stimulus effects. To provide a more complete characterization of the discriminative stimulus effects of nalbuphine in opioid-treated subjects, seven White Carneux pigeons were treated daily with 10 mg/kg morphine i.m. and trained 6 h later to discriminate among 10 mg/kg morphine, 1.0 mg/kg nalbuphine, and saline by responding on one of three different keys. When tested, morphine produced morphine-key responding and nalbuphine produced nalbuphine-key responding. Replacing the daily morphine injection with saline produced nalbuphine-key responding, and this effect was reversed by the administration of morphine. In substitution tests with other compounds, the antagonists naltrexone (i.m.) and CTAP (D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Tryp-Lys-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2) (i.c.v.) produced nalbuphine-key responding. High-efficacy agonists fentanyl and etorphine produced morphine-key responding. The intermediate-efficacy agonists buprenorphine, dezocine, and butorphanol produced a pattern of morphine-, saline-, and/or nalbuphine-key responding that differed across individual pigeons. The lower efficacy agonists nalorphine and levallorphan produced predominantly nalbuphine-key responding. The kappa agonists spiradoline and U50,488 [trans-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-(2-[1-pyrrolidinyl]cyclohexyl)benzeneacetamide methanesulfonate], the nonopioid d-amphetamine, and saline produced predominantly saline-key responding. Naltrexone and nalbuphine dose dependently reversed the morphine-key responding produced by the training dose of morphine. Together, these data suggest that the discriminative-stimulus effects of the low-efficacy micro agonist nalbuphine in morphine-treated pigeons are similar to those of other low-efficacy agonists, naltrexone, and the termination of daily morphine treatment. PMID:15044559

  12. 77 FR 67397 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Johnson Matthey, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ...) II Drug Schedule Diphenoxylate (9170) II Hydrocodone (9193) II Meperidine (9230) II Methadone (9250) II Methadone intermediate (9254) II Morphine (9300) II Thebaine (9333) II The company plans...

  13. Quality of Life in Methadone Maintenance Treated Patients in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Aghayan, Shahrokh; Amiri, Mohammad; Chaman, Reza; Khosravi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Measurement of life quality as an index of health status has a widespread application in health care domain. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the quality of life of referents to addiction cessation centers of Iran. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 988 addicts who had referred to addiction cessation centers in Shahroud were studied through SF-36 questionnaire. The data were analyzed using linear regression in structural equation modeling and STATA 12 statistical software. Results: The mean ± SD age of the participants was 41.2 ± 11.8 years. Most of the referents used smoking followed by eating method of opium abuse. The mean ± SD score of life quality was 67.8 ± 17.2, the mean ± SD score of life quality in physical health dimension was 76.9 ± 26.7, and the mean ± SD score in mental health dimension was 64.5 ± 18.4. Univariate analysis showed a significant relationship between life quality and gender, place of residence, education, occupation, marital status, and income (P ≤ 0.05). However, in multivariate analysis a significant relationship was observed only between gender, socioeconomic status, and quality of life score. Conclusions: Although most studies have reported low and weak quality of life in addicts, the findings of this study shows that the life quality score of addicts is rather good. It seems that the maintenance treatment that addicts receive in addiction cessation centers has been effective in improving the quality of life of the patients. Hence, expanding methadone treatment centers can play a leading role in the improvement of life quality in addicts. PMID:26870708

  14. Morphine/Codeine Ratio, a Key in Investigating a Case of Doping

    PubMed Central

    Seif-Barghi, Tohid; Moghadam, Navid; Kobarfard, Farzad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Consumption of codeine can lead to positive urine test for morphine in athletes. Morphine is classified as a prohibited doping drug while Codeine is not. Morphine/codeine ratio is used in forensic medicine to distinguish the consumption of codeine from abuse of morphine and other narcotics. Case Presentation: We present an athlete with positive urine test for morphine with a history of consumption of codeine. The disciplinary committee came to conclusion that the athlete had not consumed morphine and did not violate doping code based on morphine/codeine ratio. Conclusions: Analysis of codeine to morphine metabolism rate is needed when we are using morphine/codeine ratio to rule out abuse of narcotics. WADA should consider analysis for the CYP2D6 alleles (main metabolizer of codeine) in case of including morphine/codeine ratio in future prohibited list. The possibility of ultra-rapid CYP2D6 cannot be ruled out in certain results of morphine/codeine near the cut point. PMID:26715976

  15. Morphine with adjuvant ketamine versus higher dose of morphine alone for acute pain: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xibing; Jin, Shuqing; Niu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Tingting; Zhao, Xiang; Ren, Hao; Tong, Yao; Li, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Ketamine is currently the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel blocker in clinical use. Morphine in pain management is usually limited by adverse effect such as nausea and vomiting. Adjuvant treatment with ketamine may be value in giving better analgesia with fewer adverse effects. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the differences when patients received morphine with adjuvant ketamine (MK) compared with higher dose of morphine (MO) for acute pain. Methods: The PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library databases were searched (Last search performed on July 1, 2014) by two reviewers independently. Data were extracted independently by the same two individuals who searched the studies. Results: A total of 7 trials involving 492 patients were included in the current analysis. We found pain scores were lower in the MK group compared to the MO group [MD 2.19, 95% CI (1.24, 3.13) P<0.00001]. And more patients in the MO required diclofenac [OR 1.97, 95% CI (1.06, 3.67) P=0.03]. Furthermore, morphine plus ketamine can reduced post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) [OR 3.71, 95% CI (2.37, 5.80) P<0.00001]. Importantly, the wakefulness scores for the MK group were consistently and significantly better than those for the MO group [MD -1.53, 95% CI (-2.67, -0.40) P=0.008]. Conclusion: The use of ketamine plus 1/4~2/3 the dose of morphine is better than higher dose of morphine alone in reducing pain scores, and rescuing analgesic requirement. It also improved PONV and wakefulness. PMID:25356103

  16. Effects of voluntary exercise on anxiety-like behavior and voluntary morphine consumption in rat pups borne from morphine-dependent mothers during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Haydari, Sakineh; Miladi-Gorji, Hossein; Mokhtari, Amin; Safari, Manouchehr

    2014-08-22

    Exposure to morphine during pregnancy produced long-term effects in offspring behaviors. Recent studies have shown that voluntary exercise decreases the severity of anxiety behaviors in both morphine-dependent and withdrawn rats. Thus, the aims of the present study were to examine whether maternal exercise decreases prenatal dependence-induced anxiety and also, voluntary consumption of morphine in animal models of craving in rat pups. Pregnant rats were made dependent by chronic administration of morphine in drinking water simultaneously with access to a running wheel that lasted at least 21 days. Then, anxiety-like behaviors using the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and voluntary consumption of morphine using a two-bottle choice paradigm (TBC) were tested in male rat pups. The results showed that the rat pups borne from exercising morphine-dependent mothers exhibited an increase in EPM open arm time (P<0.0001) and entries (P<0.05) as compared with the sedentary groups. In animal models of craving showed that voluntary consumption of morphine in the rat pups borne from exercising morphine-dependent mothers was less in the second (P<0.032) and third (P<0.014) periods of intake as compared with the sedentary group. This study showed that maternal exercise decreases the severity of the anxiogenic-like behaviors and voluntary consumption of morphine in rat pups. PMID:24973610

  17. Concurrent Heroin Use and Correlates among Methadone Maintenance Treatment Clients: A 12-Month Follow-up Study in Guangdong Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Peizhen; Gong, Xiao; Zhang, Lei; Tang, Weiming; Zou, Xia; Chen, Wen; Ling, Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess concurrent heroin use and correlates among Methadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT) clients in Guangdong Province, China. Method: Demographic and drug use data were collected with a structured questionnaire, and MMT information was obtained from the MMT clinic registration system in Guangdong. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected status and urine morphine results were obtained from laboratory tests. Logistic regressions were employed to investigate the factors associated with concurrent heroin use. Results: Among the 6848 participants, 75% continued using heroin more than once during the first 12 months after treatment initiation. Concurrent heroin use was associated with inharmonious family relationship (OR (odds ratio) = 1.49, 95% CI (confidence intervals): 1.24–1.78), HIV positivity (OR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.01–1.55), having multiple sex partners (OR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.07–1.69), having ever taken intravenous drugs (OR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.69–0.95), higher maintenance dose (OR = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.01–1.28) and poorer MMT attendance (OR<20% = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.13–1.53; OR20%– = 1.33, 95% CI: 1.14–1.54; OR50%– = 1.69, 95% CI: 1.44–2.00). Among those who used heroin concurrently, the same factors, and additionally being older (OR35– = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.11–1.43; OR≥45 = 1.63, 95% CI: 1.30–2.05) and female (OR = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.28–2.00), contribute to a greater frequency of heroin use. Conclusions: Concurrent heroin use was prevalent among MMT participants in Guangdong, underscoring the urgent needs for tailored interventions and health education programs for this population. PMID:27005649

  18. Evidence-based treatment for opioid disorders: a 23-year national study of methadone dose levels.

    PubMed

    D'Aunno, Thomas; Pollack, Harold A; Frimpong, Jemima A; Wuchiett, David

    2014-10-01

    Effective treatment for patients with opioid use problems is as critical as ever given the upsurge in heroin and prescription opioid abuse. Yet, results from prior studies show that the majority of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) programs in the US have not provided dose levels that meet evidence-based standards. Thus, this paper examines the extent to which US MMT programs have made changes in the past 23 years to provide adequate methadone doses; we also identify factors associated with variation in program performance. Program directors and clinical supervisors of nationally-representative methadone treatment programs were surveyed in 1988 (n=172), 1990 (n=140), 1995 (n=116), 2000 (n=150), 2005 (n=146), and 2011 (n=140). Results show that the proportion of patients who received doses below 60 mg/day-the minimum recommended-declined from 79.5 to 22.8% in a 23-year span. Results from random effects models show that programs that serve a higher proportion of African-American or Hispanic patients were more likely to report low-dose care. Programs with Joint Commission accreditation were more likely to provide higher doses, as were a program that serves a higher proportion of unemployed and older patients. Efforts to improve methadone treatment practices have made substantial progress, but 23% of patients across the nation are still receiving doses that are too low to be effective. PMID:25012549

  19. Randomized Trial of Contingent Prizes versus Vouchers in Cocaine-Using Methadone Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Nancy M.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Hanson, Tressa; Sierra, Sean

    2007-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) interventions frequently utilize vouchers as reinforcers, but a prize-based system is also efficacious. This study compared these approaches. Seventy-four cocaine-dependent methadone outpatients were randomly assigned to standard treatment (ST), ST plus a maximum of $585 in contingent vouchers, or ST plus an expected…

  20. Attitudes of Methadone Program Staff toward Provision of Harm Reduction and Other Services

    PubMed Central

    Deren, Sherry; Kang, Sung-Yeon; Mino, Milton; Seewald, Randy M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The need for expansion of health services provided in drug treatment programs has been widely discussed since the beginning of the HIV epidemic among drug users. Service expansion has focused on various types of services including medical services (e.g., primary care) and harm reduction services (e.g., provision of sterile syringes). Methods A staff survey was conducted in eight methadone maintenance clinics in the New York/New Jersey area to assess attitudes towards the provision of harm reduction and other services in methadone clinics, and the relationship of these attitudes to other variables. Participants A total of 114 staff members in eight methadone maintenance clinics completed the survey. Results The majority of staff was supportive of adding services, over 90% supported medical services, and the majority supported harm reduction services such as syringe access and disposal services. Higher education and HIV knowledge levels were significant correlates of favorable attitudes toward service provision. Conclusion Support for providing harm reduction services in methadone maintenance clinics was found. Enhancing knowledge of staff regarding various types of health services, and engaging them in how best to institute new services, should be undertaken when new services are planned. PMID:22107879

  1. Patterns in admission delays to outpatient methadone treatment in the United States.

    PubMed

    Gryczynski, Jan; Schwartz, Robert P; Salkever, David S; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Jaffe, Jerome H

    2011-12-01

    Waiting lists for methadone treatment have existed in many U.S. communities, but little is known nationally about what patient and service system factors are related to admission delays that stem from program capacity shortfalls. Using a combination of national data sources, this study examined patterns in capacity-related admission delays to outpatient methadone treatment in 40 U.S. metropolitan areas (N = 28,920). Patient characteristics associated with admission delays included racial/ethnic minority status, lower education, criminal justice referral, prior treatment experience, secondary cocaine or alcohol use, and co-occurring psychiatric problems. Injection drug users experienced fewer delays, as did self-pay patients and referrals from health care and addiction treatment providers. Higher community-level utilization of methadone treatment was associated with delay, whereas delays were less common in communities with higher utilization of alternative modalities. These findings highlight potential disparities in timely admission to outpatient methadone treatment. Implications for improving treatment access and service system monitoring are discussed. PMID:21821378

  2. UHPLC-MS/MS quantification of buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, methadone, and glucuronide conjugates in umbilical cord plasma.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Amy Redmond; Carmical, Jennifer; Shah, Darshan; Pryor, Jason; Brown, Stacy

    2015-10-01

    Opioid use during pregnancy can result in the newborn being physically dependent on the substance, thus experiencing drug withdrawal, termed neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Buprenorphine and methadone are two drugs used to treat opioid withdrawal and are approved for use in pregnancy. Quantification of these compounds in umbilical cord plasma would help assess in utero exposure of neonates in cases of buprenorphine or methadone use during pregnancy. An LC-MS/MS method using solid-phase extraction sample preparation was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of methadone, buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, and glucuronide metabolites in umbilical cord plasma. The average accuracy (percentage error) and precision (relative standard deviation) were <15% for each validated concentration. Our data establishes a 2 week maximum freezer storage window in order to achieve the most accurate cord plasma concentrations of these analytes. Additionally, we found that the umbilical cord tissue analysis was less sensitive compared with analysis with umbilical cord blood plasma, indicating that this may be a more appropriate matrix for determination of buprenorphine and metabolite concentrations. This method was successfully applied to the analysis of cord blood from women with known buprenorphine or methadone use during pregnancy. PMID:25808363

  3. Comparison of intravenous buprenorphine and methadone self-administration by recently detoxified heroin-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Comer, Sandra D; Sullivan, Maria A; Walker, Ellen A

    2005-12-01

    Although buprenorphine is used worldwide as a safe and effective maintenance medication for opioid dependence, some countries have reported a growing incidence of abuse of this medication. Buprenorphine is considered to have lower abuse potential because of its partial agonist profile, but no studies have directly compared the reinforcing effects of buprenorphine with those of full mu opioid agonists in humans. The present double-blind, placebo-controlled inpatient study compared the reinforcing and subjective effects of intravenously administered buprenorphine (0.5, 2, and 8 mg) and methadone (5, 10, and 20 mg). Participants (n = 6) were detoxified from heroin during the first 1 to 2 weeks after admission. During subsequent weeks, participants received a sample drug dose and $20 on Monday, and they could self-administer either the sampled dose or $20 during one choice session per day on Thursday and Friday. Participants responded under a modified progressive ratio schedule during each choice session. All active doses maintained higher progressive ratio break points (largest completed ratio) than placebo. There were no significant differences in break point values between buprenorphine and methadone or among the different doses of drug. However, several subjective ratings, including "good drug effect", "high", and "liking" dose-dependently increased after administration of buprenorphine and methadone. The peak ratings for these effects did not significantly differ for the two drugs. These results demonstrate that under these experimental conditions, buprenorphine and methadone were equally effective in producing reinforcing and subjective effects. PMID:16144974

  4. Retention, HIV risk, and illicit drug use during treatment: methadone dose and visit frequency.

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, H M; Creson, D; Elk, R; Schmitz, J; Grabowski, J

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined two major methadone treatment factors, visit frequency and methadone dose, posited to be important in reducing intravenous drug use and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission. METHODS: One hundred fifty opiate-dependent subjects randomly assigned to four groups received 50 or 80 mg of methadone and attended a clinic 2 or 5 days per week. RESULTS: Survival analysis indicated higher dropout rates for groups having five vs two visits per week (Chi2[1]=7.76). Higher proportions of opiate-positive results on urine screens were associated with lower methadone doses (F[1,91]=4.74). CONCLUSIONS: Receiving take-home doses early in treatment enhanced treatment retention. The 50-mg dose combined with five visits per week produced the worst outcome. Fewer visits enhanced retention at 50 mg, but opiate use rates were higher at this dose than they were for either 80-mg group. The HIV infection rate at entry was 9%. No subjects seroconverted during the study. Risk behaviors for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome declined over time regardless of group/dose assignment. These results have important implications for modification of regulatory and clinic policy changes. PMID:9584030

  5. The 2-Year Test-Retest Reliability of the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised in Methadone Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Megan; Cacciola, John S.; Alterman, Arthur I.; McKay, James R.; Cook, Terry G.

    1999-01-01

    Examined the two-year test-retest reliability of the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (R. Hare, 1991)(PCL-R) in 200 men and 25 women methadone patients. Stability of the PCL-R was generally good, but the measure was somewhat more reliable as a continuous measure than a dichotomous measure. (SLD)

  6. The Relationship between Sugar-Containing Methadone and Dental Caries: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tripathee, Sheela; Akbar, Tahira; Richards, Derek; Themessl-Huber, Markus; Freeman, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To review the evidence of a relationship between sugar-containing methadone and dental caries. Data sources: A systematic search of Cochrane Library, PubMed, PsychINFO, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Current Controlled Trials, WHO, OHRN, SIGLE and ERIC databases was conducted from January 1978 up to June 2010. Study selection: Articles were assessed…

  7. Intervention for Infants and Toddlers Exposed to Methadone in Utero: Three Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, M. Susan; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Three case studies describe intervention with infants/toddlers who were exposed to methadone in utero. Intervention included providing therapeutic nursery services and addressing developmental and mental health needs of the children and the high-risk family systems, including parents' knowledge of child development and parents' emotional support…

  8. Associated risk factors to Non-compliance to Methadone Maintenance Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ramli, M; Zafri, A B A; Junid, M R; Hatta, S

    2012-12-01

    The escalating problem of opiate dependence in Malaysia and the limitations of regimental approach of forced admission to rehabilitation centres had triggered the government to expand the methadone maintenance therapy to become a national programme. This study aimed to evaluate the short-term outcomes of the Methadone Maintenance Therapy programme in one of the busiest hospital in east coast Malaysia. We also explored the prevalence on non-compliance and factors associated to it. A total of 172 patient case notes at Methadone Clinic Hospital Tengku Ampuan Afzan (HTAA) were retrieved for relevant data. A short survey was also conducted to determine the subjects' current employment and marital status. The programme's retention rate was 62% and factors associated with poor compliance were unemployment, low quality of life scores and low dose of methadone. A special attention on the patients with these three risk factors may improve their compliance to MMT. The short-term evaluation of MMT at HTAA revealed favourable findings. PMID:23770945

  9. Evidence-Based Drug Treatment Practice and the Child Welfare System: The Example of Methadone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundgren, Lena M.; Schilling, Robert F.; Peloquin, Susan D.

    2005-01-01

    This article examined the extent to which methadone maintenance (MM) is considered a treatment alternative for drug-dependent parents, as reflected in the social work and child welfare literature and in child welfare policies. Findings were derived from a review of 15 social work journals published from 1996 through 2002 and from a review of child…

  10. Impact of a Vocational Counselor on Employment-Related Outcomes among Methadone Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appel, P. W.; Smith, R.; Schmeidler, J. B.; Randell, J.

    2000-01-01

    Studied the effects of placement of a vocational rehabilitation counselor (VRC) in methadone maintenance clinics for 333 and 358 patients. Results suggest that placement of a VRC in clinic settings is a cost effective change to vocational and educational services. (SLD)

  11. Prize Reinforcement Contingency Management for Cocaine Dependence: Integration with Group Therapy in a Methadone Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Nancy M.; Martin, Bonnie; Simcic, Francis

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors evaluated a low-cost contingency management (CM) procedure for reducing cocaine use and enhancing group therapy attendance in 77 cocaine-dependent methadone patients. Patients were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of standard treatment or standard treatment with CM, in which patients earned the opportunity to win prizes…

  12. Methadone: The Drug and Its Therapeutic Uses In the Treatment of Addiction. Series 31, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamage, James R.; Zerkin, E. Lief

    This fact sheet from the National Clearinghouse for Drug Abuse Information discusses methadone, a therapeutic drug for the treatment of narcotic addiction. It reviews the pharmacology of the drug as well as physiological and psychological effects, patterns of use, and adverse effects (toxicity and poisoning). It examines the success rates of…

  13. Psychological Symptoms in Methadone Maintenance Patients: Prevalence and Change over Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corty, Eric; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Twice interviewed methadone maintenance patients in three cities using Addiction Severity Index. Of subjects followed, 35.4 percent reported having experienced recent psychological symptoms. Found no relation between length of time in treatment at first interview and psychiatric severity. Over one-year period, treatment that subjects received from…

  14. Self-Efficacy and Illicit Opioid Use in a 180-Day Methadone Detoxification Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Patrick M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Studied self-efficacy and treatment outcomes in a sample of opioid addicts. Results show self-efficacy influenced subsequent drug use in parallel with previous behavior. Suggests that psychological constructs like self-efficacy may hold promise for understanding and decreasing illicit opioid use during long-term methadone detoxification treatment.…

  15. Voucher-Based Contingent Reinforcement of Smoking Abstinence among Methadone-Maintained Patients: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Kelly E.; Sigmon, Stacey C.; Thomas, Colleen S.; Heil, Sarah H.; Higgins, Stephen T.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a contingency management (CM) intervention to promote smoking cessation in methadone-maintained patients. Twenty participants, randomized into contingent (n = 10) or noncontingent (n = 10) experimental conditions, completed the 14-day study. Abstinence was determined using breath carbon monoxide and urine…

  16. Contracting for Treatment Termination to Reduce Illicit Drug Use among Methadone Maintenance Treatment Failures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Michael P.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Evaluated the effectiveness of a contingency contracting intervention on reducing illicit drug use by methadone maintenance outpatients. Illicit drug use was significantly reduced during the 30-day intervention and remained below baseline levels during 60-day follow-up. (Author/MCF)

  17. Assessment of Drug-Drug Interactions between Daclatasvir and Methadone or Buprenorphine-Naloxone

    PubMed Central

    Wang, R.; Luo, W.-L.; Wastall, P.; Kandoussi, H.; DeMicco, M.; Bruce, R. D.; Hwang, C.; Bertz, R.; Bifano, M.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is common among people who inject drugs, including those managed with maintenance opioids. Pharmacokinetic interactions between opioids and emerging oral HCV antivirals merit evaluation. Daclatasvir is a potent pangenotypic inhibitor of the HCV NS5A replication complex recently approved for HCV treatment in Europe and Japan in combination with other antivirals. The effect of steady-state daclatasvir (60 mg daily) on stable plasma exposure to oral opioids was assessed in non-HCV-infected subjects receiving methadone (40 to 120 mg; n = 14) or buprenorphine plus naloxone (8 to 24 mg plus 2 to 6 mg; n = 11). No relevant interaction was inferred if the 90% confidence interval (CI) of the geometric mean ratio (GMR) of opioid area under the plasma concentration-time curve over the dosing interval (AUCτ) or maximum concentration in plasma (Cmax) with versus without daclatasvir was within literature-derived ranges of 0.7 to 1.43 (R- and S-methadone) or 0.5 to 2.0 (buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine). Dose-normalized AUCτ for R-methadone (GMR, 1.08; 90% CI, 0.94 to 1.24), S-methadone (1.13; 0.99 to 1.30), and buprenorphine (GMR, 1.37; 90% CI, 1.24 to 1.52) were within the no-effect range. The norbuprenorphine AUCτ was slightly elevated in the primary analysis (GMR, 1.62; 90% CI, 1.30 to 2.02) but within the no-effect range in a supplementary analysis of all evaluable subjects. Dose-normalized Cmax for both methadone enantiomers, buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine, were within the no-effect range. Standardized assessments of opioid pharmacodynamics were unchanged throughout daclatasvir administration with methadone or buprenorphine. Daclatasvir pharmacokinetics were similar to historical data. Coadministration of daclatasvir and opioids was generally well tolerated. In conclusion, these data suggest that daclatasvir can be administered with buprenorphine or methadone without dose adjustments. PMID:26124175

  18. Assessment of drug-drug interactions between daclatasvir and methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone.

    PubMed

    Garimella, T; Wang, R; Luo, W-L; Wastall, P; Kandoussi, H; DeMicco, M; Bruce, R D; Hwang, C; Bertz, R; Bifano, M

    2015-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is common among people who inject drugs, including those managed with maintenance opioids. Pharmacokinetic interactions between opioids and emerging oral HCV antivirals merit evaluation. Daclatasvir is a potent pangenotypic inhibitor of the HCV NS5A replication complex recently approved for HCV treatment in Europe and Japan in combination with other antivirals. The effect of steady-state daclatasvir (60 mg daily) on stable plasma exposure to oral opioids was assessed in non-HCV-infected subjects receiving methadone (40 to 120 mg; n = 14) or buprenorphine plus naloxone (8 to 24 mg plus 2 to 6 mg; n = 11). No relevant interaction was inferred if the 90% confidence interval (CI) of the geometric mean ratio (GMR) of opioid area under the plasma concentration-time curve over the dosing interval (AUCτ) or maximum concentration in plasma (C max) with versus without daclatasvir was within literature-derived ranges of 0.7 to 1.43 (R- and S-methadone) or 0.5 to 2.0 (buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine). Dose-normalized AUCτ for R-methadone (GMR, 1.08; 90% CI, 0.94 to 1.24), S-methadone (1.13; 0.99 to 1.30), and buprenorphine (GMR, 1.37; 90% CI, 1.24 to 1.52) were within the no-effect range. The norbuprenorphine AUCτ was slightly elevated in the primary analysis (GMR, 1.62; 90% CI, 1.30 to 2.02) but within the no-effect range in a supplementary analysis of all evaluable subjects. Dose-normalized C max for both methadone enantiomers, buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine, were within the no-effect range. Standardized assessments of opioid pharmacodynamics were unchanged throughout daclatasvir administration with methadone or buprenorphine. Daclatasvir pharmacokinetics were similar to historical data. Coadministration of daclatasvir and opioids was generally well tolerated. In conclusion, these data suggest that daclatasvir can be administered with buprenorphine or methadone without dose adjustments. PMID:26124175

  19. Prescription opioids. III. Disposition of oxycodone in oral fluid and blood following controlled single-dose administration.

    PubMed

    Cone, Edward J; DePriest, Anne Z; Heltsley, Rebecca; Black, David L; Mitchell, John M; LoDico, Charles; Flegel, Ron

    2015-04-01

    Oxycodone (OC) is recommended to be included as an analyte tested in the proposed Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA's) Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs using Oral Fluid (OF) Specimens. This study demonstrates the time course of OC and metabolites, noroxycodone (NOC), oxymorphone (OM) and noroxymorphone (NOM), in near-simultaneous paired OF and whole blood (BL) specimens by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) (limit of detection = 1 ng/mL OF, 5 ng/mL BL). A single dose of OC 20 mg controlled-release was administered to 12 healthy subjects followed by specimen collections for 52 h. Analyte prevalence was as follows: OF, OC > NOC > OM; and BL, OC > NOC > NOM. OC and NOC were frequently detected within 15-30 min in OF and 30 min to 2 h in BL. NOM and OM appeared between 1.5-5 h post-dose. The mean OF-to-BL (OF:BL) ratios and correlations were 5.4 for OC (r = 0.719) and 1.0 for NOC (r = 0.651). The period of detection for OF exceeded BL by ∼2-fold at similar cutoff concentrations. At a 1 ng/mL cutoff for OF, the mean detection time was 34 h for OC and NOC. These data provide new information that should facilitate interpretation of OC test results. PMID:25589778

  20. Synthetic Geopolymers for Controlled Delivery of Oxycodone: Adjustable and Nanostructured Porosity Enables Tunable and Sustained Drug Release

    PubMed Central

    Forsgren, Johan; Pedersen, Christian; Strømme, Maria; Engqvist, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    In this article we for the first time present a fully synthetic mesoporous geopolymer drug carrier for controlled release of opioids. Nanoparticulate precursor powders with different Al/Si-ratios were synthesized by a sol-gel route and used in the preparation of different geopolymers, which could be structurally tailored by adjusting the Al/Si-ratio and the curing temperatures. In particular, it was shown that the pore sizes of the geopolymers decreased with increasing Al/Si ratio and that completely mesoporous geopolymers could be produced from precursor particles with the Al/Si ratio 2∶1. The mesoporosity was shown to be associated with a sustained and linear in vitro release profile of the opioid oxycodone. A clinically relevant release period of about 12 h was obtained by adjusting the size of the pellets. The easily fabricated and tunable geopolymers presented in this study constitute a novel approach in the development of controlled release formulations, not only for opioids, but whenever the clinical indication is best treated with a constant supply of drugs and when the mechanical stability of the delivery vehicle is crucial. PMID:21423616

  1. Synthetic geopolymers for controlled delivery of oxycodone: adjustable and nanostructured porosity enables tunable and sustained drug release.

    PubMed

    Forsgren, Johan; Pedersen, Christian; Strømme, Maria; Engqvist, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    In this article we for the first time present a fully synthetic mesoporous geopolymer drug carrier for controlled release of opioids. Nanoparticulate precursor powders with different Al/Si-ratios were synthesized by a sol-gel route and used in the preparation of different geopolymers, which could be structurally tailored by adjusting the Al/Si-ratio and the curing temperatures. In particular, it was shown that the pore sizes of the geopolymers decreased with increasing Al/Si ratio and that completely mesoporous geopolymers could be produced from precursor particles with the Al/Si ratio 2:1. The mesoporosity was shown to be associated with a sustained and linear in vitro release profile of the opioid oxycodone. A clinically relevant release period of about 12 h was obtained by adjusting the size of the pellets. The easily fabricated and tunable geopolymers presented in this study constitute a novel approach in the development of controlled release formulations, not only for opioids, but whenever the clinical indication is best treated with a constant supply of drugs and when the mechanical stability of the delivery vehicle is crucial. PMID:21423616

  2. Varenicline efficacy and safety among methadone maintained smokers: A randomized placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Nahvi, Shadi; Ning, Yuming; Segal, Kate S.; Richter, Kimber P.; Arnsten, Julia H.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To test the efficacy and safety of varenicline as an aid to smoking cessation in methadone maintained smokers. Design Multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with random assignment to 12 weeks of varenicline 1 mg twice daily (n=57) or matched placebo (n=55), with in-person and telephone counseling. Setting Urban methadone programmes in the Bronx, New York City, New York, USA. Participants: Methadone maintenance patients, smoking ≥5 cigarettes/day, interested in quitting, stable in methadone treatment, without current axis I psychiatric disorders, suicidal ideation, or recent suicide attempts. Measurements Seven-day point prevalence abstinence verified by expired carbon monoxide (CO) < 8 p.p.m at week 12 (primary outcome); CO-verified abstinence, cigarettes/day, incident axis I psychiatric illness, suicidal ideation or serious adverse events (SAEs) at weeks 2, 4, 8, 12 or 24 (secondary outcomes). Findings Baseline demographic, smoking and clinical factors were similar between groups. Retention at 24 weeks was 90%. Subjects receiving varenicline were more likely than those receiving placebo to achieve abstinence (10.5% v 0%, p = .03; effect size 10.5%, 95% CI 4.4 – 19.3%) and to reduce smoking (median 5 v 2 cigarettes/day, p<.001) at 12 weeks. These effects were not maintained after drug treatment ceased. Incident psychiatric illness (OR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.16, 4.4) and suicidality (OR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.2, 3.9) were not different between groups. There were no psychiatric or cardiac SAEs. Conclusions Varenicline can aid short-term smoking abstinence in methadone maintained smokers. PMID:24862167

  3. Auditory target processing in methadone substituted opiate addicts: The effect of nicotine in controls

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Bernhard W; Specka, Michael; Steinchen, Nicolai; Zerbin, Dieter; Lodemann, Ernst; Finkbeiner, Thomas; Scherbaum, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    Background The P300 component of the auditory evoked potential is an indicator of attention dependent target processing. Only a few studies have assessed cognitive function in substituted opiate addicts by means of evoked potential recordings. In addition, P300 data suggest that chronic nicotine use reduces P300 amplitudes. While nicotine and opiate effects combine in addicted subjects, here we investigated the P300 component of the auditory event related potential in methadone substituted opiate addicts with and without concomitant non-opioid drug use in comparison to a group of control subjects with and without nicotine consumption. Methods We assessed 47 opiate addicted out-patients under current methadone substitution and 65 control subjects matched for age and gender in an 2-stimulus auditory oddball paradigm. Patients were grouped for those with and without additional non-opioid drug use and controls were grouped for current nicotine use. P300 amplitude and latency data were analyzed at electrodes Fz, Cz and Pz. Results Patients and controls did not differ with regard to P300 amplitudes and latencies when whole groups were compared. Subgroup analyses revealed significantly reduced P300 amplitudes in controls with nicotine use when compared to those without. P300 amplitudes of methadone substituted opiate addicts were in between the two control groups and did not differ with regard to additional non-opioid use. Controls with nicotine had lower P300 amplitudes when compared to patients with concomitant non-opioid drugs. No P300 latency effects were found. Conclusion Attention dependent target processing as indexed by the P300 component amplitudes and latencies is not reduced in methadone substituted opiate addicts when compared to controls. The effect of nicotine on P300 amplitudes in healthy subjects exceeds the effects of long term opioid addiction under methadone substitution. PMID:17986348

  4. Comparison of methadone and buprenorphine for opiate detoxification (LEEDS trial): a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Nat MJ; Sheard, Laura; Adams, Clive E; Rushforth, Bruno J; Harrison, Wendy; Bound, Nicole; Hart, Roger; Tompkins, Charlotte NE

    2011-01-01

    Background Many opiate users require prescribed medication to help them achieve abstinence, commonly taking the form of a detoxification regime. In UK prisons, drug users are nearly universally treated for their opiate use by primary care clinicians, and once released access GP services where 40% of practices now treat drug users. There is a paucity of evidence evaluating methadone and buprenorphine (the two most commonly prescribed agents in the UK) for opiate detoxification. Aim To evaluate whether buprenorphine or methadone help to achieve drug abstinence at completion of a reducing regimen for heroin users presenting to UK prison health care for detoxification. Design Open-label, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial in three prison primary healthcare departments in the north of England. Method Prisoners (n = 306) using illicit opiates were recruited and given daily sublingual buprenorphine or oral methadone, in the context of routine care, over a standard reduced regimen of not more than 20 days. The primary outcome measure was abstinence from illicit opiates at 8 days post detoxification, as indicated by urine test (self-report/clinical notes where urine sample was not feasible). Secondary outcomes were also recorded. Results Abstinence was ascertained for 73.7% at 8 days post detoxification (urine sample = 52.6%, self report = 15.2%, clinical notes = 5.9%). There was no statistically significant difference in the odds of achieving abstinence between methadone and buprenorphine (odds ratio [OR] = 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.81 to 3.51; P = 0.163). Abstinence was associated solely with whether or not the participant was still in prison at that time (15.22 times the odds; 95% CI = 4.19 to 55.28). The strongest association for lasting abstinence was abstinence at an earlier time point. Conclusion There is equal clinical effectiveness between methadone and buprenorphine in achieving abstinence from opiates at 8 days post detoxification within prison

  5. Improvement of saccadic functions after dosing with methadone in opioid addicted individuals.

    PubMed

    Gorzelańczyk, Edward Jacek; Walecki, Piotr; Feit, Julia; Kunc, Marek; Fareed, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    In the current experiment, we used the saccadometric test to study the effect of a single therapeutic dose of methadone on the integrity of cortico-subcortical brain functioning. In this prospective study, we used the Saccadometer System (Advanced Clinical Instrumentation, Cambridge, UK). The saccadometric test was performed before and 1.5 hours after methadone dosing. We analyzed the following saccadic parameters: latency, duration, amplitude, average and peak velocity, and processing performance (promptness) as well as a number of different types of saccades (like correct/incorrect, under/overshoot, and left-sided/right-sided). The sample consists of 40 subjects with an average 18 years of opioid addiction. The mean age is 35.3 ± 7 (80% males and 20% females). The mean period of heroin dependence is 15.3 ± 6.3 years. The mean daily dose of methadone in substitution therapy is 90 ± 26.5 mg. After administration of a single therapeutic dose of methadone, there were statistically significant differences in the values of saccade duration and latency when compared to the values before the drug administration. Average duration of saccade was significantly longer [51.40 ± 8.75 ms versus 48.93 ± 6.91 ms, z = 2.53, p = .01] and average latency was significantly longer [198.85 ± 52.57 ms versus 183.05 ± 30.95 ms, z = 2.09 p < .03]. This is the first study to test the therapeutic effect of daily methadone dosing on the integrity of the cortico-subcortical brain functions as measured by the saccadometry. More research is needed to explore the effect of illicit opioid use on the integrity of brain structures and functions, and the protective effect of opioid agonist therapy on reversing the damaging effects of illicit opioid use. PMID:26488804

  6. Site and mechanism of morphine tolerance in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    AKBARALI, H. I.; INKISAR, A.; DEWEY, W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Opioid-induced constipation is a major clinical problem. The effects of morphine, and other narcotics, on the gastrointestinal tract persist over long-term use thus limiting the clinical benefit of these excellent pain relievers. The effects of opioids in the gut, including morphine, are largely mediated by the μ-opioid receptors at the soma and nerve terminals of enteric neurons. Recent studies demonstrate that regional differences exist in both acute and chronic morphine along the gastrointestinal tract. While tolerance develops to the analgesic effects and upper gastrointestinal motility upon repeated morphine administration, tolerance does not develop in the colon with chronic opioids resulting in persistent constipation. Here, we review the mechanisms by which tolerance develops in the small but not the large intestine. The regional differences lie in the signaling and regulation of the μopioid receptor in the various segments of the gastrointestinal tract. The differential role of β-arrestin2 in tolerance development between central and enteric neurons defines the potential for therapeutic approaches in developing ligands with analgesic properties and minimal constipating effects. PMID:25257923

  7. Monoamine mediation of the morphine-induced activation of mice

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Bernard J.; Sharp, Peter T.

    1972-01-01

    1. The dose-response relationship for hyperactivity in grouped mice following the injection of morphine sulphate has been established. 2. The activation response can be modified by drugs which affect either catecholamines or indoleamines. 3. The monoamine precursors L-DOPA and 5-hydroxytryptophan potentiate the response. 4. The monoamine synthesis inhibitors α-methyl-p-tyrosine and p-chlorophenylalanine reduce the response. 5. Inhibition of monoamine oxidase activity by pargyline caused a great increase in the response. The simultaneous administration of reserpine resulted in a further potentiation. 6. Reserpine blocked the response whenever it was given alone, either before, with or after the injection of morphine. 7. Blockade of α-adrenoceptors with phentolamine or phenoxybenzamine reduced the response. 8. Blockade of tryptaminergic receptors with methysergide or cinanserin also antagonized the response. 9. The major tranquillizers haloperidol and chlorpromazine reduced the response. Haloperidol was especially effective in this regard. 10. The tricyclic antidepressant drug imipramine potentiated the response. 11. The morphine antagonist nalorphine completely prevented the response. 12. The anticholinergic agent atropine and the antihistaminic drug mepyramine did not affect the response. 13. We conclude that dopamine, noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine are all involved in the normal activation response of grouped mice to morphine, with dopaminergic mechanisms being of primary importance. PMID:4263794

  8. Mighty Morphin Power Ranger Play: Research and Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosser, Sandra

    1995-01-01

    Explores the question of whether or not Mighty Morphin Power Rangers-type aggressive play is developmentally appropriate for the early childhood classroom. Compares results from research in child development to the reality of television programming, highlighting the relationship between television violence and children's aggressive behavior. (AA)

  9. Epidural morphine analgesia in Guillain Barré syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Genis, D; Busquets, C; Manubens, E; Dávalos, A; Baró, J; Oterino, A

    1989-01-01

    Severe pain is a frequent symptom in the Guillain Barré syndrome and can be intense, long lasting and with no response to the usual analgesics, including parenteral opiates. Epidural analgesia using morphine chloride in low doses has satisfactorily relieved pain in this disease in nine patients. PMID:2795070

  10. Morphine-augmented cholescintigraphy in the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Pjura, G.; Lowry, P.; Nguyen, M.; Pollack, M.

    1986-12-01

    Cholescintigraphy is a sensitive procedure for diagnosing or excluding acute cholecystitis. However, when rapid diagnosis is critical, the requirement for delayed images (4 hr or more after injection) to minimize the false-positive rate diminishes its utility. We prospectively evaluated 40 cholescintigraphic examinations that did not visualize the gallbladder 1 hr after injection of 99mTc diisopropyliminodiacetic acid. These examinations were then augmented by administration of IV morphine, followed by an additional 30 min of imaging. After the morphine, 18 of these examinations demonstrated visualization of the gallbladder; none subsequently required surgical exploration. Of the remaining 22, who demonstrated persistent nonvisualization of the gallbladder post-morphine, 11 were explored surgically and found to be abnormal. The 11 others were treated medically. Low-dose morphine administered when the gallbladder fails to visualize after 1 hr is a useful adjunct to conventional cholescintigraphy because it reduces the time required to obtain a diagnostic result and decreases the number of false-positive results.

  11. Temperament and Character Dimensions: Correlates of Impulsivity in Morphine Addicts

    PubMed Central

    Abassi, Moslem; Abolghasemi, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Given the role of temperament and character dimensions on impulsivity in addicts, the purpose of this study was to temperament and character dimensions: correlates of impulsivity in morphine addicts. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine and verify the association of temperament and character dimensions with impulsivity in morphine addicts. Patients and Methods: The research method was descriptive and correlational. The study sample consisted of 120 morphine addicts referred to drug addiction treatment centers in Ardabil city in 2013. The participants were selected through convenience sampling method from 5 centers. We used impulsivity scale as well as temperament and character inventory to collect data. Results: The results showed that significant relationship existed between impulsivity and characteristics such as novelty seeking, harm avoidance, reward dependence, persistence, self-directedness, and cooperativeness, while no significant relationship between impulsivity and self-transcendence was observed. The results of the multiple regression analysis showed that 47% of the impulsivity variance was explained by temperament and character dimensions. Conclusions: These findings suggest that temperament and character dimensions are associated with impulsivity. The findings also have important implications for prevention, pathology, and treatment in the morphine addicts. PMID:26870706

  12. 21 CFR 862.3640 - Morphine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Morphine test system. 862.3640 Section 862.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  13. 21 CFR 862.3640 - Morphine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Morphine test system. 862.3640 Section 862.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  14. Morphine-like insomnia from heroin in nondependent human addicts.

    PubMed Central

    Kay, D C; Pickworth, W B; Neider, G L

    1981-01-01

    1 This study was performed because dose-related effects of heroin on human sleep had not been described previously, and to discover if heroin produces a morphine-like insomnia. 2 After three adaptation nights, the sleep of seven male nondependent opiate addicts was studied following i.m. doses of heroin (3, 6, 12 mg/70 kg), morphine (10, 20 mg/70 kg) or placebo at weekly intervals in a randomized double-blind crossover design. 3 Heroin produces a dose-related increase in wakefulness, drowsiness episodes, muscle tension, and shifts in sleep-waking states. 4 Heroin produces a dose-related decrease in total sleep, sleep efficiency, delta sleep and REM sleep (REMS). 5 Heroin is about twice as potent as morphine in producing this type of insomnia. 6 'Morphine insomnia' appears to be a characteristic initial effect of several opioids, at least in nondependent opiate addicts, and might serve as a model insomnia for evaluation of hypnotics. PMID:7213520

  15. Use of morphine in cholescintigraphy for obstructive cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Nguyen, M.; Pjura, G.; Pollack, M.; Gobuty, A.

    1985-05-01

    Non-visualization of the gallbladder (GB) during the first hour of cholescintigraphy is observed in cystic duct obstruction (e.g. in acute cholecystitis) but may also occur in chronic cholecystitis, hepatocellular disease, alcoholism and prolonged total parenteral nutrition. Low dose morphine is shown to improve the specificity of the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis (from 85% to 100%) with no loss in sensitivity (98%) at a small cost in terms of additional study time. The authors reviewed 27 selected cholescintigraphic examinations augmented by intravenous (IV) morphine (0.04 mg/Kg). Of the 16 cases with persistent nonvisualization of the GB, ultrasound revealed gallstones in 5 cases, sludge in 4, acalculous cholecystitis in 3, one distended GB, one contracted GB and 2 normal GB's. Of the 4 patients taken to surgery, one with gallstones and one with acalculous cholecystitis were confirmed to have acute cholecystitis while another with gallstones had chronic cholecystitis and the final patient, who was sonographically normal, presented a single common duct stone. The authors conclude that the use of IV morphine is an effective adjunct to cholescintigraphy in the evaluation of gallbladder disease, especially when visualization post morphine rules out acute cholecystitis.

  16. Pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of oxycodone and acetaminophen following single-dose administration of MNK-795, a dual-layer biphasic IR/ER combination formulation, under fed and fasted conditions

    PubMed Central

    Devarakonda, Krishna; Morton, Terri; Margulis, Rachel; Giuliani, Michael; Barrett, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background XARTEMIS™ XR (formerly MNK-795) is a combination oxycodone (OC) and acetaminophen (APAP) analgesic with both immediate-release and extended-release (ER) components (ER OC/APAP). The tablets are designed with gastric-retentive ER oral delivery technology that releases the ER component at a controlled rate in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Because consumption of food has demonstrated an impact on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of some marketed products using gastric-retentive ER oral delivery technology, a characterization of the effects of fed (high- and low-fat diets) versus fasted conditions on the PK of ER OC/APAP was performed. Methods This Phase I study used an open-label randomized single-dose three-period six-sequence crossover single-center design. Healthy adult participants (n=48) were randomized to receive two tablets of ER OC/APAP under three conditions: following a high-fat meal; following a low-fat meal; and fasted. Plasma concentration versus time data from predose throughout designated times up to 48 hours postdose was used to estimate the PK parameters of oxycodone and APAP. Results Thirty-one participants completed all three treatment periods. Both oxycodone and APAP were rapidly absorbed under fasted conditions. Total oxycodone and APAP exposures (area under the plasma drug concentration-time curve [AUC]) from ER OC/APAP were not significantly affected by food, and minimal changes to maximum observed plasma concentration for oxycodone and APAP were also noted. However, food marginally delayed the time to maximum observed plasma concentration of oxycodone and APAP. There was no indication that tolerability was affected by food. Conclusion The findings from this study suggest that ER OC/APAP can be administered with or without food. PMID:25170252

  17. Preemptive morphine suppository for postoperative pain relief after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Mojtaba; Farsani, Daryoush Moradi; Naghibi, Khosrou; Alikiaii, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain is a major problem following laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and there is no general agreement on the effective method of pain relief. Rectal morphine suppositories are one of the newly released morphine forms. The aim of this study is to compare the impact of suppository morphine with placebo on pain relief after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods: Seventy patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia, were randomly allocated to two groups according to the drug used for postoperative analgesia: Group morphine suppository (MS - 10 mg) just before induction of anesthesia And Group placebo suppository (PS) (the pills were made from cocoa butter, physically similar to the real drug). Pain intensity based on visual analog scale (VAS) and opioid consumption were assessed 30 and 60 min, and 2, 4, 8, 16, and 24 h after arrival of the patient to the recovery room. Results: VAS scores were significantly lower in MS group (from 3.8 ± 1 to 5.3 ± 1.6) compared with PS group (from 4.9 ± 0.9 to 6.7 ± 1) from 30 min after arrival to the recovery room until 16 h postoperatively (P < 0.05). There were no additional analgesic requirements in the first 2 h after the entrance of the patient to the recovery room in MS group. The number of patients requiring pethidine was significantly different between two groups (P < 0.05) in all periods except for 24 h postoperatively. Conclusion: Suppository morphine administration is more effective than placebo to reduce pain and analgesic requirements after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:27110554

  18. [Quality of buprenorphine and morphine as components of combined anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Knoche, E; Dick, W; Rummel, C; Konietzke, D

    1988-02-01

    Perioperative effects of buprenorphine during and after combined anesthesia for gynecological laparotomies were compared to those of morphine. In a controlled, randomized study two similar groups of patients received flunitrazepam (0.016 mg/kg) and either buprenorphine (0.008 mg/kg) or morphine (0.333 mg/kg); all patients were ventilated with a N2O/O2-mixture. To maintain adequate anesthesia, additional injections of buprenorphine or morphine and a volatile anesthetic agent (enflurane, less than 1.0 vol.%) were administered as needed. In some patients in both groups the injection of thiopental (1-2 mg/kg) became necessary for induction of anesthesia. Hemodynamic parameters showed a slight but not significant increase during intubation and remained stable intraoperatively (Figs. 1 and 2). The frequencies of additional intraoperative injections of buprenorphine or morphine and modalities of enflurane administration were similar in both groups. Based on an awakeness score, recovery from anesthesia was similar in both groups (Fig. 3). All patients were pain-free for a long period postoperatively (pain score 1-2, duration 6-10 h) (Fig. 4). In both groups respiratory depression could be demonstrated by means of ventilatory CO2 response (Figs. 6 and 7). The respiratory depression was of no clinical importance and seems to have been due to the combination of a long-acting benzodiazepine with an opiate. There were no differences in the occurrence of nausea and vomiting in both groups. Buprenorphine seems to be an alternative to morphine in combined anesthesia. PMID:3284406

  19. Influence of fentanyl and morphine on intestinal circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tverskoy, M.; Gelman, S.; Fowler, K.C.; Bradley, E.L.

    1985-06-01

    The influence of fentanyl and morphine on the intestinal circulation was evaluated in an isolated loop preparation in 37 dogs anesthetized with pentobarbital intravenously. Selected intestinal segments were pumped with aortic blood at a constant pressure of 100 mm Hg. A mixture of /sup 86/Rb and 9-micron spheres labeled with /sup 141/Ce was injected into the arterial cannula supplying the intestinal loop, while mesenteric venous blood was collected for activity counting. A strong correlation was found between the clearances of rubidium and microspheres (r = 0.97, P less than 0.0001), suggesting that the shunting of 9-micron spheres through the intestines reflects the shunting of blood through nonnutritive vessels. Intravenous fentanyl decreased oxygen uptake (O/sub 2/up), and vascular resistance (VR), and increased blood flow (BF), rubidium and microsphere clearances (Cl-Rb, Cl-Sph, respectively), and permeability--surface area product (PS) in a dose-related fashion. Intravenous morphine in a dose of 1 mg X kg-1 increased Cl-Rb (nutritive BF) without changes in total (nutritive and nonnutritive) BF. This increase in nutritive BF is probably related to morphine-induced histamine release. Morphine in a dose of 5 mg X kg-1 was accompanied by vasoconstriction that was completely abolished by alpha-adrenoceptor blockade. The data suggest that morphine-induced intestinal vasoconstriction is mediated via a release of epinephrine, apparently from the adrenal medulla. It is concluded that changes in the intestinal circulation during anesthesia with narcotics might play a certain role in the cardiovascular homeostasis during anesthesia and surgery. An increase in oxygen content in portal venous blood, resulting from a decrease in intestinal oxygen uptake, should facilitate hepatic oxygenation.

  20. Evaluation of menstrual cycle effects on morphine and pentazocine analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro-Dasilva, MC; Shinal, RM; Glover, T; Williams, RS; Staud, R; Riley, JL; Fillingim, RB

    2011-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated menstrual cycle influences on basal pain perception, but direct evidence of menstrual cycle influences on analgesic responses has not been reported in humans. Our aim was to determine whether the magnitude of morphine and pentazocine analgesia varied across the menstrual cycle. Sixty-five healthy women, 35 taking oral contraceptives (OC) and 30 normally cycling (NOC), underwent experimental pain assessment both before and after intravenous administration morphine (0.08 mg/kg) or pentazocine (0.5 mg/kg) compared to saline placebo. Both active drug and placebo were administered once during the follicular phase and once during the luteal phase. Measures of heat, ischemic and pressure pain sensitivity were obtained before and after drug administration. Change scores in pain responses were computed to determine morphine and pentazocine analgesic responses, and medication side effects were recorded. The data were analyzed using mixed-model ANOVAs. NOC women showed slightly greater heat pain sensitivity in the follicular vs. luteal phase, while the reverse pattern emerged for OC women (p=0.046). Also, OC women showed lower pressure pain thresholds compared to NOC women (p < .05). Regarding analgesic responses, NOC women showed greater morphine analgesia for ischemic pain during the follicular vs. the luteal phase (p=0.004). Likewise, side effects for morphine were significantly higher in NOC women in the follicular phase than in the luteal phase (p=0.02). These findings suggest that sex hormones may influence opioid responses; however, the effects vary across medications and pain modalities and are likely to be modest in magnitude. PMID:21239109

  1. Opiate receptor in praying mantis: effect of morphine and naloxone.

    PubMed

    Zabala, N A; Miralto, A; Maldonado, H; Nuñez, J A; Jaffe, K; Calderon, L D

    1984-05-01

    A praying mantis displays a "frightening reaction" called deimatic reaction (DR), any time that it is faced with a patterned visual stimulus that represents a potential damage for the insect. Results of the present paper show that the DR could be also elicited by an actual noxious (an electrical shock) and that this response is similar to that elicited by a potential nociceptive stimulus (a patterned visual stimulus). The DR elicited by the electric shock was used as a model for studying the analgesic effect of opiates. The mantis was placed in an apparatus that allowed us to give the insect an electrical shock and to measure the strength of its DR. During a first session the voltage threshold necessary to induce a full DR was determined, and then, the insect was injected with a certain solution. The voltage threshold was tested one, two and four hours after injection. Mantises that were injected with only distilled water showed no changes in their voltage threshold during the three tests. Injections of 300, 350 and 400 micrograms/g of morphine-HCl increased the voltage threshold in both a time-dependent and a dose related manner. A dose of 350 micrograms/g of morphine-HCl produced 50% of response inhibition after two hours of injections and is referred to as the median antinoxious dose ( AD50 ). Sixteen micrograms/g of naloxone given in conjunction with an AD50 of morphine, partially blocked the effect of morphine during the first hour and fully blocked it during the second hour. Thirty-two micrograms/g of naloxone fully blocked the morphine effect during the first and the second hour. However, more than 48 micrograms/g of naloxone alone also increased the voltage threshold in insects, similar to those described for vertebrates. PMID:6330763

  2. Effects of berberine on acquisition and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vahdati Hassani, Faezeh; Hashemzaei, Mahmoud; Akbari, Edris; Imenshahidi, Mohsen; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective: It has been shown that berberine, a major component of Berberis vulgaris extract, modulates the activity of several neurotransmitter systems including dopamine (Da) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) contributing to rewarding and reinforcing effects of morphine. Drug craving and relapsing even after a long time of abstinence therapy are the most important problems of addiction. In the present study, we investigated the alleviating effects of berberine on the acquisition and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) in mice. Materials and Methods: In male NMRI mice, the acquisition of CPP was established by 40 mg/kg of morphine sulphate injection and extinguished after the extinction training and reinstated by a 10 mg/kg injection of morphine. The effects of different doses of berberine (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) on the acquisition and reinstatement induced by morphine were evaluated in a conditioned place preference test. Results: The results showed that intraperitoneal administration of berberine (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) did not induce conditioned appetitive or aversive effects. Injection of berberine (10 and 20 mg/kg) 2 h before the morphine administration reduced acquisition of morphine-induced CPP. In addition, same doses of berberine significantly prevented the reinstatement of morphine-induced CPP. Conclusion: These results suggest that berberine can reduce the acquisition and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference and may be useful in treatment of morphine addiction. PMID:27222833

  3. Enhancement of Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity by Morphine and Its Attenuation by the Opioid Antagonist Naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Aminian, Atefeh; Javadi, Shiva; Rahimian, Reza; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Asadi Amoli, Fahimeh; Moghaddas, Payman; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram

    2016-07-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a major side effect of cisplatin, a widely used chemotherapy agent. Morphine and other opioids are also used extensively in different types of cancer for the clinical management of pain associated with local or metastatic neoplastic lesions. In addition to its analgesic effects, morphine has also been reported to possess potential immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties. Herein, we investigated the effects of morphine in a rat model of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Following administration of a single dose of cisplatin (5 mg/kg), animals received intraperitoneal injections of morphine (5 mg/kg/day) and/or naltrexone (20 mg/kg/day), an opioid antagonist, for 5 days. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was detected by a significant increase in plasma urea and creatinine levels in addition to alterations in kidney tissue morphology. Levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly increased in the renal tissue in cisplatin group. Moreover, glutathione (GSH) concentration and superoxide dismutase activity were significantly reduced in renal tissue in cisplatin group compared with control animals. Treatment with morphine aggravated the deleterious effects of cisplatin at clinical, biochemical and histopathological levels; whereas naltrexone diminished the detrimental effects of morphine in animals receiving morphine and cisplatin. Morphine or naltrexone alone had no effect on the mentioned parameters. Our findings indicate that concomitant treatment with morphine might intensify cisplatin-induced renal damage in rats. These findings suggest that morphine and other opioids should be administered cautiously in patients receiving cisplatin chemotherapy. PMID:27424012

  4. Myoelectric activity of the small intestine during morphine dependence and withdrawal in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kuperman, D.A.; Sninsky, C.A.; Lynch, D.F.

    1987-04-01

    The authors investigated (1) the effect of morphine dependence on the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC) of the small intestine, (2) whether bacterial overgrowth developed in morphine-dependent rats, and (3) the effect of naloxone and methylbromide naltrexone, a peripheral opioid antagonist, on the MMC in morphine-naive and morphine-dependent rats. They also evaluated intestinal motility during naloxone-induced withdrawal in animals pretreated with clonidine. Intestinal myoelectric activity was monitored by four indwelling electrodes in unanesthetized, fasted rats. D-(/sup 14/C)xylose breath tests were performed before and after morphine-pellet implantation to evaluate the presence of bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. Naloxone had no effect on myoelectric activity of the small intestine in morphine-naive rats. Cycling activity fronts were present in morphine-dependent animals, but there was a significant prolongation of activity front periodicity and slowing of the propagation velocity. No significant increase in /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ excretion was noted in the morphine-dependent rats. They conclude from their studies that (1) myoelectric activity of the small intestine develops incomplete tolerance to morphine; (2) bacterial overgrowth is not a feature of morphine dependence in the rat; (3) alterations of intestinal myoelectric activity are a component of the opiate withdrawal syndrome, and they appear at least partially mediated by a peripheral mechanism that can be suppressed by an ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonist.

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Ropivacaine Addition to Intrathecal Morphine for Pain Management in Intractable Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Li, Xihan; Zhu, Tong; Lin, Jian; Tao, Gaojian

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Although intrathecal drug infusion has been commonly adopted for terminal cancer pain relief, its adverse effects have made many clinicians reluctant to employ it for intractable cancer pain. The objective of this study is to compare the efficacy and security of an intrathecal continuous infusion of morphine and ropivacaine versus intrathecal morphine alone for cancer pain. Methods. Thirty-six cancer patients received either a continuous morphine (n = 19) or morphine and ropivacaine (n = 17) infusion using an intrathecal catheter through a subcutaneous port. Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) scores and the Barthel Index were analyzed. Adverse effects and complications on postoperative days 1, 3, 7, and 15 were also analyzed. Results. All patients experienced pain relief. Compared to those who received morphine alone, patients receiving morphine and ropivacaine had significantly lower postoperative morphine requirements and higher Barthel Index scores on the 15th postsurgical day (P < 0.05). Patients receiving morphine and ropivacaine had lower NRS scores than patients receiving morphine alone on postoperative days 1, 3, 7, and 15 (P < 0.05). Negative postsurgical effects were similar in both groups. Conclusions. Morphine and ropivacaine administration through intrathecal access ports is efficacious and safe and significantly improves quality of life. PMID:26556955

  6. Adenosine receptor antagonists inhibit the development of morphine sensitization in the C57BL/6 mouse.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, S P; Kaplan, G B

    1999-04-01

    We examined the effects of adenosine antagonists on the development of morphine sensitization in C57BL/6 mice. Adenosine antagonists or vehicle were repeatedly co-administered intraperitoneally with morphine (10 mg/kg, s.c.) to mice once every other day for 9 days. Two days later, a 10 mg/kg morphine-only challenge was administered to each group. Consistent with sensitization, mice receiving morphine alone developed enhanced ambulatory activity responses to subsequent morphine administrations and, upon morphine-only challenge, had a significantly greater response to morphine than vehicle pretreated animals. The nonselective adenosine antagonist, caffeine, at 10 and 20 mg/kg but not at 5 mg/kg, attenuated the development of sensitization during co-administration with morphine and also following morphine-only challenge. The adenosine A1 selective antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-(2-amino-4-chlorophenyl)-xanthine (PACPX), at 0.001 and 0.002 mg/kg but not at 0.2 mg/kg, similarly attenuated the development of morphine sensitization. We propose a mechanism which involves an adenosine receptor role in the mesolimbic dopamine system. PMID:10320021

  7. Memory Impairment and Reduced Exploratory Behavior in Mice after Administration of Systemic Morphine

    PubMed Central

    Kitanaka, Junichi; Kitanaka, Nobue; Hall, F Scott; Fujii, Mei; Goto, Akiko; Kanda, Yusuke; Koizumi, Akira; Kuroiwa, Hirotoshi; Mibayashi, Satoko; Muranishi, Yumi; Otaki, Soichiro; Sumikawa, Minako; Tanaka, Koh-ichi; Nishiyama, Nobuyoshi; Uhl, George R; Takemura, Motohiko

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of morphine were examined on tests of spatial memory, object exploration, locomotion, and anxiety in male ICR mice. Administration of morphine (15 or 30 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) induced a significant decrease in Y-maze alternations compared to saline vehicle-treated mice. The reduced Y-maze alternations induced by morphine were completely blocked by naloxone (15 mg/kg) or β-funaltrexamine (5 mg/kg) but not by norbinaltorphimine (5 mg/kg) or naltrindole (5 mg/kg), suggesting that the morphine-induced spatial memory impairment was mediated predominantly by μ-opioid receptors (MOPs). Significant spatial memory retrieval impairments were observed in the Morris water maze (MWM) in mice treated with morphine (15 mg/kg) or scopolamine (1 mg/kg), but not with naloxone or morphine plus naloxone. Reduced exploratory time was observed in mice after administration of morphine (15 mg/kg), in a novel-object exploration test, without any changes in locomotor activity. No anxiolytic-like behavior was observed in morphine-treated mice in the elevated plus maze. A significant reduction in buried marbles was observed in morphine-treated mice measured in the marble-burying test, which was blocked by naloxone. These observations suggest that morphine induces impairments in spatial short-term memory and retrieval, and reduces exploratory behavior, but that these effects are not because of overall changes in locomotion or anxiety. PMID:25987850

  8. Towards "evidence-making intervention" approaches in the social science of implementation science: The making of methadone in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Tim; Closson, Elizabeth F; Paparini, Sara; Guise, Andy; Strathdee, Steffanie

    2016-04-01

    In this commentary, we take the recent introduction of methadone treatment in response to emerging problems of HIV linked to heroin addiction in Kenya as a case for reflecting on the social science of implementation science. We offer a framework of 'evidence-making intervention' which we hold as distinct from mainstream 'evidence-based intervention' approaches. Whilst accepting that interventions are shaped in their contexts, evidence-based intervention approaches tend to imagine a stable intervention object with universal effect potential. By contrast, an evidence-making intervention approach investigates how an intervention, and the knowledge which constitutes it, is made locally, through its processes of implementation. Drawing on qualitative research generated in Kenya prior to (2012-2013) and during (2014-2015) the implementation of methadone treatment, we explore the making of 'methadone promise' as a case of evidence-making intervention. We show how enactments of methadone promise make multiple methadones, through which a binary is negotiated between the narratives of methadone as hope for addiction recovery and methadone as hope for HIV prevention. Addiction recovery narratives predominate, despite methadone's incorporation into policy via its globally supported HIV prevention evidence-base. Key practices in the making of methadone promise in Kenya include its medicalization, and renaming, as 'medically assisted treatment' - or simply 'MAT' - which distance it from prior constitutions elsewhere as a drug of substitution, and the visualisation of its effects wherein unhealthy people can be seen and shown to have become well. We also show how actors seek to protect the story of methadone promise from counter narratives, including through mass media projects. We conclude that there is no single biomedical object of methadone intervening on a single biological body across contexts, and no single universe of evidence. By giving weight to local rather than

  9. Supervised daily consumption, contingent take-home incentive and non-contingent take-home in methadone maintenance.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Saenz, E; Busse, A; Maremmani, I; Ciccocioppo, R; Zaimovic, A; Gerra, M L; Amore, M; Manfredini, M; Donnini, C; Somaini, L

    2011-03-30

    Methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) has been found effective in treating heroin addiction. Serious consideration should be given to the modality of methadone distribution, as it influences not only treatment outcome but the attitudes of policy makers and the community, too. On one hand, the choice of take-home methadone removes the need for daily attendance at a methadone clinic, which seems to improve patients' quality of life. On the other, this method, because of its lack of supervision and the absence of strict consumption monitoring, runs the risk of methadone misuse and diversion. In this study, we compared A) supervised daily consumption, B) contingent take-home incentives and C) non-contingent take-home in methadone maintenance in three groups of heroin-addicted patients attending three different MMT programmes. Retention rates at 12 months were significantly higher in contingent take-home patients (group B) than in those with supervised daily consumption (group A) and the non-contingent take-home (group C). Retention rates were higher in group A than in group C patients. Compared to patients in groups A and B, those in group C showed fewer negative urinalyses and higher rates of self-reported diversion and episodes of crime or violence. Results indicate a more positive outcomes following take-home methadone associated with behavioural incentives and other measures that aim to facilitate treatment compliance than those following daily supervised consumption. By contrast, non-contingent take-home methadone given to non-stabilized patients is associated with a high rate of diversion, along with more crime episodes and maladaptive behaviours. PMID:21147192

  10. Evaluation of QTc interval in Iranian causalities (Janbazan) of Iran-Iraq war receiving maintenance methadone treatment

    PubMed Central

    Esfahani, Morteza Abdar; Vosughi, Ali Akbar; Fatehi, Mohamad Hossein; Shahsanaee, Armindokht; Teimuri, Azam

    2012-01-01

    Background: Methadone is a synthetic opioid, used in treatment of chronic pains. The current study was carried out to evaluate the QTc interval in Iranian causalities (Janbazan) of Iran-Iraq war receiving maintenance methadone treatment. Materials and Methods: In 2010, one hundred war causalities in Isfahan who chronically take daily dose of 20 mg or more of methadone (more than 2 weeks), and did not have the history of cerebrovascular or coronary artery diseases, cardiac pacemaker, congenital prolonged QTC, or taking drugs affecting QTc, or having electrolyte abnormalities, were selected for the study. An electrocardiogram was taken from each patient using cardiofax instrument, and QTC was calculated manually. The data was analyzed using SPSS software with descriptive statistical methods and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Findings: All patients were male and had the mean age of 45.6 ± 6.1 years. The patients received 20-240 mg methadone daily for 1 to 108 months. The QTc was prolonged in 25% of the patients (QTc 5 450 ms), with the mean of 472.72 ± 18.5 ms (range 450-508 ms) and the mean daily dose of methadone 85.2 ± 59.0 mg. No significant relationship was observed between QTC interval on the one hand, and methadone dose (R = 0.025, P = 0.8), duration of treatment (R =-0.048, P = 0.68), age (R = 0.037, P = 0.71), and weight (R = 0.1, P = 0.21) of the patients, on the other hand. None of the patients had faint, syncope, arrhythmia, or sudden death. Conclusion: Oral methadone causes prolongation of QTC interval. However, the dosage of methadone and duration of treatment were not statistically related to QTC interval. PMID:23267379

  11. The selective mGlu2/3 receptor agonist LY354740 attenuates morphine-withdrawal-induced activation of locus coeruleus neurons and behavioral signs of morphine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Vandergriff, J; Rasmussen, K

    1999-02-01

    Naltrexone-precipitated morphine withdrawal induces hyperactivity of locus coeruleus (LC) neurons, as well as a plethora of behavioral withdrawal signs. Previous research has demonstrated that an increased release of glutamate and activation of AMPA receptors, particularly in the LC, play an important role in opiate withdrawal. LY354740 is a novel Group II metabotropic glutamate mGlu2/3 receptor agonist that decreases the release of glutamate. Therefore, we investigated the effect of LY354740 on naltrexone-precipitated morphine-withdrawal-induced activation of LC neurons and behavioral signs of morphine withdrawal. In in vivo recordings from anesthetized rats, pretreatment with LY354740 (3-30 mg/kg, s.c.) dose-dependently attenuated the morphine-withdrawal-induced activation of LC neurons. In unanesthetized, morphine-dependent animals, pretreatment with LY354740 (3-30 mg/kg, s.c.) dose-dependently suppressed the severity and occurrence of many naltrexone-precipitated morphine-withdrawal signs. These results indicate mGlu2/3 receptor agonists: (1) can attenuate the morphine-withdrawal-induced activation of LC neurons and many behavioral signs of morphine withdrawal; and (2) may have therapeutic effects in man for the treatment of opiate withdrawal. PMID:10218862

  12. Opioid switch from low dose of oral oxycodone to transdermal fentanyl matrix patch for patients with stable thoracic malignancy-related pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The effectiveness and safety of switch from oral oxycodone to fentanyl patch is little known. Here, we investigated if early phase opioid switch from low dose of oral oxycodone to transdermal fentanyl matrix patch provided any benefits for patients with thoracic malignancy and stable cancer-related pain. Methods This open-label two-centered prospective study enrolled patients with thoracic malignancy suffering persistent malignancy-related pain with numeric rating scale of pain intensity ≤ 3 which had been controlled by oral oxycodone ≤ 20 mg/day. Eligible patients switched from oral oxycodone to 12.5 μg/h of transdermal fentanyl matrix patch. The dose was allowed to be titrated upwards every 3 day by 25-50%, except for the first increase from 12.5 μg/hr to 25 μg/hr,until achieving adequate pain control. The data on patients’ global assessment scores measured on a five-step scale, an 11-point numeric rating scale of pain intensity, the severity of adverse effects using a four-point categorical rating scale, and the Epworth sleepiness scale questionnaire were collected for 15 days. Results Forty-nine eligible patients were analyzed. Overall patients’ satisfaction score significantly improved from day 1 (2.7 ± 0.9) to day 15 (2.3 ± 0.9) (p < 0.05), and 90% and 78% of patients remained to receive the minimum dose of fentanyl patch on day 8 and 15 from the opioid switch. There was a significant difference in sleepiness throughout the study period, though no difference was detected in pain intensity and other adverse effects. Conclusion Transdermal fentanyl matrix patch is an alternative analgesic option for a stable cancer pain in patients with thoracic malignancies. PMID:25313295

  13. Comparable Efficacy of Contingency Management for Cocaine Dependence Among African American, Hispanic and White Methadone Maintenance Clients

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Danielle; Sullivan, Brendan; Petry, Nancy M.

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine use is a significant problem among methadone maintenance clients. Contingency management (CM) is a reinforcement-based approach with demonstrated efficacy for reducing cocaine use. This study examines whether the efficacy of CM treatment for cocaine-dependent individuals receiving methadone maintenance for opioid dependence differs by ethnicity. Participants were 191 African American, Hispanic and White cocaine-dependen