Science.gov

Sample records for methyl iodide poisoning

  1. Methyl Iodide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl iodide (MeI, iodomethane, CH3I) was reported as a potential alternative to the stratospheric ozone-depleting fumigant methyl bromide (MeBr) in the mid-1990s (Sims et al., 1995; Ohr et al., 1996). It has since received significant research attention to determine its environmental fate and tran...

  2. Methyl iodide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl iodide ; CASRN 74 - 88 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effe

  3. Delayed cognitive and psychiatric symptoms following methyl iodide and manganese poisoning: Potential for misdiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie Ross, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes two patients who were exposed to toxic substances in the workplace, but for whom diagnosis proved difficult, particularly in case 2. Case 1 was exposed to methyl iodide and case 2 to manganese. Poisoning was characterised by delayed onset of symptoms following exposure and symptom progression after cessation of exposure. The clinical consequences of exposure to these substances include cerebellar and Parkinsonian symptoms followed by the development of cognitive impairment and the late appearance of psychiatric disturbances. Both cases were evaluated by physicians with little training in toxicology. Apart from abnormal liver function in case 1 and decreased power, coordination and proprioception in case 2, results of most routine medical investigations were normal. Both cases were referred for MRI brain scan and neuropsychological assessment. Abnormalities were noted on MRI but reported as being absent initially in case 1and of unknown significance in case 2. There was evidence of cognitive impairment in both and personality change in case 1 of sufficient severity to prevent both cases from returning to work and to impact on family life. There is no antidote to methyl iodide or manganese poisoning. Successful treatment requires early diagnosis and cessation of exposure, but neurotoxic syndromes are difficult to diagnose when a time lag exists between exposure and symptom onset and there is no biomarker of exposure. These syndromes may initially be confused with other neurodegenerative conditions, infectious processes, and psychiatric disorders. Clinician's lack of familiarity with the potential toxicity of environmental and industrial chemicals can lead to misdiagnosis and mismanagement, and this lack of recognition can lead to continued exposure. These cases highlight the importance of taking a detailed occupational history in patients who present with atypical neurological symptoms. PMID:26256070

  4. [Accidental methyl alcohol poisoning].

    PubMed

    Xiao, J H

    1990-05-01

    An accidental poisoning due to drinking methyl alcohol in Chaoyang county is reported, analysing the accident. The poison came from the "retail white spirit" which was contaminated with methyl alcohol. Twenty-nine persons drank the wine, fourteen of them died, two of them became blind. After drinking this "retail white spirit" the drinkers showed symptoms of vertigo, headache, weakness, vomiting, night sweat, dyspnea and blurring of vision etc. within 6-120 hours. On examining the remaining spirit, we found the content of methyl alcohol to be between 16.6 and 40.69 g/100 ml. Some of the patients' urine and blood also contained methyl alcohol. We reckoned that each one of the twenty patients had taken more than 27 g of methyl alcohol and each of the ten dead drank more than 40 ml of the alcohol. PMID:2253526

  5. Methyl Bromide Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Rathus, E. M.; Landy, P. J.

    1961-01-01

    Seven cases of methyl bromide poisoning which occurred amongst workers engaged on a fumigation project are described. The methods adopted for investigation of the environmental situation are discussed and the measurement of blood bromide levels on random samples of workers is suggested as an index of the effectiveness of equipment and working methods. PMID:13739738

  6. Methyl Iodide Fumigation of Bacillus anthracis Spores.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Mark; Kane, Staci R; Wollard, Jessica R

    2015-09-01

    Fumigation techniques such as chlorine dioxide, vaporous hydrogen peroxide, and paraformaldehyde previously used to decontaminate items, rooms, and buildings following contamination with Bacillus anthracis spores are often incompatible with materials (e.g., porous surfaces, organics, and metals), causing damage or residue. Alternative fumigation with methyl bromide is subject to U.S. and international restrictions due to its ozone-depleting properties. Methyl iodide, however, does not pose a risk to the ozone layer and has previously been demonstrated as a fumigant for fungi, insects, and nematodes. Until now, methyl iodide has not been evaluated against Bacillus anthracis. Sterne strain Bacillus anthracis spores were subjected to methyl iodide fumigation at room temperature and at 550C. Efficacy was measured on a log-scale with a 6-log reduction in CFUs being considered successful compared to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency biocide standard. Such efficacies were obtained after just one hour at 55 °C and after 12 hours at room temperature. No detrimental effects were observed on glassware, PTFE O-rings, or stainless steel. This is the first reported efficacy of methyl iodide in the reduction of Bacillus anthracis spore contamination at ambient and elevated temperatures. PMID:26502561

  7. Formation of methyl iodide on a natural manganese oxide.

    PubMed

    Allard, Sébastien; Gallard, Hervé; Fontaine, Claude; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2010-08-01

    This paper demonstrates that manganese oxides can initiate the formation of methyl iodide, a volatile compound that participates to the input of iodine into the atmosphere. The formation of methyl iodide was investigated using a natural manganese oxide in batch experiments for different conditions and concentrations of iodide, natural organic matter (NOM) and manganese oxide. Methyl iodide was formed at concentrations iodide concentrations ranging from 0.8 to 38.0 mg L(-1). The production of methyl iodide increased with increasing initial concentrations of iodide ion and Mn sand and when pH decreased from 7 to 5. The hydrophilic NOM isolate exhibited the lowest yield of methyl iodide whereas hydrophobic NOM isolates such as Suwannee River HPOA fraction produced the highest concentration of methyl iodide. The formation of methyl iodide could take place through the oxidation of NOM on manganese dioxide in the presence of iodide. However, the implication of elemental iodine cannot be excluded at acidic pH. Manganese oxides can then participate with ferric oxides to the formation of methyl iodide in soils and sediments. The formation of methyl iodide is unlikely in technical systems such as drinking water treatment i.e. for ppt levels of iodide and low contact times with manganese oxides. PMID:20580399

  8. Phase 2 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Nick; Watson, Tony

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear fission produces fission products (FPs) and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the second phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during the second half of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014. Test results continue to show that methyl iodide adsorption using AgZ can achieve total iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) above 1,000, until breakthrough occurred. However, mass transfer zone depths are deeper for methyl iodide adsorption compared to diatomic iodine (I2) adsorption. Methyl iodide DFs for the Ag Aerogel test adsorption efficiencies were less than 1,000, and the methyl iodide mass transfer zone depth exceeded 8 inches. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption under various conditions specified in the methyl iodide test plan, and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  9. Laboratory measurements of parameters affecting wet deposition of methyl iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Maeck, W.J.; Honkus, R.J.; Keller, J.H.; Voilleque, P.G.

    1984-09-01

    The transfer of gaseous methyl iodide (CH/sub 3/I) to raindrops and the initial retention by vegetation of CH/sub 3/I in raindrops have been studied in a laboratory experimental program. The measured air-to-drop transfer parameters and initial retention factors both affect the wet deposition of methyl iodide onto vegetation. No large effects on the air-to-drop transfer due to methyl iodide concentration, temperature, acidity, or rain type were observed. Differences between laboratory measurements and theoretical values of the mass transfer coefficient were found. Pasture grass, lettuce, and alfalfa were used to study the initial retention of methyl iodide by vegetation. Only a small fraction of the incident CH/sub 3/I in raindrops was held by any of the three vegetation types.

  10. Degradation of Methyl Iodide in Soil: Effects of Environmental Factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl iodide (MeI) is a promising alternative to the phased-out fumigant methyl bromide, and its environmental fate following soil fumigation is of great concern. Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of various environmental factors on the degradation rate of MeI in soil. The chem...

  11. DEGRADATION OF METHYL IODIDE IN SOIL: EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl iodide (MeI) is a promising alternative to the phased-out fumigant methyl bromide; however, there are concerns about its environmental fate following soil fumigation. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of various environmental factors on the degradation rate of ...

  12. Phase 1 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg; Tony Watson

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products (FPs) and activation products including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent [Jubin 2012b]. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the first phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 and early FY-2014. Testing has been performed to address questions posed in the test plan, and followed the testing outline in the test plan. Tests established detection limits, developed procedures for sample analysis with minimal analytical interferences, and confirmed earlier results that show that the methyl iodide reacts when in contact with the AgZ sorbent, and not significantly in the gas flow upstream of the sorbent. The reaction(s) enable separation of the iodine from the organic moiety, so that the iodine can chemisorb onto the sorbent. The organic moiety can form other compounds, some of which are organic compounds that are detected and can be tentatively identified using GC-FID and GCMS. Test results also show that other gas constituents (NOx and/or H2O) can affect the methyl iodide reactions. With NOx and H2O present in the gas stream, the majority of uncaptured iodine exiting iodine-laden sorbent beds is in the form of I2 or HI, species that

  13. FY-2015 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Nicholas Ray; Watson, Tony Leroy

    2015-09-30

    Nuclear fission produces fission and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has continued in Fiscal Year 2015 according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. Updates to the deep-bed test system have also been performed to enable the inclusion of evaporated HNO3 and increased NO2 concentrations in future tests. This report summarizes the result of those activities. Test results showed that iodine adsorption from gaseous methyl iodide using reduced silver zeolite (AgZ) resulted in initial iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) under 1,000 for the conditions of the long-duration test performed this year (45 ppm CH3I, 1,000 ppm each NO and NO2, very low H2O levels [3 ppm] in balance air). The mass transfer zone depth exceeded the cumulative 5-inch depth of 4 bed segments, which is deeper than the 2-4 inch depth estimated for the mass transfer zone for adsorbing I2 using AgZ in prior deep-bed tests. The maximum iodine adsorption capacity for the AgZ under the conditions of this test was 6.2% (6.2 g adsorbed I per 100 g sorbent). The maximum Ag utilization was 51%. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  14. Treatment of monocrotophos-poisoned birds of prey with pralidoxime iodide.

    PubMed

    Shlosberg, A

    1976-11-01

    Monocrotophos, and organophosphorus insecticide, was sprayed by farmers to control a plague of levant voles in alfalfa fields. Large numbers of birds of prey attracted by the dying and dead voles developed secondary poisoning after eating the voles. Paralysis of skeletal muscles was the principal clinical finding in these birds. Many of the birds died but some were treated with pralidoxime iodide, 100 mg/kg of body weight, given by intramuscular injection. All treated birds recovered, some in a very short time. PMID:789316

  15. Fumigant methyl iodide can methylate inorganic mercury species in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yongguang; Li, Yanbin; Tai, Chao; Cai, Yong; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-01-01

    Methyl iodide or iodomethane (CH3I) has recently been registered as a fumigant in many countries, although its environmental impacts are not well understood. Here we report the results of a study on the methylation of mercury by CH3I in natural water by incubation experiments using both Hg ((199)HgCl2 and CH3(201)Hg(+))- and hydrogen (CD3I)-stable isotope addition techniques. We find that methylation of Hg(0), Hg2(2+) and Hg(2+) by CH3I can occur in natural water under sunlight, while only Hg(0) and Hg2(2+) can be methylated in deionized water. We propose that the methylation of Hg by CH3I in natural waters is mediated by sunlight and involves two steps, the reduction of Hg(2+) to Hg(0)/Hg2(2+) and the subsequent methylation of Hg(0)/Hg2(2+) by CH3I. Further quantitative assessment suggests that CH3I-involved methylation of inorganic Hg could be an important source of CH3Hg(+) in an environment where CH3I has been used in large amounts as a fumigant. PMID:25137238

  16. Degradation of methyl iodide in soil: effects of environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingxin; Gao, Suduan

    2009-01-01

    Methyl iodide (MeI) is a promising alternative to the phased-out fumigant methyl bromide (MeBr); however, there are concerns about its environmental fate following soil fumigation. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of various environmental factors on the rate of MeI degradation in soil. The chemical was added to soil at 48.6 mg kg(-1) and incubated under different conditions. The MeI degradation rate in soil was determined by extracting and measuring residual concentrations over a 15 d incubation period. In soil, MeI degradation followed availability-adjusted first-order kinetics. At 20 degrees C MeI had a calculated half-life of 32 d in a sandy loam containing 4.3 g kg(-1) of organic carbon. It degraded more rapidly as temperature increased, exhibiting a half-life of 23 d at 30 degrees C. Amendment with 10% cattle manure shortened the half-life to 4 d at 20 degrees C. In both unamended and manure-amended soils, the half-life of MeI greatly increased as the organic matter (OM) was removed and it only slightly increased in soils that were sterilized, indicating predominance of chemical reactions in MeI degradation. Soil texture, mineralogy, and moderate moisture content had little influence on MeI degradation. The degradation slowed as the chemical application rate increased. The results suggest that environmental factors, especially soil temperature and organic amendments, should be considered in combination with the minimum effective MeI application rate for achieving satisfactory pest-control efficacy, reducing atmospheric volatilization, and minimizing groundwater contamination. PMID:19202021

  17. Methyl iodide as a promoter of the SCC of zirconium alloys in iodine vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, B.; Haddad, R.

    1986-01-01

    The presence of organic-iodine contaminants, or specifically methyl iodide, in the iodine environment during stress corrosion tests leads to an increased frequency of crack nucleation, and possibly a more rapid crack propagation process. The unusual fractographic features associated with these impurities suggest that they enhance the reduction in the surface energy of zirconium, cause an instability in the propagating crack front, and possibly enhance the rate of reaction to form zirconium iodides. These impurities are the most potent catalysts of iodine-induced cracking so far identified, although methyl iodide alone cannot initiate cracking.

  18. Mitigating 1,3-dichloropropene, chloropicrin, and methyl iodide emissions from fumigated soil with reactive film

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Implicated as a stratospheric ozone-depleting compound, methyl bromide (MeBr) is being phased out despite being considered to be the most effective soil fumigant. Its alternatives, i.e., 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D, which includes cis- and trans- isomers), chloropicrin (CP) and methyl iodide (MeI), h...

  19. The contribution of oceanic methyl iodide to stratospheric iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegtmeier, S.; Krüger, K.; Quack, B.; Atlas, E.; Blake, D. R.; Boenisch, H.; Engel, A.; Hepach, H.; Hossaini, R.; Navarro, M. A.; Raimund, S.; Sala, S.; Shi, Q.; Ziska, F.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the contribution of oceanic methyl iodide (CH3I) to the stratospheric iodine budget. Based on CH3I measurements from three tropical ship campaigns and the Lagrangian transport model FLEXPART, we provide a detailed analysis of CH3I transport from the ocean surface to the cold point in the upper tropical tropopause layer (TTL). While average oceanic emissions differ by less than 50% from campaign to campaign, the measurements show much stronger variations within each campaign. A positive correlation between the oceanic CH3I emissions and the efficiency of CH3I troposphere-stratosphere transport has been identified for some cruise sections. The mechanism of strong horizontal surface winds triggering large emissions on the one hand and being associated with tropical convective systems, such as developing typhoons, on the other hand, could explain the identified correlations. As a result of the simultaneous occurrence of large CH3I emissions and strong vertical uplift, localized maximum mixing ratios of 0.6 ppt CH3I at the cold point have been determined for observed peak emissions during the SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere)-Sonne research vessel campaign in the coastal western Pacific. The other two campaigns give considerably smaller maxima of 0.1 ppt CH3I in the open western Pacific and 0.03 ppt in the coastal eastern Atlantic. In order to assess the representativeness of the large local mixing ratios, we use climatological emission scenarios to derive global upper air estimates of CH3I abundances. The model results are compared with available upper air measurements, including data from the recent ATTREX and HIPPO2 aircraft campaigns. In the eastern Pacific region, the location of the available measurement campaigns in the upper TTL, the comparisons give a good agreement, indicating that around 0.01 to 0.02 ppt of CH3I enter the stratosphere. However, other tropical regions that are subject to stronger convective

  20. The contribution of oceanic methyl iodide to stratospheric iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegtmeier, S.; Krüger, K.; Quack, B.; Atlas, E.; Blake, D. R.; Boenisch, H.; Engel, A.; Hepach, H.; Hossaini, R.; Navarro, M. A.; Raimund, S.; Sala, S.; Shi, Q.; Ziska, F.

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the contribution of oceanic methyl iodide (CH3I) to the stratospheric iodine budget. Based on CH3I measurements during three tropical ship campaigns and the Lagrangian transport model FLEXPART we provide a detailed analysis of CH3I transport from the ocean surface to the cold point in the upper tropical tropopause layer (TTL). While average oceanic emissions differ by less than 50% from campaign to campaign, the measurements show much stronger variations within each campaign. A positive correlation between the oceanic CH3I emissions and the efficiency of CH3I troposphere-stratosphere transport has been identified for some cruise sections. The mechanism of strong horizontal surface winds triggering large emissions on the one hand and being associated with tropical convective systems, such as developing typhoons, on the other hand, could explain the identified correlations. As a result of the simultaneous occurrence of large CH3I emissions and strong vertical uplift, localized maximum mixing ratios of 0.6 ppt CH3I at the cold point have been determined for observed peak emissions during the SHIVA-Sonne campaign in the coastal West Pacific. The other two campaigns give considerable smaller maxima of 0.1 ppt CH3I for the TransBrom campaign in the open West Pacific and 0.03 ppt for emissions from the coastal East Atlantic during the DRIVE campaign. In order to assess the representativeness of the large local mixing ratios we use climatological emission scenarios to derive global upper air estimates of CH3I abundances. The model results are compared to available upper air measurements including data from the recent ATTREX and HIPPO2 aircraft campaigns. In the East Pacific region, the location of the available measurement campaigns in the upper TTL, the comparisons give a good agreement indicating that around 0.01 to 0.02 ppt of CH3I enter the stratosphere. However, other tropical regions, which are subject to stronger convective activity show larger CH3I

  1. Fundamental studies of methyl iodide adsorption in DABCO impregnated activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Herdes, Carmelo; Prosenjak, Claudia; Román, Silvia; Müller, Erich A

    2013-06-11

    Methyl iodide capture from a water vapor stream using 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO)-impregnated activated carbons is, for the first time, fundamentally described here on the atomic level by means of both molecular dynamics and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. A molecular dynamics annealing strategy was adopted to mimic the DABCO experimental impregnation procedure in a selected slitlike carbon pore. Predictions, restricted to the micropore region, are made about the adsorption isotherms of methyl iodide, water, and nitrogen on both impregnated and bare activated carbon models. Experimental and simulated nitrogen adsorption isotherms are compared for the validation of the impregnation strategy. Selectivity analyses of the preferential adsorption toward methyl iodide over water are also reported. These simulated adsorption isotherms sum up to previous experimental studies to provide an enhanced picture for this adsorption system of widespread use at nuclear plant HVAC facilities for the capture of radioactive iodine compounds. PMID:23679202

  2. Electron stimulated reactions of methyl iodide coadsorbed with amorphous solid water

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, C. C.; Faradzhev, N. S.; Madey, T. E.; Fairbrother, D. H.

    2007-05-28

    The electron stimulated reactions of methyl iodide (MeI) adsorbed on and suspended within amorphous solid water (ice) were studied using a combination of postirradiation temperature programmed desorption and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy. For MeI adsorbed on top of amorphous solid water (ice), electron beam irradiation is responsible for both structural and chemical transformations within the overlayer. Electron stimulated reactions of MeI result principally in the formation of methyl radicals and solvated iodide anions. The cross section for electron stimulated decomposition of MeI is comparable to the gas phase value and is only weakly dependent upon the local environment. For both adsorbed MeI and suspended MeI, reactions of methyl radicals within MeI clusters lead to the formation of ethane, ethyl iodide, and diiodomethane. In contrast, reactions between the products of methyl iodide and water dissociation are responsible for the formation of methanol and carbon dioxide. Methane, formed as a result of reactions between methyl radicals and either parent MeI molecules or hydrogen atoms, is also observed. The product distribution is found to depend on the film's initial chemical composition as well as the electron fluence. Results from this study highlight the similarities in the carbon-containing products formed when monohalomethanes coadsorbed with amorphous solid water are irradiated by either electrons or photons.

  3. Electron stimulated reactions of methyl iodide coadsorbed with amorphous solid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, C. C.; Faradzhev, N. S.; Madey, T. E.; Fairbrother, D. H.

    2007-05-01

    The electron stimulated reactions of methyl iodide (MeI) adsorbed on and suspended within amorphous solid water (ice) were studied using a combination of postirradiation temperature programmed desorption and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy. For MeI adsorbed on top of amorphous solid water (ice), electron beam irradiation is responsible for both structural and chemical transformations within the overlayer. Electron stimulated reactions of MeI result principally in the formation of methyl radicals and solvated iodide anions. The cross section for electron stimulated decomposition of MeI is comparable to the gas phase value and is only weakly dependent upon the local environment. For both adsorbed MeI and suspended MeI, reactions of methyl radicals within MeI clusters lead to the formation of ethane, ethyl iodide, and diiodomethane. In contrast, reactions between the products of methyl iodide and water dissociation are responsible for the formation of methanol and carbon dioxide. Methane, formed as a result of reactions between methyl radicals and either parent MeI molecules or hydrogen atoms, is also observed. The product distribution is found to depend on the film's initial chemical composition as well as the electron fluence. Results from this study highlight the similarities in the carbon-containing products formed when monohalomethanes coadsorbed with amorphous solid water are irradiated by either electrons or photons.

  4. Phase partitioning, retention kinetics, and leaching of fumigant methyl iodide in agricultural soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although it is not currently being sold in the USA, the recent US registration of the fumigant methyl iodide has led to an increased interest in its environmental fate and transport. Although some work has now considered its volatile emissions from soil, there remains a lack of experimental data reg...

  5. Trapping radiodine, in the form of methyl iodide, on nuclear carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Nacapricha, D.; Taylor, C.

    1996-12-31

    Studies have been performed on potassium-iodide-impregnated charcoals of the type used in the nuclear industry for trapping radioiodine released during nuclear fission. The effects of various parameters on the trapping efficiency of methyl iodide have been investigated. A variation in particle size within a bulk charcoal caused poor precision in K value measurements because of differences in surface area, pore volume, and bed density, leading to differences in the deposition of the impregnant. Precision is improved by sieving the charcoal to a narrower size because smaller particles have a higher porosity. This finding is supported by surface area and pore measurements. Two methods of impregnation are compared by measuring K values and the deposition of potassium iodide. Charcoal impregnated by rotary evaporation exhibits both higher K values and higher potassium iodide contents than sprayed charcoal. Two designs of spraying drum are compared: a drum with helical vanes allows more efficient deposition and more uniform distribution of impregnant than a drum with axial vanes. A decrease in the K value with increasing humidity correlates with the available surface area. A similar correlation exists between water content and available pore volume. Aging of potassium-iodide-impregnated charcoal, caused by the formation of oxygen complexes on the surface, is associated with significant falls in K value. K values of charcoals also can be restored to at least their original values by heat treatment in the absence of air. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Angular distribution anisotropy of fragments ejected from methyl iodide clusters: Dependence on fs laser intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karras, G.; Kosmidis, C.

    2010-10-01

    The angular distribution of the fragment ions ejected from the interaction of methyl iodide clusters with 20 fs strong laser pulses is studied by means of a mass spectrometer. Three types of angular distributions, one isotropic and two anisotropic, have been observed and their dependence on the laser intensity has been studied. There is strong evidence that the ions exhibiting anisotropic angular distribution with a maximum in the direction parallel to the laser polarization vector are produced via an electron impact ionization process.

  7. Distribution and leaching of methyl iodide in soil following emulated shank and drip application.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingxin; Zheng, Wei; Papiernik, Sharon K; Yates, Scott R

    2004-01-01

    Methyl iodide (MeI) is a promising alternative to methyl bromide in soil fumigation. The pest-control efficacy and ground water contamination risks of MeI as a fumigant are highly related to its gas-phase distribution and leaching after soil application. In this study, the distribution and leaching of MeI in soil following shank injection and subsurface drip application were investigated. Methyl iodide (200 kg ha(-1)) was directly injected or drip-applied at a 20-cm depth into Arlington sandy loam (coarse-loamy, mixed, thermic Haplic Durixeralfs) columns (12-cm i.d., 70-cm height) tarped with virtually impermeable film. Concentration profiles of MeI in the soil air were monitored for 7 d. Methyl iodide diffused rapidly after soil application, and reached a 70-cm depth within 2 h. Relative to shank injection, drip application inhibited diffusion, resulting in significantly lower concentration profiles in the soil air. Seven days after MeI application, fumigated soil was uncapped, aerated for 7 d, and leached with water. Leaching of MeI was significant from the soil columns under both application methods, with concentrations of >10 mug L(-1) in the early leachate. The leaching was greater following shank injection than drip application, with an overall potential of 33 g ha(-1) for shank injection and 19 g ha(-1) for drip application. Persistent residues of MeI remaining in soils after leaching were 50 to 240 ng kg(-1), and the contents were slightly higher following shank injection than drip application. The results suggest that fumigation with MeI may pose a risk of ground water contamination in vulnerable areas. PMID:15537937

  8. Methylation of sodium iodide symporter promoter correlated with aggressiveness and metastasis in papillary thyroid carcinoma: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun-Yu; Wang, Huan-Jun; Wang, Hai-Peng; Yao, Jin-Ming; Wu, Xiao-Yun; Shang, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Rui; Zhu, Huan-Gao; Dong, Jian-Jun; Liao, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Methylation of sodium iodide symporter promoter has been reported to increase the incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). In this meta-analysis stratified via methylation of sodium iodide symporter promoter, we evaluate the relationship between methylation of sodium iodide symporter promoter and PTC. The association between methylation with aggressiveness and metastasis potential of PTC is also discussed. Methods: We searched electronic databases for original articles and references of included studies both in English and Chinese from 1966 to 2014. Two reviewers selected the case-control study and extracted data from relevant literature independently. Results: Seven articles, including 360 cases and 268 controls, were involved in this meta-analysis. The prevalence of PTC in patients with methylated sodium iodide symporter promoter was significantly higher than those with non-methylated promoter (OR=7.36, 95% CI: 4.25-12.74, P<0.001). Stratified analysis showed that PTC patients with multiple lesions, capsule invasion and lymphatic metastasis had significantly higher rates of methylation (OR=2.22, 95% CI: 1.12-4.41, P=0.02; OR=2.14, 95% CI: 1.12-4.08, P=0.02; OR=3.56, 95% CI: 1.97-6.46, P<0.0001). But no relationship was found among the methylation of sodium iodide symporter and age, gender and size of tumor. Conclusions: The methylation of sodium iodide symporter promoter is related with PTC and its aggressive and metastatic potential. Due to the limited sample size, more clinical researches should be taken in the future. PMID:26379865

  9. Irrigation, organic matter addition, and tarping as methods of reducing emissions of methyl iodide from agricultural soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl iodide (MeI) is set to become increasingly used as a highly effective alternative to the soil fumigant methyl bromide. Due to its physical properties, its emission from soil to air is likely to be high and may become a human health risk. Using soil columns that make it possible to determine e...

  10. 76 FR 16770 - Petition To Suspend and Cancel All Registrations for the Soil Fumigant Iodomethane (Methyl Iodide...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... AGENCY Petition To Suspend and Cancel All Registrations for the Soil Fumigant Iodomethane (Methyl Iodide... 31, 2010, EPA received a petition from Earthjustice requesting that all uses of iodomethane (methyl... comments to docket ID number EPA-HQ-OPP- 2010-0541. EPA's policy is that all comments received will...

  11. 1-(Ferrocen-1-ylmeth­yl)-3-methyl­imidazol-3-ium iodide

    PubMed Central

    Nyamori, Vincent O.; Zulu, Siphesihle M.; Omondi, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The structure of the title compound, [Fe(C5H5)(C10H12N2)]I, consists of a 1-(ferrocen-1-ylmeth­yl)-3-methyl­imidazolium cation which is counter-balanced by an iodide anion. The cyclo­penta­dienyl (Cp) rings of the ferrocene unit have a slightly staggered conformation skewed from an ideal eclipsed conformation by an angle of 3.5 (6)°. The inter­planar angle between the Cp and the imidazole ring is 67.94 (2)°. PMID:23468696

  12. Coupling of soil solarization and reduced rate fumigation: Effects on methyl iodide emissions from raised beds under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using field plots, we studied the effect on methyl iodide (MeI) emissions of coupling soil solarization (passive and active) and reduced rate fumigation (70% of a standard fumigation) in raised beds under virtually impermeable film (VIF). The results showed that for the standard fumigation and the p...

  13. Ammonium iodide-induced sulfonylation of alkenes with DMSO and water toward the synthesis of vinyl methyl sulfones.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaofang; Pan, Xiaojun; Gao, Jian; Huang, Huawen; Yuan, Gaoqing; Li, Yingwei

    2015-01-01

    A novel ammonium iodide-induced sulfonylation of alkenes with DMSO and water toward the synthesis of vinyl methyl sulfones is described. The process proceeded smoothly under metal-free conditions with high stereoselectivity and good functional group tolerance. The reaction mechanism was revealed to proceed through a domino reaction of oxidation and elimination after the radical addition to alkenes. PMID:25406694

  14. Atomic iodine production in a gas flow by decomposing methyl iodide in a dc glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheyev, P A; Shepelenko, A A; Voronov, A I; Kupryaev, Nikolai V

    2002-01-31

    The production of atomic iodine for an oxygen - iodine laser is studied by decomposing methyl iodide in a dc glow discharge in a vortex gas flow. The concentration of iodine atoms in discharge products was measured from the atomic iodine absorption of the radiation of a single-frequency tunable diode laser at a wavelength of 1.315 {mu}m. Atomic iodine concentrations sufficient for the operation of an oxygen - iodine laser were obtained. The concentration of atomic iodine amounted to 3.6 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} for a pressure of the carrying argon gas of 15 Torr. The discharge stabilisation by a vortex gas flow allowed the glow discharge to be sustained in a strongly electronegative halogen-containing gas mixture for pressures up to 20 Torr. (active media)

  15. Nickel-Catalyzed Methylation of Aryl Halides with Deuterated Methyl Iodide.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lu; Liu, Xin; Liao, Xuebin

    2016-08-01

    A nickel-catalyzed methylation of aryl halides with cheap and readily available CH3 I or CD3 I is described. The reaction is applicable to a wide range of substrates and allows installation of a CD3 group under mild reaction conditions without deuterium scrambling to other carbon atoms. Initial mechanistic studies on the stoichiometric and catalytic reactions of the isolated [(dppp)Ni(C6 H4 -4-CO2 Et)Br] [dppp=1,3-bis(diphenylphosphanyl)propane] suggest that a Ni(0) /Ni(II) catalytic cycle is favored. PMID:27381725

  16. Dipole Alignment at the Carbon Nanotube and Methyl Ammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Przepioski, Joshua

    2015-08-28

    This work correlates resonant peaks from first principles calculation on ammonia (NH3) Nitrogen 1s x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) within the methyl ammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3), and proposes a curve to determine the alignment of the methyl ammonium dipole if there exists angular dependence. The Nitrogen 1s XAS was performed at varying incident angles on the perovskite with and without a carbon nanotube (CNT) interface produced from an ultrasonic spray deposition. We investigated the peak contribution from PbI2 and the poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene- 2,7-diyl) with bipyridine (PFO-BPy) wrapped around the CNT, and used normalization techniques to better identify the dipole alignment. There was angular dependence on samples containing the CNT interface suggesting an existing dipole alignment, but there was no angular dependence on the perovskite samples alone; however, more normalization techniques and experimental work must be performed in order to ensure its validity and to better describe its alignment, and possible controlling factors.

  17. Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... gas heater and any other gas-, oil- or wood-fueled appliances serviced regularly. Be sure these appliances ... on the skin, rinse it off with running water and remove any poisoned clothing. If the poison ...

  18. Diffusional analysis of the adsorption of methyl iodide on silver exchanged mordenite

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.; Counce, R.M.

    1997-08-01

    The removal of organic iodides from off-gas streams is an important step in controlling the release of radioactive iodine to the environment during the treatment of radioactive wastes or the processing of some irradiated materials. Nine-well accepted mass transfer models were evaluated for their ability to adequately explain the observed CH{sub 3}I uptake behavior onto the Ag{degrees}Z. Linear and multidimensional regression techniques were used to estimate the diffusion constants and other model parameters, which then permitted the selection of an appropriate mass transfer model. Although a number of studies have been conducted to evaluate the loading of both elemental and methyl iodide on silver-exchanged mordenite, these studies focused primarily on the macro scale (deep bed) while evaluating the material under a broad range of process conditions and contaminants for total bed loading at the time of breakthrough. A few studies evaluated equilibrium or maximum loading. Thus, to date, only bulk loading data exist for the adsorption of CH{sub 3}I onto Ag{degrees}Z. Hence this is believed to be the first study to quantify the controlling mass transfer mechanisms of this process, It can be concluded from the analysis of the experimental data obtained by the {open_quotes}single-pellet{close_quotes} type experiments and for the process conditions used in this study that the overall mass transfer rate associated with the adsorption of CH{sub 3}I onto Ag{degrees}Z is affected by both micropore and macropore diffusion. The macropore diffusion rate was significantly faster than the micropore diffusion, resulting in a two-step adsorption behavior which was adequately modeled by a bimodal pore distribution model. The micropore diffusivity was determined to be on the order of 2 x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/s. The system was also shown to be isothermal under all conditions of this study. 21 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. New insights into the photodissociation of methyl iodide at 193 nm: stereodynamics and product branching ratios.

    PubMed

    Marggi Poullain, Sonia; González, Marta G; Samartzis, Peter C; Kitsopoulos, Theofanis N; Rubio-Lago, Luis; Bañares, Luis

    2015-11-28

    The stereodynamics of methyl iodide photodissociation after excitation at 193 nm has been studied using a combination of slice imaging and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection of the methyl and iodine products. A weak anisotropic ring appearing in the image corresponding to vibrationally excited CH3(ν1 = 1) confirms the production of ground state I((2)P3/2) atoms at this excitation wavelength as a signature of the predissociation channel reported previously [M. G. González et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2011, 135, 021102] tentatively assigned to the coupling between the B-band (3)R1 Rydberg state and the A-band (1)Q1 repulsive state. Direct REMPI detection of ground state iodine atoms indicates that most of the I((2)P3/2) species are produced in correlation with highly internally excited methyl radicals, in excellent agreement with the recent results of Xu and Pratt [Xu et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2013, 139, 214310; Xu et al., J. Phys. Chem. A, 2015, 119, 7548]. From the comparison between the CH3(ν) second order Dixon's bipolar moments β(2)(0)(20), β(0)(0)(22), β(2)(0)(02) and β(2)(0)(22) measured in this work and those reported previously for the B-band origin and the A-band, a general picture of the CH3I photodissociation stereodynamics in terms of different effects, such as the breakdown of the unique recoil direction (URD) approximation, the non-adiabatic curve crossings and the depolarization induced by the parent molecule rotation, is drawn. PMID:26489797

  20. In vitro glutathione conjugation of methyl iodide in rat, rabbit, and human blood and tissues.

    PubMed

    Poet, Torka S; Wu, Hong; Corley, Richard A; Thrall, Karla D

    2009-05-01

    Methyl iodide (MeI) is an intermediate in the manufacture of some pesticides and pharmaceuticals, and is under review for US registration as a non-ozone depleting alternative for methyl bromide for pre-plant soil fumigation. MeI is primarily metabolized via conjugation with glutathione (GSH), with further metabolism to S-methyl cysteine and methanethiol. To facilitate extrapolations of animal pharmacokinetic data to humans, rate constants for the GSH metabolism of MeI were determined in cytosols prepared from the liver and kidneys of rats, human donors, female rabbits, and rabbit fetuses, from rabbit olfactory and respiratory epithelium, and from rabbit and rat blood using a headspace vial equilibration technique and two-compartment mathematical model. MeI was metabolized in liver and kidney from adults of all three species, but metabolism was not detectable in fetal rabbit kidney. Maximal metabolic rates (V(max)) were similar in liver from rat and human donors (approximately 40 and 47 nmol/min/mg, respectively) whereas the V(max) rates in kidney cytosols varied approximately three-fold between the three species. No difference was observed in the loss of MeI from active and inactive whole blood from either rats or rabbits. The metabolism in olfactory and respiratory epithelial cytosol had Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)) values that were several times higher than for any other tissue, suggesting essentially first-order metabolism in the nose. The metabolism of MeI in human liver cytosol prepared from five individual donors indicated two potential populations, one high affinity/low capacity and one with a lower affinity but higher capacity. PMID:19519152

  1. Assessment of methods for methyl iodide emission reduction and pest control using a simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Lifang; Ashworth, Daniel J.; Šimunek, Jirka; Xuan, Richeng; Yates, Scott R.

    2013-02-01

    The increasing registration of the fumigant methyl iodide within the USA has led to more concerns about its toxicity to workers and bystanders. Emission mitigation strategies are needed to protect the public and environmental health while providing effective pest control. The effectiveness of various methods on emissions reduction and pest control was assessed using a process-based mathematical model in this study. Firstly, comparisons between the simulated and laboratory measured emission fluxes and cumulative emissions were made for methyl iodide (MeI) under four emission reduction treatments: 1) control, 2) using soil with high organic matter content (HOM), 3) being covered by virtually impermeable film (VIF), and 4) irrigating soil surface following fumigation (Irrigation). Then the model was extended to simulate a broader range of emission reduction strategies for MeI, including 5) being covered by high density polyethylene (HDPE), 6) increasing injection depth from 30 cm to 46 cm (Deep), 7) HDPE + Deep, 8) adding a reagent at soil surface (Reagent), 9) Reagent + Irrigation, and 10) Reagent + HDPE. Furthermore, the survivability of three types of soil-borne pests (citrus nematodes [Tylenchulus semipenetrans], barnyard seeds [Echinochloa crus-galli], fungi [Fusarium oxysporum]) was also estimated for each scenario. Overall, the trend of the measured emission fluxes as well as total emission were reasonably reproduced by the model for treatments 1 through 4. Based on the numerical simulation, the ranking of effectiveness in total emission reduction was VIF (82.4%) > Reagent + HDPE (73.2%) > Reagent + Irrigation (43.0%) > Reagent (23.5%) > Deep + HDPE (19.3%) > HOM (17.6%) > Deep (13.0%) > Irrigation (11.9%) > HDPE (5.8%). The order for pest control efficacy suggests, VIF had the highest pest control efficacy, followed by Deep + HDPE, Irrigation, Reagent + Irrigation, HDPE, Deep, Reagent + HDPE, Reagent, and HOM. Therefore, VIF is the optimal method disregarding

  2. Crystal structure of tris­(di­methyl­amido-κN)­bis­(di­methyl­amine-κN)­zirconium(IV) iodide

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Wesley D.; Akurathi, Gopalakrishna; Valle, Henry U.; Hollis, T. Keith

    2016-01-01

    Zirconium amides have become increasingly popular and useful due to their widespread use as precursors to other zirconium complexes and their use in the production of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Herein we report the mol­ecular structure of tris­(di­methyl­amido)­bis­(di­methyl­amine)­zirconium(IV) iodide, [Zr(C2H6N)3(C2H7N)2]I. The bond lengths and bond angles are consistent with a slightly distorted trigonal–bipyramidal coordination geometry around the metal atom. N⋯I contacts of 3.6153 (15) and 3.5922 (14) Å are consistent with the presence of N—H⋯I inter­actions. These N—H⋯I inter­actions link the complex cations and iodide anions into extended chains that propagate parallel to the a axis. PMID:26870590

  3. Photodissociation of methyl iodide adsorbed on low-temperature amorphous ice surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    DeSimone, Alice J.; Olanrewaju, Babajide O.; Grieves, Gregory A.; Orlando, Thomas M.

    2013-02-28

    Photodissociation dynamics of methyl iodide (CH{sub 3}I) adsorbed on both amorphous solid water (ASW) and porous amorphous solid water (PASW) has been investigated. The ejected ground-state I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) and excited-state I({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) photofragments produced by 260- and 290-nm photons were detected using laser resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. In contrast to gas-phase photodissociation, (i) the I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) photofragment is favored compared to I({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) at both wavelengths, (ii) I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) and I({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) have velocity distributions that depend upon ice morphology, and (iii) I{sub 2} is produced on ASW. The total iodine [I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2})+I({sup 2}P{sub 1/2})+I{sub 2}] yield varies with substrate morphology, with greater yield from ASW than PASW using both 260- and 290-nm photons. Temperature-programmed desorption studies demonstrate that ice porosity enhances the trapping of adsorbed CH{sub 3}I, while pore-free ice likely allows monomer adsorption and the formation of two-dimensional CH{sub 3}I clusters. Reactions or collisions involving these clusters, I atomic fragments, or I-containing molecular fragments at the vacuum-surface interface can result in I{sub 2} formation.

  4. Glutathione transferase activity and formation of macromolecular adducts in two cases of acute methyl bromide poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, R; Rambourg-Schepens, M O; Müller, A; Hallier, E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the activity of glutathione transferase and to measure the S-methylcysteine adducts in blood proteins, after acute inhalation exposure to methyl bromide. To examine the influence of the polymorphism of glutathione-S-transferase theta (GSTT1) on the neurotoxicity of methyl bromide. METHODS: Two workers acutely exposed to methyl bromide with inadequate respiratory protective devices were poisoned. Seven weeks after the accident, blood samples were drawn from both patients, for measurement of glutathione transferase activity in erythrocytes (conjugator status--that is, GSTT1 phenotype) and measurement of binding products of methyl bromide with blood proteins. Conjugator status was determined by a standard procedure. The binding product of methyl bromide, S-methylcysteine, was measured in globin and albumin. RESULTS: Duration and intensity of exposure were identical for both patients as they worked together with the same protective devices and with similar physical effort. However, one patient had very severe poisoning, whereas the other only developed mild neurotoxic symptoms. The first patient was a "conjugator" with normal glutathone transferase activity, whereas this activity was undetectable in the erythrocytes of the second patient, who consequently had higher concentrations of S-methylcysteine adduct in albumin (149 v 91 nmol/g protein) and in globin (77 v 30 nmol/g protein). CONCLUSIONS: Methyl bromide is genotoxic and neurotoxic. Its genotoxicity seems to be the consequence of the alkylating activity of the parent compound, and conjugation to glutathione has a protective effect. The data presented here suggest a different mechanism for methyl bromide neurotoxicity which could be related to the transformation of methylglutathione into toxic metabolites such as methanethiol and formaldehyde. If such metabolites are the ultimate toxic species, N-acetylcysteine treatment could have a toxifying rather than a detoxifying effect. PMID:8704864

  5. Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Try to have the following information ready: The container or bottle from the medicine or poison The ... dangerous gases. Always store household chemicals in the container they came in. Don't reuse containers. Keep ...

  6. Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... been swallowed, DO NOT give the person activated charcoal. DO NOT give children ipecac syrup. DO NOT ... poison from being absorbed, you may receive: Activated charcoal A tube through the nose into the stomach ...

  7. Intermolecular electron transfer states of 1-methyl-3-(N-(1,8-naphthalimidyl)ethyl)imidazolium iodide obtained by constrained density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Takao; Sumita, Masato; Izawa, Hironori; Morihashi, Kenji

    2016-07-21

    Electron transfer (ET) states of 1-methyl-3-(N-(1,8-naphthalimidyl)ethyl)imidazolium iodide are responsible for its photophysics. Investigation of an ET state based on constrained density functional theory (CDFT) revealed that nonradiative decay from the ET excited state is mediated by the interaction of the iodine atom with the 1,8-naphthalimide or the imidazolium group. PMID:27222312

  8. Correlation Between Methyl Iodide and Ozone Concentrations Recorded at the Mt. Cimone Station (2165 m asl) in the Northern Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maione, M.; Arduini, J.; Bonasoni, P.; Cristofanelli, P.; Calzolari, F.

    2005-12-01

    Many chemical species and atmospheric transport processes are involved in establishing tropospheric ozone budget. Particularly, Iodine compounds can perturb the oxidative capacity of the troposphere, influencing the ozone concentration. In this work we present a study concerning correlations between ozone and methyl iodide concentrations recorded at the Mt. Cimone Station (2165 m a.s.l., Italian Northern Apennines). methyl iodide is continuously (one sample every third hour) measured by GC-MS at the Station since July 2003 within the framework of EU-project SOGE (System for Observation of halogenated Greenhouse gases in Europe), together with a number of halogenated hydrocarbons ozone O3 in high mountain area is characteristic of atmospheric background conditions and can be influenced by natural or anthropic contributions. The continuous observations of ozone and methyl iodide carried out at Mt. Cimone, allowed us to better evaluate their variability regarding to different dynamic conditions and transport processes (i.e. Saharan dust transport, marine air mass advection, polluted air mass advection, stratosphere to troposphere exchange. Air mass three-dimensional back trajectories as well as meteorological parameter and aerosol concentration and size distribution analysis have been used to explain the different behaviour of ozone and methyl iodide revealed at Mt. Cimone.

  9. Coupling of soil solarization and reduced rate fumigation: effects on methyl iodide emissions from raised beds under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Daniel J; Yates, Scott R; Luo, Lifang; Lee, Sang R; Xuan, Richeng

    2013-12-26

    Using field plots, we studied the effect on methyl iodide (MeI) emissions of coupling soil solarization (passive and active) and reduced rate fumigation (70% of a standard fumigation) in raised beds under virtually impermeable film (VIF). The results showed that for the standard fumigation and the passive solarization + fumigation treatments, emissions from the nontarped furrow were very high (∼50%). Emissions from the bed top and sidewall of these treatments were relatively low but were increased in the latter due to the longer environmental exposure of the VIF covering with the coupled approach (increased tarp permeability). Overall, this approach offered no advantage over fumigation-only in terms of emission reduction. With active solarization + fumigation, the large application of hot water during solarization apparently led to severely limited diffusion causing very low total emissions (<1%). Although this suggests a benefit in terms of air quality, a lack of diffusion could limit the pesticidal efficacy of the treatment. PMID:24308342

  10. Spatio-temporal distributions of chlorofluorocarbons and methyl iodide in the Changjiang (Yangtze River) estuary and its adjacent marine area.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Da; Yang, Gui-Peng; He, Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Temporal and spatial distribution patterns of volatile halogenated organic compounds (VHOCs), such as dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12), trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11), trichlorotrifluoroethane (CFC-113), and methyl iodide (CH3I), in the Changjiang (Yangtze River) estuary and its adjacent marine area were measured during two cruises from 21 February to 10 March 2014 and from 10 to 21 July 2014. VHOC concentrations showed seasonal variation with higher values during winter. VHOC distributions evidently decreased along the freshwater plume from the river mouth to the open sea and from inshore to offshore regions. VHOC distributions were obviously influenced by the Changjiang runoff, anthropogenic inputs, and biological release of phytoplankton. The study area was a net sink for CFC-12 and CFC-11, but a net source for atmospheric CH3I during the study periods. PMID:26707981

  11. Acute and chronic methyl mercury poisoning impairs rat adrenal and testicular function

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, G.V.; Meikle, A.W.

    1980-05-01

    Animals poisoned with methyl mercury (CH/sub 3/Hg) exhibit stress intolerance and decreased sexual activity, which suggest both adrenal and testicular dysfunction. Adrenal and testicular function was studied in male rats after treatment with CH/sub 3/Hg. In animals treated chronically, the adrenal glands were markedly hyperplastic with enlargement of the zona fasciculata. The mean basal serum levels of corticosterone were similar in experimental (17.8 ..mu..g/dl) and control (16.8 ..mu..g/dl) groups. However, with ether stress, experimental animals had a subnormal response, and the mean serum levels of corticosterone increased to only 23.9 ..mu../dl compared to 40.6 ..mu..g/dl in the controls. Exogenous ACTH stimulation produced a mean level of 19.0 ..mu..g/dl in the CH/sub 3/Hg-treated animals and 49.7 ..mu..g/dl in the controls. In vitro studies demonstrated a defect in the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone. A profound impairment in swimming was partially reversed with glucocorticoid therapy. In animals treated with CH/sub 3/Hg, serum testosterone was lower than normal in the basal state. Human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation increased the mean serum concentration of testosterone to 23.4 ng/ml in controls, but it was only 4.50 ng/ml in experimental animals. The data indicate that CH/sub 3/Hg poisoning impairs adrenal and testicular steroid hormone secretion, which accounts in part for the diminished stress tolerance and decreased sexual activity observed in CH/sub 3/Hg-intoxicated animals.

  12. Crystallization of a perovskite film for higher performance solar cells by controlling water concentration in methyl ammonium iodide precursor solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Nirmal; Dubey, Ashish; Gaml, Eman A.; Vaagensmith, Bjorn; Reza, Khan Mamun; Mabrouk, Sally Adel Abdelsalam; Gu, Shaopeng; Zai, Jiantao; Qian, Xuefeng; Qiao, Qiquan

    2016-01-01

    An optimal small amount of water added into methyl ammonium iodide (MAI) solution in isopropyl alcohol (IPA) helps perovskite crystallization and leads to larger grain size from sequential deposition of perovskite films. The concentration of water was varied from 1% to 7% (vol% of IPA) in MAI solution and optical absorption, crystallization, morphology of perovskite films and their photovoltaic performance were studied in perovskite solar cells. 5% by volume was found to lead to preferential crystallization in the (110) plane with grain size about three times that of perovskite films prepared without adding water into the MAI solution. The optimal water concentration of 5% by volume in the MAI solution led to average perovskite grain size of ~600 nm and solar cell efficiency of 12.42% at forward scan with a rate of 0.5 V s-1. Device performance decreases after increasing water concentration beyond 5% in the MAI solution due to formation of the PbI2 phase. Transient photocurrent and photovoltage measurements show the shortest charge transport time at 0.99 μs and the longest charge carrier life time at 13.6 μs for perovskite films prepared from 5% water in MAI solution, which improved perovskite solar cell efficiency from 9.04% to 12.42%.An optimal small amount of water added into methyl ammonium iodide (MAI) solution in isopropyl alcohol (IPA) helps perovskite crystallization and leads to larger grain size from sequential deposition of perovskite films. The concentration of water was varied from 1% to 7% (vol% of IPA) in MAI solution and optical absorption, crystallization, morphology of perovskite films and their photovoltaic performance were studied in perovskite solar cells. 5% by volume was found to lead to preferential crystallization in the (110) plane with grain size about three times that of perovskite films prepared without adding water into the MAI solution. The optimal water concentration of 5% by volume in the MAI solution led to average perovskite

  13. Crystal structure of 1-[(1-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)meth­yl]pyridinium iodide

    PubMed Central

    Belguedj, Roumaissa; Bouraiou, Abdelmalek; Merazig, Hocine; Belfaitah, Ali; Bouacida, Sofiane

    2015-01-01

    In the title salt, C10H11N4O2 +·I−, the asymmetric unit consists of a pyridinium cation bearning a (1-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)methyl group at the N position and an iodide anion. The imidazole ring is quasiplanar, with a maxiumum deviation of 0.0032 (16) Å, and forms a dihedral angle of 67.39 (6)° with the plane of the pyridinium ring. The crystal packing can be described as alternating zigzag layers of cations parallel to the (001) plane, which are sandwiched by the iodide ions. The structure features two types of hydrogen bonds (C—H⋯O and C—H⋯I), viz. cation–anion and cation–cation, which lead to the form ation of a three-dimensional network. PMID:25878869

  14. Crystallization of a perovskite film for higher performance solar cells by controlling water concentration in methyl ammonium iodide precursor solution.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Nirmal; Dubey, Ashish; Gaml, Eman A; Vaagensmith, Bjorn; Reza, Khan Mamun; Mabrouk, Sally Adel Abdelsalam; Gu, Shaopeng; Zai, Jiantao; Qian, Xuefeng; Qiao, Qiquan

    2016-01-28

    An optimal small amount of water added into methyl ammonium iodide (MAI) solution in isopropyl alcohol (IPA) helps perovskite crystallization and leads to larger grain size from sequential deposition of perovskite films. The concentration of water was varied from 1% to 7% (vol% of IPA) in MAI solution and optical absorption, crystallization, morphology of perovskite films and their photovoltaic performance were studied in perovskite solar cells. 5% by volume was found to lead to preferential crystallization in the (110) plane with grain size about three times that of perovskite films prepared without adding water into the MAI solution. The optimal water concentration of 5% by volume in the MAI solution led to average perovskite grain size of ∼600 nm and solar cell efficiency of 12.42% at forward scan with a rate of 0.5 V s(-1). Device performance decreases after increasing water concentration beyond 5% in the MAI solution due to formation of the PbI2 phase. Transient photocurrent and photovoltage measurements show the shortest charge transport time at 0.99 μs and the longest charge carrier life time at 13.6 μs for perovskite films prepared from 5% water in MAI solution, which improved perovskite solar cell efficiency from 9.04% to 12.42%. PMID:26758661

  15. Microhydration Effects on the Intermediates of the SN2 Reacation of Iodide Anion with Methyl Iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Keisuke; Togano, Eijiro; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Nakanishi, Ryuzo; Nagata, Takashi; Ebata, Takayuki; Inokuchi, Yoshiya

    2013-04-15

    Reactions of halide anions with methyl halides (X- + CH3Y → XCH3 + Y-) are bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reactions that have been well investigated in the last few decades.[1] Figure 1 shows typical potential energy surfaces (PESs) proposed for symmetric (X- + CH3X → XCH3 + X-) SN2 reactions along the reaction coordinate. In the gas phase, the PES has two minima corresponding to the stable X-(CH3X) complexes.[2] The PES is substantially distorted by the solvation. Since the negative charge is delocalized over the [X•••CH3•••X]- moiety at the transition state the stabilization energy gained by the solvation is smaller for the transition state than that for the (X- + CH3X) reactants or the X- (CH3X) complexes. In solution, a large potential barrier exists between the reactants and products. The rate constants of these reactions in protic solvents were reported to be a few orders of magnitude smaller than those in aprotic solvents; this trend was explained by the formation of solvation shells of protic molecules around the halide anions.[1,3] Morokuma has previously reported a theoretical study on the PES of the (Cl- + CH3Cl → ClCH3 + Cl-) SN2 reaction with a few H2O molecules. The attachment of H2O molecules to the Cl-(CH3Cl) reactive system produces metastable isomers, which affect the reaction mechanism.[4] Johnson and coworkers extensively investigated the structure and reactions of halide anion complexes in the gas phase using photodissociation spectroscopy.

  16. New analysis of the ν6 and 2ν3 bands of methyl iodide (CH3I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, A.; Haykal, I.; KwabiaTchana, F.; Manceron, L.; Doizi, D.; Ducros, G.

    2016-06-01

    A new rovibrational study of the ν6 band of methyl iodide was conducted to obtain a rather complete line list. A new analysis of line positions was accomplished. The spectrum of this band has been first recorded using the Bruker IFS125HR Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the AILES beamline of the SOLEIL Synchrotron facility and later with the Bruker IFS125HR FTS located at the LISA facility in Créteil. Altogether, about 10,000 lines were assigned for the ν6 and 2ν3 bands up to high quantum numbers (J ⩽ 85 and K ⩽ 20). Because of the large value of the 127I nuclear quadrupole hyperfine constant, a significant portion of these assignments concerns clusters of hyperfine subcomponents, which are easily observable at 11 μm. These infrared data were combined in a least squares fit together with the existing microwave data on rotational transitions within the v6 = 1 and v3 = 2 vibrational states to get the upper state rotational constants and interacting parameters for the v6 = 1 and v3 = 2 states. Due to the high values of quantum numbers achieved during this infrared analysis, the final energy level calculation accounts for aCx (Δℓ = ± 1; ΔK = ± 1) and an α (Δℓ = ∓ 1; ΔK = ± 2) types of Coriolis interactions coupling the v6 = 1 energy levels with those from the v3 = 2 and v2 = 1 states, respectively. On the other hand, it proved unnecessary to update the existing hyperfine parameters for the v6 = 1 and v3 = 2 states.

  17. Methyl iodide oxidative addition to [Rh(acac)(CO)(PPh3)]: an experimental and theoretical study of the stereochemistry of the products and the reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Conradie, Marrigje M; Conradie, Jeanet

    2011-08-28

    Density functional theory was used to investigate the oxidative addition and subsequent carbonyl insertion and deinsertion steps of the reaction of methyl iodide to a rhodium(I) acetylacetonato complex of the formula [Rh(acac)(CO)(PPh(3))] (Hacac = acetylacetone). This process has been studied experimentally for many rhodium β-diketonato complexes, but, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic computational study of the complete reaction sequence. Experimental (1)H techniques complement the theoretical results on the stereochemistry of the reaction intermediates and products. (1)H NMR also revealed the existence of a second rhodium(III)-acyl product, which has not been previously observed in this reaction. The calculated Gibbs free energy of activation of the oxidative addition reaction is 71 kJ mol(-1), which is in agreement with the experimental value of 82(1) kJ mol(-1). The DFT-calculated oxidative addition corresponds to an associative S(N)2 nucleophilic attack by the rhodium metal centre on the methyl iodide, which is in agreement with calculated and experimental (in brackets) activation parameters of the reaction, 27 (38.8) kJ mol(-1) for ΔH((≠)) and -147 (-146) J K(-1) mol(-1) for ΔS((≠)). PMID:21761056

  18. Fatal ethyl and methyl alcohol-related poisoning in Ankara: A retrospective analysis of 10,720 cases between 2001 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Celik, Safa; Karapirli, Mustafa; Kandemir, Eyup; Ucar, Fatma; Kantarcı, Muhammed Nabi; Gurler, Mukaddes; Akyol, Omer

    2013-04-01

    Methyl and ethyl alcohol poisoning are still responsible for high morbidity and mortality rates. The purpose of this retrospective study was to examine ethyl and methyl alcohol poisoning related deaths in Ankara and surrounding cities between 2001 and 2011 and compare them with previous studied conducted in Turkey and other countries. For this purpose, 10,720 medico-legal autopsy cases performed in Ankara Branch of the Council of Forensic Medicine were reviewed in terms of alcohol poisonings. The deaths due to methanol and ethanol poisoning were 74 (0.69% of all medico-legal autopsies performed) and the distribution among them was 35 (47.3%) for methanol poisoning and 39 (52.7%) for ethanol poisoning. Overwhelming majority of the cases were male (n = 67, 90.5%). The mean age of the victims was 44.9 ± 10.9 years and ranging from 21 to 92 years. The age group of 35-49 years was the mostly affected. Most of the cases were seen in 2004 (n = 12, 16.2%). The levels of postmortem blood alcohol levels were available for all cases and the mean alcohol levels were 322.8 ± 155.5 mg/dL ranging from 74 to 602 mg/dL for methanol and 396.8 ± 87.1 mg/dL and ranging from 136 to 608 mg/dL for ethanol. Early diagnosis is essential for successful treatment in methanol and ethanol poisoning. Besides increased awareness, more sensitive/specific diagnostic tools, and the prompt approach to the poisoned individual should be implemented in the hospitals. PMID:23472793

  19. Hydroxypropyl Cellulose Based Non-Volatile Gel Polymer Electrolytes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Applications using 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide ionic liquid

    PubMed Central

    Khanmirzaei, Mohammad Hassan; Ramesh, S.; Ramesh, K.

    2015-01-01

    Gel polymer electrolytes using imidazolium based ionic liquids have attracted much attention in dye-sensitized solar cell applications. Hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC), sodium iodide (NaI), 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide (MPII) as ionic liquid (IL), ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) are used for preparation of non-volatile gel polymer electrolyte (GPE) system (HPC:EC:PC:NaI:MPII) for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) applications. The highest ionic conductivity of 7.37 × 10−3 S cm−1 is achieved after introducing 100% of MPII with respect to the weight of HPC. Temperature-dependent ionic conductivity of gel polymer electrolytes is studied in this work. XRD patterns of gel polymer electrolytes are studied to confirm complexation between HPC polymer, NaI and MPII. Thermal behavior of the GPEs is studied using simultaneous thermal analyzer (STA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSSCs are fabricated using gel polymer electrolytes and J-V centeracteristics of fabricated dye sensitized solar cells were analyzed. The gel polymer electrolyte with 100 wt.% of MPII ionic liquid shows the best performance and energy conversion efficiency of 5.79%, with short-circuit current density, open-circuit voltage and fill factor of 13.73 mA cm−2, 610 mV and 69.1%, respectively. PMID:26659087

  20. Hydroxypropyl Cellulose Based Non-Volatile Gel Polymer Electrolytes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Applications using 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Khanmirzaei, Mohammad Hassan; Ramesh, S; Ramesh, K

    2015-01-01

    Gel polymer electrolytes using imidazolium based ionic liquids have attracted much attention in dye-sensitized solar cell applications. Hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC), sodium iodide (NaI), 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide (MPII) as ionic liquid (IL), ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) are used for preparation of non-volatile gel polymer electrolyte (GPE) system (HPC:EC:PC:NaI:MPII) for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) applications. The highest ionic conductivity of 7.37 × 10(-3) S cm(-1) is achieved after introducing 100% of MPII with respect to the weight of HPC. Temperature-dependent ionic conductivity of gel polymer electrolytes is studied in this work. XRD patterns of gel polymer electrolytes are studied to confirm complexation between HPC polymer, NaI and MPII. Thermal behavior of the GPEs is studied using simultaneous thermal analyzer (STA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSSCs are fabricated using gel polymer electrolytes and J-V centeracteristics of fabricated dye sensitized solar cells were analyzed. The gel polymer electrolyte with 100 wt.% of MPII ionic liquid shows the best performance and energy conversion efficiency of 5.79%, with short-circuit current density, open-circuit voltage and fill factor of 13.73 mA cm(-2), 610 mV and 69.1%, respectively. PMID:26659087

  1. Hydroxypropyl Cellulose Based Non-Volatile Gel Polymer Electrolytes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Applications using 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanmirzaei, Mohammad Hassan; Ramesh, S.; Ramesh, K.

    2015-12-01

    Gel polymer electrolytes using imidazolium based ionic liquids have attracted much attention in dye-sensitized solar cell applications. Hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC), sodium iodide (NaI), 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide (MPII) as ionic liquid (IL), ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) are used for preparation of non-volatile gel polymer electrolyte (GPE) system (HPC:EC:PC:NaI:MPII) for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) applications. The highest ionic conductivity of 7.37 × 10-3 S cm-1 is achieved after introducing 100% of MPII with respect to the weight of HPC. Temperature-dependent ionic conductivity of gel polymer electrolytes is studied in this work. XRD patterns of gel polymer electrolytes are studied to confirm complexation between HPC polymer, NaI and MPII. Thermal behavior of the GPEs is studied using simultaneous thermal analyzer (STA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSSCs are fabricated using gel polymer electrolytes and J-V centeracteristics of fabricated dye sensitized solar cells were analyzed. The gel polymer electrolyte with 100 wt.% of MPII ionic liquid shows the best performance and energy conversion efficiency of 5.79%, with short-circuit current density, open-circuit voltage and fill factor of 13.73 mA cm-2, 610 mV and 69.1%, respectively.

  2. Line positions in the v6=1 band of methyl iodide: Validation of the C3v TDS package based on the tensorial formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haykal, I.; Doizi, D.; Boudon, V.; El Hilali, A.; Manceron, L.; Ducros, G.

    2016-04-01

    A tensorial formalism adapted to the case of symmetric-top molecules has been recently developed in Dijon (El Hilali et al., J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf 2010;111, 1305-1315) [18]. It is based on the O(3) ⊃C∞v ⊃C3v group chain and allows a systematic expansion of the Hamiltonian and dipole moment operators, including all possible interactions for a given rovibrational polyad system. This suite of programs is used to analyze and simulate the mid-infrared spectrum of methyl iodide in order to test its performance. The v6 fundamental band has been recorded using the FTIR Bruker HR125 at the AILES beamline of the SOLEIL Synchrotron facility with the Globar internal source. 3882 lines up to J=61 were assigned and fitted with only 16 tensorial parameters.

  3. Crystal structure of hepta­kis­(2,6-di­methyl­phenyl isocyanide-κC)vanadium(I) iodide

    PubMed Central

    Minyaev, Mikhail E.; Ellis, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The title salt, [V(C9H9N)7]+I− or [V(CNX­yl)7]+I− (Xyl is 2,6-di­methyl­phen­yl), crystallized from tetra­hydro­furan at low temperatures after reacting (Et4N)+[V(CO)6]−, excess of CNXyl and iodine. The complex cation and the two crystallographically different iodide anions, each located on a different glide plane, are well separated in the crystal structure. The V(CN)7 core of the cation has the form of a distorted monocapped trigonal prism. This compound is of inter­est as the first isolable homoleptic seven-coordinate vanadium analog of the 18-electron [V(CO)7]+ monocation. PMID:26029408

  4. Conductivity study and fourier transform infrared (FTIR) characterization of methyl cellulose solid polymer electrolyte with sodium iodide conducting ion

    SciTech Connect

    Abiddin, Jamal Farghali Bin Zainal; Ahmad, Azizah Hanom

    2015-08-28

    Sodium ion (Na{sup +}) based solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) has been prepared using solution cast technique with distilled water as solvent and Methylcellulose (MC) as a polymer host. Methylcellulose polymer was chosen as the polymer host due to the abundance of lone pair electrons in the carbonyl and C-O-C constituents, which in turn provide multiple hopping sites for the Na{sup +} conducting ions. Variable compositions of sodium iodide (NaI) salt were prepared to investigate the optimum MC-NaI weight ratio. Results from Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) technique show that pure methylcellulose has a low conductivity of 3.61 × 10{sup −11} S/cm.The conductivity increases as NaI content increases up to optimum NaIcomposition of 40 wt%, which yields an average conductivity of 2.70 × 10{sup −5} S/cm.

  5. How unclogging a sink can be lethal: case report of an accidental methyl bromide poisoning leading to a multiple organ failure.

    PubMed

    Lecailtel, Sylvain; Broucqsault-Dedrie, Céline; Vanbaelinghem, Clément; Nyunga, Martine; Colling, Delphine; Herbecq, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Methyl bromide (CH3Br) is a colorless and odorless volatile gas, used as an insecticide, fire extinguisher, fumigant, and refrigerant. Although forbidden since 1987 for domestic use, it is still used in industry, for example, to fumigate agricultural fields which are for importation in the United States. Here is the case of a 74-year-old man who was accidentally exposed to methyl bromide after using an old fire extinguisher. Even though he finally survived, he developed a severe multiple organ failure and spent 2 months in intensive care unit. We present in this report all the difficulties we had to diagnose this unusual poisoning. PMID:27408727

  6. An unusual case of non-fatal poisoning due to herbicide 4-chloro-2-methyl phenoxyacetic acid (MCPA).

    PubMed

    Tennakoon, D A S Sakunthala; Perera, K A P Bandumala; Hathurusinghe, L S

    2014-10-01

    MCPA (4-chloro-2-methyl phenoxyacetic acid) is a systemic hormone-type selective herbicide readily absorbed by leaves and roots. Use of MCPA for murder or attempted murder is very rare in Sri Lanka. However, a reported case of attempted murder by adding MCPA to water will be discussed in this paper. Three extraction methods were carried out with urine samples spiked with MCPA, namely liquid-liquid extraction with chloroform, solid phase extraction using C18 cartridges and vortex mixing with methanolic hydrochloric acid. Based on the recovery results, solid phase extraction was selected as the most suitable method and applied in the analysis of urine and water samples. Identification of MCPA in urine, water and the suspected poison bottle was carried out by HPLC and was confirmed by GC-MS. 4-chloro -2- methyl phenol metabolite was also identified and confirmed in the urine sample of the patient by GC-MS. Quantitative analysis of MCPA was carried out by HPLC using a validated method where Zorbax XDB-C18 column was used with photo diode array detector. In this case, presence of MCPA in one patient's urine sample collected four days after the incident was confirmed by GC-MS and found at a concentration of 0.83μg/ml. MCPA was not identified in the urine samples collected after 13 days in other three patients. The water sample taken from the suspected water storage tank found to contain 101μg/ml of MCPA. The results showed that HPLC combined with GC-MS is suitable for forensic analysis of MCPA in urine. PMID:24867053

  7. Crystal structure of 4-{2-[4-(di­methyl­amino)­phen­yl]diazen-1-yl}-1-methyl­pyridinium iodide

    PubMed Central

    Chulvi, Katherine; Costero, Ana; Ochando, Luis E.; Gaviña, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The mol­ecular geometry of the ionic title compound, C14H17N4 +·I− or DAZOP+·I−, is essentially featureless. Regarding the crystal structure, in addition to the obvious cation–anion Coulombic inter­actions, the packing is mostly directed by non-covalent inter­actions involving both ring systems, as well as the iodide anion. It consists of cationic mol­ecules aligned along [101] and disposed in an anti­parallel fashion while linked into π-bonded dimeric entities by a stacking contact involving symmetry-related phenyl rings, with a centroid–centroid distance of 3.468 (3) Å and a slippage of 0.951 Å. The dimers are, in addition, sustained by a number of C—H⋯I and I⋯π (I⋯centroid = 3.876 Å) inter­actions involving the anion. Finally, inter­dimeric contacts are of the C—H⋯I and C—H⋯π types. PMID:26870502

  8. Crystal structure of 4-{2-[4-(di-methyl-amino)-phen-yl]diazen-1-yl}-1-methyl-pyridinium iodide.

    PubMed

    Chulvi, Katherine; Costero, Ana; Ochando, Luis E; Gaviña, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    The mol-ecular geometry of the ionic title compound, C14H17N4 (+)·I(-) or DAZOP(+)·I(-), is essentially featureless. Regarding the crystal structure, in addition to the obvious cation-anion Coulombic inter-actions, the packing is mostly directed by non-covalent inter-actions involving both ring systems, as well as the iodide anion. It consists of cationic mol-ecules aligned along [101] and disposed in an anti-parallel fashion while linked into π-bonded dimeric entities by a stacking contact involving symmetry-related phenyl rings, with a centroid-centroid distance of 3.468 (3) Å and a slippage of 0.951 Å. The dimers are, in addition, sustained by a number of C-H⋯I and I⋯π (I⋯centroid = 3.876 Å) inter-actions involving the anion. Finally, inter-dimeric contacts are of the C-H⋯I and C-H⋯π types. PMID:26870502

  9. Growth and characterization of an organic single crystal: 2-[2-(4-diethylamino-phenyl)-vinyl]-1-methyl-pyridinium iodide.

    PubMed

    Senthil, K; Kalainathan, S; Ruban Kumar, A

    2014-05-01

    Optically transparent crystal of the organic salt DEASI (2-[2-(4-Diethylamino-phenyl)-vinyl]-1-methyl-pyridinium iodide) has been synthesized by using knoevenagel condensation reaction method. The synthesized material has been purified by successfully recrystallization process. Single crystals of DEASI have been grown by slow evaporation technique at room temperature. The solubility of the title material has been determined at different temperature in acetonitrile/methanol mixture. The cell parameters and crystallinity of the title crystal were determined by single crystal XRD. The powder diffraction was carried out to study the reflection plane of the grown crystal and diffraction peaks were indexed. The presence of different functional groups in the crystal was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis. (1)H NMR spectrum was recorded to confirm the presence of hydrogen nuclei in the synthesized material. The optical property of the title crystal was studied by UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopic analysis. The melting point and thermal property of DEASI were studied using TGA/DSC technique. The Vicker's hardness (Hv) was carried out to know the category. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the compound decreases with an increase in frequencies. Chemical etching studies showed that the DEASI grows in the two dimensional growth mechanisms. The Kurtz-Perry powder second harmonic generation (SHG) test has done for title crystal. PMID:24566112

  10. Growth and characterization of an organic single crystal: 2-[2-(4-Diethylamino-phenyl)-vinyl]-1-methyl-pyridinium iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil, K.; Kalainathan, S.; Ruban Kumar, A.

    Optically transparent crystal of the organic salt DEASI (2-[2-(4-Diethylamino-phenyl)-vinyl]-1-methyl-pyridinium iodide) has been synthesized by using knoevenagel condensation reaction method. The synthesized material has been purified by successfully recrystallization process. Single crystals of DEASI have been grown by slow evaporation technique at room temperature. The solubility of the title material has been determined at different temperature in acetonitrile/methanol mixture. The cell parameters and crystallinity of the title crystal were determined by single crystal XRD. The powder diffraction was carried out to study the reflection plane of the grown crystal and diffraction peaks were indexed. The presence of different functional groups in the crystal was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis. 1H NMR spectrum was recorded to confirm the presence of hydrogen nuclei in the synthesized material. The optical property of the title crystal was studied by UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopic analysis. The melting point and thermal property of DEASI were studied using TGA/DSC technique. The Vicker’s hardness (Hv) was carried out to know the category. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the compound decreases with an increase in frequencies. Chemical etching studies showed that the DEASI grows in the two dimensional growth mechanisms. The Kurtz-Perry powder second harmonic generation (SHG) test has done for title crystal.

  11. Potassium Iodide

    MedlinePlus

    ... radioactive iodine that may be released during a nuclear radiation emergency. Radioactive iodine can damage the thyroid gland. ... only take potassium iodide if there is a nuclear radiation emergency and public officials tell you that you ...

  12. Potassium Iodide

    MedlinePlus

    Potassium iodide is used to protect the thyroid gland from taking in radioactive iodine that may be released during a nuclear radiation emergency. Radioactive iodine can damage the thyroid gland. You ...

  13. Lanolin poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Wool wax poisoning; Wool alcohol poisoning; Glossylan poisoning; Golden dawn poisoning; Sparklelan poisoning ... a minor skin rash. Lanolin is similar to wax, so eating large amounts of it can cause ...

  14. Delineation of G-Quadruplex Alkylation Sites Mediated by 3,6-Bis(1-methyl-4-vinylpyridinium iodide)carbazole-Aniline Mustard Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Han; Hu, Tsung-Hao; Huang, Tzu-Chiao; Chen, Ying-Lan; Chen, Yet-Ran; Cheng, Chien-Chung; Chen, Chao-Tsen

    2015-11-23

    A new G-quadruplex (G-4)-directing alkylating agent BMVC-C3M was designed and synthesized to integrate 3,6-bis(1-methyl-4-vinylpyridinium iodide)carbazole (BMVC) with aniline mustard. Various telomeric G-4 structures (hybrid-2 type and antiparallel) and an oncogene promoter, c-MYC (parallel), were constructed to react with BMVC-C3M, yielding 35 % alkylation yield toward G-4 DNA over other DNA categories (<6 %) and high specificity under competition conditions. Analysis of the intact alkylation adducts by electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS) revealed the stepwise DNA alkylation mechanism of aniline mustard for the first time. Furthermore, the monoalkylation sites and intrastrand cross-linking sites were determined and found to be dependent on G-4 topology based on the results of footprinting analysis in combination with mass spectroscopic techniques and in silico modeling. The results indicated that BMVC-C3M preferentially alkylated at A15 (H26), G12 (H24), and G2 (c-MYC), respectively, as monoalkylated adducts and formed A15-C3M-A21 (H26), G12-C3M-G4 (H24), and G2-C3M-G4/G17 (c-MYC), respectively, as cross-linked dialkylated adducts. Collectively, the stability and site-selective cross-linking capacity of BMVC-C3M provides a credible tool for the structural and functional characterization of G-4 DNAs in biological systems. PMID:26769627

  15. [Acute salicylate poisoning].

    PubMed

    Reingardiene, Dagmara; Lazauskas, Robertas

    2006-01-01

    Although aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) has become widely available without prescription, cases of self-poisoning due to overdose of salicylates are quite uncommon, with a low reported mortality. However, severe poisoning with these preparations is life threatening. Besides the aspirin, there are other sources of salicylate poisoning, such as an excessive application of topical agents, ingestion of salicylate containing ointments, use of keratolytic agents or agents containing methyl salicylate (e.g. oil of wintergreen). Most of these preparations are liquid, highly concentrated and lipid soluble, and, therefore, they are able to provoke a severe, rapid salicylate poisoning. On the basis of clinical and metabolic features or salicylate concentration in plasma it is very important to diagnose severe poisoning with salicylates in time and prescribe an adequate treatment. In the present review article various aspects of salicylate poisoning and its treatment are discussed: epidemiology, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of salicylates, clinical manifestations of their toxicity, management, enhanced elimination and prognosis. PMID:16467617

  16. Synthesis of (/sup 75/Se)trimethylselenonium iodide from (/sup 75/Se)selenocystine

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, S.J.; Ganther, H.E.

    1984-02-15

    The synthesis of (/sup 75/Se)trimethylselenonium iodide from (/sup 75/)selenocystine is described. The starting compound is reduced to (/sup 75/Se)selenocysteine with borohydride and reacted with methyl iodide to form (/sup 75/Se)Se-methyl-selenocysteine, then treated with methyl iodide in formic acid solution to form Se-dimethyl-selenocysteine selenonium iodide. Over a period of days, the selenonium intermediate undergoes spontaneous elimination to form alanine and dimethyl selenide, which reacts with methyl iodide to give the trimethylselenonium product in over 90% yield. 15 references.

  17. Rate constant for the reaction of OH with methyl iodide, a re-determination by flash photolysis of water vapour and time resolved resonance fluorescence of OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaoliang; Strekowski, Rafal; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2010-05-01

    Methyl iodide is a major source gas for atmospheric iodine, and it is mainly emitted from the ocean. Aqueous-phase reactions, such as hydrolysis and exchange reactions with chloride control its emissions to the atmosphere, where its lifetime is limited to less than a week, mainly by photolysis. A minor contribution to the loss processes in the troposphere is the gas-phase reaction with OH radicals, that has been investigated by several authors. On the other hand, this reaction turned out to be uncertain in spite of interest in nuclear safety after the International Phebus Fission Product programme, initiated in 1988. Some of the most important observed phenomena with regard to the chemistry of iodine were not predicted, clearly showing the need for carrying out rate constant determinations for the reactions of I2 and CH3I with OH, which is a major oxidant product from the air radiolysis under accident conditions. We have measured the rate constant for the reaction OH + CH3I - H2O + CH2I in He at 260 mbar in the temperature range from 298 to 362 K. OH radicals were produced by flash photolysis of H2O in the vacuum-UV at wavelengths > 115 nm using a Xe flash lamp with a MgF2 window. Time profiles of OH radicals are monitored by resonance fluorescence of the A2 Σ - X2 Π transition at 308 nm, induced by the emission from a microwave discharge of a flow of He and H2O, a few Torr each. The signal is monitored by photon counting and multichannel scaling, collecting the counts from 50 flashes each, obtaind by pulsed photolysis of various mixtures of H2O and CH3I under slow-flow conditions. Decays of OH in the presence of CH3I are observed to be exponential, and the decay rates are found to be linearly dependent on the concentration of CH3I. Rate constants, k ± 2σ (in units of 10-14 cm3 s-1) of 4.14±0.20, 6.33±0.68, 7.31±1.18 and 8.24±1.60 at 298, 326, 352 and 362 K, respectively, are obtained from linear regressions and lead to an Arrhenius expression of k = 1.5

  18. Mushroom Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... poisoning, call your doctor or the Poison Control Center. Call 911 immediately if the person is unconscious, not breathing or convulsing. The phone number for the Poison Control Center is 1-800-222-1222. This number is ...

  19. Deodorant poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... if known) Time it was swallowed Amount swallowed Poison Control Your local poison center can be reached directly by calling the national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere ...

  20. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Experiments Stories Lessons Topics Games Activities Lessons MENU Lead Poisoning Kids Homepage Topics Pollution Lead Poisoning What is ... you can avoid contact with it! Sources of Lead Poisoning HOUSE PAINTS: Before1950, lead-based paint was used ...

  1. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Lead Poisoning What is it and who is affected? Lead is a highly toxic substance, exposure to which ... and children can suffer from the effects of lead poisoning, but childhood lead poisoning is much more frequent. ...

  2. Toxicokinetics, including saturable protein binding, of 4-chloro-2-methyl phenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in patients with acute poisoning.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Darren M; Dawson, Andrew H; Senarathna, Lalith; Mohamed, Fahim; Cheng, Ron; Eaglesham, Geoffrey; Buckley, Nick A

    2011-03-25

    Human data on protein binding and dose-dependent changes in toxicokinetics for MCPA are very limited. 128 blood samples were obtained in 49 patients with acute MCPA poisoning and total and unbound concentrations of MCPA were determined. The Scatchard plot was biphasic suggesting protein binding to two sites. The free MCPA concentration increased when the total concentration exceeded 239mg/L (95% confidence interval 198-274mg/L). Nonlinear regression using a two-site binding hyperbola model estimated saturation of the high affinity binding site at 115mg/L (95%CI 0-304). Further analyses using global fitting of serial data and adjusting for the concentration of albumin predicted similar concentrations for saturable binding (184mg/L and 167mg/L, respectively) without narrowing the 95%CI. In 25 patients, the plasma concentration-time curves for both bound and unbound MCPA were approximately log-linear which may suggest first order elimination, although sampling was infrequent so zero order elimination cannot be excluded. Using a cut-off concentration of 200mg/L, the half-life of MCPA at higher concentrations was 25.5h (95%CI 15.0-83.0h; n=16 patients) compared to 16.8h (95%CI 13.6-22.2h; n=10 patients) at lower concentrations. MCPA is subject to saturable protein binding but the influence on half-life appears marginal. PMID:21256202

  3. Cologne poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 100. Jacobsen D, Hovda KE. ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 32. Mycyk MB. Toxic alcohols. ...

  4. Insecticide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 76. Borron SW. Pyrethins, repellants, ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 77. Cannon RD, Ruha A- ...

  5. Poisonous Plants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH POISONOUS PLANTS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Photo courtesy ... U.S. Department of Agriculture Many native and exotic plants are poisonous to humans when ingested or if ...

  6. Copper poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 75. Holland MG. Pulmonary toxicology. ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 9. Jones AL, Dargan PI. ...

  7. Merbromin poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 71. Linakis JG, Skarbek-Borowska S. ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 18. Rusyniak DE, Arroyo A, ...

  8. Starch poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Cooking starch poisoning; Laundry starch poisoning ... Cooking and laundry starch are both made from vegetable products, most commonly: Corn Potatoes Rice Wheat Both are usually considered nonpoisonous (nontoxic), but ...

  9. Ethanol poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002644.htm Ethanol poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Ethanol poisoning is caused by drinking too much alcohol. ...

  10. Foxglove poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Foxglove poisoning most often occurs from sucking the flowers or eating the seeds, stems, or leaves of ... The poisonous substances are found in: Flowers, leaves, stems, and seeds of the foxglove plant Heart medicine (digitalis glycoside)

  11. Photodissociation of methyl iodide at 229. 4 nm: A determination of the fragment recoil anisotropy using energy-selective electron impact ionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, S.M.; Hayden, C.C.; Carlson Muyskens, K.J.; Crim, F.F.

    1988-09-01

    Energy-selective electron impact ionization of laser-produced photofragments together with time-of-flight mass spectrometry is a general and sensitive means of studying primary photodissociation processes. Low-energy electrons ionize photofragments without the production of background fragment ions from dissociative ionization of the parent molecules, and the time-of-flight mass spectral peak shapes provide direct information on the photofragment recoil anisotropy. In the first application of this combination of techniques, we have studied the photodissociation of methyl iodide at 229.4 nm, the short-wavelength end of the A band, in order to assess the contribution of transitions to the /sup 1/Q/sub 1/ state to the absorption profile. The results presented here show that I(/sup 2/P/sub 1//sub ///sub 2/) is the primary iodine--atom product and that the transition is largely parallel (..beta.. = (1.6 +- 0.1) for I(/sup 2/P/sub 1//sub ///sub 2/)) at 229.4 nm. These data together with previous photofragmentation results suggest that excitation to the /sup 3/Q/sub 0/ state dominates the entire A band absorption profile.

  12. Stonefish poisoning.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Richard Mark

    2004-01-01

    Scuba diving is becoming an increasingly popular recreation. Divers are traveling further afield, often to remote dive locations. These locations are often home to poisonous marine creatures such as stonefish. A case of acute stonefish poisoning in a scuba diver is described, including his treatment, the difficulties encountered with his management and evacuation, and his subsequent return to full health. The proper management of stonefish poisoning is reviewed, and the implications for divers traveling to remote locations are given. PMID:15636379

  13. Outsmarting Poison Ivy and Other Poisonous Plants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Updates Outsmarting Poison Ivy and Other Poisonous Plants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... hang in loose clusters. back to top Poison Plant Rashes Aren’t Contagious Poison ivy and other ...

  14. Cesium iodide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Kim, H.E.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1992-12-15

    A transparent, strong CsI alloy is described having additions of monovalent iodides. Although the preferred iodide is AgI, RbI and CuI additions also contribute to an improved polycrystalline CsI alloy with outstanding multispectral infrared transmittance properties. 6 figs.

  15. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Sal soda poisoning; Soda ash poisoning; Disodium salt poisoning; Carbonic acid poisoning; Washing soda poisoning ... have symptoms. In this rare situation, long-term effects, even death, are possible if you do not ...

  16. Methanol poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... with has an exposure, call your local emergency number (such as 911), or your local poison center can be reached directly by calling the national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere in the United States.

  17. Mercury iodide crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cadoret, R.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the Mercury Iodide Crystal Growth (MICG) experiment is the growth of near-perfect single crystals of mercury Iodide (HgI2) in a microgravity environment which will decrease the convection effects on crystal growth. Evaporation and condensation are the only transformations involved in this experiment. To accomplish these objectives, a two-zone furnace will be used in which two sensors collect the temperature data (one in each zone).

  18. Gasoline poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    This article discusses the harmful effects from swallowing gasoline or breathing in its fumes. This article is ... The poisonous ingredients in gasoline are chemicals called ... only hydrogen and carbon. Examples are benzene and methane.

  19. Ink poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Mirkin DB. Benzene and related aromatic hydrocarbons. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. Haddad and Winchester's Clinical Management of Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  20. Naphthalene poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... K. General approach to the poisoned patient. In: Marx J, ed. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical ... 147. Levine MD, Zane R. Chemical injuries. In: Marx J, ed. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical ...

  1. Ammonia poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... K. General approach to the poisoned patient. In: Marx J, ed. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical ... 147. Levine MD, Zane R. Chemical injuries. In: Marx J, ed. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical ...

  2. Depilatory poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 100. Pfau PR, Hancock SM. ... Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 27. Wax PM, Young A. ...

  3. Aftershave poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2014:chap 185. Jacobsen D, Hovda KE. ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 32. White SR. Toxic alcohols. ...

  4. Iodine poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002658.htm Iodine poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Iodine is a naturally occurring chemical. Small amounts are ...

  5. Lanolin poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Lanolin is an oily substance taken from sheep's wool. Lanolin poisoning occurs when someone swallows a product that contains lanolin. This article is for information only. Do NOT use it to treat or ...

  6. Menthol poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Menthol is used to add peppermint flavor to candy and other products. It is also used in certain skin lotions and ointments. This article discusses menthol poisoning from swallowing pure menthol. This article is ...

  7. Diazinon poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... care unit and getting long-term therapy. Some effects of the poison may last for weeks or months, or even longer. ... RD, Ruha A-M. Insecticides, herbicides, and rodenticides. In: Adams JG. Emergency Medicine . 2nd ...

  8. Bee poison

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by a sting from a bee, wasp , or yellow jacket. This article is for information ... anywhere in the United States. Poisonous Ingredient Bee, wasp, and yellow jacket stings contain a substance called ...

  9. Food poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... growing or shipping can contain animal or human waste. Food may be handled in an unsafe way during preparation in grocery stores, restaurants, or homes. Food poisoning can occur after eating or drinking: ...

  10. Refrigerant poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    A refrigerant is a chemical that makes things cold. This article discusses poisoning from sniffing or swallowing such chemicals. ... occurs when people intentionally sniff a type of refrigerant called Freon. This article is for information only. ...

  11. Mistletoe poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms of mistletoe poisoning can affect many parts of the body. EYES, EARS, NOSE, MOUTH, AND THROAT Blurred vision STOMACH AND INTESTINES Diarrhea Nausea and vomiting Stomach pain HEART AND BLOOD Weakness NERVOUS SYSTEM Drowsiness

  12. Detergent poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002777.htm Detergent poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Detergents are powerful cleaning products that may contain strong ...

  13. Lead poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... swallows a lead object or breathes in lead dust, some of the poison can stay in the ... a health problem. Lead is everywhere, including dirt, dust, new toys, and old house paint. Unfortunately, you ...

  14. Lacquer poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Poisoning from lacquers is due to hydrocarbons, which are substances that contain only hydrogen and carbon. ... Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  15. Gasoline poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    The poisonous ingredients in gasoline are chemicals called hydrocarbons, which are substances that contain only hydrogen and ... Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ...

  16. Pokeweed poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... highest amounts of poison are found in the roots, leaves, and stems. Small amounts are in the ... is no guarantee that they are safe. The roots should never be eaten. Symptoms most often appear ...

  17. Antifreeze poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    The poisonous ingredients in antifreeze are: Ethylene glycol Methanol Propylene glycol ... For ethylene glycol: Death may occur within the first 24 hours. If the patient survives, there may be little ...

  18. Shellac poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    These substances are found in: Paint remover Shellac Wood finishing products Other products may also contain these ... a vein (IV) Medicine (antidote) to reverse the effect of the poison Surgery to remove burned skin ...

  19. Yew poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... poisoning occurs when someone eats pieces of this plant. This article is for information only. DO NOT use it ... information: Person's age, weight, and condition Name and part of the plant that was swallowed, if known Time it was ...

  20. Paraffin poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... patient. In: Marx J, ed. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2013:chap 147. Shannon MW. Emergency management of poisoning. In: Shannon MW, ed. Haddad and ...

  1. Mistletoe poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002883.htm Mistletoe poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mistletoe is an evergreen plant with white berries. Mistletoe ...

  2. Methyl chloroform

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, T.K.

    1994-04-01

    Methyl chloroform is identified as a Class 1 ozone-depleting substance under Title VI of the CAA Amendments. On Nov. 30, 1993, EPA ordered the phaseout of Class 1 ozone-depleting substances -- chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halons, carbon tetrachloride and methyl chloroform -- by Jan. 1, 1996. Methyl chloroform and other Class 1 substances may be used after the dead-line if sources can be found through recycling or existing inventories. Methyl chloroform is listed as a hazardous air pollutant under CAA. It also is a SARA Title III, Sec. 313 compound with a reportable quantity of 1,000 pounds. OSHA and the American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists have set 350 ppm as the time-weighted average airborne exposure level for methyl chloroform. NIOSH lists its immediately dangerous to life or health'' concentration as 1,000 parts per million. DOT identifies the substance as a hazardous material, Class 6.1 (poison).

  3. Poisoning - fish and shellfish

    MedlinePlus

    Fish poisoning; Dinoflagellate poisoning; Seafood contamination; Paralytic shellfish poisoning; Ciguatera poisoning ... algae and algae-like organisms called dinoflagellates. Small fish that eat the algae become contaminated. If larger ...

  4. Photographic fixative poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Photographic developer poisoning; Hydroquinone poisoning; Quinone poisoning; Sulfite poisoning ... Hydroquinones Quinones Sodium thiosulfate Sodium sulfite/bisulfite Boric acid Photographic fixative can also break down (decompose) to form sulfur dioxide gas.

  5. Atmospheric methyl iodide /CH3I/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, R. A.; Khalil, M. A. K.; Gunawardena, R.; Hoyt, S. D.

    1982-01-01

    It is found that atmospheric concentrations of CH3I are not greater than about 3 pptv over most of the earth's surface and drop to less than half this value above the boundary layer, suggesting that the compound is not likely to play such important roles, on a global scale, as the destruction of tropospheric O3 and free radicals and the increasing of the NO2/NO ratio and hydroxyl radical densities. It is hypothesized that a large portion of the global CH3I comes from oceanic regions of high biomass productivity, where the compound may play a key role in local atmospheric chemistry. Attention is given to CH3I measurement uncertainties with regard to global distribution, sources, and sinks.

  6. Poison Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Safety & Prevention ... Content Article Body Post the Poison Help number 1-800-222-1222 on the emergency list next to every phone in your home and in your cell phone. A toddler or preschooler who vomits may ...

  7. Acetone poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. Acetone is a chemical used in many household products. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing acetone-based ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Household Products Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  8. Malathion poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... care unit and getting long-term therapy. Some effects of the poison may last for weeks or months, or even longer. ... Cannon RD, Ruha A-M. Insecticides, herbicides, and rodenticides. ... Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR); 2003.

  9. Poison Ivy

    MedlinePlus

    ... poison ivy”. The plant is found around the world, but it usually doesn’t grow in the desert or in high elevations. It usually grows in clusters in the woods, up in trees, and on the ground. Every part of the ...

  10. Lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Rekus, J.F.

    1992-08-01

    Construction workers who weld, cut or blast structural steel coated with lead-based paint are at significant risk of lead poisoning. Although technology to control these exposures may not have existed when the lead standard was promulgated, it is available today. Employers who do not take steps to protect their employees from lead exposure may be cited and fined severely for their failure.

  11. Yew poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... is found in various kinds of the yew plant. The poison is in most parts of the yew plant, but the highest amount ... information: Person's age, weight, and condition Name and part of the plant that was swallowed, if known Time it was ...

  12. Paradichlorobenzene poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... level of alertness). Before Calling Emergency Have this information ready: Person's age, weight, and condition (for example, is the person awake or alert?) Name of the product Time it was swallowed Amount swallowed However, DO NOT delay calling ... Poison Control Your local ...

  13. Nicotine poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... 15 minutes. Before Calling Emergency Determine the following information: The person's age, weight, and condition Name of product (as well as the ingredients and strength, if known) When it was swallowed or inhaled The amount swallowed or ... Poison Control Your local ...

  14. Poison Ivy

    MedlinePlus

    ... ground. It is usually found in groups of many plants and looks like weeds growing from 6 inches ... or anything else that may have touched the plant (like camping, sporting, fishing or hunting gear). If you develop a poison ivy rash, it will go away on its own in 1 to 3 ...

  15. Poisonings at Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, B; Singh, P M; Bharati, U; Dhungel, S

    2011-09-01

    Poisoning is an increasingly common social problem in Nepal. Studies on poisoning in semi urban areas of Nepal are minimal. Here we, present a prospective study of poisoning in semi urban area of capital, Kathmandu lasting for six years duration. Altogether there were 354 cases of various poisoning, admitted in Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital from Baisakh 2062 (April 16, 2005) to Chaitra 2067 (April 15, 2011). Male: Female ratio was 135:219 (1:1.6) and Age +/- SD was age 29.3 +/- 13.8 years. Age group (20-29 years) comprised of 138 patients (38.9% followed by < 20 years age group (92, 25.9%). Brahman/ chhetri (150, 42.4%) and Mongolian (146, 41.2%) ethnic groups were the main sufferers of poisoning, followed by newars (41, 11.6%) patients. Deliberate self harm was the cause for poisoning in maximum number of patients (156, 44.1%), followed by depression (64, 18.1%) and accidental poisoning (42, 11.9%). Organophosphorus (152, 42.9%), medicines (71, 20.1%), and rodenticide poisoning (38, 10.7%) were common poisons. Metacid (Methyl parathion) (46, 15.5%) was the most popular brand of poisoning agent used in Nepal for suicidal purpose. The over all mortality rate of poisoning in general was 7.1% with organophosphorus poisoning topping the list (19, 12.5%). We also present mad honey poisonings in a small group of 9 (3.2%) patients with M:F 8:1, age 26.5 +/- 8.8 years. Due precaution should be undertaken during their management as some of them may go into cardiopulmonary arrest and should not be considered benign when more than 5 tablespoonful wild honey is consumed. PMID:22808816

  16. Delayed cyanide poisoning following acetonitrile ingestion.

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, M.; Borland, C.

    1997-01-01

    Acetonitrile (methyl cyanide) is a common industrial organic solvent but is a rare cause of poisoning. We report the first recorded UK case. Acetonitrile is slowly converted to cyanide, resulting in delayed toxicity. We describe a case of deliberate self-poisoning by a 39-year-old woman resulting in cyanide poisoning 11 hours later which was successfully treated by repeated boluses of sodium nitrite and thiosulphate. The half-life of conversion of acetonitrile was 40 hours and harmful blood cyanide levels persisted for over 24 hours after ingestion. Departments treating or advising in cases of poisoning need to be aware of the delayed toxicity of acetonitrile. Monitoring in an intensive care unit of cases of acetonitrile poisoning should continue for 24-48 hours. PMID:9196706

  17. Cesium iodide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Moorhead, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    This invention relates to a CsI composition with improved mechanical strength and outstanding multispectral infrared transmittance, for window use. The additive is a monovalent iodide, other than CsI, added in amounts sufficient to maximize fracture strength from 16 to 40 MPa, while maintaining at least 10% transparency in the 4 to 50 micrometer wavelength range. The preferred additive is AgI, although RbI or CuI can be used. 6 figs. (DLC)

  18. Mercuric chloride poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mercuric chloride is a very poisonous form of mercury. It is a type of mercury salt. There are different types of mercury poisonings . This article discusses poisoning from swallowing mercuric ...

  19. Plant fertilizer poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Household plant food poisoning; Plant food - household - poisoning ... Belson M. Ammonia and nitrogen oxides. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. Haddad and Winchester's Clinical Management of Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ...

  20. Shaving cream poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... if known) Time it was swallowed Amount swallowed Poison Control Your local poison center can be reached directly by calling the national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere ...

  1. Rhubarb leaves poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... if known Time it was swallowed Amount swallowed Poison Control Your local poison center can be reached directly by calling the national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere ...

  2. Lip moisturizer poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... The time it was swallowed The amount swallowed Poison Control Your local poison center can be reached directly by calling the national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere ...

  3. Hair tonic poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... if known) Time it was swallowed Amount swallowed Poison Control Your local poison center can be reached directly by calling the national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere ...

  4. Ink remover poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... be very poisonous if swallowed in large doses) Wood alcohol (methanol, which is very poisonous) ... Immediate kidney dialysis Medicine (antidote) to reverse the effect of the poison Tube through the mouth into ...

  5. Lead Poisoning Prevention Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC.gov . Lead Home Calendar of Events National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week Archived Materials CDC's Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program Advisory Committee (ACCLPP) Current Activities Blood ...

  6. Protecting Yourself from Poisonous Plants

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIOSH NIOSH Fast Facts: Protecting Yourself from Poisonous Plants Language: English Español (Spanish) Kreyol Haitien (Hatian Creole) ... outdoors is at risk of exposure to poisonous plants, such as poison ivy, poison oak, and poison ...

  7. House of Poison: Poisons in the Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Rosanne

    One of a series of instructional materials produced by the Literacy Council of Alaska, this booklet provides information about common household poisons. Using a simplified vocabulary and shorter sentences, it provides statistics concerning accidental poisonings; a list of the places poisons are usually found in the home; steps to make the home…

  8. Frequently Asked Questions on Potassium Iodide (KI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... needs to take potassium iodide (KI) after a nuclear radiation release? What potassium iodide (KI) products are currently ... needs to take potassium iodide (KI) after a nuclear radiation release? The FDA guidance prioritizes groups based on ...

  9. Prevention of Food Poisoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Quartermaster School, Ft. Lee, VA.

    The programed text provides a single lesson, four-hour, correspondence subcourse on the prevention of food poisoning. It covers the following areas: a definition of food poisoning; chemical food poisoning; biological food poisoning; causes and prevention of trichinosis; six factors controlling bacteria growth; bacterial infection; prevention of…

  10. Hydrogen iodide decomposition

    DOEpatents

    O'Keefe, Dennis R.; Norman, John H.

    1983-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen iodide is decomposed to form hydrogen and iodine in the presence of water using a soluble catalyst. Decomposition is carried out at a temperature between about 350.degree. K. and about 525.degree. K. and at a corresponding pressure between about 25 and about 300 atmospheres in the presence of an aqueous solution which acts as a carrier for the homogeneous catalyst. Various halides of the platinum group metals, particularly Pd, Rh and Pt, are used, particularly the chlorides and iodides which exhibit good solubility. After separation of the H.sub.2, the stream from the decomposer is countercurrently extracted with nearly dry HI to remove I.sub.2. The wet phase contains most of the catalyst and is recycled directly to the decomposition step. The catalyst in the remaining almost dry HI-I.sub.2 phase is then extracted into a wet phase which is also recycled. The catalyst-free HI-I.sub.2 phase is finally distilled to separate the HI and I.sub.2. The HI is recycled to the reactor; the I.sub.2 is returned to a reactor operating in accordance with the Bunsen equation to create more HI.

  11. Pesticide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ashish; Aggarwal, Praveen

    2007-01-01

    Acute poisoning with pesticides is a global public health problem and accounts for as many as 300,000 deaths worldwide every year. The majority of deaths occur due to exposure to organophosphates, organochlorines and aluminium phosphide. Organophosphate compounds inhibit acetylcholinesterase resulting in acute toxicity. Intermediate syndrome can develop in a number of patients and may lead to respiratory paralysis and death. Management consists of proper oxygenation, atropine in escalating doses and pralidoxime in high doses. It is Important to decontaminate the skin while taking precautions to avoid secondary contamination of health personnel. Organochlorine pesticides are toxic to the central nervous system and sensitize the myocardium to catecholamines. Treatment involves supportive care and avoiding exogenous sympathomimetic agents. Ingestion of paraquat causes severe inflammation of the throat, corrosive injury to the gastrointestinal tract, renal tubular necrosis, hepatic necrosis and pulmonary fibrosis. Administration of oxygen should be avoided as it produces more fibrosis. Use of immunosuppressive agents have improved outcome in patients with paraquat poisoning. Rodenticides include thallium, superwarfarins, barium carbonate and phosphides (aluminium and zinc phosphide). Alopecia is an atypical feature of thallium toxicity. Most exposures to superwarfarins are harmless but prolonged bleeding may occur. Barium carbonate Ingestion can cause severe hypokalaemia and respiratory muscle paralysis. Aluminium phosphide is a highly toxic agent with mortality ranging from 37% to 100%. It inhibits mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase and leads to pulmonary and cardiac toxicity. Treatment is supportive with some studies suggesting a beneficial effect of magnesium sulphate. Pyrethroids and insect repellants (e.g. diethyltoluamide) are relatively harmless but can cause toxic effects to pulmonary and central nervous systems. Ethylene dibromide-a highly toxic, fumigant

  12. Phenyltrimethylammonium Salts as Methylation Reagents in the Nickel-Catalyzed Methylation of C-H Bonds.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Mao; Chatani, Naoto

    2016-02-24

    Methylation of C(sp(2))-H bonds was achieved through the Ni(II)-catalyzed reaction of benzamides with phenyltrimethylammonium bromide or iodide as the source of the methyl group. The reaction has a broad scope and shows high functional-group compatibility. The reaction is also applicable to the methylation of C(sp(3))-H bonds in aliphatic amides. PMID:26821872

  13. Solvent-free synthesis of alkylbenzimidazolium iodides and their applications in dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Mei; Shi, Chengwu; Sun, Renjie; Liu, Zhaokun; Cai, Molang

    2010-10-15

    In this paper, the synthesis of 1-hexyl-3-methylbenzimidazolium iodide (HMBI) and 1-hexyl-3-propylbenzimidazolium iodide (HPBI) was developed by quaternization reaction of 1-hexylbenzimidazole and alkyl iodide under solvent-free condition using Teflon-lined, stainless autoclaves. Their thermal properties were measured on the thermo gravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimeter. The influence of HMBI, HPBI and 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide (MPII) on redox behavior of I{sub 3}{sup -} and I{sup -} was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It was found that the resulting HMBI and HPBI had high purity and the reaction time was shortened to 3 h. The thermal stability of HMBI and HPBI was better than that of alkylimidazolium iodides, and HMBI and HPBI were prone to exhibit the supercooling phenomena. The DSCs with HMBI, HPBI and MPII gave photoelectric conversion efficiency of 5.49%, 5.34% and 5.54%, respectively. (author)

  14. Etching of mercuric iodide in cation iodide solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponpon, J. P.; Amann, M.

    2006-07-01

    The surface properties of mercuric iodide after etching in various cation iodide solutions have been investigated in terms of dissolution rate, morphology, electrical properties and reaction with water vapour. No significant differences have been observed in the etching rates. However, dissolution of HgI 2 in NH 4I, NaI, KI or RbI leaves the surface more or less covered with a residual iodo mercurate compound whose electrical properties and stability with regard to humidity may noticeably influence the behaviour of mercuric iodide devices. The smallest effect has been observed for etching in NaI.

  15. Fatal poisonings in Trabzon (Turkey).

    PubMed

    Birincioglu, Ismail; Karadeniz, Hulya; Teke, Hacer Yasar

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to present the characteristics of medicolegal autopsies of fatal poisonings in Trabzon (Turkey), performed from 1998 to 2008, to contribute to the available data on this topic. A retrospective study of the forensic records and the toxicological data of all autopsies performed over that period revealed that 285 cases (6.34%) of the 4492 total autopsies performed were attributed to fatal poisoning. Major toxic substances were classified in five categories as follows: carbon monoxide (CO), insecticides, prescription medications, narcotic drugs, and alcohol (methyl and ethyl). CO was the most frequent cause of death (63.2%), followed by insecticides (17.2%), prescription medications and narcotic drugs (9.8%), alcohol (7.7%), and others (mushroom, rodenticide, and botulism) (2.1%). Ages of the patients ranged from 1 to 86 years (21.55 ± 36.56). PMID:21447071

  16. 21 CFR 172.375 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 172.375 Section 172.375 Food and... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.375 Potassium iodide. The food additive potassium iodide may be safely used in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Potassium iodide may be...

  17. 21 CFR 172.375 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 172.375 Section 172.375 Food and... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.375 Potassium iodide. The food additive potassium iodide may be safely used in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Potassium iodide may be...

  18. 21 CFR 172.375 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium iodide. 172.375 Section 172.375 Food and... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.375 Potassium iodide. The food additive potassium iodide may be safely used in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Potassium iodide may be...

  19. 21 CFR 172.375 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 172.375 Section 172.375 Food and....375 Potassium iodide. The food additive potassium iodide may be safely used in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Potassium iodide may be safely added to a food as a source of...

  20. 21 CFR 172.375 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 172.375 Section 172.375 Food and... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.375 Potassium iodide. The food additive potassium iodide may be safely used in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Potassium iodide may be...

  1. Excited State Electronic Properties of Sodium Iodide and Cesium Iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Luke W.; Gao, Fei

    2013-05-01

    We compute from first principles the dielectric function, loss function, lifetime and scattering rate of quasiparticles due to electronic losses, and secondary particle spectrum due to plasmon decay in two scintillating alkali halides, sodium iodide and cesium iodide. Particular emphasis is placed on quasiparticles within several multiples of the band gap from the band edges. A theory for the decay spectra of plasmons and other electronic excitations in crystals is presented. Applications to Monte Carlo radiation transport codes are discussed.

  2. Hair straightener poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002706.htm Hair straightener poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hair straightener poisoning occurs when someone swallows products that ...

  3. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe damage, such ... poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  4. Poisoning first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007579.htm Poisoning first aid To use the sharing features on this page, ... or burns Stupor Unconsciousness Unusual breath odor Weakness First Aid Seek immediate medical help. For poisoning by swallowing: ...

  5. Hair bleach poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002702.htm Hair bleach poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hair bleach poisoning occurs when someone swallows hair bleach or ...

  6. Plant fertilizer poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Plant fertilizers and household plant foods are used to improve plant growth. Poisoning can occur if someone swallows these products. Plant fertilizers are mildly poisonous if small amounts are swallowed. ...

  7. Ciguatera Fish Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... By Syndrome Life Cycle Impacts Human Health Wildlife Ecosystems Socioeconomic Freshwater Regions Distribution - U.S. Distribution - World Maps ... Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning Cyanobacteria Medical Community ... Fish Poisoning Causative organisms: Gambierdiscus ...

  8. Face powder poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002700.htm Face powder poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Face powder poisoning occurs when someone swallows or breathes ...

  9. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe damage, ... discusses poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  10. Hand lotion poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002708.htm Hand lotion poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hand lotion poisoning occurs when someone swallows hand lotion or ...

  11. Blue nightshade poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Blue nightshade poisoning occurs when someone eats parts of the blue nightshade plant. This article is for information only. DO NOT use it to treat or manage an actual poison exposure. If you or someone you ...

  12. Bubble bath soap poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002762.htm Bubble bath soap poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bubble bath soap poisoning occurs when someone swallows bubble bath soap. ...

  13. Black nightshade poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Black nightshade poisoning occurs when someone eats pieces of the black nightshade plant. This article is for information only. ... Poisons are found in the black nightshade plant, especially in the unripened fruit and leaves.

  14. Bracken fern poisoning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum) is found throughout the world and enzootic hematuria, bright blindness, and bracken staggers. This chapter reviews the plant, the various poisoning syndrome that it produces, the current strategies to prevent poisoning, and recommended treatments....

  15. Lead Poisoning in Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M., Ed.; Linakis, James G., Ed.; Anderson, Angela C., Ed.

    The magnitude of childhood lead poisoning has been inexplicably neglected by modern medicine and by legislators. However, since the 1970s, increased attention has been focused on lead poisoning, and advances have been made in several areas, including understanding of the neurodevelopmental and behavioral ramifications of lead poisoning, and…

  16. Lead Poisoning (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Lead Poisoning KidsHealth > For Parents > Lead Poisoning Print A A ... Family en español La intoxicación por plomo About Lead Poisoning If you have young kids, it's important to ...

  17. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, A. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Early symptoms of lead poisoning in children are often overlooked. Lead poisoning has its greatest effects on the brain and nervous system. The obvious long-term solution to the lead poisoning problem is removal of harmful forms of the metal from the environment. (JN)

  18. Lead poisoning: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendel, Neil

    1993-01-01

    A problem that should be of great concern to all of us is the lead poisoning of children. First, I would like to present a short overview concerning the reasons everyone should care about lead poisoning, then discuss the history of lead poisoning, what is happening today across the country, and the future.

  19. Methyl halides in and over the eastern Pacific (40 /sup 0/N-32 /sup 0/S)

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, H.B.; Salas, L.J.; Stiles, R.E.

    1983-04-20

    Methyl chloride, methyl bromide, and methyl iodide measurements in and over the eastern Pacific (40 /sup 0/N and 32 /sup 0/S latitude) show mean air concentrations of 633 parts per trillion (ppt), 23 ppt, and 2 ppt, and mean surface seawater concentrations of 11.5 ng/l, 1.2 ng/l, and 1.6 ng/l respectively. Long-term ambient measurements at a marine Pacific site (39 /sup 0/N) show an essentially unchanging background, with some indication of high concentrations of methyl bromide and methyl iodide during summertime. The oceanic data indicate a mean surface supersaturation of 275%, 250%, and 340%, respectively, for these three methyl halides. Depth profiles show that methyl halides are most abundant in the top mixed layer of the ocean. Oceanic concentrations of methyl chloride and methyl bromide are significantly correlated (linear regression coefficient of 0.85), suggesting a common source. No relationship between oceanic methyl iodide concentrations and the other two halides could be found. Coexistence of high concentrations of methyl iodide with relatively low concentrations of methyl chloride and vice versa provided no direct support for the hypothesis that chloride ion reactions with methyl iodide may be the dominant oceanic source of methyl chloride. For the eastern Pacific, mean ocean to air fluxes (in units of 10/sup -7/ g cm/sup -2/ yr/sup -1/) of 13,1, and 1 are determined for methyl chloride, methyl bromine, and methyl iodide, respectively. When extrapolated to global waters, they provide an adequate source to explain the atmospheric reservoir of these organic halides. Total organic bromine and iodine measurements would suggest that methyl bromide and methyl iodide contribute predominately to the tropospheric bromine and iodine organic reservoir.

  20. Poisoning: Effective Clinical Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Turner, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    Poisoning accounts for 40-60% of suicides, is the commonest medical emergency in small children, and an important source of occupational injury. Prevention of unintentional poisoning involves primarily education of parents. In intervention, the patient—not the poison—must be treated. Self-poisoners require supportive but firm handling. Treatment is directed towards prevention of further absorption, removal of absorbed poison, symptomatic or supportive therapy, and administration of systemic antidotes. Careful attention should be paid to the physician's legal responsibilities in cases of poisoning. Imagesp2032-a PMID:21286544

  1. Marijuana poisoning.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C; Newquist, Kristin L

    2013-02-01

    , tremors, hypothermia, and bradycardia. Higher dosages may additionally cause nystagmus, agitation, tachypnea, tachycardia, ataxia, hyperexcitability, and seizures. Treatment of marijuana ingestion in animals is largely supportive. Vital signs including temperature and heart rate and rhythm must be continually monitored. Stomach content and urine can be tested for cannabinoids. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry can be utilized for THC detection but usually may take several days and are not practical for initiation of therapy. Human urine drug-screening tests can be unreliable for confirmation of marijuana toxicosis in dogs owing to the interference of a large number of the metabolites in canine urine. False negatives may also arise if testing occurs too recently following THC ingestion. Thus, the use of human urine drug-screening tests in dogs remains controversial. No specific antidote presently exists for THC poisoning. Sedation with benzodiazepines may be necessary if dogs are severely agitated. Intravenous fluids may be employed to counter prolonged vomiting and to help control body temperature. Recently, the use of intralipid therapy to bind the highly lipophilic THC has been utilized to help reduce clinical signs. The majority of dogs experiencing intoxication after marijuana ingestion recover completely without sequellae. Differential diagnoses of canine THC toxicosis include human pharmaceuticals with central nervous system stimulatory effects, drugs with central nervous system depressant effects, macrolide parasiticides, xylitol, and hallucinogenic mushrooms. PMID:23796481

  2. Glyphosate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bradberry, Sally M; Proudfoot, Alex T; Vale, J Allister

    2004-01-01

    Glyphosate is used extensively as a non-selective herbicide by both professional applicators and consumers and its use is likely to increase further as it is one of the first herbicides against which crops have been genetically modified to increase their tolerance. Commercial glyphosate-based formulations most commonly range from concentrates containing 41% or more glyphosate to 1% glyphosate formulations marketed for domestic use. They generally consist of an aqueous mixture of the isopropylamine (IPA) salt of glyphosate, a surfactant, and various minor components including anti-foaming and colour agents, biocides and inorganic ions to produce pH adjustment. The mechanisms of toxicity of glyphosate formulations are complicated. Not only is glyphosate used as five different salts but commercial formulations of it contain surfactants, which vary in nature and concentration. As a result, human poisoning with this herbicide is not with the active ingredient alone but with complex and variable mixtures. Therefore, It is difficult to separate the toxicity of glyphosate from that of the formulation as a whole or to determine the contribution of surfactants to overall toxicity. Experimental studies suggest that the toxicity of the surfactant, polyoxyethyleneamine (POEA), is greater than the toxicity of glyphosate alone and commercial formulations alone. There is insufficient evidence to conclude that glyphosate preparations containing POEA are more toxic than those containing alternative surfactants. Although surfactants probably contribute to the acute toxicity of glyphosate formulations, the weight of evidence is against surfactants potentiating the toxicity of glyphosate. Accidental ingestion of glyphosate formulations is generally associated with only mild, transient, gastrointestinal features. Most reported cases have followed the deliberate ingestion of the concentrated formulation of Roundup (The use of trade names is for product identification purposes only and

  3. Zebrafish Models for Human Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Melissa; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Padrós, Francesc; Babin, Patrick J.; Sebastián, David; Cachot, Jérôme; Prats, Eva; Arick II, Mark; Rial, Eduardo; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Mathieu, Guilaine; Le Bihanic, Florane; Escalon, B. Lynn; Zorzano, Antonio; Soares, Amadeu M.V.M; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2015-01-01

    Terrorist use of organophosphorus-based nerve agents and toxic industrial chemicals against civilian populations constitutes a real threat, as demonstrated by the terrorist attacks in Japan in the 1990 s or, even more recently, in the Syrian civil war. Thus, development of more effective countermeasures against acute organophosphorus poisoning is urgently needed. Here, we have generated and validated zebrafish models for mild, moderate and severe acute organophosphorus poisoning by exposing zebrafish larvae to different concentrations of the prototypic organophosphorus compound chlorpyrifos-oxon. Our results show that zebrafish models mimic most of the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this toxidrome in humans, including acetylcholinesterase inhibition, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, and calcium dysregulation as well as inflammatory and immune responses. The suitability of the zebrafish larvae to in vivo high-throughput screenings of small molecule libraries makes these models a valuable tool for identifying new drugs for multifunctional drug therapy against acute organophosphorus poisoning. PMID:26489395

  4. Zebrafish Models for Human Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Faria, Melissa; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Padrós, Francesc; Babin, Patrick J; Sebastián, David; Cachot, Jérôme; Prats, Eva; Arick Ii, Mark; Rial, Eduardo; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Mathieu, Guilaine; Le Bihanic, Florane; Escalon, B Lynn; Zorzano, Antonio; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2015-01-01

    Terrorist use of organophosphorus-based nerve agents and toxic industrial chemicals against civilian populations constitutes a real threat, as demonstrated by the terrorist attacks in Japan in the 1990 s or, even more recently, in the Syrian civil war. Thus, development of more effective countermeasures against acute organophosphorus poisoning is urgently needed. Here, we have generated and validated zebrafish models for mild, moderate and severe acute organophosphorus poisoning by exposing zebrafish larvae to different concentrations of the prototypic organophosphorus compound chlorpyrifos-oxon. Our results show that zebrafish models mimic most of the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this toxidrome in humans, including acetylcholinesterase inhibition, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, and calcium dysregulation as well as inflammatory and immune responses. The suitability of the zebrafish larvae to in vivo high-throughput screenings of small molecule libraries makes these models a valuable tool for identifying new drugs for multifunctional drug therapy against acute organophosphorus poisoning. PMID:26489395

  5. [Seafood poisonings. Part II. Fish poisonings].

    PubMed

    Ciszowski, Krzysztof; Mietka-Ciszowska, Aneta

    2012-01-01

    Fish plays a significant role in human life, mainly as part of a balanced healthy diet and a good source of many of nutrients. However, contact with fish may be harmful or even life-threatening to man. Toxic effects, that fish exerts toward men (ichthyotoxism), result from envenomations by poison. ous fish equipped in venom apparatus (ichthyoacanthotoxism), direct contact with venom produced by skin glandules (ichthyocrinotoxism), or consuming fish containing toxins for nutritional purposes (ichthyosarcotoxism). In the present review, different fish-borne food poisonings are presented including their etiology, pathogenesis, symptomatology and treatment. In fact, the majority of fish poisonings are intoxications with toxins primary produced by bacteria, cyanobacteria and algae. These are consumed and accumulated in the food chain by herbivorous and predatory fish, that in turn may be a cause of poisonings in humans. PMID:23243919

  6. IODIDE DEFICIENCY, THYROID HORMONES, AND NEURODEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Iodide is an essential nutrient for thyroid hormone synthesis. Severe iodide insufficiency during early development is associated with cognitive deficits. Environmental contaminants can perturb the thyroid axis and this perturbation may be more acute under conditio...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 582.5634 Section 582.5634 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5634 Potassium iodide. (a) Product. Potassium iodide. (b) Tolerance. 0.01 percent....

  8. 21 CFR 582.5634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 582.5634 Section 582.5634 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5634 Potassium iodide. (a) Product. Potassium iodide. (b) Tolerance. 0.01 percent....

  9. 21 CFR 184.1634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium iodide. 184.1634 Section 184.1634 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1634 Potassium iodide. (a) Potassium iodide (KI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-11-0) is the potassium salt of hydriodic acid. It occurs naturally in sea water and in...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 184.1634 Section 184.1634 Food... GRAS § 184.1634 Potassium iodide. (a) Potassium iodide (KI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-11-0) is the potassium... reacting hydriodic acid (HI) with potassium bicarbonate (KHCO3). (b) The ingredient meets...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 582.5634 Section 582.5634 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5634 Potassium iodide. (a) Product. Potassium iodide. (b) Tolerance. 0.01 percent....

  12. 21 CFR 582.5634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 582.5634 Section 582.5634 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5634 Potassium iodide. (a) Product. Potassium iodide. (b) Tolerance. 0.01 percent....

  13. 21 CFR 184.1634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 184.1634 Section 184.1634 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1634 Potassium iodide. (a) Potassium iodide (KI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-11-0) is the potassium salt of hydriodic acid. It occurs naturally in sea water and in...

  14. 21 CFR 582.5634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 582.5634 Section 582.5634 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5634 Potassium iodide. (a) Product. Potassium iodide. (b) Tolerance. 0.01 percent....

  15. 21 CFR 184.1634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 184.1634 Section 184.1634 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1634 Potassium iodide. (a) Potassium iodide (KI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-11-0) is the potassium salt of hydriodic acid. It occurs naturally in sea water and in...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 184.1634 Section 184.1634 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1634 Potassium iodide. (a) Potassium iodide (KI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-11-0) is the potassium salt of hydriodic acid. It occurs naturally in sea water and in...

  17. Phosphorus poisoning in waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coburn, D.R.; DeWitt, J.B.; Derby, J.V., Jr.; Ediger, E.

    1950-01-01

    Black ducks and mallards were found to be highly susceptible to phosphorus poisoning. 3 mg. of white phosphorus per kg. of body weight given in a single dose resulted in death of a black duck in 6 hours. Pathologic changes in both acute and chronic poisoning were studied. Data are presented showing that diagnosis can be made accurately by chemical analysis of stored tissues in cases of phosphorus poisoning.

  18. Oxalic acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms of oxalic acid poisoning include: Abdominal pain Burns and blisters where the acid contacted the skin Collapse Convulsions Mouth pain Shock Throat pain Tremors (unintentional trembling) Vomiting

  19. Hair dye poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hair tint poisoning ... Different types of hair dye contain different harmful ingredients. The harmful ingredients in permanent dyes are: Naphthylamine Other aromatic amino compounds Phenylenediamines Toluene ...

  20. Grass and weed killer poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Weedoff poisoning; Roundup poisoning ... Glyphosate is the poisonous ingredient in some weed killers. ... Glyphosate is in weed killers with these brand names: Roundup Bronco Glifonox Kleen-up Rodeo Weedoff Other ...

  1. Poison Ivy, Oak, and Sumac

    MedlinePlus

    ... U.S.) is a delayed allergic reaction. Brushing the plant on the skin results in blisters and slightly ... of poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac plants. People typically have itchy bumps (papules) and blisters ( ...

  2. Formation of iodinated organic compounds by oxidation of iodide-containing waters with manganese dioxide.

    PubMed

    Gallard, Hervé; Allard, Sébastien; Nicolau, Rudy; von Gunten, Urs; Croué, Jean Philippe

    2009-09-15

    This study shows that iodinated organic compounds can be produced when iodide-containing waters are in contact with manganese oxide birnessite (delta-MnO2) in the pH range of 5-7. In the absence of natural organic matter (NOM), iodide is oxidized to iodate that is also adsorbed onto delta-MnO2. In the presence of iodide and NOM, adsordable organic iodine compounds (AOI) are formed at pH < 7 because of the oxidation of iodide to iodine by delta-MnO2 and the reactions of iodine with NOM. In addition, iodoacetic acid and iodoform have been identified as specific iodinated byproducts. Formation of iodoform is not observed for high NOM/delta-MnO2 ratios due to inhibition of the catalytic effect of delta-MnO2 by NOM poisoning. Experiments with model compounds such as resorcinol and 3,5-heptanedione confirmed that the delta-MnO2/l(-) system is very effective for the formation of iodinated organic compounds. These results suggest that birnessite acts as a catalyst through the oxidation of iodide to iodine and the polarization of the iodine molecule, which then reacts with NOM moieties. Furthermore, our results indicate that during water treatment in the presence of manganese oxide, iodinated organic compounds may be formed, which may lead to taste and odor or toxicological problems. PMID:19806734

  3. Electrodeposition of Epitaxial Lead Iodide and Conversion to Textured Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite.

    PubMed

    Hill, James C; Koza, Jakub A; Switzer, Jay A

    2015-12-01

    Applications for lead iodide, such as lasing, luminescence, radiation detection, and as a precursor for methylammonium lead iodide perovskite photovoltaic cells, require highly ordered crystalline thin films. Here, an electrochemical synthesis route is introduced that yields textured and epitaxial films of lead iodide at room temperature by reducing molecular iodine to iodide ions in the presence of lead ions. Lead iodide grows with a [0001] fiber texture on polycrystalline substrates such as fluorine-doped tin oxide. On single-crystal Au(100), Au(111), and Au(110) the out-of-plane orientation of lead iodide is also [0001], but the in-plane orientation is controlled by the single-crystal substrate. The epitaxial lead iodide on single-crystal gold is converted to textured methylammonium lead iodide perovskite with a preferred [110] orientation via methylammonium iodide vapor-assisted chemical transformation of the solid. PMID:26565593

  4. Hydrofluoric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... with has an exposure, call your local emergency number (such as 911), or your local poison center can be reached directly by calling the national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere in the United States.

  5. Poisoning - fish and shellfish

    MedlinePlus

    ... contaminated waters. Scombroid poisoning usually occurs from large, dark meat fish such as tuna, mackerel, mahi mahi, and albacore. Because this poison develops after a fish is caught and dies, it does not matter where the fish is caught. The main factor ...

  6. Suspected Pesticide Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Sellar, Christine; Ferguson, Joyce A.

    1991-01-01

    Of 1125 calls to a regional poison control center about suspected pesticide poisonings, more than half concerned children younger than 6 years, most of whom had ingested small amounts and required no treatment other than drinking fluids. Adults represented a small proportion of victims, but were more likely to have consumed moderate or large quantities, to have symptoms, and to need referral. PMID:21228985

  7. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin-Fu, Jane S.

    This publication is a guide to help social and health workers plan a preventive campaign against lead poisoning, a cause of mental retardation other neurological handicaps, and death among children. The main victims are 1- to 6-year-olds living in areas where deteriorating housing prevails. Among the causes of lead poisoning are: ingestion of…

  8. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. PMID:26057987

  9. Mitigating iodomethane emissions and iodide residues in fumigated soils.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Richeng; Ashworth, Daniel J; Wu, Laosheng; Yates, Scott R

    2013-11-19

    Although long-regarded as an excellent soil fumigant for killing plant pests, methyl bromide (MeBr) was phased out in 2005 in the USA, because it can deplete the stratospheric ozone layer. Iodomethane (MeI) has been identified as an effective alternative to MeBr and is used in a number of countries for preplant pest control. However, MeI is highly volatile and potentially carcinogenic to humans if inhaled. In addition, iodide anions, a breakdown product of MeI, can build up in fumigated soils and potentially cause plant toxicity and contaminate groundwater via leaching. In order to overcome the above two obstacles in MeI application, a method is proposed to place reactive bags containing ammonium hydroxide solution (NH4OH) on the soil surface underneath an impermeable plastic film covering the fumigated area. Our research showed that using this approach, over 99% of the applied MeI was quantitatively transferred to iodide. Of all the resulting iodide, only 2.7% remained in the fumigated soil, and 97.3% was contained in the reactive bag that can be easily removed after fumigation. PMID:24151978

  10. Look Out! It's Poison Ivy!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darlington, Elizabeth, Day

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on poison ivy and offers suggestions for instructional activities. Includes illustrations of the varieties of poison ivy leaf forms and poison ivy look-alikes. Highlights interesting facts and cases associated with poison ivy and its relatives. (ML)

  11. Toluene and xylene poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... used in: Fingernail polish Glues and adhesives Lacquers Octane booster in gasoline Paints Paint thinners Printing and ... anywhere in the United States.This national hotline number will let you talk to experts in poisoning. ...

  12. Metal cleaner poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Metal cleaners are very strong chemical products that contain acids. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing or ... Metal cleaners contain organic compounds called hydrocarbons, including: 1,2-butylene oxide Boric acid Cocoyl sarcosine Dicarboxylic ...

  13. Pine oil poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... K. General approach to the poisoned patient. In: Marx J, ed. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical ... Mosby; 2013:chap 147. Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx J, ed. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical ...

  14. Bug spray poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... effective bug sprays contain pyrethrins. Pyrethrins are a pesticide made from the chrysanthemum flower. It is generally ... Borron SW. Pyrethrins, repellants, and other pesticides. In: Shannon ... of Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  15. Ethylene glycol poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... kidneys. The poisoning causes disturbances in the body's chemistry, including metabolic acidosis . The disturbances may be severe ... other tests such as: Arterial blood gas analysis Chemistry panel and liver function studies Chest x-ray ( ...

  16. Acid soldering flux poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 158. Mirkin DB. Benzene and ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 94. Wax PM, Yarema M. ...

  17. Window cleaner poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 32. Mycyk MB. Toxic alcohols. ... JG, ed. Emergency Medicine . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 151. White SR. Toxic alcohols. ...

  18. Ammonium hydroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 97. Harchelroad FP Jr, Rottinghaus ... Textbook of Critical Care . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 187. Wax PM, Yarema M. ...

  19. Wart remover poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 48. Nelson LS, Ford MD. ... eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 110. Seger DL, Murray L. ...

  20. Plastic resin hardener poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 41. Holland MG. Occupational toxicology. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. Haddad and Winchester's Clinical Management of Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. ...

  1. Tips to Prevent Poisonings

    MedlinePlus

    ... local take back programs in your community . Household Chemicals and Carbon Monoxide Always read the label before using a product that may be poisonous. Keep chemical products in their original bottles or containers. Do ...

  2. Turpentine oil poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Turpentine oil comes from a substance in pine trees. Turpentine oil poisoning occurs when someone swallows turpentine oil or breathes in the fumes. Breathing these fumes on purpose is sometimes called "huffing" ...

  3. Face powder poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Face powder poisoning occurs when someone swallows or breathes in this substance. This article is for information ... The ingredients in face powder that can be harmful are: Baking soda Talcum powder Many other types of powder

  4. Mineral spirits poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Mineral spirits are liquid chemicals used to thin paint and as a degreaser. Mineral spirits poisoning occurs ... be found in: Mineral spirits ( Stoddard solvent ) Some paints Some floor and furniture waxes and polishes Some ...

  5. Rhubarb leaves poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Field R, Panter KE, et al. Selected poisonous plants affecting animal and human health. In: Haschek WAM, Rousseaux CG, Wallig MA, eds. Haschek and Rousseaux's Handbook of Toxicologic Pathology . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2013:chap 40.

  6. Cold wave lotion poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002693.htm Cold wave lotion poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cold wave lotion is a hair care product used ...

  7. Black nightshade poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... when someone eats pieces of the black nightshade plant. This article is for information only. DO NOT ... Poisons are found in the black nightshade plant, especially in the unripened fruit and leaves.

  8. Automatic dishwasher soap poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... OJ, et al., eds. Tintinalli's Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide . 7th ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Medical; 2011:chap 211. Kulig K. General approach to the poisoned patient. In: Marx J, ed. ...

  9. Trisodium phosphate poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... removal of burned skin) Washing of the skin (irrigation). Perhaps every few hours for several days. Ointments ... For eye exposure, the person may receive: Extensive irrigation to flush out the poison Medicines

  10. Occupational cyanide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Amizet, Loic; Pruvot, Gauthier; Remy, Sophie; Kfoury, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Cyanide poisoning has existed for centuries. In most cases, cyanide is combined with other toxic substances; for example with carbon monoxide in fire smoke. Cases of pure cyanide poisoning are rare, and usually due to accidental exposure. Their treatment is based on oxygenation and the infusion of hydroxocobalamin. The seriousness of this type of poisoning calls for a rapid and specific response, which demonstrates the usefulness of non-hospital based medical treatment. The authors report here the case of a man who was the victim of occupational poisoning with sodium cyanide and who was treated at the workplace by fire-fighters and the Service Mobile d’Urgence et Reanimation emergency ambulance service. PMID:22674698

  11. The Poisons Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Barbara A.

    1998-01-01

    Details a project in which students explore and study the poisons in their environment by asking and finding answers to their own research questions. Includes some suggestions for involving students successfully in inquiry-based learning. (DDR)

  12. Sodium hypochlorite poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... poisoning, especially if the product is mixed with ammonia. This article is for information only. Do NOT ... hypochlorite, which may cause severe injury. NEVER mix ammonia with sodium hypochlorite (bleach or bleach-containing products). ...

  13. Trisodium phosphate poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... For swallowed poison, the person may receive: Endoscopy. Camera is placed down the throat to see burns ... the nose or mouth into the lungs Bronchoscopy. Camera is placed down the throat to see burns ...

  14. Poison Control Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... except Maricopa County Mail donation to: College of Pharmacy, Development Office PO Box 210202, Tucson, AZ 85721 ... ly/1HDxdHb Tucson, AZ 85721 Online http://www.pharmacy.arizona.edu/outreach/poison/ Email: boesen at pharmacy ...

  15. Sodium bisulfate poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... in large amounts. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing sodium bisulfate. This article is for information only. ... Symptoms from swallowing more than a tablespoon of this acid may include: Burning pain in the mouth Chest pain from burns ...

  16. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... any major gas-burning appliances (such as a furnace or water heater). Many carbon monoxide poisonings occur in the winter months when furnaces, gas fireplaces, and portable heaters are being used ...

  17. Hand lotion poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hand lotion poisoning occurs when someone swallows hand lotion or hand cream. This article is for information only. DO ... These ingredients in hand lotion or cream can be harmful if swallowed: Dimethicone Mineral oil Paraffins (waxes) Petrolatum Various alcohols

  18. Mineral spirits poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... substances may be found in: Mineral spirits ( Stoddard solvent ) Some paints Some floor and furniture waxes and ... for recovery. Swallowing such poisons can have severe effects on many parts of the body. The ultimate ...

  19. Potassium carbonate poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Potassium carbonate is a white powder used to make soap, glass, and other items. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing or breathing in potassium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do ...

  20. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium carbonate (known as washing soda or soda ash) is a chemical found in many household and ... products. This article focuses on poisoning due to sodium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do ...

  1. Window cleaner poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Jacobsen D, Hovda KE. Methanol, ethylene glycol, and other toxic alcohols. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. Haddad and Winchester's Clinical Management of Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  2. Caulking compound poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Caulking compounds are substances used to seal cracks and holes around windows and other openings. Caulking compound poisoning occurs when someone swallows these substances. This is for information only and not for use in the ...

  3. Drain cleaner poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002779.htm Drain cleaner poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Drain cleaners contain very dangerous chemicals that can be ...

  4. Poison Ivy Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... familiar skin rash. No one is born with sensitivity to Poison ivy, but if exposed enough most ... sensitized at some time and remain allergic. A sensitivity can change at any time. There's no way ...

  5. Boric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... boric acid poisoning usually occurs when someone swallows powdered roach-killing products that contain the chemical. Chronic ... vein (IV) Medicines to treat symptoms Note: Activated charcoal does not effectively treat (absorb) boric acid. For ...

  6. Hair spray poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hair spray poisoning occurs when someone breathes in (inhales) hair spray or sprays it down their throat or ... The harmful ingredients in hair spray are: Carboxymethylcellulose ... Polyvinyl alcohol Propylene glycol Polyvinylpyrrolidone

  7. Potassium carbonate poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... dishwasher soaps Some forms of potash (material from wood ashes that is used in fertilizers) Some home ... chance for recovery. Swallowing poisons can have severe effects on many parts of the body. Damage to ...

  8. Jerusalem cherry poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... poisoning occurs when someone eats pieces of this plant. This article is for information only. DO NOT use it ... information: Person's age, weight, and condition Name and part of the plant that was swallowed, if known Time it was ...

  9. Swimming pool cleaner poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Swimming pool cleaner poisoning occurs when someone swallows this type of cleaner, touches it, or breathes in ... The harmful substances in swimming pool cleaner are: Bromine ... copper Chlorine Soda ash Sodium bicarbonate Various mild acids

  10. Pyopneumothorax Following Kerosene Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Shyam Chand; Sawlani, Kamal Kumar; Yathish, B. E.; Singh, Ambukeshwar; Kumar, Suresh; Parihar, Anit

    2014-01-01

    Kerosene poisoning is a common poisoning in India especially in childhood, and clinical spectrum can range from meager chemical pneumonitis to grave complications such as hypoxia, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and emphysema. Pyopneumothorax that may require aggressive management in the form of thoracotomy has not been reported in literature. We hereby report a 22-year young female who had developed series of respiratory complications including pyopneumothorax following ingestion of kerosene with suicidal intent and was treated successfully. PMID:24748745