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Sample records for methyl bromide exposure

  1. Uptake and excretion of ( UC)methyl bromide as influenced by exposure concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Medinsky, M.A.; Dutcher, J.S.; Bond, J.A.; Henderson, R.F.; Mauderly, J.L.; Snipes, M.B.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Cheng, Y.S.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    Uptake of methyl bromide and pathways for excretion of UC were investigated in male Fischer-344 rats after nose-only inhalation of 50, 300, 5700, or 10,400 nmol (1.6 to 310 ppm) of ( UC)methyl bromide/liter of air for 6 hr. Fractional uptake of methyl bromide decreased at the highest concentrations, 5700 and 10,400 nmol/liter, with 37 and 27% of the inhaled methyl bromide absorbed, respectively, compared to 48% at the lower levels. Total methyl bromide absorbed was 9 or 40 mol/kg body wt after exposure to 50 or 300 nmol/liter, respectively. Elimination of UC was linearly related to the amount of methyl bromide absorbed as determined from urine, feces, expired CO2, and parent compound collected for 66 hr after the end of exposure. Exhaled UCO2 was the dominant route of excretion, with from 1.2 to 110 mol (50% of amount absorbed) exhaled, and was described by a two-component negative exponential function; 85% was exhaled with t1/2 of 4 hr, and the remaining 15% was exhaled with a t1/2 of 17 hr. The rate of exhalation of UCO2 was not affected by the amount of ( UC)methyl bromide absorbed. From 0.4 to 54 mol was excreted in urine (20% of amount absorbed). The half-time for excretion of UC in urine was approximately 10 hr, and the rate of excretion was not dependent on the amount of ( UC)methyl bromide absorbed. Little UC was exhaled as methyl bromide (<4% of the dose) or excreted in feces (<2%). At the end of 66 hr, 25% of the UC absorbed remained in the rats. Liver, kidneys, adrenals, lungs, thymus, and turbinates (maxilloturbinates, ethmoturbinates, and nasal epithelial membrane) contained the highest concentrations of UC. Results indicated that uptake of inhaled methyl bromide could be saturated. Any ( UC)methyl bromide equivalents absorbed, however, would be excreted by concentration-independent mechanisms. 20 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  2. Methyl Bromide Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Rathus, E. M.; Landy, P. J.

    1961-01-01

    Seven cases of methyl bromide poisoning which occurred amongst workers engaged on a fumigation project are described. The methods adopted for investigation of the environmental situation are discussed and the measurement of blood bromide levels on random samples of workers is suggested as an index of the effectiveness of equipment and working methods. PMID:13739738

  3. Illness associated with exposure to methyl bromide-fumigated produce--California, 2010.

    PubMed

    2011-07-15

    Methyl bromide (MeBr) is a toxic gas used to fumigate agricultural fields and some produce. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) requires MeBr fumigation of grapes imported from Chile to prevent invasion by the Chilean false red mite, Brevipalpus chilensis. In 2010, two workers were exposed intermittently to MeBr over several months as part of their job inspecting produce at a cold-storage facility in Carson, California. Both workers had disabling neurologic symptoms (e.g., ataxia, memory difficulties, and dizziness) and elevated serum bromide concentrations. An environmental investigation revealed the potential for MeBr to accumulate in enclosed areas during the transportation and storage of fumigated grapes. Some MeBr air concentrations measured at a single point in time exceeded current 8-hour exposure limits, suggesting that exposure in confined areas could result in poisoning. Possible measures for facilities managers to consider to reduce postfumigation MeBr exposures include 1) increased aeration time, 2) reduction of packaging that might absorb MeBr or limit aeration, and 3) changes in the stacking of pallets to improve air flow. Facilities should monitor air MeBr levels if they store MeBr-fumigated commodities in enclosed spaces entered by workers. Clinicians should consider occupational and environmental exposures in their differential diagnosis, and workers who might become exposed to fumigants should be informed of the health hazards related to these pesticides. PMID:21753746

  4. Neurological manifestation of methyl bromide intoxication.

    PubMed

    Suwanlaong, Kanokrat; Phanthumchinda, Kammant

    2008-03-01

    Methyl bromide is a highly toxic gas with poor olfactory warning properties. It is widely used as insecticidal fumigant for dry foodstuffs and can be toxic to central and peripheral nervous systems. Most neurological manifestations of methyl bromide intoxication occur from inhalation. Acute toxicity characterized by headache, dizziness, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and visual disturbances. Tremor, convulsion, unconsciousness and permanent brain damage may occur in severe poisoning. Chronic exposure can cause neuropathy, pyramidal and cerebellar dysfunction, as well as neuropsychiatric disturbances. The first case of methyl bromide intoxication in Thailand has been described. The patient was a 24-year-old man who worked in a warehouse of imported vegetables fumigated with methyl bromide. He presented with unstable gait, vertigo and paresthesia of both feet, for two weeks. He had a history of chronic exposure to methyl bromide for three years. His fourteen co-workers also developed the same symptoms but less in severity. Neurological examination revealed ataxic gait, decreased pain and vibratory sense on both feet, impaired cerebellar signs and hyperactive reflex in all extremities. The serum concentration of methyl bromide was 8.18 mg/dl. Electrophysilogical study was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain (MRI) revealed bilateral symmetrical lesion of abnormal hypersignal intensity on T2 and fluid-attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences at bilateral dentate nuclei of cerebellum and periventricular area of the fourth ventricle. This incident stresses the need for improvement of worker education and safety precautions during all stages of methyl bromide fumigation. PMID:18575299

  5. Post-exposure treatment with nasal atropine methyl bromide protects against microinstillation inhalation exposure to sarin in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Che, Magnus M.; Conti, Michele; Boylan, Megan; Sabnekar, Praveena; Rezk, Peter; Sciuto, Alfred M.; Doctor, Bhupendra P.; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P.

    2009-09-15

    We evaluated the protective efficacy of nasal atropine methyl bromide (AMB) which does not cross the blood-brain barrier against sarin inhalation exposure. Age and weight matched male guinea pigs were exposed to 846.5 mg/m{sup 3} sarin using a microinstillation inhalation exposure technique for 4 min. The survival rate at this dose was 20%. Post-exposure treatment with nasal AMB (2.5 mg/kg, 1 min) completely protected against sarin induced toxicity (100% survival). Development of muscular tremors was decreased in animals treated with nasal AMB. Post-exposure treatment with nasal AMB also normalized acute decrease in blood oxygen saturation and heart rate following sarin exposure. Inhibition of blood AChE and BChE activities following sarin exposure was reduced in animals treated with nasal AMB, indicating that survival increases the metabolism of sarin or expression of AChE. The body weight loss of animals exposed to sarin and treated with nasal AMB was similar to saline controls. No differences were observed in lung accessory lobe or tracheal edema following exposure to sarin and subsequent treatment with nasal AMB. Total bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein, a biomarker of lung injury, showed trends similar to saline controls. Surfactant levels post-exposure treatment with nasal AMB returned to normal, similar to saline controls. Alkaline phosphatase levels post-exposure treatment with nasal AMB were decreased. Taken together, these data suggest that nasal AMB blocks the copious airway secretion and peripheral cholinergic effects and protects against lethal inhalation exposure to sarin thus increasing survival.

  6. An Ill Wind: Methyl Bromide Use Near California Schools, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Zev; Walker, Bill

    A California study investigates the use of the toxic pesticide methyl bromide near the state's public schools, explains why proposed safety rules have failed to protect children and others from exposure, and examines regions at particular exposure risk. Study results show an increasing exposure to methyl bromide near schools already at risk while…

  7. Measured and predicted airshed concentrations of methyl bromide in an agricultural valley and applications to exposure assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honaganahalli, Puttanna S.; Seiber, James N.

    A field study was conducted in September 1995 to measure the ambient atmospheric concentrations of methyl bromide (MeBr) in the Salinas Valley, California. Air concentrations of MeBr were measured at 11 sites located on the adjacent mountains, valley floor and at the Pacific Ocean coast over a 4-d period. The concentrations ranged up to 8.98 μg m -3. Industrial Source Complex Short Term 3 (ISCST3) and CALPUFF dispersion model simulations were performed with several fumigated fields serving as sources, using two estimates of source strengths from published flux values. CALPUFF was driven by 3D meteorology from CALMET. With the lower of the two estimates, the ISCST3 model underpredicted concentrations for 76% of data and averaged 66% of measured, and the CALPUFF model also underpredicted concentrations for 67% of observations and averaged 84% of measured. With the higher of the two estimates the ISCST3 overpredicted by a factor of two for 67% of data, and CALPUFF overpredicted concentrations by a factor of 1.6 for over 50% of data. Between the model predicted and measured concentrations, the coefficient of determination, R 2, was ≈0.7 for both source strengths with ISCST3 model. The R 2 with CALPUFF model was 0.55 and 0.82 with source strength estimated from two prior flux studies. The margin of exposure (MOE) for the population of the city of Salinas was calculated based on the measured ambient concentrations and compared with the current benchmark used by US-EPA and California Department of Pesticide Regulation for acceptable human health risk. Based on the models predicted worst-case exposure concentration, the MOE for acute effects was approximately 10,000. For chronic effects it was approximately 100, indicating a need for attention to exposure to MeBr in areas of intense methyl bromide use.

  8. Methyl bromide users search for science

    SciTech Connect

    Winegar, E.D.

    1995-01-01

    Workers, neighbors and the ozone are protected by regulation from this chemical, but those needing it complain that a solid foundation is lacking for the rules. Although not yet featured on {open_quotes}60 Minutes,{close_quotes} the pesticide methyl bromide is gaining widespread attention because of its central position in debates about worker health and safety, environmental toxics exposure and global ozone depletion.

  9. 49 CFR 173.193 - Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. 173.193 Section 173.193 Transportation Other Regulations... bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. (a) Bromoacetone must...

  10. 49 CFR 173.193 - Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. 173.193 Section 173.193 Transportation Other Regulations... bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. (a) Bromoacetone must...

  11. 49 CFR 173.193 - Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. 173.193 Section 173.193 Transportation Other Regulations... bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. (a) Bromoacetone must...

  12. METHYL BROMIDE ALTERNATIVES FOR VINEYARD REPLANT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil fumigation with methyl bromide is needed by grape growers in central California to control soilborne pests. However, use of methyl bromide is banned and soil fumigation with other chemicals subjects to strict regulations to protect human health and air quality. The objective was to determine,...

  13. Measuring methyl bromide emissions from fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S.R.; Gan, J.; Ernst, F.F.; Yates, M.V.

    1995-12-31

    Methyl bromide is used extensively for pest control. Recent evidence suggests that methyl bromide may react with stratospheric ozone and, due to the Clean Air Act, is scheduled for phase-out within the next 5 to 10 years. As indicated in a recent report from The National Agricultural Pesticide Impact Assessment Program, there will be substantial economic impact on the agricultural community if the use of methyl bromide is restricted. There are several areas of uncertainty concerning the agricultural use of methyl bromide. Foremost is the quantification of mass emitted to the atmosphere from agricultural fields. To address this, two field experiments were conducted to directly measure methyl bromide emissions. In the first experiment, methyl bromide was injected at approximately 25 cm depth and the soil was covered with 1 mil high-density polyethylene plastic. The second experiment was similar except that methyl bromide was injected at approximately 68 cm depth and the soil was not covered. From these experiments, the emission rate into the atmosphere and the subsurface transport of methyl bromide was determined. Both experiments include a field-scale mass balance to verify the accuracy of the flux-measurement methods as well as to check data consistency. The volatilization rate and mass lost was determined from estimates of the degradation and from several atmospheric and chamber flux methods.

  14. 77 FR 35295 - Methyl Bromide; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 RIN 2070-ZA16 Methyl Bromide; Pesticide Tolerances AGENCY: Environmental... methyl bromide in or on cotton, undelinted seed under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA.... Background In the Federal Register of April 6, 2012 (77 FR 20752) (FRL-9345- 1), EPA issued a proposed...

  15. Health and Environmental Effects Profile for methyl bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    The Health and Environmental Effects Profile for methyl bromide was prepared to support listings of hazardous constituents of a wide range of waste streams under Section 3001 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and to provide health-related limits for emergency actions under Section 101 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). Both published literature and information obtained from Agency program office files were evaluated as they pertained to potential human health, aquatic life, and environmental effects. Quantitative estimates are presented provided sufficient data are available. Methyl bromide has been determined to be a systemic toxicant. An Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI), for methyl bromide is 0.0014 mg/kg/day for oral exposure. The Reportable Quantity (RQ) value for methyl bromide is 100.

  16. Disposition of ( UC)methyl bromide in rats after inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, J.A.; Dutcher, J.S.; Medinsky, M.A.; Henderson, R.F.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the disposition and metabolism of ( UC)methyl bromide in rats after inhalation. Male Fischer-344 rats were exposed nose only to a vapor concentration of 337 nmol ( UC)methyl bromide/liter air (9.0 ppm, 25C, 620 torr) for 6 hr. Urine, feces, expired air, and tissues were collected for up to 65 hr after exposure. Elimination of UC as UCO2 was the major route of excretion with about 47% (3900 nmol/rat) of the total ( UC)methyl bromide absorbed excreted by this route. CO2 excretion exhibited a biphasic elimination pattern with 85% of the UCO2 being excreted with a half-time of 3.9 +/- 0.1 hr (anti x +/- SE) and 15% excreted with a half-time of 11.4 +/- 0.2 hr. Half-times for elimination of UC in urine and feces were 9.6 +/- 0.1 and 16.1 +/- 0.1 hr, respectively. By 65 hr after exposure, about 75% of the initial radioactivity had been excreted with 25% remaining in the body. Radioactivity was widely distributed in tissues immediately following exposure with lung (250 nmol equivalents/g), adrenal (240 nmol equivalents/g), and nasal turbinates (110 nmol equivalents/g) containing the highest concentrations of UC. Radioactivity in livers immediately after exposure accounted for about 17% of the absorbed methyl bromide. Radioactivity in all other tissues examined accounted for about 10% of the absorbed methyl bromide. Elimination half-times of UC from tissues were on the order of 1.5 to 8 hr. In all tissues examined, over 90% of the UC in the tissues was methyl bromide metabolities. The data from this study indicate that after inhalation methyl bromide is rapidly metabolized in tissues and readily excreted. 22 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  17. Emission of methyl bromide from biomass burning

    SciTech Connect

    Manoe, S.; Andreae, M.O. )

    1994-03-04

    Bromine is, per atom, far more efficient than chlorine in destroying stratospheric ozone, and methyl bromide is the single largest source of stratospheric bromine. The two main previously known sources of this compound are emissions from the ocean and from the compound's use as an agricultural pesticide. Laboratory biomass combustion experiments showed that methyl bromide was emitted in the smoke from various fuels tested. Methyl bromide was also found in smoke plumes from wildfires in savannas, chaparral, and boreal forest. Global emissions of methyl bromide from biomass burning are estimated to be in the range of 10 to 50 gigagrams per year, which is comparable to the amount produced by ocean emission and pesticide use and represents a major contribution ([approximately]30 percent) to the stratospheric bromine budget.

  18. Methyl Bromide Poisoning—A Bizarre Neurological Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Raymond P.

    1965-01-01

    Methyl bromide, a widely used fumigant, may cause burns of the skin, fatalities accompanied by coma and convulsions, or prolonged neurologic and psychiatric symptoms. Burns are more likely to occur where evaporation is prevented under protective clothing. Symptoms of serious illness may not develop for hours after exposure. Since action appears to be one of methylation, especially of SH groups, B.A.L. may be helpful if used promptly. PMID:14347974

  19. 49 CFR 173.193 - Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. 173.193 Section 173.193 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  20. 49 CFR 173.193 - Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. 173.193 Section 173.193 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  1. Methyl Bromide Alternatives for Vineyard Replant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The project is part of the USDA-ARS Pacific Area-Wide Pest Management Program for Methyl Bromide Alternatives. This is the first year of a three-year project. The research was initiated in summer 2007 with a field study planned for October 2007 at the USDA-ARS San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Scienc...

  2. METHYL BROMIDE ALTERNATIVES FOR CALIFORNIA STRAWBERRY NURSERIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of methyl bromide (MB) alternative fumigants on soil pests, plant productivity in nursery and fruiting fields, as well as production costs, were evaluated in California strawberry nurseries by an interdisciplinary team. Our trials followed nursery stock through low and high elevation ph...

  3. Challenges in Weed Management Without Methyl Bromide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide has been used for several decades for pre-plant soil fumigation in high value agricultural and horticultural crops because it can provide broad-spectrum control of insects, nematodes, pathogens, and weeds. However, MeBr has been identified as a powerful ozone-depleting chemical and i...

  4. Can Georgia growers replace methyl bromide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The price and availability of methyl bromide is limiting its use on Georgia farms; the need for an alternative is essential for sustainable vegetable production in GA. Three alternatives were evaluated in on-farm trials in the spring 2007 in Tift, Colquitt and Echols Counties. Treatments were replic...

  5. The toxic chemistry of methyl bromide.

    PubMed

    Bulathsinghala, A T; Shaw, I C

    2014-01-01

    Methyl bromide (MeBr) is a chemically reactive compound that has found use as a fire retardant and fumigant used for wood, soil, fruits and grains. Its use is banned in many countries because of its ozone-depleting properties. Despite this ban, the use of MeBr persists in some parts of the world (e.g. New Zealand) due to its important role in maintaining strict biosecurity of exported and imported products. Its high chemical reactivity leads to a broad toxicological profile ranging from acute respiratory toxicity following inhalation exposure, through carcinogenicity to neurotoxicty. In this article, we discuss the chemistry of MeBr in the context of its mechanisms of toxicity. The chemical reactivity of MeBr clearly underlies its toxicity. Bromine (Br) is electronegative and a good leaving group; the δ+ carbon thus facilitates electrophilic methylation of biological molecules including glutathione (GSH) via its δ- sulphur atom, leading to downstream effects due to GSH depletion. DNA alkylation, either directly by MeBr or indirectly due to reduction in GSH-mediated detoxification of reactive alkylating chemical species, might explain the carcinogenicity of MeBr. The neurotoxicity of MeBr is much more difficult to understand, but we speculate that methyl phosphates formed in cells might contribute to its neurone-specific toxicity via cholinesterase inhibition. Finally, evidence reviewed shows that it is unlikely for Br⁻ liberated by the metabolism of MeBr to have any toxicological effect because the Br⁻ dose is very low. PMID:23800997

  6. WEED CONTROL IN THE LIFE AFTER METHYL BROMIDE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetable growers are losing the soil fumigant methyl bromide. Efforts are on-going to extend the deadline for using methyl bromide until suitable alternatives are developed. Regardless of whether the deadline is extended or not, growers need to begin to study alternatives to methyl bromide and be...

  7. 75 FR 5582 - Methyl Bromide; Amendments to Terminate Uses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... AGENCY Methyl Bromide; Amendments to Terminate Uses AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... requested by the registrants and accepted by the Agency, of products containing the pesticide methyl bromide... Requests from the registrants listed in Table 2 to amend to terminate post-harvest methyl bromide uses...

  8. 40 CFR 180.124 - Methyl bromide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Methyl bromide; tolerances for... § 180.124 Methyl bromide; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance is established for residues of the fumigant methyl bromide, including metabolites and degradates, in or on the commodity in...

  9. 7 CFR 305.6 - Methyl bromide fumigation treatment schedules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Methyl bromide fumigation treatment schedules. 305.6..., fumigation with methyl bromide for sapote fruit fly. Regulated citrus fruits originating inside an area... equal concentrations of methyl bromide throughout the chamber, a fan should be placed near the point...

  10. Methyl bromide fumigation of packed table grapes: Effect of shipping box on gas concentrations and phytotoxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current methyl bromide schedules for table grapes to control mealybugs are approved for fruit packed in Toyon Kraft Veneer (TKV) boxes. The question arose concerning equivalence of exposure to methyl bromide if an Extruded Polystyrene (EPS) box was used in lieu of the TKV box for table grapes being ...

  11. Measurements of atmospheric methyl bromide and bromoform

    SciTech Connect

    Cicerone, R.J.; Heidt, L.E.; Pollock, W.H.

    1988-04-20

    We have measured gaseous methyl bromide (CH/sub 3/Br) and bromoform (CHBr/sub 3/) in air samples that were gathered approximately weekly from five ground-level sites: Point Barrow, Alaska; Mauna Loa Observatory and Cape Kumukahi, Hawaii; Matatula, Samoa; and Kaitorete Spit, New Zealand. Approximately 750 samples have been analyzed for CH/sub 3/Br between January 1985 and October 1987 and 990 samples have been analyzed for CHBr/sub 3/ between early 1984 and September 1987, all by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Methyl bromide concentrations are typically 10--11 parts per trillion (ppt) by volume; there are no clear indications of temporal increases. Bromoform concentrations are typically 2--3 ppt, but large seasonal variations are seen at Point Barrow. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  12. Methyl bromide: Ocean sources, ocean sinks, and climate sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Anbar, A.D.; Yung, Y.L.; Chavez, F.P.

    1996-03-01

    This study was performed to examine conflicting conclusions of two previously published studies which estimated the size of oceanic sources of methyl bromide. In addition, the sensitivity of atmospheric methyl bromide to climatic variations was examined. A steady state mass balance model was used to reexamine data from the previous studies. Linear scaling of methyl bromide production rates to chlorophyll content provided agreement between the two models. The results suggest that the open ocean is a small net sink for atmospheric methyl bromide, rather than a large net source. A high rate of biological production of methyl bromide in seawater is also strongly indicated. A coupled ocean-atmosphere model indicated that methyl bromide variations induced by climatic change can be larger than those resulting from 25% variations in anthropogenic sources. Quantifying marine production rates of methyl bromide is suggested as a necessary step in assessing stratospheric ozone loss. 63 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. [Research advances in methyl bromide in the ocean].

    PubMed

    Du, Hui-na; Xie, Wen-xia; Cui, Yu-qian; Chen, Jian-lei; Ye, Si-yuan

    2014-12-01

    Methyl bromide is an important atmospheric trace gas, which plays significant roles in the global warming and atmospheric chemistry. The ocean plays important and complex roles in the global biogeochemical cycles of methyl bromide, not only the source of atmospheric methyl bromide, but also the sink. Therefore, developing the chemical research of the soluble methyl bromide in the ocean, will not only have a certain guiding significance to the atmospheric ozone layer protection, but also provide a theoretical basis for estimating methyl bromide's contribution to the global environmental change on global scale. This paper reviewed the research advances on methyl bromide in the ocean, from the aspects of the biogeochemical cycle of methyl bromide in the ocean, the analysis and determination method, the concentration distribution, the sea-to-air flux and its sources and sinks in the atmosphere. Some deficiencies in the current studies were put forward, and the directions of the future studies were prospected. PMID:25876424

  14. Methyl bromide volatility measurements from treated fields

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, M.S.; Woodrow, J.E.; Seiber, J.N. |

    1995-12-31

    Methyl bromide is used as an agricultural soil fumigant and concern is growing over the role it may play in the depletion of stratospheric ozone. Methyl bromide is applied using various techniques and little is known about how much of the applied fumigant volatilizes into the atmosphere after application. The post-application volatilization losses of methyl bromide from two fields using different application practices were measured using an aerodynamic-gradient technique. One field was covered with a high-barrier plastic film tarp during application and the other was left uncovered, but the furrows made by the injection shanks were bedded over. The cumulative volatilization losses from the tarped field were 22% of the nominal application within the first 5 days of the experiment and about 32% of the nominal application within 9 days including the one day after the tarp was removed on day 8. The nontarped field lost 89%of the nominal application by volatilization in 5 days. The error associated, with each flux measurement, as well as variations in daily flux losses with differing sampling period lengths show the degree of variability inherent in this type of study.

  15. Degradation of methyl bromide in anaerobic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Miller, L.G.; Strohmaler, F.E.

    1994-01-01

    Methyl bromide (MeBr) was anaerobically degraded in saltmarsh sediments after reaction with sulfide. The product of this nucleophilic substitution reaction was methanethiol, which underwent further chemical and bacterial reactions to form dimethyl sulfide. These two gases appeared transiently during sediment incubations because they were metabolized by methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria. A second, less significant reaction of MeBr was the exchange with chloride, forming methyl chloride, which was also susceptible to attack by sulfide. Incubation of 14C-labeled methyl iodide as an analogue of MeBr resulted in the formation of 14CH4 and 14CO2 and also indicated that sulfate-reducing bacteria as well as methanogens metabolized the methylated sulfur intermediates. These results suggest that exposed sediments with abundant free sulfide, such as coastal salt-marshes, may constitute a sink for atmospheric MeBr.

  16. Methyl bromide emissions from tarped fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cicerone, R.J.; Williams, J.; Wang, N.Y.

    1995-12-31

    Once in the stratosphere, bromine atoms can destroy ozone effectively. Because of this potential effect, certain organobromine compounds including methyl bromide (MeBr) are being controlled or eliminated by national and international regulations. It would be valuable to determine the fraction of MeBr used in soil fumigations that subsequently enters the atmosphere to better assess the need for, and value of, strong regulations. We have designed and conducted several experiments accompanying field fumigations with MeBr/chloropicrin mixtures. In each of three field-fumigation experiments new Irvine, CA in which the fumigated field was covered immediately with plastic tarping, we have deployed static flux chambers on top of the tarping and measured escape fluxes of MeBr. After tarp removal, the same chambers were replaced on the bare soil to continue the measurements. We have also measured soil bromide contents before and after the fumigation. One experiment yielded an escape fraction of 80 to 87% (with 19% remaining as bromide) while the other two experiments yielded escape fractions of 30 to 35% (with about 70% remaining as bromide). This paper will summarize stratospheric bromine chemistry, describe the field experiments and discuss factors that influence emissions, including soil pH, moisture and organic content and injection technique. We acknowledge TriCal, Inc. for many helpful discussions and for professional field applications of MeBr.

  17. Problems with NIOSH method 2520 for methyl bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Tharr, D.

    1994-03-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) publishes the NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods (NMAM), a collection of analytical methods for characterizing exposures to environmental chemicals. When an industrial hygienist selects a method to monitor worker exposure, it is important to remember that not all the methods in the NMAM have undergone the same level of evaluation, as the following case demonstrates. As part of an industrywide study of the health effects resulting from methyl bromide exposure in structural and agricultural applicators, NIOSH researchers conducted industrial hygiene monitoring for methyl bromide in Florida during July 1990. NIOSH method 2520 was used. This method recommends use of two charcoal tubes (400 mg/100 mg) in series, desorption with carbon disulfide, and analysis by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector. Sampling results from these surveys indicated a capacity problem. A project was then initiated to determine the reason for the methyl bromide breakthrough that occurred during industrial hygiene monitoring. While conducting research to define and solve this problem, several other problems were identified: reduced adsorption capacity caused by high humidity, difficulty in preparing standard solutions, sample instability, change in recovery with loading, and insufficiently low quantitation limit. The addition of a drying tube to the sampling train, as well as changes to the analytical technique, to the desorption solvent, and to the time till analysis, resulted in an improved method for methyl bromide. This case study demonstrates the importance of noting the conditions under which a method was evaluated and the benefit of testing method performance under conditions likely to exist at a field site. 5 refs.

  18. Photodissociation of methyl chloride and methyl bromide in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Methyl chloride (CH3Cl) and methyl bromide (CH3Br) have been suggested to be significant sources of the stratospheric halogens. The breakup of these compounds in the stratosphere by photodissociation or reaction with OH releases halogen atoms which catalytically destroy ozone. Experimental results are presented for ultraviolet photoabsorption cross sections of CH3Cl and CH3Br. Calculations are presented of loss rates for the methyl halides due to photodissociation and reaction with OH and of mixing ratios of these species in the stratosphere.

  19. The Thz Absorption of Methyl Bromide (CH_3BR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Marlon; Drouin, Brian J.

    2011-06-01

    The possibility of monitoring Methyl Bromide is of interest for both environmental and health concerns. It has an ozone depletion potential of 0.2% and falls under regulations of the Clean Air Act. Neurological effects from long term exposure may result from its major use as a pesticide. Recent improvements in microwave limb sounding at mm & submm wavelengths have resulted in retrievals of Methyl Chloride from atmospheric spectra. It is conceivable that Methyl Bromide would also be measurable by this technique. In an effort to extend and improve the previous work, the THz spectrum of Methyl Bromide has been measured at JPL. We used an isotopically enriched 13CH_3Br (90%) sample and recorded spectra from 750 - 1200 GHz. Our assignment covers the CH_379Br, CH_381Br, 13CH_379Br and 13CH_381Br isotopologues with J< 66 and K< 17 for the ground vibrational state. We plan to assign vibrational satellites and investigate possible perturbations near K =12 in the ground state.

  20. Methyl bromide fate in fumigated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T.A.; Rice, P.J.; Cink, J.H.

    1995-12-31

    Although widespread use of methyl bromide (MeBr) as a sail and structure fumigant has previously been recognized as a potential significant source of atmospheric MeBr, losses have not been well quantified. Our research indicates that, in laboratory studies, MeBr is volatilized rapidly from fumigated soils and that volatility increases with temperature (35{degrees}C > 25{degrees}C and 15{degrees}C) and moisture (0.03 bar and 0.3 bar > 1 bar > 3 bar). Degradation of MeBr in soil, as indicated by production of bromide ion, was also directly related to temperature and moisture. Most of the soil degradation of MeBr in these studies appears to be abiotic based on the observation of toxicity (reduced microbial respiration) in fumigated soils. We also determined the transformation and movement of MeBr in undisturbed soil columns. These studies also indicated that MeBT volatilizes rapidly (> 50% in 48 h) from soil. In addition, MeBr was not detected in the leachate from the soil columns, however, bromide ion was detected at levels above background 48 h after fumigation and peaked at 5 weeks.

  1. Interaction of methyl bromide with soil.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ting; Maciel, Gary E

    2002-02-15

    Because methyl bromide (CH3Br) is a widely used agricultural fumigant for soil disinfection, it is important to know the chemical behavior and fate of CH3Br as a result of its use for soil treatment. A solid-state 13C NMR study of 13CH3Br-treated soil and soil-component samples shows that methylation of soil organic matter may be the major pathway for degradation of CH3Br in soils. Adsorption of CH3Br on a dried clay like Ca-montmorillonite or kaolinite does not contribute directly to the degradation of CH3Br. The results are interpreted in terms of the chemical structures of separated soil fractions and the nature of the separation procedure. PMID:11878373

  2. 40 CFR 180.124 - Methyl bromide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Methyl bromide; tolerances for residues. 180.124 Section 180.124 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.124 Methyl bromide; tolerances...

  3. 40 CFR 180.124 - Methyl bromide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Methyl bromide; tolerances for residues. 180.124 Section 180.124 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.124 Methyl bromide; tolerances...

  4. Atmosphere-plant canopy interactions of methyl bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.E. Jr.; Leonard, T.D.; Gustin, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    In the planetary boundary layer, parcels of air containing background and elevated concentrations of methyl bromide commonly pass through plant canopies in managed (agriculture) and natural (forests, grasslands) ecosystems. It is hypothesized that leaf surfaces are a significant sink or methyl bromide on a local and regional scale and that failure to account for this sink results in a significant overestimation of methyl bromide transport to the stratosphere. Using highly controlled environments, studies are investigating the reactivity of leaf surfaces for methyl bromide at elevated and global background concentrations. Estimates of pathway resistances are being calculated and sites of deposition determined. The results indicate that plant canopies are a significant unrecognized sink for methyl bromide in the atmosphere.

  5. Methyl bromide intoxication in four field-workers during removal of soil fumigation sheets.

    PubMed

    Herzstein, J; Cullen, M R

    1990-01-01

    Methyl bromide is a highly toxic and penetrating compound used extensively as an insecticide for dry foodstuffs and as a soil fumigant (in greenhouses and fields) for the control of nematodes, fungi, and weeds. More than 300 cases of systemic poisoning and 60 fatalities attributable to methyl bromide have been reported [Alexeeff and Kilgore, 1983], resulting in substantial regulations concerning its handling, storage, application, and disposal. A recent exposure incident at a Connecticut nursery represents to our knowledge the first report of toxicity stemming from exposures in the field during removal of plastic sheets days after injection of methyl bromide into soil. Following removal of polyethylene sheets covering soil fumigated with methyl bromide, four field-workers developed fatigue and light-headedness and 3 workers noted progressive respiratory, gastrointestinal (GI), and neurologic symptoms. The acute systemic symptoms improved over several days, but later-onset neuropsychiatric symptoms persisted for several weeks. This incident stresses the need for improved worker education and strict adherence to safety precautions during all stages of methyl bromide fumigation and raises the possibility of an increased risk of toxicity associated with methyl bromide fumigation during a cool season. PMID:2305812

  6. UV photodissociation of methyl bromide and methyl bromide cation studied by velocity map imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, Valerie; Samartzis, Peter C.; Wodtke, Alec M.

    2009-01-21

    We employ the velocity map imaging technique to measure kinetic energy and angular distributions of state selected CH{sub 3} (v{sub 2}=0,1,2,3) and Br ({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}, {sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) photofragments produced by methyl bromide photolysis at 215.9 nm. These results show unambiguously that the Br and Br* forming channels result in different vibrational excitations of the umbrella mode of the methyl fragment. Low energy structured features appear on the images, which arise from CH{sub 3}Br{sup +} photodissociation near 330 nm. The excess energy of the probe laser photon is channeled into CH{sub 3}{sup +} vibrational excitation, most probably in the {nu}{sub 4} degenerate bend.

  7. Residential Proximity to Methyl Bromide Use and Birth Outcomes in an Agricultural Population in California

    PubMed Central

    Gemmill, Alison; Gunier, Robert B.; Bradman, Asa; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Background: Methyl bromide, a fungicide often used in strawberry cultivation, is of concern for residents who live near agricultural applications because of its toxicity and potential for drift. Little is known about the effects of methyl bromide exposure during pregnancy. Objective: We investigated the relationship between residential proximity to methyl bromide use and birth outcomes. Methods: Participants were from the CHAMACOS (Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas) study (n = 442), a longitudinal cohort study examining the health effects of environmental exposures on pregnant women and their children in an agricultural community in northern California. Using data from the California Pesticide Use Reporting system, we employed a geographic information system to estimate the amount of methyl bromide applied within 5 km of a woman’s residence during pregnancy. Multiple linear regression models were used to estimate associations between trimester-specific proximity to use and birth weight, length, head circumference, and gestational age. Results: High methyl bromide use (vs. no use) within 5 km of the home during the second trimester was negatively associated with birth weight (β = –113.1 g; CI: –218.1, –8.1), birth length (β = –0.85 cm; CI: –1.44, –0.27), and head circumference (β = –0.33 cm; CI: –0.67, 0.01). These outcomes were also associated with moderate methyl bromide use during the second trimester. Negative associations with fetal growth parameters were stronger when larger (5 km and 8 km) versus smaller (1 km and 3 km) buffer zones were used to estimate exposure. Conclusions: Residential proximity to methyl bromide use during the second trimester was associated with markers of restricted fetal growth in our study. PMID:23603811

  8. The oceans: A source or a sink of methyl bromide?

    SciTech Connect

    Pilinis, C.; King, D.B.; Saltzman, E.S.

    1996-04-15

    The global ocean/atmosphere flux of methyl bromide has been estimated from shipboard measurements of the saturation anomaly. When such data are extrapolated globally on the basis of constant saturation anomaly, the ocean is a net sink for methyl bromide [Lobert et al.]. The same data can also be extrapolated on the basis of steady-state production rate of methyl bromide in the water column, allowing regional and seasonal variations in temperature to affect the saturation anomaly. The authors have carried out this type of extrapolation, and they found that the oceans are a strong net source of methyl bromide to the atmosphere. The difference arises mainly due to slow degradation rates in water of higher latitudes. A reduction of the applied production rate by more than 35% is needed in order to switch the ocean from a source to a sink of methyl bromide. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of current estimates of oceanic flux to assumptions about methyl bromide production and destruction in the water column. 19 refs., 2 fig.

  9. Glutathione transferase activity and formation of macromolecular adducts in two cases of acute methyl bromide poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, R; Rambourg-Schepens, M O; Müller, A; Hallier, E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the activity of glutathione transferase and to measure the S-methylcysteine adducts in blood proteins, after acute inhalation exposure to methyl bromide. To examine the influence of the polymorphism of glutathione-S-transferase theta (GSTT1) on the neurotoxicity of methyl bromide. METHODS: Two workers acutely exposed to methyl bromide with inadequate respiratory protective devices were poisoned. Seven weeks after the accident, blood samples were drawn from both patients, for measurement of glutathione transferase activity in erythrocytes (conjugator status--that is, GSTT1 phenotype) and measurement of binding products of methyl bromide with blood proteins. Conjugator status was determined by a standard procedure. The binding product of methyl bromide, S-methylcysteine, was measured in globin and albumin. RESULTS: Duration and intensity of exposure were identical for both patients as they worked together with the same protective devices and with similar physical effort. However, one patient had very severe poisoning, whereas the other only developed mild neurotoxic symptoms. The first patient was a "conjugator" with normal glutathone transferase activity, whereas this activity was undetectable in the erythrocytes of the second patient, who consequently had higher concentrations of S-methylcysteine adduct in albumin (149 v 91 nmol/g protein) and in globin (77 v 30 nmol/g protein). CONCLUSIONS: Methyl bromide is genotoxic and neurotoxic. Its genotoxicity seems to be the consequence of the alkylating activity of the parent compound, and conjugation to glutathione has a protective effect. The data presented here suggest a different mechanism for methyl bromide neurotoxicity which could be related to the transformation of methylglutathione into toxic metabolites such as methanethiol and formaldehyde. If such metabolites are the ultimate toxic species, N-acetylcysteine treatment could have a toxifying rather than a detoxifying effect. PMID:8704864

  10. Methyl bromide emissions from a covered field: II. Volatilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S.R.; Gan, J.; Ernst, F.F.

    1996-01-01

    An experiment to investigate the environmental fate and transport of methyl bromide in agricultural fields is described. The methyl bromide volatilization rate was determined as a function of time for conditions where methyl bromide was applied at a rate of 843 kg in a 3.5-ha (i.e., 240 kg/ha) field covered with plastic at a depth of 25 cm. Three methods were used to estimate the methyl bromide volatilization rate, including: the aerodynamic, theoretical profile shape and integrated horizontal flux methods. The highest methyl bromide volatilization rates were at the beginning of the experiment. Within the first 24 h, approximately 36% of the applied methyl bromide mass was lost. Diurnally, the largest volatilization rates occurred during the day when temperatures were high and the atmosphere was unstable. Cooler temperatures, light winds, and neutral to stable atmospheric conditions were present at night, reducing the flux. The total emission calculated using these methods was found to be approximately 64% ({+-} 10%) of the applied mass. A mass balance was calculated using each flux estimation technique and several methods for analyzing the data. The average mass recovery using all the flux methods was 867 kg ({+-}83 kg), which was 102.8% ({+-}9.8%) of the applied (i.e., 843 kg). The range in the mass balance percent (i.e., percent of applied mass that is measured) is from 88 to 112%. The averaged mass balance percent for the aerodynamic method, which involved using the measured data directly, was approximately 100.8%. The total emission calculated using the aerodynamic method was found to be approximately 62% ({+-}11%) of the applied mass. 29 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Prostate cancer and toxicity from critical use exemptions of methyl bromide: Environmental protection helps protect against human health risks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although ozone-depleting methyl bromide was destined for phase-out by 2005, it is still widely applied as a consequence of various critical-use-exemptions and mandatory international regulations aiming to restrict the spread of pests and alien species (e.g. in globalized transport and storage). The withdrawal of methyl bromide because of its environmental risk could fortuitously help in the containment of its human toxicity. Methods We performed a systematic review of the literature, including in vitro toxicological and epidemiological studies of occupational and community exposure to the halogenated hydrocarbon pesticide methyl bromide. We focused on toxic (especially chronic) or carcinogenic effects from the use of methyl bromide, on biomonitoring data and reference values. Eligible epidemiological studies were subjected to meta-analysis. Results Out of the 542 peer reviewed publications between 1990-2011, we found only 91 referring to toxicity of methyl bromide and 29 using the term "carcinogenic", "neoplastic" or "mutagenic". Several studies provide new additional data pertaining to the mechanistic aspects of methyl bromide toxicity. Few studies have performed a detailed exposure assessment including biomonitoring. Three evaluated epidemiological studies assessed a possible association between cancer and methyl bromide. Overall, exposure to methyl bromide is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer OR, 1.21; 95% CI (0,98-1.49), P = 0.076. Two epidemiological studies have analyzed environmental, non-occupational exposure to methyl bromide providing evidence for its health risk to the general public. None of the epidemiological studies addressed its use as a fumigant in freight containers, although recent field and case reports do refer to its toxic effects associated with its use in shipping and storage. Conclusions Both the epidemiological evidence and toxicological data suggest a possible link between methyl bromide exposure and serious

  12. Methyl bromide alternatives for postharvest insect disinfestation of California walnuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Before shipment, California inshell walnuts destined for the valuable export market must be disinfested of both field pests (codling moth and navel orangeworm) and common storage pests (Indianmeal moth and red flour beetle). Until recently fumigation with methyl bromide has been the most common dis...

  13. HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS PROFILE FOR METHYL BROMIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Health and Environmental Effects Profile for Methyl Bromide was prepared to support listings of hazardous constituents of a wide range of waste streams under Section 3001 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and to provide health-related limits for emergency a...

  14. Reactive films for mitigating methyl bromide emissions from fumigated soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emissions of methyl bromide (MeBr) from agricultural fumigation can lead to depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, and so its use is being phased out. However, as MeBr is still widely used under Critical Use Exemptions, strategies are still required to control such emissions. In this work, nove...

  15. Methyl Bromide Alternatives for Floriculture Production in a Problem Site

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Successful methyl bromide alternatives must manage a variety of pest problems in floriculture and vegetable production systems including weeds, plant-parasitic nematodes, and soil-borne diseases. Methods that may be successful in some situations may be challenged in sites with unusually heavy pest p...

  16. The Fate of Alternative Soil Funigants to Methyl Bromide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil fumigation is an important agricultural practice for the control of soil-borne pests. Since the phase–out of methyl bromide, due to its role in the depletion of stratospheric ozone, several alternatives such as 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D), chloropicrin (CP), and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) are b...

  17. Status of Alternatives for Methyl Bromide in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide is a fumigant used for disinfestation of soils, commodities and structures. Listed as an ozone-depleting chemical international environmental protocols and the U.S. Clean Air Act require that its use be severely restricted. Although use of this fumigant has fallen considerably, the U....

  18. Weed Control with Methyl Bromide Alternatives: A Review.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide (MeBr) has been used for several decades for pre-plant soil fumigation in high value agricultural and horticultural crops because it can provide broad-spectrum control of insects, nematodes, pathogens, and weeds. However, MeBr has been identified as a powerful ozone-depleting chemica...

  19. Methyl bromide phase out could affect future reforestation efforts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide has long been an integral component in producing healthy tree seedlings in forest nurseries of California, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. The fumigant was supposed to be completely phased out of use in the United States of America by 2005, but many forest nurseries continue to...

  20. REVIEW OF CONTROL OPTIONS FOR METHYL BROMIDE IN COMMODITY TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes recent developments in the control of methyl bromide (MeBr) and discusses technical considerations and requirements for and economic feasibility of recovery. (NOTE: MeBr, fumigant for agricultural commodities, is an ozone depleting chemical. The U.S. EPA has ...

  1. Calla lily production with methyl bromide alternatives – Year 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cut flower and ornamental bulb industries rely heavily on a methyl bromide/chloropicrin (MB/Pic) mixture as a key pest management tool. The loss of MB will seriously affect the cut flower and bulb industry, and, in the future, will require growers to use alternative fumigants. Past experiments have...

  2. Depleting methyl bromide residues in soil by reaction with bases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite generally being considered the most effective soil fumigant, methyl bromide (MeBr) use is being phased out because its emissions from soil can lead to stratospheric ozone depletion. However, a large amount is still currently used due to Critical Use Exemptions. As strategies for reducing the...

  3. Methyl bromide alternatives for postharvest insect disinfestation of California walnuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Before shipment, California inshell walnuts destined for the valuable export market must be disinfested of both field pests (codling moth and navel orangeworm) and common storage pests (Indianmeal moth and red flour beetle). Until recently fumigation with methyl bromide has been the most common disi...

  4. Methyl bromide alternatives for raspberry nurseries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberry nurseries must produce plants free from disease to meet marketplace and export requirements. Minor disease infestations in nurseries can cause severe epidemics in production fields. Raspberry nurseries presently qualify for critical use and quarantine/preshipment exemptions to use Methyl B...

  5. Oceanic Uptake of Methyl Bromide: Implications for Oceanic Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yvon-Lewis, S. A.; Butler, J. H.; King, D. B.; Saltzman, E. S.; Tokarczyk, R.

    2002-12-01

    Methyl bromide (CH3Br) is a source of inorganic bromine (Br) in the stratosphere, where it contributes to the depletion of stratospheric ozone. Unlike the chlorofluorocarbons, which are entirely anthropogenic, methyl bromide has both natural and anthropogenic sources. At ~10 parts per trillion in the troposphere, methyl bromide is believed to be the single largest contributor of stratospheric Br. Once in the stratosphere, Br is approximately 50 times more effective in depleting stratospheric ozone than Cl. However, the budget for CH3Br remains largely unbalanced with known sinks outweighing sources by ~50%. With production and degradation occurring in the ocean, the ocean is both a source and a sink for CH3Br. The balance between production and degradation results in the net undersaturation of CH3Br that has been observed over much of the world's ocean with an estimated global net ocean sink ranging from -11 to -20 Gg/y [King et al., 2000 and references therein]. However, effects of climate change, such as changes in windspeed distribution or sea-surface temperature could alter this balance. Modeling the potential effect of such forcing on the net flux of this important trace gas requires an understanding of the factors controlling the distributions of production and degradation in the surface ocean. During three recent research cruises (North Atlantic, North Pacific, and Southern Ocean), CH3Br degradation rate constants were measured along with saturation anomalies. Here we incorporate these data into a gridded global box model to examine the distribution of oceanic production rates necessary to support the observations. King, D.B., J.H. Butler, S.A. Montzka, S.A. Yvon-Lewis, and J.W. Elkins, Implications of methyl bromide supersaturations in the temperate North Atlantic Ocean, J. of Geophys. Res., 105 (D15), 19763-19769, 2000.

  6. 76 FR 34700 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Request for Methyl Bromide Critical Use Exemption Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... AGENCY Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Request for Methyl Bromide Critical Use Exemption Applications... exemption from the phaseout of methyl bromide for 2014. Critical use exemptions last only one year. All... interested parties to provide EPA with new data on the technical and economic feasibility of methyl...

  7. 75 FR 41177 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Request for Methyl Bromide Critical Use Exemption Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... AGENCY Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Request for Methyl Bromide Critical Use Exemption Applications... exemption from the phaseout of methyl bromide for 2013. Critical use exemptions last only one year. All... interested parties to provide EPA with new data on the technical and economic feasibility of methyl...

  8. Off-site air monitoring following methyl bromide chamber and building fumigations and evaluation of the ISCST air dispersion model

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, T.; Swgawa, R.; Wofford, P.

    1995-12-31

    The Department of Pesticide Regulation`s preliminary risk characterization of methyl bromide indicated an inadequate margin of safety for several exposure scenarios. Characterization of the air concentrations associated with common methyl bromide use patterns was necessary to determine specific scenarios that result in an unacceptable margin of safety. Field monitoring data were used in conjunction with the Industrial Source Complex, Short Tenn (ISCST) air dispersion model to characterize air concentrations associated with various types of methyl bromide applications. Chamber and building fumigations were monitored and modelled. For each fumigation the emission rates, chamber or building specifications and on-site meteorological data were input into the ISCST model. The model predicted concentrations were compared to measured air concentrations. The concentrations predicted by the ISCST model reflect both the pattern and magnitude of the measured concentrations. Required buffer zones were calculated using the ISCST output.

  9. Solid phase microextraction for active or passive sampling of methyl bromide during fumigations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The high diffusivity and volatility of methyl bromide make it an ideal compound for Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME)-based sampling of air prior to gas-chromatographic quantifications. SPME fibers can be used as active methyl bromide samplers, with high capacities and an equilibrium time of 1-2 m...

  10. 77 FR 48153 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Request for Methyl Bromide Critical Use Exemption Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ...On May 17, 2012, the EPA published a notice in the Federal Register requesting applications for the Critical Use Exemption from the phaseout of methyl bromide for 2015. On August 3, 2012, EPA received a letter from methyl bromide stakeholders requesting an extension to the August 15, 2012 deadline for submitting Critical Use Exemption applications. The letter requested a deadline of August 29,......

  11. Performance of soil solarization and methyl bromide in sites infested with root-knot nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil fumigation with methyl bromide has been the principal means of managing soil-borne pest problems on ornamental crops in the United States for many years. Interest in effective alternatives increased during the phase-out of methyl bromide, and will become more acute as existing stocks are deple...

  12. Destruction of methyl bromide sorbed to activated carbon by thiosulfate and electrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide is widely used as a fumigant for post-harvest and quarantine uses at port facilities due to the low treatment times required, but it is vented to the atmosphere after its use. Due to the potential contributions of methyl bromide to stratospheric ozone depletion, technologies for the c...

  13. Bacterial oxidation of methyl bromide in Mono Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connell, T.L.; Joye, S.B.; Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidation of methyl bromide (MeBr) in the water column of Mono Lake, CA, was studied by measuring the formation of H14CO3 from [14C]MeBr. Potential oxidation was detected throughout the water column, with highest rates occurring in the epilimnion (5-12 m depth). The oxidation of MeBr was eliminated by filter-sterilization, thereby demonstrating the involvement of bacteria. Vertical profiles of MeBr activity differed from those obtained for nitrification and methane oxidation, indicating that MeBr oxidation is not simply a co-oxidation process by either nitrifiers or methanotrophs. Furthermore, specific inhibitors of methane oxidation and/or nitrification (e.g., methyl fluoride, acetylene, allyl sulfide) had no effect upon the rate of MeBr oxidation in live samples. Of a variety of potential electron donors added to Mono Lake water, only trimethylamine resulted in the stimulation of MeBr oxidation. Cumulatively, these results suggest that the oxidation of MeBr in Mono Lake waters is attributable to trimethylamine-degrading methylotrophs. Neither methyl chloride nor methanol inhibited the oxidation of [14C]MeBr in live samples, indicating that these bacteria directly oxidized MeBr rather than the products of MeBr nucleophilic substitution reactions.

  14. Error Evaluation of Methyl Bromide Aerodynamic Flux Measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majewski, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    Methyl bromide volatilization fluxes were calculated for a tarped and a nontarped field using 2 and 4 hour sampling periods. These field measurements were averaged in 8, 12, and 24 hour increments to simulate longer sampling periods. The daily flux profiles were progressively smoothed and the cumulative volatility losses increased by 20 to 30% with each longer sampling period. Error associated with the original flux measurements was determined from linear regressions of measured wind speed and air concentration as a function of height, and averaged approximately 50%. The high errors resulted from long application times, which resulted in a nonuniform source strength; and variable tarp permeability, which is influenced by temperature, moisture, and thickness. The increase in cumulative volatilization losses that resulted from longer sampling periods were within the experimental error of the flux determination method.

  15. Methyl bromide emissions from a covered field: I. Experimental conditions and degradation in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S.R.; Gan, J.; Ernst, F.F.

    1996-01-01

    An experiment is described to investigate the environmental fate and transport of methyl bromide in agricultural systems. The experiment was designed to determine the dynamics of methyl bromide movement through soil, degradation, and total emissions to the atmosphere. This is of particular interest because it will allow an assessment of the environmental impacts (i.e., stratospheric ozone depletion) resulting from the agricultural use of methyl bromide. Methyl bromide was applied at a rate of 843 kg in a 3.5-ha (i.e., 240 kg/ha) field at a depth of 0.25 m and covered with a sheet of 1-mil polyethylene plastic. The maximum methyl bromide concentration in the atmosphere occurred at night between 0200 and 0600 h. During the first 3 d of the experiment, the maximum daily concentrations at 0.2 m above the soil surface were 30, 5, and 1 mg/(m{sup 3} of air), respectively. The trend of reduced emissions with time continued until the plastic was removed, when a momentary increase in the methyl bromide emissions occurred. The maximum soil gas concentration 24 h after injection was 30 g/m{sup 3} located at a 0.25-m depth. When the plastic was removed from the field (at 5.6 d), the maximum soil gas concentration was approximately 2 g/m{sup 3} at a 0.5-m depth. A mass-difference method for estimating the total methyl bromide emissions from the soil, based on degradation of methyl bromide to Br{sup -}, indicates that approximately 39% or 325 kg ({+-} 164 kg) of the applied methyl bromide was converted to Br{sup -} and, therefore, 61% or 518 kg ({+-} 164 kg) was lost via volatilization. 16 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. 77 FR 31564 - Notice of Availability of a Treatment Evaluation Document; Methyl Bromide Fumigation of Cottonseed

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-29

    ... Federal Register on April 6, 2012 (77 FR 20752-20756), EPA proposed to reinstate the tolerance of methyl...; Methyl Bromide Fumigation of Cottonseed AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION... add to the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual a treatment schedule for methyl...

  17. Bioreactors for removing methyl bromide following contained fumigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Baesman, S.M.; Oremland, R.S.

    2003-01-01

    Use of methyl bromide (MeBr) as a quarantine, commodity, or structural fumigant is under scrutiny because its release to the atmosphere contributes to the depletion of stratospheric ozone. A closed-system bioreactor consisting of 0.5 L of a growing culture of a previously described bacterium, strain IMB-1, removed MeBr (> 110 ??mol L-1) from recirculating air. Strain IMB-1 grew slowly to high cell densities in the bioreactor using MeBr as its sole carbon and energy source. Bacterial oxidation of MeBr produced CO2 and hydrobromic acid (HBr), which required continuous neutralization with NaOH for the system to operate effectively. Strain IMB-1 was capable of sustained oxidation of large amounts of MeBr (170 mmol in 46 d). In an open-system bioreactor (10-L fermenter), strain IMB-1 oxidized a continuous supply of MeBr (220 ??mol L-1 in air). Growth was continuous, and 0.5 mol of MeBr was removed from the air supply in 14 d. The specific rate of MeBr oxidation was 7 ?? 10-16 mol cell-1 h-1. Bioreactors such as these can therefore be used to remove large quantities of contaminant MeBr, which opens the possibility of biodegradation as a practical means for its disposal.

  18. Atmospheric methyl bromide: Trends and global mass balance

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, M.A.K.; Rasmussen, R.A.; Gunawardena, R. )

    1993-02-20

    Atmospheric methyl bromide is of considerable environmental importance as the largest reservoir of gaseous bromine in the atmosphere. Bromine gases can catalytically destroy stratospheric ozone. Since agricultural activities, automobiles, biomass burning, and other human activities produce CH[sub 3]Br, it is of interest to know its global mass balance and particularly the specific sources and sinks. In this paper the authors provide a decadal time series of global CH[sub 3]Br concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere. The data show that average concentrations are about 10 pptv and during the last 4 years may be increasing at 0.3 [plus minus] 0.1 pptv/yr (3%/yr [plus minus] 1%/yr). They estimate that the atmospheric lifetime of CH[sub 3]Br that is due to reaction with OH, is about 2 years, resulting in a calculated global emission rate of about 100 Gy/yr. Ocean supersaturations of 140-180% are observed, and atmospheric concentrations over the open oceans are higher than at comparably located coastal sites. The ocean source is estimated to be about 35 Gg/yr. The remaining emissions must come from other natural sources and anthropogenic activities. The results are based on some 2,200 samples obtained over more than a decade. Mass balance calculations explain most aspects of the present data but other implications are not easily reconciled, leaving open the possibility of undiscovered sources and sinks. 20 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Palladium-catalyzed direct α-arylation of methyl sulfones with aryl bromides.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bing; Jia, Tiezheng; Walsh, Patrick J

    2013-04-01

    A direct and efficient approach for palladium-catalyzed arylation of aryl and alkyl methyl sulfones with aryl bromides has been developed. The catalytic system affords arylated sulfones in good to excellent yields (73-90%). PMID:23517309

  20. Factors affecting performance of methyl bromide alternatives - a South Atlantic perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumigant application methods and equipment were identified as a source of variability in the performance of methyl bromide alternatives during several field demonstration trials conducted in 2007. Shank injection systems incorrectly modified to accommodate reduced fumigant flow rates through deliv...

  1. Bacterial oxidation of methyl bromide in fumigated agricultural soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Connell, T.L.; Guidetti, J.R.; Oremland, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidation of [14C]methyl bromide ([14C]MeBr) to 14CO2 was measured in field experiments with soils collected from two strawberry plots fumigated with mixtures of MeBr and chloropicrin (CCI3NO2). Although these fumigants are considered potent biocides, we found that the highest rates of MeBr oxidation occurred 1 to 2 days after injection when the fields were tarped, rather than before or several days after injection. No oxidation of MeBr occurred in heat-killed soils, indicating that microbes were the causative agents of the oxidation. Degradation of MeBr by chemical and/or biological processes accounted for 20 to 50% of the loss of MeBr during fumigation, with evasion to the atmosphere inferred to comprise the remainder. In laboratory incubations, complete removal of [14C]MeBr occurred within a few days, with 47 to 67% of the added MeBr oxidized to 14CO2 and the remainder of counts associated with the solid phase. Chloropicrin inhibited the oxidation of MeBr, implying that use of this substance constrains the extent of microbial degradation of MeBr during fumigation. Oxidation was by direct bacterial attack of MeBr and not of methanol, a product of the chemical hydrolysis of MeBr. Neither nitrifying nor methane-oxidizing bacteria were sufficiently active in these soils to account for the observed oxidation of MeBr, nor could the microbial degradation of MeBr be linked to cooxidation with exogenously supplied electron donors. However, repeated addition of MeBr to live soils resulted in higher rates of its removal, suggesting that soil bacteria used MeBr as an electron donor for growth. To support this interpretation, we isolated a gram-negative, aerobic bacterium from these soils which grew with MeBr as a sole source of carbon and energy.

  2. Carbon isotope fractionation of methyl bromide during agricultural soil fumigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bill, M.; Miller, L.G.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2002-01-01

    The isotopic composition of methyl bromide (CH3Br) has been suggested to be a potentially useful tracer for constraining the global CH3Br budget. In order to determine the carbon isotopic composition of CH3Br emitted from the most significant anthropogenic application (pre-plant fumigation) we directly measured the ??13C of CH3Br released during commercial fumigation. We also measured the isotopic fractionation associated with degradation in agricultural soil under typical field fumigation conditions. The isotopic composition of CH3Br collected in soil several hours after injection of the fumigant was -44.5??? and this value increased to -20.7??? over the following three days. The mean kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with degradation of CH3Br in agricultural soil (12???) was smaller than the reported value for methylotrophic bacterial strain IMB-1, isolated from previously fumigated agricultural soil, but was similar to methylotrophic bacterial strain CC495, isolated from a pristine forest litter zone. Using this fractionation associated with the degradation of CH3Br in agricultural soil and the mean ??13C of the industrially manufactured CH3Br (-54.4???), we calculate that the agricultural soil fumigation source has a carbon isotope signature that ranges from -52.8??? to -42.0???. Roughly 65% of industrially manufactured CH3Br is used for field fumigations. The remaining 35% is used for structural and post-harvest fumigations with a minor amount used during industrial chemical manufacturing. Assuming that the structural and post-harvest fumigation sources of CH3Br are emitted without substantial fractionation, we calculate that the ??13C of anthropogenically emitted CH3Br ranges from -53.2??? to -47.5???.

  3. Methyl chloride and methyl bromide emissions from baking: an unrecognized anthropogenic source.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Brett F; Horst, Axel; Carrizo, Daniel; Holmstrand, Henry

    2016-05-01

    Methyl chloride and methyl bromide (CH3Cl and CH3Br) are the largest natural sources of chlorine and bromine, respectively, to the stratosphere, where they contribute to ozone depletion. We report the anthropogenic production of CH3Cl and CH3Br during breadbaking, and suggest this production is an abiotic process involving the methyl ester functional groups in pectin and lignin structural polymers of plant cells. Wide variations in baking styles allow only rough estimates of this flux of methyl halides on a global basis. A simple model suggests that CH3Br emissions from breadbaking likely peaked circa 1990 at approximately 200tonnes per year (about 0.3% of industrial production), prior to restrictions on the dough conditioner potassium bromate. In contrast, CH3Cl emissions from breadbaking may be of similar magnitude as acknowledged present-day CH3Cl industrial emissions. Because the mechanisms involve functional groups and compounds widely found in plant materials, this type of methyl halide production may occur in other cooking techniques as well. PMID:26878644

  4. A Case Report of Toxic Brain Syndrome Caused by Methyl Bromide

    PubMed Central

    Büyükçoban, Sibel; Arıcı, Mualla Aylin; Koca, Uğur; Kalkan, Şule

    2015-01-01

    Methyl bromide (CH3Br) is a halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbon that may cause acute and chronic toxicities. We describe a case of a 44-year-old male patient who developed toxic brain syndrome (TBS) and central nervous system (CNS) toxicity after exposure to CH3Br by inhalation. Toxicity began with progressive nervousness, dysarthria and coordination disorder. The complaints on admission to the hospital were speech defect, balance disorder, consciousness disorder and involuntary movements. The patient was treated symptomatically in the intensive care unit (ICU), and organic reasons were excluded. Findings in the magnetic resonance imaging were considered secondary demyelination related to systemic intoxication. Because of the CH3Br, alkylates the crucial sulfhydryl-containing enzymes, N-acetylcysteine was used as a source of sulfhydryl groups for the treatment of the patient. He was hospitalised for nearly 1.5 months in the ICU. PMID:27366483

  5. Improved light olefin yield from methyl bromide coupling over modified SAPO-34 molecular sieves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Shouli; Komon, Zachary J A; Osterwalder, Neil; Gadewar, Sagar; Stoimenov, Peter; Auerbach, Daniel J; Stucky, Galen D; McFarland, Eric W

    2011-02-21

    As an alternative to the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas followed by methanol synthesis and the subsequent generation of olefins, we have studied the production of light olefins (ethylene and propylene) from the reaction of methyl bromide over various modified microporous silico-aluminophosphate molecular-sieve catalysts with an emphasis on SAPO-34. Some comparisons of methyl halides and methanol as reaction intermediates in their conversion to olefins are presented. Increasing the ratio of Si/Al and incorporation of Co into the catalyst framework improved the methyl bromide yield of light olefins over that obtained using standard SAPO-34. PMID:21203621

  6. Bacterial oxidation of methyl bromide in fumigated agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Miller, L G; Connell, T L; Guidetti, J R; Oremland, R S

    1997-11-01

    The oxidation of [(sup14)C]methyl bromide ([(sup14)C]MeBr) to (sup14)CO(inf2) was measured in field experiments with soils collected from two strawberry plots fumigated with mixtures of MeBr and chloropicrin (CCl(inf3)NO(inf2)). Although these fumigants are considered potent biocides, we found that the highest rates of MeBr oxidation occurred 1 to 2 days after injection when the fields were tarped, rather than before or several days after injection. No oxidation of MeBr occurred in heat-killed soils, indicating that microbes were the causative agents of the oxidation. Degradation of MeBr by chemical and/or biological processes accounted for 20 to 50% of the loss of MeBr during fumigation, with evasion to the atmosphere inferred to comprise the remainder. In laboratory incubations, complete removal of [(sup14)C]MeBr occurred within a few days, with 47 to 67% of the added MeBr oxidized to (sup14)CO(inf2) and the remainder of counts associated with the solid phase. Chloropicrin inhibited the oxidation of MeBr, implying that use of this substance constrains the extent of microbial degradation of MeBr during fumigation. Oxidation was by direct bacterial attack of MeBr and not of methanol, a product of the chemical hydrolysis of MeBr. Neither nitrifying nor methane-oxidizing bacteria were sufficiently active in these soils to account for the observed oxidation of MeBr, nor could the microbial degradation of MeBr be linked to cooxidation with exogenously supplied electron donors. However, repeated addition of MeBr to live soils resulted in higher rates of its removal, suggesting that soil bacteria used MeBr as an electron donor for growth. To support this interpretation, we isolated a gram-negative, aerobic bacterium from these soils which grew with MeBr as a sole source of carbon and energy. PMID:16535728

  7. Bacterial Oxidation of Methyl Bromide in Fumigated Agricultural Soils

    PubMed Central

    Miller, L. G.; Connell, T. L.; Guidetti, J. R.; Oremland, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidation of [(sup14)C]methyl bromide ([(sup14)C]MeBr) to (sup14)CO(inf2) was measured in field experiments with soils collected from two strawberry plots fumigated with mixtures of MeBr and chloropicrin (CCl(inf3)NO(inf2)). Although these fumigants are considered potent biocides, we found that the highest rates of MeBr oxidation occurred 1 to 2 days after injection when the fields were tarped, rather than before or several days after injection. No oxidation of MeBr occurred in heat-killed soils, indicating that microbes were the causative agents of the oxidation. Degradation of MeBr by chemical and/or biological processes accounted for 20 to 50% of the loss of MeBr during fumigation, with evasion to the atmosphere inferred to comprise the remainder. In laboratory incubations, complete removal of [(sup14)C]MeBr occurred within a few days, with 47 to 67% of the added MeBr oxidized to (sup14)CO(inf2) and the remainder of counts associated with the solid phase. Chloropicrin inhibited the oxidation of MeBr, implying that use of this substance constrains the extent of microbial degradation of MeBr during fumigation. Oxidation was by direct bacterial attack of MeBr and not of methanol, a product of the chemical hydrolysis of MeBr. Neither nitrifying nor methane-oxidizing bacteria were sufficiently active in these soils to account for the observed oxidation of MeBr, nor could the microbial degradation of MeBr be linked to cooxidation with exogenously supplied electron donors. However, repeated addition of MeBr to live soils resulted in higher rates of its removal, suggesting that soil bacteria used MeBr as an electron donor for growth. To support this interpretation, we isolated a gram-negative, aerobic bacterium from these soils which grew with MeBr as a sole source of carbon and energy. PMID:16535728

  8. The ocean in near equilibrium with atmospheric methyl bromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lei; Yvon-Lewis, Shari; Liu, Yina; Bianchi, Thomas S.

    2012-09-01

    Saturation-anomaly measurements of methyl bromide (CH3Br) were made in the eastern Pacific (3/30-4/27, 2010) and the eastern Atlantic (10/25-11/26, 2010) to assess the oceanic saturation state as the phaseout of fumigation - non-Quarantine and Pre-Shipment (non-QPS) uses of CH3Br nears completion and atmospheric concentrations continue to decline. These cruises occurred 16 years after the Bromine Latitudinal Air-Sea Transect (BLAST) cruises, which were conducted in the same regions and first established a global oceanic net sink of -12.6 Gg yr-1 for atmospheric CH3Br in 1994. Results from this study suggest saturation anomalies of CH3Br in the surface ocean have become less negative than those observed 16 years ago as the atmospheric burden has declined over the past decade. The global net sea-to-air flux was estimated at 0 to 3 Gg yr-1 in 2010, suggesting that the ocean may become a net small source to atmospheric CH3Br. There are no significant differences between this study and previous studies for measured biological loss rate constants and calculated annual production rates, suggesting that annual production rates and biological degradation rate constants for CH3Br in the surface ocean have likely remained relatively constant over the past 16 years. When including the biological loss rate constants from this study and all previous studies, the mean global biological loss rate constant is constrained to 0.05 ± 0.01 d-1 (at a 95% confidence level). Combining chemical and eddy degradation rate constants, and using an updated gas transfer velocity, we estimate the CH3Br partial atmospheric lifetime with respect to oceanic loss to be 3.1 (2.3 to 5.0) years. Although the new partial atmospheric lifetime is about 1.3 years longer than the best prior estimate, it does not change the overall atmospheric lifetime of CH3Br, 0.8 (0.7-0.9) years.

  9. Determination of methyl bromide in air samples by headspace gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Woodrow, J.E.; McChesney, M.M.; Seiber, J.N.

    1988-03-01

    Methyl bromide is extensively used in agriculture (4 x 10/sup 6/ kg for 1985 in California alone as a fumigant to control nematodes, weeds, and fungi in soil and insect pests in harvested grains and nuts. Given its low boiling point (3.8/sup 0/C) and high vapor pressure (approx. 1400 Torr at 20/sup 0/C), methyl bromide will readily diffuse if not rigorously contained. Methods for determining methyl bromide and other halocarbons in air vary widely. A common practice is to trap the material from air on an adsorbent, such as polymeric resins, followed by thermal desorption either directly into the analytical instrumentation or after intermediary cryofocusing. While in some cases analytical detection limits were reasonable (parts per million range), many of the published methods were labor intensive and required special handling techniques that precluded high sample throughput. They describe here a method for the sampling and analysis of airborne methyl bromide that was designed to handle large numbers of samples through automating some critical steps of the analysis. The result was a method that allowed around-the-clock operation with a minimum of operator attention. Furthermore, the method was not specific to methyl bromide and could be used to determine other halocarbons in air.

  10. Methyl bromide: ocean sources, ocean sinks, and climate sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Anbar, A D; Yung, Y L; Chavez, F P

    1996-03-01

    The oceans play an important role in the geochemical cycle of methyl bromide (CH3Br), the major carrier of O3-destroying bromine to the stratosphere. The quantity of CH3Br produced annually in seawater is comparable to the amount entering the atmosphere each year from natural and anthropogenic sources. The production mechanism is unknown but may be biological. Most of this CH3Br is consumed in situ by hydrolysis or reaction with chloride. The size of the fraction which escapes to the atmosphere is poorly constrained; measurements in seawater and the atmosphere have been used to justify both a large oceanic CH3Br flux to the atmosphere and a small net ocean sink. Since the consumption reactions are extremely temperature-sensitive, small temperature variations have large effects on the CH3Br concentration in seawater, and therefore on the exchange between the atmosphere and the ocean. The net CH3Br flux is also sensitive to variations in the rate of CH3Br production. We have quantified these effects using a simple steady state mass balance model. When CH3Br production rates are linearly scaled with seawater chlorophyll content, this model reproduces the latitudinal variations in marine CH3Br concentrations observed in the east Pacific Ocean by Singh et al. [1983] and by Lobert et al. [1995]. The apparent correlation of CH3Br production with primary production explains the discrepancies between the two observational studies, strengthening recent suggestions that the open ocean is a small net sink for atmospheric CH3Br, rather than a large net source. The Southern Ocean is implicated as a possible large net source of CH3Br to the atmosphere. Since our model indicates that both the direction and magnitude of CH3Br exchange between the atmosphere and ocean are extremely sensitive to temperature and marine productivity, and since the rate of CH3Br production in the oceans is comparable to the rate at which this compound is introduced to the atmosphere, even small

  11. Methyl bromide: ocean sources, ocean sinks, and climate sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Yung, Y. L.; Chavez, F. P.

    1996-01-01

    The oceans play an important role in the geochemical cycle of methyl bromide (CH3Br), the major carrier of O3-destroying bromine to the stratosphere. The quantity of CH3Br produced annually in seawater is comparable to the amount entering the atmosphere each year from natural and anthropogenic sources. The production mechanism is unknown but may be biological. Most of this CH3Br is consumed in situ by hydrolysis or reaction with chloride. The size of the fraction which escapes to the atmosphere is poorly constrained; measurements in seawater and the atmosphere have been used to justify both a large oceanic CH3Br flux to the atmosphere and a small net ocean sink. Since the consumption reactions are extremely temperature-sensitive, small temperature variations have large effects on the CH3Br concentration in seawater, and therefore on the exchange between the atmosphere and the ocean. The net CH3Br flux is also sensitive to variations in the rate of CH3Br production. We have quantified these effects using a simple steady state mass balance model. When CH3Br production rates are linearly scaled with seawater chlorophyll content, this model reproduces the latitudinal variations in marine CH3Br concentrations observed in the east Pacific Ocean by Singh et al. [1983] and by Lobert et al. [1995]. The apparent correlation of CH3Br production with primary production explains the discrepancies between the two observational studies, strengthening recent suggestions that the open ocean is a small net sink for atmospheric CH3Br, rather than a large net source. The Southern Ocean is implicated as a possible large net source of CH3Br to the atmosphere. Since our model indicates that both the direction and magnitude of CH3Br exchange between the atmosphere and ocean are extremely sensitive to temperature and marine productivity, and since the rate of CH3Br production in the oceans is comparable to the rate at which this compound is introduced to the atmosphere, even small

  12. Dispersion characteristics and sinks for methyl bromide vapors downwind of treated agricultural fields

    SciTech Connect

    Seiber, J.N.; Woodrow, J.E.; Dowling, K.

    1995-12-31

    A study of methyl bromide volatilization and fate from a treated agricultural field was conducted in Monterey County, California, in 1994. Air concentrations were measured above and downwind from the field with the objective of comparing vertical and horizontal flux terms. Another objective was to compare observed downwind concentrations with those predicted by the Industrial Source Complex model, to begin the process of identifying potential sinks which might scavenge methyl bromide from the atmosphere. The final objective was to determine the limit of detection of our analytical method for airborne methyl bromide using field samples representing a wide range of concentrations. A description of the methods and results of the study will be presented, along with a discussion of data quality and interpretation.

  13. Efficacy of Methyl Bromide for Control of Different Life Stages of Stored-Product Psocids.

    PubMed

    Athanassiou, Christos G; Hasan, M Mahbub; Phillips, Thomas W; Aikins, M Jamie; Throne, James E

    2015-06-01

    The psocid species Liposcelis paeta Pearman, Liposcelis entomophila (Enderlein), Liposcelis decolor (Pearman), Liposcelis bostrychophila Badonnel (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae), and Lepinotus reticulatus Enderlein (Psocoptera: Trogiidae) were evaluated in laboratory bioassays to determine their susceptibility to six concentrations of methyl bromide (0.027, 0.113, 0.280, 0.393, 0.452, and 0.616 g/m3) after 48 h of exposure at 27.5°C. The life stages that were evaluated were adults (for all species), nymphs (for all species except Lep. reticulatus), and eggs (for L. entomophila, L. decolor, and L. bostrychophila). Adults and nymphs were very susceptible, and complete mortality was recorded at concentrations between 0.027 and 0.280 g/m3. In contrast, eggs were by far more tolerant than adults and nymphs for all species tested. At 0.027 g/m3, mortality did not exceed 53%, while survival was high even at 0.113 g/m3. Complete (100%) egg mortality was recorded at 0.393 g/m3 for L. decolor and at 0.452 g/m3 for L. entomophila and L. bostrychophila; concentrations estimated to give 99% mortality for eggs of these three species were 0.710, 1.044, and 0.891 g/m3, respectively. These results show that stored-product psocids are susceptible to methyl bromide, but concentrations of ≥0.452 g/m3 should be used to control all life stages. PMID:26470271

  14. 78 FR 14508 - Notice of Affirmation of Addition of a Treatment Schedule for Methyl Bromide Fumigation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... Treatment Schedule for Methyl Bromide Fumigation of Cottonseed AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection... methyl bromide fumigation of cottonseed for the fungal plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp... Manual of the treatment described in the notice published at 77 FR 31564-31566 on May 29, 2012....

  15. Leisingera methylohalidivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a marine methylotroph that grows on methyl bromide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaefer, J.K.; Goodwin, K.D.; McDonald, I.R.; Murrell, J.C.; Oremland, R.S.

    2002-01-01

    A marine methylotroph, designated strain MB2T, was isolated for its ability to grow on methyl bromide as a sole carbon and energy source. Methyl chloride and methyl iodide also supported growth, as did methionine and glycine betaine. A limited amount of growth was observed with dimethyl sulfide. Growth was also noted with unidentified components of the complex media marine broth 2216, yeast extract and Casamino acids. No growth was observed on methylated amines, methanol, formate, acetate, glucose or a variety of other substrates. Growth on methyl bromide and methyl iodide resulted in their oxidation to CO2 with stoichiometric release of bromide and iodide, respectively. Strain MB2T exhibited growth optima at NaCl and Mg2+ concentrations similar to that of seawater. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence placed this strain in the ??-Proteobacteria in proximity to the genera Ruegeria and Roseobacter. It is proposed that strain MB2T (= ATCC BAA-92T = DSM 14336T) be designated Leisingera methylohalidivorans gen. nov., sp. nov.

  16. Reduced rates and alternatives to methyl bromide for snapdragon production in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field trial was conducted to evaluate soil solarization, Midas™ (iodomethane:chloropicrin 50:50, Arysta LifeScience Corp., Cary, NC) and different rates and formulations of methyl bromide under standard and metalized films for the production of snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) in Martin County, Flor...

  17. Comparison of Shank-and-Drip-Applied Methyl Bromide Alternatives in Perenial Crop Field Nurseries.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide has been used extensively at open-field perennial crop nurseries to ensure the production of plants that are free of soilborne pests and pathogens. California regulations require that nursery stock for farm planting be commercially clean with respect to economically important nematod...

  18. Methyl bromide and sulfuryl fluoride effectiveness against red flour beetle life stages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of methyl bromide (MB) and sulfuryl fluoride (SF) for managing all life stages of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, was investigated in the Hal Ross Flour Mill at Kansas State University. Eggs, young larvae, large larvae, pupae, and adults confined in plastic compartments with ...

  19. Status of methyl bromide alternatives for ornamental crop production in Florida and California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phase-out of methyl bromide presents critical challenges to producers of cut-flowers and in-ground ornamentals. Work in California and Florida has included combinations of chemicals, various formulations, and application methods for registered compounds, including 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D), ch...

  20. Methods to facilitate the adoption of alternatives to methyl bromide soil fumigation by California strawberry growers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this project is to facilitate the adoption of strawberry production systems that do not use methyl bromide (MB). The five year project initially focused on fumigant alternatives to MB. The project has resulted in increased use of barrier films that reduce fumigant emission. The focus s...

  1. Steam disinfestation as a methyl bromide alternative in California cut flower nurseries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Steam may be an effective alternative to methyl bromide in cut flower production in California. Advantages of steam include broad spectrum pest control and a zero hour re-entry interval. The principle disadvantage of sheet steaming is cost effectiveness due to current energy prices and application...

  2. WEED COMMUNITY COMPOSITION IN TREE FRUIT NURSERIES TREATED WITH METHYL BROMIDE AND ALTERNATIVE FUMIGANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several agricultural cropping systems, for decades, have relied on methyl bromide (MeBr) for pest control including weeds. Alternative fumigants are being sought worldwide because MeBr has been identified as an ozone-layer depleting substance. Weed communities respond dynamically to alterations in...

  3. 78 FR 36507 - Notice of Availability of a Treatment Evaluation Document; Methyl Bromide Fumigation of Blueberries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ...We are advising the public that we have determined that it is necessary to immediately add to the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual an additional treatment schedule for methyl bromide fumigation of blueberries for Mediterranean fruit fly and South American fruit fly. We have prepared a treatment evaluation document that describes the new treatment schedule and explains why we......

  4. PERENNIAL CROP NURSERIES TREATED WITH METHYL BROMIDE AND ALTERNATIVE FUMIGANTS: EFFECT ON WEED COMMUNITY COMPOSTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed communities can respond dynamically to shifts in management systems. Thus, transition from methyl bromide (MeBr) to alternative fumigants for pre-plant soil treatments may cause shifts in weed species composition. This hypothesis was tested in four perennial crop nurseries in California. The...

  5. Forest nurseries face critical choices with the loss of methyl bromide fumigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forest nurseries in the western United States have relied for decades on methyl bromide for the control of soilborne pathogens such as Cylindrocarpoin, Fusarium, and Pythium species that affect bareroot tree seedling production. However, increased state and federal regulations have led to a substan...

  6. Methyl Bromide Alternatives Area-Wide Pest Management Project - South Atlantic Progress Report

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protocols and Standard Operational Procedures (SOPs) were developed for collecting environmental and soil edaphic information during and after application of methyl bromide alternatives. Parameters measured included soil moisture, soil bulk density, percent moisture at field capacity (-0.3 bars wat...

  7. Methyl bromide release from activated carbon and the soil/water/carbon interface

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl Bromide (MB) is a major source of stratospheric bromine radical, a known depletor of ozone. The use of ozone-depleting chemicals, including MB, is regulated by the Montreal Protocol. Critical uses of MB are permitted, such as when postharvest fumigation is mandated by an importing country. Fo...

  8. EVALUATION OF CONTAINMENT AND CONTROL OPTIONS FOR METHYL BROMIDE IN COMMODITY TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an investigation of means for methyl bromide (MeBr) recovery, reuse, and destruction to prevent atmospheric emissions if its limited use were still allowed. (NOTE: MeBr is an ozone-depleting chemical scheduled to be phased out by the Clean Air Act by t...

  9. Headspace gas chromatographic method for determination of methyl bromide in food ingredients

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, J.W.; Broge, J.M.; Schroeder, J.P.; Bowers, R.H.; Larson, P.A.; Burns, N.M.

    1985-11-01

    A headspace gas chromatographic (GC) method, which can be automated, has been developed for determination of methyl bromide. This method has been applied to wheat, flour, cocoa, and peanuts. Samples to be analyzed are placed in headspace sample vials, water is added, and the vials are sealed with Teflon-lined septa. After an appropriate equilibration time at 32 degrees C, the samples are analyzed within 10 h. A sample of the headspace is withdrawn and analyzed on a gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector (ECD). Methyl bromide levels were quantitated by comparison of peak area with a standard. The standard was generated by adding a known amount of methyl bromide to a portion of the matrix being analyzed and which was known to be methyl bromide free. The detection limit of the method was 0.4 ppb. The coefficient of variation (CV) was 6.5% for wheat, 8.3% for flour, 3.3% for cocoa, and 11.6% for peanuts.

  10. 77 FR 29341 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Request for Methyl Bromide Critical Use Exemption Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... part 2 subpart B; 41 FR 36752, 43 FR 40000, 50 FR 51661. If no claim of confidentiality accompanies the... to the provisions of the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer for... AGENCY Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Request for Methyl Bromide Critical Use Exemption...

  11. The use of agricultural by-products to capture methyl bromide following post-harvest fumigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activated carbons were prepared from plum and peach stone as well as almond and walnut shell and comparatively evaluated as sorbents to minimize the atmospheric emission of methyl bromide following postharvest fumigations. A variety of methods were used to make the activated carbons and each is desc...

  12. Fumigant use and transition from methyl bromide to alternatives in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports fumigant use status and changes in response to the phase-out of methyl bromide (MeBr) and transition to alternative chemicals based on the 2010 Pesticide Use Reporting (PUR) database compiled by California Department of Pesticide Regulation. The data were analyzed from 2000 throug...

  13. Characterization of methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes at temperate freshwater wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardacre, Catherine J.; Heal, Mathew R.

    2013-01-01

    Methyl bromide (CH3Br) and methyl chloride (CH3Cl) are important natural sources of halogens to the atmosphere. A total of 568 CH3Br and 418 CH3Cl net flux measurements were made for up to 2 years at the same locations within four different wetlands in Scotland. Mean (± 1 standard deviation (SD)) CH3Br and CH3Cl net fluxes across all measurements at each wetland were: Auchencorth Moss, 8 (± 7) and 3560 (± 1260) ng m-2 h-1; Old Castle Farm, 420 (± 70) and 500 (± 260) ng m-2 h-1; Red Moss of Balerno, 500 (± 90) and 140,000 (± 36,000) ng m-2 h-1; and St Margaret's Marsh, 3600 (± 600) and -270 (± 450) ng m-2 h-1. None of the wetlands was a large net sink. Where substantial emissions were observed, these followed seasonal trends, increasing early in the growing season and declining in early autumn. Some diurnal cycles were observed, with emissions greatest during the day, although lower emissions were present at night. None of the measured environmental parameters was a strong "universal" driver for fluxes, which were heterogeneous within and between the wetlands, and larger on average than reported to date; plant species appeared to be the dominant factor, the latter confirmed by vegetation removal experiments. Calluna vulgaris and Phragmites australis emitted particularly large amounts of CH3Br, the former also emitting substantial CH3Cl. While acknowledging the substantial uncertainties in extrapolating globally, observations from this work suggest that wetlands contribute more CH3Br and CH3Cl to the atmosphere than current World Meteorological Organization estimates.

  14. The developmental toxicity of 1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium bromide on Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan-Rui; Li, Xiao-Yu; Chen, Xiao-Xiao; Zhang, Bang-Jun; Sun, Zhen-Jun; Wang, Jian-Ji

    2008-12-01

    The developmental toxicity of 1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium bromide ([C(8)mim]Br) on Daphnia magna was investigated. The 24 and 48 h LC(50) values for [C(8)mim]Br in D. magna were 1.99 and 0.95 mg/L, respectively. A series of multigenerational toxicity tests were then used to explore [C(8)mim]Br effects in D. magna. [C(8)mim]Br significantly inhibited the body lengths of the F0 and F1 1st generations. After 21 days of exposure, [C(8)mim]Br lowered the reproductive ability of the F0 and F1 1st generations. In F1 3rd generation, 21 days of [C(8)mim]Br exposure prolonged the time to bear the first egg and the time to the first brood compared with the control, but the number of first-brood offspring and the number of broods produced by these animals were reduced. After the recovery period all the reproductive parameters returned to normal in F1 1st generation except for the number of broods. The dead neonates increased with prolonged exposure and increasing concentrations, and the dead neonates of the F1 3rd generation went far beyond that of the F1 1st and F0 generations. The intrinsic rate of natural increase (r) values of the three D. magna generations significantly decreased after exposure to higher concentrations of [C(8)mim]Br compared with control groups. Collectively, these results suggest that [C(8)mim]Br exerts a toxic effect on the development of D. magna. This study also highlights the importance of systematically evaluating the potential effects of aquatic ecosystems of ionic liquids that may be released into bodies of water. PMID:18442076

  15. Recovery of bromine from methyl bromide using amorphous MnO{sub x} photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jung-Chou; Suib, S.L.; Cutlip, M.B.

    1996-07-01

    Amorphous MnO{sub x} (AMO) has been prepared by the reaction of potassium permanganate and oxalic acid. Surface area measurements and pore size distribution analyses show that AMO has high surface (200 m{sup 2}/g) area and a microporous structure. Kinetic results indicate that methyl bromide degradation using AMO photocatalysts is due to a combination of thermocatalytic and photocatalytic reactions; however, the photocatalytic reaction is predominant. Detailed studies show that both molecular oxygen and bulk lattice oxygen of AMO can be involved in the oxidation of methyl bromide to carbon dioxide. Kinetic data, Auger analyses, and FTIR spectra suggest that both oxidation state changes of Mn and the presence of bromide adsorbed on the surface might lead to deactivation of the catalyst. According to mass balance calculations and analyses with potassium iodide solutions with starch, the final products are bromine, carbon dioxide, and water. The overall reaction for methyl bromide degradation under illumination using AMO photocatalyst can be expressed as CH{sub 3}Br{sub (g)} + 7/4O{sub 2(g)} {yields} CO{sub 2(g)} + 3/2H{sub 2}O(g) + {1/2}Br{sub 2(g)}. 27 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Strain IMB-1, a novel bacterium for the removal of methyl bromide in fumigated agricultural soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connell, Hancock T.L.; Costello, A.M.; Lidstrom, M.E.; Oremland, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    A facultatively methylotrophic bacterium, strain IMB-1, that has been isolated from agricultural soil grows on methyl bromide (MeBr), methyl iodide, methyl chloride, and methylated amines, as well as on glucose, pyruvate, or acetate. Phylogenetic analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence indicates that strain IMB-1 classes in the alpha subgroup of the class Proteobacteria and is closely related to members of the genus Rhizobium. The ability of strain IMB-1 to oxidize MeBr to CO2 is constitutive in cells regardless of the growth substrate. Addition of cell suspensions of strain IMB-1 to soils greatly accelerates the oxidation of MeBr, as does pretreatment of soils with low concentrations of methyl iodide. These results suggest that soil treatment strategies can be devised whereby bacteria can effectively consume MeBr during field fumigations, which would diminish or eliminate the outward flux of MeBr to the atmosphere.

  17. Atmospheric chemistry of toxic contaminants 4. Saturated halogenated aliphatics: Methyl bromide, epichlorhydrin, phosgene

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D. )

    1991-01-01

    Mechanisms are outlined for the reactions that contribute to in-situ formation and atmospheric removal of the saturated halogenated aliphatic contaminants methyl bromide, epichlorhydrin, and phosgene. In-situ formation is important only for phosgene and involves the reaction of OH with chloroethenes and other chlorinated hydrocarbons. A ranking of these phosgene precursors is given using data for precursor ambient concentrations and chemical reactivity. The three toxic compounds studied are long-lived in the atmosphere, where removal of phosgene and methyl bromide by chemical reactions is negligibly slow. Epichlorhydrin is removed slowly by reaction with OH, leading to formaldehyde, chloroacetaldehyde, and the chlorinated peroxyacyl nitrate CH{sub 2}ClC(O)OONO{sub 2}.

  18. Reactions of ground-state and electronically excited sodium atoms with methyl bromide and molecular chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, P.S.; Mestdagh, J.M.; Schmidt, H.; Covinsky, M.H.; Lee, Y.T. )

    1991-04-18

    The reactions of ground- and excited-state Na atoms with methyl bromide (CH{sub 3}Br) and chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) have been studied by using the crossed molecular beams method. For both reactions, the cross sections increase with increasing electronic energy. The product recoil energies change little with increasing Na electronic energy, implying that the product internal energies increase substantially. For Na + CH{sub 3}Br, the steric angle of acceptance opens with increasing electronic energy.

  19. A CHRONIC INHALATION STUDY OF METHYL BROMIDE TOXICITY IN B6C3F1 MICE. (FINAL REPORT TO THE NATIONAL TOXICOLOGY PROGRAM)

    SciTech Connect

    HABER, S.B.

    1987-06-26

    This report provides a detailed account of a two year chronic inhalation study of methyl bromide toxicity in B6C3Fl mice conducted for the National Toxicology Program. Mice were randomized into three dose groups (10, 33 and 100 ppm methyl bromide) and one control group (0 ppm) per sex and exposed 5 days/week, 6 hours/day, for a total of 103 weeks. Endpoints included body weight; clinical signs and mortality, and at 6, 15 and 24 months of exposure, animals were sacrificed for organ weights, hematology and histopathology. In addition, a subgroup of animals in each dosage group was monitored for neurobehavioral and neuropathological changes. After only 20 weeks of exposure, 48% of the males and 12% of the females in the 100 ppm group had died. Exposures were terminated in that group and the surviving mice were observed for the duration of the study. Exposure of B6C3Fl mice to methyl bromide, even for only 20 weeks, produced significant changes in growth rate, mortality, organ weights and neurobehavioral functioning. These changes occurred in both males and females, but were more pronounced in males.

  20. Prediction of methyl bromide flux from area sources using the ISCST model

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, L.J.; Johnson, B.; Kim, K.D.; Hsu, J.

    1996-07-01

    Growing concern about atmospheric exposure of humans to pesticides has led to increased air monitoring in California. Air monitoring data typically consist of measurements made downwind from point or area sources. The utility of monitoring at fixed stations is limited for establishing buffer zones to protect neighboring populations from pesticide exposure. A modeling approach designed to use these data would provide the flexibility needed to establish buffer zones. The Industrial Source Complex Short Term (ISCST) model is a gaussian plume dispersion model that predicts air concentrations around point or area sources using emission rates (flux) and meteorological conditions as model inputs. The flux data, however, are typically not collected in the field nor available in the literature. In order to use the field data currently available, we developed a procedure using methyl bromide (MeBr) concentrations around two area sources and the ISCST model, to back-calculate flux. In addition, MeBr flux was measured concurrently by cooperators conducting an independent study. Air concentrations, together with actual meteorological data, were used as inputs to the ISCST model. Flux of MeBr was then back-calculated using a two step process: (1) an arbitrary flux value of 100 {mu}g m{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} was used as an initial input value. Resultant air concentrations predicted by the model were then regressed on air concentrations predicted by the model were then regressed on air concentrations measured offsite and (2) the resultant regression coefficient was then used to adjust the arbitrary flux to a back-calculated flux. Using another regression analysis, back-calculated and measured flux rates were found to be significantly correlated, indicating this approach may be suitable for indirect estimation of flux. Implications for the use of this method in establishing buffer zones designed to protect human health are discussed. 14 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. The suppression of opposed-jet methane-air flames by methyl bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E.; McMillion, L.G. )

    1992-04-01

    This paper reports on an opposed-jet diffusion flame burner that was used in conjunction with an emission infrared spectrometer to study the effects of the addition of methyl bromide on the combustion of methane with air. An optical system permitted incremental scanning of a laminar diffusion flame formed between two horizontally opposed burner tubes. The image of the flat flame was focused on an auxiliary slit of the spectrometer by optical mirrors and scanned by moving the slit passed the image. For a methane-air flame with an overall stoichiometric ratio, {phi}, of 0.86, the spectra for the 3700-2400 cm{sup {minus}1} region (H{sub 2}O, OH, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}, and HCHO bands) and 2400 to 2000 cm{sup {minus}1} (CO and CO{sub 2} bands) were compared with the spectra obtained when methyl bromide was added to the air-side of the burner. Supplementary measurements were made on methane-air and methane-oxygen-nitrogen flames with {phi} values in the range of 0.74 - 2.0. In some cases, the methane was diluted with nitrogen, and the methyl bromide was added to either the fuel or the air side of the burner.

  2. Determination of methyl bromide in air resulting from pre-plant fumigations of plowed fields

    SciTech Connect

    Woodrow, J.E.; Honaganahalli, P.; Seiber, J.N.

    1995-12-31

    A method for measuring residues of methyl bromide in air entails concentrating the fumigant on charcoal from an airstream at a flowrate of 100 ml/min, desorption of the trapped material with benzyl alcohol solvent in a sealed vial at 60-110{degrees}C for 10-15 min, and then sampling of the equilibrated vapor for gas chromatographic assay using electron-capture detection. The desorbed vapor is chromatographed on a 27 in x 0.32 mm (id) porous-layer open tubular column, on which methyl bromide has a retention time of about 6 min at 90{degrees}C and at a carrier gas flowrate of 3-3.5 ml/min. Using this method, standard curves were linear over at least three orders of magnitude and a practical limit of detection for field air was about 20 ng/m{sup 3} ({approximately}5 ppt). This method has been used in studies concerned with methyl bromide volatilization from fumigated fields and with ambient background levels.

  3. Improving food and agriculture productivity and the environment: Canadian initiatives in methyl bromide alternatives and emission control technologies. Revised edition

    SciTech Connect

    Marcotte, M.; Tibelius, C.

    1998-12-31

    Methyl bromide, a fumigant used in the agricultural sector, was listed as an ozone-depleting substance under the Montreal Protocol and is scheduled for phasing out in Canada. This report begins with a review of the joint industry/government approach being taken to plan and manage this phase-out. It then reviews alternative solutions that have been formulated and tested as replacements for the use of methyl bromide in greenhouse cultivation, soil fumigation, strawberry transplant production, tobacco production, grain production, and food processing facilities. Contact names and addresses are provided for those seeking further information. The final sections describe activities in methyl bromide recovery and recycling and list industry and government organizations that have expertise in methyl bromide alternatives.

  4. High-resolution slice imaging of quantum state-to-state photodissociation of methyl bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Lipciuc, M. Laura; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2007-12-14

    The photodissociation of rotationally state-selected methyl bromide is studied in the wavelength region between 213 and 235 nm using slice imaging. A hexapole state selector is used to focus a single (JK=11) rotational quantum state of the parent molecule, and a high speed slice imaging detector measures directly the three-dimensional recoil distribution of the methyl fragment. Experiments were performed on both normal (CH{sub 3}Br) and deuterated (CD{sub 3}Br) parent molecules. The velocity distribution of the methyl fragment shows a rich structure, especially for the CD{sub 3} photofragment, assigned to the formation of vibrationally excited methyl fragments in the {nu}{sub 1} and {nu}{sub 4} vibrational modes. The CH{sub 3} fragment formed with ground state Br({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) is observed to be rotationally more excited, by some 230-340 cm{sup -1}, compared to the methyl fragment formed with spin-orbit excited Br({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}). Branching ratios and angular distributions are obtained for various methyl product states and they are observed to vary with photodissociation energy. The nonadiabatic transition probability for the {sup 3}Q{sub 0+}{yields}{sup 1}Q{sub 1} transition is calculated from the images and differences between the isotopes are observed. Comparison with previous non-state-selected experiments indicates an enhanced nonadiabatic transition probability for state-selected K=1 methyl bromide parent molecules. From the state-to-state photodissociation experiments the dissociationenergy for both isotopes was determined, D{sub 0}(CH{sub 3}Br)=23 400{+-}133 cm{sup -1} and D{sub 0}(CD{sub 3}Br)=23 827{+-}94 cm{sup -1}.

  5. Description of toluene inhibition of methyl bromide biodegradation in seawater and isolation of a marine toluene oxidizer that degrades methyl bromide.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Kelly D; Tokarczyk, Ryszard; Stephens, F Carol; Saltzman, Eric S

    2005-07-01

    Methyl bromide (CH3Br) and methyl chloride (CH3Cl) are important precursors for destruction of stratospheric ozone, and oceanic uptake is an important component of the biogeochemical cycle of these methyl halides. In an effort to identify and characterize the organisms mediating halocarbon biodegradation, we surveyed the effect of potential cometabolic substrates on CH3Br biodegradation using a 13CH3Br incubation technique. Toluene (160 to 200 nM) clearly inhibited CH3Br and CH3Cl degradation in seawater samples from the North Atlantic, North Pacific, and Southern Oceans. Furthermore, a marine bacterium able to co-oxidize CH3Br while growing on toluene was isolated from subtropical Western Atlantic seawater. The bacterium, Oxy6, was also able to oxidize o-xylene and the xylene monooxygenase (XMO) pathway intermediate 3-methylcatechol. Patterns of substrate oxidation, lack of acetylene inhibition, and the inability of the toluene 4-monooxygenase (T4MO)-containing bacterium Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 to degrade CH3Br ruled out participation of the T4MO pathway in Oxy6. Oxy6 also oxidized a variety of toluene (TOL) pathway intermediates such as benzyl alcohol, benzylaldehyde, benzoate, and catechol, but the inability of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 to degrade CH3Br suggested that the TOL pathway might not be responsible for CH3Br biodegradation. Molecular phylogenetic analysis identified Oxy6 to be a member of the family Sphingomonadaceae related to species within the Porphyrobacter genus. Although some Sphingomonadaceae can degrade a variety of xenobiotic compounds, this appears to be the first report of CH3Br degradation for this class of organism. The widespread inhibitory effect of toluene on natural seawater samples and the metabolic capabilities of Oxy6 indicate a possible link between aromatic hydrocarbon utilization and the biogeochemical cycle of methyl halides. PMID:16000753

  6. Aerodynamic measurements of methyl bromide volatilization from tarped and nontarped fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majewski, M.S.; McChesney, M.M.; Woodrow, J.E.; Prueger, J.H.; Seiber, J.N.

    1995-01-01

    Methyl bromide (MeBr) is used extensively in agriculture as a soil fumigant and there is growing concern over the role it may play in the depletion of stratospheric ozone. Methyl bromide is applied using various techniques and very little is known about how much of the applied fumigant volatilizes into the atmosphere after the application. This held study was designed to estimate the post-application methyl bromide volatilization loss rates from two different application practices. The fields were approximately 6 km apart in Monterey County, California, and were treated in conformity with local practices as of 1992. The MeBr was injected at a depth of 25 to 30 cm. One field was covered simultaneously with a high-barrier plastic film tarp during the application, and the other was left uncovered, but the furrows made by the injection shanks were bedded over. Volatilization fluxes were estimated using an aerodynamic-gradient technique immediately following the completion of the application process and continued for 9 d for the tarped held and 6 d for the nontarped field. The cumulative volatilization losses from the tarped field were 22% of the nominal application within the first 5 d of the experiment and about 32% of the nominal application within 9 d including the one day after the tarp was removed on Day 8 after application. In contrast, the nontarped field lost 89% of the nominal application by volatilization in 5 d. The volatilization rate from the tarped field was shown to he significantly lower than the nontarped field at a 95% confidence level.

  7. Aerodynamic measurements of methyl bromide volatilization from tarped and nontarped fields

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, M.S.; McChesney, M.M.; Woodrow, J.E.; Seiber, J.N.

    1995-07-01

    Methyl bromide (MeBr) is used extensively in agriculture as a soil fumigant and there is growing concern over the role it may play in the depletion of stratospheric ozone. Methyl bromide is applied using various techniques and very little is known about how much of the applied fumigant volatilizes into the atmosphere after the application. This field study was designed to estimate the post-application methyl bromide volatilization loss rates from two different application practices. The fields were approximately 6 km apart in Monterey County, California, and were treated in conformity with local practices as of 1992. The MeBr was injected at a depth of 25 to 30 cm. One field was covered simultaneously with a high-barrier plastic film tarp during the application, and the other was left uncovered, but the furrows made by the injection shanks were bedded over. Volatilization fluxes were estimated using an aerodynamic-gradient technique immediately following the completion of the application process and continued for 9 d for the tarped field and 6 d for the nontarped field. The cumulative volatilization losses from the tarped field were 22% of the nominal application within the first 5 d of the experiment and about 32% of the nominal application within 9 d including the one day after the tarp was removed on Day 8 after application. In contrast, the nontarped field lost 89% of the nominal application by volatilization in 5 d. The volatilization rate from the tarped field was shown to be significantly lower than the nontarped field at a 95% confidence level. 43 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Crystal structure of 2-bromo-3-di-methyl-amino-N,N,N',N',4-penta-methyl-4-(tri-methyl-sil-yloxy)pent-2-eneamidinium bromide.

    PubMed

    Tiritiris, Ioannis; Kress, Ralf; Kantlehner, Willi

    2015-12-01

    The reaction of the ortho-amide 1,1,1-tris-(di-methyl-amino)-4-methyl-4-(tri-methyl-sil-yloxy)pent-2-yne with bromine in benzene, yields the title salt, C15H33BrN3OSi(+)·Br(-). The C-N bond lengths in the amidinium unit are 1.319 (6) and 1.333 (6) Å, indicating double-bond character, pointing towards charge delocalization within the NCN plane. The C-Br bond length of 1.926 (5) Å is characteristic for a C-Br single bond. Additionally, there is a bromine-bromine inter-action [3.229 (3) Å] present involving the anion and cation. In the crystal, weak C-H⋯Br inter-actions between the methyl H atoms of the cation and the bromide ions are present. PMID:26870498

  9. Tailoring acidity of HZSM-5 nanoparticles for methyl bromide dehydrobromination by Al and Mg incorporation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Three kinds of HZSM-5 nanoparticles with different acidity were tailored by impregnating MgO or varying Si/Al ratios. Both the textural and acidic properties of the as-prepared nanoparticles were characterized by nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ammonia temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR or Py-FTIR). It was found that the intensity of Lewis acid sites with weak strength was enhanced by impregnating MgO or reducing Al concentration, and such an enhancement could be explained by the formation of Mg(OH)+ or charge unbalance of the MgO framework on the surface of HZSM-5 support. The effect of HZSM-5 nanoparticles' acidity on methyl bromide dehydrobromination as catalyst was evaluated. As the results, MgHZ-360 catalyst with the highest concentration of Lewis acid sites showed excellent stability, which maintained methyl bromide conversion of up 97% in a period of 400 h on stream. Coke characterization by BET measurements and TGA/DTA and GC/MS analysis revealed that polymethylated naphthalenes species were formed outside the channels of the catalyst with higher acid intensity and higher Brønsted acid concentration during the initial period of reaction, while graphitic carbon formed in the channels of catalyst with lower acid intensity and higher Lewis acid concentration during the stable stage. PMID:25328502

  10. Tailoring acidity of HZSM-5 nanoparticles for methyl bromide dehydrobromination by Al and Mg incorporation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Zhongdong; Xing, Wei; Komarneni, Sridhar; Yan, Zifeng; Gao, Xionghou; Zhou, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Three kinds of HZSM-5 nanoparticles with different acidity were tailored by impregnating MgO or varying Si/Al ratios. Both the textural and acidic properties of the as-prepared nanoparticles were characterized by nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ammonia temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR or Py-FTIR). It was found that the intensity of Lewis acid sites with weak strength was enhanced by impregnating MgO or reducing Al concentration, and such an enhancement could be explained by the formation of Mg(OH)(+) or charge unbalance of the MgO framework on the surface of HZSM-5 support. The effect of HZSM-5 nanoparticles' acidity on methyl bromide dehydrobromination as catalyst was evaluated. As the results, MgHZ-360 catalyst with the highest concentration of Lewis acid sites showed excellent stability, which maintained methyl bromide conversion of up 97% in a period of 400 h on stream. Coke characterization by BET measurements and TGA/DTA and GC/MS analysis revealed that polymethylated naphthalenes species were formed outside the channels of the catalyst with higher acid intensity and higher Brønsted acid concentration during the initial period of reaction, while graphitic carbon formed in the channels of catalyst with lower acid intensity and higher Lewis acid concentration during the stable stage. PMID:25328502

  11. Evaluation of alternatives to methyl bromide in melon crops in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Pérez, M; Camacho-Ferre, F; Diánez-Martínez, F; De Cara-García, M; Tello-Marquina, J C

    2009-02-01

    The monoculture of melon in Guatemala has caused the massive appearance of plants with an analogous syndrome for the well-known disease commonly called melon collapse, or vine decline, causing significant losses in crops. Methyl bromide is commonly used to sterilize soil prior to planting in Guatemala, but it must be phased out by 2015. The objective of this study was to evaluate the technique of grafting melon onto hybrids of Cucurbita (Cucurbita maxima x Cucurbita moschata), as an alternative to using soil disinfectants (such as Metam sodium, 1,3-dichloropropene, and methyl bromide) for the control of collapse. The results suggested that both soil disinfection and grafting were not necessary in these locations, since there were no statistical differences in terms of yields between the treatments and the untreated control. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that decisions to disinfect the soil must be based on the firm identification of the causal agents, in addition to preliminary assessments of yield losses. PMID:18998189

  12. Evaluation of sorbent materials for the sampling and analysis of phosphine, sulfuryl fluoride and methyl bromide in air.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, R; Rittfeldt, L; Åstot, C

    2015-01-01

    Phosphine (PH3), sulfuryl fluoride (SO2F2) and methyl bromide (CH3Br) are highly toxic chemical substances commonly used for fumigation, i.e., pest control with gaseous pesticides. Residues of fumigation agents constitute a health risk for workers affected, and therefore accurate methods for air sampling and analysis are needed. In this study, three commercial adsorbent tubes; Carbosieve SIII™, Air Toxics™ and Tenax TA™, were evaluated for sampling these highly volatile chemicals in air and their subsequent analysis by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS). The breakthrough volume (BTV) of each fumigant was experimentally determined on the different adsorbents at concentrations at or above their permissible exposure limits, using a method based on frontal chromatography of generated fumigant atmospheres. Carbosieve SIII™, a molecular sieve possessing a very high specific area, proved to be a better adsorbent than both Air Toxics™ and Tenax TA™, resulting in at least a 4-fold increase of the BTV50%. BTV50% for Carbosieve SIII™ at 20°C was measured as 4.7L/g, 5.5L/g and 126L/g for phosphine, sulfuryl fluoride and methyl bromide, respectively, implying safe sampling volumes of 1.9L, 2.2L and 50L, respectively, for a commercial tube packed with 800mg Carbosieve SIII™. The temperature dependence of BTV was strong for Carbosieve SIII™, showing a reduction of 3-5%/°C in breakthrough volume within the range -20 to 40°C. Furthermore, although Carbosieve SIII™ reportedly has a higher affinity for water than most other adsorbents, relative humidity had only a moderate influence on the retention capacity of phosphine. Overall, the applicability of Carbosieve SIII™ adsorbent sampling in combination with TD-GC-MS analysis was demonstrated for highly volatile fumigants. PMID:25512126

  13. Photochemistry of Methyl Bromide on the α-Cr2O3(0001) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2010-09-30

    The photochemical properties of the Cr-terminated α-Cr2O3(0001) surface were explored using methyl bromide (CH3Br) as a probe molecule. CH3Br adsorbed and desorbed molecularly from the Cr-terminated α-Cr2O3(0001) surface without detectable thermal decomposition. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) revealed a CH3Br desorption state at 240 K for coverages up to 0.5 ML, followed by more weakly bound molecules desorbing at 175 K for coverages up to 1 ML. Multilayer exposures led to desorption at ~130 K. The CH3Br sticking coefficient was unity at 105 K for coverages up to monolayer saturation, but decreased as the multilayer formed. In contrast, pre-oxidation of the surface (using an oxygen plasma source) led to capping of surface Cr3+ sites and near complete removal of CH3Br TPD states above 150 K. The photochemistry of chemisorbed CH3Br was explored on the Cr-terminated surface using post-irradiation TPD and photon stimulated desorption (PSD). Irradiation of adsorbed CH3Br with broad band light from a Hg arc lamp resulted in both photodesorption and photodecomposition of the parent molecule at a combined cross section of ~10-22 cm2. Parent PSD was indicative of molecular photodesorption, but CH3 was also detected in PSD and Br atoms were left on the surface, both reflective of photo-induced CH3-Br bond dissociation. Use of a 385 nm cut-off filter effectively shut down the photodissociation pathway but not the parent molecule photodesorption process. From these observations it is inferred that d-to-d transitions in α-Cr2O3, occurring at photon energies <3 eV, are not responsible for photodecomposition of 2 adsorbed CH3Br. It is unclear to what extent band-to-band versus direct CH3Br photolysis play in CH3-Br bond dissociation initiated by more energetic photons.

  14. Irradiation as a disinfestation method — update on methyl bromide phase out, regulatory action and emerging opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcotte, Michelle

    1998-06-01

    Methyl bromide (MeBr), is the most widely used agricultural fumigant in the world for the control of pests and plant diseases. It is used to control pests and diseases in food, agricultural and forestry commodities after harvest, before or during storage or transportation and/or at time of import to control quarantine or storage pests. Knowing MeBr will be phased out has spurred a search for alternative treatments and products, and has placed pressure on regulatory authorities to approve alternatives. Some of methyl bromide use could be replaced with irradiation. Methyl bromide is also used for soil and structural fumigation, and although there is some use of irradiation for packaged soil or greenhouse products, in general, these uses can not be replaced by irradiation. Some radiation processing facilities have either seen increased business to disinfest commodities, or have experienced more inquiries for service. There are many other processes and products competing for this market and irradiation will not win its share of the business without an improved regulatory picture, improved marketing to methyl bromide users and improved information to answer questions from commodity sectors. The United Nations Environment Program — Methyl Bromide Technical Options Committee (MBTOC) provides a venue for the publication or information about the use and availability of irradiation as an alternative to methyl bromide. It provides the technical base to the Montreal Protocol contributing to the setting of phase out dates; this committee is actively researching and assessing all alternatives and needs information about irradiation. The author is a member of the MBTOC committee.

  15. Evaluation of containment and control options for methyl bromide in commodity treatment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    DeWolf, G.B.; Harrison, M.R.

    1994-07-01

    Methyl bromide (MeBr), with the chemical formula CH3Br, also called bromomethane, is listed by the 1991 Montreal Protocol as an ozone depleting chemical similar to the other halogenated hydrocarbons such as the chloro-fluorocarbons (CFCs). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) regulations authorized by the Clean Air Act (CAA) call for a phaseout of MeBr by the year 2001. MeBr is widely used in United States agriculture as a fumigant. This study has gathered preliminary data that can be used to determine if some of the essential agricultural commodity fumigation applications for MeBr could be continued by the use of some emission control methods on those commodity fumigation applications.

  16. Determination of methyl bromide in foods by headspace capillary gas chromatography with electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Page, B D; Avon, R J

    1989-01-01

    Methyl bromide (MB, bromomethane) is determined in a variety of foods by headspace capillary gas chromatography with electron capture detection. The comminuted food sample as an aqueous sodium sulfate slurry is equilibrated with stirring for 1 h at room temperature before a 1 mL headspace aliquot is removed and injected using a modified on-column syringe needle. Methyl bromide is cryogenically focussed at -60 degrees C and then eluted by temperature programming. The procedure requires blending of soft samples, e.g. raisins, prunes, or oranges, and ultrasonic homogenization of hard samples, e.g. wheat, cocoa beans, corn, or nuts, with portions of water and ice so the final temperature of the food-water slurry is less than 1 degree C. A 20 g aliquot (4 g food) is then added to a cold headspace vial containing 4 g sodium sulfate. Losses of MB during a 3.5 min ultrasonic homogenization of wheat were 11% at 0.95 ppb and 4.4% at 4.8 ppb. For flour, cocoa, and finely divided spices, which do not require blending, 4 g is added to the cold headspace vial containing 16 mL cold water and 4 g sodium sulfate. Studies show that comminution of wheat or peanuts must be carried out to release MB trapped within the food so the headspace equilibrium can be attained in 1 h as well as to obtain homogeneous samples and representative sampling. No interferences were noted with the above foods or with many grain-based baking mixes analyzed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2808244

  17. Effect of potential methyl bromide alternatives on plant parasitic nematodes and grape yield under vineyard replant conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root-knot (Meloidogyne spp.) and citrus (Tylenchulus semipenetrans) nematodes are often present in vineyards affected by “replant problems” of grapes in California. Methyl bromide (MB) has been used to control these nematodes and other soil borne pathogens prior to replanting new vineyards, but, exc...

  18. A clean start to productive orchards and vineyards: recent research on methyl bromide alternatives for perennial crop nurseries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide (MB) is an important pest management tool in open field perennial crop nurseries in California for control of many soil borne pests including plant parasitic nematodes, pathogens, and weeds. Because MB is being phased out under the provisions of the Montreal Protocol, alternatives are...

  19. Effects of reduced-rate methyl bromide applications under conventional and virtually impermeable plastic film in perennial crop field nurseries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Producers of perennial crop nursery stock in California use preplant soil fumigation to meet state phytosanitary requirements. Although methyl bromide (MB) has been phased out in many agricultural industries, it is still the preferred treatment in the perennial nursery industry and is u...

  20. Alternative fumigants to methyl bromide for killing pupae and preventing emergence of apple maggot fly (Diptera:Tephritidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of methyl bromide, ECO2FUME (phosphine gas + CO2), Vapam (sodium methyldithiocarbamate), chloropicrin, Telone II (1, 3 dichloropropene), and chloropicrin + Telone II on killing the pupae and preventing adult emergence of apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh) was determined. In an e...

  1. Resurgance of soilborne pests in double-cropped cucumber after application of methyl bromide chemical alternatives and solarization in tomato.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field studies were conducted during four consectutive tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum)-cucumber (Cucumis sativus) rotations to examine the long-term residual effects of tomato methyl bromide alternatives on soilborne pests in double-cropped cucumber. Four treatments were established in tomato field...

  2. Aerosols and contact insecticides as alternatives to methyl bromide in flour mills, food production facilities, and food warehouses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fumigant methyl bromide (MB) is being phased out of production and usage to control stored product insects in flour and rice mills, as well as feed and food production plants, in the United States (US) and other developed countries throughout the world. A phase-out schedule has also been establi...

  3. Optimizing postharvest methyl bromide treatments to control spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, in sweet cherries from Western USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide (MB) chamber fumigations were evaluated for postharvest control of spotted wing drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) (Diptera: Drosophilidae), in fresh sweet cherry exports from Western USA. Sweet cherries were infested with SWD, incubated to maximize numbers of the most M...

  4. Evaluation of Methyl Bromide Alternatives Efficacy against Soil-Borne Pathogens, Nematodes and Soil Microbial Community

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongwei; Yan, Dongdong; Mao, Liangang; Wang, Qiuxia; Li, Yuan; Ouyang, Canbin; Guo, Meixia; Cao, Aocheng

    2015-01-01

    Methyl bromide (MB) and other alternatives were evaluated for suppression of Fusarium spp., Phytophthora spp., and Meloidogyne spp. and their influence on soil microbial communities. Both Fusarium spp. and Phytophthora spp. were significantly reduced by the MB (30.74 mg kg-1), methyl iodide (MI: 45.58 mg kg-1), metham sodium (MS: 53.92 mg kg-1) treatments. MS exhibited comparable effectiveness to MB in controlling Meloidogyne spp. and total nematodes, followed by MI at the tested rate. By contrast, sulfuryl fluoride (SF: 33.04 mg kg-1) and chloroform (CF: 23.68 mg kg-1) showed low efficacy in controlling Fusarium spp., Phytophthora spp., and Meloidogyne spp. MB, MI and MS significantly lowered the abundance of different microbial populations and microbial biomass in soil, whereas SF and CF had limited influence on them compared with the control. Diversity indices in Biolog studies decreased in response to fumigation, but no significant difference was found among treatments in PLFA studies. Principal component and cluster analyses of Biolog and PLFA data sets revealed that MB and MI treatments greatly influenced the soil microbial community functional and structural diversity compared with SF treatment. These results suggest that fumigants with high effectiveness in suppressing soil-borne disease could significantly influence soil microbial community. PMID:25723395

  5. Destruction of methyl bromide sorbed to activated carbon by thiosulfate or electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Li, Yuanqing; Walse, Spencer S; Mitch, William A

    2015-04-01

    Methyl bromide (CH3Br) is widely used as a fumigant for postharvest and quarantine applications for agricultural products at port facilities due to the short treatment period required, but it is vented from fumigation chambers to the atmosphere after its use. Due to the potential contributions of CH3Br to stratospheric ozone depletion, technologies for the capture and degradation of the CH3Br are needed to enable its continued use. Although granular activated carbon (GAC) has been used for CH3Br capture and thiosulfate has been used for destruction of CH3Br in aqueous solution, this research explored techniques for direct destruction of CH3Br sorbed to GAC. Submerging the GAC in an aqueous thiosulfate solution achieved debromination of CH3Br while sorbed to the GAC, but it required molar concentrations of thiosulfate because of the high CH3Br loading and produced substantial concentrations of methyl thiosulfate. Submergence of the GAC in water and use of the GAC as the cathode of an electrolysis unit also debrominated sorbed CH3Br. The reaction appeared to involve a one-electron transfer, producing methyl radicals that incorporated into the GAC. Destruction rates increased with decreasing applied voltage down to ∼-1.2 V vs the standard hydrogen electrode. Cycling experiments conducted at -0.77 V indicated that >80% debromination of CH3Br was achieved over ∼ 30 h with ∼ 100% Coulombic efficiency. Sorptive capacity and degradation efficiency were maintained over at least 3 cycles. Capture of CH3Br fumes from fumigation chambers onto GAC, and electrolytic destruction of the sorbed CH3Br could mitigate the negative impacts of CH3Br usage pending the development of suitable replacement fumigants. PMID:25789797

  6. Degradation of methyl bromide by methanotrophic bacteria in cell suspensions and soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Miller, L.G.; Culbertson, C.W.; Connell, T.L.; Jahnke, L.

    1994-01-01

    Cell suspensions of Methylococcus capsulatus mineralized methyl bromide (MeBr), as evidenced by its removal from the gas phase, the quantitative recovery of Br- in the spent medium, and the production of 14CO2 from [14C]MeBr. Methyl fluoride (MeF) inhibited oxidation of methane as well as that of [14C]MeBr. The rate of MeBr consumption by cells varied inversely with the supply of methane, which suggested a competitive relationship between these two substrates. However, MeBr did not support growth of the methanotroph. In soils exposed to high levels (10,000 ppm) of MeBr, methane oxidation was completely inhibited. At this concentration, MeBr removal rates were equivalent in killed and live controls, which indicated a chemical rather than biological removal reaction. At lower concentrations (1,000 ppm) of MeBr, methanotrophs were active and MeBr consumption rates were 10-fold higher in live controls than in killed controls. Soils exposed to trace levels (10 ppm) of MeBr demonstrated complete consumption within 5 h of incubation, while controls inhibited with MeF or incubated without O2 had 50% lower removal rates. Aerobic soils oxidized [14C]MeBr to 14CO2, and MeF inhibited oxidation by 72%. Field experiments demonstrated slightly lower MeBr removal rates in chambers containing MeF than in chambers lacking MeF. Collectively, these results show that soil methanotrophic bacteria, as well as other microbes, can degrade MeBr present in the environment.

  7. The Challenge of Research and Extension to Define and Implement Alternatives to Methyl Bromide

    PubMed Central

    Noling, J. W.; Becker, J. O.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, methyl bromide (MBr), a broad spectrum fumigant, has been used extensively for soilborne disease and pest control in the production of many fruit, vegetable, turf, and nursery crops. Recently, agricultural emissions of MBr were implicated as a potentially significant contributor to stratospheric ozone depletion. As a precautionary measure for global ozone protection, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has enforced federal legislation which mandates a complete phase-out of MBr use within the United States by 1 January 2001. Thus, new cost effective, environmentally compatible strategies for control of nematodes and other soilborne pests and pathogens must be developed and tested in a relatively short time to avoid significant losses in crop productivity. The extent to which certain agricultural industries that are now heavily reliant on MBr are affected will depend on the development of sustainable, integrated tactics to pest control, such as combinations of cultural, chemical, and biological tactics. New muhidisciplinary research and extension programs must be developed to address and overcome major constraints and incompatibilities that have prevented such tactics from being widely adopted. PMID:19279928

  8. Methyl bromide emissions from a covered field: III. Correcting chamber flux for temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S.R.; Gan, J.; Ernst, F.F.; Wang, D.

    1996-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the environmental fate and transport of methyl bromide (MeBr) in agricultural systems. Part of this experiment involved the use of three flow-through chambers to estimate the MeBr flux through a sheet of clear polyethylene plastic covering the field. Using the chamber data, the total mass lost to the atmosphere was estimated to be 96% of the applied mass, and the results were highly variable between chambers (i.e., standard deviation of 298 kg or 35%). The air temperature inside the chamber was found to be much higher than the air temperature outside and was highly correlated with the diurnal variation in incoming solar radiation. Since the diffusion through polyethylene film was found to be strongly dependent on the temperature, a method was developed to correct the chamber flux density data for enhanced diffusion caused by increases in the temperature inside the chamber. After correcting for temperature, the estimated total MeBr emission was reduced to approximately 59% (21% standard deviation) of the applied amount, which is about 5% less than was measured using other methods. When chambers are used to measure volatilization of MeBr or other fumigants from fields covered with a sheet of polyethylene plastic, the chambers should be designed to minimize internal heating or some method should be used to correct the volatilization rate for the effects of temperature. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. An investigation of the atmospheric sources and sinks of Methyl Bromide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Kanakidou, M.

    1993-01-01

    Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) is a ubiquitous component of the atmosphere and has been implicated as an important player in the depletion of stratospheric ozone. Atmospheric CH3Br abundances, interhemispheric gradients, oceanic concentrations, man-made emissions, and removal processes have been analyzed and interpreted with the help of a simple box model and a 2D global photochemical model. Its calculated atmospheric lifetime (T) of 1.7-1.9 years, based on reaction with OH radicals, is consistent with a global source of 90-110 Gg (10 exp 9 g)/year. Consequences of a much shorter lifetime of 1.2 years, due to possible deposition/hydrolysis losses, are also considered. Available data are used to estimate a CH3Br source that is 35 percent (20-50 percent) man-made and 65 percent (80-50 percent) natural. Oceans are substantially supersaturated and provide the most important natural source of about 60 (40-80) Gg/year.

  10. Stable bromine isotopic composition of methyl bromide released from plant matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, Axel; Holmstrand, Henry; Andersson, Per; Thornton, Brett F.; Wishkerman, Asher; Keppler, Frank; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2014-01-01

    Methyl bromide (CH3Br) emitted from plants constitutes a natural source of bromine to the atmosphere, and is a component in the currently unbalanced global CH3Br budget. In the stratosphere, CH3Br contributes to ozone loss processes. Studies of stable isotope composition may reduce uncertainties in the atmospheric CH3Br budget, but require well-constrained isotope fingerprints of the source end members. Here we report the first measurements of stable bromine isotopes (δ81Br) in CH3Br from abiotic plant emissions. Incubations of both KBr-fortified pectin, a ubiquitous cell-stabilizing macromolecule, and of a natural halophyte (Salicornia fruticosa), yielded an enrichment factor (ε) of -2.00 ± 0.23‰ (1σ, n = 8) for pectin and -1.82 ± 0.02‰ (1σ, n = 4) for Salicornia (the relative amount of the heavier 81Br was decreased in CH3Br compared to the substrate salt). For short incubations, and up to 10% consumption of the salt substrate, this isotope effect was similar for temperatures from 30 up to 300 °C. For longer incubations of up to 90 h at 180 °C the δ81Br values increased from -2‰ to 0‰ for pectin and to -1‰ for Salicornia. These δ81Br source signatures of CH3Br formation from plant matter combine with similar data for carbon isotopes to facilitate multidimensional isotope diagnostics of the CH3Br budget.

  11. A Comprehensive Theoretical Investigation of the Molecular Properties of Methyl Bromide (CH3Br)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ang-Yang; Efil, Kürşat; Yang, Rui; Hu, Qing-Miao

    2015-12-01

    The properties of the ground and the lowest excited state of methyl bromide (CH3Br) have been studied with and without inclusion of the solvent effects in this work. The geometric parameters, energies, and frequencies of the ground state and the triplet state are calculated by using the MP2(full)/6-311++G** level of theory. The vertical excitation for the singlet state is also investigated. It is found that the theoretical results performed by the TDDFT/B3P86/6-311++G** method are in the best agreement with the experimental results. In addition, the dissociation energy of CH3Br molecule is computed at MP2(full)/6-311++G** level of theory for the gas phase and in water. The ionisation potential (IP), electron affinity (EA), electronegativity (χ), electrophilicity index (ω), hardness (η), softness (S), and chemical potential (μ) values are calculated from HOMO-LUMO energies both in the gas phase and in solvent (water). These theoretical results could serve as a guide for future experimental investigations.

  12. Laboratory-scale measurements and simulations of effect of application methods on soil methyl bromide emission

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, J.; Yates, S.R.; Spencer, W.F.

    1997-01-01

    Methyl bromide (bromomethane, MeBr), which originates from the oceans, fumigation, and a few other sources, is reportedly contributing to the ozone depletion in the stratosphere. Due to the heavy reliance on this fumigant in the production of many crops, it is of particular importance to accurately quantify the atmospheric input of MeBr arising from agricultural uses, and develop feasible measures to minimize these emissions. In this study, we determined the effect of two important application variables, surface tarp and injection depth, on MeBr transport and transformation in the soil and its emission from the soil surface under controlled conditions. Following 20- and 30-cm injections, covering the soil surface with 1-mil (0.025 mm) high-density polyethylene film resulted in an average of 48% reduction in MeBr emission. Increasing the injection depth from 20 to 60 cm caused a decrease in MeBr emission of 54% under untarped conditions and 40% under tarped conditions. The influence of application methods on MeBr atmospheric emissions should be considered when estimating the contribution of agricultural fumigation to the overall atmospheric MeBr burden on a global scale. The results also indicate that MeBr emission after soil fumigation may be substantially minimized by using surface tarpaulins and deep injections. 34 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Native Kenyan plants as possible alternatives to methyl bromide in soil fumigation.

    PubMed

    Rugutt, J K; Ngigi, A N; Rugutt, K J; Ndalut, P K

    2006-09-01

    Methyl bromide (CH3Br) is a biocidal fumigant used widely in crop production and commodity preservation worldwide. CH3Br escapes to the stratosphere and releases bromine atom (Br), which contributes to significant destruction of the ozone (O3). It is therefore necessary to explore alternatives to CH3Br that are environmentally safe and suitable for resource-poor African farmers. We present here the results of a study on the inhibitory activity of crude extracts from Kenyan medicinal plants against three soil pathogens, Fusarium oxysporum, Alternaria passiflorae, and Aspergillus niger. Crude organic extracts of Warburgia ugandensis Sprague, Azadirachta indica A. Juss, Tagetes minuta and Urtica massaica were active against all soil pathogens, while those from U. massaica were not. Chromatographic purification of the crude extract of W. ugandensis provided two pure compounds, muzigadial (1) and muzigadiolide (5). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC value) for muzigadial (1) ranged from 5 to 100mug/ml. Muzigadiolide (5) was not active. Greenhouse tests of W. ugandensis extracts against F. oxysporium pathogen showed the most effective inhibitory concentration to be at least 5 mg/ml. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models were used to rationalize the variation in biological activities of muzigadial (1), warburganal (2), polygodial (3), ugandensidial (4), muzigadiolide (5), azadirachtin (6), and CH3Br. The models were based on several molecular descriptors including LogP, van der Waals surface area (VDW(A)), van der Waals volume (VDW(v)), dipole moment, total energy, polarizability, and differences between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO-LUMO gap). PMID:16920513

  14. An estimation of the global emission of methyl bromide from rapeseed ( Brassica napus) from 1961 to 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, M. Iqbal; White, Iain R.; Nickless, Graham; Wang, Kuo-Ying; Shallcross, Dudley E.

    Gan et al. [Gan, J., Yates, S.R., Ohr, H.D., Sims, J.J., 1998. Production of methyl bromide by terrestrial higher plants. Geophysical Research Letters 25 (19), 3595-3598] have reported that plants of the family Brassicaceae take up bromide from soils and subsequently release methyl bromide (CH 3Br) to the atmosphere deriving a significant emission from this source of about 7 Gg(10 9 g) yr -1. In this study, we determine a yearly global emission rate for CH 3Br from one such species, rapeseed, from 1961 to 2003 using data on crop harvest index and growth rate in conjunction with global production data. This study suggests that CH 3Br emissions from rapeseed have increased 10-fold from 1961 to 2003 and by a factor of 3-4 since 1980. It also suggests that the geographical distribution of emissions has also changed substantially in the last 40 yr. The annual emission of CH 3Br from mustard and cabbage is also estimated; whilst relative levels emitted from these species are less significant, as these crops are continually exploited for new applications CH 3Br emissions are set to increase.

  15. Methyl bromide emission from fields partially covered with a high-density polyethylene and a virtually impermeable film

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.; Yates, S.R.

    1998-09-01

    Recent field studies in the interior valley of southern California have indicated that 56--73% of methyl bromide (MeBr) used in soil fumigation is lost to atmospheric emission when the fields are covered completely with a high-density polyethylene (HDPE) film. The emission can be reduced to less than 5% when a virtually impermeable film or Hytibar is used to cover the fields. This study was conducted to determine MeBr emission from bedded field plots where only the beds were covered with a HDPE or a virtually impermeable plastic film. The results provide an assessment on MeBr emission from field beds partially covered with the HDPE film and the suitability of using a virtually impermeable film for emission reduction. Methyl bromide gas was applied to replicated field beds covered with either a HDPE or the Hytibar film. The films were removed 6 days after MeBr application. Replicated soil cores were taken from different locations of the field beds, 20 days after MeBr application, for the determination of soil bromide ion concentrations. The total amount of MeBr degraded from each plot was calculated from the measured bromide ion concentrations, and the potential emission was determined as the difference between the amount of applied and that of degraded. Results indicated that the potential emission from this bedded system was about 95% for the HDPE treatment and 90% for the Hytibar-covered plots. Regardless of the small improvement with the virtually impermeable film, the experiment clearly indicates that partially covering the field with either a HDPE or a virtually impermeable film would result in unacceptably high emission losses.

  16. Methyl bromide as a quarantine treatment for Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in regulated wood packing material.

    PubMed

    Barak, A V; Wang, Y; Xu, L; Rong, Z; Hang, X; Zhan, G

    2005-12-01

    Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky), has recently (since 1996) established in limited infestations near several cities in the United States. A. glabripennis was probably introduced into the United States with solid wood packing or dunnage. During 2001, we evaluated the current APHIS Schedule T404-b-1-1 for methyl bromide (MeBr) fumigation. Fumigations were conducted in 432-liter Lexan chambers inside a 6.1-m refrigerated container. Each fumigation consisted of 12 high-moisture, naturally infested Populus spp. timbers. We fumigated wood for 24 h at 4.4 degrees C (80 g/m3), 10.0 degrees C (64 g/m3), 15.6 degrees C (56 g/m3), and 21.1 degrees C (48 g/m3). All schedule doses resulted in 100% kill of A. glabripennis larvae. During 2002, we conducted additional fumigations to determine the basic toxicity of MeBr to A. glabripennis larvae in solid wood timbers of 10 by 10 by 115-cm size. Probit analysis estimated the CxT product at 99.0, 99.9, 99.99, and 99.99683% kill (probit-9). The probit-9 values for CxT were 1,196.1, 918.7, 642.4, and 362.4 g-h/m3 at 4.4, 10.0, 15.6, and 21.1 degrees C, respectively. Applied doses to achieve this level of control were estimated to be 119.6, 82.7, 56.0, and 32.2 g/m3, respectively. These applied doses are satisfactory for wood as a commodity with wood load factors of approximately 25% and may be higher than necessary for container fumigation where sorptive wood load as crating or pallets may only be 5% or less. The APHIS Schedule T404-b-1-1 is adequate if extended for 24 h and should be amended to include intermediate doses at 10.0 and 15.6 degrees C, thus reducing the use of MeBr at these temperatures. PMID:16539113

  17. Critical use of methyl bromide for soil disinfestation in Belgium during 2005.

    PubMed

    Viaene, N; Eloot, B; De Vis, R; Decadt, R; Vergote, N; Bleyaert, P; Peeters, L; Trybou, M; Heungens, K

    2006-01-01

    During 2005, Belgium enforced a strict procedure for the assignment of critical-use permits for methyl bromide (MeBr) as a soil disinfestant. This procedure involved an inspection of the site before disinfestation by a representative of a registered institute, and a mandatory demonstration of the presence of a pest or disease for which a critical use permit could be granted according to the Critical Use Nominations (CUNs). The procedure was subject to random inspections by an independent institute. The results of these inspections demonstrated proper and timely evaluation of the permit requests. A total of 113 requests for a MeBr disinfestation permit were submitted in 2005. Out of these, 105 referred to applications in 2005. The remaining 8 requests referred to applications in 2006 and were denied a permit based on the lack of MeBr quotum granted to Belgium for 2006. Of the 105 requests for applications in 2005, 93 received a MeBr application permit for soil disinfestation. These 93 permits represented 15911 kg or 37.3% of the total quotum assigned to Belgium in 2005 (42676 kg). Most of the quotum was used for butterhead lettuce (11456 kg or 72% of the applied MeBr). For most commodities, a surplus in quotum was available. However, for chrysanthemum, the amount requested for critical use exceeded the available quotum. The most important pests and diseases for which a permit was assigned were Meloidogyne, Sclerotinia, Rhizoctonia, Olpidium, Pythium, Pyrenochaeta, Verticillium, and a combination of these fungi and nematodes. The 12 requests for which no permit was granted represented 2010 kg or 11.3% of the total amount requested. In addition, institutes carrying out the assignment procedure reported at least 62 extra cases where they had been contacted by a grower but where no official permit request was filed based on the first inspection. When including those cases, the total reduction of the potentially used amount of MeBr is about 44 %. When adding an estimated

  18. 76 FR 7200 - Methyl Bromide; Notice of Receipt of Requests To Voluntarily Amend Registrations To Terminate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... Hawaii (use allowed until December 31, 2012); (2) soils on golf courses and athletic/recreational fields..., Vidalia onions grown in Georgia, ginger grown in Hawaii; (2) soils on golf courses and athletic... bromide on soil for resurfacing/replanting turf or sod on golf courses and athletic/recreational...

  19. How unclogging a sink can be lethal: case report of an accidental methyl bromide poisoning leading to a multiple organ failure.

    PubMed

    Lecailtel, Sylvain; Broucqsault-Dedrie, Céline; Vanbaelinghem, Clément; Nyunga, Martine; Colling, Delphine; Herbecq, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Methyl bromide (CH3Br) is a colorless and odorless volatile gas, used as an insecticide, fire extinguisher, fumigant, and refrigerant. Although forbidden since 1987 for domestic use, it is still used in industry, for example, to fumigate agricultural fields which are for importation in the United States. Here is the case of a 74-year-old man who was accidentally exposed to methyl bromide after using an old fire extinguisher. Even though he finally survived, he developed a severe multiple organ failure and spent 2 months in intensive care unit. We present in this report all the difficulties we had to diagnose this unusual poisoning. PMID:27408727

  20. Atmospheric methyl bromide (CH{sub 3}Br) from agricultural soil fumigations

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, K.; Williams, J.; Wang, N.Y.; Cicerone, R.J.

    1995-03-31

    The treatment of agricultural soils with CH{sub 3}Br (MeBr) has been suggested to be a significant source of atmospheric MeBr which is involved in stratospheric ozone loss. A field fumigation experiment showed that, after 7 days, 34 percent of the applied MeBr had escaped into the atmosphere. The remaining 66 percent should have caused an increase in bromide in the soil; soil bromide increased by an amount equal to 70 percent of the applied MeBr, consistent with the flux measurements to within 4 percent. Comparison with an earlier experiment in which the escape of MeBr to the atmosphere was greater showed that higher soil pH, organic content and soil moisture, and deeper, more uniform injection of MeBr may in combination reduce the escape of MeBr. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Evaluation of the combination of dimethyl disulfide and dazomet as an efficient methyl bromide alternative for cucumber production in China.

    PubMed

    Mao, Liangang; Yan, Dongdong; Wang, Qiuxia; Li, Yuan; Ouyang, Canbin; Liu, Pengfei; Shen, Jin; Guo, Meixia; Cao, Aocheng

    2014-05-28

    The combination of dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) and dazomet (DZ) is a potential alternative to methyl bromide (MB) for soil disinfestation. The efficacy of DMDS plus DZ in controlling key soilborne pests was evaluated in a laboratory study and in two commercial cucumber greenhouses. Laboratory studies found that all of the combinations had positive synergistic effects on root-knot nematodes, two key soilborne fungi, and two major weed seeds. Greenhouse trials revealed that the combination of DMDS and DZ (30 + 25 g m(-2)) successfully suppressed Meloidogyne spp. root galling, sharply reduced the colony-forming units of Fusarium spp. and Phytophthora spp. on media, maintained high cucumber yields, and was not significantly different from MB or DMDS alone, but better than DZ alone. All of the chemical treatments provided significantly better results than the nontreated control. The results indicate that the combination of DMDS and DZ is an efficient MB alternative for cucumber production. PMID:24820184

  2. Synthesis, spectral, optical and thermal studies of 1-methyl-2,6-dimethyl-4-hydroxypyridinium chloride monohydrate and bromide monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Dhanuskodi, S; Manivannan, S; Philip, J

    2008-04-01

    Semiorganic 1-methyl-2,6-dimethyl-4-hydroxypyridinium chloride monohydrate (MDMPCl.H(2)O) and bromide monohydrate (MDMPBr.H(2)O) salts have been synthesized. Single crystals of MDMPCl.H(2)O and MDMPBr.H(2)O were grown by the slow evaporation method from aqueous solution at constant temperatures 30 and 32 degrees C respectively. The grown crystals were characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR and FT-NMR techniques and their molecular structures were elucidated. Thermogravimetric, differential thermal analyses and differential scanning calorimetry reveal the presence of water molecules in the crystal lattices and thermal stabilities. Optical transmittance windows in aqueous solution were found as 300-1100 nm using UV-vis-NIR spectrophotometer. PMID:17709283

  3. PERENNIAL CROP NURSERIES TREATED WITH METHYL BROMIDE AND ALTERNATIVE FUMIGANTS: EFFECTS ON WEED SEED VIABILITY, WEED DENSITIES, AND TIME REQUIRED FOR HAND WEEDING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed control provided by alternative fumigants to methyl bromide (MeBr) needs to be tested in perennial crop nurseries in California because MeBr is being phased out in accordance with the Montreal Protocol, few herbicides are registered for perennial nursery use, and costs of other control measures...

  4. The treatment of fresh fruit from California with methyl bromide for postharvest control of light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide chamber fumigations were evaluated for postharvest control of light brown apple moth (LBAM), Epiphyas postvittana (Walker), in fresh fruit exports. To simulate external feeding, larvae were contained in gas-permeable cages and distributed throughout loads of peaches, plums, nectarines...

  5. Evaluation of non-fumigant alternatives to methyl bromide for weed control and crop yield in California strawberries (Fragaria ananassa L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In California, USA, agricultural fumigant use regulations hinder the complete transition from methyl bromide (MB) to alternative fumigants. Alternative fumigants such as 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) and chloropicrin (Pic) are being used on approximately half of California conventional strawberry prod...

  6. Emissions and distribution of methyl bromide in field beds and applied at two rates and covered with two types of plastic mulches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field experiment was conducted to compare two plastic mulches, polyethylene film (PE) and virtually impermeable film (VIF), on surface emissions and subsurface distribution of methyl bromide (MBr), applied at rates of 392 (high) and 196 (low) kg/ha. Within 30 min after injection to a 30 cm depth, MB...

  7. ASSESSMENT OF THE MUTAGENIC POTENTIAL OF CARBON DISULFIDE, CARBON TETRACHLORIDE, DICHLOROMETHANE, ETHYLENE DICHLORIDE, AND METHYL BROMIDE: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS IN RELATION TO ETHYLENE DIBROMIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document provides an evaluation of the mutagenic potential of five alternative fumigants to ethylene dibromide(EDB). These include carbon disulfide(CS2), carbon tetrachloride(CCl4), dichloromethane(DCM), ethylene dichloride(EDC), and methyl bromide (MB). Of the five proposed ...

  8. Activated carbons from end-products of tree nut and tree fruit production as sorbents for removing methyl bromide in ventilation effluent from postharvest chamber fumigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    End-products of tree nuts and tree fruits grown in California, USA were evaluated for the ability to remove methyl bromide from the ventilation effluent of postharvest chamber fumigations. Activated carbon sorbents from walnut and almond shells as well as peach and prune pits were prepared using dif...

  9. Effects of reduced rates of Telone C35 and methyl bromide in conjunction with virtually impermeable film on weeds and root-knot nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two field trials were conducted in Florida in 2004 to test the efficacy of reduced rates of the fumigants methyl bromide and 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) plus chloropicrin in combination with virtually impermeable film (VIF) and standard low density polyethylene (LDPE) film. In spring grown tomato, ...

  10. Development of an activated carbon-based electrode for the capture and rapid electrolytic reductive debromination of methyl bromide from post-harvest fumigations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to concerns surrounding its ozone depletion potential, there is a need for technologies to capture and destroy methyl bromide (CH3Br) emissions from post-harvest fumigations applied to control agricultural pests. Previously we described a system in which CH3Br fumes vented from fumigation chambe...

  11. Methyl Bromide alternatives for vegetable production in Georgia: On-farm trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three fumigant alternatives, methyl iodide plus chloropicirn (MIDAS), dimethyl disulfide plus chloropicrin (DMDS), and Telone II plus chloropicrin plus Vapam (3-Way) have exhibited promising results in small plot trials for the control of pests (weeds, pathogens, nematodes) in plasticulture producti...

  12. Persistent Na+ and K+ channel dysfunctions after chronic exposure to insecticides and pyridostigmine bromide.

    PubMed

    Nutter, T J; Jiang, N; Cooper, Brian Y

    2013-12-01

    Many soldiers that served in the 1991 Gulf War developed widespread chronic pain. Exposure to insecticides and the nerve gas prophylactic pyridostigmine bromide (PB) was identified as risk factors by the Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses (GWI). We examined whether a 60 day exposure to neurotoxicants/PB (NTPB) produced behavioral, molecular and cellular indices of chronic pain in the rat. Male rats were exposed to chlorpyrifos (120mg/kg; SC), permethrin (2.6mg/kg; topical), and PB (13.0mg/kg; oral) or their respective vehicles (corn oil, ethanol, and water). Permethrin can exert profound influences on voltage activated Na(+) channel proteins; while chlorpyrifos and PB can increase absorption and/or retard metabolism of permethrin as well as inhibit cholinesterases. During and after exposure to these agents, we assessed muscle pressure pain thresholds and activity (distance and rest time). Eight and 12 weeks after treatments ceased, we used whole cell patch electrophysiology to examine the physiology of tissue specific DRG nociceptor channel proteins expressed in muscle and putative vascular nociceptors (voltage dependent, activation, inactivation, and deactivation). Behavioral indices were unchanged after treatment with NTPB. Eight weeks after treatments ended, the peak and average conductance of Kv7 mediated K(+) currents were significantly increased in vascular nociceptors. When a specific Kv7 inhibitor was applied (linopirdine, 10μM) NTPB treated vascular nociceptors emitted significantly more spontaneous APs than vehicle treated neurons. Changes to Kv7 channel physiology were resolved 12 weeks after treatment. The molecular alterations to Kv7 channel proteins and the specific susceptibility of the vascular nociceptor population could be important for the etiology of GWI pain. PMID:23994030

  13. Degradation of Methyl Bromide and Methyl Chloride in Soil Microcosms: Use of Stable C Isotope Fractionation and Stable Isotope Probing to Identify Reactions and the Responsible Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. G.; Warner, K. L.; Baesman, S. M.; Oremland, R. S.; McDonald, I. R.; Radajewski, S.; Murrell, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    Methyl bromide (MeBr) and methyl chloride (MeCl) are important atmospheric trace gases that contribute directly to stratospheric ozone depletion. These compounds have natural and anthropogenic sources and sinks in both aquatic and terrestrial environments. Soils comprise the largest known sink for MeBr on the Earth's surface and are also a large sink for MeCl. However, the processes that influence the flux of these compounds from air to soil or soil to air are poorly understood at present. Bacteria in soil microcosm experiments oxidized both MeCl and MeBr, the former compound more rapidly than the latter. MeBr was also removed by chemical reactions while MeCl was not. Chemical degradation of MeBr accounted for more than half of its total loss. We applied new techniques to determine if different bacteria were responsible for degrading MeBr and MeCl. Stable isotope probing revealed that different populations of soil bacteria assimilated added 13C-labeled MeBr and MeCl. Soil bacterial oxidation of MeBr and MeCl was characterized by different kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). The KIE for MeBr oxidation by bacteria was 22 +/- 5 \\permil and the KIE for MeCl oxidation was 56 +/- 3 \\permil, suggesting that different bacteria were responsible for degrading each compound. The identity of the active MeBr and MeCl degrading bacteria in soil was determined by analysis of 16S rDNA sequences amplified from 13C-DNA fractions. The diverse population of active bacteria was reflected by the range of sequences found for the cmuA gene, which codes for the enzyme that catalyzes the initial step in the oxidation of MeBr and MeCl. The diversity and number of different bacteria actively degrading MeBr and MeCl in the soil and the number of bacteria identified that contain the enzyme capable of degrading methyl halides were in contrast to the limited number of methyl halide degrading bacteria that have been isolated thus far from soil and aquatic environments; thus suggesting that the

  14. Degradation of methyl bromide and methyl chloride in soil microcosms: Use of stable C isotope fractionation and stable isotope probing to identify reactions and the responsible microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Laurence G.; Warner, Karen L.; Baesman, Shaun M.; Oremland, Ronald S.; McDonald, Ian R.; Radajewski, Stefan; Murrell, J. Colin

    2004-08-01

    Bacteria in soil microcosm experiments oxidized elevated levels of methyl chloride (MeCl) and methyl bromide (MeBr), the former compound more rapidly than the latter. MeBr was also removed by chemical reactions while MeCl was not. Chemical degradation dominated the early removal of MeBr and accounted for more than half of its total loss. Fractionation of stable carbon isotopes during chemical degradation of MeBr resulted in a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 59 ± 7‰. Soil bacterial oxidation dominated the later removal of MeBr and MeCl and was characterized by different KIEs for each compound. The KIE for MeBr oxidation was 69 ± 9‰ and the KIE for MeCl oxidation was 49 ± 3‰. Stable isotope probing revealed that different populations of soil bacteria assimilated added 13C-labeled MeBr and MeCl. The identity of the active MeBr and MeCl degrading bacteria in soil was determined by analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences amplified from 13C-DNA fractions, which identified a number of sequences from organisms not previously thought to be involved in methyl halide degradation. These included Burkholderia, the major clone type in the 13C-MeBr fraction, and Rhodobacter, Lysobacter and Nocardioides the major clone types in the 13C-MeCl fraction. None of the 16S rRNA gene sequences for methyl halide oxidizing bacteria currently in culture (including Aminobacter strain IMB-1 isolated from fumigated soil) were identified. Functional gene clone types closely related to Aminobacter spp. were identified in libraries containing the sequences for the cmuA gene, which codes for the enzyme known to catalyze the initial step in the oxidation of MeBr and MeCl. The cmuA gene was limited to members of the alpha-Proteobacteria whereas the greater diversity demonstrated by the 16S rRNA gene may indicate that other enzymes catalyze methyl halide oxidation in different groups of bacteria.

  15. Degradation of methyl bromide and methyl chloride in soil microcosms: Use of stable C isotope fractionation and stable isotope probing to identify reactions and the responsible microorganisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Warner, K.L.; Baesman, S.M.; Oremland, R.S.; McDonald, I.R.; Radajewski, S.; Murrell, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria in soil microcosm experiments oxidized elevated levels of methyl chloride (MeCl) and methyl bromide (MeBr), the former compound more rapidly than the latter. MeBr was also removed by chemical reactions while MeCl was not. Chemical degradation dominated the early removal of MeBr and accounted for more than half of its total loss. Fractionation of stable carbon isotopes during chemical degradation of MeBr resulted in a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 59 ?? 7???. Soil bacterial oxidation dominated the later removal of MeBr and MeCl and was characterized by different KIEs for each compound. The KIE for MeBr oxidation was 69 ?? 9??? and the KIE for MeCl oxidation was 49 ?? 3???. Stable isotope probing revealed that different populations of soil bacteria assimilated added 13C-labeled MeBr and MeCl. The identity of the active MeBr and MeCl degrading bacteria in soil was determined by analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences amplified from 13C-DNA fractions, which identified a number of sequences from organisms not previously thought to be involved in methyl halide degradation. These included Burkholderia , the major clone type in the 13C-MeBr fraction, and Rhodobacter, Lysobacter and Nocardioides the major clone types in the 13C-MeCl fraction. None of the 16S rRNA gene sequences for methyl halide oxidizing bacteria currently in culture (including Aminobacter strain IMB-1 isolated from fumigated soil) were identified. Functional gene clone types closely related to Aminobacter spp. were identified in libraries containing the sequences for the cmuA gene, which codes for the enzyme known to catalyze the initial step in the oxidation of MeBr and MeCl. The cmuA gene was limited to members of the alpha-Proteobacteria whereas the greater diversity demonstrated by the 16S rRNA gene may indicate that other enzymes catalyze methyl halide oxidation in different groups of bacteria. Copyright ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Methyl Bromide in the Decontamination of Building and Interior Materials Contaminated with Bacillus anthracis Spores

    PubMed Central

    Wendling, Morgan; Richter, William; Lastivka, Andrew; Mickelsen, Leroy

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to determine the conditions required for the effective inactivation of Bacillus anthracis spores on materials by using methyl bromide (MeBr) gas. Another objective was to obtain comparative decontamination efficacy data with three avirulent microorganisms to assess their potential for use as surrogates for B. anthracis Ames. Decontamination tests were conducted with spores of B. anthracis Ames and Geobacillus stearothermophilus, B. anthracis NNR1Δ1, and B. anthracis Sterne inoculated onto six different materials. Experimental variables included temperature, relative humidity (RH), MeBr concentration, and contact time. MeBr was found to be an effective decontaminant under a number of conditions. This study highlights the important role that RH has when fumigation is performed with MeBr. There were no tests in which a ≥6-log10 reduction (LR) of B. anthracis Ames was achieved on all materials when fumigation was done at 45% RH. At 75% RH, an increase in the temperature, the MeBr concentration, or contact time generally improved the efficacy of fumigation with MeBr. This study provides new information for the effective use of MeBr at temperatures and RH levels lower than those that have been recommended previously. The study also provides data to assist with the selection of an avirulent surrogate for B. anthracis Ames spores when additional tests with MeBr are conducted. PMID:26801580

  17. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Methyl Bromide in the Decontamination of Building and Interior Materials Contaminated with Bacillus anthracis Spores.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joseph P; Wendling, Morgan; Richter, William; Lastivka, Andrew; Mickelsen, Leroy

    2016-04-01

    The primary goal of this study was to determine the conditions required for the effective inactivation of Bacillus anthracis spores on materials by using methyl bromide (MeBr) gas. Another objective was to obtain comparative decontamination efficacy data with three avirulent microorganisms to assess their potential for use as surrogates for B. anthracis Ames. Decontamination tests were conducted with spores of B. anthracis Ames and Geobacillus stearothermophilus, B. anthracis NNR1Δ1, and B. anthracis Sterne inoculated onto six different materials. Experimental variables included temperature, relative humidity (RH), MeBr concentration, and contact time. MeBr was found to be an effective decontaminant under a number of conditions. This study highlights the important role that RH has when fumigation is performed with MeBr. There were no tests in which a ≥6-log10 reduction (LR) of B. anthracis Ames was achieved on all materials when fumigation was done at 45% RH. At 75% RH, an increase in the temperature, the MeBr concentration, or contact time generally improved the efficacy of fumigation with MeBr. This study provides new information for the effective use of MeBr at temperatures and RH levels lower than those that have been recommended previously. The study also provides data to assist with the selection of an avirulent surrogate for B. anthracis Ames spores when additional tests with MeBr are conducted. PMID:26801580

  18. Prenatal antiepileptic exposure associates with neonatal DNA methylation differences.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alicia K; Conneely, Karen N; Newport, D Jeffrey; Kilaru, Varun; Schroeder, James W; Pennell, Page B; Knight, Bettina T; Cubells, Joseph C; Stowe, Zachary N; Brennan, Patricia A

    2012-05-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used to treat a variety of neuropsychiatric illnesses commonly encountered in women during their reproductive years, including epilepsy and bipolar disorder. Despite their widespread use, the impact of prenatal exposure on fetal development remains obscure. To evaluate whether AEDs taken by pregnant mothers influence DNA methylation patterns in their neonates, DNA was extracted from the umbilical cord blood of 201 neonates whose mothers were treated for neuropsychiatric illness during pregnancy and interrogated across 27,578 CpG sites using the Illumina HumanMethylation27 BeadChip. The association of each methylation value with the cumulative duration of prenatal AED exposure was examined using a linear mixed model. The average methylation level across all CpG sites was calculated for each subject, and this global methylation measure was evaluated similarly. Neonates with a longer duration of AED exposure in pregnancy showed a decrease in average global methylation (p = 0.0045). Further, DNA methylation of CpG sites in 14 genes significantly decreased with the duration of prenatal AED exposure even after adjusting for multiple comparisons (FDR < 0.05). For a small subset (n = 19) of these neonates, a second tissue, placenta, was available in addition to cord blood. Methylation of 3 of these 14 CpG sites was also significantly decreased in placental tissue. These novel data suggest decreased DNA methylation in neonates of mothers who took AEDs during pregnancy. The long-term stability and potential impact of these changes warrant further attention, and caution may be warranted before prescribing AEDs to pregnant women. PMID:22419127

  19. Potential impacts of imposing methyl bromide phaseout on US strawberry growers: a case study of a nomination for a critical use exemption under the Montreal Protocol.

    PubMed

    Norman, Catherine S

    2005-04-01

    The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer requires developed countries to phaseout methyl bromide production and non-quarantine uses by 2005 and developing countries to do the same by 2015. Exemptions to phaseout have been significant in slowing the process of abatement; many countries have applied for exemptions for some uses, partly on grounds that phaseout is economically infeasible. Data on the US strawberry market are used to investigate grower costs arising from substitution away from methyl bromide, the impact of trends in and characteristics of the demand for fresh strawberries, and characteristics of trade with countries not yet required to eliminate use of the compound. It appears that actual net costs to growers will be much smaller than the simple increase in production costs cited in the US nomination for exemption. PMID:15763159

  20. Bacterial oxidation of dibromomethane and methyl bromide in natural waters and enrichment cultures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, K.D.; Schaefer, J.K.; Oremland, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Bacterial oxidation of 14CH2Br2 and 14CH3Br was measured in freshwater, estuarine, seawater, and hypersaline-alkaline samples. In general, bacteria from the various sites oxidized similar amounts of 14CH2Br2 and comparatively less 14CH3Br. Bacterial oxidation of 14CH3Br was rapid in freshwater samples compared to bacterial oxidation of 14CH3Br in more saline waters. Freshwater was also the only site in which methyl fluoride-sensitive bacteria (e.g., methanotrophs or nitrifiers) governed brominated methane oxidation. Half-life calculations indicated that bacterial oxidation of CH2Br2 was potentially significant in all of the waters tested. In contrast, only in freshwater was bacterial oxidation of CH3Br as fast as chemical removal. The values calculated for more saline sites suggested that bacterial oxidation of CH3Br was relatively slow compared to chemical and physical loss mechanisms. However, enrichment cultures demonstrated that bacteria in seawater can rapidly oxidize brominated methanes. Two distinct cultures of nonmethanotrophic methylotrophs were recovered; one of these cultures was able to utilize CH2Br2 as a sole carbon source, and the other was able to utilize CH3Br as a sole carbon source.

  1. Identification of Methyl Halide-Utilizing Genes in the Methyl Bromide-Utilizing Bacterial Strain IMB-1 Suggests a High Degree of Conservation of Methyl Halide-Specific Genes in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodall, C.A.; Warner, K.L.; Oremland, R.S.; Murrell, J.C.; McDonald, I.R.

    2001-01-01

    Strain IMB-1, an aerobic methylotrophic member of the alpha subgroup of the Proteobacteria, can grow with methyl bromide as a sole carbon and energy source. A single cmu gene cluster was identified in IMB-1 that contained six open reading frames: cmuC, cmuA, orf146, paaE, hutI, and partial metF. CmuA from IMB-1 has high sequence homology to the methyltransferase CmuA from Methylobacterium chloromethanicum and Hyphomicrobium chloromethanicum and contains a C-terminal corrinoid-binding motif and an N-terminal methyl-transferase motif. However, cmuB, identified in M. chloromethanicum and H. chloromethanicum, was not detected in IMB-1.

  2. DNA methylation alterations in response to pesticide exposure in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao; Wallace, Andrew D.; Du, Pan; Kibbe, Warren A.; Jafari, Nadereh; Xie, Hehuang; Lin, Simon; Baccarelli, Andrea; Soares, Marcelo Bento; Hou, Lifang

    2013-01-01

    Although pesticides are subject to extensive carcinogenicity testing before regulatory approval, pesticide exposure has repeatedly been associated with various cancers. This suggests that pesticides may cause cancer via non-mutagenicity mechanisms. The present study provides evidence to support the hypothesis that pesticide-induced cancer may be mediated in part by epigenetic mechanisms. We examined whether exposure to 7 commonly used pesticides (i.e., fonofos, parathion, terbufos, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, malathion, and phorate) induces DNA methylation alterations in vitro. We conducted genome-wide DNA methylation analyses on DNA samples obtained from the human hematopoietic K562 cell line exposed to ethanol (control) and several OPs using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip. Bayesian-adjusted t-tests were used to identify differentially methylated gene promoter CpG sites. In this report, we present our results on three pesticides (fonofos, parathion, and terbufos) that clustered together based on principle component analysis and hierarchical clustering. These three pesticides induced similar methylation changes in the promoter regions of 712 genes, while also exhibiting their own OP-specific methylation alterations. Functional analysis of methylation changes specific to each OP, or common to all three OPs, revealed that differential methylation was associated with numerous genes that are involved in carcinogenesis-related processes. Our results provide experimental evidence that pesticides may modify gene promoter DNA methylation levels, suggesting that epigenetic mechanisms may contribute to pesticide-induced carcinogenesis. Further studies in other cell types and human samples are required, as well as determining the impact of these methylation changes on gene expression. PMID:22847954

  3. Are one or two dangerous? Methyl salicylate exposure in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jonathan E

    2007-01-01

    Serious toxicity can result from exposure to small amounts of methyl salicylate. Methyl salicylate is widely available as a component in many over-the-counter brands of creams, ointments, lotions, liniments and medicated oils intended for topical application to relieve musculoskeletal aches and pains. Among the most potent forms of methyl salicylate is oil of wintergreen (98% methyl salicylate). Other products with varying concentrations of methyl salicylate are ubiquitous throughout many parts of the world, including a number of products marketed as Asian herbal remedies. The toxic potential of all of these formulations is often underestimated by health care providers and the general public. A comprehensive review of the existing medical literature on methyl salicylate poisoning was performed, and data compiled over the past two decades by the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) was examined. Methyl salicylate continues to be a relatively common source of pediatric exposures. Persistent reports of life-threatening and fatal toxicity were found. In children less than 6 years of age, a teaspoon (5 mL) or less of oil of wintergreen has been implicated in several well-documented deaths. More needs to be done to educate both health care providers and the general public regarding the dangers of these widely available formulations. PMID:17239735

  4. Consumption of Tropospheric Levels of Methyl Bromide by C1 Compound-Utilizing Bacteria and Comparison to Saturation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Kelly D.; Varner, Ruth K.; Crill, Patrick M.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2001-01-01

    Pure cultures of methylotrophs and methanotrophs are known to oxidize methyl bromide (MeBr); however, their ability to oxidize tropospheric concentrations (parts per trillion by volume [pptv]) has not been tested. Methylotrophs and methanotrophs were able to consume MeBr provided at levels that mimicked the tropospheric mixing ratio of MeBr (12 pptv) at equilibrium with surface waters (≈2 pM). Kinetic investigations using picomolar concentrations of MeBr in a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) were performed using strain IMB-1 and Leisingeria methylohalidivorans strain MB2T — terrestrial and marine methylotrophs capable of halorespiration. First-order uptake of MeBr with no indication of threshold was observed for both strains. Strain MB2T displayed saturation kinetics in batch experiments using micromolar MeBr concentrations, with an apparent Ks of 2.4 μM MeBr and a Vmax of 1.6 nmol h−1 (106 cells)−1. Apparent first-order degradation rate constants measured with the CSTR were consistent with kinetic parameters determined in batch experiments, which used 35- to 1 × 107-fold-higher MeBr concentrations. Ruegeria algicola (a phylogenetic relative of strain MB2T), the common heterotrophs Escherichia coli and Bacillus pumilus, and a toluene oxidizer, Pseudomonas mendocina KR1, were also tested. These bacteria showed no significant consumption of 12 pptv MeBr; thus, the ability to consume ambient mixing ratios of MeBr was limited to C1 compound-oxidizing bacteria in this study. Aerobic C1 bacteria may provide model organisms for the biological oxidation of tropospheric MeBr in soils and waters. PMID:11722890

  5. Atomistic simulations of the solid-liquid transition of 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium bromide ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Feng, Haijun; Zhou, Jian; Qian, Yu

    2011-10-14

    Achieving melting point around room temperature is important for applications of ionic liquids. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are carried out to investigate the solid-liquid transition of ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium bromide ([emim]Br) by direct heating, hysteresis, void-nucleation, sandwich, and microcanonical ensemble approaches. Variations of the non-bonded energy, density, diffusion coefficient, and translational order parameter of [emim]Br are analyzed as a function of temperature, and a coexisting solid-liquid system is achieved in the microcanonical ensemble method. The melting points obtained from the first three methods are 547 ± 8 K, 429 ± 8 K, and 370 ± 6 K; while for the sandwich method, the melting points are 403 ± 4 K when merging along the x-axis by anisotropic isothermal-isobaric (NPT) ensemble, 393 ± 4 K when along the y-axis by anisotropic NPT ensemble, and 375 ± 4 K when along the y-axis by isotropic NPT ensemble. For microcanonical ensemble method, when the slabs are merging along different directions (x-axis, y-axis, and z-axis), the melting points are 364 ± 3 K, 365 ± 3 K, and 367 ± 3 K, respectively, the melting points we get by different methods are approximately 55.4%, 21.9%, 5.1%, 14.5%, 11.6%, 6.5%, 3.4%, 3.7%, and 4.3% higher than the experimental value of 352 K. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed. The void-nucleation and microcanonical ensemble methods are most favorable for predicting the solid-liquid transition. PMID:22010721

  6. Dissociation of internal energy-selected methyl bromide ion revealed from threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence velocity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Xiaoguo; Sun, Zhongfa; Liu, Shilin; Liu, Fuyi; Sheng, Liusi; Yan, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Dissociative photoionization of methyl bromide (CH3Br) in an excitation energy range of 10.45-16.90 eV has been investigated by using threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) velocity imaging. The coincident time-of-flight mass spectra indicate that the ground state X2E of CH3Br+ is stable, and both A2A1 and B2E ionic excited states are fully dissociative to produce the unique fragment ion of CH3+. From TPEPICO 3D time-sliced velocity images of CH3+ dissociated from specific state-selected CH3Br+ ion, kinetic energy release distribution (KERD) and angular distribution of CH3+ fragment ion are directly obtained. Both spin-orbit states of Br(2P) atom can be clearly observed in fast dissociation of CH3Br+(A2A1) ion along C-Br rupture, while a KERD of Maxwell-Boltzmann profile is obtained in dissociation of CH3Br+(B2E) ion. With the aid of the re-calculated potential energy curves of CH3Br+ including spin-orbit coupling, dissociation mechanisms of CH3Br+ ion in A2A1 and B2E states along C-Br rupture are revealed. For CH3Br+(A2A1) ion, the CH3+ + Br(2P1/2) channel is occurred via an adiabatic dissociation by vibration, while the Br(2P3/2) formation is through vibronic coupling to the high vibrational level of X2E state followed by rapid dissociation. C-Br bond breaking of CH3Br+(B2E) ion can occur via slow internal conversion to the excited vibrational level of the lower electronic states and then dissociation.

  7. Consumption of Tropospheric Levels of Methyl Bromide by C1 Compound-Utilizing Bacteria and Comparison to Saturation Kinetics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, K.D.; Varner, R.K.; Crill, P.M.; Oremland, R.S.

    2001-01-01

    Pure cultures of methylotrophs and methanotrophs are known to oxidize methyl bromide (MeBr); however, their ability to oxidize tropospheric concentrations (parts per trillion by volume [pptv]) has not been tested. Methylotrophs and methanotrophs were able to consume MeBr provided at levels that mimicked the tropospheric mixing ratio of MeBr (12 pptv) at equilibrium with surface waters (???2 pM). Kinetic investigations using picomolar concentrations of MeBr in a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) were performed using strain IMB-1 and Leisingeria methylohalidivorans strain MB2T - terrestrial and marine methylotrophs capable of halorespiration. First-order uptake of MeBr with no indication of threshold was observed for both strains. Strain MB2T displayed saturation kinetics in batch experiments using micromolar MeBr concentrations, with an apparent Ks of 2.4 ??M MeBr and a Vmax of 1.6 nmol h-1 (106 cells)-1. Apparent first-order degradation rate constants measured with the CSTR were consistent with kinetic parameters determined in batch experiments, which used 35- to 1 ?? 107-fold-higher MeBr concentrations. Ruegeria algicola (a phylogenetic relative of strain MB2T), the common heterotrophs Escherichia coli and Bacillus pumilus, and a toluene oxidizer, Pseudomonas mendocina KR1, were also tested. These bacteria showed no significant consumption of 12 pptv MeBr; thus, the ability to consume ambient mixing ratios of MeBr was limited to C1 compound-oxidizing bacteria in this study. Aerobic C1 bacteria may provide model organisms for the biological oxidation of tropospheric MeBr in soils and waters.

  8. DNA methylation: conducting the orchestra from exposure to phenotype?

    PubMed

    Leenen, Fleur A D; Muller, Claude P; Turner, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation, through 5-methyl- and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5mC and 5hmC), is considered to be one of the principal interfaces between the genome and our environment, and it helps explain phenotypic variations in human populations. Initial reports of large differences in methylation level in genomic regulatory regions, coupled with clear gene expression data in both imprinted genes and malignant diseases, provided easily dissected molecular mechanisms for switching genes on or off. However, a more subtle process is becoming evident, where small (<10 %) changes to intermediate methylation levels are associated with complex disease phenotypes. This has resulted in two clear methylation paradigms. The latter "subtle change" paradigm is rapidly becoming the epigenetic hallmark of complex disease phenotypes, although we are currently hampered by a lack of data addressing the true biological significance and meaning of these small differences. Our initial expectation of rapidly identifying mechanisms linking environmental exposure to a disease phenotype led to numerous observational/association studies being performed. Although this expectation remains unmet, there is now a growing body of literature on specific genes, suggesting wide ranging transcriptional and translational consequences of such subtle methylation changes. Data from the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) has shown that a complex interplay between DNA methylation, extensive 5'UTR splicing, and microvariability gives rise to the overall level and relative distribution of total and N-terminal protein isoforms generated. Additionally, the presence of multiple AUG translation initiation codons throughout the complete, processed mRNA enables translation variability, hereby enhancing the translational isoforms and the resulting protein isoform diversity, providing a clear link between small changes in DNA methylation and significant changes in protein isoforms and cellular locations. Methylation changes in

  9. Dissociation of internal energy-selected methyl bromide ion revealed from threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence velocity imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Xiaoguo E-mail: yanbing@jlu.edu.cn; Liu, Shilin; Sun, Zhongfa; Liu, Fuyi; Sheng, Liusi; Yan, Bing E-mail: yanbing@jlu.edu.cn

    2014-01-28

    Dissociative photoionization of methyl bromide (CH{sub 3}Br) in an excitation energy range of 10.45–16.90 eV has been investigated by using threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) velocity imaging. The coincident time-of-flight mass spectra indicate that the ground state X{sup 2}E of CH{sub 3}Br{sup +} is stable, and both A{sup 2}A{sub 1} and B{sup 2}E ionic excited states are fully dissociative to produce the unique fragment ion of CH{sub 3}{sup +}. From TPEPICO 3D time-sliced velocity images of CH{sub 3}{sup +} dissociated from specific state-selected CH{sub 3}Br{sup +} ion, kinetic energy release distribution (KERD) and angular distribution of CH{sub 3}{sup +} fragment ion are directly obtained. Both spin-orbit states of Br({sup 2}P) atom can be clearly observed in fast dissociation of CH{sub 3}Br{sup +}(A{sup 2}A{sub 1}) ion along C–Br rupture, while a KERD of Maxwell-Boltzmann profile is obtained in dissociation of CH{sub 3}Br{sup +}(B{sup 2}E) ion. With the aid of the re-calculated potential energy curves of CH{sub 3}Br{sup +} including spin-orbit coupling, dissociation mechanisms of CH{sub 3}Br{sup +} ion in A{sup 2}A{sub 1} and B{sup 2}E states along C–Br rupture are revealed. For CH{sub 3}Br{sup +}(A{sup 2}A{sub 1}) ion, the CH{sub 3}{sup +} + Br({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) channel is occurred via an adiabatic dissociation by vibration, while the Br({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) formation is through vibronic coupling to the high vibrational level of X{sup 2}E state followed by rapid dissociation. C–Br bond breaking of CH{sub 3}Br{sup +}(B{sup 2}E) ion can occur via slow internal conversion to the excited vibrational level of the lower electronic states and then dissociation.

  10. Arsenic exposure and DNA methylation among elderly men

    PubMed Central

    Lambrou, Angeliki; Baccarelli, Andrea; Wright, Robert O.; Weisskopf, Marc; Bollati, Valentina; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Arsenic exposure has been linked to epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation in in vitro and animal studies. This association has also been explored in highly exposed human populations, but studies among populations environmentally exposed to low arsenic levels are lacking. METHODS We evaluated the association between exposure to arsenic, measured in toenails, and blood DNA methylation in Alu and Long Interspersed Nucleotide Element-1 (LINE-1) repetitive elements in elderly men environmentally exposed to low levels of arsenic. We also explored potential effect modification by plasma folate, cobalamin (vitamin B12), and pyridoxine (vitamin B6). The study population was 581 participants from the Normative Aging Study in Boston, of whom 434, 140, and 7 had 1, 2, and 3 visits, respectively, between 1999-2002 and 2006-2007. We used mixed-effects models and included interaction terms to assess potential effect modification by nutritional factors. RESULTS There was a trend of increasing Alu and decreasing LINE-1 DNA methylation as arsenic exposure increased. In subjects with plasma folate below the median (< 14.1 ng/ml), arsenic was positively associated with Alu DNA methylation (β=0.08 [95% confidence interval = 0.03 to 0.13] for one interquartile range [0.06μg/g] increase in arsenic) while a negative association was observed in subjects with plasma folate above the median (β=-0.08 [-0.17 to 0.01]). CONCLUSIONS We found an association between arsenic exposure and DNA methylation in Alu repetitive elements that varied by folate level. This suggests a potential role for nutritional factors in arsenic toxicity. PMID:22833016

  11. Synthesis of tetraaza bromide macrocyclic and studies of its effect on poly(methyl methacrylate) grafted natural rubber (MG49) - lithium tertrafluoroborate (LiBF{sub 4}) films

    SciTech Connect

    Mariam, Siti Nor; Yamin, Bohari M.; Ahmad, Azizan

    2013-11-27

    Good Poly(Methyl Methacrylate) Grafted natural Rubber (MG49) films with homogeneous and smooth surface were obtained in the presence of Lithium Tertrafluoroborate (LiBF{sub 4}) and 5,5,7,12,12,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-7,14-dienium bromide, (Me{sub 6}N{sub 4}H{sub 4})Br{sub 2} as dopants. The conductivity was found to be 3.63×10{sup −6} S/cm an increase by seven fold compare to the undoped MG49.

  12. Synthesis of tetraaza bromide macrocyclic and studies of its effect on poly(methyl methacrylate) grafted natural rubber (MG49) - lithium tertrafluoroborate (LiBF4) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariam, Siti Nor; Yamin, Bohari M.; Ahmad, Azizan

    2013-11-01

    Good Poly(Methyl Methacrylate) Grafted natural Rubber (MG49) films with homogeneous and smooth surface were obtained in the presence of Lithium Tertrafluoroborate (LiBF4) and 5,5,7,12,12,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-7,14-dienium bromide, (Me6N4H4)Br2 as dopants. The conductivity was found to be 3.63×10-6 S/cm an increase by seven fold compare to the undoped MG49.

  13. Blast94: Bromine latitudinal air/sea transect 1994. Report on oceanic measurements of methyl bromide and other compounds. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Lobert, J.M.; Butler, J.H.; Geller, L.S.; Yvon, S.A.; Montzka, S.A.

    1996-02-01

    Methyl bromide (CH3Br) is of particular interest because it is both produced and consumed in the ocean, thus allowing the ocean to act as a buffer for CH3Br in the atmosphere. The main objective of the two NOAA/CMDL Bromine Latitudinal Air/Sea Transect Expeditions has been to resolve the discrepancy in previously reported data for oceanic CH3Br, and to extend the understanding of the distribution and cycling of CH3Br between the atmosphere and ocean. This was pursued by making frequent, shipboard measurements of CH3Br in the surface water and the marine atmosphere along the cruise tracks and by obtaining depth profiles of CH3Br at selected stations. Secondary objectives included obtaining atmospheric and surface water data for other methyl halides, most notably CH3Cl, CH3I, CH2Br2, and CHBr3.

  14. Modeling tribal exposures to methyl mercury from fish consumption.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jianping; Zartarian, Valerie; Mintz, Bruce; Weber, Marc; Bailey, Ken; Geller, Andrew

    2015-11-15

    Exposure assessment and risk management considerations for tribal fish consumption are different than for the general U.S. population because of higher fish intake from subsistence fishing and/or from unique cultural practices. This research summarizes analyses of available data and methodologies for estimating tribal fish consumption exposures to methyl mercury (MeHg). Large MeHg fish tissue data sets from the Environmental Protections Agency's (EPA's) Office of Water, USGS's EMMMA program, and other data sources, were integrated, analyzed, and combined with fish intake (consumption) data for exposure analyses using EPA's SHEDS-Dietary model. Results were mapped with GIS tools to depict spatial distributions of the MeHg in fish tissues and fish consumption exposure patterns. Contribution analyses indicates the major sources for those exposures, such as type and length of fish, geographical distribution (water bodies), and dietary exposure patterns. Sensitivity analyses identify the key variables and exposure pathways. Our results show that MeHg exposure of tribal populations from fish are about 3 to 10 times higher than the US general population and that exposure poses potential health risks. The estimated risks would be reduced as much as 50%, especially for high percentiles, just by avoiding consumption of fish species with higher MeHg concentrations such as walleye and bowfin, even without changing total fish intake. These exposure assessment methods and tools can help inform decisions regarding meal sizes and frequency, types of fish and water bodies to avoid, and other factors to minimize exposures and potential health risks from contaminated fish on tribal lands. PMID:26151654

  15. Persistent modification of Na{sub v}1.9 following chronic exposure to insecticides and pyridostigmine bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Nutter, Thomas J. Cooper, Brian Y.

    2014-06-15

    Many veterans of the 1991 Gulf War (GW) returned from that conflict with a widespread chronic pain affecting deep tissues. Recently, we have shown that a 60 day exposure to the insecticides permethrin, chlorpyrifos, and pyridostigmine bromide (NTPB) had little influence on nociceptor action potential forming Na{sub v}1.8, but increased K{sub v}7 mediated inhibitory currents 8 weeks after treatment. Using the same exposure regimen, we used whole cell patch methods to examine whether the influences of NTPB could be observed on Na{sub v}1.9 expressed in muscle and vascular nociceptors. During a 60 day exposure to NTPB, rats exhibited lowered muscle pain thresholds and increased rest periods, but these measures subsequently returned to normal levels. Eight and 12 weeks after treatments ceased, DRG neurons were excised from the sensory ganglia. Whole cell patch studies revealed little change in voltage dependent activation and deactivation of Na{sub v}1.9, but significant increases in the amplitude of Na{sub v}1.9 were observed 8 weeks after exposure. Cellular studies, at the 8 week delay, revealed that NTPB also significantly prolonged action potential duration and afterhyperpolarization (22 °C). Acute application of permethrin (10 μM) also increased the amplitude of Na{sub v}1.9 in skin, muscle and vascular nociceptors. In conclusion, chronic exposure to Gulf War agents produced long term changes in the amplitude of Na{sub v}1.9 expressed in muscle and vascular nociceptors. The reported increases in K{sub v}7 amplitude may have been an adaptive response to increased Na{sub v}1.9, and effectively suppressed behavioral pain measures in the post treatment period. Factors that alter the balance between Na{sub v}1.9 and K{sub v}7 could release spontaneous discharge and produce chronic deep tissue pain. - Highlights: • Rats were treated 60 days with permethrin, chlorpyrifos and pyridostigmine bromide. • 8 weeks after treatments, Nav1.9 activation and deactivation were

  16. Reverse osmosis membrane composition, structure and performance modification by bisulphite, iron(III), bromide and chlorite exposure.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, O; Gibert, O; Cortina, J L

    2016-10-15

    Reverse osmosis (RO) membrane exposure to bisulphite, chlorite, bromide and iron(III) was assessed in terms of membrane composition, structure and performance. Membrane composition was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and membrane performance was assessed by water and chloride permeation, using a modified version of the solution-diffusion model. Iron(III) dosage in presence of bisulphite led to an autooxidation of the latter, probably generating free radicals which damaged the membrane. It comprised a significant raise in chloride passage (chloride permeation coefficient increased 5.3-5.1 fold compared to the virgin membrane under the conditions studied) rapidly. No major differences in terms of water permeability and membrane composition were observed. Nevertheless, an increase in the size of the network pores, and a raise in the fraction of aggregate pores of the polyamide (PA) layer were identified, but no amide bond cleavage was observed. These structural changes were therefore, in accordance with the transport properties observed. PMID:27470468

  17. Protective effect of ipratropium bromide on bronchoconstriction induced by sulfur dioxide exposure during apricot sufurization processes that causes asthma-like syndrome in agricultural environment.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Zeki; Kilic, Talat; Koksal, Nurhan; Kotuk, Mahir

    2005-05-01

    We previously showed that apricot sulfurization workers are exposed to high concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2), resulting in an asthma-like syndrome. The aim of this study was to investigate whether pre-treatment of ipratropium bromide protects bronchoconstriction induced by SO2 exposure during apricot sulfurization processes that causes asthma-like syndrome. Firstly, pulmonary function tests were measured before and immediately after SO2 exposure due to processes of apricot sulfurization in 21 healthy volunteer apricot sulfurization workers who did not use any medication in apricot farms. One week later, same measurements were repeated in the same workers when they were working in same farm but they were administered two puffs of ipratropium bromide (20 microg per dose) before 30 min second SO2 exposure for protection of SO2-induced bronchoconstriction. Occupational SO2 exposure caused significant decrement in forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume (FEV1) and forced mid-expiratory flow rate (FEF25-75%) in the worker and these decrements were prevented by ipratropium bromide given 30 min before SO2 exposure. This result suggests that pre-treatment of ipratropium bromide protects SO2-induced bronchoconstriction in healthy worker during apricot sulfurization processes that causes asthma-like syndrome in agricultural environment. PMID:15749463

  18. Morphology and local organization of water-containing (1R,2S)-dodecyl(2-hydroxy-1-methyl-2-phenylethyl)dimethylammonium bromide reverse micelles dispersed in toluene.

    PubMed

    Longo, Alessandro; Giannici, Francesco; Portale, Giuseppe; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Calandra, Pietro; Turco Liveri, Vincenzo

    2014-08-28

    The structure of (1R,2S)-dodecyl(2-hydroxy-1-methyl-2-phenylethyl)dimethylammonium bromide (DMEB) reverse micelles, at various water-to-surfactant molar ratio (Rw, Rw = [water]/[DMEB]) and DMEB concentrations, has been investigated by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). SAXS data of dry reverse micelles are consistent with a model of spherical hydrophilic core surrounded by DMEB alkyl chains whose polydispersity decreases significantly with surfactant concentration. By adding water, a sphere to cylinder transition occurs leading to a one-dimensional growth of reverse micellar cores with Rw and surfactant concentration. The observed behavior was taken as an indication that water molecules are confined in the core of DMEB reverse micelles, quite uniformly distributed among them and mainly located among surfactant head groups. EXAFS data allow to focus within the hydrophilic micellar core to solve the short range local environment around the Br(-) counterion and to follow its changing with surfactant concentration and Rw. Analysis of Fourier transform of the EXAFS spectra indicates the existence of a local order nearby the bromide ions; pointing toward a quite structured hydrophilic core of DMEB reverse micelles. However, as a consequence of the fluid nature of reverse micelles, such local order is lower than that found in the lamellar structure of solid DMEB. Water confinement within the reverse micellar cores induces an increase of the local disorder suggesting an enhancement of the micellar core dynamics. PMID:25173042

  19. Morphology and local organization of water-containing (1R,2S)-dodecyl(2-hydroxy-1-methyl-2-phenylethyl)dimethylammonium bromide reverse micelles dispersed in toluene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Alessandro; Giannici, Francesco; Portale, Giuseppe; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Calandra, Pietro; Liveri, Vincenzo Turco

    2014-08-01

    The structure of (1R,2S)-dodecyl(2-hydroxy-1-methyl-2-phenylethyl)dimethylammonium bromide (DMEB) reverse micelles, at various water-to-surfactant molar ratio (Rw, Rw = [water]/[DMEB]) and DMEB concentrations, has been investigated by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). SAXS data of dry reverse micelles are consistent with a model of spherical hydrophilic core surrounded by DMEB alkyl chains whose polydispersity decreases significantly with surfactant concentration. By adding water, a sphere to cylinder transition occurs leading to a one-dimensional growth of reverse micellar cores with Rw and surfactant concentration. The observed behavior was taken as an indication that water molecules are confined in the core of DMEB reverse micelles, quite uniformly distributed among them and mainly located among surfactant head groups. EXAFS data allow to focus within the hydrophilic micellar core to solve the short range local environment around the Br- counterion and to follow its changing with surfactant concentration and Rw. Analysis of Fourier transform of the EXAFS spectra indicates the existence of a local order nearby the bromide ions; pointing toward a quite structured hydrophilic core of DMEB reverse micelles. However, as a consequence of the fluid nature of reverse micelles, such local order is lower than that found in the lamellar structure of solid DMEB. Water confinement within the reverse micellar cores induces an increase of the local disorder suggesting an enhancement of the micellar core dynamics.

  20. EVALUATION OF PROPARGYL BROMIDE AS A SOIL FUMIGANT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cut flower and bulb industry has relied heavily upon the use of methyl bromide as a key soil treatment for soilborne pest control. Due to the phase-out of methyl bromide it is important to develop alternatives to manage pests now managed by methyl bromide. The emphasis of this work was to eval...

  1. In Brief: Agreement signed for NSF participation in IODP; Asian dust storms' intensity, scale grow; Continued use of methyl bromide allowed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Judith; Showstack, Randy

    2004-04-01

    The U.S. National Science Foundation on 30 March signed a cooperative agreement with the Joint Oceanographic Institutions (JOI) in Washington, D.C., to lead U.S. participation in the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). Large-scale, destructive dust and sand storms that originate in the dry regions of northern China and Mongolia are plaguing the Korean peninsula, Japan and other parts of northeast Asia nearly five times more frequently than in the 1950s, participants in a meeting sponsored by the U.N. Environment Programme (UNEP) learned on 30 March. Twelve countries have received ``critical use exemptions'' to continue using limited amounts of the pesticide methyl bromide in 2005.

  2. Airborne arsenic exposure and excretion of methylated arsenic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, T J; Crecelius, E A; Reading, J C

    1977-01-01

    First void urine samples were collected from copper smelter workers exposed to inorganic arsenic and from unexposed controls. Arsenic compounds (As (III), As (V), methylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid) in these samples were analyzed by selective volatilization as arsines with determination of arsenic by plasma excitation emission spectrometry. On the day preceding the urine sample collection a breathing zone measurement was made of respirable arsenic particulates for each subject. It was found that all of the subjects, including the controls excreted arsenic primarily as methylated species. Approximately 50% of the total arsenic was excreted as dimethylarsinic acid and 20% as methylarsonic acid. Slight differences in the proportion of various arsenic compounds were observed with varying levels of inorganic arsenic exposure. Amounts of arsenic species were all closely correlated with each other and with exposure. Irrespirable particulate exposures were measured on a subset of high exposure workers. Irrespirable arsenic was found to be more closely correlated with excretion of arsenic compounds than was respirable arsenic. PMID:908318

  3. Association of second hand smoke exposures with DNA methylation in bladder carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm-Benartzi, Charlotte S.; Christensen, Brock C.; Koestler, Devin C.; Houseman, E. Andres; Schned, Alan R.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Kelsey, Karl T.; Marsit, Carmen J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The association between secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure and bladder cancer is inconclusive. Epigenetic alterations in bladder tumors have been linked to primary cigarette smoking and could add to the biological plausibility of an association between SHS exposure and bladder cancer. Hypothesis SHS exposure is associated with DNA methylation in bladder tumors. Methods Using an array-based approach, we profiled DNA methylation from never smoking cases of incident bladder cancer. Analyses examined associations between individual loci’s methylation with SHS variables (exposure in adulthood, childhood, occupationally and total exposure). A canonical pathway analysis was used to find pathways significantly associated with each SHS exposure type. Results There is a trend towards increased methylation of numerous CpG loci with increasing exposure to adulthood, occupational and total SHS. Discrete associations between methylation extent of several CpG loci and SHS exposures demonstrated significantly increased methylation of these loci across all types of SHS exposure. CpGs with SHS-related methylation alterations were associated with genes in pathways involved in carcinogenesis, immune modulation and immune signaling. Interpretation Exposure to SHS in adulthood, childhood, occupationally and in total are each significantly associated with changes in DNA methylation of several CpG loci in bladder tumors, adding biological plausibility to SHS as a risk factor for bladder cancer. PMID:21660454

  4. Tris(N,N-di­methyl­anilinium) hexa­bromido­stannate(IV) bromide

    PubMed Central

    Chouaib, Hassen; Kamoun, Slaheddine; Ayedi, Hassine Ferid

    2013-01-01

    In the title compound, (C8H12N)3[SnBr6]Br, the anilinium N atom of one of the three unique cations exhibits flip-flop disorder with an 0.60:0.40 occupancy ratio. In the crystal, N—H⋯Br hydrogen bonds link the N,N-di­methyl­anilinium cations and both Br− anions and [SnBr6]2− dianions into a layered arrangement parallel to (001). PMID:23794978

  5. DOSE-RESPONSE MODELING FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF CUMULATIVE RISK DUE TO EXPOSURE TO N-METHYL CARBAMATE PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPAs N-Methyl Carbamate Cumulative Risk Assessment (NMCRA) assesses the effect on acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity of exposure to 10 N-methyl carbamate (NMC) pesticides through dietary, drinking water, and residential exposures.

  6. Phasing-out of methyl bromide (CH3Br) and usage of sulfuryl fluoride (SO2F2) for pest control in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimann, S.; Brunner, D.; Vollmer, M. K.; Henne, S.; Maione, M.; Arduini, I.

    2011-12-01

    Methyl bromide (CH3Br) has been widely used for fumigation in agriculture, in food mills and for transport applications. Due to its high ozone-depleting potential, its use has been banned within the Montreal Protocol and its amendments, except for quarantine/pre-shipment uses. This led to a decline of global atmospheric background concentrations and of world-wide emissions. In Europe, emissions have declined concurrently and a generally good compliance with legislation is suggested based on emission estimates using inverse modelling of continuous measurements from the European high-altitude sites Jungfraujoch (Switzerland) and Monte Cimone (Italy). However, episodic pollution events of CH3Br show a violation of international legislation, as this substance has been banned in Europe from 2007 onwards in agriculture and from 2010 in quarantine/pre-shipment uses. Sulfuryl fluoride (SO2F2) is one of the replacement compounds for CH3Br in food processing structures. SO2F2 does not affect the ozone layer but is a potent greenhouse gas (100-year GWP: 4740) with a lifetime of 36 years. European emissions of SO2F2 are estimated by using measurements at Jungfraujoch. Large pollution events are very sporadic but consistently linked to emissions during long weekends and public holidays, presumably a preferable time to fumi-gate food processing structures.

  7. Real-World Verification of Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) Phase-Out in Europe and its Partial Replacement with Sulfuryl Fluoride (SO2F2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimann, S.; Vollmer, M. K.; Brunner, D.; Henne, S.; Maione, M.; Arduini, I.

    2014-12-01

    In the last decades methyl bromide (CH3Br) has been widely used for pest control in agriculture, during transport and in susceptible environments such as grain elevators, flour mills. Due to its ozone-depleting properties most applications, except for quarantine-preshipment uses, are practically forbidden within the Montreal Protocol and its amendments. This led to a decline of both world-wide emissions and of global background concentrations. In Europe, emissions have declined concurrently, as CH3Br has not been allowed to be used in Europe from 2007 onwards in agriculture and from 2010 in quarantine/preshipment uses. Continuous measurements from the European high-altitude sites Jungfraujoch (Switzerland) and Monte Cimone (Italy) are used to verify this phase-out in different parts of Europe. Pollution events were still detected at these sites until around 2012, potentially indicating forbidden small scale usage of CH3Br in Europe. However, within the last 2 years the abundance and the height of these events have become very small - showing an overall good acceptance of the CH3Br ban in Europe. On the other hand, sulfuryl fluoride (SO2F2) is used as a partial replacement of CH3Br in the fumigation of food processing structures. It shows very distinct, sporadic peak events at the Jungfraujoch measurement site. SO2F2 does not affect the ozone layer but is a potent greenhouse gas (100-year GWP: 4740) with a lifetime of 36 years. European sources of SO2F2 were estimated by using measurements at Jungfraujoch.

  8. Activated carbons from end-products of tree nut and tree fruit production as sorbents for removing methyl bromide in ventilation effluent following postharvest chamber fumigation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Wiley A; Bellamy, David E; Walse, Spencer S

    2015-04-01

    End-products of tree nuts and tree fruits grown in California, USA were evaluated for the ability to remove methyl bromide (MB) from ventilation effluent following postharvest chamber fumigation. Activated carbon sorbents from walnut and almond shells as well as peach and prune pits were prepared using different methods of pyrolysis, activation, and quenching. Each source and preparation was evaluated for yield from starting material (%, m/m) and performance on tests where MB-containing airstreams were directed through a columnar bed of the activated carbon in an experimental apparatus, termed a parallel adsorbent column tester, which was constructed as a scaled-down model of a chamber ventilation system. We report the number of doses needed to first observe the breakthrough of MB downstream of the bed and the capacity of the activated carbon for MB (%, m/m) based on a fractional percentage of MB mass sorbed at breakthrough relative to mass of the bed prior to testing. Results were based on a novel application of solid-phase microextraction with time-weighted averaging sampling of MB concentration in airstreams, which was quantitative across the range of fumigation-relevant conditions and statistically unaffected by relative humidity. Activated carbons from prune pits, prepared either by steam activation or carbon dioxide activation coupled to water quenching, received the greatest number of doses prior to breakthrough and had the highest capacity, approximately 12-14%, outperforming a commercially marketed activated carbon derived from coconut shells. Experimental evidence is presented that links discrepancy in performance to the relative potential for activated carbons to preferentially sorb water vapor relative to MB. PMID:25758836

  9. Developmental effects of methyl benzimidazolecarbamate following exposure during early pregnancy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methyl 2-benzimidazolecarbamate (MBC) and its parent compound benomyl are used as agricultural fungicides. Both chemicals are embryotoxic if administered during organogenesis, and benomyl is teratogenic. Based on a previous study indicating a lack of maternal effects of MBC follo...

  10. DIETARY METHYL MERCURY EXPOSURE IN AMERICAN KESTRELS; PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic mercury emissions have increased atmospheric mercury levels about threefold since the advent of industrial activity. Atmospheric deposition is the primary source of mercury in the environment hence mercury contamination has increased in similar fashion. Methyl mercu...

  11. DEVELOPMENTAL EFFECTS OF METHYL BENZIMIDAZOLECARBAMATE FOLLOWING EXPOSURE DURING EARLY PREGNANCY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methyl 2-benzimidazolecarbamate (MBC) and its parent compound benomyl are used as agricultural fungicides. oth chemicals are embryotoxic if administered during organogenesis, and benomyl is teratogenic. ased on a previous study indicating a lack of maternal effects of MBC followi...

  12. USE OF EXPOSURE-RELATED DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL (ERDEM) FOR ASSESSMENT OF AGGREGATE EXPOSURE OF INFANT AND CHILDREN TO N-METHYL CARBAMATE INSECTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed within the Exposure Related Dose Estimating Model (ERDEM) framework to investigate selected exposure inputs related to recognized exposure scenarios of infants and children to N-methyl carbamate pesticides as spec...

  13. Cyanogen bromide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Cyanogen bromide ; CASRN 506 - 68 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  14. Vinyl bromide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Vinyl bromide ; CASRN 593 - 60 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  15. Effect of prenatal arsenic exposure on DNA methylation and leukocyte subpopulations in cord blood

    PubMed Central

    Kile, Molly L; Houseman, E Andres; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Mostofa, Golam; Cardenas, Andres; Wright, Robert O; Christiani, David C

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal arsenic exposure is associated with increased risk of disease in adulthood. This has led to considerable interest in arsenic’s ability to disrupt fetal programming. Many studies report that arsenic exposure alters DNA methylation in whole blood but these studies did not adjust for cell mixture. In this study, we examined the relationship between arsenic in maternal drinking water collected ≤ 16 weeks gestational age and DNA methylation in cord blood (n = 44) adjusting for leukocyte-tagged differentially methylated regions. DNA methylation was quantified using the Infinium HumanMethylation 450 BeadChip array. Recursively partitioned mixture modeling examined the relationship between arsenic and methylation at 473,844 CpG sites. Median arsenic concentration in water was 12 µg/L (range < 1- 510 µg/L). Log10 arsenic was associated with altered DNA methylation across the epigenome (P = 0.002); however, adjusting for leukocyte distributions attenuated this association (P = 0.013). We also observed that arsenic had a strong effect on the distribution of leukocytes in cord blood. In adjusted models, every log10 increase in maternal drinking water arsenic exposure was estimated to increase CD8+ T cells by 7.4% (P = 0.0004) and decrease in CD4+ T cells by 9.2% (P = 0.0002). These results show that prenatal exposure to arsenic had an exposure-dependent effect on specific T cell subpopulations in cord blood and altered DNA methylation in cord blood. Future research is needed to determine if these small changes in DNA methylation alter gene expression or are associated with adverse health effects. PMID:24525453

  16. Effects of metsulfuron methyl and cypermethrin exposure on freshwater model ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Wendt-Rasch, L; Pirzadeh, P; Woin, P

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the short-term (2 weeks) effects of the herbicide metsulfuron methyl alone and in combination with the insecticide cypermethrin in freshwater enclosures (80 l). We used a factorial design with four levels of herbicide (0, 1, 5, 20 microg/l) and two levels of insecticide (0 and 0.05 microg/l). The root growth of the macrophyte species Elodea canadensis and Myriophyllum spicatum decreased following exposure to the lowest concentration of metsulfuron methyl tested. Metsulfuron methyl exposure resulted in a decreased pH in the aquatic enclosure at the lowest concentration tested, which is most likely a further indication of decreased macrophyte primary production. The biomass of periphytic algae growing on the leaves of M. spicatum increased in the enclosures exposed to metsulfuron methyl. The species composition of the periphytic algae differed significantly from the controls in the enclosures exposed to 20 microg/l of the herbicide. The increased biomass of periphytic algae on the leaves of the macrophytes is probably an indirect effect of the herbicide exposure. The exposure to metsulfuron methyl possibly induced a leakage of nutrients from the macrophyte leaves, which promoted an increased algal growth. The exposure to metsulfuron methyl did not alter the biomass or the species composition of the phytoplankton community. The zooplankton communities in the enclosures were dominated by rotifers, which were not affected by the exposure to cypermethrin. However, a cypermethrin exposure of 0.05 microg/l initially decreased the abundance of copepod nauplii. Ten days after exposure, the abundance of nauplii was significantly higher in the insecticide-exposed enclosures compared with the non-exposed enclosures. This might be an indication of a sub-lethal stress response, which either increased the number of offspring produced or induced an increased hatching of copepod resting stages. No combined effects of the herbicide and

  17. EFFECTS OF THE DURATION AND TIMING OF DIETARY METHYL PARATHION EXPOSURE ON BOBWHITE REPRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two northern bobwhite (colinus virginianus) reproduction tests were conducted concurrently to evaluate how the duration and time of initiation of methyl parathion exposure affeCted dose-response relationships of reproductive parameters. n the long-term exposure test, pairs of adu...

  18. Exposure to persistent organic pollutants and sperm DNA methylation changes in Arctic and European populations.

    PubMed

    Consales, Claudia; Toft, Gunnar; Leter, Giorgio; Bonde, Jens Peter E; Uccelli, Raffaella; Pacchierotti, Francesca; Eleuteri, Patrizia; Jönsson, Bo A G; Giwercman, Aleksander; Pedersen, Henning S; Struciński, Paweł; Góralczyk, Katarzyna; Zviezdai, Valentyna; Spanò, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) and DDT [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane], are environmental contaminants with potential endocrine disrupting activity. DNA methylation levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been associated with serum concentrations of POPs in Greenland Inuit and Korean populations. Greenland Inuits are characterized by the highest worldwide POP levels. In this cross-sectional study we evaluated the relationship between serum POP concentrations and DNA methylation levels in sperm of non-occupationally exposed fertile men from Greenland, Warsaw (Poland), and Kharkiv (Ukraine). Serum levels of PCB-153 [1,2,4-trichloro-5-(2,4,5-trichlorophenyl)benzene], as a proxy of the total PCBs body burden, and of p,p'-DDE [1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethylene], the main metabolite of DDT were measured. Sperm DNA methylation level was assessed globally by flow cytometric (FCM) immunodetection of 5-methyl-cytosines and at specific repetitive DNA sequences (Alu, LINE-1, Satα) by PCR-pyrosequencing after bisulfite conversion. Multivariate linear regression analysis was applied to investigate correlations between serum POP concentrations and DNA methylation. No consistent associations between exposure to POPs and sperm DNA methylation at repetitive DNA sequences were detected. A statistically significant global decrease in methylation was associated with exposure to either POP by FCM analysis. This is the first study to investigate environmental exposure to POPs and DNA methylation levels considering sperm as the target cells. Although POP exposure appears to have a limited negative impact on sperm DNA methylation levels in adult males, the global hypomethylation detected by one of the methods applied suggests that further investigation is warranted. PMID:26801515

  19. Global DNA methylation in gonads of adult zebrafish Danio rerio under bisphenol A exposure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Zhang, Yingying; Tao, Shiyu; Guan, Yongjing; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Zaizhao

    2016-08-01

    Altered DNA methylation is pervasively associated with changes in gene expression and signal transduction after exposure to a wide range of endocrine disrupting chemicals. As a weak estrogenic chemical, bisphenol A (BPA) has been extensively studied for reproductive toxicity. In order to explore the effects of BPA on epigenetic modification in gonads of zebrafish Danio rerio, we measured the global DNA methylation together with the gene expression of DNA methyltransferase (dnmts), glycine N-methyltransferase (gnmt), and ten-eleven translocation (tets) in gonads of D. rerio under BPA exposure by ELISA and quantitative real-time PCR method, respectively. The global level of DNA methylation was significantly decreased in ovaries after exposed to BPA for 7 days, and testes following 35-day exposure. Moreover, the global level of DNA methylation was also significantly reduced in testes after exposed to 15μg/L BPA for 7 days. Besides the alteration of the global level of DNA methylation, varying degrees of transcriptional changes of dnmts, gnmt and tets were detected in gonads of D. rerio under BPA exposure. The present study suggested that BPA might cause the global DNA demethylation in gonads of zebrafish by regulating the transcriptional changes of the DNA methylation/demethylation-associated genes (dnmts, gnmt, and tets). PMID:27101439

  20. Prenatal antidepressant exposure associated with CYP2E1 DNA methylation change in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Gurnot, Cécile; Martin-Subero, Ignacio; Mah, Sarah M; Weikum, Whitney; Goodman, Sarah J; Brain, Ursula; Werker, Janet F; Kobor, Michael S; Esteller, Manel; Oberlander, Tim F; Hensch, Takao K

    2015-01-01

    Some but not all neonates are affected by prenatal exposure to serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SRI) and maternal mood disturbances. Distinguishing the impact of these 2 exposures is challenging and raises critical questions about whether pharmacological, genetic, or epigenetic factors can explain the spectrum of reported outcomes. Using unbiased DNA methylation array measurements followed by a detailed candidate gene approach, we examined whether prenatal SRI exposure was associated with neonatal DNA methylation changes and whether such changes were associated with differences in birth outcomes. Prenatal SRI exposure was first associated with increased DNA methylation status primarily at CYP2E1(βNon-exposed = 0.06, βSRI-exposed = 0.30, FDR = 0); however, this finding could not be distinguished from the potential impact of prenatal maternal depressed mood. Then, using pyrosequencing of CYP2E1 regulatory regions in an expanded cohort, higher DNA methylation status—both the mean across 16 CpG sites (P < 0.01) and at each specific CpG site (P < 0.05)—was associated with exposure to lower 3rd trimester maternal depressed mood symptoms only in the SRI-exposed neonates, indicating a maternal mood x SRI exposure interaction. In addition, higher DNA methylation levels at CpG2 (P = 0.04), CpG9 (P = 0.04) and CpG10 (P = 0.02), in the interrogated CYP2E1 region, were associated with increased birth weight independently of prenatal maternal mood, SRI drug exposure, or gestational age at birth. Prenatal SRI antidepressant exposure and maternal depressed mood were associated with altered neonatal CYP2E1 DNA methylation status, which, in turn, appeared to be associated with birth weight. PMID:25891251

  1. Lead exposure in pheochromocytoma cells induces persistent changes in amyloid precursor protein gene methylation patterns.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Tian; Wan, Yanjian; Xu, Shun-qing

    2012-08-01

    It has been suggested that lead (Pb) exposure in early life may increase amyloid precursor protein (APP) expression and promote the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease in old age. The current study examined whether the DNA methylation patterns of APP gene in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells changed after Pb acetate exposure. Undifferentiated PC12 cells were exposed to three doses of Pb acetate (50, 250, and 500 nM) and one control for 2 days or 1 week. The methylation patterns of APP promoter and global DNA methylation were analyzed. The DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) expression and the level of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) were also investigated. The results showed that the exposure of the three concentrations of Pb acetate could make the APP promoter hypomethylated. The global DNA methylation level and the expression of DNMT1 were changed in the 500 nM group after 2 days exposure and in the 250 and 500 nM group after 7 days exposure. Thus, Pb may exert neurotoxic effects through mechanisms that alter the global and promoter methylation patterns of APP gene. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2012. PMID:22764079

  2. Fetal lung and placental methylation is associated with in utero nicotine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Divya; Sharma, Sunita; Kho, Alvin T; Gaedigk, Roger; Vyhlidal, Carrie A; Leeder, J Steven; Morrow, Jarrett; Carey, Vincent J; Weiss, Scott T; Tantisira, Kelan G; DeMeo, Dawn L

    2014-01-01

    In utero smoke exposure has been shown to have detrimental effects on lung function and to be associated with persistent wheezing and asthma in children. One potential mechanism of IUS effects could be alterations in DNA methylation, which may have life-long implications. The goal of this study was to examine the association between DNA methylation and nicotine exposure in fetal lung and placental tissue in early development; nicotine exposure in this analysis represents a likely surrogate for in-utero smoke. We performed an epigenome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in fetal lung tissue (n = 85, 41 smoke exposed (48%), 44 controls) and the corresponding placental tissue samples (n = 80, 39 smoke exposed (49%), 41 controls) using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. Differential methylation analyses were conducted to evaluate the variation associated with nicotine exposure. The most significant CpG sites in the fetal lung analysis mapped to the PKP3 (P = 2.94 × 10−03), ANKRD33B (P = 3.12 × 10−03), CNTD2 (P = 4.9 × 10−03) and DPP10 (P = 5.43 × 10−03) genes. In the placental methylome, the most significant CpG sites mapped to the GTF2H2C and GTF2H2D genes (P = 2.87 × 10−06 − 3.48 × 10−05). One hundred and one unique CpG sites with P-values < 0.05 were concordant between lung and placental tissue analyses. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis demonstrated enrichment of specific disorders, such as asthma and immune disorders. Our findings demonstrate an association between in utero nicotine exposure and variable DNA methylation in fetal lung and placental tissues, suggesting a role for DNA methylation variation in the fetal origins of chronic diseases. PMID:25482056

  3. Prenatal phthalate exposure, infant growth, and global DNA methylation of human placenta.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Shi, Hui-jing; Xie, Chang-ming; Chen, Jiao; Laue, Hannah; Zhang, Yun-hui

    2015-04-01

    Prenatal phthalate exposure has been shown to be associated with reduced fetal growth. Epigenetic changes such as DNA methylation might be a molecular mechanism through which phthalate exposure affects fetal growth. In this study, we examined associations between prenatal phthalate exposure, infant growth, and global DNA methylation in human placenta samples. We measured global DNA methylation of 119 subjects [55 fetal growth restriction (FGR) cases and 64 normal controls], as assessed by long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) methylation, via quantitative polymerase chain reaction-pyrosequencing. Prenatal phthalate exposure was assessed by measuring maternal urinary phthalate metabolites concentrations using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Concentrations of mono (2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate (MEHHP), mono (2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (MEOHP), and SumDEHP (molar sum of MEHP, MEHHP, and MEOHP) were significantly higher in FGR cases than those in normal controls (P = 0.002, 0.003, and 0.002, respectively). Placental LINE-1 methylation were found to be positively associated with fetal birth weight standard deviation scores, and negatively associated with urinary phthalate metabolites concentrations (MEHHP and SumDEHP). Every natural-log unit increase in urinary concentrations of MEHHP and SumDEHP was associated with 0.015 (β = -0.015, P = 0.150) and 0.012 kg (β = -0.012, P = 0.167) decrease in birth weight mediated through LINE-1 methylation. These findings suggest that changes in placental LINE-1 methylation might be part of the underlying biological pathway between prenatal phthalate exposure and adverse fetal growth. PMID:25327576

  4. Sun exposure related methylation in malignant and non-malignant skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Sathyanarayana, Ubaradka G; Moore, Angela Yen; Li, Lin; Padar, Asha; Majmudar, Kuntal; Stastny, Victor; Makarla, Prakash; Suzuki, Makoto; Minna, John D; Feng, Ziding; Gazdar, Adi F

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the aberrant promoter methylation status of 12 genes in skin lesions, both malignant (basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), n=68 and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), n=35) and non-malignant (tags, n=58) skin lesions and compared the results of lesions from sun exposed (SE) and sun protected (SP) regions. Methylation was studied using a methylation specific PCR (MSP) and methylation of CDH1 was also measured using a semi-quantitative fluorescence based real-time MSP method. The methylation index (MI) was calculated as the methylated fraction of the genes examined. In this report, we found high frequencies of methylation of several known or suspected tumor suppressor genes in tags and skin cancers. Among the 12 genes, for the cadherin genes CDH1 and CDH3 and for two of the laminin 5 encoding genes LAMA3 and LAMC2 methylation frequencies greater than 30% were noted in one or more specimen types. We investigated whether methylation was tumor related. Surprisingly, the differences in the methylation profile of genes among the three specimen types were modest, and the MI, indicators of overall methylation frequencies, was nearly identical. However, significant differences were noted in the frequencies of methylation among the three specimen types for the genes RASSF1A (P=0.002), CDH1 (P=0.007) and one or more of three CAD genes (P=0.02). Methylation was highly significantly related to sun exposure, and sun protected specimens had little or no methylation. As methylation of CDH1 was completely SE specific we analyzed all the skin samples using a semi-quantitative real-time PCR assay for the CDH1 gene. The concordance between standard MSP and real-time MSP for all the samples (n=161) was 75% (P<0.0001). While weak signals were detected in the SP samples by real time PCR, the differences between SE and SP specimens were 148 fold for tags and 390 fold for BCCs. These differences were highly significant (P<0.0001). These findings suggest that methylation commences in

  5. Impact of Cadmium Exposure during Pregnancy on Hepatic Glucocorticoid Receptor Methylation and Expression in Rat Fetus

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Paula; Ibáñez, Freddy; Guajardo, Angélica; Llanos, Miguel N.; Ronco, Ana M.

    2012-01-01

    Adverse fetal environment due to maternal undernutrition or exposure to environmental chemicals alters glucocorticoid (GC) metabolism increasing the risk of metabolic disorders in adulthood. In this study, we investigated the effects of maternal exposure to cadmium (Cd, 50 ppm) during pregnancy in the methylation of fetal hepatic glucocorticoid receptor promoter (GR) and the correlation with its expression and that of the DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1a and 3a). We also studied the expression of liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and acyl-CoA oxidase (AOX), two enzymes involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids respectively. The methylation of the rat GR gene exon 110 (GR110) in nucleotides -2536 to -2361 was analyzed by pyrosequencing. Quantitative real time PCR was used to assess hepatic GR, PEPCK and AOX mRNA, and their protein levels using Western blotting analysis. Differential methylation was noted across groups at all CpG sites in the GR exon 110 in a sex-dependent manner. In males, CpG were more methylated than the controls (185±21%, p<0.001) but only CpG sites 1,6,7 and 9 showed a significantly different extent of methylation. In addition, a lower expression of GR (mRNA and protein) was found. On the contrary, in females, CpG were less methylated than the controls (62±11%, p<0.05) and overexpressed, affecting PEPCK and AOX expression, which did not change in males. The GR methylation profile correlates with DNMT3a expression which may explain epigenetic sex-dependent changes on GR110 promoter induced by Cd treatment. In conclusion, Cd exposure during pregnancy affects fetal liver DNMT3a resulting in sex-dependent changes in methylation and expression of GR110. Although these effects do not seem to be directly involved in the low birth weight and height, they may have relevant implications for long-term health. PMID:22957049

  6. A Sandmeyer type reaction for bromination of 2-mercapto-1-methyl-imidazoline (N2C4H6S) into 2-bromo-1-methyl-imidazole (N2C4H5Br) in presence of copper(I) bromide.

    PubMed

    Lobana, Tarlok S; Sultana, Razia; Butcher, Ray J

    2011-11-21

    2-Mercapto-1-methyl-imidazoline (N(2)C(4)H(6)S) is converted at room temperature into 2-bromo-1-methyl-imidazole (N(2)C(4)H(5)Br) in presence of copper(I) bromide in acetonitrile-chloroform mixture via extrusion of sulfur as sulfate and oxidation of Cu(I) into Cu(II). 2-Bromo-1-methyl-imidazole was isolated as its self assembled tetranuclear Cu(II) cluster, [Cu(4)(η(1)-N-(N(2)C(4)H(5)Br)(4)(μ(4)-O)(μ-Br)(6)] 1 {η(1)-N-(N(2)C(4)H(5)Br) = 2-bromo-1-methyl-imidazole}. PMID:21960310

  7. Prenatal Exposure to DEHP Affects Spermatogenesis and Sperm DNA Methylation in a Strain-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Prados, Julien; Stenz, Ludwig; Somm, Emmanuel; Stouder, Christelle; Dayer, Alexandre; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane

    2015-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phtalate (DEHP) is a plasticizer with endocrine disrupting properties found ubiquitously in the environment and altering reproduction in rodents. Here we investigated the impact of prenatal exposure to DEHP on spermatogenesis and DNA sperm methylation in two distinct, selected, and sequenced mice strains. FVB/N and C57BL/6J mice were orally exposed to 300 mg/kg/day of DEHP from gestation day 9 to 19. Prenatal DEHP exposure significantly decreased spermatogenesis in C57BL/6J (fold-change = 0.6, p-value = 8.7*10-4), but not in FVB/N (fold-change = 1, p-value = 0.9). The number of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) by DEHP-exposure across the entire genome showed increased hyper- and decreased hypo-methylation in C57BL/6J compared to FVB/N. At the promoter level, three important subsets of genes were massively affected. Promoters of vomeronasal and olfactory receptors coding genes globally followed the same trend, more pronounced in the C57BL/6J strain, of being hyper-methylated in DEHP related conditions. In contrast, a large set of micro-RNAs were hypo-methylated, with a trend more pronounced in the FVB/N strain. We additionally analyze both the presence of functional genetic variations within genes that were associated with the detected DMRs and that could be involved in spermatogenesis, and DMRs related with the DEHP exposure that affected both strains in an opposite manner. The major finding in this study indicates that prenatal exposure to DEHP can decrease spermatogenesis in a strain-dependent manner and affects sperm DNA methylation in promoters of large sets of genes putatively involved in both sperm chemotaxis and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26244509

  8. Prenatal Exposure to DEHP Affects Spermatogenesis and Sperm DNA Methylation in a Strain-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Somm, Emmanuel; Stouder, Christelle; Dayer, Alexandre; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane

    2015-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phtalate (DEHP) is a plasticizer with endocrine disrupting properties found ubiquitously in the environment and altering reproduction in rodents. Here we investigated the impact of prenatal exposure to DEHP on spermatogenesis and DNA sperm methylation in two distinct, selected, and sequenced mice strains. FVB/N and C57BL/6J mice were orally exposed to 300 mg/kg/day of DEHP from gestation day 9 to 19. Prenatal DEHP exposure significantly decreased spermatogenesis in C57BL/6J (fold-change = 0.6, p-value = 8.7*10-4), but not in FVB/N (fold-change = 1, p-value = 0.9). The number of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) by DEHP-exposure across the entire genome showed increased hyper- and decreased hypo-methylation in C57BL/6J compared to FVB/N. At the promoter level, three important subsets of genes were massively affected. Promoters of vomeronasal and olfactory receptors coding genes globally followed the same trend, more pronounced in the C57BL/6J strain, of being hyper-methylated in DEHP related conditions. In contrast, a large set of micro-RNAs were hypo-methylated, with a trend more pronounced in the FVB/N strain. We additionally analyze both the presence of functional genetic variations within genes that were associated with the detected DMRs and that could be involved in spermatogenesis, and DMRs related with the DEHP exposure that affected both strains in an opposite manner. The major finding in this study indicates that prenatal exposure to DEHP can decrease spermatogenesis in a strain-dependent manner and affects sperm DNA methylation in promoters of large sets of genes putatively involved in both sperm chemotaxis and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26244509

  9. Modeling tribal exposures to methyl mercury from fish consumption

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure assessment and risk management considerations for tribal fish consumption are different than for the general U.S. population because of higher fish intake from subsistence fishing and/or from unique cultural practices. This research summarizes analyses of available data ...

  10. Effects of arsenic exposure on DNA methylation and epigenetic gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Reichard, John F; Puga, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    Arsenic is a nonmutagenic human carcinogen that induces tumors through unknown mechanisms. A growing body of evidence suggests that its carcinogenicity results from epigenetic changes, particularly in DNA methylation. Changes in gene methylation status, mediated by arsenic, have been proposed activate oncogene expression or silence tumor suppressor genes, leading to long-term changes in activity of genes controlling cell transformation. Mostly descriptive, and often contradictory, studies have demonstrated that arsenic exposure is associated with both hypo- and hyper-methylation at various genetic loci in vivo or in vitro. This ambiguity has made it difficult to assess whether the changes induced by arsenic are causally involved in the transformation process or are simply a reflection of the altered physiology of rapidly dividing cancer cells. Here, we discuss the evidence supporting changes in DNA methylation as a cause of arsenic carcinogenesis and highlight the strengths and limitations of these studies, as well areas where consistencies and inconsistencies exist. PMID:20514360

  11. Benzopyrene exposure disrupts DNA methylation and growth dynamics in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sadikovic, Bekim; Rodenhiser, David I. . E-mail: drodenhi@uwo.ca

    2006-11-01

    Exposures to environmental carcinogens and unhealthy lifestyle choices increase the incidence of breast cancer. One such compound, benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), leads to covalent DNA modifications and the deregulation of gene expression. To date, these mechanisms of BaP-induced carcinogenesis are poorly understood, particularly in the case of breast cancer. We tested the effects of BaP exposure on cellular growth dynamics and DNA methylation in four breast cancer cell lines since disruptions in DNA methylation lead to deregulated gene expression and the loss of genomic integrity. We observed robust time- and concentration-dependent loss of proliferation, S phase and G2M accumulation and apoptosis in p53 positive MCF-7 and T47-D cells. We observed minimal responses in p53 negative HCC-1086 and MDA MB 231 cells. Furthermore, BaP increased p53 levels in both p53 positive cell lines, as well as p21 levels in MCF-7 cells, an effect that was prevented by the p53-specific inhibitor pifithrin-{alpha}. No changes in global levels of DNA methylation levels induced by BaP were detected by the methyl acceptor assay (MAA) in any cell line, however, methylation profiling by AIMS (amplification of intermethylated sites) analysis showed dynamic, sequence-specific hypo- and hypermethylation events in all cell lines. We also identified BaP-induced hypomethylation events at a number of genomic repeats. Our data confirm the p53-specific disruption of the cell cycle as well as the disruption of DNA methylation as a consequence of BaP treatment, thus reinforcing the link between environmental exposures, DNA methylation and breast cancer.

  12. REFINED PBPK MODEL OF AGGREGATE EXPOSURE TO METHYL TERTIARY-BUTYL ETHER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aggregate (multiple pathway) exposures to methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) in air and water occur via dermal, inhalation, and oral routes. Previously, physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have been used to quantify the kinetic behavior of MTBE and its primary met...

  13. Acute leukaemia after exposure to a weed killer, 2-methyl-4-chlorphenoxyacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Timonen, T T; Palva, I P

    1980-01-01

    Acute leukaemia is known to develop in many cases of benzene-induced pancytopenia [1]. This is a report of the development of acute leukaemia in a patient who had apparently recovered from pancytopenia after chronic exposure to a weed killer, 2-methyl-4-chlorphenoxyacetic acid. PMID:6769284

  14. Response to copper bromide exposure in Vicia sativa L. seeds: analysis of genotoxicity, nucleolar activity and mineral profile.

    PubMed

    Bellani, Lorenza M; Muccifora, Simonetta; Giorgetti, Lucia

    2014-09-01

    Copper bromide (CuBr2) effects on seed germination and plantlet development of Vicia sativa L. are evaluated through mitotic index, chromosome aberrations, nucleolar activity and mineral profile. CuBr2 induces a significant presence of micronuclei, sticky and c-metaphases, anaphase bridges and chromosome breaks. Increased number of nucleoli and scattering of AgNOR proteins from the nucleolus in the nuclear surface at CuBr2 1mM and in the cytoplasm at CuBr2 5mM, goes along with the decrease of root growth. In V. sativa embryo the content of many macro and micronutrients increases up to copper 1mM in agreement with reserve mobilization while at CuBr2 5mM some elements are present in lower amount. We hypothesize that inhibitory effects observed at 5mM are due either to a nutrient shortage or to a direct influence of copper on root cell division, evidenced by low mitotic index, high occurrence of chromosome aberrations and loss of material from the nucleolus. PMID:25011121

  15. Prenatal Tobacco Smoke Exposure Is Associated with Childhood DNA CpG Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Carrie V.; Siegmund, Kimberly D.; Joubert, Bonnie R.; Wang, Xinhui; Qui, Weiliang; Carey, Vincent; Nystad, Wenche; Håberg, Siri E.; Ober, Carole; Nicolae, Dan; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Martinez, Fernando; Liu, Andy; Lemanske, Robert; Strunk, Robert; Weiss, Scott; London, Stephanie; Gilliland, Frank; Raby, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Background Smoking while pregnant is associated with a myriad of negative health outcomes in the child. Some of the detrimental effects may be due to epigenetic modifications, although few studies have investigated this hypothesis in detail. Objectives To characterize site-specific epigenetic modifications conferred by prenatal smoking exposure within asthmatic children. Methods Using Illumina HumanMethylation27 microarrays, we estimated the degree of methylation at 27,578 distinct DNA sequences located primarily in gene promoters using whole blood DNA samples from the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) subset of Asthma BRIDGE childhood asthmatics (n = 527) ages 5–12 with prenatal smoking exposure data available. Using beta-regression, we screened loci for differential methylation related to prenatal smoke exposure, adjusting for gender, age and clinical site, and accounting for multiple comparisons by FDR. Results Of 27,578 loci evaluated, 22,131 (80%) passed quality control assessment and were analyzed. Sixty-five children (12%) had a history of prenatal smoke exposure. At an FDR of 0.05, we identified 19 CpG loci significantly associated with prenatal smoke, of which two replicated in two independent populations. Exposure was associated with a 2% increase in mean CpG methylation in FRMD4A (p = 0.01) and Cllorf52 (p = 0.001) compared to no exposure. Four additional genes, XPNPEP1, PPEF2, SMPD3 and CRYGN, were nominally associated in at least one replication group. Conclusions These data suggest that prenatal exposure to tobacco smoke is associated with reproducible epigenetic changes that persist well into childhood. However, the biological significance of these altered loci remains unknown. PMID:24964093

  16. Exposure to Maternal Diabetes in Utero and DNA Methylation Patterns in the Offspring.

    PubMed

    West, Nancy A; Kechris, Katerina; Dabelea, Dana

    2013-03-01

    Perturbations in early life environments, including intrauterine exposure to maternal gestational diabetes (GDM), are hypothesized to lead to metabolic imprinting resulting in increased risk of cardiometabolic outcomes later in life. We aimed to 1) identify candidate genes and biological pathways associated with differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in relation to exposure to GDM in utero and, 2) using mediation analysis, more definitively investigate the potential for mediation of the effect of exposure to maternal diabetes in utero on cardiometabolic traits in childhood risk through our identified DMRs. Genome-wide methylation analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cell's DNA was conducted in 21 healthy children, ages 8-12 years. P-values from multiple linear regression analyses for >27,000 CpG sites were ranked to identify DMRs between the exposure groups. Among the top 10 ranked DMRs, we identified several genes, including NPR1, PANK1, SCAND1, and GJA4, which are known to be associated with cardiometabolic traits. Gene enrichment analysis of the top 84 genes, each with p<=0.005, identified the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) as the most enriched biological pathway (p = 0.07). The UPS pathway reflects biological processes known to be associated with endothelial function, inflammation, lipid metabolism, insulin resistance and β-cell apoptosis, whose derangements are central to the pathogenesis of cardiometabolic diseases. Increased methylation of PYGO1 and CLN8 had the greatest relative mediation effect (RME = 87%, p=0.005 and RME=50%, p=0.01) on the impact of exposure to maternal diabetes in utero on VCAM-1 levels in the offspring. Multiple candidate genes and the UPS were identified for future study as possible links between exposure to maternal gestational diabetes in utero and adverse cardiometabolic traits in the offspring. In particular, increased methylation of PYGO1 and CLN8 may be biological links between intrauterine exposure to maternal

  17. Cytogenetic effects of methyl isocyanate exposure in Bhopal.

    PubMed

    Goswami, H K

    1986-09-01

    Among human survivors following the methyl isocyanate (MIC) gas tragedy the major complaints have been related to deep-seated suffocation, terrible pain in breathing, and severe ocular irritations. In order to assess the possible genetic effects we have used lymphocyte cultures and screened chromosomes by two techniques; one by looking for chromosomal aberrations and the other by estimating sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) frequencies. Both these parameters are good indicators of genetic damage in chromosomal DNA. SCE frequencies in lymphocytes have been increased more than three times in MIC-exposed persons. The results were compared to two groups of controls (one group comprising persons present in the same house; the second group of persons were chosen from distant places, 20-50 km away from the incident). Chromosomal breaks have been observed in 10 out of 14 MIC-affected people (71.4%) studied while only 6 out of 28 (21.4%) controls had chromosomal breaks. Some MIC-exposed persons had chromatin bodies in addition to the normal 46 chromosomes. These observations suggest that chromosomal DNA has been damaged. PMID:3759088

  18. Influence of Prenatal Arsenic Exposure and Newborn Sex on Global Methylation of Cord Blood DNA

    PubMed Central

    Pilsner, J. Richard; Hall, Megan N.; Liu, Xinhua; Ilievski, Vesna; Slavkovich, Vesna; Levy, Diane; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Yunus, Mahammad; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Graziano, Joseph H.; Gamble, Mary V.

    2012-01-01

    Background An emerging body of evidence indicates that early-life arsenic (As) exposure may influence the trajectory of health outcomes later in life. However, the mechanisms underlying these observations are unknown. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of prenatal As exposure on global methylation of cord blood DNA in a study of mother/newborn pairs in Matlab, Bangladesh. Design Maternal and cord blood DNA were available from a convenience sample of 101 mother/newborn pairs. Measures of As exposure included maternal urinary As (uAs), maternal blood As (mbAs) and cord blood As (cbAs). Several measures of global DNA methylation were assessed, including the [3H]-methyl-incorporation assay and three Pyrosequencing assays: Alu, LINE-1 and LUMA. Results In the total sample, increasing quartiles of maternal uAs were associated with an increase in covariate-adjusted means of newborn global DNA methylation as measured by the [3H]-methyl-incorporation assay (quartile 1 (Q1) and Q2 vs. Q4; p = 0.06 and 0.04, respectively). Sex-specific linear regression analyses, while not reaching significance level of 0.05, indicated that the associations between As exposures and Alu, LINE-1 and LUMA were positive among male newborns (N = 58) but negative among female newborns (N = 43); tests for sex differences were borderline significant for the association of cbAs and mbAs with Alu (p = 0.05 and 0.09, respectively) and for the association between maternal uAs and LINE-1 (p = 0.07). Sex-specific correlations between maternal urinary creatinine and newborn methyl-incorporation, Alu and LINE-1 were also evident (p<0.05). Conclusions These results suggest that prenatal As exposure is associated with global DNA methylation in cord blood DNA, possibly in a sex-specific manner. Arsenic-induced epigenetic modifications in utero may potentially influence disease outcomes later in life. Additional studies are needed to confirm these findings

  19. Methyl Iodide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl iodide (MeI, iodomethane, CH3I) was reported as a potential alternative to the stratospheric ozone-depleting fumigant methyl bromide (MeBr) in the mid-1990s (Sims et al., 1995; Ohr et al., 1996). It has since received significant research attention to determine its environmental fate and tran...

  20. DNA methylation: a mechanism linking environmental chemical exposures to risk of autism spectrum disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Kimberly P.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2016-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that gene by environment interactions are important in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). However, the mechanisms by which environmental factors interact with genetic susceptibilities to confer individual risk for ASD remain a significant knowledge gap in the field. The epigenome, and in particular DNA methylation, is a critical gene expression regulatory mechanism in normal and pathogenic brain development. DNA methylation can be influenced by environmental factors such as diet, hormones, stress, drugs, or exposure to environmental chemicals, suggesting that environmental factors may contribute to adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes of relevance to ASD via effects on DNA methylation in the developing brain. In this review, we describe epidemiological and experimental evidence implicating altered DNA methylation as a potential mechanism by which environmental chemicals confer risk for ASD, using polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), lead, and bisphenol A (BPA) as examples. Understanding how environmental chemical exposures influence DNA methylation and how these epigenetic changes modulate the risk and/or severity of ASD will not only provide mechanistic insight regarding gene-environment interactions of relevance to ASD but may also suggest potential intervention strategies for these and potentially other neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:27158529

  1. Lead Exposure Disrupts Global DNA Methylation in Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Alters Their Neuronal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Senut, Marie-Claude; Sen, Arko; Cingolani, Pablo; Shaik, Asra; Land, Susan J.; Ruden, Douglas M.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to lead (Pb) during childhood can result in learning disabilities and behavioral problems. Although described in animal models, whether Pb exposure also alters neuronal differentiation in the developing brains of exposed children is unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of physiologically relevant concentrations of Pb (from 0.4 to 1.9μM) on the capacity of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to progress to a neuronal fate. We found that neither acute nor chronic exposure to Pb prevented hESCs from generating neural progenitor cells (NPCs). NPCs derived from hESCs chronically exposed to 1.9μM Pb throughout the neural differentiation process generated 2.5 times more TUJ1-positive neurons than those derived from control hESCs. Pb exposure of hESCs during the stage of neural rosette formation resulted in a significant decrease in the expression levels of the neural marker genes PAX6 and MSI1. Furthermore, the resulting NPCs differentiated into neurons with shorter neurites and less branching than control neurons, as assessed by Sholl analysis. DNA methylation studies of control, acutely treated hESCs and NPCs derived from chronically exposed hESCs using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip demonstrated that Pb exposure induced changes in the methylation status of genes involved in neurogenetic signaling pathways. In summary, our study shows that exposure to Pb subtly alters the neuronal differentiation of exposed hESCs and that these changes could be partly mediated by modifications in the DNA methylation status of genes crucial to brain development. PMID:24519525

  2. Lead exposure disrupts global DNA methylation in human embryonic stem cells and alters their neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Senut, Marie-Claude; Sen, Arko; Cingolani, Pablo; Shaik, Asra; Land, Susan J; Ruden, Douglas M

    2014-05-01

    Exposure to lead (Pb) during childhood can result in learning disabilities and behavioral problems. Although described in animal models, whether Pb exposure also alters neuronal differentiation in the developing brains of exposed children is unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of physiologically relevant concentrations of Pb (from 0.4 to 1.9μM) on the capacity of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to progress to a neuronal fate. We found that neither acute nor chronic exposure to Pb prevented hESCs from generating neural progenitor cells (NPCs). NPCs derived from hESCs chronically exposed to 1.9μM Pb throughout the neural differentiation process generated 2.5 times more TUJ1-positive neurons than those derived from control hESCs. Pb exposure of hESCs during the stage of neural rosette formation resulted in a significant decrease in the expression levels of the neural marker genes PAX6 and MSI1. Furthermore, the resulting NPCs differentiated into neurons with shorter neurites and less branching than control neurons, as assessed by Sholl analysis. DNA methylation studies of control, acutely treated hESCs and NPCs derived from chronically exposed hESCs using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip demonstrated that Pb exposure induced changes in the methylation status of genes involved in neurogenetic signaling pathways. In summary, our study shows that exposure to Pb subtly alters the neuronal differentiation of exposed hESCs and that these changes could be partly mediated by modifications in the DNA methylation status of genes crucial to brain development. PMID:24519525

  3. Biological effects of short-term, high-concentration exposure to methyl isocyanate. I. Study objectives and inhalation exposure design.

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, D E; Frank, F R; Fowler, E H; Troup, C M; Milton, R M

    1987-01-01

    Early reports from India indicated that humans were dying within minutes to a few hours from exposure to methyl isocyanate (MIC). Attempts to explain the cause(s) of these rapid mortalities is where Union Carbide Corporation concentrated its post-Bhopal toxicologic investigations. The MIC studies involving rats and guinea pigs focused primarily on the consequences of acute pulmonary damage. All MIC inhalation exposures were acute, of short duration (mainly 15 min), and high in concentration (ranging from 25-3506 ppm). MIC vapors were statically generated in a double chamber exposure design. Precautionary measures taken during exposures are discussed. Guinea pigs were more susceptible than rats to MIC exposure-related early mortality. A greater than one order of magnitude difference was observed between an MIC concentration that caused no early mortality in rats (3506 ppm) and an MIC concentration that caused partial (6%) early mortality in guinea pigs (225 ppm) for exposures of 10 to 15 min duration. For both species, the most noteworthy clinical signs during exposure were lacrimation, blepharospasm, and mouth breathing. Fifteen minute LC50 tests with 14-day postexposure follow-up were conducted, and the LC50 (95% confidence limit) values were 171 (114-256) ppm for rats and 112 (61-204) ppm for guinea pigs. Target exposure concentrations for the toxicologic investigations of MIC-induced early mortality were established. A short summary of pertinent results of Union Carbide Corporation's post-Bhopal toxicologic investigations is presented. PMID:3622426

  4. Biological effects of short-term, high-concentration exposure to methyl isocyanate. I. Study objectives and inhalation exposure design

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, D.E.; Frank, F.R.; Fowler, E.H.; Troup, C.M.; Milton, R.M.

    1987-06-01

    Early reports from India indicated that humans were dying within minutes to a few hours from exposure to methyl isocyanate (MIC). Attempts to explain the cause(s) of these rapid mortalities is where Union Carbide Corporation concentrated its post-Bhopal toxicologic investigations. The MIC studies involving rats and guinea pigs focused primarily on the consequences of acute pulmonary damage. All MIC inhalation exposures were acute, of short duration (mainly 15 min), and high in concentration. MIC vapors were statically generated in a double chamber exposure design. Precautionary measures taken during exposures are discussed. Guinea pigs were more susceptible than rats to MIC exposure-related early mortality. A greater than one order of magnitude difference was observed between an MIC concentration that caused no early mortality in rats (3506 ppm) and an MIC concentration that caused partial (6%) early mortality in guinea pigs (225 ppm) for exposures of 10 to 15 min duration. For both species, the most noteworthy clinical signs during exposure were lacrimation, blepharospasm, and mouth breathing. Fifteen minute LC/sub 50/ tests with 14-day postexposure follow-up were conducted, and the LC/sub 50/ (95% confidence limit) values were 171 (114-256) ppm for rats and 112 (61-204) ppm for guinea pigs. Target exposure concentrations for the toxicologic investigations of MIC-induced early mortality were established. A short summary of pertinent results of Union Carbide Corporation's post-Bhopal toxicologic investigations is presented.

  5. DNA methylation signatures link prenatal famine exposure to growth and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tobi, Elmar W; Goeman, Jelle J; Monajemi, Ramin; Gu, Hongcang; Putter, Hein; Zhang, Yanju; Slieker, Roderick C; Stok, Arthur P; Thijssen, Peter E; Müller, Fabian; van Zwet, Erik W; Bock, Christoph; Meissner, Alexander; Lumey, L H; Eline Slagboom, P; Heijmans, Bastiaan T

    2014-01-01

    Periconceptional diet may persistently influence DNA methylation levels with phenotypic consequences. However, a comprehensive assessment of the characteristics of prenatal malnutrition-associated differentially methylated regions (P-DMRs) is lacking in humans. Here we report on a genome-scale analysis of differential DNA methylation in whole blood after periconceptional exposure to famine during the Dutch Hunger Winter. We show that P-DMRs preferentially occur at regulatory regions, are characterized by intermediate levels of DNA methylation and map to genes enriched for differential expression during early development. Validation and further exploratory analysis of six P-DMRs highlight the critical role of gestational timing. Interestingly, differential methylation of the P-DMRs extends along pathways related to growth and metabolism. P-DMRs located in INSR and CPT1A have enhancer activity in vitro and differential methylation is associated with birth weight and serum LDL cholesterol. Epigenetic modulation of pathways by prenatal malnutrition may promote an adverse metabolic phenotype in later life. PMID:25424739

  6. Phenanthrene exposure induces cardiac hypertrophy via reducing miR-133a expression by DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lixing; Xi, Zhihui; Wang, Chonggang; Zhang, Youyu; Yang, Zhibing; Zhang, Shiqi; Chen, Yixin; Zuo, Zhenghong

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that there is an emerging link between environmental pollution and cardiac hypertrophy, while the mechanism is unclear. The objective of this study was to examine whether phenanthrene (Phe) could cause cardiac hypertrophy, and elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved. We found that: 1) Phe exposure increased the heart weight and cardiomyocyte size of rats; 2) Phe exposure led to enlarged cell size, and increased protein synthesis in H9C2 cells; 3) Phe exposure induced important markers of cardiac hypertrophy, such as atrial natriuretic peptide, B-type natriuretic peptide, and c-Myc in H9C2 cells and rat hearts; 4) Phe exposure perturbed miR-133a, CdC42 and RhoA, which were key regulators of cardiac hypertrophy, in H9C2 cells and rat hearts; 5) Phe exposure induced DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) in H9C2 cells and rat hearts; 6) Phe exposure led to methylation of CpG sites within the miR-133a locus and reduced miR-133a expression in H9C2 cells; 7) DNMT inhibition and miR-133a overexpression could both alleviate the enlargement of cell size and perturbation of CdC42 and RhoA caused by Phe exposure. These results indicated that Phe could induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in the rat and H9C2 cells. The mechanism might involve reducing miR-133a expression by DNA methylation. PMID:26830171

  7. Aplastic anaemia after exposure to a weed killer, 2-methyl-4-chlorphenoxyacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Palva, H L; Koivisto, O; Palva, I P

    1975-01-01

    A 64-year-old farmer developed aplastic anaemia after exposure to 2-methyl-4-chlorphenoxyactic acid while spraying weed killer. Muscular weakness, haemorrhagic gastritis and slight signs of liver damage occurred at the same time. All these symptoms, including blood dyscrasia , are consistent with those described as toxic effects of chlorphenoxyacetic acids in animal experiments. A causal relationship between aplastic anaemia and the 2-methyl-4-chlorphenoxyacetic acid thus seems probable. The anaemia was reversible, but the case serves as a warning that careful safety measures are required during the use of chlorphenoxyacetic acids and related compounds. PMID:804793

  8. Alterations in DNA methylation corresponding with lung inflammation and as a biomarker for disease development after MWCNT exposure.

    PubMed

    Brown, Traci A; Lee, Joong Won; Holian, Andrij; Porter, Virginia; Fredriksen, Harley; Kim, Minju; Cho, Yoon Hee

    2016-05-01

    Use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) is growing which increases occupational exposures to these materials. Their toxic potential makes it important to have an in-depth understanding of the inflammation and disease that develops due to exposure. Epigenetics is one area of interest that has been quickly developing to assess disease processes due to its ability to change gene expression and thus the lung environment after exposure. In this study, promoter methylation of inflammatory genes (IFN-γ and TNF-α) was measured after MWCNT exposure using the pyrosequencing assay and found to correlate with initial cytokine production. In addition, methylation of a gene involved in tissue fibrosis (Thy-1) was also altered in a way that matched collagen deposition. In addition to using epigenetics to better understand disease processes, it has also been used as a biomarker of exposure and disease. In this study, global methylation was determined in the lung to ascertain whether MWCNT alter global methylation at the site of exposure and if those alterations coincide with disease development. Then, global methylation levels were determined in the blood to ascertain whether global methylation could be used as a biomarker of exposure in a more easily accessible tissue. Using the LuUminometric Methylation Assay (LUMA) and 5-Methylcytosine (5-mC) Quantification assay, we found that MWCNT lead to DNA hypomethylation in the lung and blood, which coincided with disease development. This study provides initial data showing that alterations in gene-specific methylation correspond with an inflammatory response to MWCNT exposure. In addition, global DNA methylation in the lung and blood coincides with MWCNT-induced disease development, suggesting its potential as a biomarker of both exposure and disease development. PMID:26375518

  9. Prenatal Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Benzo[a]pyrene–DNA Adducts, and Genomic DNA Methylation in Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Deliang; Zhu, Deguang; Qu, Lirong; Sjödin, Andreas; Li, Zheng; Camann, David; Perera, Frederica P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are carcinogenic environmental pollutants generated during incomplete combustion. After exposure and during metabolism, PAHs can form reactive epoxides that can covalently bind to DNA. These PAH–DNA adducts are established markers of cancer risk. PAH exposure has been associated with epigenetic alterations, including genomic cytosine methylation. Both global hypomethylation and hypermethylation of specific genes have been associated with cancer and other diseases in humans. Experimental evidence suggests that PAH–DNA adduct formation may preferentially target methylated genomic regions. Early embryonic development may be a particularly susceptible period for PAH exposure, resulting in both increased PAH–DNA adducts and altered DNA methylation. Objective: We explored whether prenatal exposure to PAHs is associated with genomic DNA methylation in cord blood and whether methylation levels are associated with the presence of detectable PAH–DNA adducts. Methods: In a longitudinal cohort study of nonsmoking women in New York City, we measured PAH exposure during pregnancy using personal air monitors, assessed PAH internal dose using prenatal urinary metabolites (in a subset), and quantified benzo[a]pyrene–DNA adducts and genomic DNA methylation in cord blood DNA among 164 participants. Results: Prenatal PAH exposure was associated with lower global methylation in umbilical cord white blood cells (p = 0.05), but global methylation levels were positively associated with the presence of detectable adducts in cord blood (p = 0.01). Conclusions: These observations suggest that PAH exposure was adequate to alter global methylation in our study population. Additional epidemiologic studies that can measure site-specific cytosine methylation and adduct formation will improve our ability to understand this complex molecular pathway in vivo. PMID:22256332

  10. Gender-specific methylation differences in relation to prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Susan K; Adigun, Abayomi; Huang, Zhiqing; Overcash, Francine; Wang, Frances; Jirtle, Randy L; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Murtha, Amy P; Iversen, Edwin S; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2012-02-15

    Epigenetic alterations may mechanistically explain the developmental origins of adult disease, namely the hypothesis that many complex adult chronic diseases originate as a result of conditions encountered in utero. If true, epigenetically regulated imprinted genes, critical to normal growth and development, may partially mediate these outcomes. We determined the influence of in utero exposure to cigarette smoking on methylation at two differentially methylated regions (DMRs) regulating Insulin-like Growth Factor 2 (IGF2) and H19, and how this might relate to birth weight of infants born to 418 pregnant women. Smoking status was ascertained through self-report and medical records. Bisulfite pyrosequencing was used to measure methylation in umbilical cord blood DNAs. Least squares DNA methylation means at each DMR and birth weight were compared between infants of smokers and non-smokers, using generalized linear models. While there were no significant differences at the H19 DMR, infants born to smokers had higher methylation at the IGF2 DMR than those born to never smokers or those who quit during pregnancy (49.5%, SD=8.0 versus 46.6%, SD=5.6 and 45.8%, SD=6.3, respectively; p=0.0002). The smoking-related increase in methylation was most pronounced in male offspring (p for sex interaction=0.03), for whom approximately 20% of smoking-related low birth weight was mediated by DNA methylation at the IGF2 DMR. Our findings suggest that IGF2 DMR plasticity is an important mechanism by which in utero adjustments to environmental toxicants are conferred. Larger studies to replicate these findings are required. PMID:22202639