Science.gov

Sample records for methyl proton resonances

  1. Characterization by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and proton-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy of pertrimethylsilyl methyl glycosides obtained in the methanolysis of glycoproteins and glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Kamerling, J P; Gerwig, G J; Vliegenthart, J F; Clamp, J R

    1975-12-01

    The quantitative analysis by gas chromatography of monosaccharides present in glycoproteins and glycopeptides using methanolysis, followed by re-N-acetylation and trimethylsilylation, gives rise to several peaks for each monosaccharide. The identity of these peaks for xylose, fucose, mannose, galactose, glucose, N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine and N-acetylneuraminic acid was established for alpha- and beta-methyl pyranosides and furanosides by combined g.l.c.-mass spectrometry and proton-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy. These data provide for the unambiguous interpretation of the gas chromatograms obtained in the application of this g.l.c. method, and supply basic information for the further application of mass spectrometry in this field. PMID:1218089

  2. Proton resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shriner, J.F. Jr.

    1991-11-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Complete Level Scheme for {sup 30}P; A Search for Resonances Suitable for Tests of Detailed-Balance Violation; The Fourier Transform as a Tool for Detecting Chaos; Entrance Channel Correlations in p + {sup 27}Al; The Parity Dependence of Level Densities in {sup 49}V; and A Computer Program for the Calculation of Angular Momentum Coupling.

  3. On the Importance of Exchangeable NH Protons in Creatine for the Magnetic Coupling of Creatine Methyl Protons in Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruiskamp, M. J.; Nicolay, K.

    2001-03-01

    The methyl protons of creatine in skeletal muscle exhibit a strong off-resonance magnetization transfer effect. The mechanism of this process is unknown. We previously hypothesized that the exchangeable amide/amino protons of creatine might be involved. To test this the characteristics of the creatine magnetization transfer effect were investigated in excised rat hindleg skeletal muscle that was equilibrated in either H2O or D2O solutions containing creatine. The efficiency of off-resonance magnetization transfer to the protons of mobile creatine in excised muscle was similar to that previously reported in intact muscle in vivo. Equilibrating the isolated muscle in D2O solution had no effect on the magnetic coupling to the immobile protons. It is concluded that exchangeable protons play a negligible role in the magnetic coupling of creatine methyl protons in muscle.

  4. Proton Resonance Spectroscopy -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Shriner, Jr, J F

    2009-07-27

    This report summarizes work supported by the DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER40990 during its duration from June 1996 to May 2009. Topics studied include (1) statistical descriptions of nuclear levels and measurements of proton resonances relevant to such descriptions, including measurements toward a complete level scheme for 30P, (2) the development of methods to estimate the missing fraction of levels in a given measurement, and (3) measurements at HRIBF relevant to nuclear astrophysics.

  5. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  6. Imaging Intelligence with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Rex E.; Gasparovic, Charles; Chavez, Robert S.; Caprihan, Arvind; Barrow, Ranee; Yeo, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([to the first power]H-MRS) is a technique for the assay of brain neurochemistry "in vivo." N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the most prominent metabolite visible within the [to the first power]H-MRS spectrum, is found primarily within neurons. The current study was designed to further elucidate NAA-cognition…

  7. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wolinsky, J.S.; Narayana, P.A.; Fenstermacher, M.J. )

    1990-11-01

    Regional in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides quantitative data on selected chemical constituents of brain. We imaged 16 volunteers with clinically definite multiple sclerosis on a 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance scanner to define plaque-containing volumes of interest, and obtained localized water-suppressed proton spectra using a stimulated echo sequence. Twenty-five of 40 plaque-containing regions provided spectra of adequate quality. Of these, 8 spectra from 6 subjects were consistent with the presence of cholesterol or fatty acids; the remainder were similar to those obtained from white matter of normal volunteers. This early experience with regional proton spectroscopy suggests that individual plaques are distinct. These differences likely reflect dynamic stages of the evolution of the demyelinative process not previously accessible to in vivo investigation.

  8. Proton resonance scattering of 7Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Saito, A.; He, J. J.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Amadio, G.; Fujikawa, H.; Kubono, S.; Khiem, L. H.; Kwon, Y. K.; Niikura, M.; Teranishi, T.; Nishimura, S.; Togano, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.

    2006-07-01

    We have studied the proton resonance scattering of 7Be by using a pure 7Be beam produced at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator; CNS stands for Center of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo). The excitation function of 8B was measured up to the excitation energy of 6.8 MeV, with the thick-target method. The excited states of 8B higher than 3.5 MeV were not known by the past experiments. This proton elastic scattering is also of importance in relation with the 7Be(p,γ)8B reaction, which is a key reaction in the standard solar model.

  9. Proton affinity of methyl nitrate - Less than proton affinity of nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Rice, Julia E.

    1992-01-01

    Several state-of-the-art ab initio quantum mechanical methods were used to investigate the equilibrium structure, dipole moments, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and IR intensities of methyl nitrate, methanol, and several structures of protonated methyl nitrate, using the same theoretical methods as in an earlier study (Lee and Rice, 1992) of nitric acid. The ab initio results for methyl nitrate and methanol were found to be in good agreement with available experimental data. The proton affinity (PA) of methyl nitrate was calculated to be 176.9 +/-5 kcal/mol, in excellent agreement with the experimental value 176 kcal/mol obtained by Attina et al. (1987) and less than the PA value of nitric acid. An explanation of the discrepancy of the present results with those of an earlier study on protonated nitric acid is proposed.

  10. Proton resonance assignments of horse ferricytochrome c

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Y.; Roder, H.; Englander, S.W.; Wand, A.J.; Di Stefano, D.L. )

    1989-01-10

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2D NMR) was used to obtain extensive resonance assignments in the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of horse ferricytochrome c. Assignments were made for the main-chain and C{sub {beta}} protons of 102 residues (all except Pro-44 and Gly-84) and the majority of side-chain protons. As starting points for the assignment of the oxidized protein, a limited set of protons was initially assigned by use of 2D NMR magnetization transfer methods to correlate resonances in the oxidized form with assigned resonances in the reduced form. Given the complexity of the spectrum due to the size of this protein (104 residues) and its paramagnetic center, the initial search for side-chain spin systems in J-correlated spectra was successful only for the simplest side chains, but the majority of NH-C{sub {alpha}}H-C{sub {beta}}H subspin systems (NAB sets) could be identified at this stage. The subsequent search for sequential NOE connectivities focused on NAB sets, with use of previously assigned residues to place NOE-connected segments within the amino acid sequence. Selective proton labeling of either the slowly or the rapidly exchanging amide sites was used to simplify the spectra, and systematic work at two temperatures was used to resolve ambiguities in the 2D NMR spectra. These approaches, together with the use of magnetization transfer methods to correlate reduced and oxidized cytochrome c spectra, provide multiple cross-checks to verify assignments.

  11. Proton Resonance Spectroscopy in CALCIUM-40.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warthen, Barry Joseph

    1987-09-01

    The differential cross sections for the ^{39}K(p,p_{ rm o})^{39}K and ^{39}K(p,alpha_ {rm o})^{36}Ar reactions have been measured for E_{ rm p} = 1.90 to 4.02 MeV at laboratory angles theta = 90^ circ, 108^circ, 150^circ and 165^ circ. Data were taken with the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) KN Van de Graaff accelerator and the associated high resolution system. The targets consisted of 1-2 mug/cm^2 of potassium carbonate (K_2CO _3), enriched to 99.97% ^{39}K, evaporated onto gold coated carbon backings. Excitation functions were measured in proton energy steps varying from 100 to 400 eV. The energy region studied corresponds to an excitation energy range in the ^{40}Ca nucleus of E_{rm x} = 10.2 to 12.3 MeV. A multi-level multi-channel R-matrix based computer code was used to fit the experimental excitation functions. Resonance parameters obtained include resonance energy, spin, parity, partial widths, and channel spin and orbital angular momentum mixing ratios. Of the 248 resonances observed in the proton channel, 148 were also observed in the alpha channel. A fit to the observed level density yielded a nuclear temperature of 1.5 MeV. The data were compared with predictions of statistical theories of energy levels for both level spacing and reduced width distributions. The alpha reduced widths agree with the Porter-Thomas distribution and suggest that only 5-10% of the states with alpha widths were not observed. The summed strength in each of the alpha channels represents a significant fraction of the Wigner limit for these channels. The proton channels, on the other hand, generally have much smaller fractions. The two proton s-wave strength functions are equal and thus show no evidence for spin-exchange forces in the nucleon-nucleus interaction.

  12. Spin-lattice relaxation of the methyl group protons in solids revisited: Damped quantum rotation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymański, S.

    2012-07-01

    Proton spin-lattice relaxation of the methyl group in solids had been one of the most thoroughly addressed theoretical problems in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, considered at different levels of sophistication. For systems with substantial quantum tunneling effects, several quantum mechanical treatments were reported, although in practical applications the quantum models were always augmented with or replaced by the classical jump model. However, the latter has recently proved invalid in the description of NMR line shape effects in variable-temperature spectra of hindered methyl groups, while the competing theory of damped quantum rotation (DQR) was shown to be adequate. In this work, the spin-lattice relaxation issue for the methyl protons is readdressed using the latter theory. The main outcome is that, while the existing formulas for the relaxation rates remain unchanged, the crucial parameter entering them, the correlation time of the relevant random process, need to be reinterpreted. It proves to be the inverse of one of the two quantum-rate constants entering the DQR model, neither of which, when taken separately, can be related to the jump process. It can be identified with one describing the life-time broadening of the tunnel peaks in inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra of the methyl groups. Such a relationship between the relaxation and INS effects was reported from another laboratory long ago, but only for the low-temperature limit where thermal population of the excited torsional levels of the methyl group can be neglected. The whole spectrum of cases encountered in practical relaxation studies on protonated methyl groups is addressed for the first time. Preliminary experimental confirmation of this novel approach is reported, based on already published NMR data for a single crystal of methylmalonic acid. The once extensively debated issues of quenching of the coherent tunneling and of the classical limit in the dynamics of the

  13. Residual methyl protonation in perdeuterated proteins for multi-dimensional correlation experiments in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Vipin; Reif, Bernd

    2008-09-01

    NMR studies involving perdeuterated proteins focus in general on exchangeable amide protons. However, non-exchangeable sites contain as well a small amount of protons as the employed precursors for protein biosynthesis are not completely proton depleted. The degree of methyl group protonation is in the order of 9% for CD 2H using >97% deuterium enriched glucose. We show in this manuscript that this small amount of residual protonation is sufficient to perform 2D and 3D MAS solid-state NMR experiments. In particular, we suggest a HCCH-TOBSY type experiment which we successfully employ to assign the methyl resonances in aliphatic side chains in a perdeuterated sample of the SH3 domain of chicken α-spectrin.

  14. Proton resonance assignments of horse ferrocytochrome c

    SciTech Connect

    Wand, A.J.; Di Stefano, D.L.; Feng, Y.; Roder, H.; Englander, S.W. )

    1989-01-10

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to assign the proton resonances of horse ferrocytochrome c. Assignments were based on the main chain directed (MCD) and sequential assignment procedures. The fundamental units of the MCD approach, the main-chain NH-C{sub {alpha}}H-C{sub {beta}}H J-coupled subspin systems of each amino acid residue (NAB sets), were defined by analysis of direct and relayed coherence transfer spectra. Recognition of main-chain NOE connectivity patterns specified in the MCD algorithm them allowed NAB sets to be aligned in their proper juxtaposition within secondary structural units. The units of secondary structure were placed within the polypeptide sequence of identification of a small number of side-chain J-coupled spin systems, found by direct recognition in 2D spectra of some J-coupled spin systems and by pairwise comparisons of the J-correlated spectra of six homologous cytochromes c having a small number of known amino acid differences. The placement of a given segment in this way defines the amino acid identity of all its NAB sets. This foreknowledge allowed the vast majority of the side-chain resonances to be discerned in J-correlated spectra. Extensive confirmation of the assignments derives internally from multiple main-chain NOE connectivities and their consistency following temperature-induced changes of the chemical shifts of NOE-correlated protons. The observed patterns of main-chain NOEs provide some structural information and suggest small but potentially significant differences between the solution structure observed by NMR and that defined earlier in crystallographic studies at 2.8-{angstrom} resolution.

  15. Metabolite specific proton magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, R.E.; Freeman, D.M.

    1989-06-01

    An imaging method is described that makes use of proton double quantum nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to construct images based on selected metabolites such as lactic acid. The optimization of the method is illustrated in vitro, followed by in vivo determination of lactic acid distribution in a solid tumor model. Water suppression and editing of lipid signals are such that two-dimensional spectra of lactic acid may be obtained from a radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) tumor in under 1 min and lactic acid images from the same tumor in under 1 hr at 2.0 T. This technique provides a fast and reproducible method at moderate magnetic field strength for mapping biologically relevant metabolites.

  16. Proton Spin Structure in the Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    F. R. Wesselmann; K. Slifer; S. Tajima; A. Aghalaryan; A. Ahmidouch; R. Asaturyan; F. Bloch; W. Boeglin; P. Bosted; C. Carasco; R. Carlini; J. Cha; J. P. Chen; M. E. Christy; L. Cole; L. Coman; D. Crabb; S. Danagoulian; D. Day; J. Dunne; M. Elaasar; R. Ent; H. Fenker; E. Frlez; L. Gan; D. Gaskell; J. Gomez; B. Hu; M. K. Jones; J. Jourdan; C. Keith; C. E. Keppel; M. Khandaker; A. Klein; L. Kramer; Y. Liang; J. Lichtenstadt; R. Lindgren; D. Mack; P. McKee; D. McNulty; D. Meekins; H. Mkrtchyan; R. Nasseripour; I. Niculescu; K. Normand; B. Norum; D. Pocanic; Y. Prok; B. Raue; J. Reinhold; J. Roche; D. Rohe; O. A. Rondon; N. Savvinov; B. Sawatzky; M. Seely; I. Sick; C. Smith; G. Smith; S. Stepanyan; L. Tang; G. Testa; W. Vulcan; K. Wang; G. Warren; S. Wood; C. Yan; L. Yuan; Junho Yun; Markus Zeier; Hong Guo Zhu

    2006-10-11

    The RSS collaboration has measured the spin structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} of the proton at Jefferson Lab using the lab's polarized electron beam, the Hall C HMS spectrometer and the UVa polarized solid target. The asymmetries A{sub parallel} and A{sub perp} were measured at the elastic peak and in the region of the nucleon resonances (1.085 GeV < W < 1.910 GeV) at an average four momentum transfer of Q{sup 2} = 1.3 GeV{sup 2}. The extracted spin structure functions and their kinematic dependence make a significant contribution in the study of higher-twist effects and polarized duality tests.

  17. UV action spectroscopy of protonated PAH derivatives. Methyl substituted quinolines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klærke, B.; Holm, A. I. S.; Andersen, L. H.

    2011-08-01

    Aims: We investigate the production of molecular photofragments upon UV excitation of PAH derivatives, relevant for the interstellar medium. Methods: The action absorption spectra of protonated gas-phase methyl-substituted quinolines (CH3 - C9H7NH+) have been recorded in the 215-338 nm spectral range using the electrostatic storage ring ELISA, an electrospray ion source and 3 ns UV laser pulses. Results: It is shown that the absorption profile is both redshifted and broadened when moving the methyl group from the heterocycle containing nitrogen to the homoatomic ring. The absorption profiles are explained by TD-DFT calculations. The dissociation time of the studied molecules is found to be of several milliseconds at 230 nm and it is shown that after redistribution of the absorbed energy the molecules dissociate in several channels. The dissociation time found is an order of magnitude faster than the estimated IR relaxation time. Photophysical properties of both nitrogen containing and methyl-substituted PAHs are interesting in an astrophysical context in connection with identifying the aromatic component of the interstellar medium.

  18. Methyl quantum tunneling and nitrogen-14 NQR NMR studies using a SQUID magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Black, B.E. |

    1993-07-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques have been very successful in obtaining molecular conformation and dynamics information. Unfortunately, standard NMR and NQR spectrometers are unable to adequately detect resonances below a few megahertz due to the frequency dependent sensitivity of their Faraday coil detectors. For this reason a new spectrometer with a dc SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) detector, which has no such frequency dependence, has been developed. Previously, this spectrometer was used to observe {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al NQR resonances. The scope of this study was increased to include {sup 23}Na, {sup 51}V, and {sup 55}Mn NQR transitions. Also, a technique was presented to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances through cross relaxation of the nitrogen polarization to adjacent proton spins. When the proton Zeeman splitting matches one nitrogen quadrupoler transition the remaining two {sup 14}N transitions can be detected by sweeping a saturating rf field through resonance. Additionally, simultaneous excitation of two nitrogen resonances provides signal enhancement which helps to connect transitions from the same site. In this way, nitrogen-14 resonances were observed in several amino acids and polypeptides. This spectrometer has also been useful in the direct detection of methyl quantum tunneling splittings at 4.2 K. Tunneling, frequencies of a homologous series of carboxylic acids were measured and for solids with equivalent crystal structures, an exponential correlation between the tunneling frequency and the enthalpy of fusion is observed. This correlation provides information about the contribution of intermolecular interactions to the energy barrier for methyl rotation.

  19. Measuring N-acetyl aspartate synthesis in vivo using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Su; Yang, Jehoon; Shen, Jun

    2008-01-01

    N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) is an important marker of neuronal function and viability that can be measured using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In this paper, we proposed a method to measure NAA synthesis using proton MRS with infusion of uniformly 13C-labeled glucose, and demonstrated its feasibility in an in vivo study of the rat brain. The rate of 13C-label incorporation into the acetyl group of NAA was measured using a localized, long echo-time proton MRS method. Signals from the 13C satellites of the main NAA methyl protons at 2.02 ppm were continuously monitored for 10 hours. Quantification of the data based on a linear kinetic model showed that NAA synthesis rate in isoflurane-anesthetized rats was 0.19 ± 0.02 µmol/g/h (mean ± standard deviation, n = 12). PMID:18486230

  20. Proton Beams Inhibit Proliferation of Breast Cancer Cells by Altering DNA Methylation Status

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byungtak; Bae, Hansol; Lee, Hyunkyung; Lee, Seungyeon; Park, Jeong Chan; Kim, Kye Ryung; Kim, Sun Jung

    2016-01-01

    Proton beam therapy has been gaining popularity in the management of a wide spectrum of cancers. However, little is known about the effect of proton beams on epigenetic alterations. In this study, the effects of proton beams on DNA methylation were evaluated in the breast cell lines MCF-10A and MCF-7. Pyrosequencing analysis of the long interspersed element 1 (LINE1) gene indicated that a few specific CpG sites were induced to be hypermethylated by proton beam treatment from 64.5 to 76.5% and from 57.7 to 60.0% (p < 0.05) in MCF-10A and MCF-7, respectively. Genome-wide methylation analysis identified “Developmental Disorder, Hereditary Disorder, Metabolic Disease” as the top network in the MCF-7 cell line. The proliferation rate significantly decreased in proton beam-treated cells, as judged by colony formation and cell proliferation assay. Upon treatment with the proton beam, expression of selected genes (MDH2, STYXL1, CPE, FAM91A1, and GPR37) was significantly changed in accordance with the changes of methylation level. Taken together, the findings demonstrate that proton beam-induced physiological changes of cancer cells via methylation modification assists in establishing the epigenetic basis of proton beam therapy for cancer. PMID:26918048

  1. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of seminolipid from bovine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, J G; Storey, B T; Hemling, M L; Grob, R L

    1990-06-01

    The high-resolution one- and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) characterization of seminolipid from bovine spermatozoa is presented. The 1H-NMR data was confirmed by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the partially methylated alditol acetates of the sugar unit, mild alkaline methanolysis of the glyceryl ester, mobility on normal phase and diphasic thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS). The structure of the molecule corresponds to 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-hexadecanoyl-3-O-beta-D-(3'-sulfo)-galactopyranosyl- sn-glycerol. PMID:2373957

  2. Monitoring lactic acid production during milk fermentation by in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bouteille, R; Gaudet, M; Lecanu, B; This, H

    2013-04-01

    When fermenting milk, lactic bacteria convert part of α- and β-lactoses into d- and l- lactic acids, causing a pH decrease responsible for casein coagulation. Lactic acid monitoring during fermentation is essential for the control of dairy gel textural and organoleptic properties, and is a way to evaluate strain efficiency. Currently, titrations are used to follow the quantity of acids formed during jellification of milk but they are not specific to lactic acid. An analytical method without the use of any reagent was investigated to quantify lactic acid during milk fermentation: in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Two methods using in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared: (1) d- and l-lactic acids content determination, using the resonance of their methyl protons, showing an increase from 2.06 ± 0.02 to 8.16 ± 0.74 g/L during 240 min of fermentation; and (2) the determination of the α- and β-lactoses content, decreasing from 42.68 ± 0.02 to 30.76 ± 1.75 g/L for the same fermentation duration. The ratio between the molar concentrations of produced lactic acids and consumed lactoses enabled cross-validation, as the value (2.02 ± 0.18) is consistent with lactic acid bacteria metabolism. PMID:23403188

  3. Proton resonant firehose instability: Temperature anisotropy and fluctuating field constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gary, S. Peter; Li, Hui; O'Rourke, Sean; Winske, Dan

    1998-07-01

    The electromagnetic proton firehose instability may grow in a plasma if the proton velocity distribution is approximately bi-Maxwellian and T∥p>T⊥p, where the directional subscripts denote directions relative to the background magnetic field. Linear Vlasov dispersion theory in a homogeneous electron-proton plasma implies an instability threshold condition at constant maximum growth rate 1-T⊥p/T∥p=Sp/β∥pαp over 1<β∥p<=10 where β∥p≡8πnpT∥p/B02 and B0 is the background magnetic field. Here Sp and αp are fitting parameters and αp~=0.7. One- and two-dimensional initial value hybrid simulations of this growing mode are carried out under proton cyclotron resonant conditions in a homogeneous plasma on the initial domain 2<~β∥p<=100. The two-dimensional simulations show that enhanced fluctuations from this instability impose a bound on the proton temperature anisotropy of the form of the above equation with the fluid theory result αp~=1.0. On this domain both one- and two-dimensional simulations yield a new form for the upper bound on the fluctuating field energy density from the proton resonant firehose instability |δB|2/B02=SB+αBln(β∥p) where SB and αB are empirical parameters which are functions of the initial growth rate. This logarithmic behavior is qualitatively different from a fluid theory prediction and, like the anisotropy bound, should be subject to observational verification in any sufficiently homogeneous plasma in which the proton velocity distribution is approximately bi-Maxwellian.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Proton Loss from Carotenoid Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, Lowell D; Focsan, A Ligia; Konovalova, Tatyana A; Lawrence, Jesse; Bowman, Michael K; Dixon, David A; Molnar, Peter; Deli, Jozsef

    2007-06-11

    Carotenoids, intrinsic components of reaction centers and pigment-protein complexes in photosynthetic membranes, play a photoprotective role and serve as a secondary electron donor. Before optimum use of carotenoids can be made in artificial photosynthetic systems, their robust nature in living materials requires extensive characterization of their electron transfer, radical trapping ability, stability, structure in and on various hosts, and photochemical behavior. Pulsed ENDOR and 2D-HYSCORE studies combined with DFT calculations reveal that photo-oxidation of natural zeaxanthin (I) and violaxanthin (II) on silica-alumina produces not only the carotenoid radical cations (Car•+) but also neutral radicals (#Car•) by proton loss from the methyl groups at positions 5 or 5', and possibly 9 or 9' and 13 or 13'. Notably, the proton loss favored in I at the 5 position by DFT calculations, is unfavorable in II due to the epoxide at the 5, 6 position. DFT calculations predict the isotropic methyl proton couplings of 8-10 MHz for Car•+ which agree with the ENDOR for carotenoid α-conjugated radical cations. Large α-proton hyperfine coupling constants (>10 MHz) determined from HYSCORE are assigned from the DFT calculations to neutral carotenoid radicals. Proton loss upon photolysis was also examined as a function of carotenoid polarity [Lycopene (III) versus 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al (IV)]; hydrogen bonding [Lutein (V) versus III]; host [silica-alumina versus MCM-41 molecular sieve]; and substituted metal in MCM-41. Loss of H+ from the 5(5'), 9(9') or 13(13') methyl positions has importance in photoprotection. Photoprotection involves nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in which 1Ch1* decays via energy transfer to the carotenoid which returns to the ground state by thermal dissipation; or via electron transfer to form a charge transfer state (I •+…Chl•-), lower in energy than 1Chl*. Formation of I •+ results in bond lengthening, a mechanism for nonradiative energy

  5. Protein conformation and proton nuclear-magnetic-resonance chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Pardi, A; Wagner, G; Wüthrich, K

    1983-12-15

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the polypeptide backbone protons in basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor from bovine organs and the inhibitors E and K from the venom of Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis have been analyzed. Using the corresponding shifts in model peptides, the chemical shifts observed in the proteins were decomposed into random-coil shifts and conformation-dependent shifts. Correlations between contributions to the latter term and the polypeptide conformation were investigated by using the crystal structure of the bovine inhibitor. In addition to the well-known ring-current effects, a correlation was found between chemical shifts of amide and C alpha protons and the length of the hydrogen bonds formed by these protons with nearby oxygen atoms as acceptor groups. There remain sizeable and as yet unexplained residual conformation shifts. Overall, the present treatment provides a satisfactory qualitative explanation for the outstandingly large shifts of backbone hydrogen atoms in these diamagnetic proteins. PMID:6198174

  6. Influence of the protonation state on the binding mode of methyl orange with cucurbiturils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Suhang; Sun, Xuzhuo; Zhang, Haibo

    2016-03-01

    Binding modes of methyl orange (MO) with cucurbiturils (CBs) have been investigated by Single Crystal X-ray Diffraction and NMR Spectroscopy. Detailed study of intermolecular interactions was supported by the Hirshfeld surface analysis. Protonation state of the anionic part of methyl orange has greatly influenced the binding mode of the complex. Stabilized by hydrogen bonding at the portal, hydrophobic and dispersion interactions in the cavity, the protonated methyl orange was deeply inserted into the cavity. On the contrary, the anionic methyl orange has been pushed towards the outside of the cavity by the electrostatic repulsion between the azo group and the portal oxygen. A "water bridge" was found in MO@CB8 linking both host and guest via hydrogen bonds.

  7. Resonant scattering of central plasma sheet protons by multiband EMIC waves and resultant proton loss timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xing; Ni, Binbin; Liang, Jun; Xiang, Zheng; Wang, Qi; Shi, Run; Gu, Xudong; Zhou, Chen; Zhao, Zhengyu; Fu, Song; Liu, Jiang

    2016-02-01

    This is a companion study to Liang et al. (2014) which reported a "reversed" energy-latitude dispersion pattern of ion precipitation in that the lower energy ion precipitation extends to lower latitudes than the higher-energy ion precipitation. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the central plasma sheet (CPS) have been suggested to account for this reversed-type ion precipitation. To further investigate the association, we perform a comprehensive study of pitch angle diffusion rates induced by EMIC wave and the resultant proton loss timescales at L = 8-12 around the midnight. Comparing the proton scattering rates in the Earth's dipole field and a more realistic quiet time geomagnetic field constructed from the Tsyganenko 2001 (T01) model, we find that use of a realistic, nondipolar magnetic field model not only decreases the minimum resonant energies of CPS protons but also considerably decreases the limit of strong diffusion and changes the proton pitch angle diffusion rates. Adoption of the T01 model increases EMIC wave diffusion rates at > ~ 60° equatorial pitch angles but decreases them at small equatorial pitch angles. Pitch angle scattering coefficients of 1-10 keV protons due to H+ band EMIC waves can exceed the strong diffusion rate for both geomagnetic field models. While He+ and O+ band EMIC waves can only scatter tens of keV protons efficiently to cause a fully filled loss cone at L > 10, in the T01 magnetic field they can also cause efficient scattering of ~ keV protons in the strong diffusion limit at L > 10. The resultant proton loss timescales by EMIC waves with a nominal amplitude of 0.2 nT vary from a few hours to several days, depending on the wave band and L shell. Overall, the results demonstrate that H+ band EMIC waves, once present, can act as a major contributor to the scattering loss of a few keV protons at lower L shells in the CPS, accounting for the reversed energy-latitude dispersion pattern of proton precipitation at low

  8. Infrared-infrared double resonance study of methyl alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, R. R. J.; Mukhopadhyay, I.; Lees, R. M.

    1992-09-01

    In this work we carried out an infrared-infrared (IR-IR) double resonance (DR) study of methyl alcohol using a CO 2 laser and a lead salt diode laser, in order to confirm previously proposed far-infrared (FIR) laser assignments for the 9P(34) and 9P(16) CO 2 laser lines. For the 9P(34) CO 2 laser line it is confirmed that the pump radiation excites the torsionally excited Q(125, 9) transition of methyl alcohol in agreement with the assignments proposed earlier. From the study it was noticed that due to the pump radiation, transitions which are not connected by dipole selection rules either to the lower or upper pumped level were also affected. Thus it appears that four-level IR-IR DR experiments are unlikely to provide useful information for transition assignments. The diode laser study was coupled with a recent spectroscopic study using a high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer to detect and identify hot band and perturbation allowed transitions in CH 3OH.

  9. Cell and membrane lipid analysis by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in five breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Le Moyec, L; Tatoud, R; Eugène, M; Gauvillé, C; Primot, I; Charlemagne, D; Calvo, F

    1992-10-01

    The lipid composition of five human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, ZR-75-1, SKBR3 and MDA-MB231) was assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in whole cells and membrane-enriched fractions. The proportions of the three main lipid resonances in 1D spectra were different for each cell line. These resonances included mobile methyl and methylene functions from fatty acids of triglycerides and phospholipids and N-trimethyl from choline of phospholipids. T47D and ZR-75-1 cells presented a high methylene/methyl ratio (6.02 +/- 0.35 and 6.28 +/- 0.90). This ratio was significantly lower for SKBR3, MCF-7 and MDA-MB231 cells (2.76 +/- 0.22, 2.27 +/- 0.57 and 1.39 +/- 0.39). The N-trimethyl/methyl ratio was high for MDA-MB231 and SKBR3 cells (1.38 +/- 0.54 and 0.86 +/- 0.32), but lower for MCF-7, T47D and ZR-75-1 cells (0.49 +/- 0.11, 0.16 +/- 0.07 and 0.07 +/- 0.03). 2D COSY spectra confirmed these different proportions in mobile lipids. From 1D spectra obtained on membrane preparations, T47D and ZR-75-1 were the only cell lines to retain a signal from mobile methylene functions. These differences might be related to the heterogeneity found for several parameters of these cells (tumorigenicity, growth rate, hormone receptors); an extended number of cases from fresh samples might enable clinical correlations. PMID:1329906

  10. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in oncology: the fingerprints of cancer?

    PubMed Central

    García-Figueiras, Roberto; Baleato-González, Sandra; Padhani, Anwar R; Oleaga, Laura; Vilanova, Joan C; Luna, Antonio; Gómez, Juan Carlos Cobas

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal metabolism is a key tumor hallmark. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) allows measurement of metabolite concentration that can be utilized to characterize tumor metabolic changes. 1H-MRS measurements of specific metabolites have been implemented in the clinic. This article performs a systematic review of image acquisition and interpretation of 1H-MRS for cancer evaluation, evaluates its strengths and limitations, and correlates metabolite peaks at 1H-MRS with diagnostic and prognostic parameters of cancer in different tumor types. PMID:26712681

  11. Magnetic Resonance Detection of Individual Proton Spins Using Quantum Reporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushkov, A. O.; Lovchinsky, I.; Chisholm, N.; Walsworth, R. L.; Park, H.; Lukin, M. D.

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate a method of magnetic resonance imaging with single nuclear-spin sensitivity under ambient conditions. Our method employs isolated electronic-spin quantum bits (qubits) as magnetic resonance "reporters" on the surface of high purity diamond. These spin qubits are localized with nanometer-scale uncertainty, and their quantum state is coherently manipulated and measured optically via a proximal nitrogen-vacancy color center located a few nanometers below the diamond surface. This system is then used for sensing, coherent coupling, and imaging of individual proton spins on the diamond surface with angstrom resolution. Our approach may enable direct structural imaging of complex molecules that cannot be accessed from bulk studies. It realizes a new platform for probing novel materials, monitoring chemical reactions, and manipulation of complex systems on surfaces at a quantum level.

  12. Solid-state proton transfer studies on phototautomerization of 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-furoyl-5-pyrazolone 4-methyl thiosemicarbazone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Liu, Guangfei; Liu, Lang; Jia, Dianzeng; Zhang, Li

    2006-08-01

    A novel keto-enol phototautomeric compound of 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-(-furoyl)-5-pyrazolone 4-methyl thiosemicarbazone was found to undergo phototautomerization in the crystalline state. The reaction rate constant was studied based on the first-order kinetics curve. Crystal structural analysis and theoretical calculations show that the pyrazolone ring stabilizes in the keto form. The conclusion can be made that its phototautomerization in the crystalline state is associated with a photo-induced intermolecular double-proton-transfer reaction along intermolecular hydrogen bonds N sbnd H⋯O and S⋯H sbnd N leading to a colored tautomer as the compound crystallizes in a hydrogen bonded supramolecular configuration.

  13. Proton pygmy resonances: Predictions for N = 20 isotones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Papakonstantinou, P.

    2016-06-01

    We study theoretically the low-energy electric-dipole response of N = 20 isotones. We present results from a quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) and a continuum random-phase approximation (CRPA), and we compare them with results for the mirror Z = 20 nuclei. According to our analysis, enhanced E1 strength is expected energetically well below the giant dipole resonance in the proton-rich isotones. Large amounts of E1 strength in the asymmetric N = 20 isotones are predicted, markedly unlike their equally asymmetric Z = 20 mirror nuclei, pointing unambiguously to the role of structural effects such as loose binding. A proton-skin oscillation could develop especially in 46Fe . The isoscalar response is predicted strong in all isotones. The proper description of non-localized threshold transitions and the nucleon effective mass in mean-field treatments may affect theoretical predictions. We call for systematic theoretical investigations to quantify the role of bulk-matter properties in anticipation of measurements of E1 transitions in proton-rich nuclei.

  14. Exclusive production of meson pairs and resonances in proton-proton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lebiedowicz, Piotr; Szczurek, Antoni

    2013-04-15

    We report a study of the central exclusive production of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and K{sup +}K{sup -} pairs in high energy hadron-hadron collisions. The amplitude is calculated in the Regge approach including both pomeron and secondary reggeon exchanges and absorption effects due to proton-proton interaction and {pi}{pi} (KK) rescattering. We discuss a measurement of exclusive production of a scalar {chi}{sub c0} meson via {chi}{sub c0}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, K{sup +}K{sup -} decay. We find that the relative contribution of resonance states and the {pi}{pi} (KK) continuum strongly depend on the cut on pion (kaon) transverse momentum. We compare the results with the existing experimental data and present predictions for the RHIC, Tevatron and LHC colliders. We discuss also the f{sub 2} (1270) meson production mediated by an effective tensor pomeron exchanges.

  15. Argand diagram representation of orbiting resonance in proton-transfer collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutrus, C. K.; Suck Salk, S. H.

    1991-05-01

    Dynamic resonance in atom-diatomic molecule collisions has been relatively well studied compared to orbiting resonance. We discuss orbiting resonance on reactive scattering involving proton (charge) transfer. Resonance structure is predicted to exist at forward-scattering angles in both the state-to-state angular distribution and the Argand diagram for the proton-transfer collision system of He+H+2-->HeH++H. The present study demonstrates the possibility of orbiting resonance particularly in proton (charge) -transfer reaction involving atom-diatomic molecule systems.

  16. Resonances above the proton threshold in 26Si

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chipps, Kelly A.

    2016-03-06

    26Al remains an intriguing target for observational gamma-ray astronomy, thanks to its characteristic decay. The 25Al(p, )26Si reaction is part of a chain that bypasses the production of the observable 26Alg in favor of the isomeric state; its rate at novae temperatures is dominated by a resonance around 400 keV, the precise location and J assignment of which has been hotly debated. Considerable confusion in this regard has arisen from the use of outdated excitation energies and masses. Here, a reanalysis of previous work is completed to first, elucidate the confusion regarding the level structure just above the proton threshold,more » and second, provide focus to future studies.« less

  17. Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxation Measurements in Frog Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Edward D.; Homer, Louis D.

    1974-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation measurements are reported for frog muscle as a function of temperature and Larmor frequency. Each T1ρ, T2, and T1 measurement covered a time domain sufficient to identify the average relaxation time for most intracellular water. Using regression analysis the data were fit with a model where intracellular water molecules are exchanging between a large compartment in which mobility is similar to ordinary water and a small compartment in which motion is restricted. The regression results suggest that: the restricted compartment exhibits a distribution of motions skewed toward that of free water; the residence time of water molecules in the restricted compartment is approximately 1 ms; and, the activation entropy for some water molecules in the restricted compartment is negative. PMID:4547668

  18. Quantitative Proton Magnetic Resonance Techniques for Measuring Fat

    PubMed Central

    Harry, Houchun; Kan, Hermien E.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate, precise, and reliable techniques for quantifying body and organ fat distributions are important tools in physiology research. They are critically needed in studies of obesity and diseases involving excess fat accumulation. Proton magnetic resonance methods address this need by providing an array of relaxometry-based (T1, T2) and chemical-shift-based approaches. These techniques can generate informative visualizations of regional and whole-body fat distributions, yield measurements of fat volumes within specific body depots, and quantify fat accumulation in abdominal organs and muscles. MR methods are commonly used to investigate the role of fat in nutrition and metabolism, to measure the efficacy of short and long-term dietary and exercise interventions, to study the implications of fat in organ steatosis and muscular dystrophies, and to elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms in the context of obesity and its comorbidities. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of mainstream MR strategies for fat quantification. The article will succinctly describe the principles that differentiate water and fat proton signals, summarize advantages and limitations of various techniques, and offer a few illustrative examples. The article will also highlight recent efforts in MR of brown adipose tissue and conclude by briefly discussing some future research directions. PMID:24123229

  19. Brain proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2014-01-01

    This chapter critically reviews brain proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) studies performed since 1994 in individuals with alcohol use disorders (AUD). We describe the neurochemicals that can be measured in vivo at the most common magnetic field strengths, summarize our knowledge about their general brain functions, and briefly explain some basic human (1)H MRS methods. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal research of individuals in treatment and of treatment-naïve individuals with AUD are discussed and interpreted on the basis of reported neuropathology. As AUDs are highly comorbid with chronic cigarette smoking and illicit substance abuse, we also summarize reports on their respective influences on regional proton metabolite levels. After reviewing research on neurobiologic correlates of relapse and genetic influences on brain metabolite levels, we finish with suggestions on future directions for (1)H MRS studies in AUDs. The review demonstrates that brain metabolic alterations associated with AUDs as well as their cognitive correlates are not simply a consequence of chronic alcohol consumption. Future MR research of AUDs in general has to be better prepared - and supported - to study clinically complex relationships between personality characteristics, comorbidities, neurogenetics, lifestyle, and living environment, as all these factors critically affect an individual's neurometabolic profile. (1)H MRS is uniquely positioned to tackle these complexities by contributing to a comprehensive biopsychosocial profile of individuals with AUD: it can provide non-invasive biochemical information on select regions of the brain at comparatively low overall cost for the ultimate purpose of informing more efficient treatments of AUDs. PMID:25307583

  20. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Adults with Childhood Lead Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Cecil, Kim M.; Dietrich, Kim N.; Altaye, Mekibib; Egelhoff, John C.; Lindquist, Diana M.; Brubaker, Christopher J.; Lanphear, Bruce P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Childhood lead exposure adversely affects neurodevelopment. However, few studies have examined changes in human brain metabolism that may underlie known adverse cognitive and behavioral outcomes. Objective We examined the association between mean childhood blood lead levels and in vivo brain metabolite concentrations as adults, determined by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in a birth cohort with documented low-to-moderate lead exposure. Methods Adult participants from the Cincinnati Lead Study [n = 159; mean age (± SD), 20.8 ± 0.9 years] completed a quantitative, short-echo proton MRS protocol evaluating seven regions to determine brain concentrations of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), creatine and phosphocreatine (Cr), cholines (Cho), myo-inositol, and a composite of glutamate and glutamine (GLX). Correlation and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted. Results Mean childhood blood lead levels were associated with regionally specific brain metabolite concentrations adjusted for age at imaging and Full-Scale intelligence quotient. Adjusted analyses estimated for a unit (micrograms per deciliter) increase in mean childhood blood lead concentrations, a decrease of NAA and Cr concentration levels in the basal ganglia, a decrease of NAA and a decrease of Cho concentration levels in the cerebellar hemisphere, a decrease of GLX concentration levels in vermis, a decrease of Cho and a decrease of GLX concentration levels in parietal white matter, and a decrease of Cho concentration levels in frontal white matter. Conclusions Gray-matter NAA reductions associated with increasing childhood blood lead levels suggest that sustained childhood lead exposure produces an irreversible pattern of neuronal dysfunction, whereas associated white-matter choline declines indicate a permanent alteration to myelin architecture. PMID:20947467

  1. Three dimensional structure prediction and proton nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of toxic pesticides in human blood plasma

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Amit Kumar; Tiwari, Rajeev Kumar; Gaur, Mulayam Singh

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assignments of hydrolyzed products extracted from human blood plasma. The correlations between chemical, functional and structural properties of highly toxic pesticides were investigated using the PreADME analysis. We observed that toxic pesticides possessed higher molecular weight and, more hydrogen bond donors and acceptors when compared with less toxic pesticides. The occurrence of functional groups and structural properties was analyzed using 1H-NMR. The 1H-NMR spectra of the phosphomethoxy class of pesticides were characterized by methyl resonances at 3.7-3.9 ppm (δ) with the coupling constants of 11-16 Hz (JP-CH3). In phosphoethoxy pesticides, the methyl resonance was about 1.4 ppm (δ) with the coupling constant of 10 Hz (JP-CH2) and the methylene resonances was 4.2-4.4 ppm (δ) with the coupling constant of 0.8 Hz (JP-CH3), respectively. Our study shows that the values of four parameters such as chemical shift, coupling constant, integration and relaxation time correlated with the concentration of toxic pesticides, and can be used to characterise the proton groups in the molecular structures of toxic pesticides. PMID:23554747

  2. Solid state proton spin relaxation and methyl and t-butyl reorientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Peter A.; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.; Fry, Anne M.; Plofker, Amy L.; Roe, Brian A.; Weiss, Jessica A.

    1994-01-01

    We have measured the temperature T and Larmor frequency ω/2π dependence of the proton spin-lattice relaxation rate R in solid 1-hydroxy-2,4,6-tri-butylbenzene. The data is interpreted in terms of the rotational motion of the t-butyl groups and their constituent methyl groups. Our data is much more extensive than a previous report [J. Yamauchi and C. A. McDowell, J. Chem. Phys. 75, 1051 (1981)] resulting in a revised dynamical model and considerably larger rotational barriers. Interesting thermal history effects are discussed.

  3. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy changes after antipsychotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Szulc, Agata; Galinska-Skok, Beata; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Bibulowicz, Daniel; Konarzewska, Beata; Tarasow, Eugeniusz

    2013-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) enables the observation of brain function in vivo. Several brain metabolites can be measured by the means of (1)H MRS: N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline containing compounds (Cho), myo-inositol (mI) and glutamate (Glu), glutamine (Gln) and GABA (together as Glx complex or separately). (1)H MRS measures have been found to be abnormal in psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia. Here we specifically review the influence exerted by antipsychotic drugs on brain metabolism, as detected by (1)H MRS. We systematically reviewed the available literature and uncovered 27 studies, 16 before-after treatment and 11 cross-sectional. Most of them addressed the effects of antipsychotics in schizophrenia and mainly focusing on NAA alterations. Follow up studies indicated antipsychotic drugs may act by increasing NAA levels in selected brain areas (the frontal lobe and thalamus), especially during the short-time observation. This phenomenon seems to vanish after longer observation. Other studies indicated that glutamate measures are decreasing along with the duration of the disease, suggesting both a neurodegenerative process present in schizophrenic brain as well as an influence of antipsychotics. The above results were reviewed according to the most recent theories in the field accounting for the impact of antipsychotics (1)HMRS measures. PMID:23157634

  4. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Naruse, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tanaka, C.; Hirakawa, K.; Nishikawa, H.; Yoshizaki, K.

    1982-06-01

    The water in normal and edematous brain tissues of rats was studied by the pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, measuring the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and the transverse relaxation time (T2). In the normal brain, T1 and T2 were single components, both shorter than in pure water. Prolongation and separation of T2 into two components, one fast and one slow, were the characteristic findings in brain edema induced by both cold injury and triethyl tin (TET), although some differences between the two types of edema existed in the content of the lesion and in the degree of changes in T1 and T2 values. Quantitative analysis of T1 and T2 values in their time course relating to water content demonstrated that prolongation of T1 referred to the volume of increased water in tissues examined, and that two phases of T2 reflected the distribution and the content of the edema fluid. From the analysis of the slow component of T2 versus water content during edema formation, it was demonstrated that the increase in edema fluid was steady, and its content was constant during formation of TET-induced edema. On the contrary, during the formation of cold-injury edema, water-rich edema fluid increased during the initial few hours, and protein-rich edema fluid increased thereafter. It was concluded that proton NMR relaxation time measurements may provide new understanding in the field of brain edema research.

  5. Determination of apomorphine freebase in sublingual tablets by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li; Chin, Shook F; Miner, Virginia W; Dong, Liang; Gupta, Suneel; Fields, Steven M

    2016-09-10

    An apomorphine sublingual tablet formulation under development contains mixtures of apomorphine freebase (FB) and apomorphine hydrochloride salt. It is important to have a reliable analytical method to determine the ratio of the base and salt forms to ensure accuracy, reproducibility and robustness of the manufacturing processes as well as to meet the requirements of the quality target product profile. A Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy method based on the proton shift of the amine methyl group (N-CH3) in apomorphine has been developed to determine the mole percentage of freebase to the total mole of freebase and hydrochloride salt in the drug product. The method was evaluated in terms of specificity, linearity, and variability. The presence of excipients does not interfere with the analysis. A standard calibration curve of the chemical shift as a function of the proportion of freebase forms of apomorphine was established, covering the range of 100% apomorphine freebase to 100% apomorhine hydrochloride. The correlation coefficient (r(2)), slope, and Y-intercept of the regression line are 0.998, -0.00596, and 3.191, respectively. The day-to-day variability of the (1)H shift in two instruments in the standard is less than 1% RSD. Three lots of the sublingual tablet drug product were examined and quantified by the standard. The mole percent apomorphine freebase was determined to be 73.8%, 75.2%, and 76.2%, respectively, within 100.0%±2.0% of the target value of 75.0%. The method is a new avenue to use the (1)H NMR technique for determination of apomorphine freebase and salt ratio in a solid drug product dosage form for release testing and in-process control. PMID:27454089

  6. Quantitation of memantine hydrochloride bulk drug and its tablet formulation using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Archana; Narayanam, Mallikarjun; Kurmi, Moolchand; Ladumor, Mayurbhai Kathadbhai; Singh, Saranjit

    2016-08-01

    The use of quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry for the determination of non-UV active memantine hydrochloride with relative simplicity and precision has been demonstrated in this study. The method was developed on a 500 MHz NMR instrument and was applied to determination of the drug in a tablet formulation. The analysis was performed by taking caffeine as an internal standard and D2 O as the NMR solvent. The signal of methyl protons of memantine hydrochloride appeared at 0.75 ppm (singlet) relative to the signal of caffeine (internal standard) at 3.13 ppm (singlet). The method was found to be linear (r(2)  = 0.9989) in the drug concentration range of 0.025 to 0.80 mg/ml. The maximum relative standard deviation for accuracy and precision was <2. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.04 and 0.11 mg/ml, respectively. The robustness of the method was revealed by changing nine different parameters. The deviation for each parameter was also within the acceptable limits. The study highlighted possibility of direct determination of memantine hydrochloride in pure form and in its marketed tablet formulation by the use of quantitative NMR, without the need of derivatization, as is the requirement in HPLC studies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26923624

  7. First proton transfer reaction to study 18F+p resonances of novae interest

    SciTech Connect

    Adekola, Aderemi S; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Brune, C.; Chae, K. Y.; Domizioli, Carlo P; Greife, U.; Heinen, Z.; Hornish, M.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Livesay, Jake; Ma, Zhanwen; Massey, T.; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Pain, S. D.; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Smith, Nathan A; Smith, Michael Scott; Thomas, J. S.; Visser, D. W.; Voinov, A.

    2011-01-01

    The 18F(p,a)15O reaction is recognized as the predominant destruction mechanism of 18F in novae, and its rate is therefore important for understanding 18F production in nova outbursts. We have studied the properties of resonances in the 18F + p system using the proton-transfer reaction 18F(d, n) for the first time. We have observed fifteen 19Ne levels, five of which are below the proton threshold, including a subthreshold state at Ex = 6.289 MeV which has significant lp = 0 strength. The proton asymptotic normalization coefficient for this state and proton widths of states above the proton threshold, are extracted from angular distributions. The 18F(p,a)15O S-factor and reaction rate are re-evaluated, taking into account the subthreshold resonance and other new information determined in this experiment.

  8. Search for resonant t t ¯ production in proton-proton collisions at √{s }=8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Dobur, D.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Ali, A.; Aly, R.; Aly, S.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Lotfy, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Masod, R.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Pekkanen, J.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.

    2016-01-01

    A search is performed for the production of heavy resonances decaying into top-antitop quark pairs in proton-proton collisions at √{s }=8 TeV . Data used for the analyses were collected with the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 . The search is performed using events with three different final states, defined by the number of leptons (electrons and muons) from the t t ¯ →W b W b decay. The analyses are optimized for reconstruction of top quarks with high Lorentz boosts, where jet substructure techniques are used to enhance the sensitivity. Results are presented for all channels and a combination is performed. No significant excess of events relative to the expected yield from standard model processes is observed. Upper limits on the production cross section of heavy resonances decaying to t t ¯ are calculated. A narrow leptophobic topcolor Z' resonance with a mass below 2.4 TeV is excluded at 95% confidence level. Limits are also derived for a broad Z' resonance with a 10% width relative to the resonance mass, and a Kaluza-Klein excitation of the gluon in the Randall-Sundrum model. These are the most stringent limits to date on heavy resonances decaying into top-antitop quark pairs.

  9. Carbon-13 and proton magnetic resonance of mouse muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Fung, B M

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that roughly 4 mmol carbon atoms/g mouse muscle can give rise to a "high resolution" 13C NMR spectrum. From the 13C spectrum, it is estimated that the protons from mobile organic molecules or molecular segments amount to 6-8%of total nonrigid protons (organic plus water) in muscle. Their spin-spin relaxation times (T2) are of the order of 0.4-2 ms. At 37 degrees C, the proton spin-echo decay of mouse muscle changes rapidly with time after death, while that of mouse brain does not. PMID:890043

  10. [(1)H] magnetic resonance spectroscopy of urine: diagnosis of a guanidinoacetate methyl transferase deficiency case.

    PubMed

    Tassini, Maria; Zannolli, Raffaella; Buoni, Sabrina; Engelke, Udo; Vivi, Antonio; Valensin, Gianni; Salomons, Gajja S; De Nicola, Anna; Strambi, Mirella; Monti, Lucia; Morava, Eva; Wevers, Ron A; Hayek, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    For the first time, the use of urine [(1)H] magnetic resonance spectroscopy has allowed the detection of 1 case of guanidinoacetate methyl transferase in a database sample of 1500 pediatric patients with a diagnosis of central nervous system impairment of unknown origin. The urine [(1)H] magnetic resonance spectroscopy of a 9-year-old child, having severe epilepsy and nonprogressive mental and motor retardation with no apparent cause, revealed a possible guanidinoacetic acid increase. The definitive assignment of guanidinoacetic acid was checked by addition of pure substance to the urine sample and by measuring [(1)H]-[(1)H] correlation spectroscopy. Diagnosis of guanidinoacetate methyl transferase deficiency was further confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, brain [(1)H] magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and mutational analysis of the guanidinoacetate methyl transferase gene. The replacement therapy was promptly started and, after 1 year, the child was seizure free. We conclude that for this case, urine [(1)H] magnetic resonance spectroscopy screening was able to diagnose guanidinoacetate methyl transferase deficiency. PMID:19461121

  11. Spin structure functions: Proton / deuteron measurements in the resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Jones; RSS Collaboration

    2006-02-01

    The RSS experiment ran in Hall C at Jefferson Lab and measured the proton and deuteron beam-target asymmetries for parallel and perpendicular target fields over a W range from pion threshold to 1.9 GeV at Q{sup 2} {approx} 1.3 GeV{sup 2}. Preliminary results for the proton spin structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} are presented.

  12. Retention of configuration in nucleophilic vinylic halide substitution - Proton magnetic resonance spectra of cis- and trans- beta-styryldiphenylphosphine oxides.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguiar, A. M.; Daigle, D.

    1965-01-01

    Cis- and trans-beta-bromostyrene reaction with lithium diphenylphosphide in tetrahydrofuran producing cis- and trans-beta- styryldiphenylphosphine, discussing proton magnetic resonance and configuration retention

  13. Resonance phenomena: From compound nucleus decay to proton radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charity, R. J.

    2016-03-01

    The role of resonances in exotic nuclei is investigated. This encompasses one and two nucleon emitters for ground-state nuclei beyond the drip lines to compound nuclei formed at higher excitation energies which, in some cases, can decay to produce these ground-state emitters. The role of barrier penetration and configuration mixing are both considered in explaining the long lifetimes observed in narrow resonances. Finally, two experimental techniques for studying exotic resonances are presented.

  14. Resonance Raman spectra of carotenoid molecules: influence of methyl substitutions.

    PubMed

    Macernis, Mindaugas; Galzerano, Denise; Sulskus, Juozas; Kish, Elizabeth; Kim, Young-Hun; Koo, Sangho; Valkunas, Leonas; Robert, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    We report here the resonance Raman spectra and the quantum chemical calculations of the Raman spectra for β-carotene and 13,13'-diphenyl-β-carotene. The first aim of this approach was to test the robustness of the method used for modeling β-carotene, and assess whether it could accurately predict the vibrational properties of derivatives in which conjugated substituents had been introduced. DFT calculations, using the B3LYP functional in combination with the 6-311G(d,p) basis set, were able to accurately predict the influence of two phenyl substituents connected to the β-carotene molecule, although these deeply perturb the vibrational modes. This experimentally validated modeling technique leads to a fine understanding of the origin of the carotenoid resonance Raman bands, which are widely used for assessing the properties of these molecules, and in particular in complex media, such as binding sites provided by biological macromolecules. PMID:25476500

  15. Single-proton resonant states and the isospin dependence investigated by Green’s function relativistic mean field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, T. T.; Niu, Z. M.; Zhang, S. Q.

    2016-08-01

    The relativistic mean field theory formulated with Green’s function method (RMF-GF) is applied to investigate single-proton resonant states and isospin dependence. The calculated energies and widths for the single-proton resonant states in {}120{{Sn}} are in good agreement with previous investigations. The single-proton resonant states of the Sn isotopes and the N = 82 isotones are systematically studied and it is shown that the calculated energies and widths decrease monotonically with the increase of neutron number while increase monotonically with the increase of proton number. To further examine the evolutions of the single-proton resonant states, their dependence on the depth, radius and diffuseness of nuclear potential is investigated with the help of an analytic Woods-Saxon potential, and it is found that the increase of radius plays the most important role in the cross phenomenon appearing in the single-proton resonant states of the Sn isotopes.

  16. Decrease of the first Schumann resonance frequency during solar proton events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldugin, V. C.; Maltsev, Y. P.; Petrova, G. A.; Vasiljev, A. N.

    2001-09-01

    The variations of the first-order Schumann resonance frequency in Kola peninsula are studied for four solar proton events on November 4 and 6, 1997 and on May 2 and May 6, 1998. It is found that the frequency decrease by about 0.15 Hz during the peaks of the proton penetrations. Such a decrease is in agreement with modeling calculations. A very intensive solar X ray burst preceding the proton flare on November 6 caused an increase of the resonance frequency. The decrease of amplitude about of 0.2 pT and the decrease of the resonance bandwidth about of 0.2 Hz are observed in the November events.

  17. Study of proton resonance structure in 27P via resonant elastic scattering of 26Si+p

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H. S.; Lee, C. S.; Kwon, Y. K.; Moon, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Yun, C. C.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Choi, Seonho; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Park, J. S.; Kim, E. J.; Moon, C.-B.; Teranishi, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Yamada, T.; Togano, Y.; Kato, S.; Cherubini, S.; Rapisarda, G. G.

    2012-11-01

    A measurement of resonant elastic scattering of 26Si+p was performed with a thick target using a 26Si radioactive ion beam at the CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) of the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. The excitation function of 27P was measured successfully with the inverse kinematics method through a covered the range of excitation energies from Ex ~ 2.3 to 3.8 MeV, providing information about the resonance structure of this nucleus. The properties of these resonances are important to better determine the production rates of 26Si(p,g)27P reaction, which is one of the astrophysically important nuclear reactions to understand the production of the 26Al. Some new resonant states have been investigated, and determined their resonance parameters, such as excitation energies, proton partial widths, and spin-parities by R-matrix calculation.

  18. Search for Narrow Resonances Decaying to Dijets in Proton-Proton Collisions at √{s }=13 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.

    2016-02-01

    A search for narrow resonances in proton-proton collisions at √{s }=13 TeV is presented. The invariant mass distribution of the two leading jets is measured with the CMS detector using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.4 fb-1 . The highest observed dijet mass is 6.1 TeV. The distribution is smooth and no evidence for resonant particles is observed. Upper limits at 95% confidence level are set on the production cross section for narrow resonances with masses above 1.5 TeV. When interpreted in the context of specific models, the limits exclude string resonances with masses below 7.0 TeV, scalar diquarks below 6.0 TeV, axigluons and colorons below 5.1 TeV, excited quarks below 5.0 TeV, color-octet scalars below 3.1 TeV, and W' bosons below 2.6 TeV. These results significantly extend previously published limits.

  19. Proton magnetic resonance characterization of phoratoxins and homologous proteins related to crambin.

    PubMed

    Lecomte, J T; Kaplan, D; Llinás, M; Thunberg, E; Samuelsson, G

    1987-02-24

    The mistletoe protein toxins ligatoxin, phoratoxins A and B, and viscotoxins A3 and B have been investigated by 1H NMR spectroscopy at 300 and 600 MHz. The five polypeptides define a set of closely related homologues, containing 46 amino acid residues each, in a structure constrained by three cystine bridges. Their methyl and aromatic spectra were analyzed and a number of signals identified and assigned via comparative criteria, two-dimensional chemical-shift correlated spectroscopy, acid-base titration, and proton Overhauser experiments in 1H2O. The spectra indicate a compact globular conformation and a common folding pattern for the toxins. In particular, use was made of well-resolved aliphatic and aromatic resonances in order to compare the mistletoe proteins with the thionins, a set of homologous toxins from gramineae, and with crambin, a closely related polypeptide from a crucifer, which we have previously studied by NMR. We observe that while all the investigated proteins have very similar secondary and tertiary structures, they differ widely in their dynamic characteristics as probed by the amide NH 1H-2H exchange kinetics in deuteriated solvents; thus, while crambin and the thionins exhibit very fast isotope exchange, the kinetics for the mistletoe toxins are slow, with some NH groups showing exchange half-lives that extend up to several days at pH* 5.8 or that are too long to be measurable at ambient temperature. The temperature dependence of the 1H NMR spectrum also indicates that the toxins are endowed with a thermally very stable native (ground-state) structure, with little evidence of large amplitude structural breathings up to approximately 370 K, although irreversible chemical degradation (denaturation) becomes evident at temperatures greater than or equal to 350 K. It is concluded that the mistletoe toxins afford valuable rigid structures for NMR conformational studies. PMID:3567163

  20. High-Resolution Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis of Metastatic Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountford, Carolyn E.; Wright, Lesley C.; Holmes, Kerry T.; MacKinnon, Wanda B.; Gregory, Patricia; Fox, Richard M.

    1984-12-01

    High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of intact cancer cells revealed differences between cells with the capacity to metastasize and those that produce locally invasive tumors. The NMR resonances that characterize the metastatic cells were associated with an increased ratio of cholesterol to phospholipid and an increased amount of plasma membrane--bound cholesterol ester. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy could therefore be used to assess the metastatic potential of primary tumors.

  1. Resonance charge exchange between excited states in slow proton-hydrogen collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstikhina, Inga Yu.; Kato, Daiji

    2010-09-15

    The theory of resonance charge exchange in slow collisions of a proton with a hydrogen atom in the excited state is developed. It extends the Firsov-Demkov theory of resonance charge exchange to the case of degenerate initial and final states. The theory is illustrated by semiclassical and quantum calculations of charge exchange cross sections between states with n=2 in parabolic and spherical coordinates. The results are compared with existing close-coupling calculations.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance observation and dynamics of specific amide protons in T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Griffey, R H; Redfield, A G; Loomis, R E; Dahlquist, F W

    1985-02-12

    We have produced T4 lysozyme using a bacterial expression system which allows efficient incorporation of isotopically labeled amino acids in lysozyme. By using conditions that repress the expression of various transaminases, we have incorporated 15N-labeled amino acid into the five phenylalanine residues of the protein. The relatively large spin--spin coupling (87 +/- 3 Hz) between the 15N nucleus and the phenylalanine amide protons may then be exploited in a variety of ways to selectively observe the five phenylalanine amide proton resonances. These include a simple "echo difference" technique which displays the amide proton resonances in one dimension and a "forbidden echo" technique [Bax, A., Griffey, R. H., & Hawkins, B.L. (1983) J. Magn. Reson. 55, 301-335] which gives two-dimensional information allowing the proton and 15N chemical shifts of each amide to be determined. With these approaches, all five phenylalanine amide protons give resolved resonances. Deuterium exchange experiments demonstrate that three of the five resonances are slow to exchange (half-times of about 1 week at pH 5.5 and 4 degrees C) while the other two are rapid with complete exchange in hours or less. These observations correlate well with the secondary structure of the protein which shows three residues in alpha-helical regions and two residues in surface-exposed environments. This approach of isotopic substitution on nitrogen or carbon atoms is of general utility and should allow virtually any proton on a protein of molecular weight 20 000 or thereabout to be selectively observed. PMID:3888265

  3. Proton-nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times in brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Kamman, R.L.; Go, K.G.; Berendsen, H.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Proton relaxation times of protein solutions, bovine brain, and edematous feline brain tissue were studied as a function of water concentration, protein concentration, and temperature. In accordance with the fast proton exchange model for relaxation, a linear relation could be established between R1 and the inverse of the weight fraction of tissue water. This relation also applied to R2 of gray matter and of protein solutions. No straightforward relation with water content was found for R2 of white matter. Temperature-dependent studies indicated that in this case, the slow exchange model for relaxation had to be applied. The effect of macromolecules in physiological relevant concentrations on the total relaxation behavior of edematous tissue was weak. Total water content changes predominantly affected the relaxation rates. The linear relation may have high clinical potential for assessment of the status of cerebral edema on the basis of T1 and T2 readings from MR images.

  4. Joint Heating of Solar Wind Protons by Multi-Wave-Modes via Multi-Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiansen; Wang, Linghua; Tu, Chuanyi; Marsch, Eckart; Chen, Christopher H. K.; Pei, Zhongtian; Zhang, Lei; Salem, Chadi S.; Bale, Stuart D.

    2016-04-01

    How the protons are heated non-adiabatically in the solar wind turbulence is a long-lasting important problem yet to be solved. The simultaneous analysis of the wave modes and proton kinetics may help to unveil part of the puzzle. The bulk parameters of solar wind protons usually behave differently in the fast and slow streams: e.g., weak VS strong density compressibility, distinct large perpendicular temperature VS evident parallel temperature. These differences may be attributed to the different heating processes in these two types of streams, which is the aim of this work. We find there are different wave activities in the fast and slow streams: quasi-parallel ion cyclotron waves and quasi-perpendicular kinetic Alfvén waves for the former, oblique Alfvén waves and quasi-perpendicular counter-propagating slow magnetosonic waves for the latter. The proton kinetics together with the wave activities reveals the different heating processes for protons in fast and slow streams. For the fast solar wind, proton cores seem to be heated perpendicularly by left-hand polarized ion cyclotron waves, proton beams are heated parallel and perpendicularly by right-hand polarized quasi-perpendicular kinetic Alfvén waves. For the slow solar wind, protons seem to be heated parallel and anti-parallel jointly by counter-propagating oblique Alfvén waves and quasi-perpendicular slow magnetosonic waves through respective Landau resonances, resulting in asymmetric bi-directional beams. Therefore, it is suggested that the solar wind protons are heated jointly in both parallel and perpendicular directions by multi-types of wave modes via various types of resonances.

  5. Lowest l=0 proton resonance in {sup 26}Si and implications for nucleosynthesis of {sup 26}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Peplowski, P. N.; Baby, L. T.; Wiedenhoever, I.; Diffenderfer, E.; Hoeflich, P.; Rojas, A.; Volya, A.; Dekat, S. E.; Gay, D. L.; Grubor-Urosevic, O.; Kaye, R. A.; Keeley, N.

    2009-03-15

    Using a beam of the radioactive isotope {sup 25}Al, produced with the new RESOLUT facility, we measured the direct (d,n) proton-transfer reaction leading to low-lying proton resonances in {sup 26}Si. We observed the lowest l=0 proton resonance, identified with the 3{sup +} state at 5.914-MeV excitation energy. This result eliminates the largest uncertainty in astrophysical reaction rates involved in the nucleosynthesis of {sup 26}Al.

  6. Search for resonant tt¯ production in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-10

    A search is performed for the production of heavy resonances decaying into top-antitop quark pairs in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV. Data used for the analyses were collected with the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb–1. The search is performed using events with three different final states, defined by the number of leptons (electrons and muons) from the tt¯ → WbWb decay. The analyses are optimized for reconstruction of top quarks with high Lorentz boosts, where jet substructure techniques are used to enhance the sensitivity. Results are presented for all channels and a combination is performed. Furthermore, no significant excess of events relative to the expected yield from standard model processes is observed.

  7. Glutamatergic Effects of Divalproex in Adolescents with Mania: A Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawn, Jeffrey R.; Patel, Nick C.; Chu, Wen-Jang; Lee, Jing-Huei; Adler, Caleb M.; Kim, Mi Jung; Bryan, Holly S.; Alfieri, David C.; Welge, Jeffrey A.; Blom, Thomas J.; Nandagopal, Jayasree J.; Strakowski, Stephen M.; DelBello, Melissa P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([superscript 1]H MRS) to evaluate the in vivo effects of extended-release divalproex sodium on the glutamatergic system in adolescents with bipolar disorder, and to identify baseline neurochemical predictors of clinical remission. Method: Adolescents with bipolar disorder who were…

  8. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Boughlala, Zakaria; Fonseca Guerra, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas‐phase Cl−X and [HCl−X]+ complexes for X+= H+, CH3 +, Li+, and Na+, using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl− and HCl for the various cations. The Cl−X bond becomes longer and weaker along X+ = H+, CH3 +, Li+, and Na+. Our main purpose is to understand the heterolytic bonding mechanism behind the intrinsic (i.e., in the absence of solvent) alkali metal cation affinities (AMCA) and how this compares with and differs from those of the proton affinity (PA) and methyl cation affinity (MCA). Our analyses are based on Kohn–Sham molecular orbital (KS‐MO) theory in combination with a quantitative energy decomposition analysis (EDA) that pinpoints the importance of the different features in the bonding mechanism. Orbital overlap appears to play an important role in determining the trend in cation affinities. PMID:27551660

  9. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Boughlala, Zakaria; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2016-06-01

    We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas-phase Cl-X and [HCl-X](+) complexes for X(+)= H(+), CH3 (+), Li(+), and Na(+), using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl(-) and HCl for the various cations. The Cl-X bond becomes longer and weaker along X(+) = H(+), CH3 (+), Li(+), and Na(+). Our main purpose is to understand the heterolytic bonding mechanism behind the intrinsic (i.e., in the absence of solvent) alkali metal cation affinities (AMCA) and how this compares with and differs from those of the proton affinity (PA) and methyl cation affinity (MCA). Our analyses are based on Kohn-Sham molecular orbital (KS-MO) theory in combination with a quantitative energy decomposition analysis (EDA) that pinpoints the importance of the different features in the bonding mechanism. Orbital overlap appears to play an important role in determining the trend in cation affinities. PMID:27551660

  10. Fundamental investigations of supported monometallic and bimetallic catalysts by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xi.

    1990-09-21

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of hydrogen, has been applied to investigate silica-supported Group VIII monometallic and Group VIII-Group IB bimetallic catalysts and alumina- and silica-supported platinum-rhenium bimetallic catalysts. Two adsorbed states of hydrogen, i.e., irreversible and reversible hydrogen, on the surfaces of monometallic Ru, Pt, and Cu particles and bimetallic Ru-Group Ib, Pt-Group Ib, and Pt-Re particles were observed directly via proton NMR. The same amounts of the irreversible hydrogen adsorbed on pure Ru catalysts were measured by both proton NMR and the volumetric technique. The electronic environments on surfaces of monometallic catalysts are sensitive to changes in metal dispersion, state of adsorbed hydrogen, and residual chlorine. Surface compositions for the Ru--Cu and Pt--Cu bimetallic catalysts were determined by NMR of adsorbed hydrogen. 297 refs., 96 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. Surface ligation-based resonance light scattering analysis of methylated genomic DNA on a microarray platform.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lan; Lei, Zhen; Liu, Xia; Liu, Dianjun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-05-10

    DNA methylation is a crucial epigenetic modification and is closely related to tumorigenesis. Herein, a surface ligation-based high throughput method combined with bisulfite treatment is developed for analysis of methylated genomic DNA. In this method, a DNA microarray is employed as a reaction platform, and resonance light scattering (RLS) of nanoparticles is used as the detection principle. The specificity stems from allele-specific ligation of Taq DNA ligase, which is further enhanced by improving the fidelity of Taq DNA ligase in a heterogeneous reaction. Two amplification techniques, rolling circle amplification (RCA) and silver enhancement, are employed after the ligation reaction and a gold nanoparticle (GNP) labeling procedure is used to amplify the signal. As little as 0.01% methylated DNA (i.e. 2 pmol L(-1)) can be distinguished from the cocktail of methylated and unmethylated DNA by the proposed method. More importantly, this method shows good accuracy and sensitivity in profiling the methylation level of genomic DNA of three selected colonic cancer cell lines. This strategy provides a high throughput alternative with reasonable sensitivity and resolution for cancer study and diagnosis. PMID:27093298

  12. Evaluation of brain edema using magnetic resonance proton relaxation times

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Nishimura, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies on the evaluation of water content in cases of brain edema were performed in vivo, using MR proton relaxation times (longitudinal relaxation time, T1; transverse relaxation time, T2). Brain edema was produced in the white matter of cats by the direct infusion method. The correlations between proton relaxation times obtained from MR images and the water content of white matter were studied both in autoserum-infused cats and in saline-infused cats. The correlations between T1 as well as T2 and the water content in human vasogenic brain edema were also examined and compared with the data obtained from the serum group. T1 and T2 showed good correlations with the water content of white matter not only in the experimental animals but also in the clinical cases. The quality of the edema fluid did not influence relaxation time and T1 seemed to represent almost solely the water content of the tissue. T2, however, was affected by the nature of existence of water and was more sensitive than T1 in detecting extravasated edema fluid. It seems feasible therefore to evaluate the water content of brain edema on the basis of T1 values.

  13. Detection and characterization of hyperfine-shifted resonances in the proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of Anabaena 7120 ferredoxin at high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Skjeldal, L; Westler, W M; Markley, J L

    1990-05-01

    This paper presents previously unobserved signals in the 1H NMR spectra of oxidized and reduced [2Fe-2S]-ferredoxin from Anabaena 7120 detected at 400, 500, and 600 MHz. The signals shifted to low field exhibited longitudinal relaxation (T1) values in the range of 100-400 microseconds and line widths in the range of 1-10 kHz (at 400 MHz), and the chemical shifts of all signals showed strong temperature dependence. Although the line widths were smaller at lower magnetic fields, the resolution was better at higher magnetic fields. In the oxidized state, a broad signal was detected at 37 ppm, which corresponds to at least 6 protons, and whose chemical shift exhibits positive temperature dependence. This signal also was found in oxidized ferredoxin reconstituted in 2H2O, which excludes the signal as arising from solvent-exchangeable amide protons. In the reduced state, four signals detected between 90 and 140 ppm exhibited negative temperature dependence. These consisted of two pairs of signals, each pair having one component with half the linewidth of the other. On the basis of their chemical shifts, linewidths, longitudinal relaxation properties, and temperature dependence we assigned these resonances to four of the beta hydrogens of the ligated cysteines. Two solvent-exchangeable hyperfine-shifted signals were found in the reduced state; these are located upfield of the diamagnetic region. The low-field hyperfine resonances of half-reduced ferredoxin in the presence of sodium dithionite showed a self electron transfer exchange rate that was slow on the NMR scale as observed earlier (Chan, T., and Markley, J. L. (1983) Biochemistry 22, 5982-5987), but the exchange rate was accelerated in the presence of methyl viologen. PMID:2327800

  14. ENSEMBLE SIMULATIONS OF PROTON HEATING IN THE SOLAR WIND VIA TURBULENCE AND ION CYCLOTRON RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2014-07-01

    Protons in the solar corona and heliosphere exhibit anisotropic velocity distributions, violation of magnetic moment conservation, and a general lack of thermal equilibrium with the other particle species. There is no agreement about the identity of the physical processes that energize non-Maxwellian protons in the solar wind, but a traditional favorite has been the dissipation of ion cyclotron resonant Alfvén waves. This paper presents kinetic models of how ion cyclotron waves heat protons on their journey from the corona to interplanetary space. It also derives a wide range of new solutions for the relevant dispersion relations, marginal stability boundaries, and nonresonant velocity-space diffusion rates. A phenomenological model containing both cyclotron damping and turbulent cascade is constructed to explain the suppression of proton heating at low alpha-proton differential flow speeds. These effects are implemented in a large-scale model of proton thermal evolution from the corona to 1 AU. A Monte Carlo ensemble of realistic wind speeds, densities, magnetic field strengths, and heating rates produces a filled region of parameter space (in a plane described by the parallel plasma beta and the proton temperature anisotropy ratio) similar to what is measured. The high-beta edges of this filled region are governed by plasma instabilities and strong heating rates. The low-beta edges correspond to weaker proton heating and a range of relative contributions from cyclotron resonance. On balance, the models are consistent with other studies that find only a small fraction of the turbulent power spectrum needs to consist of ion cyclotron waves.

  15. Changes of Schumann resonance parameters during the solar proton event of 14 July 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldugin, V. C.; Maltsev, Y. P.; Vasiljev, A. N.; Shvets, A. V.; Nikolaenko, A. P.

    2003-03-01

    The ELF measurements in Russian observatories Lovozero (the Kola Peninsula) and Lekhta (Karelija) during the solar proton event of 14 July 2000 show the decrease of frequencies of the first and second Schumann resonance modes of ˜0.4 Hz and the increase of the first-mode bandwidth from 0.8 to 1.5 Hz. The solar X-ray burst, preceding the proton precipitation, is accompanied by the increase of the first-mode frequency. Approximate formulas for frequencies and qualities of the two first modes are found for a two-layer model of the Schumann resonator (SR). The changes of the SR parameters are a response of the Earth-ionosphere resonator to large-scale disturbances of the polar ionosphere.

  16. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies of mast cell histamine

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Ludowyke, R.; Lagunoff, D.

    1987-11-03

    The state of histamine in mast cells was studied by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. Spectra were measured for histamine in situ in intact mast cells, for histamine in suspensions of mast cell granule matrices that had been stripped of their membranes, and for histamine in solutions of heparin. The /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of intact mast cells is relatively simple, consisting predominantly of resonances for intracellular histamine superimposed on a weaker background of resonances from heparin and proteins of the cells. All of the intracellular histamine contributes of the NMR signals, indicating it must be relatively mobile and not rigidly associated with the negatively charged granule matrix. Spectra for intracellular histamine and for histamine in granule matrices are similar, indicating the latter to be a reasonable model for the in situ situation. The dynamics of binding of histamine by granule matrices and by heparin are considerably different; exchange of histamine between the bulk water and the granule matrices is slow on the /sup 1/H NMR time scale, whereas exchange between the free and bound forms in heparin solution is fast. The chemical shifts of resonances for histamine in mast cells are pH dependent, decreasing as the intragranule pH increases without splitting or broadening. The results are interpreted to indicate that histamine in mast cells is relatively labile, with rapid exchange between histamine and pools of free histamine in water compartments confined in the granule matrix.

  17. Nucleon Resonance Electrocouplings from the CLAS Data on Exclusive Meson Electroproduction off Protons

    SciTech Connect

    Victor I. Mokeev, Inna G. Aznauryan, Volker D. Burkert

    2011-12-01

    {gamma}{sub v}NN* transition helicity amplitudes (electrocouplings) of several prominent excited proton states are determined for the first time in independent analyses of {pi}{sup +}n, {pi}{sup 0}p, and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}p electroproduction off protons. Consistent results on resonance electrocouplings obtained from major meson electroproduction channels offer an evidence for reliable extraction of these fundamental quantities. Analysis of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}p electroproduction has extended considerably information on electrocouplings of high lying N* states, which decay preferentially to the N{pi}{pi} final states.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in a young male patient with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis and uncommon cerebellar involvement: A case report with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Splendiani, Alessandra; Felli, Valentina; Di Sibio, Alessandra; Gennarelli, Antonio; Patriarca, Lucia; Stratta, Paolo; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Rossi, Alessandro; Massimo, Gallucci

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of a 17-year-old man presenting with new onset psychiatric symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy revealed some lesions in the right cerebellar hemisphere and ipsilateral cerebellar tonsil suggestive of encephalitis. An extensive workup was negative for both infectious and neoplastic diseases and he was afterward diagnosed with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis. This disorder is an autoimmune encephalitis, highly lethal but curable, predominantly found in young female with ovarian teratoma. He received methylprednisolone. His clinical findings gradually improve and he made a complete recovery. Accordingly, repeated brain MRI and proton MR spectroscopy showed a gradual reduction of the lesions; MRI taken six months after starting therapy showed complete resolution of the lesions. Our case shows that, although rare, anti-NMDAR encephalitis should be considered also in young men for whom a rapid onset of psychiatric neurological disorders cannot be explained by more frequent causes. Our report underlines also the usefulness of MRI and proton MR spectroscopic findings in the diagnosis and follow-up of this disease. PMID:26613928

  19. Resonance assignments of non-exchangeable protons in B type DNA oligomers, an overview.

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, F J; Hilbers, C W

    1988-01-01

    The chemical shifts of 1H resonances of non exchangeable protons (except H5', H5" and adenine H2) of over six hundred nucleotides have been collected. The influence which the base of the nucleotide itself as well as the bases on its 5' and 3' side exert on the chemical shifts of the various resonances has been investigated. Most of the resonances appear to be predominantly influenced by only one base. For H2', H2", H3', H4' and H6/H8 this is the base of the central nucleotide, for H5(C) and CH3(T) it is the one on the 5' side and for H1' it is the one on the 3' side. Chemical shift distribution profiles are presented which allow an estimation of the probability of finding a particular resonance at a particular position in the spectrum. PMID:2840632

  20. Spin-lattice relaxation study of the methyl proton dynamics in solid 9,10-dimethyltriptycene (DMT).

    PubMed

    Piślewski, N; Tritt-Goc, J; Bielejewski, M; Rachocki, A; Ratajczyk, T; Szymański, S

    2009-06-01

    Proton spin-lattice relaxation studies are performed for powder samples of 9,10-dimethyltriptycene (DMT) and its isotopomer DMT-d(12) in which all the non-methyl protons in the molecule are replaced by deuterons. The relaxation data are interpreted in terms of the conventional relaxation theory based on the random jump model in which the Pauli correlations between the relevant spin and torsional states are discarded. The Arrhenius activation energies, obtained from the relaxation data, 25.3 and 24.8 kJ mol(-1) for DMT and DMT-d(12), respectively, are very high as for the methyl groups. The validity of the jump model in the present case is considered from the perspective of Haupt theory in which the Pauli principle is explicitly invoked. To this purpose, the dynamic quantities entering the Haupt model are reinterpreted in the spirit of the damped quantum rotation (DQR) approach introduced recently for the purpose of NMR lineshape studies of hindered molecular rotators. Theoretical modelling of the relevant methyl group dynamics, based on the DQR theory, was performed. From these calculations it is inferred that direct assessments of the torsional barrier heights, based on the Arrhenius activation energies extracted from relaxation data, should be treated with caution. PMID:19181490

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance proton imaging of bone pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Atlan, H.; Sigal, R.; Hadar, H.; Chisin, R.; Cohen, I.; Lanir, A.; Soudry, M.; Machtey, Y.; Schreiber, R.; Benmair, J.

    1986-02-01

    Thirty-two patients with diversified pathology were examined with a supraconductive NMR imager using spin echo with different TR and TE to obtain T1 and T2 weighted images. They included 20 tumors (12 primary, eight metastasis), six osteomyelitis, three fractures, two osteonecrosis, and one diffuse metabolic (Gaucher) disease. In all cases except for the stress fractures, the bone pathology was clearly visualized in spite of the normal lack of signal from the compact cortical bone. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging proved to be at least as sensitive as radionuclide scintigraphy but much more accurate than all other imaging procedures including computed tomography (CT) and angiography to assess the extension of the lesions, especially in tumors extended to soft tissue. This is due both to easy acquisition of sagittal and coronal sections and to different patterns of pathologic modifications of T1 and T2 which are beginning to be defined. It is hoped that more experience in clinical use of these patterns will help to discriminate between tumor extension and soft-tissue edema. We conclude that while radionuclide scintigraphy will probably remain the most sensitive and easy to perform screening test for bone pathology, NMR imaging, among noninvasive diagnostic procedures, appears to be at least as specific as CT. In addition, where the extension of the lesions is concerned, NMR imaging is much more informative than CT. In pathology of the spine, the easy visualization of the spinal cord should decrease the need for myelography.

  2. Study of proton resonance structure in {sup 27}P via resonant elastic scattering of {sup 26}Si+p

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, H. S.; Lee, C. S.; Kwon, Y. K.; Moon, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Yun, C. C.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Choi, Seonho; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Park, J. S.; Kim, E. J.; Moon, C.-B.; Teranishi, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; and others

    2012-11-12

    A measurement of resonant elastic scattering of {sup 26}Si+p was performed with a thick target using a {sup 26}Si radioactive ion beam at the CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) of the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. The excitation function of {sup 27}P was measured successfully with the inverse kinematics method through a covered the range of excitation energies from E{sub x}{approx} 2.3 to 3.8 MeV, providing information about the resonance structure of this nucleus. The properties of these resonances are important to better determine the production rates of {sup 26}Si(p,g){sup 27}P reaction, which is one of the astrophysically important nuclear reactions to understand the production of the {sup 26}Al. Some new resonant states have been investigated, and determined their resonance parameters, such as excitation energies, proton partial widths, and spin-parities by R-matrix calculation.

  3. Characterization of heteronuclear decoupling through proton spin dynamics in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paëpe, Gaël; Eléna, Bénédicte; Emsley, Lyndon

    2004-08-01

    The work presented here aims at understanding the performance of phase modulated heteronuclear decoupling sequences such as Cosine Modulation or Two Pulse Phase Modulation. To that end we provide an analytical description of the intrinsic behavior of Cosine Modulation decoupling with respect to radio-frequency-inhomogeneity and the proton-proton dipolar coupling network. We discover through a Modulation Frame average Hamiltonian analysis that best decoupling is obtained under conditions where the heteronuclear interactions are removed but notably where homonuclear couplings are recoupled at a homonuclear Rotary Resonance (HORROR) condition in the Modulation Frame. These conclusions are supported by extensive experimental investigations, and notably through the introduction of proton nutation experiments to characterize spin dynamics in solids under decoupling conditions. The theoretical framework presented in this paper allows the prediction of the optimum parameters for a given set of experimental conditions.

  4. High-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals metabolic effects of normal brain aging

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Janna L.; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Choi, In-Young; Lee, Phil; Brooks, William M.

    2014-01-01

    Altered brain metabolism is likely to be an important contributor to normal cognitive decline and brain pathology in elderly individuals. To characterize the metabolic changes associated with normal brain aging, we used high-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo to quantify 20 neurochemicals in the hippocampus and sensorimotor cortex of young adult and aged rats. We found significant differences in the neurochemical profile of the aged brain when compared with younger adults, including lower aspartate, ascorbate, glutamate, and macromolecules, and higher glucose, myo-inositol, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, total choline, and glutamine. These neurochemical biomarkers point to specific cellular mechanisms that are altered in brain aging, such as bioenergetics, oxidative stress, inflammation, cell membrane turnover, and endogenous neuroprotection. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy may be a valuable translational approach for studying mechanisms of brain aging and pathology, and for investigating treatments to preserve or enhance cognitive function in aging. PMID:24559659

  5. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on the variant-3 neurotoxin from Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing: Sequential assignment of resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Nettesheim, D.G.; Klevit, R.E.; Drobny, G.; Watt, D.D.; Krishna, N.R. )

    1989-02-21

    The authors report the sequential assignment of resonances to specific residues in the proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the variant-3 neurotoxin from the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing (range southwestern U.S.A.). A combination of two-dimensional NMR experiments such as 2D-COSY, 2D-NOESY, and single- and double-RELAY coherence transfer spectroscopy has been employed on samples of the protein dissolved in D{sub 2}O and in H{sub 2}O for assignment purposes. These studies provide a basis for the determination of the solution-phase conformation of this protein and for undertaking detailed structure-function studies of these neurotoxins that modulate the flow of sodium current by binding to the sodium channels of excitable membranes.

  6. 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine inhibits proton motive force in energized liver mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Y.; Bhatnagar, R.; Sidhu, G.S.; Batra, J.K.; Krishna, G. )

    1989-05-15

    It is known that 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), which induces Parkinson's-like disease in primates and humans, depletes hepatocytes of ATP and subsequently causes cell death. Incubation of rat liver mitochondria with MPTP and 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium ion (MPP+) significantly inhibited incorporation of {sup 32}Pi into ATP. MPTP and MPP+ inhibited the development of membrane potential and pH gradient in energized rat liver mitochondria, suggesting that reduction of the proton motive force may have reduced ATP synthesis. Since deprenyl, an inhibitor of monoamine oxidase, prevented the formation of MPP+ and inhibited the decrease in membrane potential caused by MPTP, but not that caused by MPP+, these effects of MPTP, as well as cell death, probably were mediated by MPP+. This mechanism may play a role in the specific loss of dopaminergic neurons resulting in MPTP-induced Parkinson's disease.

  7. Resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization of pyrrole, N-methyl pyrrole, and furan

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, C.D.; Williamson, A.D.; Miller, J.C.; Compton, R.N.

    1980-08-15

    The resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra of pyrrole (C/sub 4/H/sub 5/N), N-methyl pyrrole (C/sub 5/H/sub 7/N), and furan (C/sub 4/H/sub 4/O) have been measured in the wavelength region from 365 to 680 nm. New and previously observed Rydberg states are reported for pyrrole and furan. Vibrational constants are presented for most of the Rydberg series. Accurate ionization potentials are derived for pyrrole (8.207 +- 0.003 eV) and N-methyl pyrrole (7.94 +- 0.02 eV). A strong two photon allowed transition is observed in N-methyl pyrrole at 41 193 cm/sup -1/ (0,0) and is attributed to an /sup 1/A/sub 2/ state. The corresponding state is not seen in pyrrole; however, it may be obscured by overlapping Rydberg series. Mass spectra following REMPI for benzene, pyrrole, and furan are reported. The degree of ionic fragmentation depends upon laser power density and wavelength.

  8. First proton-transfer study of 18F + p resonances relevant for novae

    SciTech Connect

    Adekola, A. S.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Brune, C.; Chae, K. Y.; Domizioli, C.; Greife, U.; Heinen, Z.; Hornish, M.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Livesay, R. J.; Ma, Z.; Massey, T.; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Pain, S. D.; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, Michael Scott; Thomas, J. S.; Visser, D. W.; Voinov, A.

    2011-01-01

    The 18F(p, )15O reaction is the predominant destruction mechanism in novae of the radionuclide 18F, a target of -ray observatories. Thus, its rate is important for understanding 18F production in novae. We have studied resonances in the 18F+p system by making a measurement of a protontransfer reaction 18F(d,n). We have observed 15 19Ne levels, 5 of which are below the proton threshold, including a subthreshold state, which has significant lp=0 strength. Our data provide a direct determination of the spectroscopic strength of these states and new constraints on their spins and parities, thereby resolving a controversy, which involves the 8- and 38- keV resonances. The 18F(p, )15O reaction rate is reevaluated, which takes the subthreshold resonance and other new information determined in this experiment into account.

  9. [In vitro evaluation of metabolic change in forebrain ischemia model of rat using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, N

    1997-05-01

    Metabolic disruption resulted from cerebral ischemia and post-ischemia reperfusion injury was studied using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS). We also analyzed the effect of 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one (MCI-186) which can scavenge free radicals induced in the brain tissue due to ischemic-reperfusion in this experiment. The ischemic model was produced using rat forebrain ischemic model (Pulsinelli's 4 vessels occlusion model). Post-ischemic reperfusion was also induced by the re-opening of the occluded common carotid arteries. The occluded time was 30 min and reperfusion time 0, 10, 30, 60 min. We obtained the specimens in the cortex under microwave fixation. Choline and acetate increased during ischemia and gradually decreased during reperfusion period. These two signals seen in 1H MRS are supposed to represent cell membrane components (products) and the increase of these signals after reperfusion seems to be related to the post ischemic reperfusion injury due to the explosive increase of free radicals. Lactate, which is induced by anaerobic glycolysis, increased during ischemia and promptly disappeared after reperfusion. The treatment of pre-ischemic administration of MCI-186 significantly suppressed increases of choline and acetate. As far as lactate is concerned, post-ischemic administration of this drug significantly reduced its increase at the point of reperfusion. Our results suggest that MCI-186 alternates changes induced by ischemic-reperfusion injury in membranous metabolism, probably due to its free radical scavenging action. PMID:9226472

  10. FLAMEnGO 2.0: An enhanced fuzzy logic algorithm for structure-based assignment of methyl group resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Fa-An; Kim, Jonggul; Xia, Youlin; Milligan, Michael; Rowe, Nancy; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2014-08-01

    We present an enhanced version of the FLAMEnGO (Fuzzy Logic Assignment of Methyl Group) software, a structure-based method to assign methyl group resonances in large proteins. FLAMEnGO utilizes a fuzzy logic algorithm coupled with Monte Carlo sampling to obtain a probability-based assignment of the methyl group resonances. As an input, FLAMEnGO requires either the protein X-ray structure or an NMR structural ensemble including data such as methyl-methyl NOESY, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE), methine-methyl TOCSY data. Version 2.0 of this software (FLAMEnGO 2.0) has a user-friendly graphic interface and presents improved modules that enable the input of partial assignments and additional NMR restraints. We tested the performance of FLAMEnGO 2.0 on maltose binding protein (MBP) as well as the C-subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA-C). FLAMEnGO 2.0 can be used as a standalone method or to assist in the completion of partial resonance assignments and can be downloaded at www.chem.umn.edu/groups/veglia/forms/flamengo2-form.html.

  11. Fast method for brain image segmentation: application to proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Bonekamp, David; Horská, Alena; Jacobs, Michael A; Arslanoglu, Atilla; Barker, Peter B

    2005-11-01

    The interpretation of brain metabolite concentrations measured by quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is assisted by knowledge of the percentage of gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within each MRSI voxel. Usually, this information is determined from T(1)-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI) that have a much higher spatial resolution than the MRSI data. While this approach works well, it is time-consuming. In this article, a rapid data acquisition and analysis procedure for image segmentation is described, which is based on collection of several, thick slice, fast spin echo images (FSE) of different contrast. Tissue segmentation is performed with linear "Eigenimage" filtering and normalization. The method was compared to standard segmentation techniques using high-resolution 3D T(1)-weighted MRI in five subjects. Excellent correlation between the two techniques was obtained, with voxel-wise regression analysis giving GM: R2 = 0.893 +/- 0.098, WM: R2 = 0.892 +/- 0.089, ln(CSF): R2 = 0.831 +/- 0.082). Test-retest analysis in one individual yielded an excellent agreement of measurements with R2 higher than 0.926 in all three tissue classes. Application of FSE/EI segmentation to a sample proton MRSI dataset yielded results similar to prior publications. It is concluded that FSE imaging in conjunction with Eigenimage analysis is a rapid and reliable way of segmenting brain tissue for application to proton MRSI. PMID:16187272

  12. A nested phosphorus and proton coil array for brain magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ryan; Lakshmanan, Karthik; Madelin, Guillaume; Parasoglou, Prodromos

    2016-01-01

    A dual-nuclei radiofrequency coil array was constructed for phosphorus and proton magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of the human brain at 7T. An eight-channel transceive degenerate birdcage phosphorus module was implemented to provide whole-brain coverage and significant sensitivity improvement over a standard dual-tuned loop coil. A nested eight-channel proton module provided adequate sensitivity for anatomical localization without substantially sacrificing performance on the phosphorus module. The developed array enabled phosphorus spectroscopy, a saturation transfer technique to calculate the global creatine kinase forward reaction rate, and single-metabolite whole-brain imaging with 1.4cm nominal isotropic resolution in 15min (2.3cm actual resolution), while additionally enabling 1mm isotropic proton imaging. This study demonstrates that a multi-channel array can be utilized for phosphorus and proton applications with improved coverage and/or sensitivity over traditional single-channel coils. The efficient multi-channel coil array, time-efficient pulse sequences, and the enhanced signal strength available at ultra-high fields can be combined to allow volumetric assessment of the brain and could provide new insights into the underlying energy metabolism impairment in several neurodegenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, as well as mental disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID:26375209

  13. Spin-symmetry conversion in methyl rotors induced by tunnel resonance at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, B.; Sun, C.; Horsewill, A. J.; Alsanoosi, A. M.; Aibout, A.

    2014-02-28

    Field-cycling NMR in the solid state at low temperature (4.2 K) has been employed to measure the tunneling spectra of methyl (CH{sub 3}) rotors in phenylacetone and toluene. The phenomenon of tunnel resonance reveals anomalies in {sup 1}H magnetization from which the following tunnel frequencies have been determined: phenylacetone, ν{sub t} = 6.58 ± 0.08 MHz; toluene, ν{sub t(1)} = 6.45 ± 0.06 GHz and ν{sub t(2)} = 7.07 ± 0.06 GHz. The tunnel frequencies in the two samples differ by three orders of magnitude, meaning different experimental approaches are required. In phenylacetone the magnetization anomalies are observed when the tunnel frequency matches one or two times the {sup 1}H Larmor frequency. In toluene, doping with free radicals enables magnetization anomalies to be observed when the tunnel frequency is equal to the electron spin Larmor frequency. Cross-polarization processes between the tunneling and Zeeman systems are proposed and form the basis of a thermodynamic model to simulate the tunnel resonance spectra. These invoke space-spin interactions to drive the changes in nuclear spin-symmetry. The tunnel resonance lineshapes are explained, showing good quantitative agreement between experiment and simulations.

  14. Search for Resonances in the Photoproduction of Proton-Antiproton Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham Stokes

    2006-06-30

    Results are reported on the reaction {gamma}p {yields} p{bar p}p with beam energy in the range 4.8-5.5 GeV. The data were collected at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in CLAS experiment E01-017(G6C). The focus of this study is an understanding of the mechanisms of photoproduction of proton-antiproton pairs, and to search for intermediate resonances, both narrow and broad, which decay to p{bar p}. The total measured cross section in the photon energy range 4.8-5.5 GeV is {sigma} = 33 {+-} 2 nb. Measurement of the cross section as a function of energy is provided. An upper limit on the production of a narrow resonance state previously observed with a mass of 2.02 GeV/c{sup 2} is placed at 0.35 nb. No intermediate resonance states were observed. Meson exchange production appears to dominate the production of the proton-antiproton pairs.

  15. Proton magnetic resonance imaging using a nitrogen-vacancy spin sensor.

    PubMed

    Rugar, D; Mamin, H J; Sherwood, M H; Kim, M; Rettner, C T; Ohno, K; Awschalom, D D

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging, with its ability to provide three-dimensional, elementally selective imaging without radiation damage, has had a revolutionary impact in many fields, especially medicine and the neurosciences. Although challenging, its extension to the nanometre scale could provide a powerful new tool for the nanosciences, especially if it can provide a means for non-destructively visualizing the full three-dimensional morphology of complex nanostructures, including biomolecules. To achieve this potential, innovative new detection strategies are required to overcome the severe sensitivity limitations of conventional inductive detection techniques. One successful example is magnetic resonance force microscopy, which has demonstrated three-dimensional imaging of proton NMR with resolution on the order of 10 nm, but with the requirement of operating at cryogenic temperatures. Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres in diamond offer an alternative detection strategy for nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging that is operable at room temperature. Here, we demonstrate two-dimensional imaging of (1)H NMR from a polymer test sample using a single NV centre in diamond as the sensor. The NV centre detects the oscillating magnetic field from precessing protons as the sample is scanned past the NV centre. A spatial resolution of ∼12 nm is shown, limited primarily by the scan resolution. PMID:25531089

  16. Proton magnetic resonance imaging using a nitrogen-vacancy spin sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugar, D.; Mamin, H. J.; Sherwood, M. H.; Kim, M.; Rettner, C. T.; Ohno, K.; Awschalom, D. D.

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging, with its ability to provide three-dimensional, elementally selective imaging without radiation damage, has had a revolutionary impact in many fields, especially medicine and the neurosciences. Although challenging, its extension to the nanometre scale could provide a powerful new tool for the nanosciences, especially if it can provide a means for non-destructively visualizing the full three-dimensional morphology of complex nanostructures, including biomolecules. To achieve this potential, innovative new detection strategies are required to overcome the severe sensitivity limitations of conventional inductive detection techniques. One successful example is magnetic resonance force microscopy, which has demonstrated three-dimensional imaging of proton NMR with resolution on the order of 10 nm, but with the requirement of operating at cryogenic temperatures. Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres in diamond offer an alternative detection strategy for nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging that is operable at room temperature. Here, we demonstrate two-dimensional imaging of 1H NMR from a polymer test sample using a single NV centre in diamond as the sensor. The NV centre detects the oscillating magnetic field from precessing protons as the sample is scanned past the NV centre. A spatial resolution of ˜12 nm is shown, limited primarily by the scan resolution.

  17. Proton electron double resonance imaging (PEDRI) of the isolated beating rat heart.

    PubMed

    Liebgott, Thibaut; Li, Haihong; Deng, Yuanmu; Zweier, Jay L

    2003-08-01

    Proton electron double resonance imaging (PEDRI) is a double resonance technique where proton MRI is performed with irradiation of a paramagnetic solute. A low-field PEDRI system was developed at 20.1 mT suitable for imaging free radicals in biological samples. With a new small dual resonator, PEDRI was applied to image nitroxide free radicals in isolated beating rat hearts. Experiments with phantoms showed maximum image enhancement factors (IEF) of 42 or 28 with TEMPONE radical concentrations of 2-3 mM at EPR irradiation powers of 12W or 6W, respectively. In the latter case, image resolution better than 0.5 mm and radical sensitivity of 5 microM was obtained. For isolated heart studies, EPR irradiation power of 6W provided optimal compromise of modest sample heating with good SNR. Only a small increase in temperature of about 1 degrees C was observed, while cardiac function remained within 10% of control values. With infusion of 3 mM TEMPONE an IEF of 15 was observed enabling 2D or 3D images to be obtained in 27 sec or 4.5 min, respectively. These images visualized the change in radical distribution within the heart during infusion and clearance. Thus, PEDRI enables rapid and high-quality imaging of free radical uptake and clearance in perfused hearts and provides a useful technique for studying cardiac radical metabolism. PMID:12876716

  18. Proton Magnetic Resonance and Human Thyroid Neoplasia III. Ex VivoChemical-Shift Microimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutter, Allison; Künnecke, Basil; Dowd, Susan; Russell, Peter; Delbridge, Leigh; Mountford, Carolyn E.

    1996-03-01

    Magnetic-resonance chemical-shift microimaging, with a spatial resolution of 40 × 40 μm, is a modality which can detect alterations to cellular chemistry and hence markers of pathological processes in human tissueex vivo.This technique was used as a chemical microscope to assess follicular thyroid neoplasms, lesions which are unsatisfactorily investigated using standard histopathological techiques or water-based magnetic-resonance imaging. The chemical-shift images at the methyl frequency (0.9 ppm) identify chemical heterogeneity in follicular tumors which are histologically homogeneous. The observed changes to cellular chemistry, detectable in foci of approximately 100 cells or less, support the existence of a preinvasive state hitherto unidentified by current pathological techniques.

  19. {Delta} resonance contribution to two-photon exchange in electron-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    S. Kondratyuk; P. G. Blunden; W. Melnitchouk; J. A. Tjon

    2005-06-01

    We calculate the effects on the elastic electron-proton scattering cross section of the two-photon exchange contribution with an intermediate {Delta} resonance. The {Delta} two-photon exchange contribution is found to be smaller in magnitude than the previously evaluated nucleon contribution, with an opposite sign at backward scattering angles. The sum of the nucleon and {Delta} two-photon exchange corrections has the angular dependence compatible with both the polarization transfer and the Rosenbluth methods of measuring the nucleon electromagnetic form factors.

  20. Correction of Proton Resonance Frequency Shift Temperature Maps for Magnetic Field Disturbances Caused by Breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmatukha, Andriy V.; Bakker, Chris J. G.

    2006-05-01

    Respiratory Induced Resonance Offset (RIRO) is a periodic disturbance of the magnetic field due to breathing. Such disturbances handicap the accuracy of the Proton Resonance Frequency Shift (PRFS) method of MRI temperature mapping in anatomies situated nearby the lungs and chest wall. In this work, we propose a method capable of minimizing errors caused by RIRO in PRFS temperature maps. In this method, a set of baseline images characterizing RIRO at a variety of respiratory cycle instants is acquired before the thermal treatment starts. During the treatment, the temperature evolution is found from two successive images. Then, the calculated temperature changes are corrected for the additional contribution caused by RIRO using the pre-treatment baseline images acquired at the identical instances of the respiratory cycle. Our method is shown to improve the accuracy and stability of PRFS temperature maps in the presence of RIRO and motion in phantom and volunteer experiments.

  1. Base-Pairing Energies of Proton-Bound Dimers and Proton Affinities of 1-Methyl-5-Halocytosines: Implications for the Effects of Halogenation on the Stability of the DNA i-Motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Wu, R. R.; Rodgers, M. T.

    2015-09-01

    (CCG)n•(CGG)n trinucleotide repeats have been found to be associated with fragile X syndrome, the most widespread inherited cause of mental retardation in humans. The (CCG)n•(CGG)n repeats adopt i-motif conformations that are preferentially stabilized by base-pairing interactions of noncanonical proton-bound dimers of cytosine (C+•C). Halogenated cytosine residues are one form of DNA damage that may be important in altering the structure and stability of DNA or DNA-protein interactions and, hence, regulate gene expression. Previously, we investigated the effects of 5-halogenation and 1-methylation of cytosine on the base-pairing energies (BPEs) using threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) techniques. In the present study, we extend our work to include proton-bound homo- and heterodimers of cytosine, 1-methyl-5-fluorocytosine, and 1-methyl-5-bromocytosine. All modifications examined here are found to produce a decrease in the BPEs. However, the BPEs of all of the proton-bound dimers examined significantly exceed those of Watson-Crick G•C, neutral C•C base pairs, and various methylated variants such that DNA i-motif conformations should still be preserved in the presence of these modifications. The proton affinities (PAs) of the halogenated cytosines are also obtained from the experimental data by competitive analysis of the primary dissociation pathways that occur in parallel for the proton-bound heterodimers. 5-Halogenation leads to a decrease in the N3 PA of cytosine, whereas 1-methylation leads to an increase in the N3 PA. Thus, the 1-methyl-5-halocytosines exhibit PAs that are intermediate.

  2. Electron spin resonance identification of a methyl associated organic radical in irradiated amorphous SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, W.R.; Leisure, R.G.

    1996-12-01

    An electron spin resonance (ESR) signal comprised of three resolved lines of equal 19.3 Gauss separation (3{times}19.3 G), but unequal amplitude, is observed in x-irradiated amorphous silicon dioxide. The radical appears exclusively in silica samples which also exhibit the methyl radical, a familiar indicator of trace carbon and hydrogen contamination. The 3{times}19.3 G signal is observed to grow most rapidly versus irradiation dose when methyl radical concentration is near maximum. This evidence suggests that the ESR signal is due to a radiolytic, organic radical which evolves after the methyl radical and, like the methyl radical, is trapped and stabilized in the amorphous silica network. Experimental methods of radical generation are presented, followed by discussion of models for the chemical structure of the 3{times}19.3 G radical. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Non-resonant kaon pair production and medium effects in proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paryev, E. Ya; Hartmann, M.; Kiselev, Yu T.

    2015-07-01

    We study the non-resonant (non-ϕ) production of {{K}+}{{K}-} pairs by protons of 2.83 GeV kinetic energy on C, Cu, Ag and Au targets within the collision model, based on the nuclear spectral function, for incoherent primary proton-nucleon and secondary pion-nucleon creation processes. The model takes into account the initial proton and final kaon absorption, target nucleon binding and Fermi motion as well as nuclear mean-field potential effects on these processes. We calculate the antikaon momentum dependences of the exclusive absolute and relative {{K}+}{{K}-} pair yields in the acceptance window of the ANKE magnetic spectrometer, used in a recent experiment performed at COoler SYnchrotron (COSY), within the different scenarios for the antikaon-nucleus optical potential. We demonstrate that the above observables are strongly sensitive to this potential. Therefore, they can be useful to help determine the {{K}-} optical potential from the direct comparison of the results of our calculations with the data from the respective ANKE-at-COSY experiment. We also show that the pion-nucleon production channels dominate in the low-momentum {{K}-}, {{K}+} production in the considered kinematics and, hence, they have to be accounted for in the analysis of these data.

  4. Langmuir probe diagnostics of plasma in high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P.; Kewlani, H.; Mishra, L.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2013-07-15

    A high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source has been developed for low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma generated in this proton ion source is performed using Langmuir probe. The diagnostics of plasma in the ion source is important as it determines beam parameters of the ion source, i.e., beam current, emittance, and available species. The plasma parameter measurement in the ion source is performed in continuously working and pulsed mode using hydrogen as plasma generation gas. The measurement is performed in the ECR zone for operating pressure and microwave power range of 10{sup −4}–10{sup −3} mbar and 400–1000 W. An automated Langmuir probe diagnostics unit with data acquisition system is developed to measure these parameters. The diagnostics studies indicate that the plasma density and plasma electron temperature measured are in the range 5.6 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} to 3.8 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} and 4–14 eV, respectively. Using this plasma, ion beam current of tens of mA is extracted. The variations of plasma parameters with microwave power, gas pressure, and radial location of the probe have been studied.

  5. Carbon-13 and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins.

    PubMed

    Goff, H M; Morgan, L O

    1978-07-01

    Carbon-13 and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra have been recorded for porphyrins, zinc porphyrins, and iron(III) porphyrin complexes in aqueous media. Spectra of porphyrin-c and hemin-c confirm the structure with thioether linkages at positions alpha to the porphyrin ring. The pattern of NMR isotropic shifts has implications regarding electron transfer in cytochrome-c. Free-base porphyrin-c and meso-substituted porphyrins have been examined for pyrrole nitrogen-hydrogen tautomerism and possible aggregation in aqueous solution. Zinc porphyrin 13C NMR spectra were recorded in order to provide diamagnetic references for paramagnetic iron(III) derivatives. Low-spin iron(III) porphyrin-biscyano complexes in aqueous solution exhibit NMR isotropic shift patterns similar to those previously observed for related compounds in non-aqueous media. The first 13C NMR spectra are reported for mu-oxo-bridged iron(III) porphyrin dimers. A partially resolved spectrum of a high-spin iron(III) porphyrin has also been obtained. Patterns of 13C and proton isotropic shifts are compared, and unpaired spin delocalization mechanisms for 13C resonances are discussed in a qualitative manner. PMID:687673

  6. Proton-Electron Double-Resonance Imaging of pH using phosphonated trityl probe

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Wataru; Bobko, Andrey A.; Dhimitruka, Ilirian; Hirata, Hiroshi; Zweier, Jay L.; Samouilov, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Variable Radio Frequency Proton-Electron Double-Resonance Imaging (VRF PEDRI) enables extracting a functional map from a limited number of images acquired at pre-selected EPR frequencies using specifically designed paramagnetic probes with high quality spatial resolution and short acquisition times. In this work we explored potential of VRF PEDRI for pH mapping of aqueous samples using recently synthesized pH-sensitive phosphonated trityl radical, pTR. The ratio of Overhauser enhancements measured at each pixel at two different excitation frequencies corresponding to the resonances of protonated and deprotonated forms of pTR probe allows for a pH map extraction. Long relaxation times of pTR allow for pH mapping at EPR irradiation power as low as 1.25 W during 130 s acquisition time with spatial resolution of about 1 mm. This is particularly important for in vivo applications enabling one to avoid sample overheating by reducing RF power deposition. PMID:25530673

  7. Resonance Raman studies of bathorhodopsin: evidence for a protonated Schiff base linkage.

    PubMed

    Eyring, G; Mathies, R

    1979-01-01

    A dual beam pump/probe technique has been used with a 585-nm probe wavelength to obtain maximal resonance enhancement of the Raman lines of bathorhodopsin in a photostationary steady-state mixture at -160 degrees C. These studies show that bathorhodopsin has a protonated Schiff base vibration at 1657 cm(-1) which shifts upon deuteration to 1625 cm(-1). Within our experimental error (+/-2 cm(-1)) these frequencies are identical to those observed in rhodopsin and isorhodopsin. These effects show that the strength of the C=N bond and the degree of protonation of the Schiff base nitrogen are the same in bathorhodopsin, rhodopsin, and isorhodopsin. The implication of these results for the structure of the retinal chromophore in bathorhodopsin are discussed. The resonance Raman spectrum of pure bathorhodopsin has been generated by accurately subtracting the residual contributions of rhodopsin and isorhodopsin from spectra of the low temperature photostationary mixture. Bathorhodopsin is found to have lines at 853, 875, 920, 1006, 1166, 1210, 1278, 1323, 1536, and 1657 cm(-1). Also, by using an intensified vidicon detector, we have observed Raman scattering from bathorhodopsin at room temperature by generating a photostationary steady state with pulsed laser excitation. At room temperature the three characteristic lines of bathorhodopsin are found at 858, 873, and 920 cm(-1). The fact that the frequencies of these bathorhodopsin lines are nearly identical at both temperatures implies that the retinal conformation in bathorhodopsin formed at -160 degrees C is the same as that formed at room temperature. PMID:284349

  8. Non-destructive Ripeness Sensing by Using Proton NMR [Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G. W.; Stroshine, R. L.; Bellon, V.

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz).

  9. Non-destructive ripeness sensing by using proton NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance)

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G.W.; Stroshine, R.L. . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering); Bellon, V. , 34 - Montpellier )

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz). 7 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Search for resonant pair production of Higgs bosons decaying to two bottom quark-antiquark pairs in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Molina, J.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.

    2015-10-01

    A model-independent search for a narrow resonance produced in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV and decaying to a pair of 125 GeV Higgs bosons that in turn each decays into a bottom quark-antiquark pair is performed by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The analyzed data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 17.9 fb-1. No evidence for a signal is observed. Upper limits at a 95% confidence level on the production cross section for such a resonance, in the mass range from 270 to 1100 GeV, are reported. Using these results, a radion with decay constant of 1 TeV and mass from 300 to 1100 GeV, and a Kaluza-Klein graviton with mass from 380 to 830 GeV are excluded at a 95% confidence level.

  11. Nuclear Structure of 8B Studied by Proton Resonance Scatterings on 7Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hayakawa, S.; Amadio, G.; Kubono, S.; Fujikawa, H.; Saito, A.; He, J. J.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Nishimura, S.; Togano, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.; Niikura, M.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.

    2008-05-01

    A new measurement of the proton resonance scattering on 7Be was performed up to the excitation energy of 6.8 MeV using the low-energy RI beam facility CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. The excitation function of 8B above 3.5 MeV was successfully measured for the first time, providing important information about the reaction rate of 7Be(p,γ)8B, which is the key reaction in the solar 8B neutrino production. For more intensive experimental studies with RI beams, the development of a cryogenic gas target system is ongoing at CNS. In this paper a preliminary result of the 7Be experiment and the present status of the development of the target system are presented.

  12. Proton and deuteron spin structure function measurements in the resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    F.R. Wesselmann

    2003-07-01

    The RSS collaboration has measured the spin structure functions of the proton and the deuteron at Jefferson Lab using the Hall C HMS spectrometer, a polarized electron beam and a polarized solid target. The asymmetries A and A were measured in the region of the nucleon resonances (0.82 GeV < W < 1.98 GeV) at an average four momentum transfer of Q2 = 1.3 GeV2. The extracted spin structure functions and their kinematic dependence will make a significant contribution in the study of higher-twist effects and polarized duality tests. A description of the experiment and the latest findings of the analysis will be presented.

  13. Nuclear Structure of {sup 8}B Studied by Proton Resonance Scatterings on {sup 7}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hayakawa, S.; Amadio, G.; Kubono, S.; Fujikawa, H.; Niikura, M.; Binh, D. N.; Saito, A.; He, J. J.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Nishimura, S.; Togano, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.; Khiem, L. H.

    2008-05-21

    A new measurement of the proton resonance scattering on {sup 7}Be was performed up to the excitation energy of 6.8 MeV using the low-energy RI beam facility CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. The excitation function of {sup 8}B above 3.5 MeV was successfully measured for the first time, providing important information about the reaction rate of {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B, which is the key reaction in the solar {sup 8}B neutrino production. For more intensive experimental studies with RI beams, the development of a cryogenic gas target system is ongoing at CNS. In this paper a preliminary result of the {sup 7}Be experiment and the present status of the development of the target system are presented.

  14. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of breast cancer: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    An emerging clinical modality called proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) enables the non-invasive in vivo assessment of tissue metabolism and is demonstrating applications in improving the specificity of MR breast lesion diagnosis and monitoring tumour responsiveness to neoadjuvant chemotherapies. Variations in the concentration of choline-based cellular metabolites, detectable with 1H-MRS, have shown an association with malignant transformation of tissue in in vivo and in vitro studies. 1H-MRS exists as an adjunct to the current routine clinical breast MR examination. This review serves as an introduction to the field of breast 1H-MRS, discusses modern high-field strength and quantitative approaches and technical considerations, and reviews the literature with respect to the application of 1H-MRS for breast cancer. PMID:22515594

  15. Absolute quantification for benzoic acid in processed foods using quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Sato, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-09-15

    The absolute quantification method of benzoic acid (BA) in processed foods using solvent extraction and quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was developed and validated. BA levels were determined using proton signals (δ(H) 7.53 and 7.98) referenced to 2-dimethyl-2-silapentane-5-sulfonate-d(6) sodium salt (DSS-d(6)) after simple solvent extraction from processed foods. All recoveries from several kinds of processed foods, spiked at their specified maximum Japanese usage levels (0.6-2.5 g kg(-1)) and at 0.13 g kg(-1) and 0.063 g kg(-1), were greater than 80%. The limit of quantification was confirmed as 0.063 g kg(-1) in processed foods, which was sufficiently low for the purposes of monitoring BA. The accuracy of the proposed method is equivalent to the conventional method using steam-distillation extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography. The proposed method was both rapid and simple. Moreover, it provided International System of Units traceability without the need for authentic analyte standards. Therefore, the proposed method is a useful and practical tool for determining BA levels in processed foods. PMID:22967562

  16. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and MRI Reveal No Evidence for Brain Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, Neva M.; Shaw, Dennis. W. W.; Richards, Todd L.; Estes, Annette M.; Friedman, Seth D.; Petropoulos, Helen; Artru, Alan A.; Dager, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Brain mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as an etiologic factor in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ([superscript 1]HMRS) and MRI were used to assess for evidence of brain mitochondrial dysfunction in longitudinal samples of children with ASD or developmental delay (DD), and cross-sectionally…

  17. Search for resonances and quantum black holes using dijet mass spectra in proton-proton collisions at √{s }=8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Molina, J.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Bagaturia, I.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Tziaferi, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. 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M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Bisello, D.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Fantinel, S.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Ryu, M. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Moon, D. H.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Marrouche, J.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Musella, P.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Petrakou, E.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Albayrak, E. A.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mathias, B.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Scarborough, T.; Wu, Z.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Krohn, M.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Gray, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Ratnikov, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Malik, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Primavera, F.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Petrillo, G.; Verzetti, M.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    A search for resonances and quantum black holes is performed using the dijet mass spectra measured in proton-proton collisions at √{s }=8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 . In a search for narrow resonances that couple to quark-quark, quark-gluon, or gluon-gluon pairs, model-independent upper limits, at 95% confidence level, are obtained on the production cross section of resonances, with masses above 1.2 TeV. When interpreted in the context of specific models the limits exclude string resonances with masses below 5.0 TeV; excited quarks below 3.5 TeV; scalar diquarks below 4.7 TeV; W' bosons below 1.9 TeV or between 2.0 and 2.2 TeV; Z' bosons below 1.7 TeV; and Randall-Sundrum gravitons below 1.6 TeV. A separate search is conducted for narrow resonances that decay to final states including b quarks. The first exclusion limit is set for excited b quarks, with a lower mass limit between 1.2 and 1.6 TeV depending on their decay properties. Searches are also carried out for wide resonances, assuming for the first time width-to-mass ratios up to 30%, and for quantum black holes with a range of model parameters. The wide resonance search excludes axigluons and colorons with mass below 3.6 TeV, and color-octet scalars with mass below 2.5 TeV. Lower bounds between 5.0 and 6.3 TeV are set on the masses of quantum black holes.

  18. New Evidence For Proton Cyclotron Resonance In a Magnetar Strength Field From SGR 1806-20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parke, William; Ibrahim, Alaa I.; Swank, Jean H.

    2002-01-01

    A great deal of evidence has recently been gathered in favor of the picture that Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars are powered by ultra-strong magnetic fields (B greater than 10(exp 14) G; i.e. magnetars). Nevertheless, present determination of the magnetic field in such magnetar candidates has been indirect and model dependent. A key prediction concerning magnetars is the detection of ion cyclotron resonance features, which would offer a decisive diagnostic of the field strength. Here we present the detection of a 5 keV absorption feature in a variety of bursts from the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1806-20, confirming our initial discovery and establishing the presence of the feature in the source's burst spectra. The line feature is well explained as proton cyclotron resonance in an ultra-strong magnetic field, offering a direct measurement of SGR 1806-20's magnetic field (B approx. 10(exp 15) G) and a clear evidence of a magnetar. Together with the source's spin-down rate, the feature also provides the first measurement of the gravitational redshift, mass and radius of a magnetar.

  19. Neurochemistry of Drug Action: Insights from Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging And Their Relevance to Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Licata, Stephanie C.; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2011-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) is a non-invasive imaging technique that permits measurement of particular compounds or metabolites within the tissue of interest. In the brain, 1H MRS provides a snapshot of the neurochemical environment within a defined volume of interest. A search of the literature demonstrates the widespread utility of this technique for characterizing tumors, tracking the progress of neurodegenerative disease, and for understanding the neurobiological basis of psychiatric disorders. As of relatively recently, 1H MRS has found its way into substance abuse research, and it is beginning to become recognized as a valuable complement in the brain imaging toolbox that also contains positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Drug abuse studies employing 1H MRS have identified a number biochemical changes in the brain. The most consistent alterations across drug class were reductions in N-acetylaspartate and elevations in myo-inositol, while changes in choline, creatine, and amino acid transmitters also were abundant. Together, the studies discussed herein provide evidence that drugs of abuse may have a profound impact on neuronal health, energy metabolism and maintenance, inflammatory processes, cell membrane turnover, and neurotransmission, and these biochemical changes may underlie the neuropathology within brain tissue that subsequently gives rise to the cognitive and behavioral impairments associated with drug addiction. PMID:20201852

  20. Search for Resonant Production of High-Mass Photon Pairs in Proton-Proton Collisions at √{s }=8 and 13 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Cimmino, A.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Schöfbeck, R.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Da Silveira, G. G.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, T.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Liu, Z.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, J.; Ban, Y.; Chen, G.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; González Hernández, C. F.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Sculac, T.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Susa, T.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Assran, Y.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mahrous, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Ghosh, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Kucher, I.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Miné, P.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grenier, G.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.

    2016-07-01

    A search for the resonant production of high-mass photon pairs is presented. The analysis is based on samples of proton-proton collision data collected by the CMS experiment at center-of-mass energies of 8 and 13 TeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 19.7 and 3.3 fb-1 , respectively. The interpretation of the search results focuses on spin-0 and spin-2 resonances with masses between 0.5 and 4 TeV and with widths, relative to the mass, between 1.4 ×10-4 and 5.6 ×10-2. Limits are set on scalar resonances produced through gluon-gluon fusion, and on Randall-Sundrum gravitons. A modest excess of events compatible with a narrow resonance with a mass of about 750 GeV is observed. The local significance of the excess is approximately 3.4 standard deviations. The significance is reduced to 1.6 standard deviations once the effect of searching under multiple signal hypotheses is considered. More data are required to determine the origin of this excess.

  1. Search for Narrow Resonances Decaying to Dijets in Proton-Proton Collisions at √[s]=13  TeV.

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Asilar, E; Bergauer, T; Brandstetter, J; Brondolin, E; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Flechl, M; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Knünz, V; König, A; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Matsushita, T; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schieck, J; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Lauwers, J; Luyckx, S; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Abu Zeid, S; Blekman, F; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; De Bruyn, I; Deroover, K; Heracleous, N; Keaveney, J; Lowette, S; Moreels, L; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Van Parijs, I; Barria, P; Brun, H; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Fasanella, G; Favart, L; Goldouzian, R; Grebenyuk, A; Karapostoli, G; Lenzi, T; Léonard, A; Maerschalk, T; Marinov, A; Perniè, L; Randle-Conde, A; Seva, T; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Yonamine, R; Zenoni, F; Zhang, F; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Crucy, S; Dobur, D; Fagot, A; Garcia, G; Gul, M; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Poyraz, D; Ryckbosch, D; Salva, S; Sigamani, M; Tytgat, M; Van Driessche, W; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bondu, O; Brochet, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Delaere, C; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Jafari, A; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Mertens, A; Musich, M; Nuttens, C; Perrini, L; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Beliy, N; Hammad, G H; Aldá Júnior, W L; Alves, F L; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Correa Martins Junior, M; Hamer, M; Hensel, C; Moraes, A; Pol, M E; Rebello Teles, P; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Huertas Guativa, L M; Malbouisson, H; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mora Herrera, C; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Ahuja, S; Bernardes, C A; De Souza Santos, A; Dogra, S; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Mercadante, P G; Moon, C S; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Romero Abad, D; Ruiz Vargas, J C; Aleksandrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Iaydjiev, P; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Glushkov, I; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Ahmad, M; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Cheng, T; Du, R; Jiang, C H; Plestina, R; Romeo, F; Shaheen, S M; Spiezia, A; Tao, J; Wang, C; Wang, Z; Zhang, H; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Li, Q; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Xu, Z; Avila, C; Cabrera, A; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Puljak, I; Ribeiro Cipriano, P M; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Micanovic, S; Sudic, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Rykaczewski, H; Bodlak, M; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Elgammal, S; Ellithi Kamel, A; Mahmoud, M A; Calpas, B; Kadastik, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Tiko, A; Veelken, C; Eerola, P; Pekkanen, J; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Talvitie, J; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Favaro, C; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Machet, M; Malcles, J; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Zghiche, A; Antropov, I; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Busson, P; Cadamuro, L; Chapon, E; Charlot, C; Davignon, O; Filipovic, N; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Jo, M; Lisniak, S; Mastrolorenzo, L; Miné, P; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Ortona, G; Paganini, P; Pigard, P; Regnard, S; Salerno, R; Sauvan, J B; Sirois, Y; Strebler, T; Yilmaz, Y; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Aubin, A; Bloch, D; Brom, J-M; Buttignol, M; Chabert, E C; Chanon, N; Collard, C; Conte, E; Coubez, X; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Goetzmann, C; Le Bihan, A-C; Merlin, J A; Skovpen, K; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Bernet, C; Boudoul, G; Bouvier, E; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Courbon, B; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fan, J; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Lagarde, F; Laktineh, I B; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Pequegnot, A L; Perries, S; Ruiz Alvarez, J D; Sabes, D; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Toriashvili, T; Rurua, L; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Feld, L; Heister, A; Kiesel, M K; Klein, K; Lipinski, M

    2016-02-19

    A search for narrow resonances in proton-proton collisions at sqrt[s]=13  TeV is presented. The invariant mass distribution of the two leading jets is measured with the CMS detector using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.4  fb^{-1}. The highest observed dijet mass is 6.1 TeV. The distribution is smooth and no evidence for resonant particles is observed. Upper limits at 95% confidence level are set on the production cross section for narrow resonances with masses above 1.5 TeV. When interpreted in the context of specific models, the limits exclude string resonances with masses below 7.0 TeV, scalar diquarks below 6.0 TeV, axigluons and colorons below 5.1 TeV, excited quarks below 5.0 TeV, color-octet scalars below 3.1 TeV, and W^{'} bosons below 2.6 TeV. These results significantly extend previously published limits. PMID:26943527

  2. Search for Resonant Production of High-Mass Photon Pairs in Proton-Proton Collisions at sqrt[s]=8 and 13 TeV.

    PubMed

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    2016-07-29

    A search for the resonant production of high-mass photon pairs is presented. The analysis is based on samples of proton-proton collision data collected by the CMS experiment at center-of-mass energies of 8 and 13 TeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 19.7 and 3.3  fb^{-1}, respectively. The interpretation of the search results focuses on spin-0 and spin-2 resonances with masses between 0.5 and 4 TeV and with widths, relative to the mass, between 1.4×10^{-4} and 5.6×10^{-2}. Limits are set on scalar resonances produced through gluon-gluon fusion, and on Randall-Sundrum gravitons. A modest excess of events compatible with a narrow resonance with a mass of about 750 GeV is observed. The local significance of the excess is approximately 3.4 standard deviations. The significance is reduced to 1.6 standard deviations once the effect of searching under multiple signal hypotheses is considered. More data are required to determine the origin of this excess. PMID:27517765

  3. Effects of Gestational Magnetic Resonance Imaging on Methylation Status of Leptin Promoter in the Placenta and Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Yan, Feng-Shan; Lian, Jian-Min; Dou, She-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely used for diagnosis in gestational women. Though it has several advantages, animal and human studies on the safety of MRI for the fetus remain inconclusive. Epigenetic modifications, which are crucial for cellular functioning, are prone to being affected by environmental changes. Therefore, we hypothesized that MRI during gestation may cause epigenetic modification alterations. Here, we investigated DNA methylation patterns of leptin promoter in the placenta and cord blood of women exposed to MRI during gestation. Results showed that average methylation levels of leptin in the placenta and cord blood were not affected by MRI. We also found that the methylation levels in the placenta and cord blood were not affected by different magnetic fields (1.5T and 3.0T MRI). However, if pregnant women were exposed to MRI at 15 to 20 weeks of gestation, the methylation level of leptin in cord blood was visibly lower than that of pregnant women exposed to MRI after 20-weeks of gestation (P = 0.037). mRNA expression level of leptin in cord blood was also altered, though mRNA expression of leptin in the placenta was not significantly affected. Therefore, we concluded that gestational MRI may not have major effects on the methylation level of leptin in cord blood and the placenta except for MRI applied before 20 weeks of gestation. PMID:26789724

  4. Assessment of thermal effects of interstitial laser phototherapy on mammary tumors using proton resonance frequency method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Kelvin; Li, Xiaosong; Figueroa, Daniel; Towner, Rheal A.; Garteiser, Philippe; Saunders, Debra; Smith, Nataliya; Liu, Hong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-12-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) uses a synergistic approach to treat cancer systemically through local laser irradiation and immunological stimulation. Currently, LIT utilizes dye-assisted noninvasive laser irradiation to achieve selective photothermal interaction. However, LIT faces difficulties treating deeper tumors or tumors with heavily pigmented overlying skin. To circumvent these barriers, we use interstitial laser irradiation to induce the desired photothermal effects. The purpose of this study is to analyze the thermal effects of interstitial irradiation using proton resonance frequency (PRF). An 805-nm near-infrared laser with an interstitial cylindrical diffuser was used to treat rat mammary tumors. Different power settings (1.0, 1.25, and 1.5 W) were applied with an irradiation duration of 10 min. The temperature distributions of the treated tumors were measured by a 7 T magnetic resonance imager using PRF. We found that temperature distributions in tissue depended on both laser power and time settings, and that variance in tissue composition has a major influence in temperature elevation. The temperature elevations measured during interstitial laser irradiation by PRF and thermocouple were consistent, with some variations due to tissue composition and the positioning of the thermocouple's needle probes. Our results indicated that, for a tissue irradiation of 10 min, the elevation of rat tumor temperature ranged from 8 to 11°C for 1 W and 8 to 15°C for 1.5 W. This is the first time a 7 T magnetic resonance imager has been used to monitor interstitial laser irradiation via PRF. Our work provides a basic understanding of the photothermal interaction needed to control the thermal damage inside a tumor using interstitial laser treatment. Our work may lead to an optimal protocol for future cancer treatment using interstitial phototherapy in conjunction with immunotherapy.

  5. Non-Resonant Scattering of Inner Belt Protons by Oblique Emic Waves from a Space-Borne Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Soria-Santacruz Pich, M.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Shprits, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The radiation of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves from a space-borne antenna has been proposed as a way to remediate the inner Van Allen proton belt. These energetic protons represent an obstacle to development of space technologies. Man-made EMIC waves, however, may induce pitch-angle scattering of the hazardous particles and precipitate them into the atmosphere, thus reducing the risk to spacecraft. EMIC waves from in-situ transmitters propagate mostly with perpendicular wave number vectors and field aligned group velocity. The spreading of these waves across field lines is therefore very small, i.e. the antenna illuminates a very narrow region of space that is confined along geomagnetic field lines. Additionally, the drift period of energetic protons is very fast, between 10 to 100 seconds at L=1.5 depending on their energy. Particles, therefore, drift through the illuminated region in a fraction of a second, where they are instantly scattered by the waves. The interaction time is more than one order of magnitude shorter than the proton gyroperiod, and occurs approximately once per particle drift orbit. In this study we analyze the nature of this interaction by solving the non-gyroaveraged equations of motion of energetic test protons interacting with man-made EMIC waves. The study shows that non-resonant wave-particle interactions dominate the scattering compared to resonant ones. Most theories on wave-particle interactions, like quasi-linear diffusion or the gyroaveraged approach, emphasize the resonant interaction but neglect the non-resonant effect. We show, however, that the latter is the dominant contribution to the scattering for wave-particle encounters shorter than a gyroperiod. From this non-gyroaveraged test particle solution, we next calculate the corresponding diffusion rates due to the non-resonant scattering. These diffusion rates are more than two orders of magnitude larger than the ones from quasi-linear theory or the gyroaveraged

  6. Removal of power-line harmonics from proton magnetic resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legchenko, Anatoly; Valla, Pierre

    2003-08-01

    The Magnetic Resonance Sounding (MRS) method is based on the resonance behaviour of proton magnetic moments in the geomagnetic field. The main distinction between MRS and other geophysical methods is that it measures the magnetic resonance signal directly from groundwater molecules, making it a selective tool sensitive to groundwater. As the signal generated by the protons is very small, the method is also sensitive to electromagnetic interference (noise) and this is one of the major limitations for practical application. The frequency of the magnetic resonance signal (the Larmor frequency) is directly proportional to the magnitude of the geomagnetic field and varies between 800 and 2800 Hz around the globe. Whilst natural noise within this frequency range is generally not very large (excepting magnetic storms or other temporary disturbances), the level of cultural noise (electrical power lines, generators, etc.) may be very high. In order to improve performance, three existing filtering techniques were adapted to processing MRS measurements: block subtraction, sinusoid subtraction and notch filtering. The first two are subtraction techniques capable of suppressing stationary power-line noise without distorting or attenuating the signal of interest, both involve subtracting an estimate of the harmonic component but differ in the way the component is estimated. The block subtraction method consists of ascertaining the power-line noise (or "noise block") from a record of the noise alone, and then subtracting this block from a record containing both the noise and the signal. The sinusoid subtraction method is based on the calculation of the amplitude, frequency and phase of power-line harmonics using noise records. The notch filtering method does not require knowledge of the power-line harmonic parameters but it may cause distortion of the measured signal. During the study, it was found that, in the investigated frequency range, the electromagnetic noise produced by

  7. Semi-inclusive Delta resonance production in proton- nucleus collisions at 12.3 GeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, David Lawrence

    2001-08-01

    In the Spring of 1996, the fixed-target Brookhaven National Laboratory Experiment 910 recorded data at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. Proton beams of momenta 12.3 GeV/c and 17.5 GeV/c were incident on targets of Be, Cu, Au, U. Approximately 15 million central and minimum- bias collisions were recorded. The E910 detector was a very large acceptance spectrometer consisting of the Equation of State Time Projection Chamber, augmented with downstream drift chambers to improve tracking of high momentum particles and Cerenkov and Time-of-Flight systems to improve particle identification. The systematics of Δ resonance production in these proton-nucleus collisions have been studied for 12.3 GeV/c protons incident on Be and Au. We have measured the total yield per event of the Δ++, Δ0, and N* resonances, using the full, correct description of the line shape of the Relativistic Breit-Wigner function. The transverse momentum and center-of-mass angular dependence of the production cross-sections are presented. The invariant yields are presented as a function of the number of collisions suffered by the incident proton, and are discussed in the context of Heavy Ion Physics and the current understanding of the underlying physics in proton-nucleus collisions.

  8. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P. Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2014-03-15

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20–40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, −2 to −4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30–40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600–1000 W of microwave power, 800–1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2–3.9) × 10{sup −3} mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  9. Inclusive production of the Δ(1232) resonance in muon-proton scattering at 280 GEV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, M.; Arvidson, A.; Aubert, J. J.; Badelek, B.; Beaufays, J.; Bee, C. P.; Benchouk, C.; Berghoff, G.; Bird, I.; Blum, D.; Böhm, E.; De Bouard, X.; Brasse, F. W.; Braun, H.; Broll, C.; Brown, S.; Brück, H.; Calen, H.; Chima, J. S.; Ciborowski, J.; Clifft, R.; Coignet, G.; Combley, F.; Coughlan, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dahlgren, S.; Dengler, F.; Derado, I.; Dreyer, T.; Drees, J.; Düren, M.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, A.; Ernst, T.; Eszes, G.; Favier, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Flauger, W.; Foster, J.; Gabathuler, E.; Gajewski, J.; Gamet, R.; Gayler, J.; Geddes, N.; Giubellino, P.; Graftström, P.; Grard, F.; Haas, J.; Hagberg, E.; Hasert, F. J.; Hayman, P.; Heusse, P.; Hoppe, C.; Jaffré, M.; Jacholkowska, A.; Janata, F.; Jancso, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kabuss, E. M.; Kellner, G.; Korbel, V.; Krüger, J.; Kullander, S.; Landgraf, U.; Lanske, D.; Loken, J.; Long, K.; Maire, M.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Maselli, S.; Mohr, W.; Montanet, F.; Montgomery, H. E.; Nagy, E.; Nassalski, J.; Norton, P. R.; Oakham, F. G.; Osborne, A. M.; Pascaud, C.; Pawlik, B.; Payre, P.; Peroni, C.; Pessard, H.; Pettingale, J.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pönsgen, B.; Pötsch, M.; Renton, P.; Ribarics, P.; Rith, K.; Rondio, E.; Scheer, M.; Schlagböhmer, A.; Schiemann, H.; Schmitz, N.; Schneegans, M.; Scholz, M.; Schröder, T.; Schouten, M.; Schultze, K.; Sloan, T.; Stier, H. E.; Studt, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Thénard, J. M.; Thompson, J. C.; De La Torre, A.; Toth, J.; Urban, L.; Urban, L.; Wallucks, W.; Whalley, M.; Wheeler, S.; Williams, W. S. C.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Windmolders, R.; Wolf, G.; European Muon Collaboration

    1986-01-01

    Inclusive production of the Δ (1232) resonance has been measured in 280 GeV/ c muon-proton interactions. The production of the Δ++ as a function of the variables χBJ, W, Q2, χF and pT2 is investigated. The average Δ++ multiplicity is found to be smaller, by a factor of 6.2 ± 1.2, than the average multiplicity of protons. An upper limit for Δ0 production is obtained. The net hadronic charge distribution for events with a Δ++ is presented. The results are compared to the predictions of the Lund and Fire string models.

  10. Search for narrow high-mass resonances in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV decaying to a Z and a Higgs boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Molina, J.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Tziaferi, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Bisello, D.; Carlin, R.; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, A.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Fanzago, F.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Ryu, M. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Moon, D. H.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Marrouche, J.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Musella, P.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. 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T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Krohn, M.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Gray, J.; Kenny, R. P., III; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Ratnikov, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Malik, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Primavera, F.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Petrillo, G.; Verzetti, M.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.

    2015-09-01

    A search for a narrow, high-mass resonance decaying into Z and Higgs (H) bosons is presented. The final state studied consists of a merged jet pair and a τ pair resulting from the decays of Z and H bosons, respectively. The analysis is based on a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, collected with the CMS experiment in 2012, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. In the resonance mass range of interest, which extends from 0.8 to 2.5 TeV, the Z and H bosons are produced with large momenta, which implies that the final products of the two quarks or the two τ leptons must be detected within a small angular interval. From a combination of all possible decay modes of the τ leptons, production cross sections in a range between 0.9 and 27.8 fb are excluded at 95% confidence level, depending on the resonance mass.

  11. Extreme projection of a proton into the pi-cloud of an aromatic ring: record shielding of an aromatic proton in trans-10b-methyl-10c-(1-naphthyl)-10b,10c-dihydropyrene.

    PubMed

    Ting, Yuhua; Lai, Yee-Hing

    2004-01-28

    A synthetic sequence involving dithiametacyclophane --> metacyclophanediene --> dihydropyrene was employed to prepare trans-10b-methyl-10c-(2-naphthyl)- and trans-10b-methyl-10c-(1-naphthyl)-10b,10c-dihydropyrene 5 and 6, respectively. Both exhibit a strong diamagnetic ring current despite the introduction of an internal bulky substituent within the pi-electron cloud. Their electronic spectra suggest interaction between the two near-perpendicular naphthyl and dihydropyrenyl pi systems, resulting in red shift and band broadening. All naphthyl protons are well resolved in their 1H NMR spectra due to a strong shielding effect of the dihydropyrene ring. The most shielded protons in 5 and 6 are H1' and H2' at delta 2.47 and 1.42, respectively, being 5.25 and 5.95 ppm shifted from those of reference protons. There is evidence for free rotation on the NMR time scale of the 2-naphthyl ring in 5 with a preference for a particular conformer, whereas the 1-naphthyl ring in 6 is conformationally rigid with its H2' projecting deeply into the pi-cloud, thus accounting for the most shielded aromatic proton (H2' in 6) reported to date. PMID:14733567

  12. Absolute quantification of carnosine in human calf muscle by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, Mahir S.; Reyngoudt, Harmen; DeDeene, Yves; Sazak, Hakan S.; Fieremans, Els; Delputte, Steven; D'Asseler, Yves; Derave, Wim; Lemahieu, Ignace; Achten, Eric

    2007-12-01

    Carnosine has been shown to be present in the skeletal muscle and in the brain of a variety of animals and humans. Despite the various physiological functions assigned to this metabolite, its exact role remains unclear. It has been suggested that carnosine plays a role in buffering in the intracellular physiological pHi range in skeletal muscle as a result of accepting hydrogen ions released in the development of fatigue during intensive exercise. It is thus postulated that the concentration of carnosine is an indicator for the extent of the buffering capacity. However, the determination of the concentration of this metabolite has only been performed by means of muscle biopsy, which is an invasive procedure. In this paper, we utilized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) in order to perform absolute quantification of carnosine in vivo non-invasively. The method was verified by phantom experiments and in vivo measurements in the calf muscles of athletes and untrained volunteers. The measured mean concentrations in the soleus and the gastrocnemius muscles were found to be 2.81 ± 0.57/4.8 ± 1.59 mM (mean ± SD) for athletes and 2.58 ± 0.65/3.3 ± 0.32 mM for untrained volunteers, respectively. These values are in agreement with previously reported biopsy-based results. Our results suggest that 1H MRS can provide an alternative method for non-invasively determining carnosine concentration in human calf muscle in vivo.

  13. Excited-State-Proton-Transfer-Triggered Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer: from 2-Naphthylamine to Phenosafranin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debanjana; Bose, Debosreeta; Sarkar, Deboleena; Chattopadhyay, Nitin

    2009-09-01

    Excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been linearly coupled leading to an efficient pH-sensitive energy transfer from 2-naphthylamine (2NA) to a potentially bioactive cationic phenazinium dye, phenosafranin (PSF). The prototropic product produced exclusively from the photoexcited 2NA in the presence of added alkali serves as the donor for the energy transfer process. The energy transfer process is turned on at pH ≥ 12, whereas the process is turned off at a pH lower than that. Within the range of pH 12 to 13, the energy transfer efficiency (E) has been shown to follow a linear relation with the solution pH establishing the governing role of pH of the solution on the energy transfer process. The energy transfer follows a long-range dipole-dipole interaction mechanism. The critical energy transfer distance (R0) and the distance between the acceptor and the donor (r) have been determined for the ESPT-promoted FRET process at an optimum pH of 13. The present study involving the coupled processes is simple but has its implication due to its potential to be exploited for designing a pH-sensitive molecular switch.

  14. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance of regenerating rat liver after partial hepatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    de Certaines, J.D.; Moulinoux, J.P.; Benoist, L.; Benard, A.; Rivet, P.

    1982-08-09

    Spin-lattice (T/sub 1/) and spin-spin (T/sub 2/) proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times were measured over a 48-hours period of experimental liver regeneration in Wistar rats, T/sub 2/ showed an early significant increase reaching a plateau 30% above baseline from the 10th hrs onwards. Laparotomized control animals showed no change in T/sub 2/ values. The increase in T/sub 1/ occurred at a later stage but was no different from that in laparotomized controls. T/sub 1/ reached a peak, 20% above baseline, around the 30th hr. The changes observed were far less marked than those previously described for cancer tissue, which showed about a 60% increase in T/sub 1/ fluctuations followed a circadian pattern, with a minimum at night's end and a maximum around mid-day. No circadian rhythm was seen for T/sub 2/. The observed T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ changes are discussed with respect to mitotic and metabolic events known to occur during regeneration of the liver.

  15. A comprehensive review of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in dementia and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Firbank, M J; Harrison, R M; O'Brien, J T

    2002-01-01

    We reviewed the literature of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in dementia and Parkinson's disease (PD) and quantitatively compared the reported values of the markers N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline, and myo-Inositol between control and disease groups. We analysed a total of 27 reports in dementia. Combining the quantitative data from these showed a relative decrease of 15% in NAA level in the temporal lobe tissue in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared with controls. The rest of the brain showed a seemingly uniform 10% decrease in NAA levels in AD compared with controls. myo-Inositol was raised by about 15%, again uniformly throughout the brain, but there was no evidence for changed levels of choline. We found 15 reports of MRS in PD, which show a small decrease (5%) in the NAA level in the lentiform nucleus compared with controls. In progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), there is a greater decrease in NAA levels in the frontal region and the lentiform nucleus. This may aid in the diagnosis of PSP. Further research is needed to determine spectroscopic changes in other dementias, to monitor how markers change with disease progression and to establish clinical utility. PMID:12145453

  16. Probing astrocyte metabolism in vivo: proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the injured and aging brain.

    PubMed

    Harris, Janna L; Choi, In-Young; Brooks, William M

    2015-01-01

    Following a brain injury, the mobilization of reactive astrocytes is part of a complex neuroinflammatory response that may have both harmful and beneficial effects. There is also evidence that astrocytes progressively accumulate in the normal aging brain, increasing in both number and size. These astrocyte changes in normal brain aging may, in the event of an injury, contribute to the exacerbated injury response and poorer outcomes observed in older traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors. Here we present our view that proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), a neuroimaging approach that probes brain metabolism within a defined region of interest, is a promising technique that may provide insight into astrocyte metabolic changes in the injured and aging brain in vivo. Although (1)H-MRS does not specifically differentiate between cell types, it quantifies certain metabolites that are highly enriched in astrocytes (e.g., Myo-inositol, mlns), or that are involved in metabolic shuttling between astrocytes and neurons (e.g., glutamate and glutamine). Here we focus on metabolites detectable by (1)H-MRS that may serve as markers of astrocyte metabolic status. We review the physiological roles of these metabolites, discuss recent (1)H-MRS findings in the injured and aging brain, and describe how an astrocyte metabolite profile approach might be useful in clinical medicine and clinical trials. PMID:26578948

  17. Absolute quantitative analysis for sorbic acid in processed foods using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Sato, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-07-13

    An analytical method using solvent extraction and quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance (qHNMR) spectroscopy was applied and validated for the absolute quantification of sorbic acid (SA) in processed foods. The proposed method showed good linearity. The recoveries for samples spiked at the maximum usage level specified for food in Japan and at 0.13 g kg(-1) (beverage: 0.013 g kg(-1)) were larger than 80%, whereas those for samples spiked at 0.063 g kg(-1) (beverage: 0.0063 g kg(-1)) were between 56.9 and 83.5%. The limit of quantification was 0.063 g kg(-1) for foods (and 0.0063 g kg(-1) for beverages containing Lactobacillus species). Analysis of the SA content of commercial processed foods revealed quantities equal to or greater than those measured using conventional steam-distillation extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography quantification. The proposed method was rapid, simple, accurate, and precise, and provided International System of Units traceability without the need for authentic analyte standards. It could therefore be used as an alternative to the quantification of SA in processed foods using conventional method. PMID:22704472

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance and proton relaxation times in experimental heterotopic heart transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Eugene, M.; Lechat, P.; Hadjiisky, P.; Teillac, A.; Grosgogeat, Y.; Cabrol, C.

    1986-01-01

    It should be possible to detect heart transplant rejection by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging if it induces myocardial T1 and T2 proton relaxation time alterations or both. We studied 20 Lewis rats after a heterotopic heart transplantation. In vitro measurement of T1 and T2 was performed on a Minispec PC20 (Bruker) 3 to 9 days after transplantation. Histologic analysis allowed the quantification of rejection process based on cellular infiltration and myocardiolysis. Water content, a major determinant of relaxation time, was also studied. T1 and T2 were significantly prolonged in heterotopic vs orthotopic hearts (638 +/- 41 msec vs 606 +/- 22 msec for T1, p less than 0.01 and 58.2 +/- 8.4 msec vs 47.4 +/- 1.9 msec for T2, p less than 0.001). Water content was also increased in heterotopic hearts (76.4 +/- 2.3 vs 73.8 +/- 1.0, p less than 0.01). Most importantly, we found close correlations between T1 and especially T2 vs water content, cellular infiltration, and myocardiolysis. We conclude that rejection reaction should be noninvasively detected by NMR imaging, particularly with pulse sequences emphasizing T2.

  19. Characterization of urban aerosol using aerosol mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, M. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Lefer, B.; Rappenglück, B.

    2012-07-01

    Particulate matter was measured during August and September of 2006 in Houston as part of the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project. Aerosol size and composition were determined using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer. Aerosol was dominated by sulfate (4.1 ± 2.6 μg m-3) and organic material (5.5 ± 4.0 μg m-3), with contributions of organic material from both primary (˜32%) and secondary (˜68%) sources. Secondary organic aerosol appears to be formed locally. In addition, 29 aerosol filter samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy to determine relative concentrations of organic functional groups. Houston aerosols are less oxidized than those observed elsewhere, with smaller relative contributions of carbon-oxygen double bonds. These particles do not fit 1H NMR source apportionment fingerprints for identification of secondary, marine, and biomass burning organic aerosol, suggesting that a new fingerprint for highly urbanized and industrially influenced locations be established.

  20. Proton magnetic resonance studies of 2'-,3'-, and 5'-deoxyadenosine conformations in solution.

    PubMed Central

    Westhof, E; Plach, H; Cuno, I; Lüdemann, H D

    1977-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance studies of 2'-deoxyadenosine (2'-dA), 3'-deoxyadenosine (3'-dA), 5'-deoxyadenosine (5'-dA) and 8-bromo-5'-deoxyadenosine (8-Br-5'-dA) have been carried out in the temperature range between -60 degrees and +40 degrees C for ND3 solutios, +40 degrees and +100 degrees C for D2O solutions, and finally +10 degrees and +60 degrees C for pyridine solutions. The analysis is based on the two-state S in equilibrium N model of the ribose moiety proposed by Altona and Sundaralingam. In all solvents, 2'-dA favours slightly the S state of the ribose and the g+ conformer of the exocyclic CH2OH group. However, 3'-dA prefers strongly the N state of the ribose and the g+ conformation. Both the S and N states of the ribose are equally favoured by 5'-DA and 8-Br-5'-dA. Evidence for the existence of an intramolecular hydrogen bond between 0(5') and N3 in purine (beta)-nucleosides is presented. It is also concluded that cordycepin (3'-dA) exists in solution mainly in the anti conformation of the base relative to the ribose. PMID:301272

  1. Localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain differentiates the inborn metabolic encephalopathies in children.

    PubMed

    Chabrol, B; Salvan, A M; Confort-Gouny, S; Vion-Dury, J; Cozzone, P J

    1995-09-01

    Localized brain proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has been performed using a STEAM (stimulated echo-acquisition mode) method with a short-echo time (20 ms) in 10 children suffering from different lysosomal diseases, 6 boys with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) and 5 healthy children. Metabolic data from localized spectra were processed by principal component analysis (PCA) of 7 metabolic variables recorded on the MR spectra. PCA allows to delineate different clusters corresponding to the 2 pathological groups which are separated from each other and from the control group. The position of each spectrum on the patient map correlates with the clinical data and to the evolution of the patients subjected to a follow-up. These results also confirm the metabolic features characterizing the pathologies of the lysosome (increase in inositol) and the peroxisome (increase in choline and free lipids). PCA constitutes an alternative to the classical statistical methods to analyze and compare metabolic modifications in small populations of patients and allows to identify the most critical parameters defining the organization of the pathological populations. This analysis clearly increases the discrimination among pathologies based on the metabolic profiles obtained by MRS. PMID:8521083

  2. Changes of the first Schumann resonance frequency during relativistic solar proton precipitation in the 6 November 1997 event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldugin, V. C.; Maltsev, Ye. P.; Vasiljev, A. N.; Vashenyuk, E. V.

    1999-10-01

    The variations of the first mode of Schumann resonance are analyzed using data from Kola peninsula stations during the solar proton event of 6 November 1997. On this day the intensive flux of energetic protons on GOES-8 and the 10% increase of the count rate of the neutron monitor in Apatity between 1220 and 2000 UT were preceded by a solar X-ray burst at 1155 UT. This burst was accompanied by a simultaneous increase of the Schumann frequency by 3.5%, and the relativistic proton flux increase was accompanied by 1% frequency decrease. These effects are explained by changes of the height and dielectric permeability of the Earth-ionosphere cavity.

  3. Studies on the shift in the frequency of the first Schumann resonance mode during a solar proton event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, S. S.; de, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, B.; Paul, Suman; Haldar, D. K.; Barui, S.

    2010-07-01

    The variation of the first Schumann resonance (SR) frequency spectra observed from the recorded data over Kolkata (22.56°N, 88.5°E) during a solar proton event (SPE) on July 14, 2000 has been presented. It shows increase in frequency during X-ray bursts and decrease during the period of occurrence of an SPE. The results from some other locations for the same event are also reported. The severe X-ray bursts recorded just before the proton event exhibit enhancement in frequency of the first mode due to enhancement of ionization in the D-region of the ionosphere. Some attempts are made to explain the observed variation during solar proton events in terms of the perturbations within the Earth-ionosphere waveguide on the basis of two-layer-model.

  4. Weak-coupling structure of proton resonant states in 23Al studied with RI beam at CNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. J.; Kubono, S.; Teranishi, T.; Notani, M.; Michimasa, S.; Baba, H.; Nishimura, S.; Nishimura, M.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Hokoiwa, N.; Kibe, M.; Gono, Y.; Moon, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, C. S.; Iwasaki, H.; Kato, S.

    2006-07-01

    Proton resonances in 23Al have been investigated for the first time by the resonant elastic and inelastic scattering of 22Mg+p by using a 4.38 MeV/nucleon 22Mg beam bombarding a thick Hydrogen target. The low-energy 22Mg beam was separated by the CNS radioactive ion beam separator (CRIB). A new resonant state due to elastic scattering was observed at Ex = 3.00 MeV with a Jπ = (3/2+) assignment. Other three excited states due to resonant inelastic scattering at 3.14, 3.26 and 3.95 MeV were identified and all mainly decay to the first excited state in 22Mg by the proton emissions. The newly observed 3.95-MeV state probably has a spin-parity of Jπ = (7/2+). The resonant properties were determined from an R-matrix analysis of the excitation functions. The weak-coupling structure in 23Al is discussed in conjunction with a shell-model calculation.

  5. Resonant scattering of radiation belt electrons and ring current protons by EMIC waves in a hot plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, X.; Ni, B.; Xiang, Z.; Zou, Z.; Gu, X.; Fu, S.; Zhou, C.; Zhao, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The full kinetic linear dispersion relation in a warm, multi-ion plasma with hot ring current protons is used to calculate the linear growth rate of parallel propagating electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves. Significant wave growth at relatively small wave numbers occurs for both H+-band and He+-band EMIC waves at the magnetic equator. We find that the growth of H+-band and He+-band EMIC waves remains strong when they propagate to higher latitudes (< 30 degrees). The full hot plasma dispersion relation and cold plasma dispersion relation are used individually to quantify the quasi-linear bounce-averaged pitch angle diffusion rates for radiation belt electrons and ring current protons due to H+-band and He+-band EMIC waves. The results demonstrate considerable differences in the rates of pitch angle scattering caused by He+-band EMIC waves between the use of hot and cold plasma dispersion relation. He+-band EMIC waves can also resonate with lower energies particles (electrons and protons) when the impact of hot plasma is included. In contrast, much smaller differences are seen in the resonant scattering rates for H+-band EMIC waves. Our study strongly suggests that the effect of hot plasmas should be carefully taken into account to approach improved understanding of the exact role that EMIC waves plays in driving the dynamical evolution of radiation belt electrons and ring current protons.

  6. Protonation-dissociation reactions of imazamethabenz-methyl and imazamethabenz-Acid in relation to their soil sorption and abiotic degradation.

    PubMed

    Pintado, Sara; Montoya, Mercedes Ruiz; Mellado, José Miguel Rodríguez

    2009-12-01

    This paper present ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra of imazamethabenz-methyl (IMBM) (mixture of the isomers methyl 6-[(RS)-4-isopropyl-4-methyl-5-oxo-2-imidazolin-2-yl]-m-toluate, m-imazamethabenz, and methyl 2-[(RS)-4-isopropyl-4-methyl-5-oxo-2-imidazolin-2-yl]-p-toluate, p-imazamethabenz) and the corresponding carboxylic acid, imazamethabenz-acid (IMBA). The spectral characteristics are determined as functions of the pH. The appreciable absorbance in the visible (or near-ultraviolet) region of the spectra indicates that the natural photolytic degradation is possible. From variations of the maximum absorbances of the bands, the pK values of 3.4 +/- 0.2 and 9.4 +/- 0.2 were obtained for protonation of the imidazol (=N-) nitrogen and dissociation of the NH imidazol nitrogen of IMBM, respectively. For IMBA, the dissociation pK of the carboxylic group is very close to that of the imidazol (=N-) nitrogen, both being close to 3.3. The dissociation pK of the NH imidazol nitrogen for IMBA is 9.6 +/- 0.2. The role of the acid-base reactions on the sorption on soils of these herbicides is discussed. PMID:19904942

  7. Search for tb resonances in proton-proton collisions at √s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdel Khalek, S; Abdelalim, A A; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abouzeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbi, E; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Aharrouche, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Akdogan, T; Akesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Akiyama, A; Alam, M S; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Aliyev, M; Allbrooke, B M M; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amaral, P; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amorim, A; Amorós, G; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Andrieux, M-L; Anduaga, X S; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoun, S; Aperio Bella, L; Apolle, R; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Arce, A T H; Arfaoui, S; Arguin, J-F; Arik, E; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnal, V; Arnault, C; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Arutinov, D; Asai, S; Asfandiyarov, R; Ask, S; Asman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astbury, A; Aubert, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Avramidou, R; Axen, D; Ay, C; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Baccaglioni, G; Bacci, C; Bach, A M; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Badescu, E; Bagnaia, P; Bahinipati, S; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baker, M D; Baker, S; Banas, E; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, Sw; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bansal, V; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Baranov, S P; Barashkou, A; Barbaro Galtieri, A; Barber, T; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Bardin, D Y; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Barrillon, P; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartsch, V; Bates, R L; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, A; Battistin, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beale, S; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, S; Beckingham, M; Becks, K H; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bedikian, S; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C P; Begel, M; Behar Harpaz, S; Behera, P K; Beimforde, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellina, F; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Beloborodova, O; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bendel, M; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez Garcia, J A; Benjamin, D P; Benoit, M; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernat, P; Bernhard, R; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bertella, C; Bertin, A; Bertinelli, F; Bertolucci, F; Besana, M I; Besson, N; Bethke, S; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Bieniek, S P; Bierwagen, K; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biscarat, C; Bitenc, U; Black, K M; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blanchot, G; Blazek, T; Blocker, C; Blocki, J; Blondel, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V B; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Boddy, C R; Boehler, M; Boek, J; Boelaert, N; Bogaerts, J A; Bogdanchikov, A; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Bohm, J; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Bolnet, N M; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Bondarenko, V G; Bondioli, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, C N; Bordoni, S; Borer, C; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borjanovic, I; Borri, M; Borroni, S; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boterenbrood, H; Botterill, D; Bouchami, J; Boudreau, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Bousson, N; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozhko, N I; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Braem, A; Branchini, P; Brandenburg, G W; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brelier, B; Bremer, J; Brendlinger, K; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Brodbeck, T J; Brodet, E; Broggi, F; Bromberg, C; Bronner, J; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, W K; Brown, G; Brown, H; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Buanes, T; Buat, Q; Bucci, F; Buchanan, J; Buchholz, P; Buckingham, R M; Buckley, A G; Buda, S I; Budagov, I A; Budick, B; Büscher, V; Bugge, L; Bulekov, O; Bundock, A C; Bunse, M; Buran, T; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgess, T; Burke, S; Busato, E; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butin, F; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Buttinger, W; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Calkins, R; Caloba, L P; Caloi, R

    2012-08-24

    This Letter presents a search for tb resonances in 1.04 fb(-1) of LHC proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. Events with a lepton, missing transverse momentum, and two jets are selected and the invariant mass of the corresponding final state is reconstructed. The search exploits the shape of the tb invariant mass distribution compared to the expected standard model backgrounds. The model of a right-handed W(R)' with standard model-like couplings is chosen as the benchmark model for this search. No statistically significant excess of events is observed in the data, and upper limits on the cross section times the branching ratio of W(R)' resonances at 95% C.L. lie in the range of 6.1-1.0 pb for W(R)' masses ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 TeV. These limits are translated into a lower bound on the allowed right-handed W(R)' mass, giving m(W(R)'))>1.13 TeV at 95% C.L. PMID:23002739

  8. Proton NMR studies on the covalently linked RNA-DNA hybrid r(GCG)d(TATACGC). Assignment of proton resonances by application of the nuclear Overhauser effect.

    PubMed Central

    Mellema, J R; Haasnoot, C A; van der Marel, G A; Wille, G; van Boeckel, C A; van Boom, J H; Altona, C

    1983-01-01

    Proton NMR spectra of a covalently linked self-complementary RNA X DNA hybrid, r(GCG)-d(TATACGC), are recorded in H2O and D2O. Imino proton resonances as well as the non-exchangeable base and H-1' resonances are unambiguously assigned by means of nuclear. Overhauser effect measurements. Additional information was obtained by 31P NMR and circular dichroism spectra. The RNA parts in the duplex attain full conformational purity and adopt the usual A-RNA conformation. The DNA residues opposite the RNA tract do not adopt an A-type structure completely. Their respective sugar rings still appear to possess a certain conformational freedom. The same holds true for the central d(-TATA-) sequence which forms a DNA X DNA duplex. There appears to be a structural break in this part: the first two residues, T(4) and A(5), are clearly influenced by the adjacent RNA structure, whereas residues T(6) and A(7) behave quite similar to what usually is found in DNA duplexes in aqueous solution. PMID:6193486

  9. Why Do Enolate Anions Favor O-Alkylation over C-Alkylation in the Gas Phase? The Roles of Resonance and Inductive Effects in the Gas-Phase SN2 Reaction between the Acetaldehyde Enolate Anion and Methyl Fluoride.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Christian G; Zhang, Huaiyu; Mo, Yirong; Karty, Joel M

    2016-05-01

    Contributions by resonance and inductive effects toward the net activation barrier were determined computationally for the gas-phase SN2 reaction between the acetaldehyde enolate anion and methyl fluoride, for both O-methylation and C-methylation, in order to understand why this reaction favors O-methylation. With the use of the vinylogue extrapolation methodology, resonance effects were determined to contribute toward increasing the size of the barrier by about 9.5 kcal/mol for O-methylation and by about 21.2 kcal/mol for C-methylation. Inductive effects were determined to contribute toward increasing the size of the barrier by about 1.7 kcal/mol for O-methylation and 4.2 kcal/mol for C-methylation. Employing our block-localized wave function methodology, we determined the contributions by resonance to be 12.8 kcal/mol for O-methylation and 22.3 kcal/mol for C-methylation. Thus, whereas inductive effects have significant contributions, resonance is the dominant factor that leads to O-methylation being favored. More specifically, resonance serves to increase the size the barrier for C-methylation significantly more than it does for O-methylation. PMID:27011344

  10. Predicting the outcome of grade II glioma treated with temozolomide using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Guillevin, R; Menuel, C; Taillibert, S; Capelle, L; Costalat, R; Abud, L; Habas, C; De Marco, G; Hoang-Xuan, K; Chiras, J; Vallée, J-N

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to evaluate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) for monitoring the WHO grade II glioma (low-grade glioma (LGG)) treated with temozolomide (TMZ). Methods: This prospective study included adult patients with progressive LGG that was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Temozolomide was administered at every 28 days. Response to TMZ was evaluated by monthly MRI examinations that included MRI with volumetric calculations and 1H-MRS for assessing Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA ratios. Univariate, multivariate and receiver-operating characteristic statistical analyses were performed on the results. Results: A total of 21 LGGs from 31 patients were included in the study, and followed for at least n=14 months during treatment. A total of 18 (86%) patients experienced a decrease in tumour volume with a greater decrease of metabolic ratios. Subsequently, five (28%) of these tumours resumed growth despite the continuation of TMZ administration with an earlier increase of metabolic ratios of 2 months. Three (14%) patients did not show any volume or metabolic change. The evolutions of the metabolic ratios, mean(Cho/Cr)n and mean(Cho/NAA)n, were significantly correlated over time (Spearman ρ=+0.95) and followed a logarithmic regression (P>0.001). The evolutions over time of metabolic ratios, mean(Cho/Cr)n and mean(Cho/NAA)n, were significantly correlated with the evolution of the mean relative decrease of tumour volume, mean(ΔVn/Vo), according to a linear regression (P<0.001) in the ‘response/no relapse' patient group, and with the evolution of the mean tumour volume (meanVn), according to an exponential regression (P<0.001) in the ‘response/relapse' patient group. The mean relative decrease of metabolic ratio, mean(Δ(Cho/Cr)n/(Cho/Cr)o), at n=3 months was predictive of tumour response over the 14 months of follow-up. The mean relative change between metabolic ratios, mean((Cho/NAA)n−(Cho/Cr)n)/(Cho/NAA)n, at n=4 months was

  11. Clinical significance of brain phenylalanine concentration assessed by in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Leuzzi, V; Bianchi, M C; Tosetti, M; Carducci, C L; Carducci, C A; Antonozzi, I

    2000-09-01

    Recent studies using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) have suggested that plasma phenylalanine (Phe) may not be a reliable indicator of brain Phe level in subjects with phenylketonuria (PKU). Interindividual variation in cerebral Phe can contribute to the phenotypic variability of the disease. We report the results of the direct assessment of brain Phe by 1H MRS in 10 off-diet PKU patients (aged 15.5-30.5 years), 4 detected and treated early, 6 late. In a single patient, brain Phe was evaluated before and 15 days after diet discontinuation. FLAIR MRI and 1H MRS were performed in the same setting by a 1.5 T clinical MR scanner. MR images were scored according to the extent of the lobar white-matter hyperintensity. Brain 1H MRS Phe signal (resonating at 7.36 ppm) was evaluated as a ratio to the creatine+phosphocreatine signal. Brain Phe was correlated with clinical, biochemical and MRI findings. Results were as follows. (1) An abnormal concentration of brain Phe was detected in all 10 PKU subjects (ranging from 0.030 to 0.074), associated with a wide interindividual variability of concurrent plasma Phe (ranging from 724 to 2800 micromol/L). (2) In late-detected subjects, brain Phe concentration correlated with clinical phenotype better than did plasma Phe. The discrepancy between brain and plasma Phe was relevant from a clinical point of view in two cases: in one, a late-detected patient with normal mental development, a high level of plasma Phe was associated with a relatively low concentration of brain Phe; in the other, a late-detected subject with severe neurological impairment, a very high level of brain Phe was associated with plasma Phe compatible with the diagnosis of mild PKU. (3) White-matter alterations were detected in all patients. FLAIR MRI sequences disclosed an involvement of optic chiasma and tracts in 7 subjects. No correlation was found between white-matter alterations and concurrent brain Phe concentrations. (4) In the only

  12. Proton and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mlynárik, Vladimír; Cacquevel, Matthias; Sun-Reimer, Lili; Janssens, Sharon; Cudalbu, Cristina; Lei, Hongxia; Schneider, Bernard L; Aebischer, Patrick; Gruetter, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The development of new diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) requires new in vivo markers reflecting early pathological changes in the brain of patients. Magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy has been shown to provide useful information about the biochemical changes occurring in AD brain in vivo. The development of numerous transgenic mouse models of AD has facilitated the evaluation of early biomarkers, allowing researchers to perform longitudinal studies starting before the onset of the pathology. In addition, the recent development of high-field animal scanners enables the measurement of brain metabolites that cannot be reliably quantified at lower magnetic fields. In this report, we studied a new transgenic mouse model of AD, the 5xFAD model, by in vivo proton and phosphorus MR spectroscopy. This model, which is characterized by an early-onset and a robust amyloid pathology, developed changes in the neurochemical profile, which are typical in the human disease, i.e., an increase in myo-inositol and a decrease in N-acetylaspartate concentrations, as early as in the 40th week of age. In addition, a significant decrease in the γ-aminobutyrate concentration was observed in transgenic mice at this age compared to controls. The pseudo-first-order rate constant of the creatine kinase reaction as well as relative concentrations of phosphorus-containing metabolites were not changed significantly in the 36 and 72-week old transgenic mice. Overall, these results suggest that mitochondrial activity in the 5 × FAD mice is not substantially affected but that the model is relevant for studying early biomarkers of AD. PMID:22451319

  13. Brain metabolomic profiles of lung cancer patients prior to treatment characterized by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Benveniste, Helene; Zhang, Shaonan; Reinsel, Ruth A; Li, Haifang; Lee, Hedok; Rebecchi, Mario; Moore, William; Johansen, Christoffer; Rothman, Douglas L; Bilfinger, Thomas V

    2012-01-01

    Cancer patients without evidence of brain metastases often exhibit constitutional symptoms, cognitive dysfunction and mood changes at the time of clinical diagnosis, i.e. prior to surgical and/or chemotherapy treatment. At present however, there is limited information on brain metabolic and functional status in patients with systemic cancers such as lung cancer prior to initiation of treatment. Therefore, a prospective, observational study was conducted on patients with a clinical diagnosis of lung cancer to assess the cerebral metabolic status before treatment using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS). Together with neurocognitive testing, 1HMRS was performed in the parietal and occipital cortices of patients diagnosed with a lung mass (N=17) and an age-matched control group (N=15). Glutamate concentrations in the occipital cortex were found to be lower in the patients compared to controls and the concentrations of creatine and phosphocreatine were significantly lower in the parietal cortex of the patients. The lung cancer patients were also characterized by greater fatigue scores (but not depression) prior to treatment when compared to controls. In addition, the serum concentration of interleukin-6 (proinflammatory cytokine) was higher in patients compared to controls; and the concentration of tumor-necrosis factor alpha ([TNF-α]) was positively correlated to the metabolic activity of the lung tumor as defined by the 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose (18FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) derived maximal standardized uptake values (SUVmax). Finally, multivariate statistical modeling revealed that the concentration of N-acetyl-aspartate [NAA] in the occipital cortex was negatively associated with [TNF-α]. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that the cerebral metabolic status of patients with lung cancer is changed even prior to treatment. In addition, the association between inflammatory cytokines, SUVmax and [NAA] points towards interactions

  14. Late Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy following Traumatic Brain Injury during Early Childhood: Relationship with Neurobehavioral Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    WALZ, NICOLAY CHERTKOFF; CECIL, KIM M.; WADE, SHARI L.; MICHAUD, LINDA J.

    2014-01-01

    We sought to extend previous research that demonstrates reduced neurometabolite concentrations during the chronic phase of pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children injured during early childhood. We hypothesized that young children with TBI in the chronic phase post-injury would have lower N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) metabolite concentrations in gray and white matter in comparison to controls. We also hypothesized that metabolite levels would be correlated with acute TBI severity and neurobehavioral skills. Ten children with a history of TBI between the ages of 3 and 6 years were compared to an age, gender, and race-matched group of 10 children with a history of an orthopedic injury (OI). Children completed neurobehavioral testing at 12 months post-injury. Proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy was completed at least 12 months post-injury when the children were 6–9 years old. Groups were compared on metabolite concentrations in the medial frontal gray matter and left frontal white matter. Metabolite levels were correlated with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores and neurobehavioral functioning. There was a trend for lower NAA concentrations in the medial frontal gray matter for the TBI group. Late NAA and Cr levels in the medial frontal gray matter and NAA levels in the left frontal white matter were strongly positively correlated with initial GCS score. Metabolite levels were correlated with some neurobehavioral measures differentially for children with TBI or OI. Some neurometabolite levels differed between the TBI and OI groups more than 1 year post-injury and were related to injury severity, as well as some neurobehavioral outcomes following TBI during early childhood. PMID:18260792

  15. MO-G-18C-07: Improving T2 Determination and Quantification of Lipid Methylene Protons in Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy at 3 T

    SciTech Connect

    Breitkreutz, D.; Fallone, B. G.; Yahya, A.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To improve proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) transverse relaxation (T{sub 2}) determination and quantification of lipid methylene chain (1.3 ppm) protons by rewinding their J-coupling evolution. Methods: MRS experiments were performed on four lipid phantoms, namely, almond, corn, sunflower and oleic acid, using a 3 T Philips MRI scanner with a transmit/receive birdcage head coil. Two PRESS (Point RESolved Spectroscopy) pulse sequences were used. The first PRESS sequence employed standard bandwidth (BW) (∼550 Hz) RF (radiofrequency) refocussing pulses, while the second used refocussing pulses of narrow BW (∼50 Hz) designed to rewind J-coupling evolution of the methylene protons in the voxel of interest. Signal was acquired with each sequence from a 5×5×5 mm{sup 3} voxel, with a repetition time (TR) of 3000 ms, and with echo times (TE) of 100 to 200 ms in steps of 20 ms. 2048 sample points were measured with a 2000 Hz sampling bandwidth. Additionally, 30 mm outer volume suppression slabs were used to suppress signal outside the voxel of interest. The frequency of the RF pulses was set to that of the methylene resonance. Methylene peak areas were calculated and fitted in MATLAB to a monexponentially decaying function of the form M{sub 0}exp(-TE/T{sub 2}), where M{sub 0} is the extrapolated area when TE = 0 ms and yields a measure of concentration. Results: The determined values of M{sub 0} and T{sub 2} increased for all fatty acids when using the PRESS sequence with narrow BW refocussing pulses. M{sub 0} and T{sub 2} values increased by an average amount (over all the phantoms) of 31% and 14%, respectively. Conclusion: This investigation has demonstrated that J-coupling interactions of lipid methylene protons causes non-negligible signal losses which, if not accounted for, Result in underestimations of their levels and T{sub 2} values when performing MRS measurements. Funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

  16. Proton-in-Flight Mechanism for the Spontaneous Hydrolysis of N-Methyl O-Phenyl Sulfamate: Implications for the Design of Steroid Sulfatase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, David R.; Wolfenden, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The hydrolysis of N-methyl O-phenyl sulfamate (1) has been studied as a model for steroid sulfatase inhibitors such as Coumate, 667 Coumate and EMATE. At neutral pH, simulating physiological conditions, hydrolysis of 1 involves an intramolecular proton transfer from nitrogen to the bridging oxygen atom of the leaving group. Remarkably, this proton transfer is estimated to accelerate the decomposition of 1 by a factor of 1011. Examination of existing kinetic data reveals that the sulfatase PaAstA catalyzes the hydrolysis of sulfamate esters with moderate efficiencies of ~104; whereas, the catalytic rate acceleration generated by the enzyme for its cognate substrate is on the order of ~1015. Rate constants for hydrolysis of a wide range of sulfuryl esters, ArOSO2X−, are shown to be correlated by a two parameter equation based on pKaArOH and pKaArOSO2XH. PMID:22486328

  17. Synthesis, characterization and intramolecular proton transfer of 3,3";-dihydroxy-4,4";-[5-methyl-1,3-phenylenebis(nitrilomethylidyne)]-bis-phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshtiagh-Hosseini, Hossein; Beyramabadi, S. Ali; Morsali, Ali; Mirzaei, Masoud; Chegini, Hamed; Elahi, Morteza; Naseri, Mohammad Ali

    2014-08-01

    A newly synthesized Schiff base, 3,3";-dihydroxy-4,4";-[5-methyl-1,3-phenylenebis(nitrilomethylidyne)]-bis-phenol, was characterized experimentally. Its geometries optimization, tautomerization, assignment of the IR bands and NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using density functional theory (DFT) method. In addition, the atoms in molecules (AIM) analysis was employed for investigation of its tautomerization. Four possible tautomers of the investigated Schiff base were optimized in both of the gas and solution phases. The Schiff base has no planar structure, but each of the benzene rings is in a separate plane. In the most stable tautomer, the phenolic protons of the two sbnd OH groups are engaged in the intramolecular-hydrogen bond with the azomethine nitrogens. Good consistency between the theoretical and experimental results confirms validity of the optimized geometry. Also, kinetics and mechanism of the intramolecular-proton transfer of the studied Schiff base was demonstrated theoretically.

  18. Complete Proton and Carbon Assignment of Triclosan via One- and Two- Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Students from an upper-division undergraduate spectroscopy class analyzed one- and two-dimensional 400 MHz NMR spectroscopic data from triclosan in CDCl3. Guided assignment of all proton and carbon signals was completed via 1D proton and carbon, nuclear Overhauser effect (nOe), distortionless enhanc...

  19. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A.; Dearden, David V.

    2016-08-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy.

  20. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results.

    PubMed

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A; Dearden, David V

    2016-08-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27220844

  1. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A.; Dearden, David V.

    2016-05-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy.

  2. A carbon-13 and proton nuclear magnetic resonance study of some experimental referee broadened-specification /ERBS/ turbine fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalling, D. K.; Pugmire, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary results of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy study of alternative jet fuels are presented. A referee broadened-specification (ERBS) aviation turbine fuel, a mixture of 65 percent traditional kerosene with 35 percent hydrotreated catalytic gas oil (HCGO) containing 12.8 percent hydrogen, and fuels of lower hydrogen content created by blending the latter with a mixture of HCGO and xylene bottoms were studied. The various samples were examined by carbon-13 and proton NMR at high field strength, and the resulting spectra are shown. In the proton spectrum of the 12.8 percent hydrogen fuel, no prominent single species is seen while for the blending stock, many individual lines are apparent. The ERBS fuels were fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography and the resulting fractions analyzed by NMR. The species found are identified.

  3. Monitoring of organic contaminants in sediments using low field proton nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Rupert, Yuri

    2016-04-01

    The effective monitoring of soils and groundwater contaminated with organic compounds is an important goal of many environmental restoration efforts. Recent geophysical methods such as electrical resistivity, complex conductivity, and ground penetrating radar have been successfully applied to characterize organic contaminants in the subsurface and to monitor remediation process both in laboratory and in field. Low field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a geophysical tool sensitive to the molecular-scale physical and chemical environment of hydrogen-bearing fluids in geological materials and shows promise as a novel method for monitoring contaminant remediation. This laboratory research focuses on measurements on synthetic samples to determine the sensitivity of NMR to the presence of organic contaminants and improve understanding of relationships between NMR observables, hydrological properties of the sediments, and amount and state of contaminants in porous media. Toluene, a light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) has been selected as a representative organic contaminant. Three types of porous media (pure silica sands, montmorillonite clay, and various sand-clay mixtures with different sand/clay ratios) were prepared as synthetic sediments. NMR relaxation time (T2) and diffusion-relaxation (D ‑ T2) correlation measurements were performed in each sediment saturated with water and toluene mixed fluid at assorted concentrations (0% toluene and 100% water, 1% toluene and 99% water, 5% toluene and 95% water, 25% toluene and 75% water, and 100% toluene and 0% water) to 1) understand the effect of different porous media on the NMR responses in each fluid mixture, 2) investigate the role of clay content on T2 relaxation of each fluid, 3) quantify the amount hydrocarbons in the presence of water in each sediment, and 4) resolve hydrocarbons from water in D ‑ T2 map. Relationships between the compositions of porous media, hydrocarbon concentration, and

  4. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of the aromatic residues in the variant-3 neurotoxin from Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, N.R.; Nettesheim, D.G.; Klevit, R.E.; Drobny, G.; Watt, D.D.; Bugg, C.E. )

    1989-02-21

    The amino acid sequence for the variant-3 (CsE-v3) toxin from the venom of the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing contains eight aromatic residues. By use of 2D NMR spectroscopic methods, the resonances from the individual protons (NH, C{sup alpha}H, C{sup beta}H{prime}, H{double prime}, and the ring) for each of the individual aromatic residues have been completely assigned. The spatial arrangement of the aromatic ring systems with respect to each other has been qualitatively analyzed by 2D-NOESY techniques. The results show that Trp-47, Tyr-4, and Tyr-42 are in close spatial proximity to each other. The NOESY contacts and the ring current induced shifts in the resonances of the individual protons of Tyr-4 and Trp-47 suggest that the aromatic ring planes of these residues are in an orthogonal arrangement. A comparison with the published crystal structure suggests that there is a minor rearrangement of the aromatic rings in the solution phase. No 2D-NOESY contacts involving Phe-44 and Tyr-14 to any other aromatic ring protons have been observed. The pH dependence of the aromatic ring proton chemical shifts has also been studied. These results suggest that the Tyr-58 phenolic group is experiencing a hydrogen-bonding interaction with a positively charged group, while Tyr-4, -14, -38, and -40 are experiencing through-space interactions with proximal negatively charged groups. These studies define the microenvironment of the aromatic residues in the variant-3 neurotoxin in aqueous solution.

  5. Search for pair-produced resonances decaying to jet pairs in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Molina, J.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. 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S.; Junkes, A.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. 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T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Ryu, M. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Moon, D. H.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. 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V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. 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I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Musella, P.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Petrakou, E.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Albayrak, E. A.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. 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D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Wu, Z.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Krohn, M.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Gray, J.; Kenny, R. P., III; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Ratnikov, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Malik, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Primavera, F.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Kolchmeyer, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.

    2015-07-01

    Results are reported of a general search for pair production of heavy resonances decaying to pairs of hadronic jets in events with at least four jets. The study is based on up to 19.4 fb-1 of integrated luminosity from proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. Limits are determined on the production of scalar top quarks (top squarks) in the framework of R-parity violating supersymmetry and on the production of color-octet vector bosons (colorons). First limits at the LHC are placed on top squark production for two scenarios. The first assumes decay to a bottom quark and a light-flavor quark and is excluded for masses between 200 and 385 GeV, and the second assumes decay to a pair of light-flavor quarks and is excluded for masses between 200 and 350 GeV at 95% confidence level. Previous limits on colorons decaying to light-flavor quarks are extended to exclude masses from 200 to 835 GeV.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance multiwindow analysis of proton local fields and magnetization distribution in natural and deuterated mouse muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Peemoeller, H; Pintar, M M

    1979-01-01

    The proton free-induction decays, spin-spin relaxation times, local fields in the rotating frame, and spin-lattice relaxation times in the laboratory and rotating frames, in natural and fully deuterated mouse muscle, are reported. Measurements were taken above and below freezing temperature and at two time windows on the free-induction decay. A comparative analysis show that the magnetization fractions deduced from the different experiments are in good agreement. The main conclusion is that the resolution of the (heterogeneous) muscle nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) response is improved by the multiwindow analysis. PMID:262554

  7. 2,4-Dihydroxy and O2 Protonated Tautomers of dThd and Thd Coexist in the Gas Phase: Methylation Alters Protonation Preferences versus dUrd and Urd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, R. R.; Yang, Bo; Frieler, C. E.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.; Rodgers, M. T.

    2016-03-01

    The gas-phase structures of protonated thymidine, [dThd + H]+, and its modified form, protonated 5-methyluridine, [Thd + H]+, are examined by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy combined with electronic structure calculations. IRMPD action spectra are measured over the ranges extending from ~600 to 1900 cm-1 and ~2800 to 3800 cm-1 using the FELIX free electron laser and an optical parametric oscillator/amplifier (OPO/OPA) laser system, respectively. Comparisons between the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) linear IR spectra calculated for the stable low-energy conformers and the measured IRMPD spectra are used to determine the most favorable tautomeric conformations of [dThd + H]+ and [Thd + H]+ and to identify those populated in the experiments. Both B3LYP and MP2 levels of theory predict a minor 2,4-dihydroxy tautomer as the ground-state conformer of [dThd + H]+ and [Thd + H]+ indicating that the 2'-hydroxyl substituent of Thd does not exert a significant impact on the structural features. [dThd + H]+ and [Thd + H]+ share parallel IRMPD spectral profiles and yields in both the FELIX and OPO regions. Comparisons between the measured IRMPD and calculated IR spectra suggest that minor 2,4-dihydroxy tautomers and O2 protonated conformers of [dThd + H]+ and [Thd + H]+ are populated in the experiments. Comparison of this work to our previous IRMPD spectroscopy study of protonated 2'-deoxyuridine and uridine suggests that the 5-methyl substituent alters the preferences of O2 versus O4 protonation.

  8. Quantification of N-Acetyl Aspartyl Glutamate in Human Brain using Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy at 7 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elywa, M.

    2015-07-01

    The separation of N-acetyl aspartyl glutamate (NAAG) from N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and other metabolites, such as glutamate, by in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7 T is described. This method is based on the stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM), with short and long echo time (TE) and allows quantitative measurements of NAAG in the parietal and pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (pgACC) of human brain. Two basesets for the LCModel have been established using nuclear magnetic resonance simulator software (NMR-SIM). Six healthy volunteers (age 25-35 years) have been examined at 7 T. It has been established that NAAG can be separated and quantified in the parietal location and does not get quantified in the pgACC location when using a short echo time, TE = 20 ms. On the other hand, by using a long echo time, TE = 74 ms, NAAG can be quantified in pgACC structures.

  9. Sequencing of Plant Wall Heteroxylans Using Enzymic, Chemical (Methylation) and Physical (Mass Spectrometry, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) Techniques.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, Sunil; Ford, Kristina; Bacic, Antony

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the specific techniques used for the characterization of reducing end (RE) and internal region glycosyl sequence(s) of heteroxylans. De-starched wheat endosperm cell walls were isolated as an alcohol-insoluble residue (AIR)(1) and sequentially extracted with water (W-sol Fr) and 1 M KOH containing 1% NaBH4 (KOH-sol Fr) as described by Ratnayake et al. (2014)(2). Two different approaches (see summary in Figure 1) are adopted. In the first, intact W-sol AXs are treated with 2AB to tag the original RE backbone chain sugar residue and then treated with an endoxylanase to generate a mixture of 2AB-labelled RE and internal region reducing oligosaccharides, respectively. In a second approach, the KOH-sol Fr is hydrolyzed with endoxylanase to first generate a mixture of oligosaccharides which are subsequently labelled with 2AB. The enzymically released ((un)tagged) oligosaccharides from both W- and KOH-sol Frs are then methylated and the detailed structural analysis of both the native and methylated oligosaccharides is performed using a combination of MALDI-TOF-MS, RP-HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS and ESI-MS(n). Endoxylanase digested KOH-sol AXs are also characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) that also provides information on the anomeric configuration. These techniques can be applied to other classes of polysaccharides using the appropriate endo-hydrolases. PMID:27077895

  10. Backbone and ILV methyl resonance assignments of E. coli thymidylate synthase bound to cofactor and a nucleotide analogue

    PubMed Central

    Sapienza, Paul J.; Lee, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TSase) is a 62 kDa homodimeric enzyme required for de novo synthesis of thymidine monophosphate (dTMP) in most organisms. This makes the enzyme an excellent target for anticancer and microbial antibiotic drugs. In addition, TSase has been shown to exhibit negative cooperativity and half-the-sites reactivity. For these collective reasons, TSase is widely studied, and much is known about its kinetics and structure as it progresses through a multi-step catalytic cycle. Recently, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation has been instrumental in demonstrating the critical role of dynamics in enzyme function in small model systems. These studies raise questions about how dynamics affect function in larger enzymes with more complex reaction coordinates. TSase is an ideal candidate given its size, oligomeric state, cooperativity, and status as a drug target. Here, as a pre-requisite to spin relaxation studies, we present the backbone and ILV methyl resonance assignments of TSase from Escherichia coli bound to a substrate analogue and cofactor. PMID:23653343

  11. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids. PMID:26203019

  12. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and 1H-1H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of 1H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as 13C or 15N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to 13C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired 13C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific 13C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of 1H-1H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  13. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of {sup 1}H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to {sup 13}C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired {sup 13}C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific {sup 13}C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  14. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of horseradish peroxidase isoenzymes: correlation of distinctive spectra with isoenzyme specific activities.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Vergara, E; Meyer, M; Goff, H M

    1985-11-01

    High-resolution proton NMR spectra are reported for the paramagnetic ferric native and cyano complexes of the five major horseradish root peroxidase (HRP) isoenzymes (A1, A2, A3, B, and C). Axial imidazole resonances are observed in the native and cyano-complex spectra of all the isoenzymes, thus indicating the presence of a common axial histidine ligand. Proton NMR spectra outside the usual diamagnetic region are identical for sets of A1 and A2 isoenzymes and for the B and C isoenzyme set. Variation in heme residue chemical shift positions may be controlled in part by porphyrin vinyl side chain-protein interactions. Diverse upfield spectra among the isoenzymes reflect amino acid substitutions and/or conformational differences near the prosthetic group, as signals in this region must result from amino acid residues in proximity to the heme center. Acid-base dependence studies reveal an "alkaline" transition that converts the native high-spin iron (III) porphyrin to the low-spin state. The transition occurs at pH 9.3, 9.4, 9.8, and 10.9 for respective HRP A1, A2, A3, and C isoenzymes, respectively. Significantly, this ordering also reflects specific activities for the isoenzymes in the order A1 = A2 greater than A3 greater than B = C. Identical proton NMR spectra for A1/A2 and B/C isoenzyme sets parallel equivalent specific activities for members of a particular set. Proton NMR spectra thus appear to be highly sensitive to protein modifications that affect catalytic activity. PMID:4084538

  15. Searches for Light- and Heavy-flavor Three-jet Resonances in proton-proton Collisions with the CMS Detector at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    A search for three-jet hadronic resonance production in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV center-of-mass energy has been conducted by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.4 fb-1. The search method is modelindependent. Events are selected that contain a large number of jets with high transverse momentum. An ensemble of jets is used to extract a new possible signal from copious QCD background. Event selection is optimized using a benchmark model where supersymmetric gluinos are pair-produced and each of the gluinos decays exclusively into three jets. Two scenarios of this decay are considered denoted by the RPV couplings λ'' 112 and λ'' 113 or λ'' 223. The first coupling allows for gluinos to decay into only light-flavor jets, while the latter two allow decays into one heavy-flavor and two light-flavor jets. No significant deviation is found between the selected events and the expected standard model multijet and t$\\bar{t}$ background. For gluinos decaying through 00 112, masses below 650 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level. The search including heavy-flavor jets in the final state with the couplings λ'' 113 or λ'' 223 is the first of its kind. Gluinos decaying into one heavy-flavor and two light-flavor jets are excluded for masses between 200 and 835 GeV.

  16. Variable radio frequency proton-electron double-resonance imaging: Application to pH mapping of aqueous samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimova, Olga V.; Sun, Ziqi; Petryakov, Sergey; Kesselring, Eric; Caia, George L.; Johnson, David; Zweier, Jay L.; Khramtsov, Valery V.; Samouilov, Alexandre

    2011-04-01

    Proton-electron double-resonance imaging (PEDRI) offers rapid image data collection and high resolution for spatial distribution of paramagnetic probes. Recently we developed the concept of variable field (VF) PEDRI which enables extracting a functional map from a limited number of images acquired at pre-selected EPR excitation fields using specific paramagnetic probes (Khramtsov et al., J. Magn. Reson. 202 (2010) 267-273). In this work, we propose and evaluate a new modality of PEDRI-based functional imaging with enhanced temporal resolution which we term variable radio frequency (VRF) PEDRI. The approach allows for functional mapping (e.g., pH mapping) using specifically designed paramagnetic probes with high quality spatial resolution and short acquisition times. This approach uses a stationary magnetic field but different EPR RFs. The ratio of Overhauser enhancements measured at each pixel at two different excitation frequencies corresponding to the resonances of protonated and deprotonated forms of a pH-sensitive nitroxide is converted to a pH map using a corresponding calibration curve. Elimination of field cycling decreased the acquisition time by exclusion periods of ramping and stabilization of the magnetic field. Improved magnetic field homogeneity and stability allowed for the fast MRI acquisition modalities such as fast spin echo. In total, about 30-fold decrease in EPR irradiation time was achieved for VRF PEDRI (2.4 s) compared with VF PEDRI (70 s). This is particularly important for in vivo applications enabling one to overcome the limiting stability of paramagnetic probes and sample overheating by reducing RF power deposition.

  17. Axial histidyl imidazole non-exchangeable proton resonances as indicators of imidazole hydrogen bonding in ferric cyanide complexes of heme peroxidases.

    PubMed

    La Mar, G N; De Ropp, J S; Chacko, V P; Satterlee, J D; Erman, J E

    1982-11-19

    Proton NMR spectra of a model of low-spin cyanide complexes of ferric hemoproteins indicate that two broad single-protein resonances from the axial imidazole can be resolved outside the diamagnetic spectral region. Upon deprotonation of the imidazole in the model, the upfield resonance shifts dramatically to higher field, suggesting that its position may reflect the degree of hydrogen bonding or proton donation of the imidazole. Met-cyano myoglobin reveals a pair of such broad peaks in the regions expected for an essentially neutral axial imidazole. In the cyano complexes of horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase, a pair of single-proton resonances are located which are assigned to the same imidazole protons on the basis of their linewidth and shift changes upon altering the heme substituents. The upfiled proton, however, is found at much higher field than in metMbCN. The upfield bias of this resonance is taken as evidence for appreciable imidazolate character for the axial ligand in these heme peroxidases. PMID:6293582

  18. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance study of the antihypertensive and antiviral protein BDS-I from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata: Sequential and stereospecific resonance assignment and secondary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, P.C.; Clore, G.M.; Beress, L.; Gronenborn, A.M. )

    1989-03-07

    The sequential resonance assignment of the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of the antihypertensive and antiviral protein BDS-I from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata is presented. This is carried out with two-dimensional NMR techniques to identify through-bond and through-space (< 5{angstrom}) connectivities. Added spectral complexity arises from the fact that the sample is an approximately 1:1 mixture of two BDS-I isoproteins, (Leu-18)-BDS-I and (Phe-18)-BDS-I. Complete assignments, however, are obtained, largely due to the increased resolution and sensitivity afforded at 600 MHz. In addition, the stereospecific assignment of a large number of {beta}-methylene protons is achieved from an analysis of the pattern of {sup 3}J{sub {alpha}{beta}} coupling constants and the relative magnitudes of intraresidue NOEs involving the NH, C{sup {alpha}}H, and C{sup {beta}}H protons. Regular secondary structure elements are deduced from a qualitative interpretation of the nuclear Overhauser enhancement, {sup 3}J{sub HN{alpha}} coupling constant, and amide NH exchange data. A triple-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet is found to be related to that found in partially homologous sea anemone polypeptide toxins.

  19. Photoassociation of ultracold molecules near a Feshbach resonance as a probe of the electron-proton mass ratio variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gacesa, Marko; Côté, Robin

    2014-06-01

    We show that the photoassociation (PA) rate of ultracold diatomic molecules in the vicinity of a Feshbach resonance could be used to probe variations of the electron-to-proton mass ratio β=me/mp, a quantity related to other fundamental constants via the ΛQCD scale. The PA rate exhibits two features near a Feshbach resonance, a minimum and a maximum, which are very sensitive to the details of the interactions and the exact mass of the system. The effect and detection threshold are illustrated in the formation rates of ultracold Li2 and LiNa molecules by performing coupled-channel calculations in an external magnetic field. We find that the PA rate is particularly sensitive near narrow Feshbach resonances in heavy molecules, where it might be possible to detect relative variability of β on the order of 10-15-10-16. We also use a two-channel model to derive a proportionality relation between the variation of the PA rate and β applicable to diatomic molecules.

  20. Quantitative analysis of (styrene/acrylonitrile/methyl methacrylate) co-polymer systems by infrared resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalbout, Abraham F.; Jiang, Tao; Fengqi, Liu; Ding, C.; Darwish, Abdalla M.

    2002-02-01

    A detailed careful analysis of the infrared resonance (IR) spectra of polystyrene (PSt), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and their co-mixtures were performed. Through this study the absorption peak area to weight ratios as well as working curves were obtained to test for their reliability as well as their suitability. Satisfactory results were achieved and these working curves were then used to measure the polymerized components of binary and ternary co-polymers. By investigating the acquired data we conclude that the monomer preferential polymeric sequence is St>MMA>AN. A quantitative method to measure P (St/AN/MMA) concentrations by IR spectroscopy is proposed in this work.

  1. Resonances and threshold effects in low-energy electron collisions with methyl halides

    SciTech Connect

    Gallup, Gordon A.; Fabrikant, Ilya I.

    2007-03-15

    Cross sections for elastic and inelastic electron collisions with CH{sub 3}X (X=Cl,Br,I) molecules are calculated. For the lowest partial wave, the resonance R-matrix theory, and for the higher partial waves, the theory of scattering by dipolar plus polarization potential, are used. It is shown that the rotationally elastic scattering amplitude for a polar molecule in the fixed-nuclei approximation is logarithmically divergent for the forward direction, and a closure formula is derived to speed up the convergence at small angles. In treating the nuclear motion, only C-X stretch vibrations are taken into account. The dipole moment as a function of the C-X distance is modeled by a function incorporating the experimental value of the molecular dipole moments at the equilibrium distance and the derivatives of the dipole moments extracted from the experimental data on infrared intensities. This is supplemented by ab initio calculations of the dipole moment function for CH{sub 3}Br using the multiconfigurational valence bond method. The results for scattering cross sections show pronounced features caused by vibrational Feshbach resonances and threshold cusps. The features are most noticeable at the v=6, 7, and 8 thresholds in CH{sub 3}Cl, at the v=3 and 4 thresholds in CH{sub 3}Br, and at the v=1 threshold in CH{sub 3}I.

  2. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of human brain in vivo in the evaluation of multiple sclerosis: Assessment of the load of disease

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, D.L.; Matthews, P.M.; Francis, G.; Antel, J. )

    1990-04-01

    Image localized, water-suppressed proton magnetic resonance spectra were obtained from affected brain in patients with multiple sclerosis. In patients with moderate to severe chronic disease, spectra revealed a decreased ratio of N-acetylaspartate to creatine resonance intensities. A normal ratio was obtained from a large recently symptomatic MRI plaque that resolved without sequelae. We propose that the observed metabolite changes can be useful as an index of irreversible CNS injury.

  3. Study of anisotropy in nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of water protons in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kasturi, S R; Chang, D C; Hazlewood, C F

    1980-01-01

    The anisotropy of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and the spin-spin relaxation times (T2) of water protons in skeletal muscle tissue have been studied by the spin-echo technique. Both T1 and T2 have been measured for the water protons of the tibialis anterior muscle of mature male rats for theta = 0, 55, and 90 degrees, where theta is the orientation of the muscle fiber with respect to the static field. The anisotropy in T1 and T2 has been measured at temperatures of 28, -5 and -10 degrees C. No significant anisotropy was observed in the T1 of the tissue water, while an average anisotropy of approximately 5% was observed in T2 at room temperature. The average anisotropy of T2 at -5 and -10 degrees C was found to be approximately 2 and 1.3%, respectively. PMID:6266530

  4. NMR resonance splitting of urea in stretched hydrogels: proton exchange and (1)H/(2)H isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Kuchel, Philip W; Naumann, Christoph; Chapman, Bogdan E; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Håkansson, Pär; Bacskay, George; Hush, Noel S

    2014-10-01

    Urea at ∼12 M in concentrated gelatin gel, that was stretched, gave (1)H and (2)H NMR spectral splitting patterns that varied in a predictable way with changes in the relative proportions of (1)H2O and (2)H2O in the medium. This required consideration of the combinatorics of the two amide groups in urea that have a total of four protonation/deuteration sites giving rise to 16 different isotopologues, if all the atoms were separately identifiable. The rate constant that characterized the exchange of the protons with water was estimated by back-transformation analysis of 2D-EXSY spectra. There was no (1)H NMR spectral evidence that the chiral gelatin medium had caused in-equivalence in the protons bonded to each amide nitrogen atom. The spectral splitting patterns in (1)H and (2)H NMR spectra were accounted for by intra-molecular scalar and dipolar interactions, and quadrupolar interactions with the electric field gradients of the gelatin matrix, respectively. PMID:25241007

  5. Increase in amino acids in the pons after sleep deprivation: a pilot study using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Murck, Harald; Struttmann, Tobias; Czisch, Michael; Wetter, Thomas; Steiger, Axel; Auer, Dorothee P

    2002-01-01

    Total sleep deprivation (TSD) is an efficient method to relieve depression. An involvement of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in the pathophysiology of depression and the mechanism of action of TSD has been suggested. To directly assess the content of GABA, glutamate (Glu) and glutamine (Gln) before and after TSD, we estimated their concentrations in four brain regions in six healthy subjects using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The unresolved estimate of GABA, Glu and Gln, as well as GABA and Gln were increased in the pons after 24 h of TSD, the effect being prominent in three subjects. There were no significant changes in the hypothalamus, thalamus or parietooccipital cortex. These preliminary data support earlier animal data and indirect findings in humans suggesting that GABA and Gln, especially in the pontine structures, may play a key role in the mechanism of TSD. PMID:11979059

  6. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and MRI reveal no evidence for brain mitochondrial dysfunction in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Neva M; Shaw, Dennis W W; Richards, Todd L; Estes, Annette M; Friedman, Seth D; Petropoulos, Helen; Artru, Alan A; Dager, Stephen R

    2012-01-01

    Brain mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as an etiologic factor in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((1)HMRS) and MRI were used to assess for evidence of brain mitochondrial dysfunction in longitudinal samples of children with ASD or developmental delay (DD), and cross-sectionally in typically developing (TD) children at 3-4, 6-7 and 9-10 years-of-age. A total of 239 studies from 130 unique participants (54ASD, 22DD, 54TD) were acquired. (1)HMRS and MRI revealed no evidence for brain mitochondrial dysfunction in the children with ASD. Findings do not support a substantive role for brain mitochondrial abnormalities in the etiology or symptom expression of ASD, nor the widespread use of hyperbaric oxygen treatment that has been advocated on the basis of this proposed relationship. PMID:21404085

  7. Quantification of ethanol methyl 1H magnetic resonance signal intensity following intravenous ethanol administration in primate brain

    PubMed Central

    Flory, Graham S.; O’Malley, Jean; Grant, Kathleen A.; Park, Byung; Kroenke, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    In vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can be used to directly monitor brain ethanol. Previously, studies of human subjects have lead to the suggestion that the ethanol methyl 1H MRS signal intensity relates to tolerance to ethanol’s intoxicating effects. More recently, the ethanol 1H MRS signal intensity has been recognized to vary between brain gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) due to differences in T2 within these environments. The methods presented here extend ethanol MRS techniques to nonhuman primate subjects. Twelve monkeys were administered ethanol while sedated and positioned within a 3T MRI system. Chemical shift imaging (CSI) measurements were performed following intravenous infusion of 1g/kg ethanol. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were also recorded for each monkey to provide volume fractions of GM, WM, and CSF for each CSI spectrum. To estimate co-variance of ethanol MRS intensity with GM, WM, and CSF volume fractions, the relative contribution of each tissue subtype was determined following corrections for radiofrequency pulse profile non-uniformity, chemical shift artifacts, and differences between the point spread function in the CSI data and the imaging data. The ethanol MRS intensity per unit blood ethanol concentration was found to differ between GM, WM, and CSF. Individual differences in MRS intensity were larger in GM than WM. This methodology demonstrates the feasibility of ethanol MRS experiments and analysis in nonhuman primate subjects, and suggests GM may be a site of significant variation in ethanol MRS intensity between individuals. PMID:20018244

  8. Experimental Study of Calculated t1 Images Under Flow Conditions Using Protons and FLUORINE-19 in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie

    A gradient refocused echo (GRE) pulse protocol has been developed and implemented to obtain calculated T1 images under flow conditions. This sequence acquires multiple images with different flip angles and uses a least -square fit to obtain calculated T1 images. A theoretical analysis of imprecision in the calculated T1 images is discussed. In accordance with Wang (49), the optimal parameters as determined by computer simulation were found to be 20 ^circ and 100^ circ for the flip angles in a two point fit for TR falling in the range 0.3 to 1.0 T1. Flow compensation was added to the pulse sequence for imaging flow phantoms containing GD-DTPA doped water and perfluorocarbon (PFC) compounds for a range of flow rates (0-55 cm/s). Flow compensation was found to effectively recover signal loss due to flow related dephasing. Experimental testing of this protocol has been performed on stationary proton and PFC compound phantoms utilizing ^1H and ^{19}F magnetic resonance imaging respectively. There is good agreement between the experimental results and the theoretical predictions about imprecision in the calculated T1 images. Analysis of variance of the mean T1 values of the calculated T1 images of the proton and PFC flow phantoms indicated that for the flow phantom geometry used in this study, there was no statistical difference among these mean T1 values from flow phantoms with different flow rates (including stationary status). It is believed that this protocol may provide an imaging method for mapping the pO _2 distribution in the vascular space in vivo utilizing perfluorocarbon compounds and ^ {19}F magnetic resonance imaging.

  9. Comparative proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies of amantadine complexes formed in aqueous solutions with three major cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Lis-Cieplak, Agnieszka; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2014-01-01

    Host-guest complexes of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins (α-CD, β-CD, and γ-CD, respectively) with amantadine (1-aminoadamantane, AMA; an antiviral agent) were characterized in aqueous solutions using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Host-guest molecular interactions were manifested by changes in the chemical shifts of AMA protons. NMR Job's plots showed that the stoichiometry of all the studied complexes was 1:1. Two-dimensional T-ROESY experiments demonstrated that the complexes were formed by different degrees of incorporation of the adamantyl group of AMA into the CD cavity. The mode of AMA binding was proposed. The AMA molecule came into the α-CD cavity (the smallest size) or β-CD cavity (the intermediate size) through its wide entrance to become shallowly or deeply accommodated, respectively. In the complex of AMA with γ-CD (the largest cavity size), the adamantyl group was also quite deeply inserted into the CD cavity, but it arrived there through the narrow cavity entrance. It was found that the adamantyl group of AMA was best accommodated by the β-CD cavity. The binding constants Kaa of the studied complexes (in M(-1) ), determined from DOSY NMR, were fairly high; their values in an ascending order were: α-CD (183) < γ-CD (306) ≪ β-CD (5150). PMID:24282085

  10. Sequence-Dependent Conformational Heterogeneity and Proton-Transfer Reactivity of the Fluorescent Guanine Analogue 6-Methyl Isoxanthopterin (6-MI) in DNA.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Neil P; Ji, Huiying; Steinberg, Thomas H; von Hippel, Peter H; Marcus, Andrew H

    2015-10-01

    The local conformations of individual nucleic acid bases in DNA are important components in processes fundamental to gene regulation. Fluorescent nucleic acid base analogues, which can be substituted for natural bases in DNA, can serve as useful spectroscopic probes of average local base conformation and conformational heterogeneity. Here we report excitation-emission peak shift (EES) measurements of the fluorescent guanine (G) analogue 6-methyl isoxanthoptherin (6-MI), both as a ribonucleotide monophosphate (NMP) in solution and as a site-specific substituent for G in various DNA constructs. Changes in the peak positions of the fluorescence spectra as a function of excitation energy indicate that distinct subpopulations of conformational states exist in these samples on time scales longer than the fluorescence lifetime. Our pH-dependent measurements of the 6-MI NMP in solution show that these states can be identified as protonated and deprotonated forms of the 6-MI fluorescent probe. We implement a simple two-state model, which includes four vibrationally coupled electronic levels to estimate the free energy change, the free energy of activation, and the equilibrium constant for the proton transfer reaction. These parameters vary in single-stranded and duplex DNA constructs, and also depend on the sequence context of flanking bases. Our results suggest that proton transfer in 6-MI-substituted DNA constructs is coupled to conformational heterogeneity of the probe base, and can be interpreted to suggest that Watson-Crick base pairing between 6-MI and its complementary cytosine in duplex DNA involves a "low-barrier-hydrogen-bond". These findings may be important in using the 6-MI probe to understand local base conformational fluctuations, which likely play a central role in protein-DNA and ligand-DNA interactions. PMID:26368400

  11. Confirmation of the assignment of the low-field proton resonance of serine proteases by using specifically nitrogen-15 labeled enzyme.

    PubMed

    Bachovchin, W W

    1985-12-01

    Proton NMR spectra of serine proteases in 1H2O solutions typically show a single resonance at very low magnetic field--i.e., 14-18 ppm from dimethylsilylapentanesulfonate. This resonance has been assigned to the proton hydrogen bonded between aspartic acid-102 and histidine-57 (chymotrypsin numbering system) of the "charge-relay system" or catalytic triad of serine proteases [Robillard, G. & Shulman, R. G. (1972) J. Mol. Biol. 71, 507-511]. Since then, there have been a number of reports that have cast doubt on its correctness. In the present work we have tested this assignment using alpha-lytic protease (EC 3.4.21.12, Myxobacter alpha-lytic proteinase), a bacterial serine protease homologous to elastase, which is specifically labeled with nitrogen-15 at N delta 1 of its single histidine residue. The low-field region of the proton spectra of this labeled enzyme shows a single resonance having the properties reported [Robillard, G. & Shulman, R. G. (1974) J. Mol. Biol. 86, 519-540], which, in addition, exhibits spin-spin splitting to the nitrogen-15 label. The observation of this 15N delta 1-H coupling makes the assignment of this resonance to the charge-relay proton unequivocal. PMID:3934665

  12. Confirmation of the assignment of the low-field proton resonance of serine proteases by using specifically nitrogen-15 labeled enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Bachovchin, W.W.

    1985-12-01

    Proton NMR spectra of serine proteases in /sup 1/H/sub 2/O solutions typically show a single resonance at very low magnetic field i.e., 14-18 ppm from dimethylsilylapentanesulfonate. This resonance has been assigned to the proton hydrogen bonded between aspartic acid-102 and histidine-57 (chymotrypsin numbering system) of the charge-relay system or catalytic triad of serine proteases. There have been a number of reports that have cast doubt on its correctness. In the present work the authors have tested this assignment using ..cap alpha..-lytic protease, a bacterial serine protease homologous to elastase, which is specifically labeled with nitrogen-15 at N/sup delta/sub 1// of its single histidine residue. The low-field region of the proton spectra of this labeled enzyme shows a single resonance having the properties reported which, in addition, exhibits spin-spin splitting to the nitrogen-15 label. The observation of this /sup 15/N-/sup delta/sub 1//-H coupling makes the assignment of this resonance to the charge-relay proton unequivocal.

  13. Glutamine and Glutamate Levels in Children and Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder: A 4.0-T Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Constance M.; Frazier, Jean A.; Glod, Carol A.; Breeze, Janis L.; Dieterich, Megan; Finn, Chelsea T.; deB. Frederick, Blaise; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to use proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, at 4.0 T, to explore the glutamine and glutamate levels in the anterior cingulate cortex of children and adolescents with bipolar disorder (BPD; medicated and unmedicated) and healthy comparison subjects (HCSs). We hypothesized that unmedicated children with…

  14. Anharmonic Resonances among Low-Lying Vibrational Levels of Methyl Iso-Cyanide (H_3CNC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pracna, P.; Urban, J.; Urban, V. S.; Varga, J.; Horneman, V.-M.

    2010-06-01

    Vibrational levels up to 1000 wn of H_3C-N≡C are currently studied in FTIR spectra together with rotational transitions within these levels. This investigation comprises the low-lying excited vibrational levels of the CNC doubly degenerate bending vibration v8=1^± 1 (267.3 wn), v8=20,± 2 (524.6 wn (A), 545.3 wn (E)), and v8=3^± 1,± 3 (792.5 wn (A1+A2), 833.9 wn (E)), respectively, and the next higher fundamental level of the C-N valence vibration v4=1 (945 wn). All these vibrational levels exhibit cubic and quartic anharmonic resonances localized to moderate values of the rotational quantum number K≤10. Therefore the system of rovibrational levels has to be treated as a global polyad in order to describe all the available data quantitatively. The ground state constants have been improved considerably by extending the assignments to higher J/K rotational states both in the purely rotational spectra recorded in the ground vibrational level and in the ground state combination differences generated from the wavenumbers assigned in the fundamental ν_4 band. Similarities and differences with respect to isoelectronic molecules CH_3CN and CH_3CCH are discussed.

  15. Seasonal and temporal characterization of dissolved organic matter in rainwater by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, Pamela J.; Kieber, Robert J.; Willey, Joan D.; Avery, G. Brooks; Dixon, Joshua L.

    2013-02-01

    Dissolved organic carbon in rainwater was concentrated by two separate techniques and characterized by 1H-NMR. The total 1H-NMR integral of lyophilized rainwater was higher in every rain sample than that of C18 solid phase extracted samples and always contained a higher percentage integral in the region of protons bound to carbon atoms singly bound to oxygen (H-C-O), such as alcohols, polyols and carbohydrate-like compounds. C18 extracted samples had higher % integral in the alkyl region, consistent with reverse phase extraction of more hydrophobic components in rainwater. Differences in both the 1H-NMR integration and spectral pattern of lyophilized rainwater samples were especially apparent between spring and winter rains, with spring samples having higher percent carbohydrate (H-C-O) signal and winter rains having higher percent alkyl protons and a spectral pattern consistent with the presence of saturated fatty acids. Spring rains are characterized by lower % Alkyl signal coupled with higher % H-C-O than all other events while marine winter events appear in regions characterized by relatively high % Alkyl and average % H-C-O, consistent with increased abundance of fatty acids or fatty acid oxidation products. The 1H-NMR data presented in this manuscript are important because they provide spectral data relating to the source and chemical characteristics of dissolved organic carbon in rainwater as a function of season and air mass back trajectory.

  16. Proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging of J-coupled resonances in human brain at 3 and 4 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Posse, Stefan; Otazo, Ricardo; Caprihan, Arvind; Bustillo, Juan; Chen, Hongji; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Marjanska, Malgorzata; Gasparovic, Charles; Zuo, Chun; Magnotta, Vincent; Mueller, Bryon; Mullins, Paul; Renshaw, Perry; Ugurbil, Kamil; Lim, Kelvin O; Alger, Jeffry R

    2007-08-01

    In this multicenter study, 2D spatial mapping of J-coupled resonances at 3T and 4T was performed using short-TE (15 ms) proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI). Water-suppressed (WS) data were acquired in 8.5 min with 1-cm(3) spatial resolution from a supraventricular axial slice. Optimized outer volume suppression (OVS) enabled mapping in close proximity to peripheral scalp regions. Constrained spectral fitting in reference to a non-WS (NWS) scan was performed with LCModel using correction for relaxation attenuation and partial-volume effects. The concentrations of total choline (tCho), creatine + phosphocreatine (Cr+PCr), glutamate (Glu), glutamate + glutamine (Glu+Gln), myo-inositol (Ins), NAA, NAA+NAAG, and two macromolecular resonances at 0.9 and 2.0 ppm were mapped with mean Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) between 6% and 18% and approximately 150-cm(3) sensitive volumes. Aspartate, GABA, glutamine (Gln), glutathione (GSH), phosphoethanolamine (PE), and macromolecules (MMs) at 1.2 ppm were also mapped, although with larger mean CRLBs between 30% and 44%. The CRLBs at 4T were 19% lower on average as compared to 3T, consistent with a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and increased spectral resolution. Metabolite concentrations were in the ranges reported in previous studies. Glu concentration was significantly higher in gray matter (GM) compared to white matter (WM), as anticipated. The short acquisition time makes this methodology suitable for clinical studies. PMID:17610279

  17. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and electron paramagnetic resonance studies on skeletal muscle actin indicate that the metal and nucleotide binding sites are separate.

    PubMed

    Barden, J A; Cooke, R; Wright, P E; dos Remedios, C G

    1980-12-01

    The distance separating the high-affinity binding sites of actin for a divalent metal ion and nucleotide was evaluated by using high-resolution proton NMR and EPR spectroscopy. Replacement of the Ca2+ or Mg2+ bound to the high-affinity divalent cation site of G-actin by trivalent lanthanide ions such as La3+, EU3+, or Gd3+ results in an increase in the mobility of the bound ATP as observed in the NMR spectra of G-actin monomers. Little difference was observed between the spectra obtained in the presence of the diamagnetic La3+ control and the paramagnetic ions Eu3+ and Gd3+ which respectively shift and broaden the proton resonances of amino acids in the vicinity of the binding site. Analysis of the NMR spectra indicates that the metal and nucleotide binding sites are separated by a distance of at least 16 A. In the past, the metal and ATP have been widely assumed to bind as a complex. Further verification that the two sites on actin are physically separated was obtained by using an ATP analogue with a nitroxide spin-label bound at the 6' position of the purine ring. An estimate of the distance was made between the site containing the ATP analogue and the paramagnetic ion, Mn2+, bound to the cation binding site. These EPR experiments were not affected by the state of polymerization of the actin. The data obtained by using this technique support the conclusion stated above, namely, that the cation and nucleotide sites on either G- or F-actin are well separated. PMID:6257295

  18. Proton-Enhanced 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Lipids and Biomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Urbina, Julio; Waugh, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    A recently developed nuclear double resonance technique which permits sensitive detection, together with high resolution, of rare spins in solids or other dipolar-coupled nuclear systems [Pines, Gibby, and Waugh (1973) J. Chem. Phys. 59, 569] has been applied to the study of natural abundance 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance in lipid mesophases and of selectively labeled carbon sites in bacterial membranes. Detailed microscopic information on the molecular organization and phase transitions of the lipid phases and their interaction with ions and other molecules can be obtained from the study of the chemical shift anisotropies and dynamical aspects of the 13C NMR spectra of unsonicated lipid dispersions (liposomes). Experiments are reported which demonstrated the feasibility of quantitatively observing the 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance of specifically labeled sites in unperturbed Escherichia coli membrane vesicles for the study of the physical state of the lipids with the aim of relating it to the known lipid-dependent functional properties of the membranes. PMID:4531036

  19. SU-E-J-229: Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Small Fiducial Markers for Proton Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Y; James, J; Panda, A; Vargas, C; Silva, A; Liu, W; Shen, J; Ding, X; Paden, R; Hanson, J; Wong, W; Schild, S; Bues, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: For proton beam therapy, small fiducial markers are preferred for patient alignment due to less interference with the proton beam. Visualizing small fiducial markers can be challenging in MRI. This study intends to investigate MRI imaging protocols for better visualization of small fiducial markers. Methods: Two carbon and two coil-shaped gold markers were placed into a gel phantom. Both carbon markers had a diameter of 1mm and a length of 3mm. Both gold markers had a length of 5mm. One gold marker had a diameter of 0.5mm and the other had a diameter of 0.75mm. T1 VIBE, T2 SPACE, TrueFISP and susceptibility weighted (SW) images were acquired. To improve marker contrast, high spatial resolution was used to reduce partial volume effect. Slice thickness was 1.5mm for all four sequences and in-plane resolution was 0.6mm for TrueFISP, 0.7mm for T1 VIBE, and 0.8mm for T2 SPACE and SW. For comparison purpose, a 3D T1 VIBE image set at 3mm slice thickness and 1.2mm in-plane resolution was also acquired. Results: All markers were visible in all high-resolution image sets. In each image set, marker-induced signal void was the smallest (in diameter) for carbon markers, followed by the 0.5mm gold marker and the largest for the 0.75mm gold marker. The SW images had the largest marker-induced signal void. However, those might be confused by susceptibility-gradient-induced signal voids. T1 VIBE had good visualization of markers with nicely defined edges. T2 SPACE had reasonable visualization of markers but edges were slightly blurred. TrueFISP had good visualization of markers only if they were not masked by banding artifacts. As a comparison, all markers were hardly visible in the standard resolution T1 VIBE images. Conclusion: 3D high-resolution T1 VIBE and SW have great potential in providing good visualization of small fiducial markers for proton beam therapy.

  20. Covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water can be probed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance experiments

    PubMed Central

    Elgabarty, Hossam; Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of covalency is widely used to describe the nature of intermolecular bonds, to explain their spectroscopic features and to rationalize their chemical behaviour. Unfortunately, the degree of covalency of an intermolecular bond cannot be directly measured in an experiment. Here we established a simple quantitative relationship between the calculated covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water and the anisotropy of the proton magnetic shielding tensor that can be measured experimentally. This relationship enabled us to quantify the degree of covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water using the experimentally measured anisotropy. We estimated that the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is on the order of 10  m while the stabilization energy due to this charge transfer is ∼15 kJ mol−1. The physical insight into the fundamental nature of hydrogen bonding provided in this work will facilitate new studies of intermolecular bonding in a variety of molecular systems. PMID:26370179

  1. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the kidney in renal stone disease.

    PubMed

    Mairiang, Eimorn; Hanpanich, Petcharakorn; Sriboonlue, Pote

    2002-12-01

    Previous studies of renal stone disease (RSD) in Thailand indicated abnormal urinary aggregator and inhibitor composition among farmers with excessive sweat loss. Our aim was to compare the proton MR spectra obtained from the kidneys of 32 proven cases of RSD (aged 38 to 65 yrs) with nine age-matched normal control subjects. We used the STEAM sequence with TE = 15 ms and TR = 2,000 ms. The spectra at 3.25, 3.6 and 3.9 ppm were analyzed. The results showed a correlation between the three peaks (p < 0.001), however, there was no significant difference between the RSD group and the normal control subjects. We therefore concluded that there was no overloading of these osmolytes among the renal stone patients. PMID:12591573

  2. Covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water can be probed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance experiments.

    PubMed

    Elgabarty, Hossam; Khaliullin, Rustam Z; Kühne, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    The concept of covalency is widely used to describe the nature of intermolecular bonds, to explain their spectroscopic features and to rationalize their chemical behaviour. Unfortunately, the degree of covalency of an intermolecular bond cannot be directly measured in an experiment. Here we established a simple quantitative relationship between the calculated covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water and the anisotropy of the proton magnetic shielding tensor that can be measured experimentally. This relationship enabled us to quantify the degree of covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water using the experimentally measured anisotropy. We estimated that the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is on the order of 10  m while the stabilization energy due to this charge transfer is ∼15 kJ mol(-1). The physical insight into the fundamental nature of hydrogen bonding provided in this work will facilitate new studies of intermolecular bonding in a variety of molecular systems. PMID:26370179

  3. Studying the Pc(4450) resonance in J/ψ photoproduction off protons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Blin, A. N. Hiller; Fernandez-Ramirez, C.; Jackura, A.; Mathieu, V.; Mokeev, V. I.; Pilloni, A.; Szczepaniak, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a resonance-like structure, the Pc(4450), has recently been observed in the J/ψ p spectrum by the LHCb collaboration. We discuss the feasibility of detecting this structure in J/ψ photoproduction in the CLAS12 experiment at JLab. We present a first estimate of the upper limit for the branching ratio of the Pc(4450) to J/ψ p. Our estimates, which take into account the experimental resolution effects, lead to a sizable cross section close to the J/ψ production threshold, which makes future experiments covering this region very promising.

  4. Studying the Pc(4450 ) resonance in J /ψ photoproduction off protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blin, A. N. Hiller; Fernández-Ramírez, C.; Jackura, A.; Mathieu, V.; Mokeev, V. I.; Pilloni, A.; Szczepaniak, A. P.; Joint Physics Analysis Center

    2016-08-01

    A resonancelike structure, the Pc(4450 ), has recently been observed in the J /ψ p spectrum by the LHCb Collaboration. We discuss the feasibility of detecting this structure in J /ψ photoproduction in the CLAS12 experiment at JLab. We present a first estimate of the upper limit for the branching ratio of the Pc(4450 ) to J /ψ p . Our estimates, which take into account the experimental resolution effects, predict that it will be possible to observe a sizable cross section close to the J /ψ production threshold and shed light on the Pc(4450 ) resonance in the future photoproduction measurements.

  5. Proton-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analyses of the Substrate Specificity of a β-Ketolase from Pseudomonas putida, Acetopyruvate Hydrolase†

    PubMed Central

    Pokorny, Diana; Brecker, Lothar; Pogorevc, Mateja; Steiner, Walter; Griengl, Herfried; Kappe, Thomas; Ribbons, Douglas W.

    1999-01-01

    A revised purification of acetopyruvate hydrolase from orcinol-grown Pseudomonas putida ORC is described. This carbon-carbon bond hydrolase, which is the last inducible enzyme of the orcinol catabolic pathway, is monomeric with a molecular size of ∼38 kDa; it hydrolyzes acetopyruvate to equimolar quantities of acetate and pyruvate. We have previously described the aqueous-solution structures of acetopyruvate at pH 7.5 and several synthesized analogues by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-Fourier transform (FT) experiments. Three 1H signals (2.2 to 2.4 ppm) of the methyl group are assigned unambiguously to the carboxylate anions of 2,4-diketo, 2-enol-4-keto, and 2-hydrate-4-keto forms (40:50:10). A 1H-NMR assay for acetopyruvate hydrolase was used to study the kinetics and stoichiometries of reactions within a single reaction mixture (0.7 ml) by monitoring the three methyl-group signals of acetopyruvate and of the products acetate and pyruvate. Examination of 4-tert-butyl-2,4-diketobutanoate hydrolysis by the same method allowed the conclusion that it is the carboxylate 2-enol form(s) or carbanion(s) that is the actual substrate(s) of hydrolysis. Substrate analogues of 2,4-diketobutanoate with 4-phenyl or 4-benzyl groups are very poor substrates for the enzyme, whereas the 4-cyclohexyl analogue is readily hydrolyzed. In aqueous solution, the arene analogues do not form a stable 2-enol structure but exist principally as a delocalized π-electron system in conjugation with the aromatic ring. The effects of several divalent metal ions on solution structures were studied, and a tentative conclusion that the enol forms are coordinated to Mg2+ bound to the enzyme was made. 1H–2H exchange reactions showed the complete, fast equilibration of 2H into the C-3 of acetopyruvate chemically; this accounts for the appearance of 2H in the product pyruvate. The C-3 of the product pyruvate was similarly labelled, but this exchange was only enzyme catalyzed; the methyl group of

  6. Neurodegenerative evidences during early onset of depression in CMS rats as detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Hemanth Kumar, B S; Mishra, Sushanta Kumar; Rana, Poonam; Singh, Sadhana; Khushu, Subash

    2012-06-15

    Depression is a complex psychiatric disorder characterized by anhedonia and feeling of sadness and chronic mild stress (CMS) seems to be a valuable animal model of depression. CMS animal model was induced and validated using behavioral studies. In the present study we investigated the neuro-metabolite changes occurring in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus during the onset of depression, in CMS rat model using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) at field strength of 7 T. Results showed that CMS caused depression-like behavior in rats, as indicated by the decrease in sucrose consumption and locomotor activity. (1)H MRS was performed in both control and CMS rats (n=10, in each group) and the quantitative assessment of the neurometabolites was done using LC model. Relative concentrations of all the metabolites along with the macromolecules were calculated for analysis. The results revealed a significant decrease of glutamate (Glu), glutamine (Gln), NAA+NAAG, Glx and GABA levels in both hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of CMS animals and an elevated level of myo-ionisitol (mI) and taurine (Tau) was observed only in hippocampus. These metabolite fluctuations revealed by proton MRS indicate that there might be change in the neuronal integrity of the glial cells and neurons within prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in CMS model of depression. The present study also suggests that there may be a degenerative process concerning the brain morphology in the CMS rats. The overall finding using (1)H MRS suggests that, there might be a major role of the glia and neuron in the onset of depression. PMID:22449862

  7. Multicomponent analysis of radiolytic products in human body fluids using high field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grootveld, Martin C.; Herz, Herman; Haywood, Rachel; Hawkes, Geoffrey E.; Naughton, Declan; Perera, Anusha; Knappitt, Jacky; Blake, David R.; Claxson, Andrew W. D.

    1994-05-01

    High field proton Hahn spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to investigate radiolytic damage to biomolecules present in intact human body fluids. γ-Radiolysis of healthy or rheumatoid human serum (5.00 kGy) in the presence of atmospheric O 2 gave rise to reproducible elevations in the concentration of NMR-detectable acetate which are predominantly ascribable to the prior oxidation of lactate to pyruvate by hydroxyl radical (·OH) followed by oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate by radiolytically-generated hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) and/or further ·OH radical. Increases in the serum levels of non-protein-bound, low-molecular-mass components such as citrate and glutamine were also observed subsequent to γ-radiolysis, an observation which may reflect their mobilisation from protein binding-sites by ·OH radical, superoxide anion and/or H 2O 2. Moreover, substantial radiolytically-mediated elevations in the concentration of serum formate were also detectable. In addition to the above modifications, γ-radiolysis of inflammatory knee-joint synovial fluid (SF) generated a low-molecular-mass oligosaccharide species derived from the radiolytic fragmentation of hyaluronate. The radiolytically-mediated production of acetate in SF samples was markedly greater than that observed in serum samples, a consequence of the much higher levels of ·OH radical-scavenging lactate present. Indeed, increases in SF acetate concentration were detectable at doses as low as 48 Gy. We conclude that high field proton NMR analysis provides much useful information regarding the relative radioprotectant abilities of endogenous components and the nature, status and levels of radiolytic products generated in intact biofluids. We also suggest that NMR-detectable radiolytic products with associated toxicological properties (e.g. formate) may play a role in contributing to the deleterious effects observed following exposure of living organisms to sources of

  8. Induced Proton Polarization for pi0 Electroproduction at Q2 = 0.126 GeV2/c2 Around the Delta(1232) Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Glen Warren; Ricardo Alarcon; Christopher Armstrong; Burin Asavapibhop; David Barkhuff; William Bertozzi; Volker Burkert; J. Chen; Jian-Ping Chen; Joseph Comfort; Daniel Dale; George Dodson; S. Dolfini; K. Dow; Martin Epstein; Manouchehr Farkhondeh; John Finn; Shalev Gilad; Ralf Gothe; Xiaodong Jiang; Mark Jones; Kyungseon Joo; A. Karabarbounis; James Kelly; Stanley Kowalski; C. Kunz; D. Liu; R.W. Lourie; Richard Madey; Demetrius Margaziotis; Pete Markowitz; Justin McIntyre; C. Mertz; Brian Milbrath; Rory Miskimen; Joseph Mitchell; S. Mukhopadhyay; Costas Papanicolas; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi; Liming Qin; Paul Rutt; Adam Sarty; Jeffrey Shaw; S.B. Soong; D. Tieger; Christoph Tschalaer; William Turchinetz; Paul Ulmer; Scott Van Verst; C. Vellidis; Lawrence Weinstein; Steven Williamson; Rhett Woo; Alaen Young

    1998-12-01

    We present a measurement of the induced proton polarization P{sub n} in {pi}{sup 0} electroproduction on the proton around the {Delta} resonance. The measurement was made at a central invariant mass and a squared four-momentum transfer of W = 1231 MeV and Q{sup 2} = 0.126 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}, respectively. We measured a large induced polarization, P{sub n} = -0.397 {+-} 0.055 {+-} 0.009. The data suggest that the scalar background is larger than expected from a recent effective Hamiltonian model.

  9. Sterically Demanding Multidentate Ligand Tris[(2-(6-methylpyridyl))methyl]amine Slows Exchange and Enhances Solution State Ligand Proton NMR Coupling to 199Hg(II)

    PubMed Central

    Bebout, Deborah C.; Bush, James F.; Crahan, Kathleen K.; Bowers, Edith V.; Butcher, Raymond J.

    2006-01-01

    The solution state coordination chemistry of Hg(ClO4)2 with tris[(2-(6-methylpyridyl))methyl]amine (TLA) was investigated in acetonitrile-d3 by proton NMR. Although Hg(II) is a d10 metal ion commonly associated with notoriously rapid exchange between coordination environments, as many as six ligand environments were observed to be in slow exchange on the chemical shift time scale at select metal-to-ligand ratios. One of these ligand environments was associated with extensive heteronuclear coupling between protons and 199Hg and was assigned to the complex [Hg(TLA)]2+. The 5J(1H199Hg) = 8 Hz associated with this complex is the first example of five-bond coupling in a nitrogen coordination compound of Hg(II). The spectral complexity of related studies conducted in acetone-d6 precluded analysis of coordination equilibria. Crystallographic characterization of the T-shaped complex [Hg(TLAH)(CH2COCH3)](ClO4)2 (1) in which two pyridyl rings are pendant suggested that the acidity of acetone combined with the poor coordinating abilities of the neutral solvent adds additional complexity to solution equilibria. The complex crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1¯ with a = 9.352(2) Å, b = 12.956(2) Å, c = 14.199(2) Å, α = 115.458(10)°, β = 90.286(11)°, γ = 108.445(11)°, and Z = 2. The HgNamine, Hg-Npyridyl, and Hg-C bond lengths in the complex are 2.614(4), 2.159(4), and 2.080(6) Å, respectively. Relevance to development of 199Hg NMR as a metallobioprobe is discussed. PMID:11978122

  10. Investigation of structure in Al23 via resonant proton scattering of Mg22+p and the 22Mg(p,γ) Al23 astrophysical reaction rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. J.; Kubono, S.; Teranishi, T.; Notani, M.; Baba, H.; Nishimura, S.; Moon, J. Y.; Nishimura, M.; Iwasaki, H.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Hokoiwa, N.; Kibe, M.; Lee, J. H.; Kato, S.; Gono, Y.; Lee, C. S.

    2007-11-01

    Proton resonant states in Al23 have been investigated for the first time by the resonant elastic and inelastic scattering of Mg22+p with a Mg22 beam at 4.38 MeV/nucleon bombarding a thick (CH2)n target. The low-energy Mg22 beam was separated by the CNS radioactive ion beam separator (CRIB). The energy spectra of recoiled protons were measured at average scattering angles of θlab≈4°,17° and 23°. A new state has been observed at Ex=3.00 MeV with a spin-parity assignment of (3/2+). In addition, resonant inelastic scattering has populated three more states at excitation energies of 3.14, 3.26, and 3.95 MeV, with proton decay to the first excited state in Mg22 being observed. The new state at 3.95 MeV has been assigned a spin-parity of Jπ=(7/2+). The resonant parameters were determined by an R-matrix analysis of the excitation functions with a SAMMY-M6-BETA code. The core-excited structure of Al23 is discussed within a shell-model picture. The stellar reaction rate of the Mg22(p,γ)Al23 reaction has been reevaluated, and the revised total reaction rate is about 40% greater than the previous result for temperatures beyond T9=0.3.

  11. Synchro-betatron resonances in the 8 GeV proton driver

    SciTech Connect

    Shoroku Ohnuma

    2002-12-02

    The major difference of these two versions is the size (circumference) and the maximum energy. In the first study, the circumference is chosen to be 711.3m, which is 1.5 times the present Booster, with the maximum energy of 16 GeV. In the second version, it is mandated to be the same as Booster together with the same maximum energy of 8 GeV. One of the major impacts of the reduced size of the ring is the inevitable reduction in the total length of available space for injection/collimation/extraction systems and for rf cavities, 14 slots of 7.43m each in the smaller ring compared with 24 slots of 6.15m each in the larger ring. Since each cavity occupies a slot of 2.35m and 22 cavities are desirable, seven or eight slots out of 14 in the smaller ring must be reserved for rf, only six or seven remaining for all other systems. The constraint in space is particularly troublesome for the extraction system since the beam loss at extraction (at the highest beam energy) is the major concern of any high intensity proton machines.

  12. Resonant Proton Capture on Sodium-23 and Elemental Variations in Globular Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaratto, John Michael

    Globular clusters represent some of the oldest stellar bodies in the universe. As such, they are used as testing grounds for theories of stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Astronomical observations have shown star-to-star abundance variation in light-mass elements in all Galactic globular clusters. Standard stellar evolution models do not predict these variations. For instance, there exists a pronounced anticorrelation between Na and O in the cluster stars that is not observed in similar, isolated field stars. The current explanations for these observations are that a preexisting massive star could have polluted the interstellar medium where a younger star was born, or that stars undergo some additional mixing beyond dredge-up. Theoreticians rely on nuclear physics input in the form of thermonuclear reaction rates to edit or propose new theories predicting these abundance anomalies. The 23Na + p reaction is a bridge between the NeNa cycle and the MgAl cycle, but large uncertainties exist in the 23Na(p, gamma)24Mg reaction rate for burning temperatures relevant to red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch stars. The uncertainties arise from an expected, but unobserved resonance at Ecmr = 138 keV. A new high-intensity, low-energy electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at the Laboratory for Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics (LENA) has increased sensitivity for measuring this reaction. After many attempts and long measurement periods, a marginal signal (90% confidence level) has been observed from the resonance and a new strength has been established. This new strength marks a factor of 70 reduction from the previous strength upper limit. The strength has also been calculated as an upper limit at 95% confidence level. New reaction rates have been calculated for the 23Na(p, gamma)24Mg and 23 Na(p, alpha)20Ne reactions and the recommended value for the 23Na(p, gamma) 24Mg rate has been reduced by over an order of magnitude at T 9 = 0.07. This will have

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of hemoproteins. IV. Hindered rotation of heme side methyl group as a probe for studying van der Waals contacts in the heme side environments of myoglobin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Morishima, I; Iizuka, T

    1975-04-29

    220 MHz roton NMR spectral evidence for restricted rotation of one methyl group in the heme side chain of ferric horse cyanomyoglobin is reported here. Temperature dependence of this methyl proton signal was computer-simulated, yielding 14,8 kcal/mol for the methyl hindered rotation. Ionic additives such as NaCl and (NH4) 2 minus SO4 caused a slackening of this restriction of methyl rotation, evidenced from collapse of methyl signal doubling by the addition of these ionic substances. This is discussed in terms of breaking of the salt bridge formed between one of the propionate COO minus group of heme and a part of the apoprotein which might lead to constraint of one of the heme side methyl groups. The peculiarity of hyperfine-shifted methyl proton signals for other myoglobin complexes such as azide and imidazole derivatives is also discussed briefly in terms of constraint of heme side methyl group buried in a hydrophobic cleft. PMID:1169971

  14. Elevated prefrontal cortex GABA in patients with major depressive disorder after TMS treatment measured with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dubin, Marc J.; Mao, Xiangling; Banerjee, Samprit; Goodman, Zachary; Lapidus, Kyle A.B.; Kang, Guoxin; Liston, Conor; Shungu, Dikoma C.

    2016-01-01

    Background GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmitter systems are central to the pathophysiology of depression and are potential targets of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). We assessed the effect of 10-Hz rTMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of patients with major depressive disorder on the levels of medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the combined resonance of glutamate and glutamine (Glx) as assessed in vivo with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS). Methods Currently depressed individuals between the ages of 23 and 68 years participated in a 5-week naturalistic, open-label treatment study of rTMS, with 1H MRS measurements of MPFC GABA and Glx levels at baseline and following 5 weeks of the rTMS intervention. We applied rTMS pulses over the left DLPFC at 10 Hz and 80%–120% of motor threshold for 25 daily sessions, with each session consisting of 3000 pulses. We assessed therapeutic response using the 24-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD24). The GABA and Glx levels are expressed as ratios of peak areas relative to the area of the synchronously acquired and similarly fitted unsuppressed voxel water signal (W). Results Twenty-three currently depressed individuals (7 men) participated in the study. GABA/W in the MPFC increased 13.8% (p = 0.013) in all depressed individuals. There were no significant effects of rTMS on Glx/W. GABA/W and Glx/W were highly correlated in severely depressed patients at baseline but not after TMS. Limitations The primary study limitations are the open-label design and the inclusion of participants currently taking stable regimens of antidepressant medications. Conclusion These results implicate GABAergic and glutamatergic systems in the mechanism of action of rTMS for major depression, warranting further investigation in larger samples. PMID:26900793

  15. Supplementation of Antipsychotic Treatment with the Amino Acid Sarcosine Influences Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Parameters in Left Frontal White Matter in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Strzelecki, Dominik; Podgórski, Michał; Kałużyńska, Olga; Gawlik-Kotelnicka, Oliwia; Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Kotlicka-Antczak, Magdalena; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka; Grzelak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of the glutamatergic system, the main stimulating system in the brain, has a major role in pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The frontal white matter (WM) is partially composed of axons from glutamatergic pyramidal neurons and glia with glutamatergic receptors. The natural amino acid sarcosine, a component of a normal diet, inhibits the glycine type 1 transporter, increasing the glycine level. Thus, it modulates glutamatergic transmission through the glutamatergic ionotropic NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) receptor, which requires glycine as a co-agonist. To evaluate the concentrations of brain metabolites (NAA, N-acetylaspartate; Glx, complex of glutamate, glutamine, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA); mI, myo-inositol; Cr, creatine; Cho, choline) in the left frontal WM, Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy was used. Twenty-five patients randomly chosen from a group of fifty with stable schizophrenia (DSM-IV-TR) and dominant negative symptoms, who were receiving antipsychotic therapy, were administered 2 g of sarcosine daily for six months. The remaining 25 patients received placebo. Assignment was double blinded. 1H-NMR spectroscopy (1.5 T) was performed twice: before and after the intervention. NAA, Glx and mI were evaluated as Cr and Cho ratios. All patients were also assessed twice with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Results were compared between groups and in two time points in each group. The sarcosine group demonstrated a significant decrease in WM Glx/Cr and Glx/Cho ratios compared to controls after six months of therapy. In the experimental group, the final NAA/Cr ratio significantly increased and Glx/Cr ratio significantly decreased compared to baseline values. Improvement in the PANSS scores was significant only in the sarcosine group. In patients with schizophrenia, sarcosine augmentation can reverse the negative effect of glutamatergic system overstimulation, with a simultaneous beneficial increase of NAA

  16. Supplementation of Antipsychotic Treatment with the Amino Acid Sarcosine Influences Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Parameters in Left Frontal White Matter in Patients with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Strzelecki, Dominik; Podgórski, Michał; Kałużyńska, Olga; Gawlik-Kotelnicka, Oliwia; Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Kotlicka-Antczak, Magdalena; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka; Grzelak, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    Dysfunction of the glutamatergic system, the main stimulating system in the brain, has a major role in pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The frontal white matter (WM) is partially composed of axons from glutamatergic pyramidal neurons and glia with glutamatergic receptors. The natural amino acid sarcosine, a component of a normal diet, inhibits the glycine type 1 transporter, increasing the glycine level. Thus, it modulates glutamatergic transmission through the glutamatergic ionotropic NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) receptor, which requires glycine as a co-agonist. To evaluate the concentrations of brain metabolites (NAA, N-acetylaspartate; Glx, complex of glutamate, glutamine, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA); mI, myo-inositol; Cr, creatine; Cho, choline) in the left frontal WM, Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (¹H-NMR) spectroscopy was used. Twenty-five patients randomly chosen from a group of fifty with stable schizophrenia (DSM-IV-TR) and dominant negative symptoms, who were receiving antipsychotic therapy, were administered 2 g of sarcosine daily for six months. The remaining 25 patients received placebo. Assignment was double blinded. ¹H-NMR spectroscopy (1.5 T) was performed twice: before and after the intervention. NAA, Glx and mI were evaluated as Cr and Cho ratios. All patients were also assessed twice with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Results were compared between groups and in two time points in each group. The sarcosine group demonstrated a significant decrease in WM Glx/Cr and Glx/Cho ratios compared to controls after six months of therapy. In the experimental group, the final NAA/Cr ratio significantly increased and Glx/Cr ratio significantly decreased compared to baseline values. Improvement in the PANSS scores was significant only in the sarcosine group. In patients with schizophrenia, sarcosine augmentation can reverse the negative effect of glutamatergic system overstimulation, with a simultaneous beneficial increase of NAA

  17. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a diagnostic biomarker in mild cognitive impairment following stroke in acute phase.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ningqin; Shi, Shengliang; Su, Ying

    2016-05-25

    To investigate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HMRS) as a diagnostic biomarker to identify mild cognitive impairment (MCI) following stroke in the acute phase. A total of 72 stroke patients were recruited in the acute phase of stroke from the Department of Neurology, including 36 stroke patients with MCI and 36 stroke patients without MCI. All patients underwent brain MRI/MRS examination on a 3.0 T scanner and a neuropsychological test in the acute phase of stroke. Single-voxel HMRS was performed to obtain hippocampal metabolism intensities and brain infarcts were assessed on MRI. Group difference in metabolite ratios was analyzed using a T-test. Spearman rank correlation was used to study the correlation between metabolite ratios and Montreal Cognitive Assessment scores. The hippocampal n-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratio was found to be significantly lower in stroke patients with MCI compared with stroke patients without MCI (P<0.02). However, we found no differences in the metabolite ratios between hippocampus ipsilateral to infarctions and the contralateral side (P>0.05) in stroke patients with MCI. Furthermore, a correlation was found between hippocampal NAA/Cr ratios and Montreal Cognitive Assessment scores in stroke patients with MCI (P<0.01). HMRS could be a biomarker to identify MCI following stroke in the acute phase by capturing neurodegenerative changes. PMID:26981713

  18. Effect of mica content on pore-size distribution and porosity of sandy sediment using proton nuclear magnetic resonance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, S.

    2015-12-01

    As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we performed a study on effect of mica content on pore size distribution and porosity of sandy sediment. This study used proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to measure the pore-size distribution and porosity of specimen to investigate mica content effect in sandy sediment. A mixture of silica sand No. 7 and mica (mica of 0 wt. %, 5 wt. % and 20 wt. %) was used in this study. The median D50 by laser diffraction method was obtained as 215.7 μm of silica sand No. 7 and 278.9 μm of mica. Pore-size distributions of specimens by the distribution of transverse magnetic relaxation time (T2) measurement by NMR were performed for the water-saturated sample under effective confining pressure of 1.0 MPa. The peaks of pore-size distribution curves decreased and showed finer shifts with increasing of mica content. The porosity of silica sand No. 7 specimen was 46.3%, and that of mica 5% and 20 % were 45.9% and 42.2%m, respectively. A change in pore-size distribution and porosity were observed with an increasing ratio of mica.

  19. Hydrogen Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Multidomain Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment and Vascular Cognitive Impairment Without Dementia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang-Qing; Cai, Qing; Shen, Yu-Ying; Xu, Chuan-Xiao; Zhou, Hua; Zhao, Zhong

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the value of hydrogen proton magnet resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) in the differential diagnosis of multiple-domain amnestic mild cognitive impairment (M-aMCI) and vascular cognitive impairment with no dementia (VCIND); (1)H-MRS was performed in patients with M-aMCI and VCIND. The level was determined for N-acetylaspartate (NAA), glutamate (Glu), inositol (mI), choline (Cho), and creatine (Cr). Compared with the normal control group, the NAA-Cr ratio in all regions studied was significantly lower in the M-aMCI and VCIND groups. The Glu-Cr ratio in the posterior cingulate gyrus of the M-aMCI group was significantly lower than in the VCIND. The mI-Cr ratio in the frontal white matter of the VCIND was significantly higher than in the M-aMCI group. In the white matter adjacent to the lateral ventricles, the Cho-Cr ratio was significantly higher in the VCIND than the M-aMCI. Our results suggested (1)H-MRS is an effective method in the differential diagnosis of M-aMCI and VCIND. PMID:26980718

  20. T2 relaxation effects on apparent N-acetylaspartate concentration in proton magnetic resonance studies of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, Bethany K.; Rouse, Elizabeth D.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Olson, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, many magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies reported lower N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in key brain regions of patients with schizophrenia (SZ) compared to healthy subjects. A smaller number of studies report no difference in NAA. Many sources of variance may contribute to these discordant results including heterogeneity of the SZ subject populations and methodological differences such as MRS acquisition parameters, and post-acquisition analytic methods. The current study reviewed proton MRS literature reporting measurements of NAA in SZ with a focus on methodology. Studies which reported lower NAA were significantly more likely to have used longer echo times (TEs), while studies with shorter TEs reported no concentration difference. This suggests that NAA quantitation using MRS was affected by the choice of TE, and that published MRS literature reporting NAA in SZ using a long TE is confounded by apparent differential T2 relaxation effects between SZ and healthy control groups. Future MRS studies should measure T2 relaxation times. This would allow for spectral concentration measurements to be appropriately corrected for these relaxation effects. In addition, as metabolite concentration and T2 relaxation times are completely independent variables, this could offer distinct information about the metabolite of interest. PMID:23769421

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance of external protons using continuous dynamical decoupling with shallow NV centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Las Casas, Charles; Ohno, Kenichi; Awschalom, David D.

    2015-03-01

    The nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a paramagnetic defect with excellent spin properties that can reside within a few nanometers of the diamond surface, enabling atomic-scale magnetic resonance sensing of external nuclear spins. Here we use rotating frame longitudinal spin relaxation (T1ρ) based sensing schemes, known as Continuous Dynamical Decoupling (CDD), to detect external nuclear spins with shallow NV centers (<5 nm from the surface). Distinguishing neighboring nuclear spins from each other requires the NV center be near enough to create differences in the hyperfine shifts and coupling strengths of the nuclei. However, spin coherence time and consequently the sensitivity of dynamical decoupling techniques degrade sharply as NVs become shallower. We use strong continuous driving to overcome this fast decoherence and detect an ensemble of external nuclear spins using a single shallow NV center with a short T2 (<2 μs) at magnetic fields as high as 0.5 Tesla. The increased sensitivity of this method relative to pulsed dynamical decoupling techniques demonstrates the benefits of CDD for sensing with very shallow NV centers. This work was supported by DARPA, AFOSR, and the DIAMANT program.

  2. Investigating the Dissolution Performance of Amorphous Solid Dispersions Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Proton NMR.

    PubMed

    Tres, Francesco; Coombes, Steven R; Phillips, Andrew R; Hughes, Leslie P; Wren, Stephen A C; Aylott, Jonathan W; Burley, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the dissolution performance of amorphous solid dispersions of poorly water-soluble bicalutamide in a Kollidon VA64 polymeric matrix as a function of the drug loading (5% vs. 30% bicalutamide). A combined suite of state-of-the-art analytical techniques were employed to obtain a clear picture of the drug release, including an integrated magnetic resonance imaging UV-Vis flow cell system and 1H-NMR. Off-line 1H-NMR was used for the first time to simultaneously measure the dissolution profiles and rates of both the drug and the polymer from a solid dispersion. MRI and 1H-NMR data showed that the 5% drug loading compact erodes linearly, and that bicalutamide and Kollidon VA64 are released at approximately the same rate from the molecular dispersion. For the 30% extrudate, data indicated a slower water ingress into the compact which corresponds to a slower dissolution rate of both bicalutamide and Kollidon VA64. PMID:26378506

  3. Characterization of proton exchange membrane materials for fuel cells by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Zueqian

    2010-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used to explore the nanometer-scale structure of Nafion, the widely used fuel cell membrane, and its composites. We have shown that solid-state NMR can characterize chemical structure and composition, domain size and morphology, internuclear distances, molecular dynamics, etc. The newly-developed water channel model of Nafion has been confirmed, and important characteristic length-scales established. Nafion-based organic and inorganic composites with special properties have also been characterized and their structures elucidated. The morphology of Nafion varies with hydration level, and is reflected in the changes in surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio of the polymer obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The S/V ratios of different Nafion models have been evaluated numerically. It has been found that only the water channel model gives the measured S/V ratios in the normal hydration range of a working fuel cell, while dispersed water molecules and polymer ribbons account for the structures at low and high hydration levels, respectively.

  4. Regional Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Patterns in Dementia with Lewy Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Boeve, Bradley F.; Murray, Melissa; Ferman, Tanis J.; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Lesnick, Timothy G.; Maroney-Smith, Mandie; Senjem, Matthew L.; Gunter, Jeffrey; Smith, Glenn E.; Knopman, David S.; Jack, Clifford R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Kantarci, Kejal

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) characteristics of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cognitively normal controls (CN) were compared. DLB (n=34), AD (n=35) and CN (n=148) participated in a MRS study from frontal, posterior cingulate and occipital voxels. We investigated DLB patients with preserved hippocampal volumes to determine the MRS changes in DLB with low probability of overlapping AD pathology. DLB patients were characterized by decreased NAA/Cr in the occipital voxel. AD patients were characterized by lower NAA/Cr in the frontal and posterior cingulate voxels. Normal NAA/Cr levels in the frontal voxel differentiated DLB patients with preserved hippocampal volumes from AD patients. DLB and AD patients had elevated Cho/Cr and mI/Cr in the posterior cingulate. MRS abnormalities associated with loss of neuronal integrity localized to the occipital lobes in DLB, and the posterior cingulate gyri and frontal lobes in AD. This pattern of MRS abnormalities may have a role in differential diagnosis of DLB and in distinguishing DLB patients with overlapping AD pathology. PMID:24468473

  5. Search for a massive resonance decaying into a Higgs boson and a W or Z boson in hadronic final states in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Dobur, D.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Ali, A.; Aly, R.; Aly, S.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Lotfy, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.

    2016-02-01

    A search for a massive resonance decaying into a standard-model-like Higgs boson (H) and a W or Z boson is reported. The analysis is performed on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1, collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. Signal events, in which the decay products of Higgs, W, or Z bosons at high Lorentz boost are contained within single reconstructed jets, are identified using jet substructure techniques, including the tagging of b hadrons. This is the first search for heavy resonances decaying into HW or HZ resulting in an all-jet final state, as well as the first application of jet substructure techniques to identify H → WW* → 4q decays at high Lorentz boost. No significant signal is observed and limits are set at 95% confidence level on the production cross sections of W' and Z' in a model with mass-degenerate charged and neutral spin-1 resonances. Resonance masses are excluded for W' in the interval [1.0, 1.6] TeV, for Z' in the intervals [1.0, 1.1] and [1.3, 1.5] TeV, and for mass-degenerate W' and Z' in the interval [1.0, 1.7] TeV. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes studied using 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Davis, Mark F; Gennett, Thomas; Dillon, Anne C; Jones, Kim M; Heben, Michael J

    2005-12-14

    The reversible protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in sulfuric acid and Nafion was investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Raman spectroscopies. Magic-angle spinning (MAS) was used to obtain high-resolution 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization (CP) NMR spectra. The 13C NMR chemical shifts are reported for bulk SWNTs, H2SO4-treated SWNTs, SWNT-Nafion polymer composites, SWNT-AQ55 polymer composites, and SWNTs in contact with water. Protonation occurs without irreversible oxidation of the nanotube substrate via a charge-transfer process. This is the first report of a chemically induced change in a SWNT 13C resonance brought about by a reversible interaction with an acidic proton, providing additional evidence that carbon nanotubes behave as weak bases. Cross polarization was found to be a powerful technique for providing an additional contrast mechanism for studying nanotubes in contact with other chemical species. The CP studies confirmed polarization transfer from nearby protons to nanotube carbon atoms. The CP technique was also applied to investigate water adsorbed on carbon nanotube surfaces. Finally, the degree of bundling of the SWNTs in Nafion films was probed with the 1H-13C CP-MAS technique. PMID:16332107

  7. Search for lepton flavour violating decays of heavy resonances and quantum black holes to an mathrm {e}μ pair in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 {TeV}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fang, W.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.

    2016-06-01

    A search for narrow resonances decaying to an electron and a muon is presented. The mathrm {e} {μ } mass spectrum is also investigated for non-resonant contributions from the production of quantum black holes (QBHs). The analysis is performed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 {fb}^ {-1} collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 {TeV} with the CMS detector at the LHC. With no evidence for physics beyond the standard model in the invariant mass spectrum of selected mathrm {e}μ pairs, upper limits are set at 95 % confidence level on the product of cross section and branching fraction for signals arising in theories with charged lepton flavour violation. In the search for narrow resonances, the resonant production of a mathrm {τ } sneutrino in R-parity violating supersymmetry is considered. The mathrm {τ } sneutrino is excluded for masses below 1.28 {TeV} for couplings λ _{132}=λ _{231}=λ '_{311}=0.01, and below 2.30 {TeV} for λ _{132}=λ _{231}=0.07 and λ '_{311}=0.11. These are the most stringent limits to date from direct searches at high-energy colliders. In addition, the resonance searches are interpreted in terms of a model with heavy partners of the {Z} boson and the photon. In a framework of TeV-scale quantum gravity based on a renormalization of Newton's constant, the search for non-resonant contributions to the mathrm {e} {μ } mass spectrum excludes QBH production below a threshold mass M_{th} of 1.99 {TeV}. In models that invoke extra dimensions, the bounds range from 2.36 {TeV} for one extra dimension to 3.63 {TeV} for six extra dimensions. This is the first search for QBHs decaying into the mathrm {e} {μ } final state.

  8. Search for lepton flavour violating decays of heavy resonances and quantum black holes to an {e}μ pair in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 {TeV}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fang, W.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. 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M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Stefaniuk, N.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. 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M.; Fahim, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. 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M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. 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M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cerminara, G.; D'Alfonso, M.; D'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; de Gruttola, M.; de Guio, F.; de Roeck, A.; de Visscher, S.; di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Du Pree, T.; Duggan, D.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz Del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; de Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Petrakou, E.; Tsai, J. F.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Cerci, S.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Zorbilmez, C.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; de Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Benelli, G.; Berry, E.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Jesus, O.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; de La Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; McLean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Paneva, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Malberti, M.; Negrete, M. Olmedo; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; MacNeill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; McColl, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Lewis, J.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes de Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, L. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; McBrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; McGinn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Tatar, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira de Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Kumar, A.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    A search for narrow resonances decaying to an electron and a muon is presented. The {e} {μ } mass spectrum is also investigated for non-resonant contributions from the production of quantum black holes (QBHs). The analysis is performed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 {fb}^ {-1} collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 {TeV} with the CMS detector at the LHC. With no evidence for physics beyond the standard model in the invariant mass spectrum of selected {e}μ pairs, upper limits are set at 95 % confidence level on the product of cross section and branching fraction for signals arising in theories with charged lepton flavour violation. In the search for narrow resonances, the resonant production of a {τ } sneutrino in R-parity violating supersymmetry is considered. The {τ } sneutrino is excluded for masses below 1.28 {TeV} for couplings λ _{132}=λ _{231}=λ '_{311}=0.01, and below 2.30 {TeV} for λ _{132}=λ _{231}=0.07 and λ '_{311}=0.11. These are the most stringent limits to date from direct searches at high-energy colliders. In addition, the resonance searches are interpreted in terms of a model with heavy partners of the {Z} boson and the photon. In a framework of TeV-scale quantum gravity based on a renormalization of Newton's constant, the search for non-resonant contributions to the {e} {μ } mass spectrum excludes QBH production below a threshold mass M_{th} of 1.99 {TeV}. In models that invoke extra dimensions, the bounds range from 2.36 {TeV} for one extra dimension to 3.63 {TeV} for six extra dimensions. This is the first search for QBHs decaying into the {e} {μ } final state.

  9. Dynamics of C-Br bond dissociation in methyl 2-bromopropionate at 235 nm: A resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Ankur; Kumar, Awadhesh; Naik, Prakash D.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of the C-Br bond dissociation on UV excitation of methyl 2-bromopropionate mainly to the 1(nσ*) state, repulsive in the C-Br bond, has been investigated, employing resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. Both the ground state and spin-orbits excited bromine atoms were detected, with the former being the major channel. Bromine fragments show bimodal translational energy distributions, with slow and fast (major) bromine atoms arising mainly from the ground and excited electronic states, respectively. The measured recoil anisotropy suggests isotropic angular distributions of bromine atoms. Molecular orbital calculations reveal an important role of avoided curve crossing on C-Br bond dissociation dynamics.

  10. Selective Methyl Labeling of Eukaryotic Membrane Proteins Using Cell-Free Expression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Structural characterization of membrane proteins and other large proteins with NMR relies increasingly on perdeuteration combined with incorporation of specifically protonated amino acid moieties, such as methyl groups of isoleucines, valines, or leucines. The resulting proton dilution reduces dipolar broadening producing sharper resonance lines, ameliorates spectral crowding, and enables measuring of crucial distances between and to methyl groups. While incorporation of specific methyl labeling is now well established for bacterial expression using suitable precursors, corresponding methods are still lacking for cell-free expression, which is often the only choice for producing labeled eukaryotic membrane proteins in mg quantities. Here we show that we can express methyl-labeled human integral membrane proteins cost-effectively by cell-free expression based of crude hydrolyzed ILV-labeled OmpX inclusion bodies. These are obtained in Escherichia coli with very high quantity and represent an optimal intermediate to channel ILV precursors into the eukaryotic proteins. PMID:24937763

  11. Selective methyl labeling of eukaryotic membrane proteins using cell-free expression.

    PubMed

    Linser, Rasmus; Gelev, Vladimir; Hagn, Franz; Arthanari, Haribabu; Hyberts, Sven G; Wagner, Gerhard

    2014-08-13

    Structural characterization of membrane proteins and other large proteins with NMR relies increasingly on perdeuteration combined with incorporation of specifically protonated amino acid moieties, such as methyl groups of isoleucines, valines, or leucines. The resulting proton dilution reduces dipolar broadening producing sharper resonance lines, ameliorates spectral crowding, and enables measuring of crucial distances between and to methyl groups. While incorporation of specific methyl labeling is now well established for bacterial expression using suitable precursors, corresponding methods are still lacking for cell-free expression, which is often the only choice for producing labeled eukaryotic membrane proteins in mg quantities. Here we show that we can express methyl-labeled human integral membrane proteins cost-effectively by cell-free expression based of crude hydrolyzed ILV-labeled OmpX inclusion bodies. These are obtained in Escherichia coli with very high quantity and represent an optimal intermediate to channel ILV precursors into the eukaryotic proteins. PMID:24937763

  12. Search for a massive resonance decaying into a Higgs boson and a W or Z boson in hadronic final states in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-05

    A search for a massive resonance decaying into a standard-model-like Higgs boson (H) and a W or Z boson is reported. The analysis is performed on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb–1, collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. Signal events, in which the decay products of Higgs, W, or Z bosons at high Lorentz boost are contained within single reconstructed jets, are identified using jet substructure techniques, including the tagging of b hadrons. This is the first search for heavy resonances decaying in HW or HZ resulting in an all-jet final state, as well as the first application of jet substructure techniques to identify H → WW* → 4q decays at high Lorentz boost. Furthermore, no significant signal is observed and limits are set at 95% confidence level on the production cross section of W' and Z' in a model with mass-degenerate charged and neutral spin-1 resonances.

  13. Search for high-mass diboson resonances with boson-tagged jets in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikematsu, K.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Inamaru, Y.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Ivarsson, J.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansky, R. W.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jeng, G.-Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Jung, C. A.; Jussel, P.; Juste Rozas, A.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karamaoun, A.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Kazarinov, M. Y.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keller, J. S.; Kempster, J. J.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Keyes, R. A.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Khoo, T. J.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, H.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O. M.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kiss, F.; Kiuchi, K.; Kivernyk, O.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M. H.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. A.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Kobayashi, A.; Kobayashi, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kogan, L. 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P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-12-01

    A search is performed for narrow resonances decaying into WW, WZ, or ZZ boson pairs using 20 .3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of √{s}=8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Diboson resonances with masses in the range from 1.3 to 3.0 TeV are sought after using the invariant mass distribution of dijets where both jets are tagged as a boson jet, compatible with a highly boosted W or Z boson decaying to quarks, using jet mass and substructure properties. The largest deviation from a smoothly falling background in the observed dijet invariant mass distribution occurs around 2 TeV in the WZ channel, with a global significance of 2.5 standard deviations. Exclusion limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the production cross section times branching ratio for the WZ final state of a new heavy gauge boson, W', and for the WW and ZZ final states of Kaluza-Klein excitations of the graviton in a bulk Randall-Sundrum model, as a function of the resonance mass. W' bosons with couplings predicted by the extended gauge model in the mass range from 1.3 to 1.5 TeV are excluded at 95% confidence level. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Search for high-mass diboson resonances with boson-tagged jets in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.

    2015-12-10

    A search is performed for narrow resonances decaying into WW, WZ, or ZZ boson pairs using 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Diboson resonances with masses in the range from 1.3 to 3.0 TeV are sought after using the invariant mass distribution of dijets where both jets are tagged as a boson jet, compatible with a highly boosted W or Z boson decaying to quarks, using jet mass and substructure properties. The largest deviation from a smoothly falling background in the observed dijet invariant mass distribution occurs around 2 TeV in the WZ channel, with a global significance of 2.5 standard deviations. Exclusion limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the production cross section times branching ratio for the WZ final state of a new heavy gauge boson, W', and for the WW and ZZ final states of Kaluza-Klein excitations of the graviton in a bulk Randall-Sundrum model, as a function of the resonance mass. As a result, W' bosons with couplings predicted by the extended gauge model in the mass range from 1.3 to 1.5 TeV are excluded at 95% confidence level.

  15. Search for high-mass diboson resonances with boson-tagged jets in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-12-10

    A search is performed for narrow resonances decaying into WW, WZ, or ZZ boson pairs using 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Diboson resonances with masses in the range from 1.3 to 3.0 TeV are sought after using the invariant mass distribution of dijets where both jets are tagged as a boson jet, compatible with a highly boosted W or Z boson decaying to quarks, using jet mass and substructure properties. The largest deviation from a smoothly falling background in themore » observed dijet invariant mass distribution occurs around 2 TeV in the WZ channel, with a global significance of 2.5 standard deviations. Exclusion limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the production cross section times branching ratio for the WZ final state of a new heavy gauge boson, W', and for the WW and ZZ final states of Kaluza-Klein excitations of the graviton in a bulk Randall-Sundrum model, as a function of the resonance mass. As a result, W' bosons with couplings predicted by the extended gauge model in the mass range from 1.3 to 1.5 TeV are excluded at 95% confidence level.« less

  16. Search for a massive resonance decaying into a Higgs boson and a W or Z boson in hadronic final states in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-05

    A search for a massive resonance decaying into a standard-model-like Higgs boson (H) and a W or Z boson is reported. The analysis is performed on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb–1, collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. Signal events, in which the decay products of Higgs, W, or Z bosons at high Lorentz boost are contained within single reconstructed jets, are identified using jet substructure techniques, including the tagging of b hadrons. This is the first search for heavy resonances decaying inmore » HW or HZ resulting in an all-jet final state, as well as the first application of jet substructure techniques to identify H → WW* → 4q decays at high Lorentz boost. Furthermore, no significant signal is observed and limits are set at 95% confidence level on the production cross section of W' and Z' in a model with mass-degenerate charged and neutral spin-1 resonances.« less

  17. Binge Toluene Exposure Alters Glutamate, Glutamine and GABA in the Adolescent Rat Brain as Measured by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Perrine, Shane A.; O'Leary-Moore, Shonagh K.; Galloway, Matthew P.; Hannigan, John H.; Bowen, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the high incidence of toluene abuse in adolescents, little is known regarding the effect of binge exposure on neurochemical profiles during this developmental stage. In the current study, the effects of binge toluene exposure during adolescence on neurotransmitter levels were determined using high-resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ex vivo at 11.7 T. Adolescent male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to toluene (0, 8,000 , or 12,000 ppm) for 15 min twice daily from postnatal day 28 (P28) through P34 and then euthanized either one or seven days later (on P35 or P42) to assess glutamate, glutamine, and GABA levels in intact tissue punches from the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), anterior striatum and hippocampus. In the mPFC, toluene reduced glutamate one day after exposure, with no effect on GABA, while after seven days, glutamate was no longer affected but there was an increase in GABA levels. In the hippocampus, neither GABA nor glutamate was altered one day after exposure, whereas seven days after exposure, increases were observed in GABA and glutamate. Striatal glutamate and GABA levels measured after either one or seven days were not altered after toluene exposure. These findings show that one week of binge toluene inhalation selectively alters these neurotransmitters in the mPFC and hippocampus in adolescent rats, and that some of these effects endure at least one week after the exposure. The results suggest that age-dependent, differential neurochemical responses to toluene may contribute to the unique behavioral patterns associated with drug abuse among older children and young teens. PMID:21126832

  18. Metabonomic investigations of age- and batch-related variations in female NMRI mice using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia V; Saric, Jasmina; Yap, Ivan K S; Utzinger, Jürg; Holmes, Elaine

    2013-12-01

    The NMRI outbred mouse model is widely used for studying metabolic disease, toxicity, and infection, yet information regarding baseline metabolism of this murine strain is relatively sparse. Using different batches of female NMRI mice, we assessed the stability of the metabolic phenotype with increasing age and weight, and determined the influence of acclimatization on the metabolic profile of biofluids (urine, plasma, and faecal water). Differences in urinary concentrations of 3-ureidopropionate, 2-oxoisocaproate, trimethylamine, and glycine were detected between three batches of 9-week-old female NMRI mice using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analysis. An acclimatization period of 2 weeks was imposed after the mice entered the laboratory environment. Strong differences in the faecal metabolome pre- and post-acclimatization were found (reduction in amino acid concentrations), whilst the urine metabolome showed increased levels of trimethylamine-N-oxide, phenylacetyl glycine, and hippurate with decreased excretion of formate and betaine post-acclimatization. Temporal variation in the metabolite profiles over a 16-week study stabilized around 7-week-old animals. The results from this study strongly argue for inclusion of an acclimatization period prior to starting an investigative procedure, and suggest that the metabolic phenotypes of female NMRI mice are more stable at around 7 weeks of age. We have also identified a set of metabolites that are more susceptible to variation in concentration. This information can serve as a benchmark in order to establish confidence in systematic variation attributable to pathology or therapeutic intervention above the background metabolic variation in the NMRI mouse. PMID:24121299

  19. Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Spectroscopic Discrimination of Wines Reflects Genetic Homology of Several Different Grape (V. vinifera L.) Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yong; Wen, Wen; Zhang, Fengmin; Hardie, Jim W.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy coupled multivariate analysis (1H NMR-PCA/PLS-DA) is an important tool for the discrimination of wine products. Although 1H NMR has been shown to discriminate wines of different cultivars, a grape genetic component of the discrimination has been inferred only from discrimination of cultivars of undefined genetic homology and in the presence of many confounding environmental factors. We aimed to confirm the influence of grape genotypes in the absence of those factors. Methods and Results We applied 1H NMR-PCA/PLS-DA and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) to wines from five, variously genetically-related grapevine (V. vinifera) cultivars; all grown similarly on the same site and vinified similarly. We also compared the semi-quantitative profiles of the discriminant metabolites of each cultivar with previously reported chemical analyses. The cultivars were clearly distinguishable and there was a general correlation between their grouping and their genetic homology as revealed by recent genomic studies. Between cultivars, the relative amounts of several of the cultivar-related discriminant metabolites conformed closely with reported chemical analyses. Conclusions Differences in grape-derived metabolites associated with genetic differences alone are a major source of 1H NMR-based discrimination of wines and 1H NMR has the capacity to discriminate between very closely related cultivars. Significance of the Study The study confirms that genetic variation among grape cultivars alone can account for the discrimination of wine by 1H NMR-PCA/PLS and indicates that 1H NMR spectra of wine of single grape cultivars may in future be used in tandem with hierarchical cluster analysis to elucidate genetic lineages and metabolomic relations of grapevine cultivars. In the absence of genetic information, for example, where predecessor varieties are no longer extant, this may be a particularly useful approach. PMID

  20. Diet-Quality Scores and Prevalence of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Population Study Using Proton-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ruth; Wong, Vincent Wai-Sun; Chu, Winnie Chiu-Wing; Wong, Grace Lai-Hung; Li, Liz Sin; Leung, Jason; Chim, Angel Mei-Ling; Yeung, David Ka-Wai; Sea, Mandy Man-Mei; Woo, Jean; Chan, Francis Ka-Leung; Chan, Henry Lik-Yuen

    2015-01-01

    Dietary pattern analysis is an alternative approach to examine the association between diet and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This study examined the association of two diet-quality scores, namely Diet Quality Index-International (DQI-I) and Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) with NAFLD prevalence. Apparently healthy Chinese adults (332 male, 465 female) aged 18 years or above were recruited through a population screening between 2008 and 2010 in a cross-sectional population-based study in Hong Kong. DQI-I and MDS, as well as major food group and nutrient intakes were calculated based on dietary data from a food frequency questionnaire. NAFLD was defined as intrahepatic triglyceride content at ≥5% by proton-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine the association between each diet-quality score or dietary component and prevalent NAFLD with adjustment for potential lifestyle, metabolic and genetic factors. A total of 220 subjects (27.6%) were diagnosed with NAFLD. DQI-I but not MDS was associated with the prevalence of NAFLD. A 10-unit decrease in DQI-I was associated with 24% increase in the likelihood of having NAFLD in the age and sex adjusted model (95% CI: 1.06–1.45, p = 0.009), and the association remained significant when the model was further adjusted for other lifestyle factors, metabolic and genetic factors [OR: 1.26 (95% CI: 1.03–1.54), p = 0.027]. Multivariate regression analyses showed an inverse association of the intake of vegetables and legumes, fruits and dried fruits, as well as vitamin C with the NAFLD prevalence (p<0.05). In conclusion, a better diet quality as characterized by a higher DQI-I and a higher consumption of vegetables, legumes and fruits was associated with a reduced likelihood of having NAFLD in Hong Kong Chinese. PMID:26418083

  1. Altered white matter metabolism in delayed neurologic sequelae after carbon monoxide poisoning: A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Hiroshi; Fujihara, Kazuo; Mugikura, Shunji; Takahashi, Shoki; Kushimoto, Shigeki; Aoki, Masashi

    2016-01-15

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was recently used to examine altered metabolism in the white matter (WM) of patients experiencing carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning; however, only a small number of patients with delayed neurologic sequelae (DNS) were analyzed. We aimed to detect altered metabolism in the WM of patients with DNS using (1)H-MRS; to explore its clinical relevance in the management of patients experiencing CO poisoning. Patients experiencing acute CO poisoning underwent (1)H-MRS and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination within 1week and at 1month after acute poisoning. Metabolites including choline-containing compounds (Cho), creatine (Cr), N-acetylaspartate (NAA), and lactate were measured from the periventricular WM. Myelin basic protein (MBP) concentrations were measured in CSF. Fifty-two patients experiencing acute CO poisoning (15 with DNS, 37 without DNS; median age, 49years; 65% males) underwent (1)H-MRS. Within 1week, NAA/Cr ratios, reflecting neuroaxonal viability, were lower in patients with DNS than in those without DNS (P<0.05). At 1month, when 9 of 15 patients (60%) developed DNS, Cho/Cr ratios were higher, and NAA/Cr and NAA/Cho ratios lower in patients with DNS (P=0.0001, <0.0001, and <0.0001, respectively), indicating increased membrane metabolism and decreased neuroaxonal viability. (1)H-MRS parameter abnormalities correlated with the elevation of MBP in CSF. The presence of a lactate peak was a predictor for a poor long-term outcome. (1)H-MRS within 1week may be useful for predicting DNS development; (1)H-MRS at 1month may be useful for discriminating patients with DNS and predicting long-term outcomes. PMID:26723994

  2. Metabolomics by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the response to chloroethylnitrosourea reveals drug efficacy and tumor adaptive metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Morvan, Daniel; Demidem, Aicha

    2007-03-01

    Metabolomics of tumors may allow discovery of tumor biomarkers and metabolic therapeutic targets. Metabolomics by two-dimensional proton high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was applied to investigate metabolite disorders following treatment by chloroethylnitrosourea of murine B16 melanoma (n = 33) and 3LL pulmonary carcinoma (n = 31) in vivo. Treated tumors of both types resumed growth after a delay. Nitrosoureas provoke DNA damage but the metabolic consequences of genotoxic stress are little known yet. Although some differences were observed in the metabolite profile of untreated tumor types, the prominent metabolic features of the response to nitrosourea were common to both. During the growth inhibition phase, there was an accumulation of glucose (more than x10; P < 0.05), glutamine (x3 to 4; P < 0.01), and aspartate (x2 to 5; P < 0.01). This response testified to nucleoside de novo synthesis down-regulation and drug efficacy. However, this phase also involved the increase in alanine (P < 0.001 in B16 melanoma), the decrease in succinate (P < 0.001), and the accumulation of serine-derived metabolites (glycine, phosphoethanolamine, and formate; P < 0.01). This response witnessed the activation of pathways implicated in energy production and resumption of nucleotide de novo synthesis, thus metabolic pathways of DNA repair and adaptation to treatment. During the growth recovery phase, it remained polyunsaturated fatty acid accumulation (x1.5 to 2; P < 0.05) and reduced utilization of glucose compared with glutamine (P < 0.05), a metabolic fingerprint of adaptation. Thus, this study provides the proof of principle that metabolomics of tumor response to an anticancer agent may help discover metabolic pathways of drug efficacy and adaptation to treatment. PMID:17332345

  3. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) methods for determining the purity of reference drug standards and illicit forensic drug seizures.

    PubMed

    Hays, Patrick A

    2005-11-01

    A rapid, sensitive, accurate, precise, reproducible, and versatile method for determining the purity of reference drug standards and the routine analysis of illicit drugs and adulterants using proton (1H) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy is presented. The methodology uses a weighed sample dissolved in a deuterated solvent or solvent mixture containing a high purity internal standard. The NMR experiment employs 8 scans using a 45 second delay and 90 degrees pulse. In the determination of purity of reference standards, the number of quantitative determinations available is equal to the number of peak groups that are baseline resolved. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of these signals is usually < 1% for pure standards, and the results agree well with other purity determining methods. This method can also aid in the determination of correct molecular weight for standards containing an unknown number of waters of hydration or an unknown number of acids per drug in salts. Because the molar response for the hydrogen nucleus is 1 for all compounds, and since no separation media are used, only one linearity study is required to test a probe. In the presented study, the linearity of the NMR probe was determined using methamphetamine HCl dissolved in deuterium oxide (D2O) with maleic acid as the internal standard (5 mg) for a range of concentrations from 0.033 to 69.18 mg/ml with a resulting correlation coefficient of >0.9999 for all 6 methamphetamine peak groups. The spectra of complex illicit heroin, methamphetamine, MDMA, and cocaine samples are presented, as well as an extensive list of compounds, their solubilities and the solvent(s) and internal standard used. PMID:16382828

  4. Accuracy and stability of measuring GABA, glutamate, and glutamine by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy: A phantom study at 4 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Michael E.; Lauriat, Tara L.; Shanahan, Meghan; Renshaw, Perry F.; Jensen, J. Eric

    2011-02-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy has the potential to provide valuable information about alterations in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), and glutamine (Gln) in psychiatric and neurological disorders. In order to use this technique effectively, it is important to establish the accuracy and reproducibility of the methodology. In this study, phantoms with known metabolite concentrations were used to compare the accuracy of 2D J-resolved MRS, single-echo 30 ms PRESS, and GABA-edited MEGA-PRESS for measuring all three aforementioned neurochemicals simultaneously. The phantoms included metabolite concentrations above and below the physiological range and scans were performed at baseline, 1 week, and 1 month time-points. For GABA measurement, MEGA-PRESS proved optimal with a measured-to-target correlation of R2 = 0.999, with J-resolved providing R2 = 0.973 for GABA. All three methods proved effective in measuring Glu with R2 = 0.987 (30 ms PRESS), R2 = 0.996 (J-resolved) and R2 = 0.910 (MEGA-PRESS). J-resolved and MEGA-PRESS yielded good results for Gln measures with respective R2 = 0.855 (J-resolved) and R2 = 0.815 (MEGA-PRESS). The 30 ms PRESS method proved ineffective in measuring GABA and Gln. When measurement stability at in vivo concentration was assessed as a function of varying spectral quality, J-resolved proved the most stable and immune to signal-to-noise and linewidth fluctuation compared to MEGA-PRESS and 30 ms PRESS.

  5. Search for resonances in the mass distribution of jet pairs with one or two jets identified as b-jets in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelijn, R.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'amen, G.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Maria, A.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duffield, E. M.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dumancic, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edwards, N. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Ennis, J. S.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. G.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, L. G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisen, M.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. 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D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, A. J.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pascuzzi, V. R.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penwell, J.; Peralva, B. S.; Perego, M. M.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrov, M.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pozo Astigarraga, M. E.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Puddu, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Raine, J. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Ratti, M. G.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Ravinovich, I.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Reale, M.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reisin, H.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rimoldi, M.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Rizzi, C.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodina, Y.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, D.; Roe, S.; Rogan, C. S.; Røhne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosenthal, O.; Rosien, N.-A.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryu, S.; Ryzhov, A.; Rzehorz, G. F.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schachtner, B. M.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schier, S.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K. R.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schott, M.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-08-01

    Searches for high-mass resonances in the dijet invariant mass spectrum with one or two jets identified as b-jets are performed using an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions with a centre-of-mass energy of √{ s} = 13 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No evidence of anomalous phenomena is observed in the data, which are used to exclude, at 95% credibility level, excited b* quarks with masses from 1.1 TeV to 2.1 TeV and leptophobic Z‧ bosons with masses from 1.1 TeV to 1.5 TeV. Contributions of a Gaussian signal shape with effective cross sections ranging from approximately 0.4 to 0.001 pb are also excluded in the mass range 1.5-5.0 TeV.

  6. Peculiarities of the signals of the protons of the alkyl group at the boron atom in the PMR spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V.V.; Gren, A.I.; Zakharov, K.S.

    1985-05-01

    The authors note the peculiarities of the resonance signals of the alkyl group bonded to the boron atom. They present two charts of data gathered by the use of PMR spectroscopy. Analyzing these data, they conclude that observed peculiarities are probably due to chemical shifts of the protons of the methyl groups and of the methine proton, but they aver that a more profound analysis of the anomaly is impossible without a precise calculation of the spectra under discussion.

  7. Characterization of pH titration shifts for all the nonlabile proton resonances in a protein by two-dimensional NMR: The case of mouse epidermal growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Kohda, Daisuke; Sawada, Toshie; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko )

    1991-05-21

    The pH titration shifts for all the nonlabile proton resonances in a 53-residue protein (mouse epidermal growth factor) were measured in the p{sup 2}H range 1.5-9 with two-dimensional (2D) {sup 1}H NMR. The 2D NMR pH titration experiment made it possible to determine the pK values for all the ionizable group which were titrated in the pH range 1.5-9 in the protein. The pK values of the nine ionizable groups ({alpha}-amino group, four Asp, two Glu, one His, and {alpha}-carboxyl group) were found to be near their normal values. The 2D titration experiment also provided a detailed description of the pH-dependent behavior of the proton chemical shifts and enabled us to characterize the pH-dependent changes of protein conformation. Analysis of the pH-dependent shifts of ca. 200 proton resonances offered evidence of conformational changes in slightly basic pH solution: The deprotonation of the N-terminal {alpha}-amino group induced a widespread conformational change over the {beta}-sheet structure in the protein, while the effects of deprotonation of the His22 imidazole group were relatively localized. The authors found that the 2D NMR pH titration experiment is a powerful tool for investigating the structural and dynamic properties of proteins.

  8. Characterization of pH titration shifts for all the nonlabile proton resonances a protein by two-dimensional NMR: the case of mouse epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed

    Kohda, D; Sawada, T; Inagaki, F

    1991-05-21

    The pH titration shifts for all the nonlabile proton resonances in a 53-residue protein (mouse epidermal growth factor) were measured in the p2H range 1.5-9 with two-dimensional (2D) 1H NMR. The 2D NMR pH titration experiment made it possible to determine the pK values for all the ionizable groups which were titrated in the pH range 1.5-9 in the protein. The pK values of the nine ionizable groups (alpha-amino group, four Asp, two Glu, one His, and alpha-carboxyl group) were found to be near their normal values. The 2D titration experiment also provided a detailed description of the pH-dependent behavior of the proton chemical shifts and enabled us to characterize the pH-dependent changes of protein conformation. Analysis of the pH-dependent shifts of ca. 200 proton resonances offered evidence of conformational changes in slightly basic pH solution: The deprotonation of the N-terminal alpha-amino group induced a widespread conformational change over the beta-sheet structure in the protein, while the effects of deprotonation of the His22 imidazole group were relatively localized. We found that the 2D NMR pH titration experiment is a powerful tool for investigating the structural and dynamic properties of proteins. PMID:2036358

  9. Assignment of selected hyperfine proton NMR resonances in the met forms of Glycera dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins and comparisons with sperm whale metmyoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinidis, I.; Satterlee, J.D.; Pandey, R.K.; Leung, H.K.; Smith, K.M.

    1988-04-19

    This work indicates a high degree of purity for our preparations of all three of the primary Glycera dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins and details assignments of the heme methyl and vinyl protons in the hyperfine shift region of the ferric (aquo.) protein forms. The assignments were carried out by reconstituting the apoproteins of each component with selectively deuteriated hemes. The results indicate that even though the individual component preparations consist of essentially a single protein, the proton NMR spectra indicate spectroscopic heterogeneity. Evidence is presented for identification and classification of major and minor protein forms that are present in solutions of each component. Finally, in contrast to previous results, a detailed analysis of the proton hyperfine shift patterns of the major and minor forms of each component, in comparison to the major and minor forms of metmyoglobin, leads to the conclusions that the corresponding forms of the proteins from each species have strikingly similar heme-globin contacts and display nearly identical heme electronic structures and coordination numbers.

  10. Differentiation of protonated aromatic regioisomers related to lignin by reactions with trimethylborate in a fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Somuramasami, J; Duan, P; Amundson, Lucas M; Archibold, E; Winger, B E; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2011-04-06

    Several lignin model compounds were examined to test whether gas-phase ion–molecule reactions of trimethylborate (TMB) in a FTICR can be used to differentiate the ortho-, meta-, and para-isomers of protonated aromatic compounds, such as those formed during degradation of lignin. All three regioisomers could be differentiated for methoxyphenols and hydroxyphenols. However, only the differentiation of the ortho-isomer from the meta- and para-isomers was possible for hydroxyacetophenones and hydroxybenzoic acids. Consideration of the previously reported proton affinities at all basic sites in the isomeric hydroxyphenols, and the calculated proton affinities at all basic sites in the three methoxyphenol isomers, revealed that the proton affinities of the analytes relative to that of TMB play an important role in determining whether and how they react with TMB. The loss of two methanol molecules (instead of one) from the adducts formed with TMB either during ion–molecule reactions, or during sustained-off resonance irradiated collision-activated dissociation of the ion–molecule reaction products, revealed the presence of two functionalities in almost all the isomers. This finding supports earlier results suggesting that TMB can be used to count the functionalities in unknown oxygen-containing analytes.

  11. Resonance scraping

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1986-06-01

    Protons lost in a ring leave at a few preferred locations, determined by some non-linear property of the dipoles. This paper suggests taking control of lost protons by beating the magnets at their own game - by means of a designed resonance used as a beam scraper. It is a study of suitable resonances, including estimates of the required multipole element strengths. The appropriate resonances are two-dimensional. A large number of figures is included.

  12. Studies related to primitive chemistry. A proton and nitrogen-14 nuclear magnetic resonance amino acid and nucleic acid constituents and a and their possible relation to prebiotic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, S. L.; Cohen, E. A.; Shiller, A. M.; Chan, S. I.

    1973-01-01

    Preliminary proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies were made to determine the applicability of this technique for the study of interactions between monomeric and polymeric amino acids with monomeric nucleic acid bases and nucleotides. Proton NMR results for aqueous solutions (D2O) demonstrated interactions between the bases cytosine and adenine and acidic and aromatic amino acids. Solutions of 5'-AMP admixed with amino acids exhibited more complex behavior but stacking between aromatic rings and destacking at high amino acids concentration was evident. The multisite nature of 5'-AMP was pointed out. Chemical shift changes for adenine and 5'-AMP with three water soluble polypeptides demonstrated that significant interactions exist. It was found that the linewidth-pH profile of each amino acid is unique. It is concluded that NMR techniques can give significant and quantitative data on the association of amino acid and nucleic acid constituents.

  13. Non-additive response of blends of rice and potato starch during heating at intermediate water contents: A differential scanning calorimetry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Geertrui M; Pareyt, Bram; Delcour, Jan A

    2016-02-01

    The impact of different hydration levels, on gelatinization of potato starch (PS), rice starch (RS) and a 1:1 blend thereof, was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and related to nuclear magnetic resonance proton distributions of hydrated samples, before and after heating. At 20% or 30% hydration, the visual appearance of all samples was that of a wet powder, and limited, if any, gelatinization occurred upon heating. At 30% hydration, changes in proton distributions were observed and related to plasticization of amorphous regions in the granules. At 50% hydration, the PS-RS blend appeared more liquid-like than other hydrated samples and showed more pronounced gelatinization than expected based on additive behavior of pure starches. This was due to an additional mobile water fraction in the unheated PS-RS blend, originating from differences in water distribution due to altered stacking of granules and/or altered hydration of PS due to presence of cations in RS. PMID:26304387

  14. 2D-1H proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging study on brain metabolite alterations in patients with diabetic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhen; Ye, Bi-Di; Shen, Zhi-Wei; Cheng, Xiao-Fang; Yang, Zhong-Xian; Liu, Yan-Yan; Wu, Ren-Hua; Geng, Kuan; Xiao, Ye-Yu

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible metabolic alterations in the frontal cortex and parietal white matter in patients with diabetic hypertension (DHT) using proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic imaging. A total of 33 DHT patients and 30 healthy control subjects aged between 45 and 75 were included in the present study. All subjects were right‑handed. The spectroscopy data were collected using a GE Healthcare 1.5T MR scanner. The multi‑voxels were located in the semioval center (repetition time/echo time=1,500 ms/35 ms). The area of interest was 8x10x2 cm in volume and contained the two sides of the frontal cortex and the parietal white matter. The spectra data were processed using SAGE software. The ratios of brain metabolite concentrations, particularly for N‑acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr) and Choline (Cho)/Cr were calculated and analyzed. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 17.0. The NAA/Cr ratio of the bilateral prefrontal cortex of the DHT group was significantly lower than that of the control group (left t=‑7.854, P=0.000 and right t=‑5.787, P=0.000), The Cho/Cr ratio was also much lower than the control group (left t=2.422, P=0.024 and right t=2.920, P=0.007). NAA/Cr ratio of the left parietal white matter of the DHT group was extremely lower than that of the control group (t=‑4.199, P=0.000). Therefore, DHT may result in metabolic disorders in the frontal cortex and parietal white matter but the metabolic alterations are different in various regions of the brain. The alteration in cerebral metabolism is associated with diabetes and hypertension. The ratios of NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr are potential metabolic markers for the brain damage induced by DHT. PMID:25652580

  15. Proton magnetic relaxation and internal rotations in tetramethylammonium cadmium chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Utton, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and relaxation studies of the proton spin-lattice relaxation time (PSLRT) and proton second moment (PSM) are reported. Tetramethylammonium cadmium chloride (TMCC) was selected as a diamagnetic member of the isomorphic series, and hence proton data relate directly to the motion of the tetramethylammonium ion in the absence of paramagnetic ions. In the model adopted, the correlation time for hindered motion of one of the methyl groups differs from that of the other three groups in the low-temperature phase below 104 K. PSLRT and PSM values agree closely with experimental data with this model. Crystallographic phase transitions in TMCC occur at 104 K and 119 K according to the PSLRT measurements. Dipolar interactions between adjacent protons account for the PSLR rates below 104 K.

  16. Search for lepton flavour violating decays of heavy resonances and quantum black holes to an eμ pair in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-06-10

    A search for narrow resonances decaying to an electron and a muon is presented. Themore » $$\\mathrm {e}$$ $${\\mu }$$ mass spectrum is also investigated for non-resonant contributions from the production of quantum black holes (QBHs). The analysis is performed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 $$~\\text {fb}^\\text {-1}$$ collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ with the CMS detector at the LHC. With no evidence for physics beyond the standard model in the invariant mass spectrum of selected $$\\mathrm {e}\\mu $$ pairs, upper limits are set at 95  $$\\%$$ confidence level on the product of cross section and branching fraction for signals arising in theories with charged lepton flavour violation. In the search for narrow resonances, the resonant production of a $$\\mathrm {\\tau }$$ sneutrino in R-parity violating supersymmetry is considered. The $$\\mathrm {\\tau }$$ sneutrino is excluded for masses below 1.28 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ for couplings $$\\lambda _{132}=\\lambda _{231}=\\lambda '_{311}=0.01$$ , and below 2.30 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ for $$\\lambda _{132}=\\lambda _{231}=0.07$$ and $$\\lambda '_{311}=0.11$$ . These are the most stringent limits to date from direct searches at high-energy colliders. In addition, the resonance searches are interpreted in terms of a model with heavy partners of the $${\\mathrm {Z}} $$ boson and the photon. In a framework of TeV-scale quantum gravity based on a renormalization of Newton’s constant, the search for non-resonant contributions to the $$\\mathrm {e}$$ $${\\mu }$$ mass spectrum excludes QBH production below a threshold mass $$M_{\\mathrm {th}}$$ of 1.99 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ . In models that invoke extra dimensions, the bounds range from 2.36 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ for one extra dimension to 3.63 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ for six extra dimensions. Furthermore, this is the first search for QBHs decaying into the $$\\mathrm {e}$$ $${\\mu }$$ final state.« less

  17. Search for lepton flavour violating decays of heavy resonances and quantum black holes to an e-mu pair in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2016-06-10

    A search for narrow resonances decaying to an electron and a muon is presented. Themore » $$\\mathrm {e}$$ $${\\mu }$$ mass spectrum is also investigated for non-resonant contributions from the production of quantum black holes (QBHs). The analysis is performed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 $$~\\text {fb}^\\text {-1}$$ collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ with the CMS detector at the LHC. With no evidence for physics beyond the standard model in the invariant mass spectrum of selected $$\\mathrm {e}\\mu $$ pairs, upper limits are set at 95  $$\\%$$ confidence level on the product of cross section and branching fraction for signals arising in theories with charged lepton flavour violation. In the search for narrow resonances, the resonant production of a $$\\mathrm {\\tau }$$ sneutrino in R-parity violating supersymmetry is considered. The $$\\mathrm {\\tau }$$ sneutrino is excluded for masses below 1.28 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ for couplings $$\\lambda _{132}=\\lambda _{231}=\\lambda '_{311}=0.01$$ , and below 2.30 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ for $$\\lambda _{132}=\\lambda _{231}=0.07$$ and $$\\lambda '_{311}=0.11$$ . These are the most stringent limits to date from direct searches at high-energy colliders. In addition, the resonance searches are interpreted in terms of a model with heavy partners of the $${\\mathrm {Z}} $$ boson and the photon. In a framework of TeV-scale quantum gravity based on a renormalization of Newton’s constant, the search for non-resonant contributions to the $$\\mathrm {e}$$ $${\\mu }$$ mass spectrum excludes QBH production below a threshold mass $$M_{\\mathrm {th}}$$ of 1.99 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ . In models that invoke extra dimensions, the bounds range from 2.36 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ for one extra dimension to 3.63 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ for six extra dimensions. This is the first search for QBHs decaying into the $$\\mathrm {e}$$ $${\\mu }$$ final state.« less

  18. Determination of the H 2ONO +2 and CH 3O(H)NO +2 bond strenghts and the proton affinities of nitric acid and methyl nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunderlin, L. S.; Squires, Robert R.

    1993-09-01

    The binding energies of water and methanol to NO +2 have been measured to be 14.8 ± 2.3 and 19.2 ± 2.3 kcal/mol, respectively, using energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation of H 2ONO +2 and CH 3O(H)NO +2 in a flowing afterglow triple quadrupole apparatus. These values are used with literature thermochemistry to derive proton affinities for nitric acid and methyl nitrate; PA(HONO 2) = 177.7 ± 2.3 kcal/mol and PA(CH 3ONO 2) = 175.0 ± 2.5 kcal/mol. These results are in good agreement with recent calculations by Lee and Rice, but only the methyl nitrate result is in agreement with experimental results of Cacace and co-workers.

  19. Carbon-13 and proton nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of shale-derived refinery products and jet fuels and of experimental referee broadened-specification jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalling, D. K.; Bailey, B. K.; Pugmire, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    A proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study was conducted of Ashland shale oil refinery products, experimental referee broadened-specification jet fuels, and of related isoprenoid model compounds. Supercritical fluid chromatography techniques using carbon dioxide were developed on a preparative scale, so that samples could be quantitatively separated into saturates and aromatic fractions for study by NMR. An optimized average parameter treatment was developed, and the NMR results were analyzed in terms of the resulting average parameters; formulation of model mixtures was demonstrated. Application of novel spectroscopic techniques to fuel samples was investigated.

  20. K-shell ionization probability in elastic proton scattering on /sup 138/Ba through an f/sub 7/2/ isobaric-analog resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Dost, M.; Lorek, R.; Roehl, S.; Seidel, J.; Koenig, W.

    1985-10-01

    The bombarding energy dependence of the K-shell ionization probability P/sub K/ was measured in elastic proton scattering on /sup 138/Ba at energies near the 69-keV-wide f/sub 7/2/ isobaric-analog resonance at 9.965 MeV. The best simultaneous fit to P/sub K/ in the scattering angle intervals 45/sup 0/--80/sup 0/ and 100/sup 0/--135/sup 0/ yields R/sub 0/ = -0.30 +- 0.30 for the tangent of the phase angle of the semiclassical monopole ionization amplitude.

  1. A search for $ t\\overline{t} $ resonances using lepton-plus-jets events in proton-proton collisions at $ \\sqrt{s}=8 $ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.

    2015-08-01

    A search for new particles that decay into top quark pairs is reported. The search is performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of s√=8s=8 TeV. The lepton-plus-jets final state is used, where the top pair decays to W+bW-b¯¯W+bW-b¯, with one W boson decaying leptonically and the other hadronically. The invariant mass spectrum of top quark pairs is examined for local excesses or deficits that are inconsistent with the Standard Model predictions. No evidence for a top quark pair resonance is found, and 95% confidence-level limits on the production rate are determined for massive states in benchmark models. The upper limits on the cross-section times branching ratio of a narrow Z' boson decaying to top pairs range from 4.2 pb to 0.03 pb for resonance masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A narrow leptophobic topcolour Z' boson with mass below 1.8 TeV is excluded. Upper limits are set on the cross-section times branching ratio for a broad colour-octet resonance with Γ/m = 15% decaying to tt¯tt¯. These range from 4.8 pb to 0.03 pb for masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A Kaluza-Klein excitation of the gluon in a Randall-Sundrum model is excluded for masses below 2.2 TeV.

  2. A search for \\( t\\overline{t} \\) resonances using lepton-plus-jets events in proton-proton collisions at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-28

    A search for new particles that decay into top quark pairs is reported. The search is performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV. The lepton-plus-jets final state is used, where the top pair decays to \\( {W}^{+}b{W}^{-}\\overline{b} \\), with one W boson decaying leptonically and the other hadronically. The invariant mass spectrum of top quark pairs is examined for local excesses or deficits that are inconsistent with the Standard Model predictions. No evidence for a top quark pair resonance is found, and 95% confidence-level limits on the production rate are determined for massive states in benchmark models. The upper limits on the cross-section times branching ratio of a narrow Z' boson decaying to top pairs range from 4.2 pb to 0.03 pb for resonance masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A narrow leptophobic topcolour Z' boson with mass below 1.8 TeV is excluded. Upper limits are set on the cross-section times branching ratio for a broad colour-octet resonance with Γ/m = 15% decaying to \\( t\\overline{t} \\). These range from 4.8 pb to 0.03 pb for masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A Kaluza-Klein excitation of the gluon in a Randall-Sundrum model is excluded for masses below 2.2 TeV.

  3. A search for \\( t\\overline{t} \\) resonances using lepton-plus-jets events in proton-proton collisions at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-28

    A search for new particles that decay into top quark pairs is reported. The search is performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV. The lepton-plus-jets final state is used, where the top pair decays to \\( {W}^{+}b{W}^{-}\\overline{b} \\), with one W boson decaying leptonically and the other hadronically. The invariant mass spectrum of top quark pairs is examined for local excesses or deficits that are inconsistent with the Standard Model predictions. No evidence for a top quark pairmore » resonance is found, and 95% confidence-level limits on the production rate are determined for massive states in benchmark models. The upper limits on the cross-section times branching ratio of a narrow Z' boson decaying to top pairs range from 4.2 pb to 0.03 pb for resonance masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A narrow leptophobic topcolour Z' boson with mass below 1.8 TeV is excluded. Upper limits are set on the cross-section times branching ratio for a broad colour-octet resonance with Γ/m = 15% decaying to \\( t\\overline{t} \\). These range from 4.8 pb to 0.03 pb for masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A Kaluza-Klein excitation of the gluon in a Randall-Sundrum model is excluded for masses below 2.2 TeV.« less

  4. Resonance Raman spectroscopic investigation of axial coordination in M. thermoautotrophicum methyl reductase and its nickel tetrapyrrole cofactor F/sub 430/ave

    SciTech Connect

    Shiemke, A.K.; Scott, R.A.; Shelnutt, J.A.

    1988-03-02

    The S-methyl coenzyme M (CH/sub 3/-S-CoM, 2-(methylthio)ethanesulfonic acid) methylreductase enzyme of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum contains F/sub 430/, the nickel-tetrapyrrole cofactor which is thought to be the site of reduction of CH/sub 3/-S-CoM to methane and HS-CoM. Here the use of resonance Raman spectroscopy is reported for the investigation of the well-characterized forms of isolated F/sub 430/ in aqueous solution and the intact methylreductase. The Raman spectra were obtained on pairs of 100-200 ..mu..M samples by using a split cell designed for a Raman difference spectrometer described previously. The spectra were excited at 441.6 nm with a 40 mW defocused, unpolarized beam of a helium-cadmium laser (Omnichrome) operating at 4-cm/sup -1/ resolution.

  5. Hydrogen bonds and hydrogen-bonded systems in Mannich bases of 2,2'-biphenol: an FTIR study of the proton polarizability and Fermi resonance effects as a function of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzezinski, Bogumil; Radziejewski, Piotr; Rabold, Arno; Zundel, Georg

    1995-09-01

    5,5'-Dibromo-3-diethylaminomethyl-2,2'-biphenol ( 1) and 5,5'-dibromo-3,3'-bis(diethylaminomethyl)-2,2'-biphenol ( 2) were synthesized and studied by FTIR and 1H NMR spectroscopy. In dichloromethane solution, 1 forms a hydrogen-bonded system with large proton polarizability due to collective tunnelling of protons in the two intramolecular hydrogen bonds. In acetonitrile the system is polarized to a greater extent. If this system is protonated, the HO⋯HO⋯bond is broken and hence the collective system destroyed. The FTIR spectrum of protonated 2 shows an intense continuum indicating a collective hydrogen-bonded system with large proton polarizability due to collective proton motion. The butyronitrile solution of 1 shows an increase of the Fermi resonance bands with decreasing temperature (above the glass transition). The hydrogen bonds become stronger. Furthermore, the proton polarizability increases. With the transition in the glass state the continuum remains unchanged since the local fields are frozen. Only the Fermi resonance effect becomes slightly stronger. With the butyronitrile solution of 2 the IR continuum caused by the polarizable OH⋯N ⇌ O -⋯H +N bonds increases above the glass transition with decreasing temperature. The equilibrium is shifted in favour of the polar structure. In the glass state no change of the continuum and thus of the proton polarizability is observed, since the local fields are frozen.

  6. Space charge effect of the high intensity proton beam during the resonance extraction for the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chong Shik; Amundson, James; Johnstone, John; Michelotti, Leo; Nagaslaev, Vladimir; Werkema, Steve; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The proposed Mu2e experiment to search for direct {mu} {yields} e conversion at Fermilab plans slow, resonant extraction of a beam with 3 x 10{sup 12} protons from the Debuncher ring. Space charge of this high intensity beam is a critical factor, since it induces significant betatron tune spread and consequently affects resonance extraction processes, such as spill uniformity and beam losses. This study shows the multi-particle simulation results in the early stages of resonance extraction and spill uniformity in the presence of 2D and 3D space charge effects. We have presented the results of the third-integer resonance extraction in early stage for the Mu2e experiment in the presence of space charge effects. In order to track particles and to calculate self-consistent space charge effects, Synergia2 was used, which is capable of parallel computing. The space charge tune shift was computed and was reasonable value compared with the analytical calculation. Locations of the septum and Lambertson were chosen so that particles are kicked and extracted efficiently. The spill rates for with and without space charge effects were uniform, but should be improved for the early stage after the sextupole field ramping.

  7. Graphene oxide-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle composite with high transverse proton relaxivity value for magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesha, N.; Srivastava, Chandan; Poojar, Pavan; Geethanath, Sairam; Qurishi, Yasrib

    2015-04-21

    The potential of graphene oxide–Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle (GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) composite as an image contrast enhancing material in magnetic resonance imaging has been investigated. Proton relaxivity values were obtained in three different homogeneous dispersions of GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites synthesized by precipitating Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in three different reaction mixtures containing 0.01 g, 0.1 g, and 0.2 g of graphene oxide. A noticeable difference in proton relaxivity values was observed between the three cases. A comprehensive structural and magnetic characterization revealed discrete differences in the extent of reduction of the graphene oxide and spacing between the graphene oxide sheets in the three composites. The GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite framework that contained graphene oxide with least extent of reduction of the carboxyl groups and largest spacing between the graphene oxide sheets provided the optimum structure for yielding a very high transverse proton relaxivity value. It was found that the GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites possessed good biocompatibility with normal cell lines, whereas they exhibited considerable toxicity towards breast cancer cells.

  8. Sequential assignment of proton resonances in the NMR spectrum of Zn-substituted alpha chains from human hemoglobin. Ligand-induced tertiary changes in the heme pocket.

    PubMed

    Martineau, L; Craescu, C T

    1993-06-01

    We constructed an artificial holoprotein as a complex between alpha globin from human adult hemoglobin and the protoporphyrin IX-Zn(II). The prosthetic group is bound in a single conformation to the apoglobin via a coordinative bond between Zn(II) ion and the proximal histidine (His87). The complex is diamagnetic and does not bind either CO nor O2 thus representing a diamagnetic model of deoxygenated alpha chains. In the present paper we report extensive resonance assignment in the proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the Zn-substituted alpha chains in phosphate buffer pH 5.6. A large number of aromatic and aliphatic side chain spin systems were identified in the two-dimensional homonuclear COSY spectra. Based on the assigned resonances of heme substituent protons and their NOE cross-peaks, we assigned the majority of resonances representing the heme pocket side chains. Using the main-chain-directed assignment strategy, we could establish several continuous patterns of sequential assignment and identify partial or total spin systems for a large number of side chains. The final assignment corresponds to 73% of the amino acids. Analysis of chemical shift of assigned resonances and of nuclear Overhauser enhancement connectivities provides structural information on the global and local tertiary conformation in solution and on the ligand-induced conformational changes. Comparison of observed and calculated ring current shifts enabled us to compare the solution structure with the X-ray crystal structure of alpha subunits in deoxy and carbonmonoxy hemoglobin. The global tertiary structure of unliganded chains is highly similar to both ligand and unliganded counterparts in the crystalline state. On the distal side of the heme pocket. Val62 is significantly closer to the heme center, in agreement with its conformation in the crystallographic structure. In contrast, the position of the proximal histidine (His87) relative to the heme is clearly more closely related

  9. Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perozzi, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A resonance in CELESTIAL MECHANICS occurs when some of the quantities characterizing the motion of two or more celestial bodies can be considered as commensurable, i.e. their ratio is close to an integer fraction. In a simplified form, this can be expressed as ...

  10. Photon-induced emission of pions and protons from various nuclei in the Δ-resonance region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arends, J.; Detemple, P.; Floss, N.; Huthmacher, S.; Kaul, G.; Mecking, B.; Nöldeke, G.; Stenz, R.

    1991-05-01

    Double differential cross sections for the photon induced emission of π-, π+ and protons from Be, C, O, Ti, and Pb have been measured in the photon energy range k = 220-450 MeV using the tagged photon beam of the Bonn 500 MeV synchrotron. The hadron detector consists of a magnetic spectrometer and a large acceptance scintillation counter array. For Be, the single-arm energy distributions show clear structures from quasi-free pion production and quasi-deuteron photodisintegration. These structures disappear with increasing target size. The dependence of the differential cross section on the nuclear size S at Θlab = 52° can be described by the power law dσ/ dΩ ∞ S α, where S is the number of protons or neutrons, respectively. The exponent is απ ≈ 0.6 for π- and π+ and αp ≈ 1.15 for protons. Data for pn, pp, and pπ coincidences are presented. The results are compared to intranuclear cascade codes (PICA and PIKI) and to microscopic calculations.

  11. The Protonation Site of para-Dimethylaminobenzoic Acid Using Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yunfeng; Weng, Guofeng; Shen, Shanshan; Sun, Cuirong; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2015-04-01

    The protonation site of para-dimethylaminobenzoic acid ( p-DMABA) was investigated using atmospheric pressure ionization methods (ESI and APCI) coupled with collision-induced dissociation (CID), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and computational chemistry. Theoretical calculations and NMR experiments indicate that the dimethyl amino group is the preferred site of protonation both in the gas phase and aqueous solution. Protonation of p-DMABA occurs at the nitrogen atom by ESI independent of the solvents and other operation conditions under typical thermodynamic control. However, APCI produces a mixture of the nitrogen- and carbonyl oxygen-protonated p-DMABA when aprotic organic solvents (acetonitrile, acetone, and tetrahydrofuran) are used, exhibiting evident kinetic characteristics of protonation. But using protic organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol) in APCI still leads to the formation of thermodynamically stable N-protonated p-DMABA. These structural assignments were based on the different CID behavior of the N- and O-protonated p-DMABA. The losses of methyl radical and water are the diagnostic fragmentations of the N- and O-protonated p-DMABA, respectively. In addition, the N-protonated p-DMABA is more stable than the O-protonated p-DMABA in CID revealed by energy resolved experiments and theoretical calculations.

  12. Roles of the. beta. 146 histidyl residue in the molecular basis of the Bohr Effect of hemoglobin: A proton nuclear magnetic resonance study

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, M.R.; Mace, J.E.; Ho, N.T.; Ho, Chien )

    1991-02-19

    Assessment of the roles of the carboxyl-terminal {beta}146 histidyl residues in the alkaline Bohr effect in human and normal adult hemoglobin by high-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy requires assignment of the resonances corresponding to these residues. By a careful spectroscopic study of human normal adult hemoglobin, enzymatically prepared des(His146{beta})-hemoglobin, and the mutant hemoglobins Cowtown ({beta}146His {yields} Leu) and York ({beta}146His {yields} Pro), the authors have resolved some of these conflicting results. By a close incremental variation of pH over a wide range in chloride-free 0.1 M N-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-N{prime}-2-ethanesulfonic acid buffer, a single resonance has been found to be consistently missing in the proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of these hemoglobin variants. The results indicate that the contribution of the {beta}146 histidyl residues is 0.52 H{sup +}/hemoglobin tetramer at pH 7.6, markedly less than 0.8 H{sup +}/hemoglobin tetramer estimated by study of the mutant hemoglobin Cowtown ({beta}146His {yields} Leu) by Shih and Perutz. They have found that at least two histidyl residues in the carbonmonoxy form of this mutant have pK values that are perturbed, and they suggest that these pK differences may in part account for this discrepancy. The results show that the pK values of {beta}146 histidyl residues in the carbonmonoxy form of hemoglobin are substantially affected by the presence of chloride and other anions in the solvent, and thus, the contribution of this amino acid residue to the alkaline Bohr effect can be shown to vary widely in magnitude, depending on the solvent composition. These results demonstrate that the detailed molecular mechanisms of the alkaline Bohr effect are not unique but are affected both by the hemoglobin structure and by the interactions with the solvent components in which the hemoglobin molecule resides.

  13. Exclusive single pion electroproduction off the proton in the high-lying resonances at Q2 < 5 GeV2 from CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kijun

    2014-09-01

    The differential cross sections and structure functions for the exclusive electroproduction process ep --> e'n pi+ were measured in the range of the invariantmass for the np+ system 1.6 GeV lte W lte 2.0 GeV, and the photon virtuality 1.8 GeV2 lte Q2 lte 4.0 GeV2 using CLAS at Jefferson Lab. For the first time, these kinematics are probed in the exclusive p+ production from the protons with nearly full coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the np+ center-of-mass system. In this analysis, approximately 39,000 differential cross-section data points in terms of W, Q2, cosq theta* _ pi, and phi*_p-, were obtained. The preliminary differential cross section and structure function analyses are carried out, which allow us to extract the helicity amplitudes in high-lying resonances.

  14. In-Vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-Mutated Gliomas: A Technical Review for Neuroradiologists

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungjin; Lee, Hyeong Hun; Heo, Hwon

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic and prognostic potential of an onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) as a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) detectable biomarker of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)-mutated (IDH-MT) gliomas has drawn attention of neuroradiologists recently. However, due to severe spectral overlap with background signals, quantification of 2HG can be very challenging. In this technical review for neuroradiologists, first, the biochemistry of 2HG and its significance in the diagnosis of IDH-MT gliomas are summarized. Secondly, various 1H-MRS methods used in the previous studies are outlined. Finally, wereview previous in vivo studies, and discuss the current status of 1H-MRS in the diagnosis of IDH-MT gliomas. PMID:27587950

  15. In-Vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-Mutated Gliomas: A Technical Review for Neuroradiologists.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeonjin; Kim, Sungjin; Lee, Hyeong Hun; Heo, Hwon

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic and prognostic potential of an onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) as a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) detectable biomarker of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)-mutated (IDH-MT) gliomas has drawn attention of neuroradiologists recently. However, due to severe spectral overlap with background signals, quantification of 2HG can be very challenging. In this technical review for neuroradiologists, first, the biochemistry of 2HG and its significance in the diagnosis of IDH-MT gliomas are summarized. Secondly, various 1H-MRS methods used in the previous studies are outlined. Finally, wereview previous in vivo studies, and discuss the current status of 1H-MRS in the diagnosis of IDH-MT gliomas. PMID:27587950

  16. Cerebellar Volume and Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy at Term, and Neurodevelopment at 2 Years of Age in Preterm Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Kooij, Britt J. M.; Benders, Manon J. N. L.; Anbeek, Petronella; van Haastert, Ingrid C.; de Vries, Linda S.; Groenendaal, Floris

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess the relation between cerebellar volume and spectroscopy at term equivalent age, and neurodevelopment at 24 months corrected age in preterm infants. Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was performed around term equivalent age in 112 preterm infants (mean gestational age 28wks 3d [SD 1wk 5d]; birthweight 1129g [SD 324g]).…

  17. Optically detected magnetic resonance study of the interaction of an arsenic(III) derivative of cacodylic acid with EcoRI methyl transferase

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, D.H.H.; Maki, A.H. )

    1991-05-07

    The interaction of the enzyme Escherichia coli RI methyl transferase (methylase) with an arsenic(III) derivative of cacodylic acid has been investigated by optical detection of triplet-state magnetic resonance (ODMR) spectroscopy in zero applied magnetic field. The reactive derivative (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}AsSR is formed by the reduction of cacodylate by a thiol. The As(III) derivative binds to the enzyme by mercaptide exchange with a cysteine (Cys) residue located close to a tryptophan (Trp) site. The arsenical binding selectively induces an external heavy-atom effect, perturbing the nearby Trp residue in the enzyme. Zero-field splittings (ZFS) and total decay rate constants of the individual triplet-state sublevels of the Trp residue in the presence and absence of perturbation by As(III) have been determined. The results indicate that the arsenical binding site in methylase which produces the Trp heavy-atom effect is protected from this ligand by ternary complex formation or the enzyme undergoes a conformation change, removing the Cys from the Trp site. This protection is also observed in fluorescence quenching experiments. In the ternary complex methylase-sinefungin-DNA, no heavy-atom perturbation of the two Trp residues in the enzyme by BrU was observed, demonstrating that Trp residues are not involved in close-range interactions with the two heavy-atom-derivatized nucleic acid bases.

  18. Excited state proton transfer dynamics of thioacetamide in S2(ππ*) state: resonance Raman spectroscopic and quantum mechanical calculations study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Zhao, Yanying; Zhang, Haibo; Xue, Jiadan; Zheng, Xuming

    2015-02-01

    The photophysics and photochemistry of thioacetamide (CH3CSNH2) after excitation to the S2 electronic state were investigated by using resonance Raman spectroscopy in conjunction with the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The A-band resonance Raman spectra in acetonitrile, methanol, and water were obtained at 299.1, 282.4, 266.0, 252.7, and 245.9 nm excitation wavelengths to probe the structural dynamics of thioacetamide in the S2 state. CASSCF calculations were done to determine the transition energies and structures of the lower-lying excited states, the conical intersection points CI(S2/S1) and CI(S1/S0), and intersystem crossing points. The structural dynamics of thioacetamide in the S2 state was revealed to be along eight Franck-Condon active vibrational modes ν15, ν11, ν14, ν10, ν8, ν12, ν18, and ν19, mostly in the CC/CS/CN stretches and the CNH8,9/CCH5,6,7/CCN/CCS in-plane bends as indicated by the corresponding normal mode descriptions. The S2 → S1 decay process via the S2/S1 conical intersection point as the major channel were excluded. The thione-thiol photoisomerization reaction mechanism of thioacetamide via the S2,FC → S'1,min excited state proton transfer (ESPT) reaction channel was proposed. PMID:25559740

  19. Translational Approaches for Studying Neurodevelopmental Disorders Utilizing in Vivo Proton (+H) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, April E.

    2014-01-01

    Intrauterine complications have been implicated in the etiology of neuripsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, autism and ADHD. This presentation will describe new translational studies derived from in vivo magnetic resonance imaging of developing and adult brain following perinatal asphyxia (PA). Our findings reveal significant effects of PA on neurometabolic profiles at one week of age, and significant relationships between early metabolites and later life phenotypes including behavior and brain morphometry

  20. Methyl cation affinities of neutral and anionic maingroup-element hydrides: trends across the periodic table and correlation with proton affinities.

    PubMed

    Mulder, R Joshua; Guerra, Célia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2010-07-22

    We have computed the methyl cation affinities in the gas phase of archetypal anionic and neutral bases across the periodic table using ZORA-relativistic density functional theory (DFT) at BP86/QZ4P//BP86/TZ2P. The main purpose of this work is to provide the methyl cation affinities (and corresponding entropies) at 298 K of all anionic (XH(n-1)(-)) and neutral bases (XH(n)) constituted by maingroup-element hydrides of groups 14-17 and the noble gases (i.e., group 18) along the periods 2-6. The cation affinity of the bases decreases from H(+) to CH(3)(+). To understand this trend, we have carried out quantitative bond energy decomposition analyses (EDA). Quantitative correlations are established between the MCA and PA values. PMID:20575582

  1. Stretched poly(methyl methacrylate) gel aligns small organic molecules in chloroform. stereochemical analysis and diastereotopic proton NMR assignment in ludartin using residual dipolar couplings and 3J coupling constant analysis.

    PubMed

    Gil, Roberto R; Gayathri, Chakicherla; Tsarevsky, Nicolay V; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2008-02-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) gels prepared by copolymerizing methyl methacrylate (MMA) and various amounts of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) in the presence of the radical initiator V-70 (2,2'-azobis(2,4-dimethyl-4-methoxyvaleronitrile)) can orient small organic molecules when swollen in NMR tubes with CDCl(3). The aligning properties of the stretched PMMA gels were evaluated by monitoring the quadrupolar splitting of the (2)H NMR signal of CDCl(3), and the aligning degree is proportional to the cross-linking density. Natural abundance one-bond (1)H-(13)C residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) for menthol measured in the gels depended on the cross-link density. The stereochemistry and assignment of the diastereotopic protons of the gastroprotective and nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor sesquiterpene lactone ludartin, isolated from Stevia yaconensis var. subeglandulosa, were unambiguously determined using a combination of natural abundance one-bond (1)H-(13)C RDCs measured in a PMMA gel and a (3)J coupling constant analysis. PMID:18177050

  2. Proton Resonance and Critical Relaxation in NH4MnF3 and NH4ZnF3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raaen, A. M.; Svare, I.; Fibich, M.

    1982-06-01

    Proton NMR line widths and relaxation have been studied in powders of almost simple cubic NH4ZnF3 and NH4MnF3. The activation energy for NH4+ reorientation is Ea/kB = 650K above Tc = 115 K in NH4ZnF3 and Ea/kB = 795 K below Tc, and probably about the same in NH4MnF3. The averaging of local fields because of rapid reorientation narrows the line and permits observation of critical relaxation near the antiferromagnetic TN = 75.8 K in NH4MnF3. If T1 propto (T - TN)ρ we find ρ in the range 0.1 to 0.3, compared to the expected ρ approx 0.33 for cubic Heisenberg antiferromagnets.

  3. A study of coal extraction with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation techniques. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.; Mehlenbacher, R.C.; Ito, O.

    1993-09-01

    An electron spin and proton magnetic relaxation study is presented on the effects of the solvent extraction of coal on the macromoleculer network of the coal and on the mobile molecular species that are initially within the coal. The eight Argonne Premium coals were extracted at room temperature with a 1:1 (v/v) N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP)-CS2 solvent mixture under an inert atmosphere. As much solvent as possible was removed from extract and residue by treatment in a vacuum. The mobilization of molecular free radicals by the solvent and the exposure of free radicals in the macromoleculer matrix to solvent or to species dissolved in the solvent, results in a preferential survival of residue radicals of types that depend on the particular coal and results in the apparently fairly uniform loss of all types of radicals in bituminous coal extracts. The surviving extract and residue free radicals are more predominantly of the odd- alternate hydrocarbon free radical type. The spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) of these coal free radicals has previously been inferred (Doetschman and Dwyer, Energy Fuels, 1992, 6, 783) to be from the modulation of the intramolecular electron-nuclear dipole-interactions of the CH groups in a magnetic field by rocldng motions of the radical in the coal matrix. Such a modulation would depend not only on the rocking amplitude and frequency but also upon the electron spin density at the CH groups in the radical. The observed SLR rates decrease with coal rank in agreement with the smaller spin densities and the lower rocidng amplitudes that are expected for the larger polycondensed ring systems in coals of higher rank. The SLR rates are found to be generally faster in the extracts (than residues) where the molecular species would be expected to have a smaller polycondensed ring system than in the macromoleculer matrix of the residue.

  4. Proton: the particle.

    PubMed

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter. PMID:24074929

  5. Proton: The Particle

    SciTech Connect

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup −6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup −24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  6. Clinical brain proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for management of Alzheimer's and sub-cortical ischemic vascular dementia in older people.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Adam D B; Rai, Gurcharan S; McConnell, James R; Chaudry, Mahera; Grant, David

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the clinical usefulness of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) performed using an automated single voxel technique at 1.0 T field strength in a district general hospital magnetic resonance (MR) scanner in the assessment of older people referred to a memory clinic with suspected dementia. Of 50 elderly subjects (M:F 20:30) examined and followed-up clinically over more than 2 years, 20 had clinical Alzheimer's disease (AD), 18 had clinical vascular dementia, six had mixed features and three were normal. Three normal volunteers were also studied. MRS was performed at the same time as structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), added <15 min to the examination and was well-tolerated in all patients studied. Patients with AD had significantly higher myoinositol/creatine (MI/Cr) ratios (mean +/- S.D.: 0.82 +/- 0.04) compared to those with vascular dementia (mean +/-S. D.: 0.71 +/- 0.07, P<0.00001) and normal subjects (mean +/- S.D.: 0.72 +/- 0.036, P<0.0002); there was little overlap between the AD and vascular groups. The mixed dementia group also had significantly higher MI/Cr ratios (mean +/- S.D.: 0.80 +/- 0.05) than vascular dementia (P<0.01) and normal (P<0.03) groups, but with considerable overlap. No significant differences were shown for N-acetyl aspartate or choline/creatine ratios between the different clinical groups. These data suggest that MI/Cr ratios can distinguish patients with AD from normal subjects and those with sub-cortical ischemic vascular dementia and that MRS will be useful to clinicians managing persons with AD in a district general hospital setting. PMID:14764351

  7. Diagnosis of Alzheimer-type dementia: a preliminary comparison of positron emission tomography and proton magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, R.P.; Budinger, T.F.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Jagust, W.J.

    1984-11-16

    The use of positron emission tomography with (18F)-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) to study glucose metabolism in dementia is described and compared with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. These studies suggest that physiological imaging with PET may be superior to MR as it is currently used in the diagnosis of dementia-like diseases. Pet is currently limited to a few centers; however, single photon emission CT can provide regional physiological data without the need for a local cyclotron. 15 references, 2 tables.

  8. A carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of inter-proton pair order parameters: a new approach to study order and dynamics in phospholipid membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Urbina, J A; Moreno, B; Arnold, W; Taron, C H; Orlean, P; Oldfield, E

    1998-09-01

    We report a simple new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic method to investigate order and dynamics in phospholipids in which inter-proton pair order parameters are derived by using high resolution 13C cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR combined with 1H dipolar echo preparation. The resulting two-dimensional NMR spectra permit determination of the motionally averaged interpair second moment for protons attached to each resolved 13C site, from which the corresponding interpair order parameters can be deducted. A spin-lock mixing pulse before cross-polarization enables the detection of spin diffusion amongst the different regions of the lipid molecules. The method was applied to a variety of model membrane systems, including 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)/sterol and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC)/sterol model membranes. The results agree well with previous studies using specifically deuterium labeled or predeuterated phospholipid molecules. It was also found that efficient spin diffusion takes place within the phospholipid acyl chains, and between the glycerol backbone and choline headgroup of these molecules. The experiment was also applied to biosynthetically 13C-labeled ergosterol incorporated into phosphatidylcholine bilayers. These results indicate highly restricted motions of both the sterol nucleus and the aliphatic side chain, and efficient spin exchange between these structurally dissimilar regions of the sterol molecule. Finally, studies were carried out in the lamellar liquid crystalline (L alpha) and inverted hexagonal (HII) phases of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE). These results indicated that phosphatidylethanolamine lamellar phases are more ordered than the equivalent phases of phosphatidylcholines. In the HII (inverted hexagonal) phase, despite the increased translational freedom, there is highly constrained packing of the lipid molecules, particularly in

  9. Eta Meson Production in Proton-Proton and Nuclear Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Dick, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Total cross sections for eta meson production in proton - proton collisions are calculated. The eta meson is mainly produced via decay of the excited nucleon resonance at 1535 MeV. A scalar quantum field theory is used to calculate cross sections, which also include resonance decay. Comparison between theory and experiment is problematic near threshold when resonance decay is not included. When the decay is included, the comparison between theory and experiment is much better.

  10. Study of Proton Resonances in 2626Si and 27P by the Elastic Scattering of 1H(25Al, p) 25Al, 1H(26Si, p)26Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, J. Y.; Lee, C. S.; Lee, J. H.; Yun, C. C.; Kim, J. C.; Youn, M.; Kubono, S.; Teranishi, T.; He, J. J.; Notani, M.; Nishimura, S.; Nishimura, M.; Guimarães, V.; Lihitenthaler, R. F.; Kato, S.

    2005-12-01

    The observational space map of 1.809-MeV gamma rays - coming from the decay of 26Al - taken by COMPTEL requires the sources and their nucleosynthetic activity to be unveiled. One suggestion for the observation is the explosive hydrogen burning process which occurs in novae or X-ray bursts. Two capture reactions such as 25 Al(p,γ)26Si and 26Si(p,γ)27P are of great importance in the production of 1.809-MeV gamma rays. Resonance states within the Gamow window should be precisely known to determine their reaction rates. As for the latter reaction, only a few levels in 27P have been known above the proton threshold in comparison with many levels known in its mirror nucleus 27Mg. We studied proton resonances in 26Si and 27P by the elastic scattering at low energies, respectively using low-energy 25Al and 26Si radioactive ion beams available from the CRIB facility at CNS, University of Tokyo. We carried out an experiment to investigate proton resonances in 26Si up to EC.M. = 3.016 MeV, especially to determine the resonance parameters of the states at Ex = 7.019 and 8.120 MeV. We also measured the elastic scattering of p + 26Si up to EC.M. = 3.290 MeV.

  11. Changes to Intermediary Metabolites in Sporadic and LRRK2 Parkinson's Disease Demonstrated by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Aasly, Jan O.; Sæther, Oddbjørn; Johansen, Krisztina K.; Bathen, Tone F.; Giskeødegård, Guro F.; White, Linda R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Parkinson's disease (PD) remains a clinical diagnosis and biomarkers are needed to detect the disease as early as possible. Genetically determined PD provides an opportunity for studying metabolic differences in connection with disease development. Objectives. To study the levels of intermediary metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with PD, either of sporadic type or in carriers of the LRRK2 p.G2019S mutation. Methods. Results from patients with sporadic PD or LRRK2-PD were compared with asymptomatic LRRK2 mutation carriers and healthy control individuals. CSF was analysed by proton MR spectroscopy (1H-MRS) giving reliable results for 16 intermediary metabolites. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was applied to study group differences. Results. PLS-DA distinguished PD patients from healthy individuals based on the metabolites identified in CSF, with 2-hydroxybutyrate, glutamine, and dimethyl sulphone largely contributing to the separations. Conclusion. Speculatively, all three metabolites could alter concentration in response to metabolic changes connected with neurodegeneration; glutamine as a means of removing excess nitrogen from brain, dimethyl sulphone as an anti-inflammatory agent, and 2-hydroxybutyrate in connection with altered glutathione metabolism. Potentially, 1H-MRS is a promising tool for identifying novel biomarkers for PD. PMID:26357583

  12. Discrimination between neurochemical and macromolecular signals in human frontal lobes using short echo time proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mary A; Simister, Robert J; Barker, Gareth J; Duncan, John S

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectra from large (35 cm3) frontal lobe voxels in vivo were analyzed using LCModel, with and without subtraction of a "metabolite nulled" spectrum with an inversion time of 650 ms to characterize the macromolecule baseline. Baseline subtraction decreased the signal to noise ratio (SNR), but improved the reliability of LCModel quantification of most metabolites, as reflected in the Cramer-Rao lower bounds, in particular for glutamate and glutamine. The reported concentrations increased for glutamine, creatine, and lactate, and decreased for glutamate, myo-inositol and NAAG, but the sum of all metabolites remained constant, as did the standard deviation of the concentrations in the control group. Macromolecule subtraction is worthwhile when SNR is high, as in the characterization of normal-appearing tissue in the brain. PMID:14992401

  13. Lithium does not alter the choline/creatine ratio in the temporal lobe of human volunteers as measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Silverstone, P H; Hanstock, C C; Rotzinger, S

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of lithium administration on brain choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) ratios in healthy volunteers. DESIGN: Double-blind, placebo-controlled, prospective study. SETTING: The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Research Unit at the University of Alberta. PARTICIPANTS: Sixteen healthy volunteers, recruited through advertisements. Subjects were excluded if they had a physical illness, or a personal or family history of psychiatric illness. The study period was from Feb. 6, 1996, to Mar. 21, 1996. INTERVENTIONS: Subjects received a baseline proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) scan, and then were instructed to take either lithium (1,200 mg) or placebo at night for 7 days. On Day 8, the subjects returned for a second 1H MRS scan. Study participants were seen by a physician at the beginning and at the end of the experiment, and had access to the physician throughout the study period. OUTCOME MEASURES: Ratios of Cho/Cr measured in the temporal lobes by 1H MRS. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the Cho/Cr ratios between the 2 groups on the test day (placebo 0.748 [standard deviation 0.29] versus lithium 0.811 [SD 0.25]; F = 0.147, p = 0.72), and there was no significant change from baseline in either group (0.003 above baseline for placebo; 0.056 above baseline for lithium; F = 1.21, p = 0.32). CONCLUSIONS: Lithium administration to healthy volunteers does not alter the Cho/Cr ratio in temporal lobe as measured by 1H MRS. The result concurs with reports that differences in Cho/Cr ratios observed in patients with bipolar disorder are likely specific to the illness, and are not the result of lithium therapy. Hence, alterations in choline function are not involved in the clinical effectiveness of lithium. Images Fig. 1 PMID:10354656

  14. Cortico-Striatal GABAergic and Glutamatergic Dysregulations in Subjects at Ultra-High Risk for Psychosis Investigated with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Madrigal, Francisco; Mao, Xiangling; León-Ortiz, Pablo; Rodríguez-Mayoral, Oscar; Solís-Vivanco, Rodolfo; Favila, Rafael; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel; Shungu, Dikoma C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dysregulations of the major inhibitory and excitatory amino neurotransmitter systems of γ-aminobutyric acid and glutamate, respectively, have been described in patients with schizophrenia. However, it is unclear whether these abnormalities are present in subjects at ultra-high risk for psychosis. Methods: Twenty-three antipsychotic naïve subjects at ultra-high risk and 24 healthy control subjects, matched for age, sex, handedness, cigarette smoking, and parental education, underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy scans in the dorsal caudate bilaterally and the medial prefrontal cortex at 3T. Levels of γ-aminobutyric acid and of the combined resonance of glutamate and glutamine (Glx) were obtained using the standard J-editing technique and expressed as peak area ratios relative to the synchronously acquired unsuppressed voxel water signal. Results: Higher levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (P<.001) and Glx (P=.007) were found in the dorsal caudate of the subjects at ultra-high risk than in the healthy controls. In the medial prefrontal cortex, likewise, both γ-aminobutyric acid (P=.03) and Glx (P=.006) levels were higher in the ultra-high risk group than in the healthy controls. No group differences were found for any of the other metabolites (N-acetylaspartate, total choline, or total creatine) in the 2 regions of interest. Conclusions: This study presents the first evidence of abnormal elevations, in subjects at ultra-high risk, of γ-aminobutyric acid and Glx in 2 brain regions that have been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychosis, warranting longitudinal studies to assess whether these neurotransmitter abnormalities can serve as noninvasive biomarkers of conversion risk to psychosis as well as of illness progression and treatment response. PMID:26364273

  15. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... nucleus is surrounded by electrons. In proton therapy, beams of fast-moving protons are used to destroy ... atoms to release proton, neutron, and helium ion beams. In this highly specialized form of radiosurgery , proton ...

  16. Cuprizone-induced demyelination and demyelination-associated inflammation result in different proton magnetic resonance metabolite spectra

    PubMed Central

    Praet, Jelle; Orije, Jasmien; Kara, Firat; Guglielmetti, Caroline; Santermans, Eva; Daans, Jasmijn; Hens, Niel; Verhoye, Marleen; Berneman, Zwi; Ponsaerts, Peter; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2015-01-01

    Conventional MRI is frequently used during the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis but provides only little additional pathological information. Proton MRS (1H-MRS), however, provides biochemical information on the lesion pathology by visualization of a spectrum of metabolites. In this study we aimed to better understand the changes in metabolite concentrations following demyelination of the white matter. Therefore, we used the cuprizone model, a well-established mouse model to mimic type III human multiple sclerosis demyelinating lesions. First, we identified CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling as a major regulator of microglial activity in the cuprizone mouse model. Compared with control groups (heterozygous CX3CR1+/− C57BL/6 mice and wild type CX3CR1+/+ C57BL/6 mice), microgliosis, astrogliosis, oligodendrocyte cell death and demyelination were shown to be highly reduced or absent in CX3CR1−/− C57BL/6 mice. Second, we show that 1H-MRS metabolite spectra are different when comparing cuprizone-treated CX3CR1−/− mice showing mild demyelination with cuprizone-treated CX3CR1+/+ mice showing severe demyelination and demyelination-associated inflammation. Following cuprizone treatment, CX3CR1+/+ mice show a decrease in the Glu, tCho and tNAA concentrations as well as an increased Tau concentration. In contrast, following cuprizone treatment CX3CR1−/− mice only showed a decrease in tCho and tNAA concentrations. Therefore, 1H-MRS might possibly allow us to discriminate demyelination from demyelination-associated inflammation via changes in Tau and Glu concentration. In addition, the observed decrease in tCho concentration in cuprizone-induced demyelinating lesions should be further explored as a possible diagnostic tool for the early identification of human MS type III lesions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25802215

  17. Brain Changes in Long-Term Zen Meditators Using Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Diffusion Tensor Imaging: A Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Fayed, Nicolás; Lopez del Hoyo, Yolanda; Andres, Eva; Serrano-Blanco, Antoni; Bellón, Juan; Aguilar, Keyla; Cebolla, Ausias; Garcia-Campayo, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This work aimed to determine whether 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are correlated with years of meditation and psychological variables in long-term Zen meditators compared to healthy non-meditator controls. Materials and Methods Design. Controlled, cross-sectional study. Sample. Meditators were recruited from a Zen Buddhist monastery. The control group was recruited from hospital staff. Meditators were administered questionnaires on anxiety, depression, cognitive impairment and mindfulness. 1H-MRS (1.5 T) of the brain was carried out by exploring four areas: both thalami, both hippocampi, the posterior superior parietal lobule (PSPL) and posterior cingulate gyrus. Predefined areas of the brain were measured for diffusivity (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) by MR-DTI. Results Myo-inositol (mI) was increased in the posterior cingulate gyrus and Glutamate (Glu), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) and N-acetyl-aspartate/Creatine (NAA/Cr) was reduced in the left thalamus in meditators. We found a significant positive correlation between mI in the posterior cingulate and years of meditation (r = 0.518; p = .019). We also found significant negative correlations between Glu (r = −0.452; p = .045), NAA (r = −0.617; p = .003) and NAA/Cr (r = −0.448; P = .047) in the left thalamus and years of meditation. Meditators showed a lower Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) in the left posterior parietal white matter than did controls, and the ADC was negatively correlated with years of meditation (r = −0.4850, p = .0066). Conclusions The results are consistent with the view that mI, Glu and NAA are the most important altered metabolites. This study provides evidence of subtle abnormalities in neuronal function in regions of the white matter in meditators. PMID:23536796

  18. Glutamine and Glutamate Levels in Children and Adolescents With Bipolar Disorder: A 4.0-T Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex

    PubMed Central

    MOORE, CONSTANCE M.; FRAZIER, JEAN A.; GLOD, CAROL A.; BREEZE, JANIS L.; DIETERICH, MEGAN; FINN, CHELSEA T.; FREDERICK, BLAISE DEB.; RENSHAW, PERRY F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to use proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, at 4.0 T, to explore the glutamine and glutamate levels in the anterior cingulate cortex of children and adolescents with bipolar disorder (BPD; medicated and unmedicated) and healthy comparison subjects (HCSs). We hypothesized that unmedicated children with BPD would have reduced glutamine and glutamate levels compared with HCSs and medicated children with BPD. Method Spectra were acquired from the anterior cingulate cortex in 22 children and adolescents with DSM-IV-TR BPD, type 1 (13 female: age 12.6 ± 4.4 years: 7 of the subjects with BPD were unmedicated at the time of the scan) and 10 HCSs (7 female: age 12.3 ± 2.5 years). Results Unmedicated subjects with BPD had significantly lower glutamine levels than HCSs or medicated subjects with BPD. There were no differences in glutamate levels between the three groups. Conclusions These results are consistent with there being an abnormality in anterior cingulate cortex glia in untreated children and adolescents with BPD. The results of this pilot study may be important in helping us better understand the pathophysiology of child and adolescent BPD. In addition, this observation may help to develop better and more targeted treatments, in particular those affecting the metabolism of glutamine, perhaps by regulation of glutamine synthetase activity. PMID:17420688

  19. X-rays and solar proton event induced changes in the first mode Schumann resonance frequency observed at a low latitude station Agra, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Birbal; Tyagi, Rajesh; Hobara, Yasuhide; Hayakawa, Masashi

    2014-06-01

    Effects of two events of X-ray bursts followed by solar proton events (SPEs) occurred on 22 September, 2011 and 06 July, 2012 on the variation of first mode Schumann resonance (SR) frequency monitored at a low latitude station, Agra (Geograph. lat. 27.2°N, long. 78°E) India are examined. The variation of average first mode SR frequency shows a sudden increase in coincidence with the X-ray bursts and a decrease associated with the peak flux of SPE. The increases in the frequency in the two cases are 8.4% and 10.9% and corresponding decreases are 4.3% and 3.3% respectively. The increases in the frequency are interpreted in terms of growth of ionization in the upper part of D-region ionosphere due to X-ray bursts and decreases during SPE are caused by the high ionization in the lower D-region (altitude about 50-60 km) in the polar region. The variation of SR frequency is observed to be consistent with other observatories at middle and high latitudes. The effects of X-ray flares on the D-region of the ionosphere at low and equatorial latitudes are also examined by analyzing the amplitude data of VLF transmitter signal (NWC, f=19.8 kHz) monitored at Agra. The flare effect observed prior to sun-set hours shows increase of electron density above 60 km in the ionosphere.

  20. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopic studies of segmental mobility in aequorin and a green fluorescent protein from Aequorea forskalea

    SciTech Connect

    Nageswara Rao, B.D.; Kemple, M.D.; Prendergast, F.G.

    1980-10-01

    Aequorin is a protein of low molecular weight (20,000) isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea forskalea which emits blue light upon the binding of Ca/sup 2 +/ ions. This bioluminescence requires neither exogenous oxygen nor any other cofactors. The light emission occurs from an excited state of a chromophore (an imidazolopyrazinone) which is tightly and noncovalently bound to the protein. Apparently the binding of Ca/sup 2 +/ by the protein induces changes in the protein conformation which allow oxygen, already bound or otherwise held by the protein, to react with and therein oxidize the chromophore. The resulting discharged protein remains intact, with the Ca/sup 2 +/ and the chromophore still bound, but is incapable of further luminescence. The fluorescence spectrum of this discharged protein and the bioluminescence spectrum of the original charged aequorin are identical. A green fluorescent protein (GFP) of approx. 30,000 mol wt isolated from the same organism, functions in vivo as an acceptor of energy from aequorin and subsequently emits green light. We are applying proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy to examine structural details of, and fluctuations associated with the luminescent reaction of aequorin and the in vivo energy transfer from aequorin to the GFP.

  1. Quantification of microheterogeneity in glioblastoma multiforme with ex vivo high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HRMAS) proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, L. L.; Anthony, D. C.; Comite, A. R.; Black, P. M.; Tzika, A. A.; Gonzalez, R. G.

    2000-01-01

    Microheterogeneity is a routinely observed neuropathologic characteristic in brain tumor pathology. Although microheterogeneity is readily documented by routine histologic techniques, these techniques only measure tumor status at the time of biopsy or surgery and do not indicate likely tumor progression. A biochemical screening technique calibrated against pathologic standards would greatly assist in predicting tumor progression from its biological activity. Here we demonstrate for the first time that proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) with high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HRMAS), a technique introduced in 1997, can preserve tissue histopathologic features while producing well-resolved spectra of cellular metabolites in the identical intact tissue specimens. Observed biochemical alterations and tumor histopathologic characteristics can thus be correlated for the same surgical specimen, obviating the problems caused by tumor microheterogeneity. We analyzed multiple specimens of a single human glioblastoma multiforme surgically removed from a 44-year-old patient. Each specimen was first measured with HRMAS 1H MRS to determine tumor metabolites, then evaluated by quantitative histopathology. The concentrations of lactate and mobile lipids measured with HRMAS linearly reflected the percentage of tumor necrosis. Moreover, metabolic ratios of phosphorylcholine to choline correlated linearly with the percentage of the highly cellular malignant glioma. The quantification of tumor metabolic changes with HRMAS 1H MRS, in conjunction with subsequent histopathology of the same tumor specimen, has the potential to further our knowledge of the biochemistry of tumor heterogeneity during development, and thus ultimately to improve our accuracy in diagnosing, characterizing, and evaluating tumor progression. PMID:11303625

  2. Evaluation of Water Exchange Kinetics on [Ln(AAZTAPh-NO2)(H2O)q](x) Complexes Using Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Shima; Tei, Lorenzo; Botta, Mauro; Helm, Lothar

    2016-06-20

    Water exchange kinetics on [Ln(AAZTAPh-NO2)(H2O)q](-) (Ln = Gd(3+), Dy(3+), or Tm(3+)) were determined by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. The number of inner-sphere water molecules was found to change from two to one when going from Dy(3+) to Tm(3+). The calculated water exchange rate constants obtained by variable-temperature proton transverse relaxation rates are 3.9 × 10(6), 0.46 × 10(6), and 0.014 × 10(6) s(-1) at 298 K for Gd(3+), Dy(3+), and Tm(3+), respectively. Variable-pressure measurements were used to assess the water exchange mechanism. The results indicate an associative and dissociative interchange mechanism for Gd(3+) and Dy(3+) complexes with ΔV(⧧) values of -1.4 and 1.9 cm(3) mol(-1), respectively. An associative activation mode (Ia or A mechanism) was obtained for the Tm(3+) complex (ΔV(⧧) = -5.6 cm(3) mol(-1)). Moreover, [Dy(AAZTAPh-NO2)(H2O)2](-) with a very high transverse relaxivity value was found as a potential candidate for negative contrast agents for high-field imaging applications. PMID:27227690

  3. Real-time analysis of organic compounds in ship engine aerosol emissions using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation and proton transfer mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Radischat, Christian; Sippula, Olli; Stengel, Benjamin; Klingbeil, Sophie; Sklorz, Martin; Rabe, Rom; Streibel, Thorsten; Harndorf, Horst; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Organic combustion aerosols from a marine medium-speed diesel engine, capable to run on distillate (diesel fuel) and residual fuels (heavy fuel oil), were investigated under various operating conditions and engine parameters. The online chemical characterisation of the organic components was conducted using a resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometer (REMPI TOF MS) and a proton transfer reaction-quadrupole mass spectrometer (PTR-QMS). Oxygenated species, alkenes and aromatic hydrocarbons were characterised. Especially the aromatic hydrocarbons and their alkylated derivatives were very prominent in the exhaust of both fuels. Emission factors of known health-hazardous compounds (e.g. mono- and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons) were calculated and found in higher amounts for heavy fuel oil (HFO) at typical engine loadings. Lower engine loads lead in general to increasing emissions for both fuels for almost every compound, e.g. naphthalene emissions varied for diesel fuel exhaust between 0.7 mg/kWh (75 % engine load, late start of injection (SOI)) and 11.8 mg/kWh (10 % engine load, late SOI) and for HFO exhaust between 3.3 and 60.5 mg/kWh, respectively. Both used mass spectrometric techniques showed that they are particularly suitable methods for online monitoring of combustion compounds and very helpful for the characterisation of health-relevant substances. Graphical abstract Three-dimensional REMPI data of organic species in diesel fuel and heavy fuel oil exhaust. PMID:25600686

  4. Identification of endogenous metabolites in human sperm cells using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Paiva, C; Amaral, A; Rodriguez, M; Canyellas, N; Correig, X; Ballescà, J L; Ramalho-Santos, J; Oliva, R

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to contribute to the first comprehensive metabolomic characterization of the human sperm cell through the application of two untargeted platforms based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Using these two complementary strategies, we were able to identify a total of 69 metabolites, of which 42 were identified using NMR, 27 using GC-MS and 4 by both techniques. The identity of some of these metabolites was further confirmed by two-dimensional (1) H-(1) H homonuclear correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and (1) H-(13) C heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) spectroscopy. Most of the metabolites identified are reported here for the first time in mature human spermatozoa. The relationship between the metabolites identified and the previously reported sperm proteome was also explored. Interestingly, overrepresented pathways included not only the metabolism of carbohydrates, but also of lipids and lipoproteins. Of note, a large number of the metabolites identified belonged to the amino acids, peptides and analogues super class. The identification of this initial set of metabolites represents an important first step to further study their function in male gamete physiology and to explore potential reasons for dysfunction in future studies. We also demonstrate that the application of NMR and MS provides complementary results, thus constituting a promising strategy towards the completion of the human sperm cell metabolome. PMID:25854681

  5. Relationship between Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Frontoinsular Gray Matter and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Very Low Birth Weight Children at the Age of 4

    PubMed Central

    Herman-Sucharska, Izabela; Urbanik, Andrzej; Klimek, Małgorzata; Karcz, Paulina; Dutkowska, Grażyna; Nitecka, Magdalena; Kwinta, Przemko

    2016-01-01

    Very low birth weight is associated with long term neurodevelopmental complications. Macroscopic brain abnormalities in prematurity survivors have been investigated in several studies. However, there is limited data regarding local cerebral metabolic status and neurodevelopmental outcomes. The purpose of this study was to characterize the relationship between proton magnetic resonance spectra in basal ganglia, frontal white matter and frontoinsular gray matter, neurodevelopmental outcomes assessed with the Leiter scale and the Developmental Test of Visual Perception and selected socioeconomic variables in a cohort of very low birth weight children at the age of four. Children were divided in three groups based on the severity of neurodevelopmental impairment. There were no differences in spectroscopy in basal ganglia and frontal white matter between the groups. Lower concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho) and myoinositol (mI) were observed in the frontoinsular cortex of the left hemisphere in children with neurodevelopmental impairment compared to children with normal neurodevelopmental outcomes. Higher parental education, daycare attendance and breastfeeding after birth were associated with more favorable neurodevelopmental prognosis, whereas rural residence was more prevalent in children with moderate and severe impairment. Our study demonstrates the role of long term neurometabolic disruption in the left frontoinsular cortex and selected socioeconomic variables in determination of neurodevelopmental prognosis in prematurity survivors. PMID:27223474

  6. Differentiation of Organically and Conventionally Grown Tomatoes by Chemometric Analysis of Combined Data from Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Mid-infrared Spectroscopy and Stable Isotope Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Monika; Monakhova, Yulia; Erich, Sarah; Christoph, Norbert; Wachter, Helmut; Holzgrabe, Ulrike

    2015-11-01

    Because the basic suitability of proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR) to differentiate organic versus conventional tomatoes was recently proven, the approach to optimize (1)H NMR classification models (comprising overall 205 authentic tomato samples) by including additional data of isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS, δ(13)C, δ(15)N, and δ(18)O) and mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy was assessed. Both individual and combined analytical methods ((1)H NMR + MIR, (1)H NMR + IRMS, MIR + IRMS, and (1)H NMR + MIR + IRMS) were examined using principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and common components and specific weight analysis (ComDim). With regard to classification abilities, fused data of (1)H NMR + MIR + IRMS yielded better validation results (ranging between 95.0 and 100.0%) than individual methods ((1)H NMR, 91.3-100%; MIR, 75.6-91.7%), suggesting that the combined examination of analytical profiles enhances authentication of organically produced tomatoes. PMID:26457410

  7. CHBPR Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Detection of Neurotransmitters in Dorsomedial Medulla Correlate with Spontaneous Baroreceptor Reflex Function

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Espinosa, Maria A.; Shaltout, Hossam A.; Olson, John; Westwood, Brian M.; Robbins, Mike E.; Link, Kerry; Diz, Debra I.

    2010-01-01

    Control of heart rate variability (HRV) via modulation of sympathovagal balance is a key function of nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus localized in the dorsomedial medulla oblongata. Normal blood pressure regulation involves precise balance of glutamate-glutamine-GABA (Glu-Gln-GABA) transmitter systems, and angiotensin (Ang) II modulates these transmitters to produce tonic suppression of reflex function. It is not known, however, whether other brain transmitters/metabolites are indicators of baroreflex function. This study establishes the concept that comprehensive baseline transmitter/metabolite profiles obtained using in vivo 1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H MRS) in rats with well characterized differences in resting blood pressure and baroreflex function can be used as indices of autonomic balance or baroreflex sensitivity. Glu concentration in dorsal medulla is significantly higher in ASrAogen rats compared to either SD and (mRen2)27. Glu levels and the ratio of Glu/Gln correlated positively with indices of higher vagal tone consistent with the importance of these neurotransmitters in baroreflex function. Interestingly, the levels of choline containing metabolites showed a significant positive correlation with spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity and a negative correlation with sympathetic tone. Thus, we demonstrate the concept that non-invasive assessment of neurochemical biomarkers may be used as an index of baroreflex sensitivity. PMID:20065146

  8. Predictors of CNS injury as measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the setting of chronic HIV infection and CART.

    PubMed

    Harezlak, J; Cohen, R; Gongvatana, A; Taylor, M; Buchthal, S; Schifitto, G; Zhong, J; Daar, E S; Alger, J R; Brown, M; Singer, E J; Campbell, T B; McMahon, D; So, Y T; Yiannoutsos, C T; Navia, B A

    2014-06-01

    The reasons for persistent brain dysfunction in chronically HIV-infected persons on stable combined antiretroviral therapies (CART) remain unclear. Host and viral factors along with their interactions were examined in 260 HIV-infected subjects who underwent magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Metabolite concentrations (NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, MI/Cr, and Glx/Cr) were measured in the basal ganglia, the frontal white matter, and gray matter, and the best predictive models were selected using a bootstrap-enhanced Akaike information criterion (AIC). Depending on the metabolite and brain region, age, race, HIV RNA concentration, ADC stage, duration of HIV infection, nadir CD4, and/or their interactions were predictive of metabolite concentrations, particularly the basal ganglia NAA/Cr and the mid-frontal NAA/Cr and Glx/Cr, whereas current CD4 and the CPE index rarely or did not predict these changes. These results show for the first time that host and viral factors related to both current and past HIV status contribute to persisting cerebral metabolite abnormalities and provide a framework for further understanding neurological injury in the setting of chronic and stable disease. PMID:24696364

  9. Neurochemical correlates of internet game play in adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sujin; Han, Doug Hyun; Kim, Sun Mi; Shi, Xianfeng; Renshaw, Perry F

    2016-08-30

    Previous studies have examined the relationship of brain metabolic changes in patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and internet gaming disorder (IGD). However, these studies have been limited by a small number of subjects, a large variance in subject age, and different brain regions of interest. The present study assessed the effects of chronic internet game play in ADHD children. Twenty eight ADHD adolescents with IGD (IGD+ADHD), 27 ADHD adolescents without problematic internet game playing (ADHD only) and 42 healthy comparison adolescents (HC) were included in the study. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was performed on a 3T MRI scanner. Our results indicate that the levels of NAA in both ADHD groups were lower than those observed in the HC group. The levels of Glu+Gln in the ADHD only group were increased, compared to those observed in the control group. However, Glu+Gln was not increased in the IGD+ADHD group. In addition, the levels of Glu+Gln in the IGD+ADHD group were positively correlated with K-ARS total and inattention scores. ADHD and IGD subjects were both characterized by decreased NAA levels within the frontal lobe, consistent with hypofrontality. PMID:27295400

  10. Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy as a Technique for Gentamicin Drug Susceptibility Studies with Escherichia coli ATCC 25922

    PubMed Central

    García-Álvarez, Lara; Busto, Jesús H.; Avenoza, Alberto; Sáenz, Yolanda; Peregrina, Jesús Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial drug susceptibility tests involving multiple time-consuming steps are still used as reference methods. Today, there is a need for the development of new automated instruments that can provide faster results and reduce operating time, reagent costs, and labor requirements. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy meets those requirements. The metabolism and antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 in the presence of gentamicin have been analyzed using NMR and compared with a reference method. Direct incubation of the bacteria (with and without gentamicin) into the NMR tube has also been performed, and differences in the NMR spectra were obtained. The MIC, determined by the reference method found in this study, would correspond with the termination of the bacterial metabolism observed with NMR. Experiments carried out directly into the NMR tube enabled the development of antimicrobial drug susceptibility tests to assess the effectiveness of the antibiotic. NMR is an objective and reproducible method for showing the effects of a drug on the subject bacterium and can emerge as an excellent tool for studying bacterial activity in the presence of different antibiotic concentrations. PMID:25972417

  11. Comparative Dynamics of Leucine Methyl Groups in FMOC-Leucine and in a Protein Hydrophobic Core Probed by Solid-State Deuteron Nuclear Magnetic Resonance over 7-324 K Temperature Range

    SciTech Connect

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Moses, Mark; Ford, Joseph J.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Hoatson, Gina; Vold, Robert L.

    2010-12-09

    Quantitative dynamics of methyl groups in 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl-leucine (FMOC-leu) have been analyzed and compared with earlier studies of methyl dynamics in chicken villin headpiece subdomain protein (HP36) labeled at L69, a key hydrophobic core position. A combination of deuteron solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance experiments over the temperature range of 7-324 K and computational modeling indicated that while the two compounds show the same modes of motions, there are marked differences in the best-fit parameters of these motions. One of the main results is that the crossover observed in the dynamics of the methyl groups in the HP36 sample at 170 K is absent in FMOC-leu. A second crossover at around 95-88 K is present in both samples. The differences in the behavior of the two compounds suggest that some of the features of methyl dynamics reflect the complexity of the protein hydrophobic core and are not determined solely by local interactions.

  12. Proton MagneƟc Resonance Spectroscopy in Asperger’s Syndrome: CorrelaƟons with Neuropsychological Test Scores

    PubMed Central

    ÖNER, Özgür; ÖZGÜVEN, Halise Devrimci; ÖKTEM, Ferhunde; YAĞMURLU, Banu; BASKAK, Bora; ÖLMEZ, Şenay; MUNiR, Kerim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives It has been shown that autistic spectrum patients have impaired theory of mind (ToM) performance; however, no study has investigated the relationship between ToM performance and brain neurochemistry in these patients. The present study aimed to investigate the correlations between dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA)/choline (Cho), NAA/creatine (Cr), and Cho/Cr values based on 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy and ToM tests. Method The study sample included 13 adult, right-handed, Caucasian males with Asperger’s syndrome (AS) (age range: 17–37 years) and 20 controls matched by age, gender, handedness, and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Revised (WAIS-R) full-scale IQ scores. Results AS cases had significantly lower ToM performance. DLPFC NAA/Cho levels were inversely correlated to ToM scores (r = −0.738, P = 0.004). On the other hand, ToM performance improved as DLPFC Cho/Cr increased (r = 0.656, P = 0.015). ACC MRS variables were not significantly correlated with ToM performance in the AS group. No significant correlation was observed between ACC or DLPFC MRS variables and ToM performance in the control group. Discussion: Because NAA/Cho was inversely correlated with ToM performance and Cho/Cr was correlated with ToM performance, it can be suggested that the Cho level was related to better ToM test performance in the AS group. An increase in the Cho peak was associated with an increase in membrane breakdown or turnover. The Cho peak was also thought to reflect cellular density and astrocytosis. It is suggested that membrane turnover and astrocytosis might affect cognitive functioning. PMID:19306123

  13. A study of the proton resonant property in 22Mg by elastic scattering of 21Na + p and its astrophysical implication in the 18Ne(α, p)21Na reaction rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. J.; Kubono, S.; Teranishi, T.; Notani, M.; Baba, H.; Nishimura, S.; Moon, J. Y.; Nishimura, M.; Michimasa, S.; Iwasaki, H.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Hokoiwa, N.; Kibe, M.; Lee, J. H.; Kato, S.; Gono, Y.; Lee, C. S.

    2008-04-01

    Proton resonances in 22Mg have been investigated by the resonant elastic scattering of 21 Na + p . The 21Na beam with a mean energy of 4.00 MeV/nucleon was separated by the CNS radioactive-ion-beam separator (CRIB) and bombarded a thick ( CH2 n target. The energy spectra of recoiled protons were measured at scattering angles of θc.m. ≈ 172° , 146° , respectively. Several excited states observed before have been confirmed including two states (at 6.616, 6.796 MeV) observed at TRIUMF. A new state at 7.06 MeV has been observed, and another new one at 7.28 MeV is tentatively identified due to its low statistics. The proton resonant parameters were deduced from an R -matrix analysis of the differential cross-section data with a SAMMY-M6-BETA code. The astrophysical implication for the 18 Ne(α, p)21 Na reaction has been briefly discussed.

  14. A Pilot In Vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study of Amino Acid Neurotransmitter Response to Ketamine Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Milak, Matthew S.; Proper, Caitlin J.; Mulhern, Stephanie T.; Parter, Amy L.; Kegeles, Lawrence S.; Ogden, R. Todd; Mao, Xiangling; Rodriguez, Carolyn I.; Oquendo, Maria A.; Suckow, Raymond F.; Cooper, Thomas B.; Keilp, John C.; Shungu, Dikoma C.; Mann, J. John

    2015-01-01

    The NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine can improve major depressive disorder (MDD) within hours. To evaluate the putative role of glutamatergic and GABAergic systems in ketamine’s antidepressant action, medial prefrontal cortical (mPFC) levels of glutamate + glutamine (Glx) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were measured before, during, and after ketamine administration using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Ketamine (0.5 mg/kg i.v.) was administered to eleven depressed patients with MDD. Glx and GABA mPFC responses were measured as ratios relative to unsuppressed voxel tissue water (W) successfully in 8/11 patients. Ten of 11 patients remitted (50% reduction in 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and total ≤ 10) within 230 minutes of commencing ketamine. mPFC Glx/W and GABA/W peaked at 37.8%±7.5% and 38.0%±9.1% above baseline in ~26 minutes. Mean areas under the curve (AUC) for Glx/W (p = 0.025) and GABA/W (p = 0.005) increased and correlated (r = 0.796; p=0.018). Clinical improvement correlated with 90-minute norketamine concentration (df=6, r=−0.78, p=0.023), but no other measures. Rapid increases in Glx and GABA in MDD following ketamine administration support the postulated antidepressant role of glutamate and for the first time raises the question of GABA’s role in the antidepressant action of ketamine. These data support the hypothesis1 that ketamine administration may cause an initial increase in glutamate that potentially activates mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway via AMPA receptors, since ketamine blocks NMDA receptors. The role of the contemporaneous surge in GABA remains to be determined.2 PMID:26283639

  15. Toxicometabolomics approach to urinary biomarkers for mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2})-induced nephrotoxicity using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR) in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyu-Bong; Um, So Young; Chung, Myeon Woo; Jung, Seung Chul; Oh, Ji Seon; Kim, Seon Hwa; Na, Han Sung; Lee, Byung Mu; Choi, Ki Hwan

    2010-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine and characterize surrogate biomarkers that can predict nephrotoxicity induced by mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) using urinary proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR) spectral data. A procedure for {sup 1}H NMR urinalysis using pattern recognition was proposed to evaluate nephrotoxicity induced by HgCl{sub 2} in Sprague-Dawley rats. HgCl{sub 2} at 0.1 or 0.75 mg/kg was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), and urine was collected every 24 h for 6 days. Animals (n = 6 per group) were sacrificed 3 or 6 days post-dosing in order to perform clinical blood chemistry tests and histopathologic examinations. Urinary {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy revealed apparent differential clustering between the control and HgCl{sub 2} treatment groups as evidenced by principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square (PLS)-discriminant analysis (DA). Time- and dose-dependent separation of HgCl{sub 2}-treated animals from controls was observed by PCA of {sup 1}H NMR spectral data. In HgCl{sub 2}-treated rats, the concentrations of endogenous urinary metabolites of glucose, acetate, alanine, lactate, succinate, and ethanol were significantly increased, whereas the concentrations of 2-oxoglutarate, allantoin, citrate, formate, taurine, and hippurate were significantly decreased. These endogenous metabolites were selected as putative biomarkers for HgCl{sub 2}-induced nephrotoxicity. A dose response was observed in concentrations of lactate, acetate, succinate, and ethanol, where severe disruption of the concentrations of 2-oxoglutarate, citrate, formate, glucose, and taurine was observed at the higher dose (0.75 mg/kg) of HgCl{sub 2}. Correlation of urinary {sup 1}H NMR PLS-DA data with renal histopathologic changes suggests that {sup 1}H NMR urinalysis can be used to predict or screen for HgCl{sub 2}-induced nephrotoxicity{sub .}

  16. Neurochemical Alterations in Methamphetamine-Dependent Patients Treated with Cytidine-5′-Diphosphate Choline: A Longitudinal Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sujung J; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Kim, Hengjun J; Kim, Tae-Suk; Sung, Young Hoon; Kim, Namkug; Lukas, Scott E; Renshaw, Perry F

    2010-01-01

    Cytidine-5′-diphosphate choline (CDP-choline), as an important intermediate for major membrane phospholipids, may exert neuroprotective effects in various neurodegenerative disorders. This longitudinal proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) study aimed to examine whether a 4-week CDP-choline treatment could alter neurometabolite levels in patients with methamphetamine (MA) dependence and to investigate whether changes in neurometabolite levels would be associated with MA use. We hypothesized that the prefrontal levels of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), a neuronal marker, and choline-containing compound (Cho), which are related to membrane turnover, would increase with CDP-choline treatment in MA-dependent patients. We further hypothesized that this increase would correlate with the total number of negative urine results. Thirty-one treatment seekers with MA dependence were randomly assigned to receive CDP-choline (n=16) or placebo (n=15) for 4 weeks. Prefrontal NAA and Cho levels were examined using 1H-MRS before medication, and at 2 and 4 weeks after treatment. Generalized estimating equation regression analyses showed that the rate of change in prefrontal NAA (p=0.005) and Cho (p=0.03) levels were greater with CDP-choline treatment than with placebo. In the CDP-choline-treated patients, changes in prefrontal NAA levels were positively associated with the total number of negative urine results (p=0.03). Changes in the prefrontal Cho levels, however, were not associated with the total number of negative urine results. These preliminary findings suggest that CDP-choline treatment may exert potential neuroprotective effects directly or indirectly because of reductions in drug use by the MA-dependent patients. Further studies with a larger sample size of MA-dependent patients are warranted to confirm a long-term efficacy of CDP-choline in neuroprotection and abstinence. PMID:20043005

  17. Metabolic Characterization of All-Trans-Retinoic Acid (ATRA)–Induced Craniofacial Development of Murine Embryos Using In Vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Lihong; Wu, Renhua; Hu, Xiao; Zhang, Guishan; Tang, Shijie

    2014-01-01

    Aim To characterize the abnormal metabolic profile of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA)–induced craniofacial development in mouse embryos using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). Methods Timed-pregnant mice were treated by oral gavage on the morning of embryonic gestation day 11 (E11) with all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA). Dosing solutions were adjusted by maternal body weight to provide 30, 70, or 100 mg/kg RA. The control group was given an equivalent volume of the carrier alone. Using an Agilent 7.0 T MR system and a combination of surface coil coils, a 3 mm×3 mm×3 mm 1H-MRS voxel was selected along the embryonic craniofacial tissue. 1H-MRS was performed with a single-voxel method using PRESS sequence and analyzed using LCModel software. Hematoxylin and eosin was used to detect and confirm cleft palate. Result 1H-MRS revealed elevated choline levels in embryonic craniofacial tissue in the RA70 and RA100 groups compared to controls (P<0.05). Increased choline levels were also found in the RA70 and RA100 groups compared with the RA30 group (P<0.01). High intra-myocellular lipids at 1.30 ppm (IMCL13) in the RA100 group compared to the RA30 group were found (P<0.01). There were no significant changes in taurine, intra-myocellular lipids at 2.10 ppm (IMCL21), and extra-myocellular lipids at 2.30 ppm (EMCL23). Cleft palate formation was observed in all fetuses carried by mice administered 70 and 100 mg/kg RA. Conclusions This novel study suggests that the elevated choline and lipid levels found by 1H-MRS may represent early biomarkers of craniofacial defects. Further studies will determine performance of this test and pathogenetic mechanisms of craniofacial malformation. PMID:24816763

  18. Analysis of brain metabolism by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder suggests a generalized differential ontogenic pattern from controls.

    PubMed

    Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Londoño, Ana C; Pineda, David A; Lopera, Francisco; Palacio, Juan David; Arbelaez, Andres; Acosta, Maria T; Vélez, Jorge I; Castellanos, Francisco Xavier; Muenke, Maximilian

    2012-12-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common behavioral disorder of childhood. Preliminary studies with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) of the brain have reported differences in brain metabolite concentration-to-Cr ratios between individuals with ADHD and unaffected controls in several frontal brain regions including anterior cingulate cortex. Using multivoxel (1)H-MRS, we compared 14 individuals affected with ADHD to 20 individuals without ADHD from the same genetic isolate. After controlling by sex, age, and multiple testing, we found significant differences at the right posterior cingulate of the Glx/Cr ratio density distribution function between ADHD cases and controls (P < 0.05). Furthermore, we found several interactions of metabolite concentration-to-Cr ratio, age, and ADHD status: Ins/Cr and Glx/Cr ratios at the left posterior cingulate, and NAA/Cr at the splenius, right posterior cingulate, and at the left posterior cingulate. We also found a differential metabolite ratio interaction between ADHD cases and controls for Ins/Cr and NAA/Cr at the right striatum. These results show that: (1) NAA/Cr, Glx/Cr, and Ins/Cr ratios, as reported in other studies, exhibit significant differences between ADHD cases and controls; (2) differences of these metabolite ratios between ADHD cases and controls evolve in specific and recognizable patterns throughout age, a finding that replicates previous results obtained by structural MRI, where is demonstrated that brain ontogeny follows a different program in ADHD cases and controls; (3) Ins/Cr and NAA/Cr ratios, at the right striatum, interact in a differential way between ADHD cases and controls. As a whole, these results replicate previous 1H-MRS findings and add new intriguing differential metabolic and ontogeny patterns between ADHD cases and controls that warrant further pursue. PMID:23012086

  19. Evaluation of intracranial neoplasia and noninfectious meningoencephalitis in dogs by use of short echo time, single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3.0 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Inés; Richter, Henning; Beckmann, Katrin; Meier, Dieter; Dennler, Matthias; Kircher, Patrick R

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate metabolite concentrations of the brains of dogs with intracranial neoplasia or noninfectious meningoencephalitis by use of short echo time, single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) at 3.0 T. ANIMALS 29 dogs with intracranial lesions (14 with neoplasia [3 oligodendromas, 3 glioblastomas multiformes, 3 astrocytomas, 2 lymphomas, and 3 meningiomas] and 15 is with noninfectious meningoencephalitis) and 10 healthy control dogs. PROCEDURES Short echo time, single voxel (1)H-MRS at 3.0 T was performed on neoplastic and noninfectious inflammatory intracranial lesions identified with conventional MRI. Metabolites of interest included N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), total choline, creatine, myoinositol, the glutamine-glutamate complex (Glx), glutathione, taurine, lactate, and lipids. Data were analyzed with postprocessing fitting algorithm software. Metabolite concentrations relative to brain water content were calculated and compared with results for the healthy control dogs, which had been previously evaluated with the same (1)H MRS technique. RESULTS NAA, creatine, and Glx concentrations were reduced in the brains of dogs with neoplasia and noninfectious meningoencephalitis, whereas choline concentration was increased. Concentrations of these metabolites differed significantly between dogs with neoplasia and dogs with noninfectious meningoencephalitis. Concentrations of NAA, creatine, and Glx were significantly lower in dogs with neoplasia, whereas the concentration of choline was significantly higher in dogs with neoplasia. Lipids were predominantly found in dogs with high-grade intra-axial neoplasia, meningioma, and necrotizing meningoencephalitis. A high concentration of taurine was found in 10 of 15 dogs with noninfectious meningoencephalitis. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE (1)H MRS provided additional metabolic information about intracranial neoplasia and noninfectious meningoencephalitis in dogs. PMID:27111012

  20. Synthesis and characterization of phosphorus-containing polyamides and copolyamides based on 1methyl]-2,4- and -2,6-diaminobenzenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikroyannidis, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Phosphorus containing polyamides and copolyamides were prepared from 1-(dialkoxyphosphinyl)methyl-2,4- and -2,6-diaminobenzenes. The polymers produced were characterized by infrared and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analysis. Their thermal properties were compared with those of the corresponding common polyamides. In addition, by determining the limiting oxygen index value of some of these polyamides, their fire resistance was evaluated.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of phosphorus-containing polyamides and copolyamides based on 1-(dialkoxyphosphinyl)methyl-2,4- and -2,6-diaminobenzenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikroyannidis, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Phosphorus containing polyamides and copolyamides were prepared from 1-(dialkoxyphosphinyl)methyl-2,4- and -2,6-diaminobenzenes. The polymers produced were characterized by infrared and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analysis. Their thermal properties were compared with those of the corresponding common polyamides. In addition, by determining the limiting oxygen index value of some of these polyamides, their fire resistance was evaluated.

  2. Differential Binding of Rimantadine Enantiomers to Influenza A M2 Proton Channel.

    PubMed

    Wright, Anna K; Batsomboon, Paratchata; Dai, Jian; Hung, Ivan; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Dudley, Gregory B; Cross, Timothy A

    2016-02-10

    Rimantadine hydrochloride (α-methyl-1-adamantane-methalamine hydrochloride) is a chiral compound which exerts antiviral activity against the influenza A virus by inhibiting proton conductance of the M2 ion channel. In complex with M2, rimantadine has always been characterized as a racemic mixture. Here, we report the novel enantioselective synthesis of deuterium-labeled (R)- and (S)-rimantadine and the characterization of their protein-ligand interactions using solid-state NMR. Isotropic chemical shift changes strongly support differential binding of the enantiomers to the proton channel. Position restrained simulations satisfying distance restraints from (13)C-(2)H rotational-echo double-resonance NMR show marked differences in the hydrogen-bonding pattern of the two enantiomers at the binding site. Together these results suggest a complex set of interactions between (R)-rimantadine and the M2 proton channel, leading to a higher stability for this enantiomer of the drug in the channel pore. PMID:26804976

  3. Rate constant for the reaction of OH with methyl iodide, a re-determination by flash photolysis of water vapour and time resolved resonance fluorescence of OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaoliang; Strekowski, Rafal; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2010-05-01

    Methyl iodide is a major source gas for atmospheric iodine, and it is mainly emitted from the ocean. Aqueous-phase reactions, such as hydrolysis and exchange reactions with chloride control its emissions to the atmosphere, where its lifetime is limited to less than a week, mainly by photolysis. A minor contribution to the loss processes in the troposphere is the gas-phase reaction with OH radicals, that has been investigated by several authors. On the other hand, this reaction turned out to be uncertain in spite of interest in nuclear safety after the International Phebus Fission Product programme, initiated in 1988. Some of the most important observed phenomena with regard to the chemistry of iodine were not predicted, clearly showing the need for carrying out rate constant determinations for the reactions of I2 and CH3I with OH, which is a major oxidant product from the air radiolysis under accident conditions. We have measured the rate constant for the reaction OH + CH3I - H2O + CH2I in He at 260 mbar in the temperature range from 298 to 362 K. OH radicals were produced by flash photolysis of H2O in the vacuum-UV at wavelengths > 115 nm using a Xe flash lamp with a MgF2 window. Time profiles of OH radicals are monitored by resonance fluorescence of the A2 Σ - X2 Π transition at 308 nm, induced by the emission from a microwave discharge of a flow of He and H2O, a few Torr each. The signal is monitored by photon counting and multichannel scaling, collecting the counts from 50 flashes each, obtaind by pulsed photolysis of various mixtures of H2O and CH3I under slow-flow conditions. Decays of OH in the presence of CH3I are observed to be exponential, and the decay rates are found to be linearly dependent on the concentration of CH3I. Rate constants, k ± 2σ (in units of 10-14 cm3 s-1) of 4.14±0.20, 6.33±0.68, 7.31±1.18 and 8.24±1.60 at 298, 326, 352 and 362 K, respectively, are obtained from linear regressions and lead to an Arrhenius expression of k = 1.5

  4. Proton Emission from Gamow Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Vertse, T.

    2001-10-19

    We demonstrated that it is possible to calculate the complex energy of the deformed Gamow state with a precision that is high enough so that the half-life calculated from the imaginary part of the energy is meaningful. We also performed a comparison between non-adiabatic and adiabatic calculations. It can be concluded that, in many cases, the corrected adiabatic treatment cannot be used as a substitute for the full non-adiabatic calculations.

  5. Induced proton polarization for {pi}{sup 0} electroproduction at Q{sup 2}=0.126 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} around the {Delta}(1232) resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Alarcon, R.; Comfort, J.R.; Dolfini, S.; Mertz, C.; Young, A.; Gothe, R.W.; Kunz, C.; Epstein, M.; Liu, D.; Margaziotis, D.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Armstrong, C.; Finn, J.M.; Jones, M.; McIntyre, J.I.; Perdrisat, C.; Woo, R.J.; Sarty, A.; Madey, R.; Van Verst, S.; Warren, G.A.; Bertozzi, W.; Chen, J.; Dodson, G.; Dow, K.; Farkhondeh, M.; Gilad, S.; Joo, K.; Kowalski, S.; Soong, S.; Tieger, D.; Tschalaer, C.; Turchinetz, W.; Punjabi, V.; Qin, L.; Ulmer, P.; Weinstein, L.B.; Rutt, P.; Burkert, V.; Chen, J.; Mitchell, J.; Karabarbounis, A.; Papanicolas, C.N.; Vellidis, C.; Williamson, S.; Dale, D.

    1998-12-01

    We present a measurement of the induced proton polarization P{sub n} in {pi}{sup 0} electroproduction on the proton around the {Delta} resonance. The measurement was made at a central invariant mass and a squared four-momentum transfer of W=1231 MeV and Q{sup 2}=0.126 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}, respectively. We measured a large induced polarization, P{sub n}={minus}0.397{plus_minus}0.055{plus_minus}0.009. The data suggest that the scalar background is larger than expected from a recent effective Hamiltonian model. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Methyl Iodide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl iodide (MeI, iodomethane, CH3I) was reported as a potential alternative to the stratospheric ozone-depleting fumigant methyl bromide (MeBr) in the mid-1990s (Sims et al., 1995; Ohr et al., 1996). It has since received significant research attention to determine its environmental fate and tran...

  7. Methyl chloroform

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, T.K.

    1994-04-01

    Methyl chloroform is identified as a Class 1 ozone-depleting substance under Title VI of the CAA Amendments. On Nov. 30, 1993, EPA ordered the phaseout of Class 1 ozone-depleting substances -- chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halons, carbon tetrachloride and methyl chloroform -- by Jan. 1, 1996. Methyl chloroform and other Class 1 substances may be used after the dead-line if sources can be found through recycling or existing inventories. Methyl chloroform is listed as a hazardous air pollutant under CAA. It also is a SARA Title III, Sec. 313 compound with a reportable quantity of 1,000 pounds. OSHA and the American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists have set 350 ppm as the time-weighted average airborne exposure level for methyl chloroform. NIOSH lists its immediately dangerous to life or health'' concentration as 1,000 parts per million. DOT identifies the substance as a hazardous material, Class 6.1 (poison).

  8. Generation of proton aurora by magnetosonic waves

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Qiugang; Wang, Yongfu; He, Zhaoguo; Su, Zhenpeng; Yang, Chang; Zhou, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    Earth's proton aurora occurs over a broad MLT region and is produced by the precipitation of low-energy (2–10 keV) plasmasheet protons. Proton precipitation can alter chemical compositions of the atmosphere, linking solar activity with global climate variability. Previous studies proposed that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves can resonate with protons, producing proton scattering precipitation. A long-outstanding question still remains whether there is another mechanism responsible for the proton aurora. Here, by performing satellite data analysis and diffusion equation calculations, we show that fast magnetosonic waves can produce trapped proton scattering that yields proton aurora. This provides a new insight into the mechanism of proton aurora. Furthermore, a ray-tracing study demonstrates that magnetosonic wave propagates over a broad MLT region, consistent with the global distribution of proton aurora. PMID:24898626

  9. 13C and 199Hg nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of alkenemercurinium ions: Effect of methyl substituents on 199Hg chemical shifts

    PubMed Central

    Olah, George A.; Garcia-Luna, Armando

    1980-01-01

    The long-lived ethylene, cyclohexene, and norbornenemercurinium ions prepared in superacidic, low-nucleophilic media have been studied by 13C and 199Hg NMR spectroscopy. The norbornenemercurinium ion shows temperature-dependent 13C and 199Hg NMR spectra, consistent with equilibration via rapid hydride and Wagner-Meerwin shifts. The 199Hg NMR shifts of a series of alkylmercury bromides were also obtained in order to elucidate the effect of methyl substituents on 199Hg NMR chemical shifts. PMID:16592870

  10. Nickel-Catalyzed Proton-Deuterium Exchange (HDX) Procedures for Glycosidic Linkage Analysis of Complex Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Price, Neil P J; Hartman, Trina M; Vermillion, Karl E

    2015-07-21

    The structural analysis of complex carbohydrates typically requires the assignment of three parameters: monosaccharide composition, the position of glycosidic linkages between monosaccharides, and the position and nature of noncarbohydrate substituents. The glycosidic linkage positions are often determined by permethylation analysis, but this can be complicated by high viscosity or poor solubility, resulting in under-methylation. This is a drawback because an under-methylated position may be misinterpreted as the erroneous site of a linkage or substituent. Here, we describe an alternative approach to linkage analysis that makes use of a nonreversible deuterium exchange of C-H protons on the carbohydrate backbone. The exchange reaction is conducted in deuterated water catalyzed by Raney nickel, and results in the selective exchange of C-H protons adjacent to free hydroxyl groups. Hence, the position of the residual C-H protons is indicative of the position of glycosidic linkages or other substituents and can be readily assigned by heteronuclear single quantum coherence-nuclear magnetic resonance (HSQC-NMR) or, following suitable derivatization, by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) analysis. Moreover, because the only changes to the parent sugar are proton/deuterium exchanges, the composition and linkage analysis can be determined in a single step. PMID:26075577

  11. Enantioselective Protonation

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Justin T.; Hong, Allen Y.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Enantioselective protonation is a common process in biosynthetic sequences. The decarboxylase and esterase enzymes that effect this valuable transformation are able to control both the steric environment around the proton acceptor (typically an enolate) and the proton donor (typically a thiol). Recently, several chemical methods to achieve enantioselective protonation have been developed by exploiting various means of enantiocontrol in different mechanisms. These laboratory transformations have proven useful for the preparation of a number of valuable organic compounds. PMID:20428461

  12. Effect of epoxidation on 30% poly(methyl methacrylate)-grafted natural rubber polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Nazir, Khuzaimah; Aziz, Ahmad Fairoz; Adam, Nurul Ilham; Yahya, Muhd Zu Azhan; Ali, Ab Malik Marwan

    2015-08-28

    Epoxidized 30% poly(methyl methacrylate)-grafted natural rubber (EMG 30) as a polymer host in solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) has been investigated. EMG30 was synthesized via performicepoxidation method onto 30% poly(methyl methacrylate)-grafted natural rubber (MG30) and the formations of epoxy group were discussed. The EMG30 were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}HNMR) to investigate their chemical structure and differential scanning calorimeter to determine their crystallinity. A new peak in {sup 1}HNMR spectra (2.71 ppm) confirmed the appearance of epoxy group. SPE based on EMG30 doped with 40 wt% LiCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3} show the highest conductivity. The complexation between EMG30 and LiCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3} were confirmed by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR)

  13. Effect of epoxidation on 30% poly(methyl methacrylate)-grafted natural rubber polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazir, Khuzaimah; Aziz, Ahmad Fairoz; Adam, Nurul Ilham; Yahya, Muhd Zu Azhan; Ali, Ab Malik Marwan

    2015-08-01

    Epoxidized 30% poly(methyl methacrylate)-grafted natural rubber (EMG 30) as a polymer host in solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) has been investigated. EMG30 was synthesized via performicepoxidation method onto 30% poly(methyl methacrylate)-grafted natural rubber (MG30) and the formations of epoxy group were discussed. The EMG30 were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1HNMR) to investigate their chemical structure and differential scanning calorimeter to determine their crystallinity. A new peak in 1HNMR spectra (2.71 ppm) confirmed the appearance of epoxy group. SPE based on EMG30 doped with 40 wt% LiCF3SO3 show the highest conductivity. The complexation between EMG30 and LiCF3SO3 were confirmed by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR).

  14. Structural analysis of colanic acid from Escherichia coli by using methylation and base-catalysed fragmentation. Comparison with polysaccharides from other bacterial sources

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, C. J.; McCleary, C. W.; Nakada, Henry I.; Rees, D. A.; Sutherland, I. W.; Wilkinson, J. F.

    1969-01-01

    Essentially the same methanolysis products were obtained after methylation of the slime and capsular polysaccharides from Escherichia coli K12 (S53 and S53C sub-strains) and the slime polysaccharides from E. coli K12 (S61), Aerobacter cloacae N.C.T.C. 5290 and Salmonella typhimurium SL1543. These were the methyl glycosides of 2-O-methyl-l-fucose, 2,3-di-O-methyl-l-fucose, 2,3-di-O-methyl-d-glucuronic acid methyl ester, 2,4,6-tri-O-methyl-d-glucose, 2,4,6-tri-O-methyl-d-galactose and the pyruvic acid ketal, 4,6-O-(1′-methoxycarbonylethylidene)-2,3-O-methyl-d-galactose. All were identified as crystalline derivatives from an E. coli polysaccharide. The structure of the ketal was proved by proton-magnetic-resonance and mass spectrometry, and by cleavage to pyruvic acid and 2,3-di-O-methyl-d-galactose. All these polysaccharides are therefore regarded as variants on the same fundamental structure for which the name colanic acid is adopted. Although containing the same sugar residues, quite different methanolysis products were obtained after methylation of the extracellular polysaccharide from Klebsiella aerogenes (1.2 strain). The hydroxypropyl ester of E. coli polysaccharide, when treated with base under anhydrous conditions, underwent β-elimination at the uronate residues with release of a 4,6-O-(1′-alkoxycarbonylethylidene)-d-galactose. Together with the identification of 3-O-(d-glucopyranosyluronic acid)-d-galactose as a partial hydrolysis product, this establishes the nature of most, if not all, of the side chains as O-[4,6-O-(1′-carboxyethylidene)-d-galactopyranosyl]-(1→4)-O-(d-glucopyranosyluronic acid)-(1→3)-d-galactopyranosyl... PMID:4902692

  15. Interaction of thiocyanate with horseradish peroxidase. 1H and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance studies.

    PubMed

    Modi, S; Behere, D V; Mitra, S

    1989-11-25

    Interaction of thiocyanate with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was investigated by relaxation rate measurements (at 50.68 MHz) of the 15N resonance of thiocyanate nitrogen and by following the hyperfine shifted ring methyl proton resonances (at 500 MHz) of the heme group of SCN-.HRP solutions. At pH 4.0, the apparent dissociation constant (KD) for thiocyanate binding to HRP was deduced to be 158 mM from the relaxation rate measurements. Chemical shift changes of 1- and 8-ring methyl proton resonances in the presence of various amounts of thiocyanate at pH 4.0 yielded KD values of 166 and 136 mM, respectively. From the pH dependence of KD and the 15N resonance line width, it was observed that thiocyanate binds to HRP only under acidic conditions (pH less than 6). The binding was found to be facilitated by protonation of an acid group on the enzyme with pKa 4.0. The pH dependence of the 15N line width as well as the apparent dissociation constant were quantitatively analyzed on the basis of a reaction scheme in which thiocyanate in deprotonated ionic form binds to the enzyme in protonated acidic form. The KD for thiocyanate binding to HRP was also evaluated in the presence of an excess of exogenous substrates such as resorcinol, cyanide, and iodide ions. It was found that the presence of cyanide (which binds to heme iron at the sixth coordination position) and resorcinol did not have any effect on the binding of thiocyanate, indicating that the binding site of the thiocyanate ion is located away from the ferric center as well as from the aromatic donor binding site. The KD in the presence of iodide, however, showed that iodide competes with thiocyanate for binding at the same site. The distance of the bound thiocyanate ion from the ferric center was deduced from the 15N relaxation time measurements and was found to be a 6.8 A. From the distance as well as the change in the chemical shifts and line width of 1- and 8-methyl proton resonances, it is suggested that the

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of phosphorus(v) pesticides. Part I. Chemical shifts of protons as a means of identification of pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Babad, H.; Herbert, W.; Goldberg, M.C.

    1968-01-01

    Correlations of structural and proton chemical-hift data for 40 commercial phosphorus(V) pesticides are reported. Correlations of structure with the phosphorus coupling constants are discussed, and general trends are noted which aid in the use of NMR as a tool for identification and analysis of phosphorus(V) compounds. ?? 1968.

  17. DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marinus, M.G.; Løbner-Olesen, A.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA of E. coli contains 19,120 6-methyladenines and 12,045 5-methylcytosines in addition to the four regular bases and these are formed by the postreplicative action of three DNA methyltransferases. The majority of the methylated bases are formed by the Dam and Dcm methyltransferases encoded by the dam (DNA adenine methyltransferase) and dcm (DNA cytosine methyltransferase) genes. Although not essential, Dam methylation is important for strand discrimination during repair of replication errors, controlling the frequency of initiation of chromosome replication at oriC, and regulation of transcription initiation at promoters containing GATC sequences. In contrast, there is no known function for Dcm methylation although Dcm recognition sites constitute sequence motifs for Very Short Patch repair of T/G base mismatches. In certain bacteria (e.g., Vibrio cholerae, Caulobacter crescentus) adenine methylation is essential and in C. crescentus, it is important for temporal gene expression which, in turn, is required for coordinating chromosome initiation, replication and division. In practical terms, Dam and Dcm methylation can inhibit restriction enzyme cleavage; decrease transformation frequency in certain bacteria; decrease the stability of short direct repeats; are necessary for site-directed mutagenesis; and to probe eukaryotic structure and function. PMID:26442938

  18. Proton irradiation robustness of dielectric mirrors for high-finesse Fabry-Pérot resonators in the near-infrared spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qun-Feng; Nevsky, Alexander; Schiller, Stephan; Campa, Erwin Portuondo; Lecomte, Steve; Parker, David

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate that a proton irradiation with fluences of 3.6 × 1010/cm2 at low energy (<36 MeV) and 1.46 × 1010/cm2 at high energy (40 and 90 MeV combined) on the dielectric mirrors of Fabry-Pérot cavities with a finesse of about 700,000 causes less than 5 % change in the finesse. Furthermore, no influence on the coupling efficiency to the cavities was observed, the efficiency being approximately 70 %. The irradiation was carried out with a spectrum approximating the proton energy spectrum of a highly elliptic Earth orbit with duration of 5 years, proposed for the Space-Time Explorer and Quantum Equivalence Space Test (STE-QUEST) mission [http://sci.esa.int/ste-quest/].

  19. Polarized proton acceleration at the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    At the conclusion of polarized proton commissioning in February 1986, protons with an average polarization of 45%, momentum of 21.7 GeV/c, and intensity of 2 x 10/sup 10/ protons per pulse, were extracted to an external polarimeter at the Brookhaven AGS. In order to maintain this polarization, five intrinsic and nearly forty imperfection depolarizing resonances had to be corrected. An apparent interaction between imperfection and intrinsic resonances occurring at very nearly the same energy was observed and the correction of imperfection resonances using ''beat'' magnetic harmonics discovered in the previous AGS commissioning run was further confirmed.

  20. Methyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl chloride ; CASRN 74 - 87 - 3 ( 07 / 17 / 2001 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  1. Methyl acrylate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl acrylate ; CASRN 96 - 33 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  2. Methyl isocyanate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl isocyanate ; CASRN 624 - 83 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  3. Methyl iodide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl iodide ; CASRN 74 - 88 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effe

  4. Methyl parathion

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl parathion ; CASRN 298 - 00 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  5. Methyl chlorocarbonate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl chlorocarbonate ; CASRN 79 - 22 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinog

  6. Methyl methacrylate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl methacrylate ; CASRN 80 - 62 - 6 ( 03 / 02 / 98 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments f

  7. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Kweon, Jin Jung; Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui; Jung, Seunho; Kwon, Chanho

    2014-07-07

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame {sup 1}H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  8. Multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic and high-performance liquid chromatographic characterization of silica, grafted with specifically deuterated 4-((propylamino)methyl)benzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Gangoda, Mahinda E; Wijekoon, Asanka; Gregory, Roger B; Khitrin, Anatoly K

    2016-08-01

    Specifically deuterated 4-((propylamino)methyl)benzoic acid-grafted silica (PAMBA-silica) was prepared by benzylation of propylamino-grafted silica (PA-silica) by either in situ reduction by sodium cyanoborodeuteride (NaCNBD3) of the Schiff base, formed by the reaction between PA-silica and 4-formylbenzoic acid, or by NaCNBD3 reduction of the isolated Schiff base. The PAMBA-silicas, which contain amine and carboxylic acid functionalities, were characterized by elemental analysis, (13)C, (29)Si, and (2)H solid state NMR, and HPLC. Solid state (13)C NMR revealed that PAMBA-silica prepared by the in situ method consists of di-benzylated, mono-benzylated, and unreacted amino-groups while PAMBA-silica prepared by the two-step synthesis consists of only mono-benzylated and unreacted amino-groups. (29)Si solid-state NMR spectra indicated that no significant loss of propylamine groups had occurred during benzylation. Nearly ideal uniaxial rigid-limit (2)H NMR spectra of grafted 4-PAMBA ligands indicates that they form a rigid structure, which provides effective electrostatic screening of inner positive charges when the ligands are in zwitterionic form. HPLC columns packed with PAMBA-silica and PA-silica were evaluated for ionic solutes at different pH of the mobile phase. Retention times increased for cations and decreased for anions at increasing pH. These trends show that PAMBA-silicas act as cation and anion exchangers at high and low pH, respectively. The pKa values of grafted carboxylic acid, determined from HPLC of weakly retaining solutes, are close to pKa of the solution PAMBA. PMID:27372413

  9. Observation of a Narrow Baryon Resonance Decaying to pK{sup 0}{sub S} in Proton-Nucleus Interactions at 70 GeV/c with the SVD-2 Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Aleev, A.N.; Amaglobeli, N.S.; Balandin, V.P.; Boguslavsky, I.V.; Gramenitsky, I.M.; Zhidkov, N.K.; Kokoulina, E.S.; Kosarev, I.G.; Kuzmin, N.A.; Lanshikov, G.I.; Nikitin, V.A.; Oleinik, A.A.; Rufanov, I.A.; Topuria, T.P.; Furmanec, N.F.; Shafranov, M.D.; Yukaev, A.I.; Ardashev, E.N.; Vasiliev, M.V.; Vorobiev, A. P.

    2005-06-01

    Data from the SVD-2 experiment that were obtained at the IHEP accelerator in 70-GeV/c proton-nucleus interactions are analyzed with the aim of searches for an exotic {theta}{sup +} baryon that decays through the pK{sup 0}{sub S} channel. The reaction pN {yields} pK{sup 0}{sub S} + X characterized by a bounded multiplicity of charged secondaries is used for this analysis. A resonance of mass M = 1526 {+-} 3(stat.) {+-} 3(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and width {gamma} < 24 MeV/c{sup 2} is observed in the invariant-mass spectrum of the pK{sup 0}{sub S} system at a statistical significance of 5.6{sigma}. The mass and the width of this resonance correspond to the recently found positive-strangeness {theta}{sup +} baryon, which was predicted to be an exotic baryon consisting of five quarks (pentaquark), uudds-bar. The total cross section for the production of a {theta}{sup +} baryon in pA interactions is estimated at a value within the range 30-120 {mu}b for x{sub F} {>=} 0. An analysis of the A dependence of the cross section for {theta}{sup +}-baryon production does not reveal a significant deviation from the A dependence for inelastic events ({approx}A{sup 0.7})

  10. Proton Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  11. Acceleration of polarized proton at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y Y

    1980-01-01

    The unexpected importance of high energy spin effects and the success of the ZGS in correcting many intrinsic and imperfection depolarizing resonances led us to attempt to accelerate polarized protons in the AGS. A collaborative effort is underway by the groups in Argonne, Michigan, Rice, Yale and Brookhaven to improve and modify the AGS to accelerate polarized protons. With the appropriate funding the first polarized proton acceleration at the AGS should be possible by 1983.

  12. Ab-initio Computation of the 17F Proton-Halo State and Resonances in A=17 Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, Gaute; Papenbrock, T.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.

    2010-01-01

    We perform coupled-cluster calculations of the energies and lifetimes of single-particle states around the doubly magic nucleus ^{16}O based on chiral nucleon-nucleon interactions at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order. To incorporate effects from the scattering continuum, we solve the coupled-cluster equations with a Gamow-Hartree-Fock basis. Our calculations for the J^{pi} = 1/2^{+} proton-halo state in ^{17}F and the 1/2^{+} state in ^{17}O agree well with experiment, while the calculated spin-orbit splitting between d_{5/2} and d_{3/2} states is too small due to the lack of three-nucleon forces. We find that continuum effects yield a significant amount of additional binding energy for the 1/2^{+} and 3/2^{+} states in ^{17}O and ^{17}F.

  13. Proton interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher L

    2008-01-01

    Energetic proton beams may provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because: they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and proton beams can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections for delayed neutrons and gamma-rays using the 800 MeV proton beam from the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Results will be presented.

  14. Photoproduction of {Lambda} and {Sigma}{sup 0} Hyperons off Protons in the Nucleon Resonance Region using CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    John McNabb

    2002-12-01

    The differential cross section and hyperon recoil polarizations of the photoproduction of the ground state hyperons, {gamma} p {yields} K{sup +} {Lambda} and {gamma} p {yields} K{sup +} {Sigma}{sup 0} , have been measured with the CLAS at Jefferson Lab up to a photon energy in the lab of 2.325 GeV. The results for both channels show significantly larger cross section in the middle to forward angles than have been observed previously by the SAPHIR Collaboration. Both reactions show significantly more backward peaking in the angular distributions than has previously been possible to observe. The backward peaking hints that hyperon resonances in the u-channel play a significant role in the production mechanism. In addition, in the {gamma} p {yields} K{sup +} {Lambda} reaction, a previously unobserved bump in the cross section was observed at forward angles, centered on a W of 1.95 GeV with a width of approximately {Gamma} = 100 MeV. In both {gamma} p {yields} K{sup +} Y reactions the recoil polarization in the forward direction seems reasonably well reproduced by t-channel interferences in a Regge model calculation as well as hadrodynamic models that include kaon resonances in the t-channel. The recoil polarization for {gamma} p {yields} K{sup +} {Lambda} shows a significant enhancement around a W of 1.9 GeV in the backward angles, which is a sign of resonance activity in this vicinity. The polarization of {gamma} p {yields} K{sup +} {Sigma}{sup 0} at backward angles is, in contrast, less pronounced and mostly consistent with zero.

  15. Methyl gallate.

    PubMed

    Bebout, Deborah; Pagola, Silvina

    2009-01-01

    THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF THE TITLE COMPOUND (SYSTEMATIC NAME: methyl 3,4,5-trihydroxy-benzoate), C(8)H(8)O(5), is composed of essentially planar mol-ecules [maximum departures from the mean carbon and oxygen skeleton plane of 0.0348 (10) Å]. The H atoms of the three hydroxyl groups, which function as hydrogen-bond donors and acceptors simultaneously, are oriented in the same direction around the aromatic ring. In addition to two intra-molecular hydrogen bonds, each mol-ecule is hydrogen bonded to six others, creating a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network. PMID:21581923

  16. Methyl gallate

    PubMed Central

    Bebout, Deborah; Pagola, Silvina

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound (systematic name: methyl 3,4,5-trihydroxy­benzoate), C8H8O5, is composed of essentially planar mol­ecules [maximum departures from the mean carbon and oxygen skeleton plane of 0.0348 (10) Å]. The H atoms of the three hydroxyl groups, which function as hydrogen-bond donors and acceptors simultaneously, are oriented in the same direction around the aromatic ring. In addition to two intra­molecular hydrogen bonds, each mol­ecule is hydrogen bonded to six others, creating a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network. PMID:21581923

  17. Long-term normal-appearing brain tissue monitoring after irradiation using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo: Statistical analysis of a large group of patients

    SciTech Connect

    Matulewicz, Lukasz . E-mail: lukasz.matulewicz@io.gliwice.pl; Sokol, Maria; Michnik, Anna; Wydmanski, Jerzy

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to detect the non-neoplastic white-matter changes vs. time after irradiation using {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in vivo. Methods and Materials: A total of 394 {sup 1}H MR spectra were acquired from 100 patients (age 19-74 years; mean and median age, 43 years) before and during 2 years after radiation therapy (the mean absorbed doses calculated for the averaged spectroscopy voxels are similar and close to 20 Gy). Results: Ocilations were observed in choline-containing compounds (Cho)/creatine and phosphocreatine (Cr), Cho/N-acetylaspartate (NAA), and center of gravity (CG) of the lipid band in the range of 0.7-1.5 ppm changes over time reveal oscillations. The parameters have the same 8-month cycle period; however the CG changes precede the other by 2 months. Conclusions: The results indicate the oscillative nature of the brain response to irradiation, which may be caused by the blood-brain barrier disruption and repair processes. These oscillations may influence the NMR results, depending on the cycle phase in which the NMR measurements are performed in. The earliest manifestation of radiation injury detected by magnetic resonance spectroscopy is the CG shift.

  18. Proton Resonance Frequency Chemical Shift Thermometry: Experimental Design and Validation Towards High-Resolution Non-Invasive Temperature Monitoring, and in vivo Experience in a Non-human Primate Model of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Hui; Howell, Leonard; Zhang, Xiaodong; Pate, K S; Magrath, P R; Tong, Frank; Wei, L; Qiu, D; Fleischer, C; Oshinski, J N

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Applications for non-invasive biological temperature monitoring are widespread in biomedicine, and of particular interest in the context of brain temperature regulation, where traditionally costly and invasive monitoring schemes limit their applicability in many settings. Brain thermal regulation therefore remains controversial, motivating the development of non-invasive approaches such as temperature-sensitive NMR phenomena. The purpose of this work was to compare the utility of competing approaches to MR thermometry (MRT) employing proton resonance frequency chemical shift. Three methodologies were tested, hypothesizing the feasibility of a fast and accurate approach to chemical shift thermometry, in a phantom study at 3.0 Tesla. MATERIALS AND METHODS A conventional, paired approach (DIFF-1), an accelerated single-scan approach (DIFF-2), and a new, further accelerated strategy (DIFF-3) were tested. Phantom temperatures were modulated during real-time fiber optic temperature monitoring, with MRT derived simultaneously from temperature-sensitive changes in the water proton chemical shift (~0.01 ppm/°C). MRT was subsequently performed in a series of in vivo non-human primate experiments under physiologic and ischemic conditions testing its reproducibility and overall performance. RESULTS Chemical shift thermometry demonstrated excellent agreement with phantom temperatures for all three approaches (DIFF-1 linear regression R2=0.994, p<0.001, acquisition time 4 min 40 s; DIFF-2 R2=0.996, p<0.001, acquisition time 4 min; DIFF-3 R2=0.998, p<0.001, acquisition time 40 s). CONCLUSION These findings confirm the comparability in performance of three competing approaches MRT, and present in vivo applications under physiologic and ischemic conditions in a primate stroke model. PMID:25655874

  19. The reorientation of t-butyl groups in butylated hydroxytoluene: A deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectral and relaxation time study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polson, James M.; Fyfe, J. D. Dean; Jeffrey, Kenneth R.

    1991-03-01

    Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and spin-lattice relaxation times were determined in order to study the dynamics of t-butyl groups in butylated hydroxytoluene. The results are consistent with a model first proposed by Beckmann et al. [J. Magn. Reson. 36, 199 (1979)], where there is an inequivalence between the methyl groups within each t-butyl group. While two methyl groups reorient rapidly relative to the whole t-butyl rotation, the remaining methyl group is more restricted in its motion, reorienting at a rate comparable to that of the t-butyl group itself. The spin-lattice relaxation data show two T1 minima, the high temperature minimum (40 °C) corresponding to the combined t-butyl and ``slow'' methyl rotations, and the low temperature minimum corresponding to ``fast'' methyl group rotation. Using an explicitly defined T1 fitting function, the T1 data yield activation energies of 2.2 and 6.0 kcal/mol for the fast methyl and t-butyl rotations, respectively, both in agreement with Beckmann's values obtained from proton T1 experiments. It was also possible to simulate the low temperature deuterium NMR spectra from T=-160 °C to T=-80 °C using the aforementioned dynamical inequivalence between the t-butyl methyl groups. While the fast methyl group rotation was in the motional narrowing region for T>-160 °C, it was possible, from the simulations, to determine the t-butyl exchange rates to within 10%. The jump rates are remarkably close to the values predicted from the T1 results. Above -80 °C, the spectra could not be simulated, implying that a third motion must be present to further alter the high temperature line shapes. The effective axial asymmetry of the T>-20° spectra indicates that the additional motion involves a two site exchange.

  20. Investigation of Proton Dynamics in a (CH3)4 NCdCl3 Single Crystal by using 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Moohee; Sim, Jung Seok; Kang, Kihyeok; Hyoun Kim, Ho; Kim, Ae Ran

    2013-03-01

    (CH3)4 NCdCl3(TMCC) is reported to exhibit two first-order structural phase transitions. The crystal has a hexagonal structure in phase I at room temperature and then changes to a monoclinic one in phase II below 118 K. Finally a ferro-elastic monoclinic phase III appears below 104 K. The a- and c-axes of TMMC were found by using X-ray diffraction at room temperature. 1H NMR measurements of spectrum, spin-lattice relaxation time T1 and rotating-frame relaxation time T1ρ were performed at 4.8 T parallel or perpendicular to the c-axis from 300 K down to 65 K. The spectrum shows no significant changes at both transition temperatures. T1 and T1ρ monotonically decrease at low temperature and then show an abrupt decrease around 110 K. As the temperature decreases further, T1 shows a minimum at 100 K and becomes longer whereas T1ρ continuously decreases. From these data, the proton dynamical behavior is analyzed and identified.

  1. Recoil polarization and beam-recoil double polarization measurement of eta electroproduction on the proton in the region of the S11(1535) resonance.

    PubMed

    Merkel, H; Achenbach, P; Ayerbe Gayoso, C; Bernauer, J C; Böhm, R; Bosnar, D; Cheymol, B; Distler, M O; Doria, L; Fonvieille, H; Friedrich, J; Janssens, P; Makek, M; Müller, U; Nungesser, L; Pochodzalla, J; Potokar, M; Sánchez Majos, S; Schlimme, B S; Sirca, S; Tiator, L; Walcher, Th; Weinriefer, M

    2007-09-28

    The beam-recoil double polarization P(x')(h) and P(z')(h) and the recoil polarization P(y') were measured for the first time for the p(e,e'p)eta reaction at a four-momentum transfer of Q(2) = 0.1 GeV(2)/c(2) and a center of mass production angle of theta = 120 degrees at the Mainz Microtron MAMI-C. With a center of mass energy range of 1500 MeVresonance was covered. The results are discussed in the framework of a phenomenological isobar model (Eta-MAID). While P(x')(h) and P(z')(h) are in good agreement with the model, P(y') shows a significant deviation, consistent with existing photoproduction data on the polarized-target asymmetry. PMID:17930579

  2. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma: Predictive Value for the Site of Postradiotherapy Relapse in a Prospective Longitudinal Study

    SciTech Connect

    Laprie, Anne Catalaa, Isabelle; Cassol, Emmanuelle; McKnight, Tracy R.; Berchery, Delphine; Marre, Delphine; Bachaud, Jean-Marc; Berry, Isabelle; Moyal, Elizabeth Cohen-Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI)-defined, metabolically abnormal tumor regions and subsequent sites of relapse in data from patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) in a prospective clinical trial. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three examinations were performed prospectively for 9 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme studied in a Phase I trial combining Tipifarnib and RT. The patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRSI before treatment and every 2 months until relapse. The MRSI data were categorized by the choline (Cho)/N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) ratio (CNR) as a measure of spectroscopic abnormality. CNRs corresponding to T1 and T2 MRI for 1,207 voxels were evaluated before RT and at recurrence. Results: Before treatment, areas of CNR2 (CNR {>=}2) represented 25% of the contrast-enhancing (T1CE) regions and 10% of abnormal T2 regions outside T1CE (HyperT2). The presence of CNR2 was often an early indicator of the site of relapse after therapy. In fact, 75% of the voxels within the T1CE+CNR2 before therapy continued to exhibit CNR2 at relapse, compared with 22% of the voxels within the T1CE with normal CNR (p < 0.05). The location of new contrast enhancement with CNR2 corresponded in 80% of the initial HyperT2+CNR2 vs. 20.7% of the HyperT2 voxels with normal CNR (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Metabolically active regions represented a small percentage of pretreatment MRI abnormalities and were predictive for the site of post-RT relapse. The incorporation of MRSI data in the definition of RT target volumes for selective boosting may be a promising avenue leading to increased local control of glioblastomas.

  3. Dose-dependent influence of short-term intermittent ethanol intoxication on cerebral neurochemical changes in rats detected by ex vivo proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do-Wan; Nam, Yoon-Ki; Kim, Tai-Kyung; Kim, Jae-Hwa; Kim, Sang-Young; Min, Jung-Whan; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Hwi-Yool; Kim, Dai-Jin; Choe, Bo-Young

    2014-03-14

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the effects of short-term intermittent ethanol intoxication on cerebral metabolite changes among sham controls (CNTL), low-dose ethanol (LDE)-exposed, and high-dose ethanol (HDE)-exposed rats, which were determined with ex vivo high-resolution spectra. Eight-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into three groups. Twenty rats in the LDE (n=10) and the HDE (n=10) groups received ethanol doses of 1.5 and 2.5 g/kg, respectively, through oral gavage every 8h for 4days. At the end of the 4-day intermittent ethanol exposure, one-dimensional ex vivo 500-MHz ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were acquired from 30 samples of the frontal cortex region (from the three groups). Normalized total N-acetylaspartate (tNAA: NAA+NAAG [N-acetylaspartyl-glutamate]), GABA, and glutathione (GSH) levels were significantly lower in the frontal cortex of the HDE-exposed rats than that of the LDE-exposed rats. Moreover, compared to the CNTL group, the LDE rats exhibited significantly higher normalized GABA levels. The six pairs of normalized metabolite levels were positively (+) or negatively (-) correlated in the rat frontal cortex as follows: tNAA and GABA (+), tNAA and aspartate (Asp) (+), myo-Inositol (mIns) and Asp (-), mIns and alanine (+), mIns and taurine (+), and mIns and tNAA (-). Our results suggested that short-term intermittent ethanol intoxication might result in neuronal degeneration and dysfunction, changes in the rate of GABA synthesis, and oxidative stress in the rat frontal cortex. Our ex vivo(1)H high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy results suggested some novel metabolic markers for the dose-dependent influence of short-term intermittent ethanol intoxication in the frontal cortex. PMID:24406441

  4. Brain lithium, N-acetyl aspartate and myo-inositol levels in older adults with bipolar disorder treated with lithium: a lithium-7 and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Forester, Brent P; Finn, Chelsea T; Berlow, Yosef A; Wardrop, Megan; Renshaw, Perry F; Moore, Constance M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the relationship between brain lithium levels and the metabolites N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and myo-inositol (myo-Ino) in the anterior cingulate cortex of a group of older adults with bipolar disorder (BD). Methods This cross-sectional assessment included nine subjects (six males and three females) with bipolar I disorder and currently treated with lithium, who were examined at McLean Hospital’s Geriatric Psychiatry Research Program and Brain Imaging Center. The subjects’ ages ranged from 56 to 85 years (66.0 ± 9.7 years) and all subjects had measurements of serum and brain lithium levels. Brain lithium levels were assessed using lithium magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All subjects also had proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to obtain measurements of NAA and myo-Ino. Results Brain lithium levels were associated with higher NAA levels [df = (1, 8), B = 12.53, t = 4.09, p < 0.005] and higher myo-Ino levels [df = (1, 7), F = 16.81, p < 0.006]. There were no significant effects of serum lithium levels on any of the metabolites. Conclusion Our findings of a relationship between higher brain lithium levels and elevated NAA levels in older adult subjects with BD may support previous evidence of lithium’s neuroprotective, neurotrophic, and mitochondrial function-enhancing effects. Elevated myo-Ino related to elevated brain lithium levels may reflect increased inositol monophosphatase (IMPase) activity, which would lead to an increase in myo-Ino levels. This is the first study to demonstrate alterations in NAA and myo-Ino in a sample of older adults with BD treated with lithium. PMID:18837863

  5. 1D and 2D NMR studies of isobornyl acrylate - Methyl methacrylate copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Deepika; Hooda, Sunita; Brar, A. S.; Shankar, Ravi

    2011-10-01

    Isobornyl acrylate - methyl methacrylate (B/M) copolymers of different compositions were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) using methyl-2-bromopropionate as an initiator and PMDETA copper complex as catalyst under nitrogen atmosphere at 70 °C. 1H NMR spectrum was used to determine the compositions of copolymer. The copolymer compositions were then used to determine the reactivity ratios of monomers. Reactivity ratios of co-monomers in B/M copolymer, determined from linear Kelen-Tudos method (KT) and non linear Error-in-Variable Method (EVM), are rB = 0.41 ± 0.11, rM = 1.11 ± 0.33 and rB = 0.52, rM = 1.31 respectively. The complete resonance assignments of 1H and 13C{ 1H} NMR spectra were carried out with the help of Distortion less Enhancement by Polarization Transfer (DEPT), two-dimensional Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence (HSQC). 2D HSQC assignments were further confirmed by 2D Total Correlation Spectroscopy (TOCSY). The carbonyl carbon of B and M units and methyl carbon of M unit were assigned up to triad compositional and configurational sequences whereas β-methylene carbons were assigned up to tetrad compositional and configurational sequences. Similarly the methine carbon of B unit was assigned up to pentad level. 1,3 and 1,4 bond order couplings of carbonyl carbon and quaternary carbon resonances with methine, methylene and methyl protons were studied in detail using 2D Hetero Nuclear Multiple Bond Correlation (HMBC) spectra.

  6. Influence of the colloidal structure of dairy gels on milk fat fusion behavior: quantification of the liquid fat content by in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (isq (1) H NMR).

    PubMed

    Bouteille, Romain; Perez, Jeanne; Khifer, Farid; Jouan-Rimbaud-Bouveresse, Delphine; Lecanu, Bruno; This, Hervé

    2013-04-01

    Dairy gels (DG), such as yoghurts, contain both solid and liquid fats at the time of consumption, as their temperature rises to anything between 10 and 24 °C after being introduced into the mouth at 4 °C. The mass ratio between solid and liquid fats, which depends on the temperature, impacts the organoleptic properties of DG. As the ordinary methods for determining this ratio can only be applied to samples consisting mainly in fat materials, a fat extraction step needs to be added into the analytical process when applied to DG, which prevents the study of the potential impact of their colloidal structure on milk fat fusion behavior. In situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (isq (1) H NMR) was investigated as a method for direct measurements in DG: at temperatures between 20.0 and 70.0 °C, the liquid fat content and the composition of triacylglycerols of the liquid phase (in terms of alkyl chains length) were determined. Spectra of isolated milk fat also enable the quantification of the double bonds of triacylglycerols. Statistical tests showed no significant difference between isolated milk fat and milk fat inside a DG in terms of melting behavior: the fat globule membrane does not seem to have a significant influence on the fat melting behavior. PMID:23464867

  7. Recoil Polarization and Beam-Recoil Double Polarization Measurement of {eta} Electroproduction on the Proton in the Region of the S{sub 11}(1535) Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, H.; Achenbach, P.; Ayerbe Gayoso, C.; Bernauer, J. C.; Boehm, R.; Distler, M. O.; Doria, L.; Friedrich, J.; Mueller, U.; Nungesser, L.; Pochodzalla, J.; Sanchez Majos, S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Tiator, L.; Walcher, Th.; Weinriefer, M.; Bosnar, D.; Makek, M.; Cheymol, B.; Fonvieille, H.

    2007-09-28

    The beam-recoil double polarization P{sub x{sup '}}{sup h} and P{sub z{sup '}}{sup h} and the recoil polarization P{sub y{sup '}} were measured for the first time for the p(e-vector,e{sup '}p-vector){eta} reaction at a four-momentum transfer of Q{sup 2}=0.1 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} and a center of mass production angle of {theta}=120 deg. at the Mainz Microtron MAMI-C. With a center of mass energy range of 1500 MeVresonance was covered. The results are discussed in the framework of a phenomenological isobar model (Eta-MAID). While P{sub x{sup '}}{sup h} and P{sub z{sup '}}{sup h} are in good agreement with the model, P{sub y{sup '}} shows a significant deviation, consistent with existing photoproduction data on the polarized-target asymmetry.

  8. Region-specific cerebral metabolic alterations in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic rats: an in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Huang, Mingming; Gao, Lifeng; Lei, Hao

    2015-11-01

    Clinical and experimental in vivo (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) studies have demonstrated that type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is associated with cerebral metabolic abnormalities. However, less is known whether T1DM induces different metabolic disturbances in different brain regions. In this study, in vivo (1)H-MRS was used to measure metabolic alterations in the visual cortex, striatum, and hippocampus of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced uncontrolled T1DM rats at 4 days and 4 weeks after induction. It was observed that altered neuronal metabolism occurred in STZ-treated rats as early as 4 days after induction. At 4 weeks, T1DM-related metabolic disturbances were clearly region specific. The diabetic visual cortex had more or less normal-appearing metabolic profile; while the striatum and hippocampus showed similar abnormalities in neuronal metabolism involving N-acetyl aspartate and glutamate; but only the hippocampus exhibited significant changes in glial markers such as taurine and myo-inositol. It is concluded that cerebral metabolic perturbations in STZ-induced T1DM rats are region specific at 4 weeks after induction, perhaps as a manifestation of varied vulnerability among the brain regions to sustained hyperglycemia. PMID:26036938

  9. Metabolomics by Proton High-Resolution Magic-Angle-Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Tomato Plants Treated with Two Secondary Metabolites Isolated from Trichoderma.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Pierluigi; Vinale, Francesco; Woo, Sheridan Lois; Pascale, Alberto; Lorito, Matteo; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2016-05-11

    Trichoderma fungi release 6-pentyl-2H-pyran-2-one (1) and harzianic acid (2) secondary metabolites to improve plant growth and health protection. We isolated metabolites 1 and 2 from Trichoderma strains, whose different concentrations were used to treat seeds of Solanum lycopersicum. The metabolic profile in the resulting 15 day old tomato leaves was studied by high-resolution magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HRMAS NMR) spectroscopy directly on the whole samples without any preliminary extraction. Principal component analysis (PCA) of HRMAS NMR showed significantly enhanced acetylcholine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content accompanied by variable amount of amino acids in samples treated with both Trichoderma secondary metabolites. Seed germination rates, seedling fresh weight, and the metabolome of tomato leaves were also dependent upon doses of metabolites 1 and 2 treatments. HRMAS NMR spectroscopy was proven to represent a rapid and reliable technique for evaluating specific changes in the metabolome of plant leaves and calibrating the best concentration of bioactive compounds required to stimulate plant growth. PMID:27088924

  10. Dynamics of ferroelectric phase transition in vinylidene fluoride/trifluoroethylene (VF2/F3E) copolymers. II. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hajime; Yukawa, Hideyuki; Nishi, Toshio

    1989-06-01

    Here we study the ferroelectric phase transition of a random copolymer of vinylidene fluoride (VF2) and trifluoroethylene (F3E), VF2/F3E(52/48), by 1H-pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Spin-spin relaxation time T2, spin-lattice relaxation time T1, and T1 in the rotating frame T1 ρ show the anomaly reflecting the phase transition. We demonstrate that the motional state in the crystalline and amorphous region is not so different. From the direct fitting of the Kubo-Tomita relation to a free induction decay, we have succeeded in obtaining the correlation time of the fluctuating local field and the second moment of the rigid lattice separately. The critical slowing down of the order-parameter fluctuation is observed through the temperature dependence of the correlation time. The anomaly of T1 near the Curie point has been found to be weak. This weak divergence of T-11 is consistent with our results on acoustic measurements. The weak anomaly can be ascribed to (1) the long-range nature of the bare interaction between dipoles which may come from the connectivity of a polymer chain (a cooperative conformational change over at least three bonds) or the dipolar long-range interaction, (2) the randomness due to random copolymerization, and/or (3) the dimensionality of the order parameter.

  11. Analysis of the Thermal Degradation of the Individual Anthocyanin Compounds of Black Carrot (Daucus carota L.): A New Approach Using High-Resolution Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Iliopoulou, Ioanna; Thaeron, Delphine; Baker, Ashley; Jones, Anita; Robertson, Neil

    2015-08-12

    The black carrot dye is a mixture of cyanidin molecules, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of which shows a highly overlapped aromatic region. In this study, the (1)H NMR (800 MHz) aromatic chemical shifts of the mixture were fully assigned by overlaying them with the characterized (1)H NMR chemical shifts of the separated compounds. The latter were isolated using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), and their chemical shifts were identified using (1)H and two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy (COSY) NMR spectroscopy. The stability of the black carrot mixture to heat exposure was investigated at pH 3.6, 6.8, and 8.0 by heat-treating aqueous solutions at 100 °C and the powdered material at 180 °C. From integration of high-resolution (1)H NMR spectra, it was possible to follow the relative degradation of each compound, offering advantages over the commonly used ultraviolet/visible (UV/vis) and HPLC approaches. UV/vis spectroscopy and CIE color measurements were used to determine thermally induced color changes, under normal cooking conditions. PMID:26160425

  12. A Marcus Treatment of Rate Constants for Protonation of Ring-Substituted α-Methoxystyrenes

    PubMed Central

    Richard, John P.; Williams, Kathleen B.

    2008-01-01

    Rate and equilibrium constants were determined for protonation of ring-substituted α-methoxystyrenes by hydronium ion and by carboxylic acids to form the corresponding ring-substituted α-methyl α-methoxybenzyl carbocations at 25 ° C and I = 1.0 (KCl). The thermodynamic barrier to carbocation formation increases by14.5 kcal/mol as the phenyl ring substituent(s) is changed from 4-MeO- to 3,5-di-NO2-, and as the carboxylic acid is changed from dichloroacetic to acetic acid. The Brønsted coefficient α for protonation by carboxylic acids increases from 0.67 to 0.77 over this range of phenyl ring substituents and the Brønsted coefficient β for proton transfer increases from 0.63 to 0.69 as the carboxylic acid is changed from dichloroacetic to acetic acid. The change in these Brønsted coefficients with changing reaction driving force, ∂α∕∂ΔGavo=∂β∕∂ΔGavo=1∕8Λ=0.011 is used to calculate a Marcus intrinsic reaction barrier of Λ = 11 kcal/mol which is close to the barrier of 13 kcal/mol for thermoneutral proton transfer between this series of acids and bases. The value of α = 0.66 for thermoneutral proton transfer is greater than α = 0.50 required by a reaction that follows the Marcus equation. This elevated value of β may be due to an asymmetry in the reaction coordinate that arises from the difference in the intrinsic barriers for proton transfer at the oxygen acid reactant and resonance stabilized carbon acid product. PMID:17488079

  13. The relationship between cognitive impairment and in vivo metabolite ratios in patients with clinical Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Waldman, A D; Rai, G S

    2003-08-01

    Previous magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies have shown increased myo-inositol (MI) and decreased N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) levels in the parieto-occipital lobes of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to those with other dementias and normal subjects. This study aimed to establish the quantitative relationship between metabolite ratios and degree of cognitive impairment in patients with mild to moderate AD and sub-cortical ischaemic vascular dementia (SIVD). Forty-four older people with clinical dementia were recruited from a memory clinic and followed up for 2.0-3.5 years; 20 cases were finally classified as probable AD, 18 as SIVD and 6 as mixed type. Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and short echo time single voxel automated MRS from the mesial parieto-occipital lobes were performed at the time of initial referral. Spearman rank correlation coefficients were calculated for MMSE scores and measured metabolite ratios MI/Cr, NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and NAA/MI. The AD group showed a significant correlation between MMSE and NAA/MI (r=0.54, P=0.014) and NAA/Cr (r=0.48, P=0.033), and a negative, non-significant association with MI/Cr (r=-0.41, P=0.072). MI/Cr was negatively correlated with NAA/Cr (r=-0.51, P=0.021). Neither Cho/Cr ratios nor age correlated with cognitive function. The SIVD group showed no correlation between any of the measured metabolite ratios and MMSE score. This study reinforces the specific association between reduced NAA and increased MI levels in the parieto-occipital region and cognitive impairment in AD. MRS may have a role in evaluating disease progression and therapeutic monitoring in AD, as new treatments become available. PMID:12879326

  14. Proton therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin redness in the radiation area, and temporary hair loss. AFTER THE PROCEDURE Following proton therapy, you should be able to resume your normal activities. You will likely see your doctor every 3 to 4 months for a follow-up exam.

  15. Ionospherically reflected proton whistlers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilov, D. I.; Shklyar, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    We present experimental observations and detailed investigation of the variety of proton whistlers that includes transequatorial and ionospherically reflected proton whistlers. The latter have previously been indicated from numerical modeling of spectrograms. The study is based on six-component ELF wave data from the Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) satellite which permits to obtain not only spectrograms displaying the power spectral density but also such wave properties as the polarization, wave normal angle, wave refractive index, and normalized parallel component of the Poynting vector. The explanation of various types of proton whistlers is based on the properties of ion cyclotron wave propagation in a multicomponent magnetoplasma, with special consideration of the effect of ion hybrid resonance reflection. Analysis of experimental data is supplemented by numerical modeling of spectrograms that reproduces the main features of experimental ones. As a self-contained result, we provide conclusive experimental evidences that the region illuminated by a lightning stroke in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide may spread over a distance of 4000 km in both hemispheres.

  16. Ab Initio Investigation of Cation Proton Affinity and Proton Transfer Energy for Energetic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Caleb M; Gordon, Mark S

    2016-08-01

    Protonation of the anion in an ionic liquid plays a key role in the hypergolic reaction between ionic liquids and oxidizers such as white fuming nitric acid. To investigate the influence of the cation on the protonation reaction, the deprotonation energy of a set of cations has been calculated at the MP2 level of theory. Specifically, guanidinium, dimethyltriazanium, triethylamine, N-ethyl-N-methyl-pyrrolidinium, N-ethyl-pyridinium, 1,4-dimethyl-1,2,4-triazolium, 1-ethyl-4-methyl-1,2,4-triazolium, and 1-butyl-4-methyl-1,2,4-triazolium were studied. In addition, the net proton transfer energies from the cations to a set of previously studied anions was calculated, demonstrating an inverse correlation between the net proton transfer energy and the likelihood that the cation/anion combination will react hypergolically with white fuming nitric acid. It is suggested that this correlation occurs due to a balance between the energy released by the proton transfer and the rate of proton transfer as determined by the ionicity of the ionic liquid. PMID:27397644

  17. Primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy during the 2008 EUCAARI campaign in the Po Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Fuzzi, S.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Eriksson Stenström, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Massoli, P.; Canaragatna, M.; Worsnop, D.; Decesari, S.

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric organic aerosols are generally classified as primary and secondary (POA and SOA) according to their formation processes. An actual separation, however, is challenging when the timescales of emission and gas-to-particle formation overlap. The presence of SOA formation in biomass burning plumes leads to scientific questions about whether the oxidized fraction of biomass burning aerosol is rather of secondary or primary origin, as some studies would suggest, and about the chemical compositions of oxidized biomass burning POA and SOA. In this study, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the functional group composition of fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols during an intensive field campaign in the Po Valley, Italy. The campaign was part of the EUCAARI project and was held at the rural station of San Pietro Capofiume in spring 2008. Factor analysis applied to the set of NMR spectra was used to apportion the wood burning contribution and other organic carbon (OC) source contributions, including aliphatic amines. Our NMR results, referred to the polar, water-soluble fraction of OC, show that fresh wood burning particles are composed of polyols and aromatic compounds, with a sharp resemblance to wood burning POA produced in wood stoves, while aged samples are clearly depleted of alcohols and are enriched in aliphatic acids with a smaller contribution of aromatic compounds. The comparison with biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA) determined by high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-TOF-AMS) at the site shows only a partial overlap between NMR BB-POA and AMS BBOA, which can be explained by either the inability of BBOA to capture all BB-POA composition, especially the alcohol fraction, or the fact that BBOA account for insoluble organic compounds unmeasured by the NMR. Therefore, an unambiguous composition for biomass burning POA could not be derived from this study, with NMR analysis indicating a higher O / C ratio

  18. Primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR) spectroscopy during the 2008 EUCAARI campaign in the Po Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Fuzzi, S.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Eriksson Stenström, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Massoli, P.; Canaragatna, M.; Worsnop, D.; Decesari, S.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric organic aerosols are generally classified into primary and secondary (POA and SOA) according to their formation processes. An actual separation, however, is challenging when the timescales of emission and of gas-to-particle formation overlap. The presence of SOA formation in biomass burning plumes leads to scientific questions about whether the oxidized fraction of biomass burning aerosol is rather of secondary or primary origin, as some studies would suggest, and about the chemical compositions of oxidized biomass burning POA and SOA. In this study, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the functional group composition of fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols during an intensive field campaign in the Po Valley, Italy. The campaign was part of the EUCAARI project and was held at the rural station of San Pietro Capofiume in spring 2008. Factor analysis applied to the set of NMR spectra was used to apportion the wood burning contribution and other organic carbon (OC) source contributions, including aliphatic amines. Our NMR results, referred to the polar, water-soluble fraction of OC, show that fresh w