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Sample records for metrizamide myelography ctmm

  1. Conventional metrizamide myelography (MM) and computed tomographic metrizamide myelography (CTMM) in scoliosis: a comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Pettersson, H.; Harwood-Nash, D.C.; Fitz, C.R.; Chuang, H.S.; Armstrong, E.

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective examination was performed to assess the accuracy of metrizamide myelography (MM) and computed tomographic metrizamide myelography (CTMM) in scoliosis. Of 81 consecutive scoliotic children studied by myelography, 30 had only MM while the remaining 51 had CTMM immediately afterward. CTMM added esential diagnostic information in 13 cases of dysraphism and 4 cases, both methods gave the same imformation. The outhors conclude that in patients with severe scoliosis, dysraphism, and scoliosis with localized neurological disturbances, CTMM should always be added to MM or be the only examination; while in idiopathic scoliosis with vague neurological disturbances a survey of the entire spine is essential, preferably with MM.

  2. The value of computed tomographic metrizamide myelography in the neuroradiological evaluation of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Dublin, A.B.; McGahan, J.P.; Reid, M.H.

    1983-01-01

    The diagnostic value of plain film metrizamide myelopgraphy (PFMM) was compared with computed tomographic metrizamide myelography (CTMM) in a study of 106 individuals who had undergone high-resolution computed tomographic scanning of the spine. CTMM provided more significant information than PFMM in 42 of 106 cases (40%), but showed no advantage over PFMM in 63 of 106 cases (59%). In 19 of the 42 cases (45%), PFMM was useful in directing the CT analysis to the appropriate region of pathology. In one patient, PFMM revealed a mobile herniated disc that had not been visualized with CTMM. In 30 of 106 cases in which plain CT scans of the spine were also obtained, the addition of intrathecal metrizamide demonstrated additional pathology in ten individuals. In general, CTMM was useful in the delineation of a variety of pathologic entities, especially neoplasms and congenital abnormalities. Low-dose CTMM (3 ml of a 150 ml/mg concentration) was performed as an outpatient procedure and found to be a useful adjunct to plain CT in two patients. A schema for the radiological evaluation of pathology of the spine is presented.

  3. Comparative advantages of small- and large-dose metrizamide myelography

    SciTech Connect

    Solti-Bohman, L.; Bentson, J.R.

    1983-10-01

    A series of myelographies performed with a smaller than customary dose (3.75 g) of metrizamide was compared with a series using the larger customary dose. While little decrease in the incidence of headache and vomiting resulted from the decreased dose, there was a heartening drop in the incidence of psychoneurologic side effects. Little difference in diagnostic quality between the two series resulted when the contrast agent was injected close to the side of main interest, but total spinal canal myelography performed with the low dose is often inadequate.

  4. Lumbar myelography with iohexol and metrizamide: a comparative multicenter prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Kieffer, S.A.; Binet, E.F.; Davis, D.O.; Gabrielsen, T.O.; Kido, D.K.; Latchaw, R.E.; Turski, P.A.; Shaw, D.D.

    1984-06-01

    Diagnostic quality of radiographs and adverse reactions associated with the use of metrizamide and iohexol as contrast agents in lumbar myelography were compared in a prospective randomized double blind study in 350 patients at seven centers. Overall quality of radiographic visualization was graded good or excellent in 95% of 175 metrizamide studies and in 98% of 175 iohexol studies. Ninety-three patients examined using metrizamide (53%) and 130 patients examined using iohexol (74%) experienced no discomfort during or after myelography. Postmyelographic headache was associated with 38% of metrizamide examinations and 21% of iohexol examinations. Nausea and vomiting were also more common with metrizamide. Five patients examined using metrizamide (3%) experienced transient confusion and disorientation following lumbar myelography. No such reactions were observed following iohexol myelography.

  5. Morphology and dimensions of the thoracic cord by computer-assisted metrizamide myelography.

    PubMed

    Gellad, F; Rao, K C; Joseph, P M; Vigorito, R D

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) measurements of the thoracic spine and its contents were obtained in 33 patients undergoing metrizamide myelography for various spinal disorders. Twenty-eight of these patients had symptoms referable to the cervical or lumbar region and form the basis of this study. Five patients had symptoms referable to the thoracic spine. Sagittal and coronal CT measurements of the thoracic cord and subarachnoid space were obtained in all cases. In addition, macroscopic measurements of the thoracic cord were obtained from 10 autopsies for correlation with the CT findings. The technical aspects of the measurements are discussed; the normal morphology of the thoracic cord and thecal sac is presented; and the metrizamide CT pattern associated with pathologic lesions involving the thoracic cord is analyzed. PMID:6410813

  6. Digital myelography of spinal dysraphism in infancy: preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.D.; Reynolds, A.F.; Galloway, D.C.; Pollay, M.; Leonard, J.C.; Prince, J.R.

    1984-06-01

    For the past 2 years, the authors have used metrizamide myelography with simple, thick-section polytomography (myelotomography) to evaluate patients with spinal dysraphism. This technique has provided separation of simultaneously imaged bone and neural landmarks in standard surgical planes, while directing CT for specific transaxial plane imaging. It also allows reduction in metrizamide dosage and total radiation exposure as compared with previously used myelographic procedures employing multiple plain filming plus complex thin-section tomography. For further reductions in risk and cost, digital fluorographic techniques are currently being explored. They describe preliminary results with digital myelography in the evaluation of spinal dysraphism in infancy.

  7. Urography with metrizamide in children

    SciTech Connect

    Siegle, R.L.; Davies, P.; Fullerton, G.D.

    1982-11-01

    Noionic contrast material could have particular value in pediatric urography because of the absence of osmotic diuresis and associated fluid loss. Excretory urograms were obtained in 23 children using metrizamide at 300 mg l/ml and administered at a dose of 2.2 ml/kg. The radiographs gave excellent urinary tract opacification without changes in serum osmolality. The calyces appeared sharp but undistended, there was increased occurrence of ureteral ridging, and the urinary bladders often remained undistended at the completion of the studied. The dense opacification attainable with isoosmolar metrizamide also gave the opportunity for performing urography with higher than normal kilovoltage and thus reducing radiation exposure to the child. Also in vitro studies demonstrated the significant radiation dose reduction possible with the higher kilovoltage technique.

  8. [Multislice computed tomographic myelography].

    PubMed

    Klingebiel, R; Masuhr, F; Rogalla, P; Hein, E; Juran, R; Bauknecht, H C; Bohner, G

    2006-02-01

    While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the first line modality in depicting intramedullary spinal lesions, computed tomographic (CT) myelography has gained renewed attention due to the introduction of multislice scanning (MS-CT). Compared with conventional CT, MS-CT permits rapid, high-resolution imaging of various spinal pathologies with extended scan length. Although soft tissue contrast is inferior to that with MRI, MS-CT myelography performs best in detailed assessment of osseous pathologies, 3D imaging of orthopedic and anesthesiologic implants, and showing dural leakage and causes of CSF circulation impairment. Whenever MRI is not available or contraindicated, MS-CT myelography is the method of choice for evaluating spinal lesions. PMID:16283150

  9. Metrizamide evaluation of the esophagus in infants

    SciTech Connect

    Belt, T.; Cohen, M.D.

    1984-08-01

    Barium and conventional hypertonic water-soluble contrast media (e.g., gastrografin) are not ideal contrast agents in the evaluation of the esophagus when leakage into the mediastinum or aspiration into the lung is possible. Metrizamide (Amipaque) is water-soluble and can be well visualized in isotonic solution. Three cases are presented where metrizamide was used successfully in the evaluation of suspected esophageal perforation or tracheoesophageal fistula.

  10. Pediatric urography: comparison of metrizamide and methylglucamine diatrizoate

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, G.; Reilly, B.J.; Carusi, P.A.; Nguyen, K.B.

    1984-01-01

    A non-ionic contrast medium (metrizamide) was compared to an ionic agent (methylglucamine diatrizoate) for pediatric urography. Fifty children were divided into two age groups: under 5, and 5 to 10. In younger children, metrizamide gave more excellent images (19% vs. 0%) and fewer inadequate images (0% vs. 18%) than methylglucamine diatrizoate (p = 0.06). In older children, metrizamide likewise gave more excellent images (44% vs 14%) and fewer inadequate images (0% vs. 7%). The same pattern was seen when the two groups were combined (excellent, 28% vs. 8%; inadequate, 0% vs. 12%) (p = 0.05). Differences with respect to changes in hematocrit, serum osmolality, serum sodium, and SGOT were statistically significant, but not adverse reactions. In terms of both efficacy and safety, the authors conclude that metrizamide is preferred for pediatric urography.

  11. Complications associated with the use of iohexol for myelography of the cervical vertebral column in dogs: 66 cases (1988-1990).

    PubMed

    Lewis, D D; Hosgood, G

    1992-05-01

    Medical records of 66 dogs that had undergone myelography, using iohexol (240 mg of iodine/ml, 0.3 to 0.5 ml/kg of body weight) during a 2-year period, were reviewed. In 3 dogs, myelography was performed twice during different anesthetic procedures. Neurologic abnormalities were more pronounced the day after myelography in dogs with caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy (P less than 0.01), meningitis (P less than 0.01), or extradural tumors (P less than 0.05). Neither anesthetic regimen nor duration of anesthesia significantly affected the frequency of complications. Seizures occurred after myelography in 6 dogs, and 1 dog had seizures after each of 2 myelographic procedures. The frequency of seizures was significantly greater in male Doberman Pinschers afflicted with caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy. Male dogs (P less than 0.01) and Doberman Pinschers (P less than 0.001) had higher prevalence of seizures. Caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy was associated with higher prevalence of seizures, compared with all other diagnoses (P less than 0.001). Seizures were significantly more prevalent when body weight was greater than or equal to 29 kg (P less than 0.001), when greater than or equal to 2 injections of contrast medium were administered (P less than 0.016), or when 2 injections of contrast medium were given at the cisterna magna (P less than 0.015). The 10% prevalence of seizures after myelography with iohexol in the study reported here is greater than in previous reports, but is lower than that reported after myelography using metrizamide. PMID:1601729

  12. Bowel perforation in the newborn: diagnosis with metrizamide

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.D.; Weber, T.R.; Grosfeld, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of bowel perforation is frequently straightforward, it may be difficult in the neonate. Clinical signs may be limited to abdominal distension. If the patient is on assisted ventilation, pneumoperitoneum may be due to air tracking down from the chest rather than perforation. Perforation in infants in whom the diagnosis could not readily be made from the clinical findings and plain radiographs was apparent when oral metrizamide was employed. This suggests that metrizamide can be a valuable adjunct in some cases of neonatal bowel perforation.

  13. Myelography

    MedlinePlus

    ... a physician specifically trained to supervise and interpret radiology examinations, will analyze the images and send a ... the best images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique ...

  14. Multi-Dimensional Impact of the Public-Private Center for Translational Molecular Medicine (CTMM) in the Netherlands: Understanding New 21(st) Century Institutional Designs to Support Innovation-in-Society.

    PubMed

    Steuten, Lotte M

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge translation is at the epicenter of 21st century life sciences and integrative biology. Several innovative institutional designs have been formulated to cultivate knowledge translation. One of these organizational innovations has been the Center for Translational Molecular Medicine (CTMM), a multi-million public-private partnership in the Netherlands. The CTMM aims to accelerate molecular diagnostics and imaging technologies to forecast disease susceptibilities in healthy populations and early diagnosis and personalized treatment of patients. This research evaluated CTMM's impact on scientific, translational, clinical, and economic dimensions. A pragmatic, operationally-defined process indicators approach was used. Data were gathered from CTMM administrations, through a CTMM-wide survey (n = 167) and group interviews. We found that the CTMM focused on disease areas with high human, clinical, and economic burden to society (i.e., oncology, cardiovascular, neurologic, infection, and immunity diseases). CTMM displayed a robust scientific impact that rests 15%-80% above international reference values regarding publication volume and impact. Technology translation to the clinic was accelerated, with >50% of projects progressing from pre-clinical development to clinical testing within 5 years. Furthermore, CTMM has generated nearly 1500 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) of translational R&D capacity. Its positive impact on translational, (future) clinical, and economic aspects is recognized across all surveyed stakeholders. As organizational innovation is increasingly considered critical to forge linkages between life sciences discoveries and innovation-in-society, lessons learned from this study may inform other institutions with similar objectives such as the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) Program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the United States. PMID:27195965

  15. Comparative hemodynamic effect of metrizamide and Renografin 76 in infants with congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Baltaxe, H.A.; Mooring, P.; Kugler, J.; Pinsky, W.; Chu, W.K.

    1983-06-01

    Twenty patients under the age of 2 years with suspected congenital heart disease received alternately Renografin 76 and metrizamide for angiocardiography. The dose was 2.0 ml/kg per injection for both contrast media into the left ventricle. Metrizamide induced slightly lesser change in heart rate, peak systolic pressure, and peak end-diastolic pressures. Serum osmolality, hematocrit, and serum electrolytes were affected equally by the contrast media. Metrizamide was well tolerated by the neonates with congenital heart disease and its radiopacity was adequate for diagnostic purposes. At the doses administered, metrizamide does not seem to have any great advantage over Renografin 76 for angiocardiography in infants with severe congenital heart disease.

  16. Computed tomography of the brain stem with intrathecal metrizamide. Part 1: the normal brain stem

    SciTech Connect

    Mawad, M.E.; Silver, A.J.; Hilal, S.K.; Ganti, S.R.

    1983-03-01

    Detailed anatomy of the brain stem and cervicomedullary junction can be accurately demonstrated with metrizamide computed tomographic cisternography. Specifically surface anatomy is unusually well outlined. Nine distinct and easily recognizable levels of section are described: four levels in the medulla, three in the pons, and two in the mesencephalon. Surface features of the brain stem, fine details in the floor of the fourth ventricle, cranial nerves, and vascular structures are shown and discussed.

  17. Myelography in the Age of MRI: Why We Do It, and How We Do It

    PubMed Central

    Ozdoba, Christoph; Gralla, Jan; Rieke, Alexander; Binggeli, Ralph; Schroth, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Myelography is a nearly ninety-year-old method that has undergone a steady development from the introduction of water-soluble contrast agents to CT myelography. Since the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging into clinical routine in the mid-1980s, the role of myelography seemed to be constantly less important in spinal diagnostics, but it remains a method that is probably even superior to MRI for special clinical issues. This paper briefly summarizes the historical development of myelography, describes the technique, and discusses current indications like the detection of CSF leaks or cervical root avulsion. PMID:22091378

  18. Impact of myelography on the treatment results for medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, M.

    1984-07-01

    Two series of newly diagnosed patients with medulloblastoma are compared in terms of survival, relapse-free survival, and sites of relapse. Patients in series I were all diagnosed and treated prior to 1974 and did not have the benefit of myelography and CSF cytology for staging. All patients treated after 1974 had myelography and most had CSF cytology studies prior to radiotherapy. In addition, patients in the latter series were all followed with CT scanning. Improved survival and relapse-free survival rates were seen in the series II patients. The better results seen in the series II patients are probably due in part to a combination of adequate staging with radiation doses to the neuraxis based on the staging, close followup with CT scanning, and aggressive re-treatment of relapses.

  19. Use of iohexol for myelography in the horse.

    PubMed

    Maclean, A A; Jeffcott, L B; Lavelle, R B; Friend, S C

    1988-07-01

    The use of iohexol as a contrast agent for myelography is reported in two groups of horses. Group 1 (n = 6) were used only for myelography and to assess the clinical and pathological effects of intrathecal administration of iohexol. A volume of 20 ml at a concentration of 300 or 350 mg iodine/ml gave satisfactory myelographic detail with no serious clinical or neurological side effects. Only a minimal inflammatory response could be demonstrated in cerebrospinal fluid at four and 14 days after injection. At post mortem examination 14 days after myelography there was no evidence of meningitis nor was any other pathological change detected. Group 2 (n = 19) comprised a series of clinical cases of suspected cervical vertebral malformation. The only untoward sequelae recorded involved two horses in which iohexol was diluted with sterile water prior in intrathecal injection. A progressive necrotising meningitis developed in both cases which necessitated euthanasia. It was concluded that the major advantages of iohexol for use in the horse were its diagnostic quality, safety and low cost. PMID:3168989

  20. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and myelography in 18 Doberman pinscher dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Ronaldo C; Parent, Joane; Dobson, Howard; Holmberg, David; Partlow, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Eighteen Doberman pinscher dogs with clinical signs of cervical spondylomyelopathy (wobbler syndrome) underwent cervical myelography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Cervical myelography was performed using iohexol, followed by lateral and ventrodorsal radiographs. Traction myelography was performed using a cervical harness exerting 9 kg of linear traction. MR imaging was performed in sagittal, transverse, and dorsal planes using a 1.5 T magnet with the spine in neutral and traction positions. Three reviewers independently evaluated the myelographic and MR images to determine the most extensive lesion and whether the lesion was static or dynamic. All reviewers agreed with the location of the most extensive lesion on MR images (100%), while the agreement using myelography was 83%. The myelogram and MR imaging findings agreed in the identification of the affected site in 13-16 dogs depending on the reviewer. MR imaging provided additional information on lesion location because it allowed direct examination of the spinal cord diameter and parenchyma. Spinal cord signal changes were seen in 10 dogs. Depending on the reviewer, two to four dogs had their lesions classified as dynamic on myelography but static on MR images. Myelography markedly underscored the severity of the spinal cord compression in two dogs, and failed to identify the cause of the signs in another. The results of this study indicated that, although myelography can identify the location of the lesion in most patients, MR imaging appears to be more accurate in predicting the site, severity, and nature of the spinal cord compression. PMID:17153059

  1. [Risk and value of conventional myelography with reference to the radiation burden of the patient].

    PubMed

    Hentschel, F

    1989-01-01

    To estimate the effective equivalent dosage with reference to the area under examination and the foils employed, fifty patients underwent conventional diagnostic myelography, after which, by means of thermoluminescence surface dosimetry, the mean organ dosage was ascertained from the radiation field size, using a computer program ORDOS. Effective equivalent dosage can be used to determine the inherent risk of radiation injury involved. The risk-benefit ratios obtained would suggest that conventional myelography, prospectively in the form of digital myelography, and spinal computer tomography are not opposing but complementary approaches to spinal diagnosis. Spinal magnetic resonance (MR) merits discussion not from the aspect of exposure to radiation but that of availability. PMID:2704768

  2. Posttraumatic spinal cord cysts: clinical features and characterization with metrizamide computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Quencer, R.M.; Green, B.A.; Eismont, F.J.

    1983-02-01

    Sixteen patients with posttraumatic spinal cord cysts (PTSCC) were evaluated clinically and studied with metrizamide computed tomography (MCT). These patients presented months to years following a severe spinal cord injury, usually with new or progressively worsening neurological symptoms. The development of the PTSCC was unrelated to the location, type, and severity of injury, or to the time interval from the original injury. MCT showed that these cysts occur most frequently in normal or atrophic cords, they may be multiple, they most frequently are found in the dorsal portion of the cord, and they may vary along their length in width and position within the cord. Knowledge of this radiographic morphology is crucial to the surgical planning. The location of the cysts and the mode of their enlargement are correlated with anatomic features of the spinal cord and changes in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics. Cyst-to-subarachnoid space shunting relieves the majority of symptoms.

  3. A prospective comparison of computed tomography and myelography in the diagnosis of herniated lumbar disks

    SciTech Connect

    Haughton, V.M.; Eldevik, O.P.; Magnaes, B.; Amundsen, P.

    1982-01-01

    Although CT effectively demonstrates normal and herniated intervetebral disks, the value of CT in low back pain has not been adequately evaluated. We compared CT prospectively with myelography in 107 patients referred to Ulleval Hospital Department of Radiology for myelography. Fifty-two patients subsequently had spinal explorations, one patient twice during the stud and two patients at two levels. Forty-six CT and 44 myelographic diagnoses agreed perfectly wth the operative diagnosis at that level. In 30 disk herniations, there were 29 true-positive CT diagnoses and 38 true-positive myelographic diagnoses. False-negative diagnoses of herniated nucleus pulposus were made twice on myelography and once on CT. In 24 other spinal operations, there were eight false-positive CT and nine false-positive myelographic diagnoses of herniated nucleus pulposus. CT demonstrates lumbar disk disease as effectively as myelography.

  4. Myelography and cytology in the treatment of medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, M.; Reigel, D.H.

    1981-06-01

    Eight of 22 children with newly diagnosed medulloblastoma had asymptomatic spinal cord involvement detected by myelography. Two additional patients had demonstrable spinal cord lesions at the time of relapse in the posterior fossa. Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) cytology results were inaccurate in predicting cord involvement. Seven patients have relapsed 9 to 69 months from completion of radiotherapy. Three had initial cord involvement and also had subsequent cord involvement at the time of intracranial relapse or afterwards. Frontal lobe involvement as the initial site of relapse occurred in 3 patients. Computerized tomography has been valuable in the early detection of intracranial relapse. Three children are alive and well 10, 18 and 19 months, respectively, from time of relapse. All were retreated with radiotherapy in conjunction with misonidazole and subsequent chemotherapy.

  5. [1st experience with Solutrast, a new contrast medium for myelography].

    PubMed

    Thun, F

    1983-01-01

    Following a brief survey of myelographic results with aqueous contrast media, the article reports on the results obtained in 150 myelographies with the new contrast medium Lopamidol = Solutrast. This substance was found to be very well tolerated, involving low risk, and is suitable for examining the entire vertebral canal. The image quality is faultless. PMID:6823535

  6. Myelography CPT Coding Updates: Effects of 4 New Codes and Unintended Consequences.

    PubMed

    Chokshi, F H; Tu, R K; Nicola, G N; Hirsch, J A

    2016-06-01

    The Current Procedural Terminology of the American Medical Association has recently introduced coding changes for myelography with the introduction of new bundled codes. The aim of this review was to help neuroradiologists understand these code changes and their unintended consequences and to discuss various scenarios in which permutations of various codes could occur in clinical practice. PMID:26744447

  7. Computer-assisted myelography in degenerative abnormalities of the cervical vertebral column.

    PubMed

    van der Tas, C

    1979-01-01

    In 19 patients with symptoms suggestive of a cervicobrachial syndrome due to degernative lesions of the cervical spine, a CT scan was made after intrathecal administration of metrizamide. The images thus obtained supply adequate information on the extent of bone apposition, if any, on the degree of displacement and compression of the spinal cord, and on the condition of the intervertebral foramina. A CT scan is indicated in the case of discrepancy between myelographic findings and clinical diagnosis. In the case of recurrent postoperative symptoms, too, CT scans have proved to supply valuable information. PMID:535511

  8. Digital subtraction myelography for the identification of spontaneous spinal CSF-venous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Schievink, Wouter I; Moser, Franklin G; Maya, M Marcel; Prasad, Ravi S

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE In most patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension, a spinal CSF leak can be found, but occasionally, no leak can be demonstrated despite extensive spinal imaging. Failure to localize a CSF leak limits treatment options. The authors recently reported the discovery of CSF-venous fistulas in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension and now report on the use of digital subtraction myelography in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension but no CSF leak identifiable on conventional spinal imaging (i.e., non-digital subtraction myelography). METHODS The patient population consisted of 53 consecutive patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension who underwent digital subtraction myelography but in whom no spinal CSF leak (i.e., presence of extradural CSF) was identifiable on conventional spinal imaging. RESULTS The mean age of the 33 women and 20 men was 53.4 years (range 29-71 years). A CSF-venous fistula was demonstrated in 10 (19%) of the 53 patients. A CSF-venous fistula was found in 9 (27%) of the 33 women and in 1 (5%) of the 20 men (p = 0.0697). One patient was treated successfully with percutaneous injection of fibrin sealant. Nine patients underwent surgery for the fistula. Surgery resulted in complete resolution of symptoms in 8 patients (follow-up 7-25 months), and in 1 patient, symptoms recurred after 4 months. CONCLUSIONS In this study, the authors found a CSF-venous fistula in approximately one-fifth of the patients with recalcitrant spontaneous intracranial hypotension but no CSF leak identifiable on conventional spinal imaging. The authors suggest that digital subtraction myelography be considered in this patient population. PMID:26849709

  9. Comparison of the predictive value of myelography, computed tomography and MRI on the treadmill test in lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun-Su; Kim, Hak-Sun; Park, Jin-Oh; Shin, Dong-Eun; Ha, Jung-Won; Shim, Dong-Jun; Kwak, Yoon-Hae; Lee, Kwang-Il

    2005-12-31

    To date, there have been no prospective, objective studies comparing the accuracy of the MRI, myelo-CT and myelography. The purpose of this study is to compare the diagnostic and predictive values of MRIs, myelo-CTs, and myelographies. Myelographies with dynamic motion views, myelo-CTs, MRIs and exercise treadmill tests were performed in 35 cases. The narrowest AP diameter of the dural sac was measured by myelography. At the pathologic level, dural cross-sectional area (D-CSA) was calculated in the MRI and Myelo-CT. The time to the first symptoms (TAF) and the total ambulation time (TAT) were measured during the exercise treadmill test and used as the standard in the comparison of correlation between radiographic parameters and walking capacity. The mean D-CSA by CT was 58.3 mm(2) and 47.6 mm(2) by MRI. All radiographic parameters such as AP diameters and D-CSA have no correlation to TAF or TAT (p > 0.05). Our data showed no statistically significant differences in the correlation of the patients' walking capacity to the severity of stenosis as assessed by myelography, myelo-CT and MRI. PMID:16385657

  10. Computerized tomography myelography with coronal and oblique coronal view for diagnosis of nerve root avulsion in brachial plexus injury

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background The authors describe a new computerized tomography (CT) myelography technique with coronal and oblique coronal view to demonstrate the status of the cervical nerve rootlets involved in brachial plexus injury. They discuss the value of this technique for diagnosis of nerve root avulsion compared with CT myelography with axial view. Methods CT myelography was performed with penetration of the cervical subarachnoid space by the contrast medium. Then the coronal and oblique coronal reconstructions were created. The results of CT myelography were evaluated and classified with presence of pseudomeningocele, intradural ventral nerve rootlets, and intradural dorsal nerve rootlets. The diagnosis was by extraspinal surgical exploration with or without spinal evoked potential measurements and choline acetyl transferase activity measurement in 25 patients and recovery by a natural course in 3 patients. Its diagnostic accuracy was compared with that of CT myelography with axial view, correlated with surgical findings or a natural course in 57 cervical roots in 28 patients. Results Coronal and oblique coronal views were superior to axial views in visualization of the rootlets and orientation of the exact level of the root. Sensitivity and specificity for coronal and oblique coronal views of unrecognition of intradural ventral and dorsal nerve root shadow without pseudomeningocele in determining pre-ganglionic injury were 100% and 96%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between coronal and oblique coronal views and axial views. Conclusion The information by the coronal and oblique coronal slice CT myelography enabled the authors to assess the rootlets of the brachial plexus and provided valuable data for helping to decide whether to proceed with exploration, nerve repair, primary reconstruction. PMID:17651476

  11. CT myelography of the thoraco-lumbar spine in 8 dogs with degenerative myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeryl C; Inzana, Karen D; Rossmeisl, John H; Bergman, Robert L; Wells, Tana; Butler, Katherine

    2005-12-01

    CT myelography of the T11-L2 region was performed in 8 large-breed dogs with a clinical diagnosis of degenerative myelopathy (DM) and 3 large-breed dogs that were clinically normal. CT myelographic characteristics were recorded for each dog, at each disc level. Area measurements of the spinal cord, dural sac, vertebral canal, and vertebral body were recorded at 4 slice locations for each disc level. Mean area ratios were calculated and graphically compared, by slice location and group. In all dogs, CT myelography identified morphologic abnormalities that were not suspected from conventional myelograms. Characteristics observed with higher frequency in DM versus normal dogs were: spinal stenosis, disc protrusion, focal attenuation of the subarachnoid space, spinal cord deformity, small spinal cord, and paraspinal muscle atrophy. Mean spinal cord:dural sac, spinal cord:vertebral canal, dural sac: vertebral canal, and vertebral canal:vertebral body ratios were smaller in DM versus normal dogs at more than one disc level. Some CT myelographic characteristics in DM dogs were similar to those previously reported in humans, dogs and horses with stenotic myelopathy. PMID:16293999

  12. A Case of Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension: The Role of Dynamic CT Myelography and Epidural Blood Patch in Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Yogesh; Hooda, Kusum; Li, Shuo; Karol, Ian; Muro, Gerard J

    2015-10-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) most commonly results from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks in the upper spinal canal. Alterations in the equilibrium between the volumes of intracranial blood and CSF lead to compensatory dilatation of the vascular spaces, mostly on the venous side. Dynamic computerized tomogram (CT) myelography can be very helpful in diagnosing the site of a CSF leak in the spinal canal. Subsequently, the site of the leak can be sealed with epidural blood patch (EBP). PMID:26630707

  13. Additional Merits of Two-dimensional Single Thick-slice Magnetic Resonance Myelography in Spinal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Abhishek; Azad, Rajiv; Ahmad, Armeen; Arora, Pankaj; Gupta, Puneet

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To validate the additional merits of two-dimensional (2D) single thick-slice Magnetic Resonance Myelography (MRM) in spinal imaging. Materials and Methods: 2D single thick-slice MRM was performed using T2 half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequence in addition to routine Magnetic resonance (MR) sequences for spine in 220 patients. The images were evaluated for additional diagnostic information in spinal and extra-spinal regions. A three-point grading system was adopted depending upon the utility of MRM in contributing to the detection of spinal or extra-spinal findings. Grade 1 represented no contribution of MRM while grade 3 would indicate that it was essential to detection of findings. Results: Utility of MRM in spine was categorized as grade 3 in 10.9% cases (24/220), grade 2 in 21.8% (48/220) cases and grade 1 in 67.3% cases (148/220). Thus, the overall additional merit of MRM in spine was seen in 32.7% (72/220) of cases. Besides in 14.1% cases (31/220) extra-spinal pathologies were identified. Conclusion: 2D single thick-slice MRM could have additional merits in spinal imaging when used as an adjunct to routine MR sequences. PMID:23393640

  14. Pedicle Morphometry for Thoracic Screw Fixation in Ethnic Koreans : Radiological Assessment Using Computed Tomographic Myelography

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yong Soo; Yi, Hyeong-Joong; Kim, Young-Joon

    2009-01-01

    Objective In the thoracic spine, insertion of a pedicle screw is annoying due to small pedicle size and wide morphological variation between different levels of the spine and between individuals. The aim of our study was to analyze radiologic parameters of the pedicle morphometry from T1 to T8 using computed tomographic myelography (CTM) in Korean population. Methods For evaluation of the thoracic pedicle morphometry, the authors prospectively analyzed a consecutive series of 26 patients with stable thoracic spines. With the consent of patients, thoracic CTM were performed, from T1 to T8. We calculated the transverse outer diameters and the transverse angles of the pedicle, distance from the cord to the inner cortical wall of the pedicle, and distance from the cord to the dura. Results Transverse outer pedicle diameter was widest at T1 (7.66 ± 2.14 mm) and narrowest at T4 (4.38 ± 1.55 mm). Transverse pedicle angle was widest at T1 (30.2 ± 12.0°) and it became less than 9.0° below T6 level. Theoretical safety zone of the medial perforation of the pedicle screw, namely, distance from the cord to inner cortical wall of the pedicle was more than 4.5 mm. Conclusion Based on this study, we suggest that the current pedicle screw system is not always suitable for Korean patients. Computed tomography is required before performing a transpedicular screw fixation at the thoracic levels. PMID:19893719

  15. [Myelography, CT scan, electromyography and neurologic examination in the diagnosis of herniated lumbar disk].

    PubMed

    Kristek, B; Dicić, M; Vranković, D; Kurbel, S

    1995-01-01

    The research was carried out at the Clinical Hospital Osijek during a three-year period. Sixty-nine patients (34 men and 35 women) with the diagnosis of lumbar slipped disc who underwent surgery were followed up. The main inclusion criterion was the surgical finding of hernia. The aim of the study was to obtain a clearer insight into the values of the myelography and CT scan by observing a sufficiently large number of patients with surgically verified hernia of lumbar disc. The characteristics of neurological and EMG findings were surveyed, as well. Thirty-one patients were at the age of 40-49 years and 21 were at 30-39 years of age. Only 5 hernias were at the level L3L4, 28 at the level L4L5, and 46 at the level L5S1. Sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of the observed parameters were estimated for 41 leftwards and 30 rightwards located hernias. Myelographic finding, regardless of the observed level of slipped disc, showed excellent sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of diagnosis. CT finding was slightly less sensitive at the level L4L5, it was 0.93, and specific at the level L5S1, amounting to 0.90. Its accuracy was not substantially lower than that of myelography. The pathological EMG was 0.88 sensitive, 0.83 specific and 0.84 accurate. The accuracy was excellent at the level L3L4, it was 0.96, but only very good at the level L5S1, amounting to 0.76. A t-test of linked pairs was used to compare surgical reports and diagnostic findings. There was a great similarity between a CT finding and surgical one in all three levels (t-values 1.00, 0.21 and 0.36). Myeolography was more congruent with the surgical finding in the middle level (t-values 1.65, 0.93 and 1.52). An EMG finding was significantly different from that found by surgery (t-values 1.71, 1.76 and 2.71). The existence of Lasègue's sign for the diagnosis of hernia was 0.93 sensitive, 0.07 specific (remarkably low) and 0.36 accurate. It was particularly inaccurate at the level L3L4, moderately

  16. MR and CT image fusion of the cervical spine: a noninvasive alternative to CT-myelography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Mirza, Sohail K.; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.; Heagerty, Patrick J.; Haynor, David R.

    2005-04-01

    CT-Myelography (CTM) is routinely used for planning surgery for degenerative disease of the spine, but its invasive nature, significant potential morbidity, and high costs make a noninvasive substitute desirable. We report our work on evaluating CT and MR image fusion as an alternative to CTM. Because the spine is only piecewise rigid, a multi-rigid approach to the registration of spinal CT and MR images was developed (SPIE 2004), in which the spine on CT images is first segmented into separate vertebrae, each of which is then rigidly registered with the corresponding vertebra on MR images. The results are then blended to obtain fusion images. Since they contain information from both modalities, we hypothesized that fusion images would be equivalent to CTM. To test this we selected 34 patients who had undergone MRI and CTM for degenerative disease of the cervical spine, and used the multi-rigid approach to produce fused images. A clinical vignette for each patient was created and presented along with either CT/MR fusion images or CTM images. A group of spine surgeons are asked to formulate detailed surgical plans based on each set of images, and the surgical plans are compared. A similar study assessing diagnostic agreement is being performed with neuroradiologists, who also assess the accuracy of registration. Our work to date has demonstrated the feasibility of segmentation and multi-rigid fusion in clinical cases and the acceptability of the questionnaire to physicians. Preliminary analysis of one surgeon's and one neuroradiologist"s evaluation has been performed.

  17. Thoracolumbar intradural disc herniation in eight dogs: clinical, low-field magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomographic myelography findings.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shinji; Doi, Shoko; Tamura, Yumiko; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Enomoto, Hirokazu; Ozawa, Tsuyoshi; Uchida, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Intradural disc herniation is a rarely reported cause of neurologic deficits in dogs and few published studies have described comparative imaging characteristics. The purpose of this retrospective cross sectional study was to describe clinical and imaging findings in a group of dogs with confirmed thoracolumbar intradural disc herniation. Included dogs were referred to one of four clinics, had acute mono/paraparesis or paraplegia, had low field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or computed tomographic myelography, and were diagnosed with thoracolumbar intradural disc herniation during surgery. Eight dogs met inclusion criteria. The prevalence of thoracolumbar intradural disc herniation amongst the total population of dogs that developed a thoracolumbar intervertebral disc herniation and that were treated with a surgical procedure was 0.5%. Five dogs were examined using low-field MRI. Lesions that were suspected to be intervertebral disc herniations were observed; however, there were no specific findings indicating that the nucleus pulposus had penetrated into the subarachnoid space or into the spinal cord parenchyma. Thus, the dogs were misdiagnosed as having a conventional intervertebral disc herniation. An intradural extramedullary disc herniation (three cases) or intramedullary disc herniation (two cases) was confirmed during surgery. By using computed tomographic myelography (CTM) for the remaining three dogs, an intradural extramedullary mass surrounded by an accumulation of contrast medium was observed and confirmed during surgery. Findings from this small sample of eight dogs indicated that CTM may be more sensitive for diagnosing canine thoracolumbar intradural disc herniation than low-field MRI. PMID:25263808

  18. Supine Digital Subtraction Myelography for the Demonstration of a Dorsal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak in a Patient with Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension: A Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Carstensen, Michael; Chaudhary, Navjot; Leung, Andrew; Ng, Wai

    2012-01-01

    A patient with spontaneous intracranial hypotension due to a spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak required localization of the leakage site prior to surgical management. Conventional, computed tomography and prone digital subtraction myelography failed to localize the dural tear, which was postulated to be dorsally located. We present here a digital subtraction myelographic approach to accurately localize a dorsal site of CSF leakage by injecting iodinated contrast via a lumbar drain with the patient in the supine position. PMID:23378882

  19. Role of screening of whole spine with sagittal MRI with MR myelography in early detection and management of occult intrasacral meningocele

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Rajiv; Azad, Sheenam; Shukla, Ashish K.; Arora, Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the role of screening of the whole spine by sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) along with MR myelography in early detection and management of occult intrasacral meningocele. Materials and Methods: A prospective and retrospective analysis of MRI and MR myelography studies of the whole spine over a period of one year was performed. Results: Thirty cases with sacral meningeal cysts were seen. On MRI, six patients (three males, three females) fulfilled the criterion of occult intrasacral meningocele. These patients showed a cyst of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) signal intensity in the sacral canal below the dural sac. This cyst communicated with the thecal sac through a narrow pedicle. Fat signal intensity in the filum terminale and occult sacral dysraphism in the form of an absent or hypoplastic neural arch was observed in all the patients. Low-lying conus medullaris with thick filum terminale was seen in five of these six patients. Excision of the cyst with the release of filum was performed in two patients with a favorable outcome. Conclusion: Screening MRI with MR myelography of the whole spine may play a role in the early detection and management of occult intrasacral meningocele. The commonly associated thick filum terminale and low-lying conus medullaris may be missed otherwise that may lead to a progression of symptoms. PMID:24551000

  20. Lumbar puncture-related cerebrospinal fluid leakage on magnetic resonance myelography: is it a clinically significant finding?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) due to excessive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage is a well-known complication of lumbar puncture. Although various factors, especially the type of spinal needle, have been demonstrated to be associated with PDPH, the clinical implications of CSF leakage detected on magnetic resonance myelography (MRM) images remain unclear. The objective of this case–control study was to evaluate the association between radiologically visualized CSF leakage and PDPH. Methods Clinical data including patients’ age and gender, types of spinal needle, duration of bed rest, interval between lumbar puncture procedures and MRM studies, and incidence of PDPH were compared between patients who were radiologically-positive and -negative for CSF leakage. Results Of the 22 patients with definite CSF leakage on MRM images, most were asymptomatic (86%, 19/22). The remaining three patients, who were suffering from PDPH, only complained of headaches and were treated conservatively. In a review of patients’ clinical data, there were no significant differences in any parameter including the incidence of PDPH between the 22 patients who were radiologically-positive for CSF leakage and the 31 radiologically-negative patients. Conclusion The significance of radiologically visualized CSF leakage should not be overestimated, as most such incidents are not associated with PDPH and do not require any treatment. PMID:24160550

  1. Comparative studies on the lysosomal association of monomeric /sup 239/Pu and /sup 241/Am in rat and Chinese hamster liver: analysis with sucrose, metrizamide, and Percoll density gradients of subcellular binding as dependent on time

    SciTech Connect

    Suetterlin, U.; Thies, W.G.; Haffner, H.; Seidel, A.

    1984-05-01

    The binding of /sup 239/Pu and /sup 241/Am in the livers of Chinese hamsters and rats was analyzed by centrifugation of a mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction in sucrose, metrizamide, and Percoll density gradients at intervals between 4 and 70 days after nuclide injection. The behavior of /sup 239/Pu and /sup 241/Am during the centrifugation experiments was very similar. In contrast to the results for rats, the median densities of the nuclide fraction liberated by addition of Triton X-100, and the nuclide profiles do not respond typically to Triton WR 1339 treatment of the animals. It was concluded from the results that the major fraction of /sup 239/Pu and /sup 241/Am remained bound to typical lysosomes in rat liver, whereas those in hamster liver may be transformed into telolysosomes. Possibly, a vesicular biliary transport system for certain heavy metals, for which evidence exists in rat liver, does not occur in Chinese hamster liver.

  2. New Diagnostic Tool for Far Lateral Lumbar Disc Herniation : The Clinical Usefulness of 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Myelography Comparing with the Discography CT

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-Gyu; Park, Jung-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Objective To prospectively assess the diagnostic and clinical value of a new technique (3-tesla magnetic resonance myelography, 3T MRM) as compared to computed tomographic discography (disco-CT) in patients with far lateral disc herniation. Methods We evaluated 3T MRM and disco-CT of 25 patients, whom we suspected of suffering from far lateral disc herniation. Using an assessment scale, 4 observers examined independently both 3T MRM and disco-CT images. We analyzed observer agreement and the accentuation of each image. Results We found complete matching, and observer agreement, between high resolution images of 3T MRM and disco-CT for diagnosing far lateral disc herniation. Conclusion We think noninvasive 3T MRM is an appropriate diagnostic tool for far lateral disc herniation as compared to disco-CT. PMID:23091667

  3. Diagnosis of sacral perineural cysts by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Tabas, J H; Deeb, Z L

    1986-07-01

    Three cases of sacral perineural cysts associated with chronic low-back pain are described with their myelography, computed tomography, and plain film findings. Significant findings include multiple cystic dilatations of lumbosacral nerve root sheaths, enlargement of the sacral foramina by masses isodense with cerebrospinal fluid, and asymmetric epidural fat distribution. Recognition of these findings on unenhanced computed tomography scans should preclude further evaluation by myelography and intrathecal metrizamide (Amipaque) computed tomography. These cysts are usually not the primary cause of back and leg pain. PMID:2942338

  4. Asystole associated with iohexol myelography in a dog.

    PubMed

    Carroll, G L; Keene, B W; Forrest, L J

    1997-01-01

    This is a report of a 10-year-old female neutered Doberman Pinscher with a clinical diagnosis of myelopathy. The dog was anesthetized using oxymorphone, thiopental, and halothane in oxygen for a cerebrospinal tap and a myelogram. Iohexal injection into the subarachnoid space by lumbar puncture was uneventful. Additional iohexal was given into the cerebeliomedullary cistern. Immediately following iohexal administration into the cerebellomedullary cistern, several electrocardiographic changes occurred. Two extended periods of asystole responded to intravenous glycopyrrolate administration. A slow multiform ventricular escape rhythm was established after the second dose of glycopyrrolate. Ultimately, atrial activity with apparent AV dissociation resumed, atrial fibrillation developed, and the rhythm converted to normal sinus rhythm. The dog had a normal cardiac examination the following day. Two days later, the dog was anesthetized using a similar anesthetic regimen with maintenance on isoflurane in oxygen for a hemilaminectomy. The dog recovered uneventfully from surgery and was discharged 2 days later. PMID:9262685

  5. [A myelographic study of idiopathic scoliosis--with special reference to its clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Isobe, K

    1988-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the concealed anomaly of the spinal cord in the so-called idiopathic scoliosis. Thirty-three patients with idiopathic scoliotic curvatures underwent metrizamide myelography before surgery from 1979 through 1985. Spinal cord anomalies were found in 8 of the 33 patients (abnormal group). They were 3 patients with Arnold-Chiari malformation with syringomyelia, 3 with syringomyelia and 2 with "narrowed dural tube". The remaining 25 patients (normal group) gave us the standard values for myelographic measurements with which we compared quantitatively the size of dural tube and spinal cord in the normal and abnormal groups. The abnormal group was classified into three types: type I was swollen spinal cord with normal dural tube; type II was swollen spinal cord with narrowed dural tube; and type III was normal spinal cord with narrowed dural tube. In conclusion myelography and myelographic measurements are essential for idiopathic scoliotic patients who will undergo spinal correction and fusion operations. PMID:3404008

  6. Crackle template based metallic mesh with highly homogeneous light transmission for high-performance transparent EMI shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yu; Lin, Jie; Liu, Yuxuan; Fu, Hao; Ma, Yuan; Jin, Peng; Tan, Jiubin

    2016-05-01

    Our daily electromagnetic environment is becoming increasingly complex with the rapid development of consumer electronics and wireless communication technologies, which in turn necessitates the development of electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding, especially for transparent components. We engineered a transparent EMI shielding film with crack-template based metallic mesh (CT-MM) that shows highly homogeneous light transmission and strong microwave shielding efficacy. The CT-MM film is fabricated using a cost-effective lift-off method based on a crackle template. It achieves a shielding effectiveness of ~26 dB, optical transmittance of ~91% and negligible impact on optical imaging performance. Moreover, high–quality CT-MM film is demonstrated on a large–calibre spherical surface. These excellent properties of CT-MM film, together with its advantages of facile large-area fabrication and scalability in processing on multi-shaped substrates, make CT-MM a powerful technology for transparent EMI shielding in practical applications.

  7. The effect of clinical bias on the interpretation of myelography and spinal computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Eldevik, O.P.; Dugstad, G.; Orrison, W.W.; Haughton, V.M.

    1982-10-01

    Spinal computed tomograms and myelograms of 107 patients with sciatica or low back pain were interpreted with and without knowledge of clinical history. A significant number of interpretations was changed by knowledge of the clinical history. More studies were interpreted correctly without the clinical history than with it. Knowledge of the clinical history increased the number of false-positive and decreased the number of false-negative diagnoses. This study suggest a tendency of observers to interpret questionable myelographic or computed tomograhic findings as positive when they correlate with clinical findings.

  8. [Spinal multiple sclerosis mimicking a spinal cord tumor: a case report].

    PubMed

    Maezawa, H; Takano, M; Nagai, S; Iida, H; Tachibana, S

    1995-11-01

    Since the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to visualize lesions of multiple sclerosis has become easy to do. However, in some cases with primary spinal cord multiple sclerosis, it is not always easy to obtain a diagnosis in the first instance. We reported a case of primary spinal multiple sclerosis diagnosed through histological examination of a surgical specimen taken by an open biopsy. A 35-year-old woman was admitted with complaints of two-months duration of progressive weakness and sensory disturbance in the legs and buttocks. On radiological examinations including metrizamide CT myelography and MRI, enlargement of the conus medullaris was the only positive finding. Respective to her clinical course, intramedullary spinal cord tumor could not be ruled out, so an open biopsy was performed. Histological examination revealed that the cord lesion was acute demyelination with perivascular inflammation. Her neurological signs were almost completely cured with administration of corticosteroid, though new brainstem signs took place two months later and then a concrete diagnosis of her having multiple sclerosis was finally achieved. Since preoperative examinations can not differentiate spinal cord tumor from any other intramedullary cord lesions such as demyelinating foci of multiple sclerosis, surgical intervention would be approved in such atypical primary spinal cord multiple sclerosis. PMID:7477708

  9. New understanding of dorsal dysraphism with lipoma (lipomyeloschisis): radiologic evaluation and surgical correction

    SciTech Connect

    Naidich, T.P.; McLone, D.G.; Mutluer, S.

    1983-06-01

    The spinal anomaly designated dorsal dysraphism with lipoma (lipomyeloschisis) consists of skin-covered, focal spina bifida; focal partial clefting of the dorsal half of the spinal cord; continuity of the dorsal cleft with the central canal of the cord above (and occasionally below) the cleft; deficiency of the dura underlying the spina bifida; deep extension of subcutaneous lipoma through the spina bifida and the dural deficiency to insert directly into the cleft on the dorsal half of the cord; variable cephalic extension of lipoma into the contiguous central canal of the cord; and variable ballooning of the subarachnoid space to form an associated meningocele. The variable individual expressions of the anomaly are best understood by reference to their archetypal concept. Careful analysis of radiographic and surgical findings in human lipomyeloschisis and correlation with an animal model of lipomyeloschisis indicate that plain spine radiographs and high-resolution metrizamide computed tomographic myelography successfully delineate the precise anatomic derangements associated with lipomyeloschisis and provide the proper basis for planning surgical therapy of this condition.

  10. [Postoperative lumbar extradural arachnoid cyst. Report of two cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Uchibori, M; Kinuta, Y; Koyama, T

    1984-04-01

    Two cases of postoperative extradural arachnoid cyst in the lumbar region were reported. The symptoms such as lumbago, sciatica and paresis of foot which were perfectly cured at discharge relapsed after several months of daily business. The two patients were readmitted and reexamined by myelography and computer assisted tomography. In the two patients a cystic pooling of metrizamide having a connection with the subarachnoid space was noted in the same way. At the second operation a small dural tear and an extradural arachnoid cyst were recognized similarly. Burres and coworkers reported that an extradural arachnoid cyst would easily grow through a small dural defect in the lumbar region, because the hydrostatic pressure is higher than that of the cervical level. Our two cases might well coincident with their theory. In consequence of the experience of the two postoperative extradural arachnoid cyst, we give emphasis that even though the dural tear would be small, especially in the lumbar region, it should not be overlooked and be closed carefully with fine sutures. PMID:6235458

  11. Atlanto-axial approach for cervical myelography in a Thoroughbred horse with complete fusion of the atlanto-occipital bones.

    PubMed

    Aleman, Monica; Dimock, Abigail N; Wisner, Erik R; Prutton, Jamie W; Madigan, John E

    2014-11-01

    A 2-year-old Thoroughbred gelding with clinical signs localized to the first 6 spinal cord segments (C1 to C6) had complete fusion of the atlanto-occipital bones which precluded performing a routine myelogram. An ultrasound-assisted myelogram at the intervertebral space between the atlas and axis was successfully done and identified a marked extradural compressive myelopathy at the level of the atlas and axis, and axis and third cervical vertebrae. PMID:25392550

  12. Atlanto-axial approach for cervical myelography in a Thoroughbred horse with complete fusion of the atlanto-occipital bones

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Monica; Dimock, Abigail N.; Wisner, Erik R.; Prutton, Jamie W.; Madigan, John E.

    2014-01-01

    A 2-year-old Thoroughbred gelding with clinical signs localized to the first 6 spinal cord segments (C1 to C6) had complete fusion of the atlanto-occipital bones which precluded performing a routine myelogram. An ultrasound-assisted myelogram at the intervertebral space between the atlas and axis was successfully done and identified a marked extradural compressive myelopathy at the level of the atlas and axis, and axis and third cervical vertebrae. PMID:25392550

  13. Case Series: Long segment extra-arachnoid fluid collections: Role of dynamic CT myelography in diagnosis and treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    Ellika, Shehanaz; Marin, Horia; Pace, Mitchell; Newman, Daniel; Abdulhak, Muwaffak; Kole, Maximilian

    2012-01-01

    We report five patients in whom spinal MRI revealed extra-arachnoid fluid collections. These spinal fluid collections most likely resulted from accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from a dural leak. The patients presented with either compressive myelopathy due to the cyst or superficial siderosis (SS). All of these fluid collections were long segment, and MRI demonstrated the fluid collections but not the exact site of leak. Dynamic CT myelogram demonstrated the site of leak and helped in the management of these complicated cases. Moreover, we also found that the epicenter of the fluid collection on MRI was different from the location of the leak on a dynamic CT myelogram. Knowledge of these associations can be helpful when selecting the imaging studies to facilitate diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23162252

  14. Crackle template based metallic mesh with highly homogeneous light transmission for high-performance transparent EMI shielding

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yu; Lin, Jie; Liu, Yuxuan; Fu, Hao; Ma, Yuan; Jin, Peng; Tan, Jiubin

    2016-01-01

    Our daily electromagnetic environment is becoming increasingly complex with the rapid development of consumer electronics and wireless communication technologies, which in turn necessitates the development of electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding, especially for transparent components. We engineered a transparent EMI shielding film with crack-template based metallic mesh (CT-MM) that shows highly homogeneous light transmission and strong microwave shielding efficacy. The CT-MM film is fabricated using a cost-effective lift-off method based on a crackle template. It achieves a shielding effectiveness of ~26 dB, optical transmittance of ~91% and negligible impact on optical imaging performance. Moreover, high–quality CT-MM film is demonstrated on a large–calibre spherical surface. These excellent properties of CT-MM film, together with its advantages of facile large-area fabrication and scalability in processing on multi-shaped substrates, make CT-MM a powerful technology for transparent EMI shielding in practical applications. PMID:27151578

  15. Crackle template based metallic mesh with highly homogeneous light transmission for high-performance transparent EMI shielding.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu; Lin, Jie; Liu, Yuxuan; Fu, Hao; Ma, Yuan; Jin, Peng; Tan, Jiubin

    2016-01-01

    Our daily electromagnetic environment is becoming increasingly complex with the rapid development of consumer electronics and wireless communication technologies, which in turn necessitates the development of electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding, especially for transparent components. We engineered a transparent EMI shielding film with crack-template based metallic mesh (CT-MM) that shows highly homogeneous light transmission and strong microwave shielding efficacy. The CT-MM film is fabricated using a cost-effective lift-off method based on a crackle template. It achieves a shielding effectiveness of ~26 dB, optical transmittance of ~91% and negligible impact on optical imaging performance. Moreover, high-quality CT-MM film is demonstrated on a large-calibre spherical surface. These excellent properties of CT-MM film, together with its advantages of facile large-area fabrication and scalability in processing on multi-shaped substrates, make CT-MM a powerful technology for transparent EMI shielding in practical applications. PMID:27151578

  16. Routine radiographic assessment of the scoliotic spine.

    PubMed

    Farren, J

    1981-04-01

    This paper is designed to give a brief account of the radiographic criteria necessary in order to demonstrate and evaluate the scoliotic spine. However, additional specialised radiographic examinations, including myelography, angiography, laminography and intravenous urography are occasionally necessary. PMID:7280196

  17. Primary empty sella syndrome with panhypopituitarism in a child.

    PubMed

    Dawod, S T; Isseh, N M; Kalantar, S M; Jorulf, H K; Ajlouni, K M

    1984-12-01

    A 10-year-old boy presented with marked growth retardation. He was found to have an empty sella demonstrated by CT and Metrizamide cisternography. Endocrinological investigation confirmed the diagnosis of panhypopituitarism. This is the first case reported in a twin and the fifth pediatric case with marked endocrine dysfunction reported in the literature. PMID:6543857

  18. Preparation of a low-density species of endocytic vesicle containing immunoglobulin A.

    PubMed Central

    Mullock, B M; Luzio, J P; Hinton, R H

    1983-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A is transported across hepatocytes in specialized vesicles. A population of endocytic vesicles of approx. 140 nm diameter, containing immunoglobulin A, has now been separated from all other major cytoplasmic organelles, including plasma membrane and lysosomes, by sequential centrifugation on Ficoll/sucrose and Metrizamide gradients. Images Fig. 2. PMID:6626159

  19. MRI of the cervical spine with neck extension: is it useful?

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, R J V; Hill, C A Rowland; Rigby, A S; Chandrasekaran, S; Narayanamurthy, H

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Standard MRI of the cervical spine is performed in a different anatomical position to that utilised for traditional contrast myelography. Those well practised in myelography are familiar with the considerable changes in configuration of the bony and soft tissues of the cervical spine that may occur with changes in the degree of neck flexion and extension. We set out to compare the findings in a select group of patients with myeloradiculopathy who had undergone myelography and MRI in both standard and neck-extended positions. These findings were correlated with the clinical status. Methods 29 patients underwent myelography with CT (CTM) and MRI in neutral and neck-extended positions. The imaging was assessed for the degree of cord compression and neural foraminal narrowing, quantified using a simple grading scheme suitable for routine clinical practice. The degree of neck extension was assessed using an angular measurement. Results For both CTM and MRI, scanning with the neck extended significantly increases the severity of cord compression compared with the standard supine position, to a degree similar to that shown during conventional prone myelography. The degree of perceived cord compression is related to the degree of neck extension achieved. Correlation of standard MRI findings and the clinical level of radiculopathy is poor. This correlation improves when the neck is extended. Conclusions The most appropriate position for routine MRI of the cervical spine in degenerative disease remains unknown, but in selected patients imaging with the neck extended may provide important additional information. PMID:22215879

  20. Ventriculography and cisternography with water-soluble contrast media in infants with myelomeningocele

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.; Nakamura, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tajima, M.; Kageyama, N.

    1982-04-01

    Fifty-four newborn infants with myelomeningocele and hydrocephalus were studied by ventriculography using water-soluble contrast media; 20 were also studied by metrizamide myeloencephalography and computerized tomographic (CT) cisternography. Ventriculography suggested that the aqueduct was patent in all cases. Outflow of contrast medium from the fourth ventricle was slow in most cases, complete obstruction was seen in 15%, communication was delayed at the outlet in 54%, and rather free communication was observedin 31%. Metrizamide myeloencephalography and CT cisternography suggested a partial block at the level of the ambient cisterns in approximately one-third of infants. These findings support the concept that flow of cerebrospinal fluid is reduced in several areas. Aqueductal stenosis was not considered an important factor in hydrocephalus, while the most important site of obstruction was felt to be the lowest portion of the fourth ventricle.

  1. Computed tomography of the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Bentson, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this chapter is to review the most pertinent articles published during the past year on the subject of computed tomography of the central nervous system. The chapter contains sections on pediatric computed tomography, and on the diagnostic use of CT in white matter disease, in infectious disease, for intracranial aneurysms, trauma, and intracranial tumors. Metrizamide flow studies and contrast enhancement are also examined. (KRM)

  2. Treatment of leptomeningeal dissemination of medulloblastoma. Report of a case with a long-term survival.

    PubMed

    Stevering, C J; Gabreëls, F J; Lippens, R J; Renier, W O; Thijssen, H O; ter Laak, H J

    1985-01-01

    A case report is presented of a boy suffering from medulloblastoma with grade IV spinal cord involvement and a survival of almost 3 years after the occurrence of spinal metastases. A review is given of the literature, with special attention to diagnostic procedures (CSF determinations, myelography) and therapeutic regimens. PMID:4092411

  3. Introduction to neuroimaging

    SciTech Connect

    Orrison, W.W.

    1989-01-01

    The author focuses on neuroradiology with emphasis on the current imaging modalities. There are chapters on angiography, myelography, nuclear medicine, ultrasonography, computer tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The other chapters are dedicated to the spine, skull, head and neck, and pediatric neuroimaging.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium-DTPA enhancement in the differentiation of benign from neoplastic cord cavitation.

    PubMed

    Clarke, C E; Hawnaur, J; Prvulovich, E; Yuill, G M; Bannister, C M

    1990-03-01

    A patient with an extensive spinal cord glioma is presented. The lumbar mass and cervical cavity associated with the tumour were demonstrated by myelography and computed tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging provided greater detail than these conventional imaging modalities without exposure to ionising radiation and was of considerable additional value in the planning of surgery. PMID:2323169

  5. Spinal perineurial and meningeal cysts.

    PubMed

    Tarlov, I M

    1970-12-01

    Perineurial cysts may be responsible for clinical symptoms and a cure effected by their removal. They do not fill on initial myelography but may fill with Pantopaque some time, days or weeks, after Pantopaque has been instilled into the subarachnoid space. Perineurial cysts arise at the site of the posterior root ganglion. The cyst wall is composed of neural tissue. When initial myelography fails to reveal an adequate cause for the patient's symptoms and signs referable to the caudal nerve roots, then about a millilitre of Pantopaque should be left in the canal for delayed myelography which may later reveal a sacral perineurial cyst or, occasionally, a meningeal cyst. Meningeal diverticula occur proximal to the posterior root ganglia and usually fill on initial myelography. They are in free communication with the subarachnoid space and are rarely in my experience responsible for clinical symptoms. Meningeal diverticula and meningeal cysts appear to represent a continuum. Pantopaque left in the subarachnoid space may convert a meningeal diverticulum into an expanding symptomatic meningeal cyst, as in the case described. Many cases described as perineurial cysts represent abnormally long arachnoidal prolongations over nerve roots or meningeal diverticula. In general, neither of the latter is of pathological significance. Perineurial, like meningeal cysts and diverticula, may be asymptomatic. They should be operated upon only if they produce progressive or disabling symptoms or signs clearly attributable to them. When myelography must be done, and this should be done only as a preliminary to a probable necessary operation, then patient effort should be made to remove the Pantopaque. PMID:5531903

  6. A bandpass filter for the enhancement of an X-ray reconstruction of the tissue in the spinal canal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, I. S.; Glenn, W. V.; Kwoh, Y. S.; Truong, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    In this communication, a new bandpass reconstruction filter is developed to partially remove the low spatial frequencies of the bone and the soft tissue in an X-ray reconstruction of a lumbar spine. This partial removal of the low frequencies suppresses the bony vertebral body and the soft tissue components within the projections of actual clinical data. It also has the effect of enhancing the sharp edges of the fatty tissue surrounding the spinal cord region. The intent of this effort is to directly visualize the spinal cord without the need for water-soluble contrast (e.g., metrizamide) to be installed through lumbar punctures.

  7. Computed tomography of the medulla

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1982-10-01

    The medulla was studied in cadavers and in 100 patients both with and without the intrathecal administration of contrast material. The computed tomographic (CT) anatomy was correlated with the appearance on anatomic dissections. The pyramids, olives, and inferior cerebellar peduncles produced characteristic contours on cross sections of the medulla. The hypoglossal nerve by its location and course in the medullary cistern could be distinguished from the glossopharyngeal, vagal, and spinal accessory nerves. For optimal evaluation of the medulla, intrathecal administration of metrizamide and 5- and/or 1.5-mm-thick axial and coronal sections are recommended.

  8. Observation of a secondary compressive lesion after treatment of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy in a dog.

    PubMed

    Wilson, E R; Aron, D N; Roberts, R E

    1994-11-01

    In a 7-year-old Doberman Pinscher with an atactic gait, neurologic examination revealed tetraparesis, conscious proprioceptive deficits, and rigid ventral flexion of the neck. Radiography and myelography revealed a ventral, extradural, dynamic compressive lesion between C6 and C7. Distraction decompression was performed, using cancellous bone screws and methylmethacrylate. After initial improvement, clinical signs recurred 2 weeks after surgery and progressed until the dog was euthanatized 6 weeks after surgery. Postmortem myelography revealed an extradural compressive lesion adjacent to the implant, between C5 and C6. Secondary compressive lesions induced by surgical or biomechanical alterations of the cervical portion of the spine may be complications of treatment of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy. PMID:7698941

  9. [Computed tomography in space-occupying intraspinal processes].

    PubMed

    Prömper, C; Friedmann, G

    1983-02-01

    Spinal computed tomography has considerably enhanced differential diagnostic safety in the course of the past two years. It has disclosed new possibilities of indication in the diagnosis of the vertebral column. With the expected improvement in apparatus technology, computed tomography will increasingly replace invasive examination methods. Detailed knowledge of clinical data, classification of the neurological findings, and localisation of the height--as far as possible--are the necessary prerequisites of successful diagnosis. If they are absent, it is recommended to perform myelography followed by secondary CT-myelography. If these preliminary conditions are observed, spinal CT can make outstanding contributions to the diagnosis of slipped disk, of the constricted vertebral canal, as well as tumours, malformations and posttraumatic conditions, postoperative changes and inflammatory processes. PMID:6338578

  10. Management of acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wagner, F C

    1977-06-01

    Based on the experience with 58 patients with acute spinal cord injuries, a system for rapidly evaluating such patients has been developed. With the knowledge that has been acquired clinically and experimentally of spinal cord injury and with the information provided by laminography and by either air or Pantopaque myelography, a reasonably certain diagnosis of the type of spinal cord injury may be made. Treatment designed to restore neurological function may then be instituted promptly. PMID:882906

  11. Cervical fibrotic stenosis in a young Rottweiler.

    PubMed

    Baum, F; de Lahunta, A; Trotter, E J

    1992-10-15

    An 18-month-old neutered male Rottweiler was examined because of slowly progressive spastic tetraparesis and ataxia. Signalment and clinical signs were suggestive of 2 neuronal degenerative diseases presumed to be inherited in young Rottweilers: leukoencephalomyelopathy and neuroaxonal dystrophy. Myelography revealed an extradural compression at the articulation of the second and third cervical vertebrae. At surgery, focal hypertrophy of the yellow ligament was observed to compress the spinal cord ventrally at that site. PMID:1429164

  12. The cervical spine: radiologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Mink, Jerrold H; Gordon, Rachael E; Deutsch, Andrew L

    2003-08-01

    This article provides an essential curriculum in cervical spine radiology. It discusses the uses of plain radiographs, MR imaging, computed tomography (CT), and CT myelography, in addition to the methodologies of discography, epidural injections under visualization, and facet and nerve root injections. It explains how radiographic images of the cervical spine can differentiate tumors, inflammation, recent or prior trauma, and the range of discal, arthritic, neural, and vascular cervical pathologies and, just as importantly, when they cannot. PMID:12948340

  13. Streptococcal meningitis following myelogram procedures.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jennifer; Jensen, Bette; Arduino, Matthew; Bergeron, Toni; Fox, Teresa; Gum, Greg; Pischke, Vera; Potts, David; Townes, John; Srinivasan, Arjun

    2007-05-01

    In September of 2004, we investigated 7 cases of post-myelography meningitis. Streptococcal species were recovered from blood or cerebrospinal fluid in all cases. Our findings suggest that droplet transmission of the oral flora of the clinician performing the procedure was the most likely source of these infections. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends the use of face masks by those performing myelograms. PMID:17464927

  14. Wet and dry bacterial spore densities determined by buoyant sedimentation.

    PubMed Central

    Tisa, L S; Koshikawa, T; Gerhardt, P

    1982-01-01

    The wet densities of various types of dormant bacterial spores and reference particles were determined by centrifugal buoyant sedimentation in density gradient solutions of three commercial media of high chemical density. With Metrizamide or Renografin, the wet density values for the spores and permeable Sephadex beads were higher than those obtained by a reference direct mass method, and some spore populations were separated into several density bands. With Percoll, all of the wet density values were about the same as those obtained by the direct mass method, and only single density bands resulted. The differences were due to the partial permeation of Metrizamide and Renografin, but not Percoll, into the spores and the permeable Sephadex beads. Consequently, the wet density of the entire spore was accurately represented only by the values obtained with the Percoll gradient and the direct mass method. The dry densities of the spores and particles were determined by gravity buoyant sedimentation in a gradient of two organic solvents, one of high and the other of low chemical density. All of the dry density values obtained by this method were about the same as those obtained by the direct mass method. PMID:6285824

  15. Stage-specific synthesis of proteins complexed to ribonucleoprotein particles and ribosomes in zoospores of Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, A J; Stumhofer, P

    1981-04-01

    In Blastocladiella emersonii zoospores, a set of proteins was found associated with the ribosomes and free ribonucleoprotein particles distinct from the ribosomes and polyribosomes. These proteins were designated P120, P105, P64, P56, and P42 based on their molecular weights determined by gel electrophoresis. Synthesis of these proteins was detected only during late sporulation just before the time polyadenylated ribonucleic acid accumulates in the sporangia. These proteins banded in isopycnic metrizamide gradients at densities of 1.31 and 1.27 g/cm3, which corresponded to the densities of the ribosomes and free ribonucleoprotein particles, respectively. Comparison of the distribution of the proteins in sucrose versus metrizamide gradients suggested that P105 was removed from the free ribonucleoprotein particles before complexing with the ribosomes. During germination, these proteins disappeared from the ribosomal fractions, with kinetics corresponding to the resumption of protein synthesis. Another protein (P178) was observed to bind to the ribosomes before the onset of protein synthesis during germination. Cycloheximide did not block the addition of this protein to the monoribosomes. PMID:6086010

  16. Intermittent dystonia in Hartnup disease.

    PubMed

    Darras, B T; Ampola, M G; Dietz, W H; Gilmore, H E

    1989-01-01

    A 6-month-old girl developed intermittent dystonic posture of the legs and eczematous dermatitis without ataxia. Qualitative and quantitative urine amino acid testing confirmed the diagnosis of Hartnup disease. Cranial computed tomography, electroencephalogram, electromyogram/nerve conduction study, posterior tibial somatosensory evoked potentials, 24-hour electroencephalographic telemetry, and metrizamide myelogram were normal. Spinal fluid hydroxy-indoleacetic acid concentration was less than or equal to 2 S.D. of normal; oral tryptophan loading (70 mg/kg) resulted in a two-fold rise in cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid concentration. Tryptophan administered alone or with nicotinic acid failed to improve the dystonia; however, trihexyphenidyl (1-2 mg/kg/day) dramatically improved it. Hartnup disease should be considered in children with unexplained dystonia. PMID:2712944

  17. Contrast agent-induced thrombophlebitis following leg phlebography: meglumine loxaglate versus meglumine lothalamate

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, M.L.; Briggs, G.M.; Kuan, B.B.

    1983-05-01

    A comparison was made of the incidence of venous thrombophlebitis resulting from the use of a high-osmolality contrast medium (Conray 60%, meglumine ioxaglate) and a low-osmolality contrast medium (Hexabrix 59%, meglumine iothalamate). In 30 patients with varicose veins, Conray was injected into one leg and Hexabrix into the other. The incidence of thrombophlebitis was then determined using the iodine-125 fibrinogen uptake test in a prospective, randomized, double-blind study. There was significantly less thrombophlebitis with Hexabrix than with Conray and the authors conclude that Hexabrix is safer for phlebography. Hexabrix is also stable in solution, only slightly more expensive than Conray, and one fifth the cost of metrizamide.

  18. Isolation of Vacuoles from Root Storage Tissue of Beta vulgaris L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, Roger A.; Branton, Daniel

    1976-01-01

    Morphologically intact and osmotically active vacuoles were isolated from root storage tissue of the red beet Beta vulgaris L., and the factors influencing both yield and stability of the vacuoles were determined. Successful isolation depended upon slicing the tissue in an apparatus specifically designed to cut open plant cells without the use of high shear forces and to liberate cellular organelles into an undisturbed reservoir of osmoticum. The resulting brei was centrifuged at 2,000g for 10 min to yield a pellet which contained many vacuoles but which also contained tissue fragments, nuclei, mitochondria, and plastids. The vacuoles were further purified by accelerated flotation through a Metrizamide step gradient. Biochemical assays, light microscopy, and electron microscopy confirmed that there was only trace contamination of the final vacuole preparation by other organelles. Isolated vacuoles were intact and retained their in vivo coloration. Images PMID:16659738

  19. Subarachnoid space: middle ear pathways and recurrent meningitis.

    PubMed

    Barcz, D V; Wood, R P; Stears, J; Jafek, B W; Shields, M

    1985-03-01

    Congenital bony abnormalities of the inner ear may result in a communication between the middle ear and the subarachnoid space. Patients with this anomaly often present with recurrent meningitis associated with acute otitis media or with middle ear fluid. This article presents three cases of recurrent meningitis with open middle ear--subarachnoid space connections. The first two cases involve a cerebrospinal fluid leak into the middle ear via the oval window, both patients having a Mondini-type of inner ear deformity. The pathway in the third case opened into the middle ear along the horizontal portion of the facial nerve. Computed tomography (CT) scanning with metrizamide and differential density calculations helped to identify the abnormal pathway and to confirm that the leak has been closed postoperatively. Use of the CT scanner in these cases can be helpful in planning the surgical closure and in postoperative follow-up. PMID:4039111

  20. Interaction of chromosomal proteins with BrdU substituted DNA as determined by chromatin-DNA competition.

    PubMed Central

    Bick, M D; Devine, E A

    1977-01-01

    Chromatin-DNA competition has been utilized to examine the general nature of chromosomal proteins interacting more strongly with BrdU substituted DNA. When chromatin is incubated with an excess of purified DNA, a portion of the chromosomal proteins will exchange to the purified DNA. These two complexes can then be separated on Metrizamide gradients due to their differing protein/DNA ratios. Using this technique we observe that most nonhistone chromosomal proteins will exchange to a competitor DNA, the extent of exchange being directly dependent upon the competitor DNA being present in excess. While essentially the same proteins will migrate to either unsubstituted or BrdU substituted DNA, the substituted DNA is found to be a quantitatively better competitor and its effectiveness as a competitor is directly related to the level of BrdU substitution. Images PMID:593882

  1. Neuroradiology

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    A discussion of some of the changes in the application of computerized tomography (CT) to the central nervous system is presented. The availability of metrizamide has rekindled interest in epidurography for the diagnosis of disk disease. There are now sufficiently large series to evaluate the importance of epidural venography. The role of angiography is also in a state of flux, and those areas in which it contributes to making a specific diagnosis are being identified. In addition, the factors influencing the complication rate of angiography are examined, and alternative noninvasive tests such as Doppler imaging are presented. Methods of therapeutic embolization, especially those using detached balloons, have also generated considerable enthusiasm. Progress in neuroradiologic techniques is by no means limited to computerized tomography. (KRM)

  2. Dandy-Walker syndrome studied by computed tomography and pneumoencephalography

    SciTech Connect

    Masdeu, J.C.; Dobben, G.D.; Azar-Kia, B.

    1983-04-01

    Based on air studies, some authors have disputed the ability of computed tomography (CT) to diagnose posterior fossa cysts. The authors correlated the pneumoencephalographic, CT, and pathological findings in 4 patients with classic Dandy-Walker syndrome. Three cases had been misdiagnosed as retrocerebellar arachnoid cysts because the fourth ventricle was incorrectly considered normal on brow-up or erect air studies, reflecting the inability of such studies to evaluate an agenetic vermis and deficient posterior medullary velum which are characteristic of Dandy-Walker malformation. Careful correlation with autopsy findings showed that even with complete agenesis of the inferior vermis, if the slit between the cerebellar hemispheres is narrow, the fourth ventricle could be misinterpreted as normal on pneumoencephalography and sagittal CT. Radionuclide studies, a small amount of air, or metrizamide may be needed to determine whether the cyst communicates with the subarachnoid space.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of Arnold-Chiari type I malformation with hydromyelia

    SciTech Connect

    DeLaPaz, R.L.; Brady, T.J.; Buonanno, F.S.; New, P.F.; Kistler, J.P.; McGinnis, B.D.; Pykett, I.L.; Taveras, J.M.

    1983-02-01

    Saturation recovery nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images and metrizamide computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained in an adult patient with a clinical history suggestive of syringomyelia. Both NMR and CT studies showed low lying cerebellar tonsils. The CT study demonstrated central cavitation of the spinal cord from the midthoracic to midcervical levels but could not exclude an intramedullary soft tissue mass at the cervico-medullary junction. The NMR images in transverse, coronal, and sagittal planes demonstrated extension of an enlarged central spinal cord cerebrospinal fluid space to the cervico-medullary junction. This was felt to be strong evidence for exclusion of an intramedullary soft tissue mass and in favor of a diagnosis of Arnold-Chiari Type I malformation with hydromyelia. The noninvasive nature of spinal cord and cervico-medullary junction evaluation with NMR is emphasized.

  4. Dynamic CT scanning of spinal column trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.M.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Cann, C.E.

    1982-12-01

    Dynamic sequential computed tomographic scanning with automatic table incrementation uses low milliampere-second technique to eliminate tube cooling delays between scanning slices and, thus, markedly shortens examination times. A total of 25 patients with spinal column trauma involving 28 levels were studied with dynamic scans and retrospectively reviewed. Dynamic studies were considerably faster than conventional spine examinations and yielded reliable diagnosis. Bone disruption and subluxation was accurately evaluated, and the use of intrathecal metrizamide in low doses allowed direct visualization of spinal cord or radicular compromise. Multiplanar image reformation was aided by the dynamic incrementation technique, since motion between slices (and the resulting misregistration artifact on image reformation) was minimized. A phantom was devised to test spatial resolution of computed tomography for objects 1-3 mm in size and disclosed minimal differences for dynamic and conventional computed tomographic techniques in resolving medium-to-high-contrast objects.

  5. Characterization of messenger ribonucleoprotein particles in dormant sporangiospores of the fungus Mucor racemosus

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, C.P.

    1986-01-01

    Extracts of sporangiospores of Mucor racemosus contained RNA that readily hybridized with (/sup 3/H)polyuridylic acid. Prior to germination, this RNA was in a form sedimenting at <80S. Within 10 minutes after initiating germination, most of this RNA sedimented with polyribosomes and 80S monoribosomes. Particulate material from spore extracts bound to oligo(dT)-cellulose at high ionic strength and was assumed to contain messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNP's). A portion of the mRNP's was released from the column by lowering the ionic strength. Other portions were eluted stepwise in buffer containing 50% and 90% formamide and in 0.1-N NaOH. Identical elution patterns were observed whether monitoring incorporated /sup 31/P-orthophosphate or L-(/sup 32/S)methionine, absorbance at 280 nm, or hybridization of (/sup 3/H)polyuridylic acid. mRNP's from the first two fractions were analyzed. A bimodal population of particles was detected in sedimentation velocity and sedimentation equilibrium centrifugation. Particles eluted at low ionic strength demonstrated a sedimentation coefficient distribution of 20S-to-80S. Particles eluted in formamide demonstrated a sedimentation coefficient distribution of 20S-to-60S. Particles eluted at low ionic strength displayed two peaks in CsCl centrifugation, with buoyant densities of 1.37 gm/cc and 1.59 gm/cc. Particles eluted in formamide displayed a single peak with a buoyant density of 1.61 gm/cc. Particles eluted at low ionic strength and centrifuged in metrizamide solution formed two bands having buoyant densities of 1.15 gm/cc and 1.30 gm/cc; formamide-eluted particles banded only at the higher density. Mucor 40S ribosomal subunits banded at 1.56 gm/cc and 1.28 gm/cc in CsCl and metrizamide solution respectively.

  6. Upper lumbar disk herniations.

    PubMed

    Cedoz, M E; Larbre, J P; Lequin, C; Fischer, G; Llorca, G

    1996-06-01

    Specific features of upper lumbar disk herniations are reviewed based on data from the literature and from a retrospective study of 24 cases treated surgically between 1982 and 1994 (seven at L1-L2 and 17 at L2-L3). Clinical manifestations are polymorphic, misleading (abdominogenital pain suggestive of a visceral or psychogenic condition, meralgia paresthetica, isolated sciatica; femoral neuralgia is uncommon) and sometimes severe (five cases of cauda equina syndrome in our study group). The diagnostic usefulness of imaging studies (radiography, myelography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and results of surgery are discussed. The risk of misdiagnosis and the encouraging results of surgery are emphasized. PMID:8817752

  7. Neuroimaging of Spinal Canal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Spinal stenosis is common and presents in a variety of forms. Symptomatic lumbar stenosis occurs in approximately 10% of the population and cervical stenosis in 9% over age 70. Imaging is central to the management decision process and first-choice MR imaging may be substituted with CT and CT myelography. A review of the literature is presented with particular emphasis on the clinical-radiologic correlation in both neurogenic intermittent claudication and cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Advanced techniques promise improvements, particularly with radicular compressive lesions, but remain underutilized in routine clinical practice. PMID:27417399

  8. Disc extrusion in a Rottweiler dog with caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy after failure of intervertebral distraction/stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Marchevsky, A M; Richardson, J L

    1999-05-01

    A Rottweiler dog was presented with an 8 week history of hindlimb ataxia. Neurological examination localised the lesion to the cervical spinal cord. Myelography demonstrated dynamic compressive lesions at C5-6 and C6-7 consistent with a diagnosis of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy. Distraction/stabilisation of both discs was performed using interbody polymethyl methacrylate. Both implants subsequently failed leading to extrusion of the remaining dorsal annulus fibrosus of the C5-6 intervertebral disc and nonambulatory tetraparesis. A ventral slot combined with distraction/stabilisation using screws and polymethyl methacrylate was performed and resulted in nearly full neurological recovery. PMID:10376097

  9. Spinal extradural arachnoid cyst causing cord compression in a 15-year-old girl: a case report.

    PubMed

    Novak, L; Dobai, J; Nemeth, T; Fekete, M; Prinzinger, A; Csecsei, G I

    2005-02-01

    The authors describe the case of a fifteen-year-old girl with progressive paraparesis of the lower limbs that was caused by an intraspinal extradural dorsal arachnoid cyst at the level of Th 3-6. Diagnosis was established with MRI and MRI myelography. The latter revealed the CSF-like content of the cyst. The patient underwent laminotomy and en bloc resection of the cyst. Ligation of the pedicle of the cyst was done with laminoplasty. Quick and complete recovery was observed after surgery. PMID:15744629

  10. [Clinical aspects and diagnosis of lumbosacral perineural cysts].

    PubMed

    Prestar, F J

    1989-01-01

    Perineurial cysts are sometimes space-occupying cystic dilatations of the lumbo-sacral nerve roots at or distal to the junction of the posterior root and the dorsal ganglion. The wall is composed of perineurium and neural tissue. We report on 2 cases of upper sacral perineurial cysts with their computed tomography and myelography findings. Indication for operation is discussed: perineurial cysts should only be operated on if their clinical symptoms are clearly attributable to them and other causes like degeneration of the lumbar spine can be excluded. PMID:2922094

  11. Extradural spinal liposarcoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Lewis, D D; Kim, D Y; Paulsen, D B; Kerwin, S C

    1991-12-01

    An 8-year-old female Doberman Pinscher was examined because of progressive, asymmetric, ambulatory caudal paraparesis. Myelography revealed extradural left ventrolateral spinal cord compression over the first and second lumbar vertebral bodies. A left hemilaminectomy, extending from the thirteenth thoracic to the second lumbar vertebrae, was done, and an extradural mass was removed. The tumor was identified histologically as myxoid liposarcoma. The dog's neurologic function improved gradually after surgery; however, at 7 months after surgery, hind limb neurologic function deteriorated rapidly over a 5-week period, presumably because of local recurrence of the tumor. The dog was euthanatized; necropsy was not permitted. PMID:1778745

  12. Evaluation of the dermatomal somatosensory evoked potential in the diagnosis of lumbo-sacral root compression.

    PubMed Central

    Katifi, H A; Sedgwick, E M

    1987-01-01

    The dermatomal somatosensory evoked potential from the lumbo-sacral dermatomes was recorded from 21 patients with radiographically and surgically (20) proven lumbo-sacral root compression due to prolapsed intervertebral disc or canal stenosis. The potential was abnormal in 19 of the 20 surgically proven cases. The dermatomal somatosensory evoked potential is as accurate as myelography for diagnosis but has the advantage of being non-invasive and repeatable. It provides useful additional diagnostic and pathophysiological information about lumbo-sacral root compression. PMID:3668570

  13. Intradural lipomas of the spinal cord. A clinicopathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Ammerman, B J; Henry, J M; De Girolami, U; Earle, K M

    1976-03-01

    Nine original cases of intradural spinal cord lipomas have been examined from a clinical and pathological standpoint. These tumors occur more commonly in men in the second to fourth decade and are found most frequently in the thoracic spinal cord. Paraparesis, sensory changes, urinary incontinence, and pain are frequent presenting complaints. Myelography is the diagnostic study of choice. All lipomas in this series were located primarily within the cord; four of these also presented an extramedullary extension. Admixed nerve bundles were present in five cases with associated hypertrophic onion-bulb formation in three. Decompression with biopsy or subtotal resection is the operative procedure of choice. PMID:1249612

  14. Septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint: Detection with bone SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Swayne, L.C.; Dorsky, S.; Caruana, V.; Kaplan, I.L. )

    1989-08-01

    We present a rare case of septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint with an associated epidural abscess resulting from Staphylococcus aureus. The infection was initially detected with planar bone scintigraphy and precisely localized with single photon emission computed tomography bone scintigraphy, despite an initially negative radiologic evaluation that included radiographs of the lumbar spine, lumbar myelography, and a postmyelography x-ray computed tomography scan. In the appropriate clinical setting, a bone scan demonstrating unilateral increased activity within the spine should raise the suspicion of inflammatory involvement of the posterior elements.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Caranci, F; Briganti, F; La Porta, M; Antinolfi, G; Cesarano, E; Fonio, P; Brunese, L; Coppolino, F

    2013-08-01

    Brachial plexus injury represents the most severe nerve injury of the extremities. While obstetric brachial plexus injury has showed a reduction in the number of cases due to the improvements in obstetric care, brachial plexus injury in the adult is an increasingly common clinical problem. The therapeutic measures depend on the pathologic condition and the location of the injury: Preganglionic avulsions are usually not amenable to surgical repair; function of some denervated muscles can be restored with nerve transfers from intercostals or accessory nerves and contralateral C7 transfer. Postganglionic avulsions are repaired with excision of the damaged segment and nerve autograft between nerve ends or followed up conservatively. Magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice for depicting the anatomy and pathology of the brachial plexus: It demonstrates the location of the nerve damage (crucial for optimal treatment planning), depicts the nerve continuity (with or without neuroma formation), or may show a completely disrupted/avulsed nerve, thereby aiding in nerve-injury grading for preoperative planning. Computed tomography myelography has the advantage of a higher spatial resolution in demonstration of nerve roots compared with MR myelography; however, it is invasive and shows some difficulties in the depiction of some pseudomeningoceles with little or no communication with the dural sac. PMID:23949940

  16. Use of traction during magnetic resonance imaging of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy ("wobbler syndrome") in the dog.

    PubMed

    Penderis, Jacques; Dennis, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Cervical spondylomyelopathy or "wobbler syndrome" is a well-defined disorder of large-breed dogs, characterized by a compressive lesion affecting the cervical spinal cord that in many dogs may have a dynamic component. Determination of whether this dynamic component is present is important in the decision-making process as regards therapeutic intervention. Despite a significant risk of neurologic deterioration following myelography in some large dogs affected by wobbler syndrome, myelography is considered an essential part of the assessment, primarily as it allows assessment of whether a dynamic compression exists. This same neurologic deterioration is not apparent following magnetic resonance (MR) imaging; however, the use of MR imaging in the investigation of wobbler syndrome has thus far been limited by the inability to perform the traction studies required to ascertain whether a dynamic component to the spinal cord compression exists. This paper presents a technique of applying traction during MR imaging of the cervical spine to reduce a dynamic wobbler syndrome lesion. PMID:15200258

  17. Spine imaging after lumbar disc replacement: pitfalls and current recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Yohan; Sandén, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    Background Most lumbar artificial discs are still composed of stainless steel alloys, which prevents adequate postoperative diagnostic imaging of the operated region when using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thus patients with postoperative radicular symptoms or claudication after stainless steel implants often require alternative diagnostic procedures. Methods Possible complications of lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) are reviewed from the available literature and imaging recommendations given with regard to implant type. Two illustrative cases are presented in figures. Results Access-related complications, infections, implant wear, loosening or fracture, polyethylene inlay dislodgement, facet joint hypertrophy, central stenosis, and ankylosis of the operated segment can be visualised both in titanium and stainless steel implants, but require different imaging modalities due to magnetic artifacts in MRI. Conclusion Alternative radiographic procedures should be considered when evaluating patients following TDR. Postoperative complications following lumbar TDR including spinal stenosis causing radiculopathy and implant loosening can be visualised by myelography and radionucleotide techniques as an adjunct to plain film radiographs. Even in the presence of massive stainless steel TDR implants lumbar radicular stenosis and implant loosening can be visualised if myelography and radionuclide techniques are applied. PMID:19619332

  18. [How reliable is the diagnosis of spinal angiomas in the myelogram?].

    PubMed

    Thron, A; Mironov, A; Voigt, K

    1983-10-01

    Using water-soluble contrast media for thoracic myelography vascular structures can be outlined within the subarachnoid space in about 30% as distinct and in another 30% as faint contrast filling defects. The localization corresponds to the results of anatomical studies demonstrating the largest vessels in the lower thoracic region and at the lumbar enlargement. The extreme variability of size and course of spinal cord vessels can cause difficulties in separating normal and angioma-like vascular pattern in myelographic examinations. Out of 100 unselected cervico-thoracic myelographies, examples of normal vascular patterns are given and compared to pathological findings of angiographically verified angiomatous malformations. The limitations of diagnostic reliability are given by anatomical factors like variability of vessel size or width of the subarachnoid space, by secondary spinal arachnitis or by the differentiation of cord tumours with vascular congestion. Furthermore, inadequate angiographic studies can result in misinterpretation of myelograms. In cases of negative arteriograms other affections leading to raised pressure in the azygos- or caval vein should be considered. PMID:6647829

  19. Treatment of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypotension With Tea: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Petramfar, Peyman; Mohammadi, S. Saeed; Hosseinzadeh, Farideh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The syndrome of spontaneous intracranial hypotension has been increasingly diagnosed since its discovery through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It is a rare syndrome that is due to the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from a tear in the dura and can occur at any age, even among adolescents, but is most frequently seen among females in late middle age. Case Presentation Here, we describe a 32-year-old woman with a two-month history of headaches and occasional nausea and vomiting (N/V). MRI without gadolinium was normal, but meningeal enhancement was seen in MRI with gadolinium. The lumbar puncture revealed a low opening pressure. Computed tomography myelography (CT myelography) showed no leakage; Therefore, idiopathic intracranial hypotension was diagnosed. Treatment was started using tea, and the patient’s headache got significantly better in about a day. Conclusions Conservative therapy, such as bed rest and caffeine treatment with eight cups of tea daily, yielded a significant improvement in our patient. Effectively, the patient constitutes a case of idiopathic intracranial hypotension due to undetectable CSF leakage or hyper-absorption, with good response to conservative management through tea-drinking. Further investigations with an appropriate sample size are needed in order to confirm this intervention in the treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypotension. PMID:27621920

  20. Syringomyelia secondary to “occult” dorsal arachnoid webs: Report of two cases with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sayal, Parag P; Zafar, Arif; Carroll, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    In a certain group of patients with syringomyelia, even with the advent of sophisticated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), no associated abnormality or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) block is easily identified. This type of syringomyelia is often termed idiopathic. Current literature has less than 10 reports of arachnoid webs to be the causative factor. We present our experience in the management of two cases of syringomyelia secondary to arachnoid webs. Both our patients presented with progressive neurological deterioration with MRI scans demonstrating cervical/thoracic syrinx without Chiari malformation or low-lying cord. There was no history of previous meningitis or trauma. Both patients underwent myelography that demonstrated dorsal flow block implying CSF obstruction. Cord displacement/change in caliber was also noted and this was not evident on MRI scans. Both patients underwent thoracic laminectomy. After opening the dura, thickened/abnormal arachnoid tissue was found that was resected thus widely communicating the dorsal subarachnoid space. Postoperatively at 6 months, both patients had significant symptomatic improvement with follow-up MRI scans demonstrating significant resolution of the syrinx. In patients with presumed idiopathic syringomyelia, imaging studies should be closely inspected for the presence of a transverse arachnoid web. We believe that all patients with idiopathic symptomatic syringomyelia should have MRI CSF flow studies and/or computed tomography (CT) myelography to identify such arachnoid abnormalities that are often underdiagnosed. Subsequent surgery should be directed at the establishment of normal CSF flow by laminectomy and excision of the offending arachnoid tissue. PMID:27217656

  1. Syringomyelia secondary to "occult" dorsal arachnoid webs: Report of two cases with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Sayal, Parag P; Zafar, Arif; Carroll, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    In a certain group of patients with syringomyelia, even with the advent of sophisticated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), no associated abnormality or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) block is easily identified. This type of syringomyelia is often termed idiopathic. Current literature has less than 10 reports of arachnoid webs to be the causative factor. We present our experience in the management of two cases of syringomyelia secondary to arachnoid webs. Both our patients presented with progressive neurological deterioration with MRI scans demonstrating cervical/thoracic syrinx without Chiari malformation or low-lying cord. There was no history of previous meningitis or trauma. Both patients underwent myelography that demonstrated dorsal flow block implying CSF obstruction. Cord displacement/change in caliber was also noted and this was not evident on MRI scans. Both patients underwent thoracic laminectomy. After opening the dura, thickened/abnormal arachnoid tissue was found that was resected thus widely communicating the dorsal subarachnoid space. Postoperatively at 6 months, both patients had significant symptomatic improvement with follow-up MRI scans demonstrating significant resolution of the syrinx. In patients with presumed idiopathic syringomyelia, imaging studies should be closely inspected for the presence of a transverse arachnoid web. We believe that all patients with idiopathic symptomatic syringomyelia should have MRI CSF flow studies and/or computed tomography (CT) myelography to identify such arachnoid abnormalities that are often underdiagnosed. Subsequent surgery should be directed at the establishment of normal CSF flow by laminectomy and excision of the offending arachnoid tissue. PMID:27217656

  2. Retrospective analysis of spinal arachnoid cysts in 14 dogs.

    PubMed

    Rylander, Helena; Lipsitz, David; Berry, Wayne L; Sturges, Beverly K; Vernau, Karen M; Dickinson, Peter J; Añor, Sonia A; Higgins, Robert J; LeCouteur, Richard A

    2002-01-01

    Spinal cord dysfunction secondary to spinal arachnoid cysts (SACs) has been reported previously in dogs. This retrospective study reviews the clinical signs, radiographic findings, and outcome after surgical resection of SACs in 14 dogs. Plain vertebral column radiographs and myelography were done in all dogs. Computed tomography (CT) was done in 7 dogs and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in 3 dogs. Affected dogs were between 1 and 12 years of age, and 8 of 14 were Rottweilers. Abnormalities detected on neurological examination depended on the location of the SAC. Five dogs had bilobed or multiple SACs. SACs were located in the cervical vertebral column in 11 dogs and in the thoracic vertebral column in 4 dogs. All dogs had dorsally or dorsolaterally located SACs. Two dogs also had additional ventrally located SACs. Spinal cord compression secondary to intervertebral disc extrusion or protrusion was demonstrated at the site of the SACs in 2 dogs. Surgical resection of the SACs was completed in all dogs. Eleven dogs were available for follow-up. Five weeks postoperatively, 7 dogs improved in neurological function, with some residual ataxia and paresis in 6 of these dogs. Neurological function had deteriorated in 4 dogs. It was concluded from this study that Rottweilers have a higher incidence of SACs than other breeds of dog. Furthermore, bilobed or multiple SACs can occur commonly, and myelography effectively localized SACs in dogs. Surgical resection of SACs resulted in improvement in neurological function in the majority of treated dogs. PMID:12465766

  3. Original surgical treatment of thoracolumbar subarachnoid cysts in six chondrodystrophic dogs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Subarachnoid cysts are rare conditions in veterinary medicine, associated with spinal cord dysfunction. Most of the 100 cases of subarachnoid cysts described since the first report in 1968 were apparently not true cysts. Reported cysts are usually situated in the cervical area and occur in predisposed breeds such as the Rottweiler. The purpose of this retrospective study, from May 2003 to April 2012, was to describe the distinctive features of thoracolumbar spinal subarachnoid cysts, together with their surgical treatment and outcome in 6 chondrodystrophic dogs. Results Five Pugs and 1 French Bulldog were examined. Images suggestive of a subarachnoid cyst were obtained by myelography (2/6) and computed tomography myelography (4/6), and associated disc herniation was observed in 3/6 dogs. A hemilaminectomy was performed. The protruding disc eventually found in 5/6 dogs was treated by lateral corpectomy. The ventral leptomeningeal adhesions observed in all dogs after durotomy were dissected. No or only mild post-operative neurological degradation was observed. Follow-up studies (7 months to 4 years) indicated good outcome and no recurrence. Conclusions All the thoracolumbar subarachnoid cysts described in these 6 chondrodystrophic dogs were associated with leptomeningeal adhesions. Good results seemed to be obtained by dissecting and removing these adhesions. A protruding disc, found here in 5/6 dogs, needs to be ruled out and can be treated by lateral corpectomy. PMID:24884635

  4. Prevalence of beta-lactams resistance among Escherichia coli clinical isolates from a hospital in Algiers.

    PubMed

    Messai, Y; Benhassine, T; Naim, M; Paul, G; Bakour, R

    2006-06-01

    phenotypes. AmpC beta-lactamases were plasmid mediated, and ESBLs belong to the CTM-M type. PMID:16964332

  5. Simultaneous Spinal and Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Cured by Craniotomy and Laminectomy: A Video Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kanamaru, Hideki; Kanamaru, Kenji; Araki, Tomohiro; Hamada, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous spinal and intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare entity. A 67-year-old man visited our hospital due to headache after diving into a river 2 weeks before. Non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral intracranial CSDH. The bilateral CSDH was evacuated and his symptoms improved. Three days after craniotomy, he complained of sensory disturbance on his buttocks. Lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion behind the thecal sac at L5. CT with myelography showed a subdural mass lesion; there was no communication with the subarachnoid space. Fourteen days after craniotomy, L5 laminectomy was performed and the dura mater was incised carefully. The video shows that a liquid hematoma similar to the intracranial CSDH flowed out, followed by cerebrospinal fluid. His symptoms improved after the operation and the hematoma did not recur. This is a rare condition of spinal CSDH demonstrated by neuroimaging and intraoperative video. PMID:27194987

  6. A huge presacral Tarlov cyst. Case report.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kazuhiko; Yuzurihara, Masahito; Asamoto, Shunji; Doi, Hiroshi; Kubota, Motoo

    2007-08-01

    Perineural cysts have become a common incidental finding during lumbosacral magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Only some of the symptomatic cysts warrant treatment. The authors describe the successful operative treatment of a patient with, to the best of their knowledge, the largest perineural cyst reported to date. A 29-year-old woman had been suffering from long-standing constipation and low-back pain. During an obstetric investigation for infertility, the clinician discovered a huge presacral cystic mass. Computed tomography myelography showed the lesion to be a huge Tarlov cyst arising from the left S-3 nerve root and compressing the ipsilateral S-2 nerve. The cyst was successfully treated by ligation of the cyst neck together with sectioning of the S-3 nerve root. Postoperative improvement in her symptoms and MR imaging findings were noted. Identification of the nerve root involved by the cyst wall, operative indication, operative procedure, and treatment of multiple cysts are important preoperative considerations. PMID:17688070

  7. Dysplasia of the caudal vertebral articular facets in four dogs: results of radiographic, myelographic and magnetic resonance imaging investigations.

    PubMed

    Penderis, J; Schwarz, T; McConnell, J F; Garosi, L S; Thomson, C E; Dennis, R

    2005-05-01

    Congenital anomalies of the vertebral column associated with aberrations of one of the primary vertebral ossification centres have been frequently described in the veterinary literature, but clinically significant abnormalities of secondary vertebral ossification centres, particularly involving the caudal articular processes, are much less frequently reported. This paper describes three dogs with aplasia and one dog with hypoplasia of the caudal vertebral articular processes. Thoracolumbar spinal cord compression and ataxia was evident in the three dogs with aplasia but no clinical signs were evident in the dog with hypoplasia. The radiographic appearance was similar in all four cases, with aplasia or hypoplasia of the caudal articular facets at one or more intervertebral joints in the thoracolumbar region. Bone proliferation was evident secondary to an associated degenerative joint disease. Compensatory hyperplasia of the adjacent cranial articular facets and ligamentum flavum protruded into the vertebral canal, resulting in a compressive myelopathy observed by myelography and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:15879540

  8. Extradural spinal synovial cysts in nine dogs.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, P J; Sturges, B K; Berry, W L; Vernau, K M; Koblik, P D; Lecouteur, R A

    2001-10-01

    Nine dogs presenting for investigation of cervical or thoracolumbar myelopathies were diagnosed with extradural spinal synovial cysts. Degenerative disease affecting the articular facets or intervertebral discs was present on plain spinal radiographs in all cases. Myelography was consistent with dorsolateral, extradural spinal cord compression. Two groups of dogs were identified: (1) young, giant breed dogs with multiple cysts involving one or more levels of the cervical spinal cord; and (2) older, large breed dogs with solitary cysts involving the thoracolumbar spinal cord. The synovial cysts constituted the major compressive lesions in four of the dogs. Analysis of lumbar cerebrospinal fluid demonstrated albuminocytological dissociation, consistent with chronic compressive myelopathy, in six dogs. All dogs underwent decompressive surgery and the diagnosis of synovial cysts was confirmed histologically. The mean follow-up period was 17 months (range four to 36 months). At the time of follow-up, all dogs were fully ambulatory with improved neurological function compared with that at initial presentation. PMID:11688527

  9. Targeted epidural patch with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (n-BCA) through a single catheter access site for treatment of a cerebral spinal fluid leak causing spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Woolen, Sean; Gemmete, Joseph J; Pandey, Aditya S; Chaudhary, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) usually occurs in the setting of a spontaneous cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) leak. We report the first description of a case of SIH caused by a CSF leak which improved after a targeted epidural patch with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (n-BCA) at the right T1-T2 level. An 81-year-old woman presented with an orthostatic headache for 6 days. MRI of the brain with contrast demonstrated low lying cerebellar tonsils, an engorged transverse sinus flow void, bifrontal small subdural fluid collections, and diffuse dural enhancement. CT myelography showed extravasation of intrathecal contrast at the right T1-T2 level. A targeted epidural patch was performed by injection of n-BCA through a catheter at the right T1-T2 level. After treatment, the patient's symptoms immediately improved and she was without a headache at 1-year follow-up. PMID:26038380

  10. Continuous lumbar hemilaminectomy for intervertebral disc disease in an Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Flegel, Thomas; Böttcher, Peter; Alef, Michaele; Kiefer, Ingmar; Ludewig, Eberhard; Thielebein, Jens; Grevel, Vera

    2008-09-01

    A 13-yr-old Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) was presented for an acute onset of paraplegia. Spinal imaging that included plain radiographs, myelography, and computed tomography performed under general anesthesia revealed lateralized spinal cord compression at the intervertebral disc space L4-5 caused by intervertebral disc extrusion. This extrusion was accompanied by an extensive epidural hemorrhage from L3 to L6. Therefore, a continuous hemilaminectomy from L3 to L6 was performed, resulting in complete decompression of the spinal cord. The tiger was ambulatory again 10 days after the surgery. This case suggests that the potential benefit of complete spinal cord decompression may outweigh the risk of causing clinically significant spinal instability after extensive decompression. PMID:18817014

  11. [Radiological examinations that have disappeared].

    PubMed

    Puylaert, Carl B A J; Puylaert, Julien B C M

    2011-01-01

    If a radiologist from 1950 could travel in time to 2011, he or she would be baffled to see how few of the radiological examinations he was familiar with, remain. We review the radiological examinations that have disappeared since X-rays were discovered, and include the causes of their disappearance. Barium studies have mainly been replaced by endoscopy, oral cholecystography by ultrasound, and intravenous urography by CT-scan. Angiography by means of a direct puncture of carotid artery and aorta has been replaced by Seldinger angiography. Pneumencephalography and myelography have been replaced by CT and MRI. Bronchography has been replaced by bronchoscopy and CT-scan, arthrography by MRI and arthroscopy. Many other radiological examinations have been replaced by ultrasound, CT or MRI. PMID:21447222

  12. [Feasibilities and bounds of diagnostic radiology in case of back pain].

    PubMed

    Pennekamp, W; Rduch, G; Nicolas, V

    2005-04-01

    Chronic monotone back pain is no pressing indication for radiographic procedures, but chronic progressive or symptomatic back pain should be investigated by radiographic means. Beneath conventional radiology and computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a more method of standard in these cases. The radiographic investigation of back pain is shown in cases of discal and vertebral degeneration and spondylitis. Typical signs and differential diagnosis are demonstrated. After demonstration of radiological means. After introduction and valuation of radiological means, as conventional radiography, CT, MRI, myelography and scintigraphy, it is entered into degenerative changes and degenerative diseases of vertebra endplates and vertebra bodies as a reason of pain. Reasons of spinal stenosis are discussed. In case of inflammatory changes, bacterial inflammation of vertebrae and intervertebral joints are represented. Changes of spondylodiscitis/spondylitis are opposed to inflammatory changes of Morbus Bechterew and Morbus Scheuermann. PMID:14999556

  13. Targeted epidural patch with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (n-BCA) through a single catheter access site for treatment of a cerebral spinal fluid leak causing spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Woolen, Sean; Gemmete, Joseph J; Pandey, Aditya S; Chaudhary, Neeraj

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) usually occurs in the setting of a spontaneous cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) leak. We report the first description of a case of SIH caused by a CSF leak which improved after a targeted epidural patch with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (n-BCA) at the right T1-T2 level. An 81-year-old woman presented with an orthostatic headache for 6 days. MRI of the brain with contrast demonstrated low lying cerebellar tonsils, an engorged transverse sinus flow void, bifrontal small subdural fluid collections, and diffuse dural enhancement. CT myelography showed extravasation of intrathecal contrast at the right T1-T2 level. A targeted epidural patch was performed by injection of n-BCA through a catheter at the right T1-T2 level. After treatment, the patient's symptoms immediately improved and she was without a headache at 1-year follow-up. PMID:26047904

  14. [Imaging of the painful cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Chevrot, A; Drapé, J L; Godefroy, D; Dupont, A M

    2003-02-01

    Neck pain can occur in several circumstances: traumatic, spontaneous, associated or not with motion, with or without head or upper limb irradiations. Each case requires appropriate clinical examination and radiographs. CT and MRI can be used to obtain additional information. Myelography and arteriography are exceptionally used. Cervical discography and facet joint arthrography are used therapeutically. After a brief anatomical review, normal and pathological patterns will be reviewed using radiographs. Each circumstance is studied: traumatic, degenerative, inflammatory and tumoral. It is emphasized that discogenic cervico-brachial neuralgia usually has a favorable spontaneous outcome. A special chapter is dedicated to calcifying and ossifying diseases of the cervical spine. Cervico-occipital neuralgia is also discussed. PMID:12665720

  15. Distraction-stabilisation of two adjacent intervertebral spaces in a Dalmatian dog with caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy.

    PubMed

    Beranek, J; Tomek, A; Lorinson, D

    2013-05-01

    A 4-year-old, 40-kg, male, entire Dalmatian was presented for evaluation of chronic neck pain and pelvic limb ataxia. Myelography revealed ventrodorsal (hourglass) extradural compression over the intervertebral space between the 5th and 6th cervical vertebra and ventral extradural compression between the 6th and 7th cervical vertebra. Cranial compression disappeared and caudal compression markedly diminished after performing cervical traction. MRI scan confirmed protrusion of intervertebral discs and spinal cord compression in previously mentioned intervertebral spaces. Surgical distraction-stabilization of both intervertebral spaces was performed using threaded pins and polymethylmethacrylate. The convalescence from surgery was uneventful and the dog was walking without any signs of paresis until 5 months after surgery when radiography revealed implants loosening. The dog recovered fully of the implant removal and remained asymptomatic for more than 30 months. PMID:23644293

  16. Clinical features, investigation and treatment of post-traumatic syringomyelia.

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, N; Symon, L; Logue, V; Cull, D; Kang, J; Kendall, B

    1981-01-01

    Thirteen patients who sustained spinal cord trauma causing persisting disability, developed new symptoms, the chief one of which was severe pain unrelieved by analgesics. The clinical diagnosis of post traumatic syringomyelia was confirmed in each case by means of myelography, as well as endomyelography in seven patients. In every case exploration of the spinal cord syrinx was performed. Ten patients were troubled by severe pain while three patients were mainly subject to altered sensation in the upper limbs. Of the six patients who had initially sustained complete cord transections, three were treated by cord transection and three were treated by syringostomy. The seven patients who sustained incomplete cord lesions were all treated by syringostomy. The patients who initially sustained incomplete sensory motor spinal cord damage had a better symptomatic response to surgery than hose who had sustained a complete spinal cord lesion. The ten patients whose main symptom was severe pain were completely relieved of their symptoms by surgery. Images PMID:7205304

  17. Surgical results of sacral perineural (Tarlov) cysts.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masato; Nakahara, Shinnosuke; Ito, Yasuo; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Ikuma, Hisanori; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the surgical outcomes and to determine indicators of the necessity of surgical intervention. Twelve consecutive patients harboring symptomatic sacral perineural cysts were treated between 1995 and 2003. All patients were assessed for neurological deficits and pain by neurological examination. Magnetic resonance of imaging, computerized tomography, and myelography were performed to detect signs of delayed filling of the cysts. We performed a release of the valve and imbrication of the sacral cysts with laminectomies in 8 cases or recapping laminectomies in 4 cases. After surgery, symptoms improved in 10 (83%) of 12 patients, with an average follow-up of 27 months. Ten patients had sacral perineural cysts with signs of positive filling defect. Two (17%) of 12 patients experienced no significant improvement. In one of these patients, the filling defect was negative. In conclusion, a positive filling defect may become an indicator of good treatment outcomes. PMID:16508691

  18. Lumbosacral perineural cysts as a cause for neurogenic muscular hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Amoiridis, G; Wöhrle, J; Heye, N; Przuntek, H

    1997-08-01

    We report the case of a 40 year-old man with a severe lesion of the anterior rami of the left spinal nerves L5 and S1 who showed hypertrophy of the leg and atrophy of the intrinsic foot and gluteal muscles. In the biopsy of the hypertrophied gastrocnemius muscle, perivascular inflammatory infiltrates were observed, apart from atrophied and hypertrophied muscle fibres. Electromyography revealed no pathologic spontaneous activity but chronic neurogenic changes. The precise site of the lesion was predicted by electrophysiologic investigations. The lesion was caused by two perineural cysts in the region of the upper sacral plexus, as demonstrated by MRI and CT of the small pelvis and confirmed at operation. Three years earlier, when almost only L5 muscles were affected, an intervertebral disc prolapse L5/S1 had been suspected on myelography and CT but could not have been confirmed at operation. PMID:9298339

  19. Cervical spinal cord compression caused by cryptococcosis in a dog: successful treatment with surgery and fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, S C; McCarthy, R J; VanSteenhouse, J L; Partington, B P; Taboada, J

    1998-01-01

    A six-year-old, male Doberman pinscher was presented for acute onset of upper motor neuron tetraparesis. An extradural compressive lesion compatible with intervertebral disk rupture at the sixth to seventh cervical (C6-C7) disk space was evident on myelography. A large, gelatinous mass of pure cryptococcal organisms causing spinal cord compression was identified upon exploratory surgery. Removal of the mass caused relief of clinical signs. No evidence of involvement of other organ systems was found; however, serum and cerebrospinal fluid titers were positive for cryptococcal infection. The dog was treated with fluconazole (5.5 mg/kg body weight, per os sid) until serum titers for cryptococcal infection were negative at seven months postsurgery. To the authors' knowledge, this is the only report of a dog with cryptococcosis treated successfully using fluconazole as a sole agent. PMID:9826290

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine: technical and clinical observations

    SciTech Connect

    Modic, M.T.; Weinstein, M.A.; Pavlicek, W.; Boumphrey, F.; Starnes, D.; Duchesneau, P.M.

    1983-12-01

    Seventy-two patients were examined to determine the clinical potential for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine. MRI using different pulse sequences was compared with plain radiography, high-resolution computed tomography, and myelography. There were 35 normal patients; pathologic conditions studied included canal stenosis, herniated disk, metastatic tumor, neurofibroma, trauma, Chiari malformation, syringomyelia, arteriovenous malformation, and rheumatoid arthritis. MRI provided sharply defined anatomic delineation and tissue characterization. It was diagnostic in syringomyelia and Chiari malformation and was useful in the evaluation of trauma and spinal canal block from any cause. MRI was sensitive to degenerative disk disease and infection. The spin-echo technique, with three pulse sequence variations, seems very promising. A short echo time (TE) produces the best signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution. Lengthening the TE enhances differentiation of various tissues by their signal intensity, whil the combined increase of TE and recovery time (TR) produces selective enhancement of the cerebrospinal fluid signal intensity.

  1. Vertebral artery anomaly causing C2 suboccipital neuralgia, relieved by neurovascular decompression.

    PubMed

    Trimble, Christopher; Reeves, Alexa; Pare, Laura; Tsai, Fong

    2013-07-01

    We report imaging and surgical findings of a symptomatic 40-year-old male with an anomalous left vertebral artery. MR, CT myelography, angiography, and intraoperative photos demonstrate the vertebral artery entering the thecal sac at the C1-C2 intervertebral foramen and compressing the dorsal C2 nerve rootlets against the cord. Open microvascular decompression alleviated the patient's long-standing suboccipital and posterior cervical neck pain. An embryologic review of the vertebral and lateral spinal artery systems reveals possible developmental explanations for this variant. Intradural course of the vertebral artery at C2 is one of the few symptomatic developmental vertebral artery anomalies. Recognition of this condition is important because surgical intervention can alleviate associated neck pain. PMID:21682793

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-26

    This report reviews the current applications of magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system. Since its introduction into the clinical environment in the early 1980's, this technology has had a major impact on the practice of neurology. It has proved to be superior to computed tomography for imaging many diseases of the brain and spine. In some instances it has clearly replaced computed tomography. It is likely that it will replace myelography for the assessment of cervicomedullary junction and spinal regions. The magnetic field strengths currently used appear to be entirely safe for clinical application in neurology except in patients with cardiac pacemakers or vascular metallic clips. Some shortcomings of magnetic resonance imaging include its expense, the time required for scanning, and poor visualization of cortical bone.

  3. Simultaneous Spinal and Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Cured by Craniotomy and Laminectomy: A Video Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Hideki; Kanamaru, Kenji; Araki, Tomohiro; Hamada, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous spinal and intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare entity. A 67-year-old man visited our hospital due to headache after diving into a river 2 weeks before. Non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral intracranial CSDH. The bilateral CSDH was evacuated and his symptoms improved. Three days after craniotomy, he complained of sensory disturbance on his buttocks. Lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion behind the thecal sac at L5. CT with myelography showed a subdural mass lesion; there was no communication with the subarachnoid space. Fourteen days after craniotomy, L5 laminectomy was performed and the dura mater was incised carefully. The video shows that a liquid hematoma similar to the intracranial CSDH flowed out, followed by cerebrospinal fluid. His symptoms improved after the operation and the hematoma did not recur. This is a rare condition of spinal CSDH demonstrated by neuroimaging and intraoperative video. PMID:27194987

  4. The Relief of Unilateral Painful Thoracic Radiculopathy without Headache from Remote Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

    PubMed Central

    Son, Byung-chul; Ha, Sang-woo; Lee, Si-hoon; Choi, Jin-gyu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) caused by spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks produces orthostatic headaches. Although upper arm pain or paresthesia is reportedly associated with SIH from spontaneous spinal CSF leak in the presence of orthostatic headache, low thoracic radicular pain due to spontaneous spinal CSF leak unassociated with postural headache is extremely rare. We report a 67-year-old female who presented with chronic, positional radicular right T11 pain. Computed tomography myelography showed a spontaneous lumbar spinal CSF leak at L2-3 and repeated lumbar epidural blood patches significantly alleviated chronic, positional, and lower thoracic radiculopathic pain. The authors speculate that a chronic spontaneous spinal CSF leak not severe enough to cause typical orthostatic headache or epidural CSF collection may cause local symptoms such as irritation of a remote nerve root. There might be considerable variabilities in the clinical features of SIH which can present a diagnostic challenge. PMID:27445613

  5. Arteriovenous malformations (AVM) of the spinal cord in children. A review of 38 cases.

    PubMed

    Riché, M C; Modenesi-Freitas, J; Djindjian, M; Merland, J J

    1982-01-01

    The cases of 38 children with AVM seen at the Lariboisière Hospital since 1962 are reviewed. The clinical picture was often of sudden onset with impairment of motor function and/or subarachnoid hemorrhage. The diagnosis was usually made by myelography, but spinal arteriography is the key examination, since it confirms the diagnosis and is essential to determine the exact location of the angioma: whether it is extramedullary, intramedullary, or mixed. Angiotomography and angiomyelography with magnification are necessary to determine if the lesion is median, compact, and if it has long sulco-commissural arteries, details which have an important bearing on the prognosis. Operation should be performed as soon as possible after its feasibility has been demonstrated angiographically. But embolization with new materials has also been effective, either associated with operation or as an alternative. PMID:7035995

  6. Electro-acupuncture and Chinese herbs for treatment of cervical intervertebral disk disease in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Matera, Júlia Maria; da Silva, Tatiana Soares; de Campos Fonseca Pinto, Ana Carolina Brandão; Cortopassi, Sílvia Renata Gaido

    2007-01-01

    A non-ambulatory dog with tetraparesis following a pain episode that had evolved over 2 months was submitted for medical treatment and diagnosed with intervertebral disk disease at C3-C4 and dorsal extradural compression at C1-C2 and C3-C4 using myelography and computed tomography. The dog experienced ambulation recovery after 15 days of treatment with only electroacupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine, with marked improvement occurring after only 10 treatments. Six months of follow-up demonstrated that the dog was stable and had no recurrence of symptoms. Therefore, it was concluded that the combination of electroacupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine was responsible for motor rehabilitation. PMID:17322780

  7. Noninvasive diagnosis and management of spontaneous intracranial hypotension in patients with marfan syndrome: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bassani, Luigi; Graffeo, Christopher S.; Behrooz, Navid; Tyagi, Vineet; Wilson, Taylor; Penaranda, Saul; Zagzag, David; Rifkin, Daniel B; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Fatterpekar, Girish; Placantonakis, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    Background: Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an uncommon clinical entity. Heritable connective tissue disorders (HCTD), such as Marfan syndrome, are frequently implicated as an underlying cause, due to dural structural weaknesses that predispose patients to spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. Due to the high prevalence of multi-system disease in HCTD, diagnosis and treatment are often complicated. Case Description: We present a 58-year-old female with Marfan syndrome on anticoagulation for a mechanical aortic valve replacement who came to medical attention with severe, acute-onset headache following a straining episode. Noninvasive magnetic resonance (MR) myelography confirmed thoracic CSF extravasations and multiple lumbar diverticula. The patient was treated conservatively and her symptoms resolved. Conclusion: We discuss the common presentation, diagnostic tools, and treatment options for spontaneous CSF leaks in patients with Marfan syndrome or related HCTD with an emphasis on noninvasive modalities and a review of the major radiographic criteria used to diagnose dural abnormalities, such as dural ectasia. PMID:24575323

  8. [Surgical treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Loembe, P M; Ndong-Launay, M; Chouteau, Y; Mwanyombet-Ompounga, L; Dukuly, L; Bouger, D

    1990-01-01

    The authors report their experiences based on 41 cases operated on for lumbar spinal stenosis between 1981 and 1988. The series included 28 men and 13 women aged between 23 and 63 years (mean age: 48 years). Neurogenic intermittent claudication was the presenting symptom in only 12% of the cases, as opposed to lumbago-sciatica in 78%. Clinical examination did not provide any specific elements. The key to diagnosis was lumbar myelography. Laminectomy was the most important aspect of treatment which, in certain cases, was associated with vertebral stabilization by arthrodesis (3 cases). There were ten minor operative complications. Further surgery was necessary in five cases (12%). Therapeutic results in patients followed from one to eight years (35 cases) were satisfactory. The discussion covers nosologic, clinicoradiologic and therapeutic aspects. PMID:2142258

  9. Imaging diagnosis--Spinal epidural hemangiosarcoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Cristian; Pumarola, Martí; Añor, Sònia

    2014-01-01

    An 8-year-old, male Boxer was examined for an acute onset of ambulatory paraparesis. Neurologic examination was consistent with a T3-L3 myelopathy. Myelography revealed an extradural spinal cord compression in the region of the T10-T13 vertebrae. On magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, a well-defined epidural mass lesion was detected. The mass was mildly hyperintense on T1-weighted, hyperintense on T2-weighted and STIR images compared to normal spinal cord and enhanced strongly and homogenously. Postmortem examination confirmed a primary epidural hemangiosarcoma. Findings indicated that the MRI characteristics of spinal epidural hemangiosarcoma may mimic other lesions including meningioma and epidural hemorrhages/hematomas of non-neoplastic etiology. PMID:23815770

  10. Cervical spinal intradural arachnoid cysts in related, young pugs.

    PubMed

    Rohdin, C; Nyman, H T; Wohlsein, P; Hultin Jäderlund, K

    2014-04-01

    Seven related young pugs were diagnosed with cervical spinal intradural arachnoid cysts by magnetic resonance imaging (n = 6) and myelography (n = 1). All dogs were presented with skin abrasions on their thoracic limbs and non-painful neurological deficits, indicating a C1-T2 myelopathy. In all six dogs examined by magnetic resonance imaging not only the spinal arachnoid cyst but also a concomitant, most likely secondary, syringohydromyelia was confirmed. Pedigree analysis suggested a genetic predisposition for spinal arachnoid cysts in this family of pugs. Generalised proprioceptive deficits more pronounced in the thoracic limbs suggesting a focal cervical spinal cord lesion, with concomitant skin abrasions on the dorsal aspect of the thoracic limbs in a young pug, should alert veterinarians to the possibility of cervical spinal arachnoid cysts. PMID:24372140

  11. Cauda equina arachnoiditis. A correlative clinical and roentgenologic study.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, A E

    1978-03-01

    A series of 93 consecutive patients whose myelograms were reported as showing arachnoiditis were studied, and correlations between the radiographic appearance and the clinical and surgical findings were tabulated. All but 1 patient had had either lumbar disc surgery and/or Pantopaque myelography. The study led to a classification of such roentgenogram changes which revealed that the majority of patients studied did not have the usual adhesive arachnoiditis, but the picture they projected was more commonly due to spinal stenosis, extraarachnoid dye injection, extradural scar, etc. Only 1 patient of the 93 presented the classic severely disabling paraparesis, intractable pain, and loss of bowel and bladder functions commonly ascribed to adhesive arachnoiditis. The presence of such myelographic changes need not deter necessary surgery for coexisting disc pathology, nerve root entrapment, or spinal stenosis. In only a small percentage of these patients could the symptoms be attributed to the arachnoiditis changes seen in the myelogram. PMID:644393

  12. Computed tomography myelographic findings in dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Ronaldo C; Echandi, Rita L; Beauchamp, Dustin

    2012-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) myelography is used occasionally in the diagnosis of cervical spondylomyelopathy, but the type of lesion found in large- versus giant-breed dogs using this modality has not been characterized. Our purpose was to report the frequency of compressive lesions in large- and giant-breed dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy and imaged using CT myelography. Fifty-eight dogs were retrospectively studied, 23 large-breed and 35 giant-breed dogs. Multiple sites of compression were found in 12 large-breed dogs (52.2%) compared to 30 (85.8%) giant-breed dogs. The main site of compression was at C5-6 and C6-7 in both large-breed (91.3%) and giant-breed (72.4%) dogs. The main cause and direction of compression was disc-associated and ventral in 19 (82.6%) of the large-breed dogs while osseous changes were the primary cause of compression in 27 (77.2%) of the giant-breed dogs, with most compressions being lateral (51.4%), followed by dorsolateral (14.2%). Osseous compression was observed at C7-T1 in eight giant-breed dogs (22.8%), and at T1-T2 or T2 only in five dogs (14.3%). Four of 23 large-breed dogs (17.4%), and seven (20%) of 35 giant-breed dogs had spinal cord atrophy. Therefore, giant-breed dogs often have multiple compressions, usually caused by osseous changes causing lateralized compressions. In large-breed dogs most compressions are disc-associated and located ventrally. Considering the number of giant-breed dogs with compressions at C7-T1, T1-2, and T2, it is important to include the cranial thoracic region when imaging dogs suspected of having cervical spondylomyelopathy. PMID:22093094

  13. Computed tomographic epidurography: an aid to understanding deformation of the lumbar dural sac by epidural injections.

    PubMed

    Fukushige, T; Kano, T; Sano, T; Irie, M

    1999-09-01

    Local anaesthetics injected into the epidural space may deform the dural sac to a variable degree, thereby contributing to variability in the extent of the block. We investigated deformation of the lumbar dural sac after injection into the lumbar epidural space. The subjects were 26 patients with low-back pain who underwent lumbar epidurography and computed tomographic (CT) epidurography, of whom seven also underwent myelography and computed tomographic myelography. The epidural space was entered via the sacral hiatus in 24 patients and through the L5/S1 interspace in two patients. Ten millilitres of local anaesthetic was then injected into the epidural space followed by 20 mL of contrast medium. Computed tomographic epidurography was undertaken approximately 30-min after the epidural injection at the mid-vertebral and mid-discal levels from the first lumbar through to the first sacral vertebrae. The dural sac usually showed an oval or hexagonal shape on the transverse views at the first and second lumbar vertebral levels, and the shape of an inverted triangle below the level of the third lumbar vertebra. A median line of translucency was also observed on the posteroanterior epidurographic view in 25 of the 26 patients. This line was though to be a manifestation of the dural deformation to the inverted triangle. Dural sac deformation usually shows a specific pattern, although there are individual variations. Dural deformability is an important consideration in any analysis of the spread of epidural block or of the changes of epidural pressure after epidural injection of local anaesthetics. PMID:10549463

  14. [Two cases of lateral approach for thoraco-lumbar junctional lesions: experiment of Kaneda's device].

    PubMed

    Nishida, K; Ueda, S; Matsumoto, K; Okada, M

    1992-01-01

    Case 1: a 32-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with major complaints of gait disturbance and urinary incontinence. The tendon reflex was markedly increased in the bilateral lower extremities, and both Babinski's reflex and clonus were strongly positive. Myelography revealed complete block in the 10th thoracic vertebral level. On April 15, 1989, a tumor in the vertebral region was exposed and excised via a right posterolateral approach. Kaneda's device was used for internal fixation. The tumor was diagnosed as myeloma histologically. The postoperative course was uneventful. Postoperatively, the patient became capable of walking by herself. Case 2: an 18-year-old woman was admitted because of burst fractures of the 1st and 2nd lumbar vertebrae due to a traffic accident in January of 1989. The fractured bones had been manually repositioned and fixed with plaster. However, the patient still had gait disturbance (intermittent claudication). Myelography revealed a complete block in the 2nd lumbar vertebral region. On May 7, the vertebral foramen was opened via a left anterolateral approach, and internal fixation was performed using Kaneda's device. Postoperatively, the patient recovered full ability to walk, and returned to normal social activity. From our experience, it is thought to be useful to employ a right posterolateral approach to the thoracic vertebrae, and a left anterolateral approach to the lumbar vertebrae. We used Kaneda's device for internal fixation, successfully. However, this device has the following disadvantages; (1) there are few plates designed for females, whose vertebrae are small, (2) it is difficult to preserve the arteries of Adamkiewicz and (3) postoperative MRI becomes impossible. PMID:1738429

  15. Effects of a phospholipase A/sub 2/ inhibitor on uptake and toxicity of liposomes containing plant phosphatidylinositol

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, M.; Alving, C.R.

    1986-05-01

    Plant phosphatidylinositol (PI) has been shown by us to have a direct cytotoxic effect on cultured tumor cells but not on normal cells. Synthetic PI containing /sup 14/C-linoleic acid in the sn-2 position, also showed the same pattern of selective cytotoxicity. When the metabolic fate of synthetic PI was examined with tumor cells, the radioactivity which no longer occurred as PI, was found as either products of phospholipase A/sub 2/ (93%, free fatty acids and phosphatidylcholine) or phospholipase C (7%, diglycerides). Uptake of liposomal PI was directly correlated with cytotoxicity. They tested a variety of inhibitors to see the effect on uptake and/or cytotoxicity of plant PI. General metabolic inhibitors such as metrizamide or sodium azide did not alter cellular uptake of the plant PI liposomes. Inhibitors of lipoxygenase formation, such as indomethacin, also did not alter the uptake or cytotoxicity induced by plant PI. Quinacrine, an inhibitor of phospholipase A/sub 2/, decreased the uptake of the PI containing liposomes to 50% of that seen in the presence or absence of any other inhibitor. Although quinacrine is itself toxic to cells, at low concentrations of quinacrine, plant PI did not show the same degree of cytotoxicity as in the absence of quinacrine. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that plant PI exerts cytotoxicity by serving as a substrate for phospholipase A/sub 2/.

  16. Flow generated around particle clusters in a rotating ultrasonic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, G

    1998-09-01

    A chamber cavity, which has a square cross section and pressure-release walls, is used to produce a well-defined, 160-kHz standing ultrasonic field. A suspension of latex microspheres in aqueous metrizamide fills the chamber. The chamber rotates about a horizontal axis producing the centripetal force necessary to contain the buoyant spheres in the axial region. At low particle concentrations, clusters of microspheres form at half-wavelength intervals near the axial positions of acoustic pressure amplitude (p0) minima, as expected because of rotational and acoustic radiation forces. At higher concentrations, additional particle distributions are often seen that suggest the presence of flow. When high concentrations of larger particles are used, small clusters also form at axial positions of p0 maxima. Theory for acoustic streaming in a rotating fluid predicts flow speeds that are too small to account for the observed flow. Reasonable agreement with observations is obtained using a theory for flow generated by the buoyant gravitational force acting on the clusters. PMID:9745732

  17. Torsten Almén (1931-2016): the father of non-ionic iodine contrast media.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Ulf; Ekberg, Olle; Aspelin, Peter

    2016-09-01

    The Swedish radiologist Torsten Almén is the first clinical radiologist ever to have made a fundamental contribution to intravascular contrast medium design, the development of non-ionic contrast media. He became emotionally triggered by the patients' severe pain each time he injected the ionic "high-osmolar" contrast media when performing peripheral arteriographies in the early 1960s. One day he got a flash of genius that combined the observation of pain, a pathophysiological theory and how to eliminate it with suitable contrast media chemistry. After self-studies in chemistry he developed the concept of iodine contrast media not dissociating into ions in solution to reduce their osmolality and even reach plasma isotonicity. He offered several pharmaceutical companies his concept of mono- and polymeric non-ionic agents but without response, since it was considered against the chemical laws of that time. Contrast media constructed as salts and dissociating into ions in solution was regarded an absolute necessity to achieve high enough water solubility and concentration for diagnostic purposes. Finally a small Norwegian company, Nyegaard & Co., took up his idea 1968 and together they developed the essentially painless "low-osmolar" monomeric non-ionic metrizamide (Amipaque) released in 1974 and iohexol (Omipaque) in 1982 followed by the "iso-osmolar" dimeric non-ionic iodixanol (Visipaque) released in 1993. This has implied a profound paradigm shift with regard to reduction of both hypertonic and chemotoxic side effects, which have been a prerequisite for the today's widespread use of contrast medium-enhanced CT and advanced endovascular interventional techniques even in fragile patients. PMID:27225455

  18. [Nerve root compression by gas containing lumbar disc herniation--case report].

    PubMed

    Yasuoka, Hiroki; Nemoto, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Masahisa; Naitou, Satoko; Yamamoto, Kouji; Ukegawa, You

    2009-06-01

    The radiographic appearance of gas collection in the intervertebral disc represents the so-called "vacuum phenomenon." Incidence of the vacuum phenomenon on plain radiographs is reported to be 1-20%, whereas gas-containing disc herniations are rarely observed. We present a case report involving a patient with L4/5 gas-containing disc herniation, which was demonstrated by CT and MRI scans and was also surgically documented. A 48-year-old man with no previous back trauma presented with a 14-day history of left leg pain. On neurologic examination, the straight leg raising test was positive at 60degrees. Leg muscle strength was weak on the extensor hallucis longus. Sensory disturbances and abnormalities in deep-tendon reflexes were not observed. Lumbar roentogenograms showed "vacuum phenomenon" at L2/3, L4/5 and the L5/S disc space. MRI indicated a herniated disc at L4/5 displacing the dural sac and a focal low intensity in the lesion. Administration of an epidural block relieved the patient's symptoms. Ten months later, the patient reported a gradual return of similar left leg pain. His symptoms did not respond to conservative management. Lumbar spine films indicated abnormalities identical to the original results. MRI showed an enlarged area of low intensity with compression of the left L5 nerve root. In addition to recurrent pain, discography with metrizamide injections confirmed the presence of intradiscal gas and compression of the left L5 nerve root. During surgery, a gray-bluish air mass compressing the L5 nerve root was identified. Manipulation of the mass resulted in rupture and the release of gas. The displaced nerve root immediately relaxed to its normal position. Seven months after the operation, the patient remains free of pain. PMID:19526837

  19. [Treatment of primary empty sella with intractable headache via the transsphenoidal approach].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, N; Okamoto, S; Yamagami, T; Kojima, M; Nakahara, I; Handa, H

    1985-07-01

    Two cases of primary empty sella with intractable headache were treated via the transsphenoidal approach. One patient was a fifty-three-year-old female with right upper nasal quadrantanopsia and intractable retrobulbar pain and the other was fourty-six-year-old female with continuous retrobulbar pain with a history of transient right temporal hemianopsia. Both cases were diagnosed by metrizamide CT cisternography. They had normal endocrinological functions. They did not respond to drug therapy and were treated surgically. In each case, the dura mater of the floor of the sella was elevated with lyophilized human dura mater and bone fragments obtained during the procedure. In the former case, significant improvement of visual field defect was not obtained but the retrobulbar pain disappeared completely after the operation. In the latter case which had intractable headache for six months, the symptom disappeared just after the operation. Until now, retroorbital pain has not recurred in both cases for several months. Primary empty sella has been considered to be a benign condition except in some cases with CSF rhinorrhea or with visual disturbance. Headache which is often accompanied to primary empty sella has rarely been treated surgically because it is difficult to know whether the headache is related to the empty sella or not. Another reason may be that there is few available data concerning to the efficacy of surgical treatment. Headache caused by stretching of the dura of the floor of the sella is usually frontal or retrobulbar, continuous, profound and intractable.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4047326

  20. Identification of spectrin as a calmodulin-binding component in the pituitary gonadotrope

    SciTech Connect

    Wooge, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) is a hypothalamic decapeptide which stimulates the release of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) from the pituitary. Ca{sup 2+} fulfills the requirements of a second messenger for this system. Inhibition of calmodulin will inhibit GnRH stimulated LH release. The aim of the present studies has been to identify the locus of action of calmodulin within the pituitary. By use of an {sup 125}I-calmodulin gel overlayer assay, five major Ca{sup 2+}-dependent {sup 125}I-calmodulin labelled components of subunit M{sub r} > 205,000; 200,000; 135,000; 60,000; and 52,000 have been identified. This labeling was found to be phenothiazine-sensitive. Ca{sup 2+}-independent binding that was observed appears to be due to hydrophobic interactions of calmodulin with acid-soluble proteins, principally histones. Subcellular fractionation revealed that the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent calmodulin-binding components are localized primarily in the cytosolic fraction. Separation of dispersed anterior pituitary cells through a linear Metrizamide gradient yielded gonadotrope-enriched fractions, which were found to contain all five {sup 125}I-calmodulin binding components corresponding to the major bands in the pituitary homogenate. The calmodulin-binding component levels do not appear to be differentially regulated by steroids. The calmodulin binding component with a M{sub r} > 205,000 has been identified as spectrin. Spectrin-like immunoreactivity and {sup 125}I-calmodulin-binding activity in pituitary tissue homogenates co-migrated in various percentage acrylamide gels with avian erythrocyte spectrin. Spectrin was detected in a gonadotrope-enriched fraction by immunoblotting, and confirmed in gonadotropes by indirect immunofluorescence of cultured pituitary cells in which spectrin- and LH-immunoreactivity co-localized.

  1. Clinical comparison of indium-111 acetylacetone and indium-111 tropolone granulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Schauwecker, D.S.; Burt, R.W.; Park, H.M.; Mock, B.H.; Witt, R.M.; Tobolski, M.M.; Wellman, H.N.

    1986-11-01

    This clinical study compares the efficacy of two /sup 111/In white blood cells preparations. Seventy-six patients were imaged after an injection of granulocytes (GRAN) isolated on a Ficoll-Hypaque gradient and labeled with (/sup 111/In)acetylacetone (ACAC) in saline; 105 patients were imaged after an injection of GRAN isolated on a metrizamide-plasma gradient and labeled with (/sup 111/In)tropolone (TROP) in plasma. Early (2-4 hr), intermediate (4-6 hr), and delayed (24 hr) images were obtained. The specificity was quite high (94-100%) in both preparations and no statistical differences could be found. The sensitivity for ACAC-GRAN for the early, intermediate, and delayed images were 39%, 63%, and 64%, respectively; for TROP-GRAN it was 80%, 89%, and 92%, respectively. In all cases the TROP-GRAN images were significantly more sensitive than the ACAC-GRAN images obtained at the same time after injection (p less than 0.001 for early and delayed images, 0.01 less than p less than 0.025 for intermediate images). For ACAC-GRAN the intermediate and delayed images were significantly more sensitive than the early images, while no significant difference could be found for TROP-GRAN. In a blinded experiment, the ability of TROP-GRAN to demonstrate a lesion was compared to that of ACAC-GRAN. TROP-GRAN demonstrated the lesions better than ACAC-GRAN, both in the early and late images (p less than 0.001). TROP-GRAN visualization scores at 4-6 hr equaled those obtained 24 hr after injection. In conclusion, GRAN separated and labeled in plasma with TROP are superior to those separated and labeled in saline with ACAC in three ways: higher visualization scores, earlier visualization of the lesion, and greater sensitivity.

  2. Positively selected Leu-11a (CD16+) cells require the presence of accessory cells or factors for the lysis of herpes simplex virus-infected fibroblasts but not herpes simplex virus-infected Raji.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald-Bocarsly, P; Feldman, M; Curl, S; Schnell, J; Denny, T

    1989-08-15

    Previous studies from our laboratory indicated that human NK activity against HSV-infected fibroblasts (HSV-Fs) but not K562 targets was sensitive to treatment with anti-HLA-DR plus C. In the current study, we have selected Leu-11a+ (CD-16) cells by fluorescence activated cell sorting and found that although Leu-11a enriched populations lysed K562 targets in 14-h 51Cr-release assays, they were unable to kill HSV-Fs targets unless a Leu-11a-depleted population was added back to the effectors or unless known activators of NK cells (IFN-alpha or IL-2) were added to the assays. In contrast, Leu-11a-enriched populations were able to mediate ADCC against HSV-Fs in the presence of sera from HSV-seropositive individuals without the requirement for accessory cells. We have begun preliminary characterization of the accessory cells which allow lysis of HSV-Fs by NK cells: they are HLA-DR+ cells which enrich in the light density fractions of Metrizamide density gradients. They need be present in very small numbers for lysis to take place and are not MHC restricted in that heterologous add-backs between anti-HLA-DR plus C and anti-Leu-11b plus C-treated populations are capable of target cell lysis at levels similar to those achieved with the autologous add-backs. Further, the levels of lysis in heterologous add-back experiments reflected the lytic potential of the effector rather than the accessory cell donor. Finally, although the requirement for accessory cells for NK lysis has been demonstrated for fibroblasts infected with HSV-1, CMV, and VZV, lysis of HSV-infected Raji lymphoblastoid cells is relatively accessory-cell independent, indicating that the requirement for accessory cells for lysis by NK cells is not a property of all herpesvirus-infected targets. PMID:2526183

  3. Imaging symptomatic bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced heterotopic bone formation within the spinal canal: case report.

    PubMed

    Chryssikos, Timothy; Crandall, Kenneth M; Sansur, Charles A

    2016-05-01

    Heterotopic bone formation within the spinal canal is a known complication of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and presents a clinical and surgical challenge. Imaging modalities are routinely used for operative planning in this setting. Here, the authors present the case of a 59-year-old woman with cauda equina syndrome following intraoperative BMP-2 administration. Plain film myelographic studies showed a region of severe stenosis that was underappreciated on CT myelography due to a heterotopic bony lesion mimicking the dorsal aspect of a circumferentially patent thecal sac. When evaluating spinal stenosis under these circumstances, it is important to carefully consider plain myelographic images in addition to postmyelography CT images as the latter may underestimate the true degree of stenosis due to the potentially similar radiographic appearances of evolving BMP-2-induced heterotopic bone and intrathecal contrast. Alternatively, comparison of sequentially acquired noncontrast CT scans with CT myelographic images may also assist in distinguishing BMP-2-induced heterotopic bony lesions from the thecal sac. Further studies are needed to elucidate the roles of the available imaging techniques in this setting and to characterize the connection between the radiographic and histological appearances of BMP-2-induced heterotopic bone. PMID:26824586

  4. Surgical techniques of anterior decompression and fusion for spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Bohlman, H H; Eismont, F J

    1981-01-01

    Many patients who have static or only slowly improving neurologic deficits and significant compression of the spinal cord and nerve roots can benefit from anterior decompression. The improvement ranges from partial root recovery to very dramatic improvement in upper as well as lower extremities in the patient with quadriparesis. Intrinsic damage or contusion of the spinal cord cannot be reversed by decompression. Patients with motor sparing preoperatively attain a better functional improvement than those patients who have only slight distal sensory function initially. The same can be said of patients with spinal cord injuries treated with surgery, but we believe the ultimate degree of functional recovery of incomplete cord injuries is greater following anterior than posterior decompression when the operation is indicated. An early accurate diagnosis must be made concerning whether a patient has a complete or an incomplete spinal cord injury. The mechanical compressive lesion must be well documented by myelography, laminography, or CAT scan. The patient should not be neurologically harmed by a posterior laminectomy approach to anterior pathology which additionally removes all posterior stability. An anterior compressive block is best removed through an anterior approach. PMID:7471590

  5. Cervical myelopathy associated with extradural synovial cysts in 4 dogs.

    PubMed

    Levitski, R E; Chauvet, A E; Lipsitz, D

    1999-01-01

    Three Mastiffs and 1 Great Dane were presented to the University of Wisconsin Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital for cervical myelopathy based on history and neurologic examination. All dogs were males and had progressive ataxia and tetraparesis. Degenerative arthritis of the articular facet joints was noted on survey spinal radiographs. Myelography disclosed lateral axial compression of the cervical spinal cord medial to the articular facets. Extradural compressive cystic structures adjacent to articular facets were identified on magnetic resonance imaging (1 dog). High protein concentration was the most important finding on cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Dorsal laminectomies were performed in all dogs for spinal cord decompression and cyst removal. Findings on cytologic examination of the cystic fluid were consistent with synovial fluid, and histopathologic results supported the diagnosis of synovial cysts. All dogs are ambulatory and 3 are asymptomatic after surgery with a follow-up time ranging from 1 to 8 months. This is the 1st report of extradural synovial cysts in dogs, and synovial cysts should be a differential diagnosis for young giant breed dogs with cervical myelopathy. PMID:10357105

  6. Using PCR-based detection and genotyping to trace Streptococcus salivarius meningitis outbreak strain to oral flora of radiology physician assistant.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Velusamy; Gertz, Robert E; Shewmaker, Patricia L; Patrick, Sarah; Chitnis, Amit S; O'Connell, Heather; Benowitz, Isaac; Patel, Priti; Guh, Alice Y; Noble-Wang, Judith; Turabelidze, George; Beall, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    We recently investigated three cases of bacterial meningitis that were reported from a midwestern radiology clinic where facemasks were not worn during spinal injection of contrast agent during myelography procedures. Using pulsed field gel electrophoresis we linked a case strain of S. salivarius to an oral specimen of a radiology physician assistant (RPA). We also used a real-time PCR assay to detect S. salivarius DNA within a culture-negative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimen. Here we extend this investigation through using a nested PCR/sequencing strategy to link the culture-negative CSF specimen to the case strain. We also provide validation of the real-time PCR assay used, demonstrating that it is not solely specific for Streptococcus salivarius, but is also highly sensitive for detection of the closely related oral species Streptococcus vestibularis. Through using multilocus sequence typing and 16S rDNA sequencing we further strengthen the link between the CSF case isolate and the RPA carriage isolate. We also demonstrate that the newly characterized strains from this study are distinct from previously characterized S. salivarius strains associated with carriage and meningitis. PMID:22384169

  7. Using PCR-Based Detection and Genotyping to Trace Streptococcus salivarius Meningitis Outbreak Strain to Oral Flora of Radiology Physician Assistant

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Velusamy; Gertz Jr., Robert E.; Shewmaker, Patricia L.; Patrick, Sarah; Chitnis, Amit S.; O'Connell, Heather; Benowitz, Isaac; Patel, Priti; Guh, Alice Y.; Noble-Wang, Judith; Turabelidze, George; Beall, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    We recently investigated three cases of bacterial meningitis that were reported from a midwestern radiology clinic where facemasks were not worn during spinal injection of contrast agent during myelography procedures. Using pulsed field gel electrophoresis we linked a case strain of S. salivarius to an oral specimen of a radiology physician assistant (RPA). We also used a real-time PCR assay to detect S. salivarius DNA within a culture-negative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimen. Here we extend this investigation through using a nested PCR/sequencing strategy to link the culture-negative CSF specimen to the case strain. We also provide validation of the real-time PCR assay used, demonstrating that it is not solely specific for Streptococcus salivarius, but is also highly sensitive for detection of the closely related oral species Streptococcus vestibularis. Through using multilocus sequence typing and 16S rDNA sequencing we further strengthen the link between the CSF case isolate and the RPA carriage isolate. We also demonstrate that the newly characterized strains from this study are distinct from previously characterized S. salivarius strains associated with carriage and meningitis. PMID:22384169

  8. Computed tomographic evaluation of cervical vertebral canal and spinal cord morphometry in normal dogs

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Eunjeong; Choi, Jihye; Choi, Mincheol

    2014-01-01

    The height, width, and cross-sectional area of the vertebral canal and spinal cord along with the area ratio of spinal cord to vertebral canal in the cervical vertebra were evaluated in images obtained using computed tomography (CT). Measurements were taken at the cranial, middle, and caudal point of each cervical vertebra in eight clinically normal small breed dogs (two shih tzu, two miniature schnauzers, and four mixed breed), 10 beagles, and four German shepherds. CT myelography facilitated the delineation of the epidural space, subarachnoid space, and spinal cord except at the caudal portion of the 7th cervical vertebra. The spinal cord had a tendency to have a clear ventral border in the middle portion of the vertebral canal and lateral borders near both end plates. The height, width, and area of the vertebral canal and spinal cord in the cervical vertebra were increased as the size of dog increased. However, the ratio of the spinal cord area to vertebral canal area in the small dogs was higher than that of the larger dogs. Results of the present study could provide basic and quantitative information for CT evaluation of pathologic lesions in the cervical vertebra and spinal cord. PMID:24136210

  9. Spinal cord compression by multistrand cables after solid posterior atlantoaxial fusion. Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Hideki; Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Ito, Manabu; Kotani, Yoshihisa; Minami, Akio

    2002-10-01

    The sublaminar wiring procedure has been commonly used for stabilizing the atlantoaxial complex. Multistrand braided cables were introduced in the early 1990s. In previous biomechanical studies these cables were demonstrated to be superior to monofilament wires in terms of their flexibility, mechanical strength, and fatigue-related characteristics. To the authors' knowledge, they are the first to describe clinically the occurrence of delayed spinal cord compression resulting from multistrand cables after the completion of rigid spinal arthrodesis in the upper cervical spine. Three patients underwent posterior atlantoaxial fusion in which two sublaminar multistrand cables were placed. Between 15 and 48 months postoperatively, they suffered from upper- and lower-extremity numbness as well as gait disturbance. Plain radiography and computerized tomography myelography revealed spinal cord compression caused by the sublaminar cables, although fusion was complete and physiological alignment was maintained at the fused segment. The radiographs obtained immediately after surgery demonstrated that the initial cable placement had been properly performed. The shape of the cable at the initial surgery was oval and then gradually became circular. The anterior arc of the circular shape of the cable in fact led to the spinal cord compression. Considering the mechanism of this late complication, a cable tends to spring open because of its high flexibility and becomes circular shaped even after the complete arthrodesis. When applying multistrand cables for intersegmental fixation at the atlantoaxial complex, delayed complications related to bowing of the cables is possible. PMID:12408393

  10. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension: diagnosis to management.

    PubMed

    Limaye, Kaustubh; Samant, Rohan; Lee, Ricky W

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension typically occurs from spontaneous CSF leak. CSF volume depletion rather than decrease in CSF pressure is thought to be the main causative feature for intracranial hypotension. More and more cases of intracranial hypotension are getting diagnosed with the advances in the imaging. The advances in the imaging have also led to the better understanding of the dynamic changes that occur with intracranial hypotension. The old theories of CSF overproduction or CSF underproduction have not been substantially associated with intracranial hypotension. It has also led to the fore different atypical clinical features and presentations. Although, it has been known for a long time, the diagnosis is still challenging and dilemma persists over one diagnostic modality over other and the subsequent management. Spontaneous CSF leaks occur at the spinal level and the skull base and other locations are rare. The anatomy of spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a very complex process with significant overlap in connective tissue disorders, previous dural weakness or meningeal diverticula. To localize the location of the CSF leak-CT myelography is the modality of choice. CSF cysternography may provide additional confirmation in uncertain cases and also MRI spine imaging may be of significant help in some cases. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension continues to be a diagnostic dilemma and our effort was to consolidate available information on the clinical features, diagnostics, and management for a practicing neurologist for a "15-20 min quick update of the topic". PMID:26661291

  11. Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Won; Seong, Han Yu

    2013-01-01

    Spinal extradural arachnoid cyst (SEAC) is a rare disease and uncommon cause of compressive myelopathy. The etiology remains still unclear. We experienced 2 cases of SEACs and reviewed the cases and previous literatures. A 59-year-old man complained of both leg radiating pain and paresthesia for 4 years. His MRI showed an extradural cyst from T12 to L3 and we performed cyst fenestration and repaired the dural defect with tailored laminectomy. Another 51-year-old female patient visited our clinical with left buttock pain and paresthesia for 3 years. A large extradural cyst was found at T1-L2 level on MRI and a communication between the cyst and subarachnoid space was illustrated by CT-myelography. We performed cyst fenestration with primary repair of dural defect. Both patients' symptoms gradually subsided and follow up images taken 1-2 months postoperatively showed nearly disappeared cysts. There has been no documented recurrence in these two cases so far. Tailored laminotomy with cyst fenestration can be a safe and effective alternative choice in treating SEACs compared to traditional complete resection of cyst wall with multi-level laminectomy. PMID:24294463

  12. Neurosyphilis manifesting as spinal transverse myelitis.

    PubMed

    Matijosaitis, Vaidas; Vaitkus, Antanas; Pauza, Valius; Valiukeviciene, Skaidra; Gleizniene, Rymante

    2006-01-01

    Spinal myelitis caused by neurosyphilis is an extremely rare disease, and there are only few visual examples of magnetic resonance imaging scans. We present a clinical case of neurosyphilis, which is of great importance concerning diagnostic, differential diagnosis, and tactics of management. A patient complaining of progressive legs weakness, numbness, and shooting-like pain in the legs as well as pelvic dysfunction was admitted to the hospital. Neurological examination revealed spinal cord lesion symptoms: legs weakness, impairment of superficial and deep sensation together with pathological symptoms in the legs. Hernia of intervertebral disc or tumor was suspected, and myelography with computed tomography of the spine was performed. No pathological findings were observed. More precise examination of the patient (a small scar in the genitals and condylomata lata in anal region were noticed) pointed to possible syphilis-induced spinal cord lesion. Serologic syphilis diagnostic tests (Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay, reagin plasma response, serum enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and cerebrospinal fluid tests (general cerebrospinal fluid test and Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test) confirmed the diagnosis of neurosyphilis. Spinal cord lesion determined by magnetic resonance imaging was evaluated as spinal syphilis or syphilis-induced myelitis. Conventional treatment showed a partial effect. PMID:16778468

  13. Intradural lumbar disc herniation after percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy: case report.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Yasuaki; Sakai, Toshinori; Miyagi, Ryo; Nakagawa, Takefumi; Shimakawa, Tateaki; Sairyo, Koichi; Chikawa, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    A 64-year-old man was referred to the authors with low-back pain (LBP) and right leg pain with a history of previously diagnosed lumbar disc herniation (LDH) at L4-5. He had undergone 2 percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomies (PELDs) for the herniation at another institution, and according to the surgical record of the second surgery, a dural tear occurred intraoperatively but was not repaired. Postoperative conservative treatments such as an epidural block and blood patch had not relieved his persistent LBP or right leg pain. Upon referral to the authors, MRI and myelography revealed an intradural LDH. The herniated mass was removed by durotomy, and posterior lumbar interbody fusion was performed. His symptoms were partially improved after surgery. Primary suture is technically difficult when a dural tear occurs during PELD. Therefore, close attention should be paid to avoiding such tears, and surgeons should increase their awareness of intradural LDH as a possible postoperative complication of PELD. PMID:26068274

  14. A three-dimensional digital visualization model of cervical nerves in a healthy person.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiaming; Fu, Dong; Li, Sen

    2013-07-15

    Three-dimensional reconstruction nerve models are classically obtained from two-dimensional ages of "visible human" frozen sections. However, because of the flexibility of nerve tissues and small color differences compared with surrounding tissues, the integrity and validity of nerve tissues can be impaired during milling. Thus, in the present study, we obtained two-dimensional data from a healthy volunteer based on continuous CT angiography and magnetic resonance myelography. Semi-automatic segmentation and reconstruction were then conducted at different thresholds in different tissues using Mimics software. Small anatomical structures such as muscles and cervical nerves were reconstructed using the medical computer aided design module. Three-dimensional digital models of the cervical nerves and their surrounding structures were successfully developed, which allowed visualization of the spatial relation of anatomical structures with a strong three-dimensional effect, distinct appearance, clear distribution, and good continuity, precision, and integrality. These results indicate the validity of a three-dimensional digital visualization model of healthy human cervical nerves, which overcomes the disadvantages of milling, avoids data loss, and exhibits a realistic appearance and three-dimensional image. PMID:25206491

  15. [Panmedullary ependymoma with complete excision in several stages. Apropos of a case].

    PubMed

    Fuentes, J M; Benezech, J; Abounader, M; Lamur, M; Aubert, D; Marty, M

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of a panmedullary ependymoma involved a three-stage operation with total excision under microscopic control and the use of the Cavitron. The patient, a 22 year old woman, presented with a three-year history, with clinical onset of staged spinal pain and cervicobrachial neuralgia, of spasmodic paraparesis with sensory and sphincter disturbances. The extent of the lesion from C3 to L2 was determined from data from conventional myelography with Iopamiron, a CT scan with intrathecal contrast and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of sagittal and frontal sections. The tumor, a grade I ependymoma, was treated by three-stage laminectomies (L2-T12, T12-T3, T3-C3), total excision being obtained by ultrasound fragmentation (Cavitron). Gross pathology showed a heterogeneous appearance with two cysts, one capping the tumor from the bulbospinal junction to C3, the other attached to the medullary cone. Hemorrhagic cavities were noted at cervicothoracic region and multiple microcysts in the dorsal expansion. The postoperative course was uneventful with recovery of walking wearing a bivalve acrylic corset, the most disturbing functional complication being the posterior cord syndrome responsible for an ataxia. PMID:3822026

  16. Epidural blood patch for spontaneous intracranial hypotension with chronic subdural haematoma: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Jin, Dan; Pan, Kong-Han

    2016-08-01

    Spinal leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is considered to be the primary cause of spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH). Subdural haematoma (SDH) is a serious complication of SIH. This current report presents a case of bilateral SDH with SIH that was treated with epidural blood patching (EBP). A 43-year-old male complained of experiencing orthostatic headaches for 2 months without neurological signs. The patient worsened in a local hospital and was transferred to the Sir Run Run Hospital. Brain computed tomography showed bilateral SDH with a midline shift. The patient underwent emergency trephination in the left frontal temporal region. Postoperative magnetic resonance myelography showed a CSF leak originating at the T11-L2 level. As a consequence of clinical deterioration of the patient, EBP was subsequently performed at the T12-L1 level. The headache was rapidly relieved and later the SDH was completely absorbed. This case report and literature review aims to remind clinicians that SIH can cause SDH and that EBP is a viable treatment option. PMID:27225863

  17. Fractures of the thoraco-lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Lifeso, R M; Arabie, K M; Kadhi, S K

    1985-08-01

    A personal prospective study of 98 consecutive patients presenting with neurological impairment and fractures or dislocations between the 9th thoracic and 2nd lumbar vertebrae bodies. Fifty-three patients underwent Harrington instrumentation, and 45 patients were treated recumbently. Neurological improvement was much better following Harrington rods in the complete paraplegia group but there was no difference in neurological recovery between the two groups in those with incomplete paraplegia. Forty-two patients who had been stabilised with Harrington rods underwent post-operative myelography or tomography to assess the adequacy of spinal decompression. The best results were in patients with adequate neural canal decompression. In 21 cases decompression had not been adequate, usually due to a stereotyped pattern in which the postero-superior aspect of the fractured body remained in the neural canal. All 21 underwent anterior decompression at an average of five months post injury. All the incomplete anterior decompression at an average of five months post injury. All the incomplete paraplegics (nine patients) regained the ability to walk, three of the 12 complete paraplegics improved and regained the ability to walk with bilateral ankle-foot orthoses. Neurological improvement was dependent upon the adequacy of spinal cord decompression and not upon Harrington rods. per se. Harrington rods alone were not adequate to decompress the spinal canal in 50 per cent of cases. The best results after anterior decompression occurred where neural compression was caused by a minimally displaced wedge fracture distal to T12. PMID:4047711

  18. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension manifesting as a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift.

    PubMed

    Inamasu, Joji; Moriya, Shigeta; Shibata, Junpei; Kumai, Tadashi; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a syndrome in which hypovolemia of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) results in various symptoms. Although its prognosis is usually benign, cases with a rapid neurologic deterioration resulting in an altered mental status have been reported. One of the characteristic radiographic findings in such cases is the presence of bilateral accumulation of subdural fluid (hematoma/hygroma). When SIH-related subdural hematoma is present only unilaterally with a concomitant midline shift, making an accurate diagnosis may be challenging, and inadvertent hematoma evacuation may result in further neurologic deterioration. We report a 58-year-old woman with an altered mental status who had visited a local hospital and in whom a brain CT showed a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift. She was referred to our department because of her neurologic deterioration after hematoma evacuation. A CT myelography revealed a massive CSF leakage in the entire thoracic epidural space. She made a full neurologic recovery following blood patch therapy. Our case is unique and educational because the suspicion for SIH as an underlying cause of subdural hematoma is warranted in nongeriatric patients not only with bilateral but also unilateral lesions. An immediate search for CSF leakage may be important in cases with failed hematoma evacuation surgery. PMID:25969682

  19. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Manifesting as a Unilateral Subdural Hematoma with a Marked Midline Shift

    PubMed Central

    Inamasu, Joji; Moriya, Shigeta; Shibata, Junpei; Kumai, Tadashi; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a syndrome in which hypovolemia of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) results in various symptoms. Although its prognosis is usually benign, cases with a rapid neurologic deterioration resulting in an altered mental status have been reported. One of the characteristic radiographic findings in such cases is the presence of bilateral accumulation of subdural fluid (hematoma/hygroma). When SIH-related subdural hematoma is present only unilaterally with a concomitant midline shift, making an accurate diagnosis may be challenging, and inadvertent hematoma evacuation may result in further neurologic deterioration. We report a 58-year-old woman with an altered mental status who had visited a local hospital and in whom a brain CT showed a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift. She was referred to our department because of her neurologic deterioration after hematoma evacuation. A CT myelography revealed a massive CSF leakage in the entire thoracic epidural space. She made a full neurologic recovery following blood patch therapy. Our case is unique and educational because the suspicion for SIH as an underlying cause of subdural hematoma is warranted in nongeriatric patients not only with bilateral but also unilateral lesions. An immediate search for CSF leakage may be important in cases with failed hematoma evacuation surgery. PMID:25969682

  20. A Symptomatic Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst with Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Kadono, Yoshinori; Yuguchi, Takamichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Iwatsuki, Koichi; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural arachnoid cyst (EAC) is a rare, usually asymptomatic condition of unknown origin, which typically involves the lower thoracic spine. We report a case of posttraumatic symptomatic EAC with lumbar disc herniation. A 22-year-old man experienced back pain and sciatica after a traffic accident. Neurological examination revealed a right L5 radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a cystic lesion at the L3 to L5 level and an L4-5 disc herniation; computed tomography myelography showed that the right L5 root was sandwiched between the cyst and the herniation. A dural defect was identified during surgery. The cyst was excised completely and the defect was repaired. A herniation was excised beside the dural sac. Histology showed that the cyst wall consisted of collagen and meningothelial cells. Postoperatively the symptoms resolved. Lumbar spinal EACs are rare; such cysts may arise from a congenital dural crack and grow gradually. The 6 cases of symptomatic lumbar EAC reported in the literature were not associated with disc herniation or trauma. In this case, the comorbid disc herniation was involved in symptom progression. Although many EACs are asymptomatic, comorbid spinal disorders such as disc herniation or trauma can result in symptom progression. PMID:25861499

  1. Paraspinal electromyographic abnormalities as a predictor of occult metastatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Watson, R; Waylonis, G W

    1975-05-01

    Profound membrane irritability localized primarily to the paraspinal muscles was the major electromyographic criterion proposed by LaBan and associates to predict the early presence and localization of spinal metastatic disease. A retrospective review was recently conducted to determine the accuracy of this interpretation and the effect of the electromyographic report on the attending physician's subsequent workup. In an analysis of 1800 electromyograms at Riverside Hospital, 91 cases were found which met the following criteria: (1) three or more paraspinal segments involved, (2) little or no membrane irritability in the anterior rami, and (3) no previous surgery on the paraspinal area. The proven discharge diagnoses were carcinoma in 24%, herniated nucleus pulposus in 28%, degenerative disc disease in 16%, diabetes mellitus in 9% and miscellaneous in 8%; in 15% no diagnosis could be made. We were unable to differentiate some cases of herniated nucleus pulposus from carcinoma using such criteria as profoundness of levels or number of spinal segments involved. There are partial explanations of why only paraspinal segments may be involved with profound changes in the diseases mentioned, but no explanation for the widespred involvement in localized disease such as a herniated disc. At our hospital it was interesting to note that internists infrequently order myelography or cerebrospinal fluid analysis while orthopedists, neurosurgeons and neurologists rarely order metastatic surveys. PMID:1137474

  2. Digital Subtraction Cystography for Detection of Communicating Holes of Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Kyowon; Kim, Eun-Sang

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the usefulness of digital subtraction cystography to identify communicating holes between a spinal extradural arachnoid cyst (SEAC) and the subarachnoid space prior to cyst removal and hole closure. Materials and Methods Six patients with SEAC were enrolled in this retrospective study. Digital subtraction cystography and subsequent CT myelography were performed for every patient. The presence and location of the communicating holes on cystography were documented. We evaluated the MRI characteristics of the cysts, including location, size, and associated spinal cord compression; furthermore, we reviewed cystographic images, CT myelograms, procedural reports, and medical records for analysis. If surgery was performed after cystography, intraoperative findings were compared with preoperative cystography. Results The location of the communicating hole between the arachnoid cyst and the subarachnoid space was identified by digital subtraction cystography in all cases (n = 6). Surgical resection of SEAC was performed in 4 patients, and intraoperative location of the communicating hole exactly corresponded to the preoperative identification. Conclusion Fluoroscopic-guided cystography for SEAC accurately demonstrates the presence and location of dural defects. Preoperative digital subtraction cystography is useful for detection of a communicating hole between a cyst and the subarachnoid space. PMID:26798223

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance proton imaging of bone pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Atlan, H.; Sigal, R.; Hadar, H.; Chisin, R.; Cohen, I.; Lanir, A.; Soudry, M.; Machtey, Y.; Schreiber, R.; Benmair, J.

    1986-02-01

    Thirty-two patients with diversified pathology were examined with a supraconductive NMR imager using spin echo with different TR and TE to obtain T1 and T2 weighted images. They included 20 tumors (12 primary, eight metastasis), six osteomyelitis, three fractures, two osteonecrosis, and one diffuse metabolic (Gaucher) disease. In all cases except for the stress fractures, the bone pathology was clearly visualized in spite of the normal lack of signal from the compact cortical bone. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging proved to be at least as sensitive as radionuclide scintigraphy but much more accurate than all other imaging procedures including computed tomography (CT) and angiography to assess the extension of the lesions, especially in tumors extended to soft tissue. This is due both to easy acquisition of sagittal and coronal sections and to different patterns of pathologic modifications of T1 and T2 which are beginning to be defined. It is hoped that more experience in clinical use of these patterns will help to discriminate between tumor extension and soft-tissue edema. We conclude that while radionuclide scintigraphy will probably remain the most sensitive and easy to perform screening test for bone pathology, NMR imaging, among noninvasive diagnostic procedures, appears to be at least as specific as CT. In addition, where the extension of the lesions is concerned, NMR imaging is much more informative than CT. In pathology of the spine, the easy visualization of the spinal cord should decrease the need for myelography.

  4. COMPARISON BETWEEN MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING ESTIMATES OF EXTRACRANIAL CEREBROSPINAL FLUID VOLUME AND PHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS IN HEALTHY DOGS.

    PubMed

    Reinitz, László Z; Bajzik, Gábor; Garamvölgyi, Rita; Petneházy, Örs; Lassó, András; Abonyi-Tóth, Zsolt; Lőrincz, Borbála; Sótonyi, Péter

    2015-01-01

    Dosages for myelography procedures in dogs are based on a hypothetical proportional relationship between bodyweight and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume. Anecdotal radiographic evidence and recent studies have challenged the existence of such a defined relationship in dogs. The objectives of this prospective cross-sectional study were to describe CSF volumes using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a group of clinically healthy dogs, measure the accuracy of MRI CSF volumes, and compare MRI CSF volumes with dog physical measurements. A sampling perfection with application optimized contrast using different flip-angle evolution MRI examination of the central nervous system was carried out on 12 healthy, male mongrel dogs, aged between 3 and 5 years with a bodyweight range of 7.5-35.0 kg. The images were processed with image analysis freeware (3D Slicer) in order to calculate the volume of extracranial CSF. Cylindrical phantoms of known volume were included in scans and used to calculate accuracy of MRI volume estimates. The accuracy of MRI volume estimates was 99.8%. Extracranial compartment CSF volumes ranged from 20.21 to 44.06 ml. Overall volume of the extracranial CSF increased linearly with bodyweight, but the proportional volume (ml/bodyweight kilograms) of the extracranial CSF was inversely proportional to bodyweight. Relative ratios of volumes in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbosacral regions were constant. Findings indicated that the current standard method of using body weight to calculate dosages of myelographic contrast agents in dogs may need to be revised. PMID:26311617

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal injury.

    PubMed

    Tracy, P T; Wright, R M; Hanigan, W C

    1989-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 30 patients following spinal injury (SI). Spin-echo sequences and surface coils were used for all patients. Plain radiographs, high-resolution computed tomography (CT), and MRI were compared for the delineation of bone, disc, and ligament injury, measurement of sagittal spinal canal diameter and subluxation, epidural hematoma, and spinal cord structure. Myelography or intrathecal contrast-enhanced CT were not performed on any of these patients. Magnetic resonance imaging accurately delineated intraspinal pathology in two of four patients with acute penetrating SI, and was normal in the other two patients. In 16 patients with acute nonpenetrating SI, MRI was superior to CT for visualizing injuries to discs, ligaments, and the spinal cord, while CT was superior to MRI in characterizing bony injury. Computed tomography and MRI provided similar measurements of subluxation in six of six patients and of sagittal spinal canal diameter in three of four patients. In ten patients with chronic SI, MRI demonstrated post-traumatic cysts, myelomalacia, spinal cord edema, and the presence or absence of spinal cord compression. In patients with acute penetrating SI and chronic SI, MRI provided comprehensive clinical information. In patients with acute nonpenetrating SI, the information obtained by MRI complemented the data given by plain radiographs and CT, allowing clinical decisions to be made without the need of invasive imaging modalities. PMID:2711244

  6. Presumptive exercise-associated peracute thoracolumbar disc extrusion in 48 dogs.

    PubMed

    McKee, W M; Downes, C J; Pink, J J; Gemmill, T J

    2010-04-24

    Forty-eight dogs were diagnosed with presumptive exercise-associated peracute thoracolumbar disc extrusion. The median age was seven years (range two to 11 years), and median bodyweight was 23 kg (range 10 to 41 kg). The duration of signs before presentation ranged from 0.5 to four days. Twenty-nine dogs were non-ambulatory, of which 17 were incontinent and two had lost pain perception. Pelvic limbs were hyporeflexic or areflexic in 11 dogs. Intervertebral disc narrowing was evident on radiographs in 44 dogs. Myelography demonstrated a small, extradural space-occupying lesion dorsal to an intervertebral disc between T11-12 and L3-4 with adjacent spinal cord swelling. Forty-six dogs were treated non-surgically, one was euthanased and one was managed by hemilaminectomy (and subsequently euthanased). Follow-up information was available for 46 dogs 1.5 to 55 months after injury (median 22 months) showing that pelvic limb function had improved in all cases and all non-ambulatory dogs had regained the ability to walk. Six dogs remained faecally incontinent, and one dog remained urinarily and faecally incontinent. PMID:20418513

  7. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension: Targeted or blind blood patch.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this review is to determine the efficacy and optimal strategy for epidural blood patch placement in the treatment of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. We present a 37-year-old man who developed a 4 week duration postural headache without sustaining significant trauma. The diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension with associated subdural hygromas was confirmed with lumbar puncture and radiologic imaging. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is generally due to cerebrospinal fluid leak from the thecal sac or nerve root sleeves, although the cause of leakage is unknown. In our patient, the site of leakage was identified at cervical C1-C2 level in the spine on myelography. Conservative management with repeated epidural blood patches was successful in symptom relief and complete resolution of cerebrospinal fluid leak and subdural hygromas. We reviewed the literature for efficacy of blood patches delivered directly to the site of leakage (targeted) or to the lumbar or thoracic spine away from the site of leakage or where the site cannot be determined (blind). No clear evidence exists on comparative efficacy due to paucity of randomized trials. However, epidural blood patches in general result in positive outcomes with overall efficacy near 90%. Some trials have suggested greater efficacy for targeted rather than blind epidural blood patches, but randomized studies and long-term prognosis remain to be evaluated. PMID:26461907

  8. Inherited prothrombotic risk factors and cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hillier, C E; Collins, P W; Bowen, D J; Bowley, S; Wiles, C M

    1998-10-01

    Fifteen patients with cerebral venous thrombosis were ascertained retrospectively. Their case notes were reviewed, and stored or new blood was assayed for factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation, prothrombin gene mutation 20201A, and 5,10 methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutation. A clinical risk factor was identified in 13 patients--the oral contraceptive pill (5), puerperium (1), HRT (1), mastoiditis (1), dehydration (1), lumbar puncture and myelography (1), carcinoma (1), lupus anticoagulant (2). In addition, two patients had the FVL mutation and five (one of whom also had the FVL mutation) were homozygous for the MTHFR mutation. The latter showed a higher than expected frequency compared to 300 healthy controls from South Wales (OR 3.15.95% Cl 1.01-9.83). No patient had the prothrombin 20201A mutation. Two patients died and three had a monocular visual deficit following anticoagulation (13) or thrombolytic (2) treatment, but there was no association between the presence of a primary prothrombotic risk factor and outcome. These results confirm the importance of investigating patients for both clinical predisposing factors and primary prothrombotic states. PMID:10024925

  9. Spinal meningiomas in dogs: Description of 8 cases including a novel radiological and histopathological presentation

    PubMed Central

    José-López, Roberto; de la Fuente, Cristian; Pumarola, Martí; Añor, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Clinical, imaging, and histological features of 8 canine spinal meningiomas, including a cervical cystic meningioma with imaging and intraoperative features of an arachnoid cyst, are described. All meningiomas were histologically classified and graded following the international World Health Organization human classification for tumors. Six meningiomas were located in the cervical spinal cord. Myelography showed intradural/ extramedullary lesions in 3/4 cases. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed hyperintense intradural/extramedullary masses on pre-contrast T1-weighted and T2-weighted images with homogeneous contrast enhancement in 7/8 cases. One dog had a cerebrospinal fluid-filled subarachnoid cavity dorsal to the cervical spinal cord. A spinal arachnoid cyst was diagnosed on imaging, but the histopathological study of the resected tissue revealed a grade I meningothelial cystic meningioma. There were no differences in outcome associated with tumor grade and surgical treatment (6/8). Cystic meningioma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraspinal cystic lesions, and biopsy is necessary for definitive diagnosis. PMID:24155414

  10. Spinal meningiomas in dogs: description of 8 cases including a novel radiological and histopathological presentation.

    PubMed

    José-López, Roberto; de la Fuente, Cristian; Pumarola, Martí; Añor, Sonia

    2013-10-01

    Clinical, imaging, and histological features of 8 canine spinal meningiomas, including a cervical cystic meningioma with imaging and intraoperative features of an arachnoid cyst, are described. All meningiomas were histologically classified and graded following the international World Health Organization human classification for tumors. Six meningiomas were located in the cervical spinal cord. Myelography showed intradural/ extramedullary lesions in 3/4 cases. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed hyperintense intradural/extramedullary masses on pre-contrast T1-weighted and T2-weighted images with homogeneous contrast enhancement in 7/8 cases. One dog had a cerebrospinal fluid-filled subarachnoid cavity dorsal to the cervical spinal cord. A spinal arachnoid cyst was diagnosed on imaging, but the histopathological study of the resected tissue revealed a grade I meningothelial cystic meningioma. There were no differences in outcome associated with tumor grade and surgical treatment (6/8). Cystic meningioma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraspinal cystic lesions, and biopsy is necessary for definitive diagnosis. PMID:24155414

  11. Cranial thoracic disc protrusions in three German Shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Gaitero, Lluís; Añor, Sònia

    2009-11-01

    Although intervertebral disc degeneration can occur at any level of the spine, cervical and thoraco-lumbar discs are more commonly affected. The presence of the inter-capital ligament between the rib heads results in an extremely low incidence of cranial thoracic intervertebral disc herniation. In this case series, the clinical, radiological, and surgical findings, as well as the post-operative outcome, in three German Shepherd dogs with T2-T3 disc protrusions is reported. These dogs had chronic progressive paraparesis and lumbar myelography and post-myelographic computerised tomography revealed ventrolateral, extra-dural spinal cord compressions over the T2-T3 intervertebral disc. All animals exhibited transient deterioration in their clinical signs and one developed unilateral Horner's syndrome following T2-T3 hemi-dorsal laminectomy. Subsequently two of the dogs improved progressively and neurological dysfunction had completely resolved by 2 months. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case series describing T2-T3 disc protrusions in the dog. PMID:18691916

  12. Lumbar spinal stenosis CAD from clinical MRM and MRI based on inter- and intra-context features with a two-level classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Jaehan; Alomari, Raja S.; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

    2011-03-01

    An imaging test has an important role in the diagnosis of lumbar abnormalities since it allows to examine the internal structure of soft tissues and bony elements without the need of an unnecessary surgery and recovery time. For the past decade, among various imaging modalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has taken the significant part of the clinical evaluation of the lumbar spine. This is mainly due to technological advancements that lead to the improvement of imaging devices in spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and multi-planar capabilities. In addition, noninvasive nature of MRI makes it easy to diagnose many common causes of low back pain such as disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and degenerative disc diseases. In this paper, we propose a method to diagnose lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), a narrowing of the spinal canal, from magnetic resonance myelography (MRM) images. Our method segments the thecal sac in the preprocessing stage, generates the features based on inter- and intra-context information, and diagnoses lumbar disc stenosis. Experiments with 55 subjects show that our method achieves 91.3% diagnostic accuracy. In the future, we plan to test our method on more subjects.

  13. Symptomatic Large Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ho-Yeon; Lee, Sun-Ho; Kim, Eun-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Spinal extradural arachnoid cysts (SEACs) are relatively rare cause of compressive myelopathy. SEACs can be either congenital or acquired, but the etiology and the mechanism for their development are still unclear. A number of cases have been reported in the literature, and the one-way valve mechanism is the most widely accepted theory which explains the expansion of cysts and spinal cord compression. We report two cases of SEAC in this article. Patients had intermittent, progressive cord compressing symptoms. MRI image showed large SEAC which caused compression of the spinal cord. Pre-operative cystography and CT myelography were performed to identify the communicating tract. Pre-operative epidural cystography showed a fistulous tract. The patients underwent primary closure of the dural defect which was a communicating tract. The operative finding (nerve root herniation through the tract) suggested that the SEAC developed through a checkvalve mechanism. Postoperatively, the patients had no surgical complications and symptoms were relieved. Based on our experience, preoperative identification of the communicating tract is important in surgical planning. Although surgical excision is the standard surgical treatment, primary closure of the dural defect which was a communicating tract can be an acceptable surgical strategy. PMID:26512289

  14. The stability, polyadenylic acid content and ribonucleoprotein form of nulcear ribonucleic acid in artichoke.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, K S; Ingle, J

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear preparation, containing 60-80% of the total tissue DNA and less than 0.5% of the total rRNA, was used to characterize the nuclear RNA species synthesized in cultured artichoke explants. The half-lives of the nuclear RNA species were estimated from first-order-decay analyses to be: hnRNA (heterogeneous nuclear RNA) containing poly(A), 38 min; hnRNA lacking poly(A), 37 min; 2.5 X 10(6)-mol. wt. precursor rRNA, 24 min; 1.4 X 10(6)-mol.wt. precursor rRNA, 58 min; 1.0 X 10(6)-mol.wt. precursor rRNA, 52 min. The shorter half-lives are probably overestimates, owing to the time required for equilibration of the nucleotide-precursor pools. The pathway of rRNA synthesis is considered in terms of these kinetic measurements. The rate of accumulation of cytoplasmic polydisperse RNA suggested that as much as 40% of the hnRNA may be transported to the cytoplasm. The 14-25% of the hnRNA that contained a poly(A) tract had an average molecular size of 0.7 X 10(6) daltons. The poly(A) segment was 40-200 nucleotides long, consisted of at least 95% AMP and accounted for 8-10% of the [32P]orthophosphate incorporated into the poly(A)-containing hnRNA. Ribonucleoprotein particles released from nuclei by sonication, lysis in EDTA or incubation in buffer were analysed by sedimentation through sucrose gradients and by isopycnic centrifugation in gradients of metrizamide and CsCl. More than 50% of the hnRNA remained bound to the chromatin after each treatment. The hnRNA was always associated with protein but the densities of isolated particles suggested that the ratio of protein to RNA was lower than that reported for mammalian cells, The particles separated from chromatin were not enriched for poly(A)-containing hnRNA. PMID:1008819

  15. Posterior thoracic laminoplasty with dorsal, intradural identification of ventral defect and transdural discectomy for a spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak: case report.

    PubMed

    Pricola Fehnel, Katie; Borges, Lawrence F

    2015-05-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) has been increasingly reported in the literature concomitant with the improved sensitivity of imaging modalities. Although typically associated with meningeal weakening, a handful of cases of SIH secondary to thoracic disc osteophytes have been reported. Five of 7 reported cases were treated with epidural blood patch (EBP) alone while 2 required surgical management. There is no standard operative approach; both anterior and posterolateral approaches can be cumbersome and associated with morbidity, particularly in young, healthy patients. The authors report a case of SIH in which a ventral dural tear secondary to a calcified thoracic disc was repaired via posterior thoracic laminoplasty with dorsal durotomy and intradural exposure of the ventral defect with transdural discectomy followed by primary closure. A 34-year-old man presented with low-pressure headaches following axial load injury from a ski accident 5 years earlier. The patient's symptoms were refractory to a trial of conservative treatment and EBP, and he developed bilateral upper-extremity paresthesias. MRI of the spine demonstrated an extrathecal collection spanning the thoracic spine, and dynamic CT myelography identified contrast extravasation adjacent to a calcified paramedian disc at T9-10. The patient underwent posterior laminoplasty with neuromonitoring. A ventral dural defect was visualized via a dorsal durotomy, the penetrating disc osteophyte was removed transdurally, and the ventral and dorsal dura maters were closed primarily. Both somatosensory and motor evoked potentials were unchanged during surgery. The patient has remained asymptomatic more than 10 months postoperatively and he has resumed work as a surgeon. Cases of SIH secondary to a calcified thoracic disc are rare with little precedent as to optimal surgical intervention. This case illustrates the potential usefulness of posterior laminectomy in nonmyelopathic patients in whom there is no

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid leakage and headache after lumbar puncture: a prospective non-invasive imaging study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yen-Feng; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Lirng, Jiing-Feng; Chen, Shih-Pin; Hseu, Shu-Shya; Wu, Jaw-Ching; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2015-06-01

    The spatial distribution and clinical correlation of cerebrospinal fluid leakage after lumbar puncture have not been determined. Adult in-patients receiving diagnostic lumbar punctures were recruited prospectively. Whole-spine heavily T2-weighted magnetic resonance myelography was carried out to characterize post-lumbar puncture spinal cerebrospinal fluid leakages. Maximum rostral migration was defined as the distance between the most rostral spinal segment with cerebrospinal fluid leakage and the level of lumbar puncture. Eighty patients (51 female/29 male, mean age 49.4 ± 13.3 years) completed the study, including 23 (28.8%) with post-dural puncture headache. Overall, 63.6% of periradicular leaks and 46.9% of epidural collections were within three vertebral segments of the level of lumbar puncture (T12-S1). Post-dural puncture headache was associated with more extensive and more rostral distributions of periradicular leaks (length 3.0 ± 2.5 versus 0.9 ± 1.9 segments, P = 0.001; maximum rostral migration 4.3 ± 4.7 versus 0.8 ± 1.7 segments, P = 0.002) and epidural collections (length 5.3 ± 6.1 versus 1.0 ± 2.1 segments, P = 0.003; maximum rostral migration 4.7 ± 6.7 versus 0.9 ± 2.4 segments, P = 0.015). In conclusion, post-dural puncture headache was associated with more extensive and more rostral distributions of periradicular leaks and epidural collections. Further, visualization of periradicular leaks was not restricted to the level of dural defect, although two-thirds remained within the neighbouring segments. PMID:25688077

  17. Long-term results of a pilot study of low dose cranial-spinal irradiation for cerebellar medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, W.N.; Schneider, P.A.; Tokars, R.P.

    1987-11-01

    Between May 1974 and March 1983, 44 children with histologically verified cerebellar medulloblastoma were seen for post-operative cranial-spinal irradiation following attempted total tumor removal. Six patients were excluded from review because they received all or part of their treatment at another institution (3 patients) or did not complete the planned course of irradiation (3 patients). All of the 38 remaining patients were treated by a previously described technique on a 4 MeV Linear Accelerator with 55 Gy delivered to the primary tumor site. Prior to December 1978, 19 consecutive children (Group A) had spinal prophylactic doses of 30-40 Gy and brain prophylactic doses of 40-50 Gy. After the date, 25 Gy was given to the cranial-spinal axis of 19 consecutive children (Group B). This lower dose was arbitrarily selected with the hope of reducing morbidity in treated survivors and achieving the same tumor control. Risk factors that define good and poor prognosis were evaluated for each group, and there were no differences noted. Myelography and CSF cytology were not routinely performed. Follow-up for the 38 patients ranges from 20 months to 124 months. For the low risk patients, survival (12/15 or 80%) was independent of cranial-spinal radiation dose (Group A 6/8, Group B 6/7). For the high risk patients survival was poor (9/23 or 39%), not dependent on cranial-spinal radiation dose (Group A 5/11, Group B 4/12), and associated with failure at the primary site (10/14), often with CSF seeding (8/10). The other 4 failures include 2 who had moved outside the United States (details of failure are unknown), 1 with supratentorial, CSF seeding and distant metastases, and 1 with distant metastasis only.

  18. [Familial spastic paraplegia with syndrome of continuous muscle fiber activity (Isaacs)].

    PubMed

    Yokota, T; Matsunaga, T; Furukawa, T; Tsukagoshi, H

    1989-06-01

    A woman aged fifty-three developed paraparesis at the age of 4, which progressed slowly and required crutches by the age of 30. At the age of 51, muscle stiffness involved bilateral hands and arms gradually. At the age of 53, she suffered from painful spasms in right deltoid muscle. Her two brothers had spastic paraplegia without other neurological deficits. Her paternal grandfather and maternal grandmother were cousins. Slight dementia was noted (WAIS: IQ, 79). Her posture was stiff and muscles of upper limbs were in a persistent contraction; Subcutaneous tissue was thin, and muscles were well-defined and firm. There was moderate muscle weakness of legs and hands. Continuous fasciculations and myokymias were recognized in muscles of the arms and the limb girdles. Muscle tone was considerably increased especially in the bilateral arms. The deep tendon reflexes were exaggerated with extensor plantar responses. Profuse sweating affected palms, soles and backs. No sensory disturbance was appreciated. There was no myotonic responses to percussion of muscles. Following laboratory data were normal; thyroid functions, CSF studies, anti HTLV-I antibody and long chain fatty acid in red blood cells, myelography and brain CT except for increased basal metabolic rate (53%). Electromyographic study in the arms and hands revealed spontaneous motor unit activities including doublets at rest and increased proportion of polyphasic potentials and high amplitude potentials in voluntary contraction. Biopsy of right quadriceps femoris muscle showed hypertrophy of type I fibers and angulated atrophy of type II fibers. Continuous muscle activities in upper limbs did not change at sleep or with intravenous administration of 7 mg diazepam.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2803825

  19. Clinical Presentation of Cervical Myelopathy at C1–2 Level

    PubMed Central

    Takebayashi, Tsuneo; Terashima, Yoshinori; Tsuda, Hajime; Yoshimoto, Mitsunori; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Single-center retrospective study. Purpose To clarify the clinical features of cervical myelopathy at the C1–2 level. Overview of Literature Methods for distinguishing the affected level based on myelomere symptoms or dysfunction of the conducting pathway were established. However, no symptoms have been identified as being specific to the C1–2 level segment. Methods We evaluated 24 patients with cervical myelopathy due to spinal cord compression at the C1–2 level. Preoperative neurological assessment were investigated and compared with the rate and site of compression of the spinal cord using computed tomography-myelography. Results Impaired temperature and pain sensation were confirmed in 18 of the 24 patients with that localized to the upper arms (n=3), forearm (n=9), both (n=2), and whole body (n=4). Muscle weakness was observed in 18 patients, muscle weakness extended from the biceps brachii to the abductor digiti minimi in 10 patients, and in the whole body in 8 patients. Deep tendon reflexes were normal in 10 patients, whereas hyperactive deep tendon reflexes were noted in 14 patients. The rate of spinal cord compression was significantly higher in patients with perceptual dysfunction and muscle weakness compared with those with no dysfunction. However, no significant difference in the rate and site of compression was identified in those with dysfunction. Conclusions Perceptual dysfunction and muscle weakness localized to the upper limbs was observed in 58% and 42% of patients, respectively. Neurological abnormalities, such as perceptual dysfunction and muscle weakness, were visualized in patients with marked compression. PMID:27559458

  20. [MR imaging of the spinal cord--with special emphasis on the factors influencing spinal cord measurement].

    PubMed

    Miyasaka, K

    1992-03-01

    On MR images the spinal cord is seen differently in size depending on imaging parameters and displaying window; consequently the findings may be interpreted erroneously as swelling or atrophy of the spinal cord. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate factors influencing spinal cord size on images and to determine the optimal condition estimating the size of the spinal cord. At first we selected 4 cases suspected of cervical spinal disorders which had been examined by both MRI and myelography with tomography. Sagittal diameter of the spinal cord was measured on a film and it was significantly different of those three. That is, the measurement value was greater on T1 weighted image (T1WI) and smaller on T2 weighted image (T2WI) than myelo-tomography. To evaluate the effect of imaging parameters, image reconstruction and image displaying window quantitatively, studied were the cadaveric cervical spinal cord and gelatin phantom tube with a diameter of 13 mm and 9 mm placed in a saline-filled plastic tube. The measurement value was significantly greater on T1WI and smaller on T2WI than true size of the objects. Numbers of phase encoding (128 and 256) significantly affected the measurement value, both on T1WI and T2WI, as well. Ringing artifact of high or low signal was observed at the boundary area of the objects and saline (so-called truncation artifact). However, when the window-level of displaying image was raised stepwisely the measurement value was proportionally decreased and it reached to real value when the level was adjusted at the mean MR signal intensity of the object and saline.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1591101

  1. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension following epidural anesthesia: a case report.

    PubMed

    An, X; Wu, S; He, F; Li, C; Fang, X

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of refractory spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) following epidural anesthesia. In this case, typical clinical symptoms and concomitant use of regional anesthesia led to the misdiagnosis of SIH as post-dural puncture headache (PDPH). A 56-year-old man received a successful appendectomy under epidural anesthesia performed at a T11-T12 intravertebral space. About 20 h later, the patient started complaining about orthostatic headache when getting up from his lying position, then a PDPH was diagnosed. However, the patient did not respond well to conservative treatment. Three months later, the first epidural blood patch was performed at the L3-L4 level, however, the patient still had an orthostatic headache. Five days later, spine magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple meningeal diverticulum in the cervicothoracic junction, and computerized tomography myelography demonstrated a C5-C6 spinal dural tear suggesting cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Finally, the patient was diagnosed as SIH and received a second epidural blood patch at the T2-T3 level and responded with improvements in symptomatology. The patient was then discharged, and at a 2-year follow-up, he had fully recovered except for some remaining neck stiffness. This case illustrates that SIH was misdiagnosed as PDPH because of the common clinical symptoms and potentially confounding events (epidural/spinal anesthesia and assumption that it was a case of PDPH). It is important to carefully observe patients in such conditions and promptly conduct suitable diagnostic tests. For a successful treatment of SIH, a timely epidural blood patch should be considered as soon as the diagnosis is established. PMID:26939569

  2. Tumors at the lateral portion of the C1-2 interlaminar space compressing the spinal cord by rotation of the atlantoaxial joint: new aspects of spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Hiroshi; Kusakabe, Takashi; Aizawa, Toshimi; Nakamura, Takeshi; Ishii, Yushin; Itoi, Eiji

    2012-12-01

    The authors describe 2 patients with C-2 nerve root tumors in whom the lesions were located bilaterally in the lateral portions of the C1-2 interlaminar space and compressed the spinal cord when the atlantoaxial joint was rotated. The patients were adult men with neurofibromatosis. Each presented with clumsiness of both hands and motor weakness of the extremities accompanied by spastic gait. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine performed with the neck in the neutral position showed tumors at the bilateral lateral portion of the C1-2 interlaminar space without direct compression of the spinal cord. The spinal cord exhibited an I-shaped deformity at the same level as the tumors in one case and a trapezoidal deformity at the same level as the tumors in the other case. Computed tomography myelography and MRI on rotation of the cervical spine revealed bilateral intracanal protrusion of the tumors compressing the spinal cord from the lateral side. The tumors were successfully excised and occipitocervical fusion was performed. The tumors were pushed out into the spinal canal from the bilateral lateral portion of the interlaminar spaces due to rotation of the atlantoaxial joint. This was caused by a combination of posteromedial displacement of the lateral mass on the rotational side of the atlas and narrowing of the lateral portion of the interlaminar space on the contralateral side due to the coupling motion of the lateral bending and extension of the atlas. The spinal cord underwent compression from both lateral sides in a one-way rotation. Without sustained spinal cord compression, intermittent long-term dynamic spinal cord compression from both lateral sides should induce a pathognomonic spinal cord deformity and the onset of paralysis. To the authors' knowledge, there have been no reports of the present conditions-that is, the bilateral protrusion of tumors from the bilateral lateral portion of the C1-2 interlaminar spaces into the spinal canal due to

  3. [Iatrogenic spinal epidermoid tumors. A late complication of spinal puncture].

    PubMed

    Reina, M A; López-García, A; Dittmann, M; de Andrés, J A; Blázquez, M G

    1996-04-01

    INTRODUCTION. Epidermoid tumors in the spinal canal are rare. Whether congenitally or iatrogenically caused, they form as the result of epidermal cells implanted within the spinal channel. Such implantation can occur during a variety of procedures and events such as bullet wounds, surgery, myelography or punctures for diagnosis, anesthesia or treatment. Although this complication is not discussed in books or journals on anesthesiology, we have found it mentioned in over 100 published cases reporting iatrogenically caused spinal epidermoid tumors. ETIOPATHOGENESIS. Iatrogenic epidermoid tumors of the spine derive from the implantation of epidermal tissue transported inside the spinal canal during lumbar punctures without guidance or with inadequate guidance. There is ample evidence that such tumors are iatrogenic. All cases occur in patients with a history of lumbar puncture. They are rarely associated with congenital anomalies. They are extramedullary. They tend to develop near sites of earlier lumbar puncture, usually near the conus medullaris and the cauda equina. Iatrogenic epidermoid tumors of the spine have been reproduced experimentally in two studies in which autologous skin fragments were implanted in the spinal canal. CLINICAL SIGNS. These tumors are well tolerated by patients for extended periods of time, ranging from 2 to 10 years. At the cauda equinus, tumors can grow slowly for long periods without signs of nerve compression. Symptoms are directly related to tumor size and site. All patients with tumors at the cauda equinus report severe pain radiating toward the roots of compressed nerves. Nuclear magnetic resonance makes it possible to detect the tumor without administration of intrathecal contrast. At present gadolinium-DTPA improves the image so that these tumors can be distinguished from other types. The prognosis for epidermoid tumors of the spine is good, as they are histologically benign. Treatment is always surgical. CONCLUSION. Although the

  4. A history of lumbar disc herniation from Hippocrates to the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Truumees, Eeric

    2015-06-01

    In ancient times, a supernatural understanding of the syndrome of lumbar radiculopathy often involved demonic forces vexing the individual with often crippling pain. The ancient Greeks and Egyptians began to take a more naturalistic view and, critically, suspected a relationship between lumbar spinal pathology and leg symptoms. Relatively little then changed for those with sciatica until the classic works by Cotugno and Kocher arrived in the late 18th century. Early lumbar canal explorations were performed in the late 1800s and early 1900s by MacEwen, Horsley, Krause, Taylor, Dandy, and Cushing, among others. In these cases, when compressive pathologies were found and removed, the lesions typically were (mis-)identified as enchondromas or osteochondritis dissecans. To better understand the history, learn more about the first treatments of lumbar disc herniation, and evaluate the impact of the early influences on modern spine practice, searches of PubMed and Embase were performed using the search terms discectomy, medical history, lumbar spine surgery, herniated disc, herniated nucleus pulposus, sciatica, and lumbar radiculopathy. Additional sources were identified from the reference lists of the reviewed papers. Many older and ancient sources including De Ischiade Nervosa are available in English translations and were used. When full texts were not available, English abstracts were used. The first true, intentional discectomy surgery was performed by Mixter and Barr in 1932. Early on, a transdural approach was favored. In 1938, Love described the intralaminar, extradural approach. His technique, although modified with improved lighting, magnification, and retractors, remains a staple approach to disc herniations today. Other modalities such as chymopapain have been investigated. Some remain a part of the therapeutic armamentarium, whereas others have disappeared. By the 1970s, CT scanning after myelography markedly improved the clinical evaluation of patients with

  5. Assessing the Effect of Spaceflight on the Propensity for Astronauts to Develop Disk Herniation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, A. H.; Mendez, C. M.; Somers, J. T.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A previous study [1] reported that the instantaneous risk of developing a Herniated Nucleus Pulposus (HNP) was higher in astronauts who had flown at least one mission, as compared with those in the corps who had not yet flown. However, the study only analyzed time to HNP after the first mission (if any) and did not account for the possible effects of multiple missions. While many HNP's occurred well into astronauts' careers or in some cases years after retirement, the higher incidence of HNPs relatively soon after completion of space missions appears to indicate that spaceflight may lead to an increased risk of HNP. The purpose of this study was to support the Human System Risk Board assessment of back pain, evaluate the risk of injury due to dynamic loads, and update the previous dataset which contained events up to December 31, 2006. METHODS: Data was queried from the electronic medical record and provided by the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health. The data included all 330 United States astronauts from 1959 through February 2014. Cases were confirmed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Computerized Tomography, Myelography, operative findings, or through clinical confirmation with a neurologist or neurosurgeon. In this analysis, astronauts who had an HNP at selection into the corps or had an HNP diagnosis prior to their first flight were excluded. The statistical challenges in using the available data to separate effects of spaceflight from those associated with general astronaut training and lifestyle on propensity to develop HNPs are many. The primary outcome is reported date of first HNP (if any), which at best is only an approximation to the actual time of occurrence. To properly analyze this data with a survival analysis model, one must also know the "exposure" time - i.e. how long each astronaut has been at risk for developing an HNP. If an HNP is reported soon after a mission, is it mission caused or general? If the former, exposure time

  6. Success with voice recognition.

    PubMed

    Sferrella, Sheila M

    2003-01-01

    You need a compelling reason to implement voice recognition technology. At my institution, the compelling reason was a turnaround time for Radiology results of more than two days. Only 41 percent of our reports were transcribed and signed within 24 hours. In November 1998, a team from Lehigh Valley Hospital went to RSNA and reviewed every voice system on the market. The evaluation was done with the radiologist workflow in mind, and we came back from the meeting with the vendor selection completed. The next steps included developing a business plan, approval of funds, reference calls to more than 15 sites and contract negotiation, all of which took about six months. The department of Radiology at Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network (LVHHN) is a multi-site center that performs over 360,000 procedures annually. The department handles all modalities of radiology: general diagnosis, neuroradiology, ultrasound, CT Scan, MRI, interventional radiology, arthography, myelography, bone densitometry, nuclear medicine, PET imaging, vascular lab and other advanced procedures. The department consists of 200 FTEs and a medical staff of more than 40 radiologists. The budget is in the $10.3 million range. There are three hospital sites and four outpatient imaging center sites where services are provided. At Lehigh Valley Hospital, radiologists are not dedicated to one subspecialty, so implementing a voice system by modality was not an option. Because transcription was so far behind, we needed to eliminate that part of the process. As a result, we decided to deploy the system all at once and with the radiologists as editors. The planning and testing phase took about four months, and the implementation took two weeks. We deployed over 40 workstations and trained close to 50 physicians. The radiologists brought in an extra radiologist from our group for the two weeks of training. That allowed us to train without taking a radiologist out of the department. We trained three to six