Science.gov

Sample records for mev gamma-ray source

  1. Discovery of a transient MeV range gamma-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, M. S.; Gruber, D. E.; Matteson, J. L.; Peterson, L. E.

    1995-01-01

    The University of California, San Diego (UCSD)/MIT hard X-ray and gamma-ray instrument on the HEAO 1 surveyed the region near the Galactic center 3 times during its lifetime in 1977-1979. During the 1977 September-October scan, a gamma-ray source was detected south of the Galactic center. The source was below the threshold sensitivity in the spring and fall of 1978. The source was detected with the medium energy phoswich scintillation counters which operated over the 80 keV-2 MeV range, had an area of 42 sq cm each, and a 17 deg FWHM aperture. The error box for the source is centered on l = 2.4 deg, b = -12.2 deg, with a 90% confidence error circle of approximately 3.5 deg radius. The flux in the 333-635 keV range was (1.89 +/- 0.29) x 10(exp -5) photons/(sq cm s keV) and was constant within statistics during the 1 month period the source was in the field of view. The spectrum can be characterized as a Gaussian in the range 300 less than or = E less than or = 650 keV, with a FWHM of 249 +/- 51 keV centered on 461 +/- 22 keV. The flux of this broad Gaussian is (6.6 +/- 1.1) x 10(exp -3) photons/(sq cm s). The source is tentatively identified with the 5.57 hr period low-mass X-ray-emitting binary system 1H 1822-371. Assuming this is correct, the ratio of gamma-ray to X-ray luminosity during the outburst was about 5; at a distance of 8 kpc, the gamma ray luminosity is 4 x 10(exp 37) ergs. The emission may be interpreted as a positron-pair plasma ejected from a compact object, possibly a black hole, and annihilating in a thick accretion disk surrounding the object.

  2. High resolution inelastic gamma-ray measurements with a white neutron source from 1 to 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.O.; Laymon, C.M.; Wender, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of prompt gamma rays following neutron-induced reactions have recently been made at the spallation neutron source at the WNR target area of LAMPF using germanium detectors. These experiments provide extensive excitation function data for inelastic neutron scattering as well as for other reactions such as (n,{alpha}), (n,n{alpha}), (n,p), (n,np), (n,nnp) and (n,xn) for 1 {le} {times} {le} 11. The continuous energy coverage available from 1 MeV to over 200 MeV is ideal for excitation function measurements and greatly extends the energy range for such data. The results of these measurements will provide a database for interpretation of gamma-ray spectra from the planned Mars Observer mission, aid in radiation transport calculations, allow verification of nuclear reaction models, and improve the evaluated neutron reaction data base.

  3. Design of a 2 MeV Compton scattering gamma-ray source for DNDO missions

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F

    2009-08-24

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence-based isotope-specific detection and imaging is a powerful new technology that can enable access to new mission spaces for DNDO. Within this context, the development of advanced mono-energetic gamma ray sources plays an important role in the DNDO R&D portfolio, as it offers a faster, more precise, and safer alternative to conventional Bremsstrahlung sources. In this report, a specific design strategy is presented, along with a series of theoretical and computational tools, with the goal of optimizing source parameters for DNDO applications. In parallel, key technologies are outlined, along with discussions justifying specific choices and contrasting those with other alternatives. Finally, a complete conceptual design is described, and machine parameters are presented in detail.

  4. UNIDENTIFIED {gamma}-RAY SOURCES: HUNTING {gamma}-RAY BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Ajello, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Tosti, G.; Gasparrini, D.

    2012-06-10

    One of the main scientific objectives of the ongoing Fermi mission is unveiling the nature of unidentified {gamma}-ray sources (UGSs). Despite the major improvements of Fermi in the localization of {gamma}-ray sources with respect to the past {gamma}-ray missions, about one-third of the Fermi-detected objects are still not associated with low-energy counterparts. Recently, using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer survey, we discovered that blazars, the rarest class of active galactic nuclei and the largest population of {gamma}-ray sources, can be recognized and separated from other extragalactic sources on the basis of their infrared (IR) colors. Based on this result, we designed an association method for the {gamma}-ray sources to recognize if there is a blazar candidate within the positional uncertainty region of a generic {gamma}-ray source. With this new IR diagnostic tool, we searched for {gamma}-ray blazar candidates associated with the UGS sample of the second Fermi {gamma}-ray LAT catalog (2FGL). We found that our method associates at least one {gamma}-ray blazar candidate as a counterpart to each of 156 out of 313 UGSs analyzed. These new low-energy candidates have the same IR properties as the blazars associated with {gamma}-ray sources in the 2FGL catalog.

  5. Unidentified Gamma-Ray Sources: Hunting Gamma-Ray Blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Tosti, G.; Ajello, M.; Gasparrini, A.Paggi.D.

    2012-04-02

    One of the main scientific objectives of the ongoing Fermi mission is unveiling the nature of the unidentified {gamma}-ray sources (UGSs). Despite the large improvements of Fermi in the localization of {gamma}-ray sources with respect to the past {gamma}-ray missions, about one third of the Fermi-detected objects are still not associated to low energy counterparts. Recently, using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) survey, we discovered that blazars, the rarest class of Active Galactic Nuclei and the largest population of {gamma}-ray sources, can be recognized and separated from other extragalactic sources on the basis of their infrared (IR) colors. Based on this result, we designed an association method for the {gamma}-ray sources to recognize if there is a blazar candidate within the positional uncertainty region of a generic {gamma}-ray source. With this new IR diagnostic tool, we searched for {gamma}-ray blazar candidates associated to the UGS sample of the second Fermi {gamma}-ray catalog (2FGL). We found that our method associates at least one {gamma}-ray blazar candidate as a counterpart each of 156 out of 313 UGSs analyzed. These new low-energy candidates have the same IR properties as the blazars associated to {gamma}-ray sources in the 2FGL catalog.

  6. DESIGN OF A 250 MeV, X-BAND PHOTOINJECTOR LINAC FOR A PRECISION COMPTON-SCATTERING BASED GAMMA-RAY SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Albert, F; Gibson, D J; McNabb, D; Messerly, M; Rusnak, B; Shverdin, M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C J; Tantawi, S; Vlieks, A

    2009-05-07

    We present a compact, X-band, high-brightness accelerator design suitable for driving a precision gamma-ray source. Future applications of gamma-rays generated by Compton-scattering of laser and relativistic electron beams place stringent demands on the brightness and stability of the incident electron beam. This design identifies the beam parameters required for gamma-ray production, including position, and pointing stability. The design uses an emittance compensated, 11.4 GHz photo-gun and linac to generate 400 pC, 1-2 mm-mrad electron bunches at up to 250 MeV and 120 Hz repetition rate. The effects of jitter in the RF power system are analyzed as well as structure and optic misalignments. Finally, strategies for the mitigation of on-axis Bremsstrahlung noise are discussed.

  7. Gamma rays from extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermer, Charles D.; Schlickeiser, Reinhard; Mastichiadis, Apostolos

    1992-01-01

    It is proposed that the important connection between 3C 273 and 3C 279, the first two extragalactic sources detected at greater than 100 MeV energies, is their superluminal nature. In support of this conjecture, we propose a radiation mechanism that focuses gamma rays in the superluminal direction, due to Compton scattering of accretion-disk photons by relativistic nonthermal electrons in the jet.

  8. Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright Gamma-ray Source List

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D.L.; Barbiellini, Guido; Bastieri, Denis; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G.F.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, Thompson H.; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the {gamma}-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than {approx}10{sigma}) {gamma}-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) {gamma}-ray sources in the early mission data.

  9. Gamma-ray burst variability above 4 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.; Ling, J. C.; Wheaton, W. A.; Jacobson, A. S.; Mahoney, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between the hard X-ray and gamma ray emissions during four bursts using the anti-coincidence shields of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory 3 (HEAO 3) Gamma Ray Spectrometer is explored. Recent observations of gamma ray bursts by the Solar Maximum Mission Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) have shown that high energy emission above 1 MeV is a common and energetically important feature (Matz et al. 1985). Time histories of four gamma ray bursts in 3 energy bands ( keV, around 511 keV, and 4 MeV) with 10.24 a resolution show that the 4 MeV flux is only weakly coupled to the spectrum below approximately 600 keV.

  10. Gamma ray astronomy. [source mechanisms review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D.

    1974-01-01

    The various source mechanisms for celestial gamma rays are reviewed. The gamma-ray data are examined as a source of information about the processes and source locations for the production of charged particle cosmic rays, galactic structure, explosive nucleosynthesis in supernovae, regions of confinement for cosmic rays, regions where matter-antimatter annihilation occurs, and the general condition in cosmological space both in the past and present. Topics include gamma rays from pi mesons by nuclear interactions, nuclear and supernovae lines, diffuse emission and discrete sources, interstellar absorption and detection of gamma rays, and others. A brief view of the available gamma-ray detection systems and techniques is presented.

  11. A three-dimensional study of 30- to 300-MeV atmospheric gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    A three-dimensional study of atmospheric gamma rays with energy greater than 30 MeV has been carried out. A knowledge of these atmospheric secondaries has significant applications to the study of cosmic gamma rays. For detectors carried on balloons, atmospherically produced gamma rays are the major source of background. For satellite detectors, atmospheric secondaries provide a calibration source. Experimental results were obtained from four balloon flights from Palestine, Texas, with a 15 cm by 15 cm digitized wire grid spark chamber. The energy spectrum for downward-moving gamma rays steepens with increasing atmospheric depth. Near the top of the atmosphere, the spectrum steepens with increasing zenith angle. A new model of atmospheric secondary production has calculated the depth, the energy, and the zenith angle dependence of gamma rays above 30 MeV, using a comprehensive three-dimensional Monte Carlo model of the nucleon-meson-electromagnetic cascade.

  12. Solar Gamma Rays Above 8 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Crannell, H.; Ramaty, R.

    1978-01-01

    Processes which lead to the production of gamma rays with energy greater than 8 MeV in solar flares are reviewed and evaluated. Excited states produced by inelastic scattering, charge exchange, and spallation reactions in the abundant nuclear species are considered in order to identify nuclear lines which may contribute to the Gamma ray spectrum of solar flares. The flux of 15.11 MeV Gamma rays relative to the flux of 4.44 MeV Gamma rays from the de-excitation of the corresponding states in C12 is calculated for a number of assumed distributions of exciting particles. This flux ratio is a sensitive diagnostic of accelerated particle spectra. Other high energy nuclear levels are not so isolated as the 15.11 MeV state and are not expected to be so strong. The spectrum of Gamma rays from the decay of Pi dey is sensitive to the energy distribution of particles accelerated to energies greater than 100 MeV.

  13. Compton MeV Gamma-ray Source on Texas Petawatt Laser-Driven GeV Electron Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Joseph M.; Tsai, Hai-En; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Wang, Xiaoming; Chang, Vincent; Fazel, Neil; Henderson, Watson; Downer, M. C.; Texas Petawatt Laser Team

    2015-11-01

    Compton Backscatter (CBS) from laser wakefield accelerated (LWFA) electron bunches is a promising compact, femtosecond (fs) source of tunable high-energy photons. CBS x-rays have been produced from LWFAs using two methods: (1) retro-reflection of the LWFA drive pulse via an in-line plasma mirror (PM); (2) scattering of a counter-propagating secondary pulse split from the drive pulse. Previously MeV photons were only demonstrated by the latter method, but the former method is self-aligning. Here, using the Texas Petawatt (TPW) laser and a self-aligned near-retro-reflecting PM, we generate bright CBS γ-rays with central energies higher than 10 MeV. The 100 μm focus of TPW delivers 100 J in 100 fs pulses, with intensity 6x1018 W/cm2 (a0 =1.5), to the entrance of a 6-cm long Helium gas cell. A thin, plastic PM immediately following the gas cell exit retro-reflects the LWFA driving pulse into the oncoming 0.5 - 2 GeV electron beam to produce a directional beam of γ-rays without significant bremsstrahlung background. A Pb-filter pack on a thick, pixelated, CsI(Tl) scintillator is used to estimate the spectrum via differential transmission and to observe the beam profile. Recorded beam profiles indicate a low divergence. Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin

  14. SMM Observations of Gamma-Ray Transients. I. A Search for Variable Emission at MeV Energies from Five Galactic and Extragalactic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, M. J.; Share, G. H.; Leising, M. D.; Grove, J. E.

    1993-10-01

    Transient emission at energies near 1 MeV has been reported by previous experiments on time scales of weeks to months from the Galactic center, the Crab Nebula, and Cyg X-1, and on shorter time-scales from NGC 4151 and Cen A. The spectra of these events fall into two broad classes: a broad line-like feature centered near 1 MeV, and continuum emission (or a very broad feature) extending from ˜600 keV up to several MeV. These features have been interpreted theoretically in terms of emission from hot pair-dominated plasmas, which may be the necessary positron source implied by reports of narrow e- e+ annihilation lines from Cyg X- 1 and the Galactic center. In this paper, data accumulated by the Solar Maximum Mission Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) between 1980 and 1989 have been searched for evidence of these two types of features. We find no compelling evidence for transient 1 MeV broad-line emission on time scales of order 12 d or longer when any of the sources are in the GRS field of view; upper limits on the transient line flux during any 12 d period are typically ˜4.5 × 10-3γ (cm2 s)-1. The same is true of variability of the continuum between 0.6-7 MeV, for which the upper limits are characteristically ˜2 times the nominal flux from the Crab for any 12 d period. Our analysis was not sensitive enough either to confirm or to reject several reports from other experiments of transient emission in the 0.6-7 MeV continuum during 1980-1989. We withdraw the statement in Share et al. (1993) that our upper limit for one such event, a transient from the Crab Nebula in 1980 Spring, is inconsistent with the measurement of Ling & Dermer (1991). We did not detect any transient emission in the 1 MeV feature preceding or coinciding with reported emission of the 0.511 MeV annihilation line from the Galactic center in 1988-1989. We discuss briefly the implications of this result for models of the annihilation of positrons produced in the Galactic center source 1E 1740.7-2942.

  15. Neutron-induced 2.2 MeV background in gamma ray telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanrosso, E. M.; Long, J. L.; Zych, A. D.; White, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron-induced gamma ray production is an important source of background in Compton scatter gamma ray telescopes where organic scintillator material is used. Most important is deuteron formation when atmospheric albedo and locally produced neutrons are thermalized and subsequently absorbed in the hydrogenous material. The resulting 2.2 MeV gamma ray line radiation essentially represents a continuous isotropic source within the scintillator itself. Interestingly, using a scintillator material with a high hydrogen-to-carbon ratio to minimize the scintillator material with a high hydrogen-to-carbon ratio to minimize the neutron-induced 4.4 MeV carbon line favors the np reaction. The full problem of neutron-induced background in Compton scatter telescopes has been previously discussed. Results are presented of observations with the University of California balloon-borne Compton scatter telescope where the 2.2 MeV induced line emission is prominently seen.

  16. Multiwavelength observations of unidentified high energy gamma ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1993-01-01

    As was the case for COS B, the majority of high-energy (greater than 100 MeV) gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET instrument on GRO are not immediately identifiable with cataloged objects at other wavelengths. These persistent gamma-ray sources are, next to the gamma-ray bursts, the least understood objects in the universe. Even a rudimentary understanding of their nature awaits identifications and follow-up work at other wavelengths to tell us what they are. The as yet unidentified sources are potentially the most interesting, since they may represent unrecognized new classes of astronomical objects, such as radio-quiet pulsars or new types of active galactic nuclei (AGN's). This two-year investigation is intended to support the analysis, correlation, and theoretical interpretation of data that we are obtaining at x ray, optical, and radio wavelengths in order to render the gamma-ray data interpretable. According to plan, in the first year concentration was on the identification and study of Geminga. The second year will be devoted to studies of similar unidentified gamma-ray sources which will become available in the first EGRET catalogs. The results obtained so far are presented in the two papers which are reproduced in the Appendix. In these papers, we discuss the pulse profiles of Geminga, the geometry and efficiency of the magnetospheric accelerator, the distance to Geminga, the implications for theories of polar cap heating, the effect of the magnetic field on the surface emission and environment of the neutron star, and possible interpretations of a radio-quiet Geminga. The implications of the other gamma-ray pulsars which were discovered to have high gamma-ray efficiency are also discussed, and the remaining unidentified COS B sources are attributed to a population of efficient gamma-ray sources, some of which may be radio quiet.

  17. COMPACT, TUNABLE COMPTON SCATTERING GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; O'Neill, K L; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Raubenheimer, T O

    2009-08-20

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable gamma-ray source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by the linac interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. The source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence lines in various isotopes; applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented.

  18. Performance of the Laser Compton Scattering Gamma-Ray Source at SAGA-LS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneyasu, T.; Takabayashi, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Koda, S.

    2013-03-01

    A laser Compton scattering gamma-ray source was constructed at the SAGA light source facility. To produce high-flux gamma rays in the few MeV region, we used a CO2 laser with a 10.6 μm wavelength. Head-on collisions between the laser photons and the 1.4 GeV electron beam in the storage ring can produce gamma rays up to a maximum energy of 3.5 MeV without affecting the light source performance. The performance of the LCS source with respect to the stability of gamma-ray flux during continuous operation is reported.

  19. Tracking and imaging gamma-ray experiment (TIGRE) for 300-keV to 100-MeV gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumer, Tumay O.; Bhattacharya, Dipen; Blair, Scott C.; Case, Gary; Dixon, David D.; Liu, Chia-Ling; O'Neill, Terrence J.; White, R. Stephen; Zych, Allen D.

    1994-09-01

    The Tracking and Imaging Gamma-Ray Experiment (TIGRE) uses multilayers of silicon strip detectors both as a gamma-ray converter and to track Compton recoil electrons and positron-electron pairs. The silicon strip detectors also measure the energy losses of these particles. For Compton events, the direction and energy of the Compton scattered gamma ray are measured with arrays of small CsI(TI)-photodiode detectors so that an unique direction and energy can be found for each incident gamma ray. The incident photon direction for pair events is found from the initial pair particle directions. TIGRE is the first Compton telescope with a direct imaging capability. With a large (pi) -steradian field-of-view, it is sensitive to gamma rays from 0.3 to 100 MeV with a typical energy resolution of 3% (FWHM) and a 1-(sigma) angular resolution of 40 arc-minutes at 2 MeV. A small balloon prototype instrument is being constructed that has a high absolute detection efficiency of 8% over the full energy range and a sensitivity of 10 milliCrabs for an exposure of 500,000 s. TIGRE's innovative design also uses the polarization dependence of the Klein-Nishina formula for gamma-ray source polarization measurements. The telescope will be described in detail and new results from measurements at 0.5 MeV and Monte Carlo calculations from 1 to 100 MeV will be presented.

  20. Arcsec source location measurements in gamma-ray astronomy from a lunar observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David G.; Hughes, E. B.

    1990-01-01

    The physical processes typically used in the detection of high energy gamma-rays do not permit good angular resolution, which makes difficult the unambiguous association of discrete gamma-ray sources with objects emitting at other wavelengths. This problem can be overcome by placing gamma-ray detectors on the moon and using the horizon as an occulting edge to achieve arcsec resolution. For the purpose of discussion, this concept is examined for gamma rays above about 20 MeV for which pair production dominates the detection process and locally-generated nuclear gamma rays do not contribute to the background.

  1. The galactic gamma-ray flux in the 0.06-5 MeV range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilman, D.; Metzger, A. E.; Parker, R. H.; Trombka, J. I.

    1979-01-01

    The observed variation of the 72-200-keV count rate in the Apollo gamma-ray spectrometer on Apollo 16 are interpreted as being due to cosmic gamma rays associated with the Crab Nebula, Cyg X-1, and the galactic-center source. A low-resolution map is presented which shows a great enhancement in the galactic-center region; a spectrum for this region is obtained. The shape of the spectrum suggests that the emission originates from an ensemble of discrete sources. It is concluded that the gamma-ray line at 4.4 MeV is not emitted as a constant fraction of the continuum in the whole region of the galactic plane between longitudes of -50 and +22 deg.

  2. Gamma rays of 0.3 to 30 MeV from PSR 0531+21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zych, A. D.; White, R. S.; Sweeney, W.; Tuemer, T.

    1985-01-01

    Pulsed gamma rays from the Crab Pulsar PSR 0531+21 are reported for energies of 0.3 to 30 MeV. The observations were carried out with the UCR gamma ray double Compton scatter telescope launched on a balloon from Palestine, Texas at 4.5 GV, at 2200 LT, September 29, 1978. Two 8 hr observations of the pulsar were made, the first starting at 0700 UT (0200 LT) September 30 just after reaching float altitude of 4.5 g/sq cm. Analysis of the total gamma ray flux from the Crab Nebula plus pulsar using telescope vertical cell pairs was published previously. The results presented supersede the preliminary ones. The double scatter mode of the UCR telescope measures the energy of each incident gamma ray from 1 to 30 MeV and its incident angle to a ring on the sky. The time of arrival is measured to 0.05 ms. The direction of the source is obtained from overlapping rings on the sky. The count rate of the first scatter above a threshold of 0.3 MeV is recorded every 5.12 ms. The Crab Pulsar parameters were determined from six topocentric arrival times of optical pulses.

  3. Observations of 1-30 MeV gamma rays from the galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanrosso, E.; Long, J. L.; Zych, A. D.; White, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported for gamma ray observations of the galactic center region made during a 15-hour balloon flight from Alice Springs, Australia on April 18, 1979. The observations were carried out with the UGR double-scatter gamma-ray telescope at energies of 1 to 30 MeV. The observations are compatible with a galactic source of approximately equal brightness along the region of system II galactic longitudes between 300 and 60 deg. The energy distribution joins smoothly to previous spark chamber results at energies above 30 MeV and to scintillator results below 1 MeV. It appears to be a combination of nuclear gamma ray lines superimposed on a power-law bremsstrahlung spectrum. The metastable C-12 line at 4.4 MeV appears to be present with a significance of about 16 standard deviations. The flux in the line is 0.0006 + or - 0.0003 photons/sq cm per sec per rad. The oxygen line at 6.1 MeV does not seem to appear significantly above background.

  4. Do gamma-ray burst sources repeat?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, C. A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pendleton, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Blumenthal, G.; Brock, M.

    1994-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al. 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic ad the two-point angular correlation function. We find the data to be consistent with the hypothesis that burst sources do not repeat; however, a repeater fraction of up to about 20% of the bursts cannot be excluded.

  5. An improved time of flight gamma-ray telescope to monitor diffuse gamma-ray in the energy range 5 MeV - 50 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui-Van, A.; Sabaud, C.; Vedrenne, G.; Agrinier, B.; Gouiffes, C.; Dacostafereiraneri, A.; Lavigne, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A time of flight measuring device is the basic triggering system of most of medium and high energy gamma-ray telescopes. A simple gamma-ray telescope has been built in order to check in flight conditions the functioning of an advanced time of flight system. The technical ratings of the system are described. This telescope has been flown twice with stratospheric balloons, its axis being oriented at various Zenital directions. Flight results are presented for diffuse gamma-rays, atmospheric secondaries, and various causes of noise in the 5 MeV-50 MeV energy range.

  6. Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses topics related to high-energy, gamma-ray astronomy (including cosmic radiation, gamma-ray detectors, high-energy gamma-ray sources, and others). Also considers motivation for the development of this field, the principal results to date, and future prospects. (JN)

  7. More data on (possible) gamma ray (point) sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermsen, W.

    1990-01-01

    The 2CG catalog of gamma ray sources was compiled before detailed knowledge was available on the fine-scale structure of the diffuse Galactic gamma-ray emission. Two independent analyses to discriminate sources which are either compact objects of due to very local and strong enhancements in the Galactic cosmic-ray distribution from those which are artifacts due to the clumpy gas distribution are about to be completed: a maximum likelihood analysis and a cross correlation analysis. Arguments are given why differences, and therefore confusion, and in resulting source lists can be expected. Detailed analysis of all COS-B gamma-ray data on Geminga (2CG195+04), reveals the existence of a drastic spectral break below 200 MeV. A power-law spectrum with index -1.88 fits the data above about 100 MeV to 3.2 GeV, however, there are also indications for a spectral break above these energies. For energies above about 100 MeV no evidence for a long-term time variability was found. The error region of Geminga was searched for a radio counterpart at wavelengths of 90, 49, 21, 6, and 2 cm using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and the Very Large Array. So far, 16 sources were detected in this error region. In the direction of 1E0630+178, the Einstein x ray source proposed to be a Vela-like pulsar and the counterpart of Geminga, no radio source was found at 21, 49, and 90 cm with 3 sigma upper limits on the flux densities ranging from 0.5 mJy at 21 cm to 4.5 mJy at 90 cm. Detailed structures in local molecular cloud complexes are so far only resolved in gamma rays for the closet and most massive complexes, namely those in the Orion-Monoceros and the Ophiuchus regions. For both region, there is circumstantial evidence for gamma ray emission from molecular gas that was photodissociated after the passage of a SN shell.

  8. Design of a compact spectrometer for high-flux MeV gamma-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Corvan, D. J. Sarri, G.; Zepf, M.

    2014-06-15

    A novel design for a compact gamma-ray spectrometer is presented. The proposed system allows for spectroscopy of high-flux multi-MeV gamma-ray beams with MeV energy resolution in a compact design. In its basic configuration, the spectrometer exploits conversion of gamma-rays into electrons via Compton scattering in a low-Z material. The scattered electron population is then spectrally resolved using a magnetic spectrometer. The detector is shown to be effective for gamma-ray energies between 3 and 20 MeV. The main properties of the spectrometer are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations.

  9. Neutron propagation and 2.2 MeV gamma-ray line production in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. T.; Ramaty, R.

    1974-01-01

    The 2.2 MeV gamma ray line intensity from the sun was calculated using a Monte Carlo method for neutron propagation in the solar atmosphere. Detailed results are provided on the total gamma ray yield per neutron and on the time profile of the 2.2 MeV line from an instantaneous and monoenergetic neutron source. The parameters which have the most significant effects on the line intensity are the energies of the neutrons, the position of the neutron source on the sun, and the abundance of He-3 in the photosphere. For an isotropic neutron source which is not too close to the limb of the sun, the gamma ray yield is between about 0.02 to 0.2 photons per neutron, provided that the neutron energies are in the range 1 to 100 MeV and the ratio He-3/H is less than about .00005.

  10. Laser Compton Scattering Gamma-Ray Beam Source at NewSUBARU Storage Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, S.; Amano, S.; Hashimoto, S.; Sakai, N.; Koizumi, A.; Hashimoto, T.; Shizuma, T.; Utsunomiya, H.; Yamagata, T.; Akimune, H.; Shima, T.; Li, D.; Asano, Y.; Ohkuma, H.

    2015-10-01

    Laser Compton scattering gamma-ray beam source has been developed at the NewSUBARU synchrotron light facility. The available maximum Gamma-ray photon energy is 76 MeV. The flux of quasi-monochromatic gamma-ray photons (for example: 16.7 MeV, ΔE/E ~ 5%) is more than 106photons/sec using a 35 W Nd:YVO4 laser combined with the 1 GeV storage electron beam with an intensity of 300 mA. We used the electron beams at Ee = 0.55 ~ 1.47 GeV for changing the energy of quasi-monochromatic gamma-ray beam. Gamma-ray beams were used for application experiments, a nuclear physics research, a nondestructive inspection of thick material, a generation of positron by pair creation, a magnetic Compton scattering measurements, and a nuclear transmutation.

  11. OVERVIEW OF MONO-ENERGETIC GAMMA-RAY SOURCES & APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; O'Neill, K L; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C P; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Raubenheimer, T O

    2010-05-18

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of tunable gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development and construction at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by an X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC NAL will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped CPA laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. This MEGa-ray source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence in various isotopes. Applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented, along with important applications, including nuclear resonance fluorescence. In conclusion, we have optimized the design of a high brightness Compton scattering gamma-ray source, specifically designed for NRF applications. Two different parameters sets have been considered: one where the number of photons scattered in a single shot reaches approximately 7.5 x 10{sup 8}, with a focal spot size around 8 {micro}m; in the second set, the spectral brightness is optimized by using a 20 {micro}m spot size, with 0.2% relative bandwidth.

  12. Do gamma-ray burst sources repeat?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald; Blumenthal, George; Brock, Martin

    1995-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports (Quashnock and Lamb, 1993; Wang and Lingenfelter, 1993) of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al., 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic and the two-point angular correlation function. We find the data to be consistent with the hypothesis that burst sources do not repeat; however, a repeater fraction of up to about 20% of the observed bursts cannot be excluded.

  13. Liquid xenon time projection chamber for gamma rays in the MeV region: Development status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, E.; Bolotnikov, A.; Chen, D.; Mukherjee, R.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of a large volume Liquid Xenon Time Projection Chamber (LXe-TPC) for three dimensional imaging and spectroscopy of cosmic gamma ray sources, was tested with a 3.5 liter prototype. The observation of induction signals produced by MeV gamma rays in liquid xenon is reported, with a good signal-to-noise ratio. The results represent the first experimental demonstration with a liquid xenon ionization chamber of a nondestructive readout of the electron image produced by point-like charges, using a sense wire configuration of the type originally proposed in 1970 by Gatti et al. An energy resolution as good as that previously measured by the millimeter size chambers, was achieved with the large prototype of 4.4 cm drift gap.

  14. The galactic gamma-ray flux in the 0.06 to 5 MeV range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilman, D. A.; Metzger, A. E.; Parker, R. H.; Trombka, J. I.

    1978-01-01

    Gamma ray emission from the longitude range -50 deg less than or equal to lambda less than or equal to 22 deg recorded by the Apollo gamma-ray spectrometer and by individual observers is discussed. Agreement of the galactic emission spectra near 1 MeV with hard X-ray observations of the galactic central regions suggests that an ensemble of point sources is responsible for the emissions. Apollo 16 upper limits to the cosmic 4.4 MeV line flux imply that the ratio of line strength to continuum emission for the region observed by Haymes et al is higher than the galactic average.

  15. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  16. A transportable source of gamma rays with discrete energies and wide range for calibration and on-site testing of gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granja, Carlos; Slavicek, Tomas; Kroupa, Martin; Owens, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Janout, Zdenek; Kralik, Miloslav; Solc, Jaroslav; Valach, Ondrej

    2015-01-01

    We describe a compact and transportable wide energy range, gamma-ray station for the calibration of gamma-ray sensitive devices. The station was specifically designed for the on-site testing and calibration of gamma-ray sensitive spacecraft payloads, intended for space flight on the BepiColombo and SoIar Orbiter missions of the European Space Agency. The source is intended to serve as a calibrated reference for post test center qualification of integrated payload instruments and for preflight evaluation of scientific radiation sensors. Discrete gamma rays in the energy range 100 keV-9 MeV are produced in the station with reasonable intensity using a radionuclide neutron source and 100 l of distilled water with 22 kg salt dissolved. The gamma-rays generated contain many discrete lines conveniently evenly distributed over the entire energy range. The neutron and gamma-ray fields have been simulated by Monte Carlo calculations. Results of the numerical calculations are given in the form of neutron and gamma-ray spectra as well as dose equivalent rate. The dose rate was also determined directly by dedicated dosemetric measurements. The gamma-ray field produced in the station was characterized using a conventional HPGe detector. The application of the station is demonstrated by measurements taken with a flight-qualified LaBr3:Ce scintillation detector. Gamma-ray spectra acquired by both detectors are presented. The minimum measuring times for calibration of the flight-version detector, was between 2 and 10 min (up to 6.2 MeV) and 20-30 min (up to 8 MeV), when the detector was placed at a distance 2-5 m from the station.

  17. Research and development of a gamma-ray imaging spectrometer in the MeV range in Barcelona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, José-Manuel; Galvez, José-Luis; Hernanz, Margarita; Isern, Jordi; Lozano, Manuel; Pellegrini, Giulio; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Cabruja, Enric; Ullán, Miguel

    2010-07-01

    Gamma-ray astrophysics in the MeV energy range plays an important role for the understanding of cosmic explosions and acceleration mechanisms in a variety of galactic and extragalactic sources, e.g., Supernovae, Classical Novae, Supernova Remnants (SNRs), Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), Pulsars, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Through the development of focusing telescopes in the MeV energy range, it will be possible to reach unprecedented sensitivities, compared with those of the currently operating gamma ray telescopes. In order to achieve the needed performance, a detector with mm spatial resolution and very high peak efficiency is required. It will be also desirable that the detector could detect polarization of the source. Our research and development activities in Barcelona aim to study a gamma-ray imaging spectrometer in the MeV range suited for the focal plane of a gamma-ray telescope mission, based on CdTe pixel detectors arranged in multiple layers with increasing thicknesses, to enhance gamma-ray absorption in the Compton regime. We have developed an initial prototype based on several CdTe module detectors, with 11x11 pixels, a pixel pitch of 1mm and a thickness of 2mm. Each pixel is stud-bump bonded to a fanout board and routed to a readout ASIC to measure pixel position, pulse height and rise time information for each incident gamma-ray photon. We will report on the results of an optimization study based on simulations, to select the optimal thickness of each CdTe detector within the module to get the best energy resolution of the spectrometer.

  18. Cosmic gamma-ray background from type Ia supernovae reexamined: Evidence for missing gamma rays at MeV energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Kyungjin; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Hoeflich, Peter

    2005-06-15

    The observed cosmic {gamma}-ray background at {approx}MeV has often been attributed to Type Ia supernovae (SNIa). Since SNIa is close to a standard candle, one can calculate the {gamma}-ray intensity of SNIa integrated over redshifts fairly accurately, once the evolution of the SNIa rate is known. The latest SNIa rate measured at z < or approx. 1.6 [Dahlen et al., Astrophys. J. 613, 189 (2004)] indicates that the previous calculations of the {gamma}-ray background consistently overestimated the SNIa rate. With the new rate, we find that the SNIa contribution is an order of magnitude smaller than observed, and thus new population(s) of sources should be invoked.

  19. COMPTEL observations of the 1.809 MeV gamma-ray line from galactic Al-26

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, R.; Dpraz, C.; Bennett, K.; Bloemen, H.; Deboer, H.; Hermsen, W.; Lichti, G. G.; Mcconnell, M.; Morris, D.; Ryan, J.

    1994-01-01

    The COMPTEL experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) has been demonstrated to be capable of imaging the Galaxy within its field of view of about 1 steradian in the 1.809 MeV gamma-ray line originating from radioactive Al-26. The combined data from the CGRO sky survey in 1991/1992 have been analyzed to provide a first map of the inner Galaxy in this gamma-ray line. The 1.809 MeV emission appears extended along the inner 70 deg of the Galactic plane, with a relatively sharp falloff outside this regime. Correlations with massive stars and supernova remnants as possible tracers of the candidate Al-26 sources are discussed.

  20. The Spectrum of Isotropic Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission Between 100 Mev and 820 Gev

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Brandt, T. J.; Hays, E.; Perkins, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    The gamma-ray sky can be decomposed into individually detected sources, diffuse emission attributed to the interactions of Galactic cosmic rays with gas and radiation fields, and a residual all-sky emission component commonly called the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background (IGRB). The IGRB comprises all extragalactic emissions too faint or too diffuse to be resolved in a given survey, as well as any residual Galactic foregrounds that are approximately isotropic. The first IGRB measurement with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) used 10 months of sky-survey data and considered an energy range between 200 MeV and 100 GeV. Improvements in event selection and characterization of cosmic-ray backgrounds, better understanding of the diffuse Galactic emission, and a longer data accumulation of 50 months, allow for a refinement and extension of the IGRB measurement with the LAT, now covering the energy range from 100 MeV to 820 GeV. The IGRB spectrum shows a significant high-energy cutoff feature, and can be well described over nearly four decades in energy by a power law with exponential cutoff having a spectral index of 2.32 plus or minus 0.02 and a break energy of (279 plus or minus 52) GeV using our baseline diffuse Galactic emission model. The total intensity attributed to the IGRB is (7.2 plus or minus 0.6) x 10(exp -6) cm(exp -2) s(exp -1) sr(exp -1) above 100 MeV, with an additional +15%/-30% systematic uncertainty due to the Galactic diffuse foregrounds.

  1. ICF burn-history measurments using 17-MeV fusion gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, R.A.; Cable, M.D.; Dendooven, P.G.

    1995-04-12

    Fusion reaction rate for inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the Nova Laser Facility is measured with 30-ps resolution using a high-speed neutron detector. We are investigating a measurement technique based on the 16.7-MeV gamma rays that are released in deuterium-tritium fusion. Our concept is to convert gamma-ray energy into a fast burst of Cerenkov light that can be recorded with a high-speed optical detector. We have detected fusion gamma rays in preliminary experiments conducted at Nova where we used a tungsten/aerogel converter to generate Cerenkov light and an optical streak camera to record the signal.

  2. GRH Characterization using 4.4 MeV ^12C Gamma-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Young, C. S.; Barton, B. T.; Mack, J. M.; McEvoy, A. M.; Evans, S.; Sedillo, T.; Stoeffl, W.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.; Miller, E. K.; Grafil, E.

    2010-11-01

    The OMEGA Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic has been characterized using a relatively well-known source of 4.43 MeV gamma rays produced from inelastic scattering of DT-neutrons off of a graphite puck placed near an imploding capsule at the OMEGA laser facility. An independently measured neutron yield, combined with the known ^12C density and ^12C(n,n'γ)^12C cross-section, allows an in-situ calibration of the GRH detection efficiency at 4.43 MeV. GRH data were collected at two different ^12C target locations to confirm the published angular distribution of gamma rays and were compared with MCNP modeling predictions. These in-situ calibrations were used to validate the GRH simulation code based on a coupled MCNP/ACCEPT Monte-Carlo method. By combining these results with other absolute calibration methods, we are able to infer a DT branching ratio for gamma to neutron production and to make an accurate plastic ablator areal density measurement.

  3. SEARCHING FOR {gamma}-RAY BLAZAR CANDIDATES AMONG THE UNIDENTIFIED INTEGRAL SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Paggi, A.; D'Abrusco, R.; Tosti, G.

    2012-05-10

    The identification of low-energy counterparts for {gamma}-ray sources is one of the biggest challenges in modern {gamma}-ray astronomy. Recently, we developed and successfully applied a new association method to recognize {gamma}-ray blazar candidates that could be possible counterparts for the unidentified {gamma}-ray sources above 100 MeV in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope Catalog. This method is based on the infrared colors of the recent Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky survey. In this Letter, we applied our new association method to the case of unidentified INTEGRAL sources (UISs) listed in the fourth soft gamma-ray source catalog. Only 86 UISs out of the 113 can be analyzed due to the sky coverage of the WISE Preliminary Data Release. Among these 86 UISs, we found that 18 appear to have a {gamma}-ray blazar candidate within their positional error region. Finally, we analyzed Swift archival data available for 10 out of these 18 {gamma}-ray blazar candidates, and we found that 7 out of 10 are clearly detected in soft X-rays and/or in the optical-ultraviolet band. We cannot confirm the associations between the UISs and the selected {gamma}-ray blazar candidates due to the discrepancies between the INTEGRAL and the soft X-ray spectra. However, the discovery of the soft X-ray counterparts for the selected {gamma}-ray blazar candidates adds an important clue to help us understand their origin and to confirm their blazar nature.

  4. Searching for Gamma-Ray Blazar Candidates Among the Unidentified INTEGRAL Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Paggi, A.; D'Abrusco, R.; Tosti, G.; /Perugia U.

    2012-04-02

    The identification of low-energy counterparts for {gamma}-ray sources is one of the biggest challenge in modern {gamma}-ray astronomy. Recently, we developed and successfully applied a new association method to recognize {gamma}-ray blazar candidates that could be possible counterparts for the unidentified {gamma}-ray sources above 100 MeV in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) catalog (2FGL). This method is based on the Infrared (IR) colors of the recent Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky survey. In this letter we applied our new association method to the case of unidentified INTEGRAL sources (UISs) listed in the fourth soft gamma-ray source catalog (4IC). Only 86 UISs out of the 113 can be analyzed, due to the sky coverage of the WISE Preliminary data release. Among these 86 UISs, we found that 18 appear to have a {gamma}-ray blazar candidate within their positional error region. Finally, we analyzed the Swift archival data available for 10 out these 18 {gamma}-ray blazar candidates, and we found that 7 out of 10 are clearly detected in soft X-rays and/or in the optical-ultraviolet band. We cannot confirm the associations between the UISs and the selected {gamma}-ray blazar candidates due to the discrepancies between the INTEGRAL and the soft X-ray spectra. However, the discovery of the soft X-ray counterparts for the selected {gamma}-ray blazar candidates adds an important clue to help understand their origin and to confirm their blazar nature.

  5. A Compton scatter camera for spectral imaging of 0.5 to 3.0 MeV gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.B.

    1994-12-31

    A prototype Compton scatter camera for imaging gamma rays has been built and tested. This camera addresses unique aspects of gamma-ray imaging at nuclear industrial sites, including gamma-ray energies in the 0.5 to 3.0 MeV range and polychromatic fields. Analytic models of camera efficiency, resolution and contaminating events are developed. The response of the camera bears strong similarity to emission computed tomography devices used in nuclear medicine. A direct Fourier based algorithm is developed to reconstruct two-dimensional images of measured gamma-ray fields. Iterative ART and MLE algorithms are also investigated. The point response of the camera to gamma rays of energies from 0.5 to 2.8 MeV is measured and compared to the analytic models. The direct reconstruction algorithm is at least ten times more efficient than the iterative algorithms are also investigated. The point response of the camera to gamma rays energies from 0.5 to 2.8 MeV is measured and compared to the analytic models. The direct reconstruction algorithm is at least ten times more efficient than the iterative algorithms and produces images that are, in general, of the same quality. Measured images of several phantoms are shown. Important results include angular resolutions as low as 4.4{degrees}, reproduction of phantom size and position within 7%, and contrast recovery of 84% or better. Spectral imaging is demonstrated with independent images from a multi-energy phantom consisting of two sources imaged simultaneously.

  6. Improved Gamma-Ray Flux Monitoring at the High Intensity Gamma-Ray Source (HIGS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Robert

    2002-10-01

    An improved gamma-ray beam flux monitor has been built for use at the High Intensity Gamma-Ray Source at the Duke University Free Electron Laser Laboratories. It is important to know precisely the gamma-ray flux of this beam. It is also important to limit beam attenuation to a minimum while making an accurate flux measurement. The improvements from a more accurate gamma-ray intensity monitor will allow for more precise cross-section measurements and will be valuable to many of the experiments conducted at HIGS. The detector consists of a thin scintillator optically coupled to two photomultiplier tubes, a thin foil, and then another thin scintillator attached to two photomultiplier tubes. The front scintillator is used to veto counts from charged particles emitted upstream in the beam-line. The preliminary tests of the monitor show very promising results and after slight adjustments and calibrations, the detector will be ready to acquire accurate beam intensity measurements while contributing very little to beam attenuation.

  7. GAMMA-RAY COMPTON LIGHT SOURCE DEVELOPMENT AT LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Jovanovic, I; Messerly, M J; Pruet, J A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; McNabb, D P; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2007-08-15

    A new class of tunable, monochromatic {gamma}-ray sources capable of operating at high peak and average brightness is currently being developed at LLNL for nuclear photoscience and applications. These novel systems are based on Compton scattering of laser photons by a high brightness relativistic electron beam produced by an rf photoinjector. A prototype, capable of producing > 10{sup 8} 0.7 MeV photons in a single shot, with a fractional bandwidth of 1%, and a repetition rate of 10 Hz, is currently under construction at LLNL; this system will be used to perform nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments. A new symmetrized S-band rf gun, using a Mg photocathode, will produce up to 1 nC of charge in an 8 ps bunch, with a normalized emittance modeled at 0.8 mm.mrad; electrons are subsequently accelerated up to 120 MeV to interact with a 500 mJ, 10 ps, 355 nm laser pulse and generate {gamma}-rays. The laser front end is a fiber-based system, using corrugated-fiber Bragg gratings for stretching, and drives both the frequency-quadrupled photocathode illumination laser and the Nd:YAG interaction laser. Two new technologies are used in the laser: a hyper-Michelson temporal pulse stacker capable of producing 8 ps square UV pulses, and a hyper-dispersion compressor for the interaction laser. Other key technologies, basic scaling laws, and recent experimental results will also be presented, along with an overview of future research and development directions.

  8. Intense inverse compton {gamma}-ray source from Duke storage ring FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    We suggest using FEL intracavity power in the Duke storage ring fortrays production via Inverse Compton Backscattering (ICB). The OK-4 FEL driven by the Duke storage ring will tens of watts of average lasing power in the UV/VUV range. Average intracavity power will be in kilowatt range and can be used to pump ICB source. The {gamma}-rays with maximum energy from 40 MeV to 200 MeV with intensity of 0.1-5 10{sup 10}{gamma} per second can be generated. In this paper we present expected parameters of {gamma}-ray beam parameters including its intensity and distribution. We discuss influence of e-beam parameters on collimated {gamma}-rays spectrum and optimization of photon-electron interaction point.

  9. Physics of Gamma Ray Burst Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, Peter

    2004-01-01

    During this grant period, the physics of gamma-ray bursts was investigated. A number of new results have emerged. The importance of pair formation in high compactness burst spectra may help explain x-ray flashes; a universal jet shape is a likely explanation for the distribution of jet break times; gravitational waves may be copiously produced both in short bursts from compact mergers and in long bursts arising from collapsars; x-ray iron lines are likely to be due to interaction with the stellar atmosphere of the progenitor; prompt optical flashes from reverse shocks will give diagnostics on the Lorentz factor and the environment; GeV and TeV emission from bursts may be expected in the external shock; etc. The group working with the PI included postdocs Dr. Bing Zhang (now assistant professor at University of Nevada); Dr. Shiho Kobayashi; graduate student Lijun Gou; collaborators Drs. Tim Kallman and Martin Rees. Meszaros shared with Rees and Dr. Bohan Paczynsky the AAS Rossi Prize in 2000 for their work on the theory of gamma ray bursts. The refereed publications and conference proceedings resulting from this research are summarized below. The PI gave a number of invited talks at major conferences, also listed.

  10. Measurement and Analysis of Gamma-Rays Emitted From Spent Nuclear Fuel Above 3 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Douglas C.; Anderson, Elaina R.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Campbell, Luke W.; Fast, James E.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Orton, Christopher R.; Runkle, Robert C.; Stave, Sean C.

    2013-12-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum of spent nuclear fuel in the 3- to 6-MeV energy range is important for active interrogation since emitted gamma rays emitted from nuclear decay are not expected to interfere with measurements in this energy region. There is, unfortunately, a dearth of empirical measurements from spent nuclear fuel in this region. This work is an initial attempt to partially ll this gap by presenting an analysis of gamma-ray spectra collected from a set of spent nuclear fuel sources using a high-purity germanium detector array. This multi-crystal array possesses a large collection volume, providing high energy resolution up to 16 MeV. The results of these measurements establish the continuum count-rate in the energy region between 3- and 6-MeV. Also assessed is the potential for peaks from passive emissions to interfere with peak measurements resulting from active interrogation delayed emissions. As one of the first documented empirical measurements of passive emissions from spent fuel for energies above 3 MeV, this work provides a foundation for active interrogation model validation and detector development.

  11. Measurement and analysis of gamma-rays emitted from spent nuclear fuel above 3 MeV.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Douglas C; Anderson, Elaina; Anderson, Kevin K; Campbell, Luke W; Fast, James E; Jarman, Kenneth; Kulisek, Jonathan; Orton, Christopher R; Runkle, Robert C; Stave, Sean

    2013-12-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum of spent nuclear fuel in the 3-6 MeV energy range is important for active interrogation since gamma rays emitted from nuclear decay are not expected to interfere with measurements in this energy region. There is, unfortunately, a dearth of empirical measurements from spent nuclear fuel in this region. This work is an initial attempt to partially fill this gap by presenting an analysis of gamma-ray spectra collected from a set of spent nuclear fuel sources using a high-purity germanium detector array. This multi-crystal array possesses a large collection volume, providing high energy resolution up to 16 MeV. The results of these measurements establish the continuum count-rate in the energy region between 3 and 6 MeV. Also assessed is the potential for peaks from passive emissions to interfere with peak measurements resulting from active interrogation delayed emissions. As one of the first documented empirical measurements of passive emissions from spent fuel for energies above 3 MeV, this work provides a foundation for active interrogation model validation and detector development. PMID:24035928

  12. Diffuse cosmic gamma rays at 1-20 MeV: a trace of the dark matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Kyle; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R E-mail: arz@phas.ubc.ca

    2008-01-15

    Several independent observations of the galactic core suggest hitherto unexplained sources of energy. The most well known case is the 511 keV line which has proven very difficult to explain with conventional astrophysical positron sources. A similar, but less well known mystery is the excess of gamma ray photons detected by COMPTEL across a broad energy range {approx}1-20 MeV. Such photons are found to be very difficult to produce via known astrophysical sources. We show in this work that dark matter in the form of dense antimatter droplets provides a natural explanation for the observed flux of gamma rays in the {approx}1-20 MeV range. We argue that such photons must always accompany the 511 keV line as they are produced by the same mechanism within our framework. We calculate the spectrum and intensity of the {approx}1-20 MeV gamma rays, and find it to be consistent with the COMPTEL data.

  13. Backward-going MeV electrons and gamma rays from 1018 W/cm2 laser interactions with water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feister, Scott; Morrison, John T.; Frische, Kyle D.; Orban, Chris; Ovchinnikov, Vladimir M.; Nees, John A.; Austin, Drake R.; Chowdhury, Enam A.; Freeman, Richard R.; Roquemore, W. Melvyn

    2015-05-01

    Gamma rays with ~1 MeV energy are measured following the relativistic interaction of a 3 mJ, 1018 W/cm2 short pulse laser with a 30 μm diameter flowing water column. Contrary to expectations, radiation emission is peaked in the direction opposite to the normally-incident laser propagation (specular direction). Experimental measurements and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of laser-plasma interaction show a pre-formed-plasma-dependent, backward-going, beam-like primary electron source. The MeV component of the electron and gamma ray spectrum, which is more than five times the ponderomotive energy scale of the laser, is highly sensitive to the presence of a nanosecond-timescale laser pre-pulse. This research was sponsored by the Quantum and Non-Equilibrium Processes Division of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, under the management of Dr. Enrique Parra, Program Manager.

  14. Precision X-Band Linac Technologies for Nuclear Photonics Gamma-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Houck, T L; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Adolphsen, C E; Chu, T S; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, F; Wang, J W; Raubenheimer, T O; Ighigeanu, D; Toma, M; Cutoiu, D

    2011-08-31

    Nuclear photonics is an emerging field of research requiring new tools, including high spectral brightness, tunable gamma-ray sources; high photon energy, ultrahigh-resolution crystal spectrometers; and novel detectors. This presentation focuses on the precision linac technology required for Compton scattering gamma-ray light sources, and on the optimization of the laser and electron beam pulse format to achieve unprecedented spectral brightness. Within this context, high-gradient X-band technology will be shown to offer optimal performance in a compact package, when used in conjunction with the appropriate pulse format, and photocathode illumination and interaction laser technologies. The nascent field of nuclear photonics is enabled by the recent maturation of new technologies, including high-gradient X-band electron acceleration, robust fiber laser systems, and hyper-dispersion CPA. Recent work has been performed at LLNL to demonstrate isotope-specific detection of shielded materials via NRF using a tunable, quasi-monochromatic Compton scattering gamma-ray source operating between 0.2 MeV and 0.9 MeV photon energy. This technique is called Fluorescence Imaging in the Nuclear Domain with Energetic Radiation (or FINDER). This work has, among other things, demonstrated the detection of {sup 7}Li shielded by Pb, utilizing gamma rays generated by a linac-driven, laser-based Compton scattering gamma-ray source developed at LLNL. Within this context, a new facility is currently under construction at LLNL, with the goal of generating tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range, at a repetition rate of 120 Hz, and with a peak brightness in the 10{sup 20} photons/(s x mm{sup 2} x mrad{sup 2} x 0.1% bw).

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BATSE occultation catalog of Gamma-Ray sources (Ling+, 2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, J. C.; Wheaton, W. A.; Wallyn, P.; Skelton, R. T.; Mahoney, W. A.; Radocinski, R. G.; Callas, J. L.; Ling, N. F.; Tumer, E.; Shubert, R.

    2000-05-01

    Using the powerful Earth-occultation technique, long-term, nearly continuous monitoring of the entire low-energy gamma-ray sky is now possible with the advent of BATSE, the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). In this paper, we present a catalog of 34 moderately strong gamma-ray sources measured by BATSE. It consists of 0.03 - 1.8 MeV photon spectra averaged over weeks and months, and light curves of the 35 - 200 keV flux, with 1 day resolution, covering the first three phases of the CGRO mission (1991 May through 1994 October). This database contains a complete record of {~}1200 daily source count rates in 14 energy channels along with the corresponding Poisson and systematic errors. (1 data file).

  16. QUASI-STAR JETS AS UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Czerny, Bozena; Sikora, Marek; Janiuk, Agnieszka

    2012-08-10

    Gamma-ray catalogs contain a considerable amount of unidentified sources. Many of these are located out of the Galactic plane and therefore may have extragalactic origin. Here we assume that the formation of massive black holes in galactic nuclei proceeds through a quasi-star stage and consider the possibility of jet production by such objects. Those jets would be the sources of collimated synchrotron and Compton emission, extending from radio to gamma rays. The expected lifetimes of quasi-stars are of the order of million of years while the jet luminosities, somewhat smaller than that of quasar jets, are sufficient to account for the unidentified gamma-ray sources. The jet emission dominates over the thermal emission of a quasi-star in all energy bands, except when the jet is not directed toward an observer. The predicted synchrotron emission peaks in the IR band, with the flux close to the limits of the available IR all sky surveys. The ratio of the gamma-ray flux to the IR flux is found to be very large ({approx}60), much larger than in BL Lac objects but reached by some radio-loud quasars. On the other hand, radio-loud quasars show broad emission lines while no such lines are expected from quasi-stars. Therefore, the differentiation between various scenarios accounting for the unidentified gamma-ray sources will be possible at the basis of the photometry and spectroscopy of the IR/optical counterparts.

  17. SAS-2 observations of high energy gamma rays from discrete sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The SAS-2 identified six localized high energy (greater than 35 MeV) gamma ray sources. Four of these are the radio pulsars, PSR 0531+21, PSR 0833-45, PSR 1818-04, and PSR 1717-46 discovered in a search of 75 radio pulsars. The fact that only one of these is observed in X-rays, and the significant differences in pulse profiles in the gamma ray and radio observations, leads to the speculation that different mechanisms are involved.

  18. Energy spectrum and flux of 3- to 20-Mev neutrons and 1- to 10-Mev gamma rays in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpar, D. M.; Lockwood, J. A.; Saint Onge, R. N.; Friling, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    An experiment is described which was designed to measure the neutron and gamma ray energy spectrums and fluxes in the energy intervals 3 to 20 MeV and 1 to 10 MeV, respectively. In addition, from the 3 to 20-MeV proton recoil spectrums it is possible to infer the shape of the neutron energy spectrum from 20 to 50 MeV. The detecting system utilized a separate charged particle rejection scheme and a two-parameter display system for the output from the pulse shape discrimination which separated gamma rays from neutrons (n). Two long-duration flights were made with this detector in 1970 at Palestine, Tex. (P sub c = 4.6 Gv) and at Ft. Churchill, Canada (P sub c = 0.3 Gv).

  19. THE MORPHOLOGY OF HADRONIC EMISSION MODELS FOR THE GAMMA-RAY SOURCE AT THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Tim; Profumo, Stefano; Lovegrove, Elizabeth

    2012-07-01

    Recently, detections of a high-energy {gamma}-ray source at the position of the Galactic center have been reported by multiple {gamma}-ray telescopes, spanning the energy range between 100 MeV and 100 TeV. Analysis of these signals strongly suggests the TeV emission to have a morphology consistent with a point source up to the angular resolution of the HESS telescope (approximately 3 pc), while the point-source nature of the GeV emission is currently unsettled, with indications that it may be spatially extended. In the case that the emission is hadronic and in a steady state, we show that the expected {gamma}-ray morphology is dominated by the distribution of target gas, rather than by details of cosmic-ray injection and propagation. Specifically, we expect a significant portion of hadronic emission to coincide with the position of the circumnuclear ring, which resides between 1 and 3 pc from the Galactic center. We note that the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be able to observe conclusive correlations between the morphology of the TeV {gamma}-ray source and the observed gas density, convincingly confirming or ruling out a hadronic origin for the {gamma}-ray emission.

  20. Specification of High Activity Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Washington, DC.

    The report is concerned with making recommendations for the specifications of gamma ray sources, which relate to the quantity of radioactive material and the radiation emitted. Primary consideration is given to sources in teletherapy and to a lesser extent those used in industrial radiography and in irradiation units used in industry and research.…

  1. Limit on galactic 6.13 MeV gamma-ray line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunphy, P. P.; Forrest, D. J.; Chupp, E. L.

    1981-01-01

    The University of New Hampshire large gamma-ray detector observed the galactic center region during a balloon flight from Alice Springs, Australia on 1977 November 21-22. The absence of any observable line at 6.13 MeV or its escape-peak energy makes it possible to place an upper limit of 8.1 x 10 to the -4th photons/(sq cm s) at the 99% confidence level on the 0-16 de-excitation line at this energy from the galactic disk in the direction of the center. This limit restricts the interpretation given by Willett et al. (1979) of the line at 6.13 MeV which they observed while viewing the galactic anticenter. The present results indicate that it is highly unlikely that the line which these authors report is due to dark nebulae or the quiet sun. Possible explanations for their observation are atmospheric background, local production in the detector, a localized cosmic source in the direction of the galactic anticenter, or a statistical fluctuation.

  2. High-energy gamma-ray sources of cosmological origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Pierre; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann

    2016-06-01

    The current generation of instruments in gamma-ray astrophysics launched a new era in the search for a dark matter signal in the high-energy sky. Such searches are said indirect, in the sense that the presence of a dark matter particle is inferred from the detection of products of its pair-annihilation or decay. They have recently started to probe the natural domain of existence for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), the favorite dark matter candidates today. In this article, we review the basic framework for indirect searches and we present a status of current limits obtained with gamma-ray observations. We also devote a section to another possible class of cosmological gamma-ray sources, primordial black holes, also considered as a potential constituent of dark matter. xml:lang="fr"

  3. The Origin of the Cosmic Gamma-ray Background in the MeV Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; The, Lih-Sin; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Ajello, Marco; Canal, Ramon; Röpke, Friedrich K.; Ohlmann, Sebastian T.; Hillebrandt, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    There has been much debate about the origin of the diffuse γ-ray background in the MeV range. At lower energies, AGNs and Seyfert galaxies can explain the background, but not above ≃0.3 MeV. Beyond ˜10 MeV blazars appear to account for the flux observed. That leaves an unexplained gap for which different candidates have been proposed, including annihilations of WIMPS. One candidate is Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Early studies concluded that they were able to account for the γ-ray background in the gap, while later work attributed a significantly lower contribution to them. All those estimates were based on SN Ia explosion models that did not reflect the full 3D hydrodynamics of SN Ia explosions. In addition, new measurements obtained since 2010 have provided new, direct estimates of high-z SN Ia rates beyond z ˜ 2. We take into account these new advances to see the predicted contribution to the gamma-ray background. We use here a wide variety of explosion models and a plethora of new measurements of SN Ia rates. SNe Ia still fall short of the observed background. Only for a fit, which would imply ˜150% systematic error in detecting SN Ia events, do the theoretical predictions approach the observed fluxes. This fit is, however, at odds at the highest redshifts with recent SN Ia rate estimates. Other astrophysical sources such as flat-spectrum radio quasars do match the observed flux levels in the MeV regime, while SNe Ia make up to 30%-50% of the observed flux.

  4. Cross sections for production of the 15.10 MeV and other astrophysically significant gamma-ray lines through excitation and spallation of sup 12 C and sup 16 O with protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, F. L.; Werntz, C. W.; Crannell, C. J.; Trombka, J. I.; Chang, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    The ratio of the flux of 15.10-MeV gamma rays to the flux of 4.438-MeV gamma rays resulting from excitation of the corresponding states in C-12 as a sensitive measure of the spectrum of the exciting particles produced in solar flares and other cosmic sources. These gamma rays are produced predominantly by interactions with C-12 and O-16, both of which are relatively abundant in the solar photosphere. Gamma ray production cross sections for proton interactions have been reported previously for all important channels except for the production of 15.10-MeV gamma rays from O-16. The first reported measurement of the 15.10-MeV gamma ray production cross section from p + O-16 is presented here. The University of Maryland cyclotron was employed to produce 40-, 65-, and 86-MeV protons which interacted with CH2 and BeO targets. The resultant gamma ray spectra were measured with a high-purity germanium semiconductor detector at 70, 90, 110, 125, and 140 degrees relative to the direction of the incident beam for each proton energy. Other gamma ray lines resulting from direct excitation and spallation reactions with C-12 and 0-16 were observed as well, and their gamma ray production cross sections described.

  5. Particle Acceleration Inside Thunderstorms and the Variation in Source Spectra of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Eric; Dwyer, Joseph R.; Briggs, Michael S.; Rassoul, Hamid K.

    2016-03-01

    One of the unresolved questions in the atmospheric sciences is the origin of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs). These flashes are short but intense gamma ray bursts emanating from Earth's atmosphere. This phenomenon has been observed by gamma ray detectors on orbiting satellites, e.g. NASA Fermi, intended to study astrophysical phenomena such as Gamma-ray Bursts. TGFs are thought to originate inside thunderstorms where electrons can be accelerated and emit radiation in the multi MeV range due to bremsstrahlung interactions with air molecules. These so called ``runaway electrons'' are seeded from cosmic ray air showers hitting the Earth's atmosphere from (extra) galactic sources. In this work, we present a Monte Carlo model that simulates particle physics inside a thunderstorm region. The subsequent transport of high energy gamma rays through the Earth's atmosphere and up to satellite orbit is also included. We show that by varying both the potential difference and the ambient electric field inside the thundercloud, different electron and photon energy distributions are produced. This effect may be detectable by orbiting spacecraft, and therefore serves as a method to remote sense the electric fields that exist inside thunderstorms.

  6. Space Detectors for Gamma Rays (100 MeV-100 GeV): from Egret to Fermi LAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The design of spaceborne high-energy (E is greater than 100 MeV) gamma-ray detectors depends on two principal factors: (1) the basic physics of detecting and measuring the properties of the gamma rays; and (2) the constraints of operating such a detector in space for an extended period. Improvements in technology have enabled major advances in detector performance, as illustrated by two successful instruments, EGRET on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and LAT on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.

  7. A correlation between hard gamma-ray sources and cosmic voids along the line of sight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furniss, A.; Sutter, P. M.; Primack, J. R.; Domínguez, A.

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the galaxy density along lines of sight to hard extragalactic gamma-ray sources by correlating source positions on the sky with a void catalogue based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Extragalactic gamma-ray sources that are detected at very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) or have been highlighted as VHE-emitting candidates in the Fermi Large Area Telescope hard source catalogue (together referred to as `VHE-like' sources) are distributed along underdense lines of sight at the 2.4σ level. There is also a less suggestive correlation for the Fermi hard source population (1.7σ). A correlation between 10 and 500 GeV flux and underdense fraction along the line of sight for VHE-like and Fermi hard sources is found at 2.4σ and 2.6σ, calculated from the Pearson correlation coefficients of r = 0.57 and 0.47, respectively. The preference for underdense sight lines is not displayed by gamma-ray emitting galaxies within the second Fermi catalogue, containing sources detected above 100 MeV, or the SDSS Data Release 7 quasar catalogue. We investigate whether this marginal correlation might be a result of lower extragalactic background light (EBL) photon density within the underdense regions and find that, even in the most extreme case of a entirely underdense sight line, the EBL photon density is only 2 per cent less than the nominal EBL density. Translating this into gamma-ray attenuation along the line of sight for a highly attenuated source with opacity τ(E, z) ˜ 5, we estimate that the attenuation of gamma-rays decreases no more than 10 per cent. This decrease, although non-negligible, is unable to account for the apparent hard source correlation with underdense lines of sight.

  8. A correlation between hard gamma-ray sources and cosmic voids along the line of sight

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Furniss, A.; Sutter, P. M.; Primack, J. R.; Dominguez, A.

    2014-11-25

    We estimate the galaxy density along lines of sight to hard extragalactic gamma-ray sources by correlating source positions on the sky with a void catalog based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Extragalactic gamma-ray sources that are detected at very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) or have been highlighted as VHE-emitting candidates in the Fermi Large Area Telescope hard source catalog (together referred to as “VHE-like” sources) are distributed along underdense lines of sight at the 2.4σ level. There is a less suggestive correlation for the Fermi hard source population (1.7σ). A correlation between 10-500 GeV fluxmore » and underdense fraction along the line of sight for VHE-like and Fermi hard sources is found at 2.4σ and 2.6σ, calculated from the Pearson correlation coefficients of r = 0.57 and 0.47, respectively. The preference for underdense sight lines is not displayed by gamma-ray emitting galaxies within the second Fermi catalog, containing sources detected above 100 MeV, or the SDSS DR7 quasar catalog. We investigate whether this marginal correlation might be a result of lower extragalactic background light (EBL) photon density within the underdense regions and find that, even in the most extreme case of a entirely underdense sight line, the EBL photon density is only 2% less than the nominal EBL density. Translating this into gamma-ray attenuation along the line of sight for a highly attenuated source with opacity τ(E, z) ~ 5, we estimate that the attentuation of gamma-rays decreases no more than 10%. This decrease, although non-neglible, is unable to account for the apparent hard source correlation with underdense lines of sight.« less

  9. A correlation between hard gamma-ray sources and cosmic voids along the line of sight

    SciTech Connect

    Furniss, A.; Sutter, P. M.; Primack, J. R.; Dominguez, A.

    2014-11-25

    We estimate the galaxy density along lines of sight to hard extragalactic gamma-ray sources by correlating source positions on the sky with a void catalog based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Extragalactic gamma-ray sources that are detected at very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) or have been highlighted as VHE-emitting candidates in the Fermi Large Area Telescope hard source catalog (together referred to as “VHE-like” sources) are distributed along underdense lines of sight at the 2.4σ level. There is a less suggestive correlation for the Fermi hard source population (1.7σ). A correlation between 10-500 GeV flux and underdense fraction along the line of sight for VHE-like and Fermi hard sources is found at 2.4σ and 2.6σ, calculated from the Pearson correlation coefficients of r = 0.57 and 0.47, respectively. The preference for underdense sight lines is not displayed by gamma-ray emitting galaxies within the second Fermi catalog, containing sources detected above 100 MeV, or the SDSS DR7 quasar catalog. We investigate whether this marginal correlation might be a result of lower extragalactic background light (EBL) photon density within the underdense regions and find that, even in the most extreme case of a entirely underdense sight line, the EBL photon density is only 2% less than the nominal EBL density. Translating this into gamma-ray attenuation along the line of sight for a highly attenuated source with opacity τ(E, z) ~ 5, we estimate that the attentuation of gamma-rays decreases no more than 10%. This decrease, although non-neglible, is unable to account for the apparent hard source correlation with underdense lines of sight.

  10. Stacking Searches for Greater Than 100 MeV Gamma Ray Emission from Radio Galaxies and Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cillis, A. N.; Hartman, R. C.; Bertsch, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    The EGRET telescope on CGRO detected more than sixty sources of high-energy gamma radiation associated with active galactic nuclei (AGN). All but one of those belong to the blazar subclass; the only exception is the nearby radio galaxy Centaurus A. Since there is no obvious reason other than proximity to expect Cen A to be the only non-blazar AGN emitting in high-energy gamma rays, we have utilized the "stacking" technique to search for $>100$-MeV emission from two non-blazar AGN subclasses, radio galaxies and Seyfert galaxies. Maps of gamma-ray counts, exposure, and diffuse background have been created, then co-added in varying numbers based on sorts by redshift, 5-GHZ flux density, and optical brightness, and finally tested for gamma-ray emission. No detection significance greater than $2\\sigma$ has been found for any subclass, sorting parameter, or number of objects co-added. Monte Carlo simulations have also been performed, to validate the technique and estimate the significance of the results.

  11. A high resolution liquid xenon imaging telescope for 0.3-10 MeV gamma-ray astrophysics: Construction and initial balloon flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena

    1994-01-01

    An instrument is described which will provide a direct image of gamma-ray line or continuum sources in the energy range 300 keV to 10 MeV. The use of this instrument to study the celestial distribution of the (exp 26)Al isotope by observing the 1.809 MeV deexcitation gamma-ray line is illustrated. The source location accuracy is 2' or better. The imaging telescope is a liquid xenon time projection chamber coupled with a coded aperture mask (LXe-CAT). This instrument will confirm and extend the COMPTEL observations from the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) with an improved capability for identifying the actual Galactic source or sources of (exp 26)Al, which are currently not known with certainty. sources currently under consideration include red giants on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB), novae, Type 1b or Type 2 supernovae, Wolf-Rayet stars and cosmic-rays interacting in molecular clouds. The instrument could also identify a local source of the celestial 1.809 MeV gamma-ray line, such as a recent nearby supernova.

  12. Imaging with INTEGRAL. [instrument for fine spectroscopy of celestial gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The INTEGRAL mission was proposed in response to the ESA M2 call for proposals and is dedicated to the fine spectroscopy and imaging of celestial gamma-ray sources in the energy range 15 keV to 10 MeV. Cosmic gamma-rays are emitted on a wide range of angular scales and structures for a diverse population of astronomical objects. The emission, which includes discrete spectral lines and continuum radiation is derived from point sources, localized regions, as well as a diffuse band along the Galactic plane. Much of the gamma-ray sky is composed from transient phenomena which range from the few second timescale associated with gamma-ray bursts to larger lived events lasting some days or more. These class of events pose the challenge of firstly identification and secondly that of precise positional location of 'random' short lived events which arrive isotropically. In this article the imaging requirements are evaluated in light of current observational astronomical data and practical solutions for the INTEGRAL telescope are discussed. Some of the key problems are highlighted.

  13. Three precise gamma-ray burst source locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Evans, W. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The precise source regions of three moderately intense gamma ray bursts are derived. These events were observed with the first interplanetary burst sensor network. The optimum locations of the detectors, widely separated throughout the inner solar system, allowed for high accuracy, over-determined source fields of size 0.7 to 7.0 arc-min(2). All three locations are at fairly high galactic latitude in regions of low source confusion; none can be identified with a steady source object. Archived photographs were searched for optical transients that are able to be associated with these source fields; one such association was made.

  14. Repeating sources of classical gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, V. C.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1995-01-01

    From an analysis of the first catalog of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) experiment (Fishman et al. 1993, 1994a) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), we find an excessive number of pairs of gamma-ray bursts which are clustered in both a space and time . The angular separation between the two bursts in each pair is less than their positional uncertainties, and the interval between their occurrence times is within several days. Optimizing the signal, we find that the probability of observing such a clustered excess froma Poisson ensemble is approximately 2 x 10(exp -5). We suggest that these bursts arise from repeating sources. A detailed study of the most prolific source, GBS 0855-00, is presented in a separate paper (Wang & Lingenfelter 1993a, b). Unlike most of the 'soft' gamma-ray repeaters, these repeating bursts have relatively hard spectra, complex light curves, and widely varying durations, that are indistinguishable from classical gamma-ray bursts. Although the significance of the clustered excess was optimized a posteriori, because it depends on temporal and spatial bin sized that could not be defined a priori, we can use the optimizations from the first catalog to test subsequent BATSE data sets. Unfortunately, the failure of the on-board tape recorders during the second catalog period seriously reduced the number of accurately positioned bursts (Fishman et al. 1994b), so that we can neither confirm, nor refute, the predicted repitition in that sample, and we must await the results of the third catalog.

  15. Final SAS-2 gamma ray results on sources in the galactic anticenter region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of SAS-2 high energy Gamma ray data from the direction of the galactic anticenter shows that this region is characterized by: a diffuse emission from the galactic plane which has a maximum along b=0 deg and an enhancement toward negative latitudes associated with Gould's Belt, a strong point source in the direction of the Crab nebula, and a second intense localized source near galactic coordinates 195 deg, +5 deg. Gamma ray emission from the Crab source is dominated by a pulsed flux from PSR 0531+21. The total flux above 100MeV is 3.7 + or - 0.8 million/sq cm s. The source near 195 deg, + 5 deg has a flux above 100 MeV of 4.3 + or - 0.9 million/sq cm s. Its spectrum appears flatter than that of the Crab. The diffuse galactic plane emission at negative lattitudes shows a general correlation with the local matter distribution associated with Gould's Belt. The calculated Gamma ray intensity agrees well with the SAS-2 observations.

  16. Strategies for Studying the Sources of Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Norris, J. P.; Hurley, K. C.

    2003-01-01

    The study of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) has rapidly evolved in recent years with the discovery of their cosmological nature and with BATSE, BeppoSAX, HETE and the IPN enabling a wide variety of associated . afterglow measurements. Multiwavelength observations ranging through the radio, optical, soft and hard x-ray, and gamma-ray regimes have exploded the field of GRB interpretation. Also, the Amanda, Milagro and LIGO experiments can search for related neutrino, cosmic-ray photon, and gravitational radiation events, even with the delayed alerts, such as from the IPN. The infrared region, where the optical emissions from sources at the extreme distances may be shifted, will become important but is undersubscribed. The soon-to-be launched Swift mission will greatly broaden the GRB discipline, and a strategy for associated ground-based measurements is outlined. The need for the improved global distribution of all instruments, in particular, robotic infrared detectors, is cited.

  17. MeV Gamma Ray Detection Algorithms for Stacked Silicon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMurray, Robert E. Jr.; Hubbard, G. Scott; Wercinski, Paul F.; Keller, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    By making use of the signature of a gamma ray event as it appears in N = 5 to 20 lithium-drifted silicon detectors and applying smart selection algorithms, gamma rays in the energy range of 1 to 8 MeV can be detected with good efficiency and selectivity. Examples of the types of algorithms used for different energy regions include the simple sum mode, the sum-coincidence mode used in segmented detectors, unique variations on sum-coincidence for an N-dimensional vector event, and a new and extremely useful mode for double escape peak spectroscopy at pair-production energies. The latter algorithm yields a spectrum similar to that of the pair spectrometer, but without the need of the dual external segments for double escape coincidence, and without the large loss in efficiency of double escape events. Background events due to Compton scattering are largely suppressed. Monte Carlo calculations were used to model the gamma ray interactions in the silicon, in order to enable testing of a wide array of different algorithms on the event N-vectors for a large-N stack.

  18. The Fermi Large Area Telescope Third Gamma-ray Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrara, Elizabeth C.; Ballet, Jean; Cavazzuti, Elisabetta; Digel, Seth

    2015-08-01

    We present an overview of the third Fermi Large Area Telescope source catalog (3FGL) of sources in the 100 MeV - 300 GeV range. Based on the first four years of science data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission, it covers the entire sky, and is the deepest yet in this energy range. The 3FGL catalog provides source localizations, broad-band spectral fits, spectral energy distributions, and light curves with 1-month binning for all 3033 sources. In addition, it includes likely multiwavelength counterparts for roughtly two-thirds of the sources, with the remaining third having no clear associations with known gamma-ray-producing objects. More than 1100 of the identified or associated sources have blazar or other AGN counterparts, and a large fraction of these are variable in gamma rays. In addition, a number of 3FGL sources are pulsars or supernova remnants, and sources with counterparts at very high energies (TeV) are flagged. The catalog, supporting data products used for its creation, visualization tools, and important caveats are publicly available through the Fermi Science Support Center: http://fermi.gsfc.nasa.gov/ssc/data/access/lat/4yr_catalog/.

  19. Gamma-ray observations of Ophiuchus with EGRET: The diffuse emission and point sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, S. D.; Digel, S. W.; De Geus, E. J.; Kanbach, G.

    1994-01-01

    Observations of the Ophiuchus region made with the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) during the first 2 1/2 years of operation show the diffuse emission from the interstellar gas in Ophiuchus as well as variable emission from two point sources. The gamma-ray emission is modeled in terms of cosmic-ray interactions with atomic and molecular hydrogen in Ophiuchus and with low-energy photons along the line of sight. The model also includes the flux from the two point sources and an isotropic diffuse contribution. The cosmic-ray density is assumed to be uniform. The derived ratio of molecular hydrogen column density to integrated CO intensity is (1.1 +/- 0.2) x 10(exp 20) H-mols/sq cm (K km/s)(exp -1). At the sensitivity and resolution of the gamma-ray data, no variation of this ratio over the modeled region is discernible, nor are any regions of enhanced cosmic-ray density apparent. The model was fitted to seven narrow energy bands to obtain the energy depedence of the gamma-ray production function and the spectra of the point sources. The derived production function is in good agreement with theoretical calculations and the local cosmic-ray electron and proton spectra. The positions of the point sources were determined from maximum likelihood analysis of the gamma-ray emission observed in excess of the diffuse model. We identify one point source with the quasar PKS 1622-253, which has an average flux, E greater than 100 MeV, of (2.5 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp -7) photons/sq cm/s and photon spectral index -1.9 +/- 0.3. The other source, denoted GRO J1631-27, has not yet been identified at other wavelengths. Its average flux, E greater than 100 MeV, is (1.1 +/- 0.4) x 10(exp -7) photons/sq cm/s; however, its spectral index is poorly determined. The spectral index and intensity of the isotropic contribution to the model agree well with the extragalactic diffuse emission derived from the SAS 2 data.

  20. The Third EGRET Catalog of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Bertsch, D. L.; Bloom, S. D.; Chen, A. W.; Deines-Jones, P.; Esposito, J. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Friedlander, D. P.; Hunter, S. D.; McDonald, L. M.; Sreekumar, P.; Thompson, D. J.; Jones, B. B.; Lin, Y. C.; Michelson, P. F.; Nolan, P. L.; Tompkins, W. F.; Kanbach, G.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Muecke, A.

    1998-01-01

    The third catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET telescope on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory includes data from 1991 April 22 to 1995 October 3 (Cycles 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the mission). In addition to including more data than the second EGRET catalog (Thompson et al. 1995) and its supplement (Thompson et al. 1996), this catalog uses completely reprocessed data (to correct a number of mostly minimal errors and problems). The 271 sources (E greater than 100 MeV) in the catalog include the single 1991 solar flare bright enough to be detected as a source, the Large Magellanic Cloud, five pulsars, one probable radio galaxy detection (Cen A), and 66 high-confidence identifications of blazars (BL Lac objects, flat-spectrum radio quasars, or unidentified flat-spectrum radio sources). In addition, 27 lower-confidence potential blazar identifications are noted. Finally, the catalog contains 170 sources not yet identified firmly with known objects, although potential identifications have been suggested for a number of those. A figure is presented that gives approximate upper limits for gamma-ray sources at any point in the sky, as well as information about sources listed in the second catalog and its supplement which do not appear in this catalog.

  1. The Third EGRET Catalog of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Bertsch, D. L.; Bloom, S. D.; Chen, A. W.; Deines-Jones, P.; Esposito, J. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Friedlander, D. P.; Hunter, S. D.; McDonald, L. M.; Sreekumar, P.; Thompson, D. J.; Jones, B. B.; Lin, Y. C.; Michelson, P. F.; Nolan, P. L.; Tompkins, W. F.; Kanbach, G.; Mayer-Hasselwander, A.; Muecke, A.

    1998-01-01

    The third catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET telescope on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory includes data from 1991 April 22 to 1995 October 3 (Cycles 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the mission). In addition to including more data than the second EGRET catalog and its supplement, this catalog uses completely reprocessed data (to correct a number of mostly minimal errors and problems). The 271 sources (E greater than 100 MeV) in the catalog include the single 1991 solar flare bright enough to be detected as a source, the Large Magellanic Cloud, five pulsars, one probable radio galaxy detection (Cen A), and 66 high-confidence identifications of blazars (BL Lac objects, flat-spectrum radio quasars, or unidentified flat-spectrum radio sources). In addition, 27 lower-confidence potential blazar identifications are noted. Finally, the catalog contains 170 sources not yet identified firmly with known objects, although potential identifications have been suggested for a number of those. A figure is presented that gives approximate upper limits for gamma-ray sources at any point in the sky, as well as information about sources listed in the second catalog and its supplement which do not appear in this catalog.

  2. Search with VERITAS and SGARFACE for bursts of gamma-rays with energy greater than 100 MeV and with duration shorter than 15 μs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroedter, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Bursts of gamma rays above 100 MeV and with duration less than 15 μs might be produced by pulsars (Lyutikov, 2007), by explosions of primordial black holes (Hawking, 1974), or via some as-yet undiscovered mechanism, for example during gamma-ray bursts. Bursts of nearly simultaneous gamma-rays above 100 MeV can be detected by their Cherenkov radiation using ground-based telescopes. SGARFACE piggy-backs on the Whipple 10 m imaging air-Cherenkov telescope to search for bursts of gamma-rays with duration less than 15 μs. To eliminate cosmic- ray background events that mimic the expected image parameters of bursts, we search for correlations with VERITAS. VERITAS is the most sensitive array of air-Cherenkov telescopes in the northern hemisphere and is located about 7 km distant from the SGARFACE experiment. The fluence sensitivity of this search is 0.2 (0.01) photons/m^2 for 1 (10) GeV gamma-rays during a 100 ns burst. About 80 hours of observations have been taken with both instruments pointed at the same source in the sky. We present results of the search for bursts produced by the Crab pulsar, by GRBs, and by the explosion of primordial black holes.

  3. Inverse Compton gamma-ray source for nuclear physics and related applications at the Duke FEL

    SciTech Connect

    O`Shea, P.G.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years the development of intense, short-wavelength FEL light sources has opened opportunities for the development new applications of high-energy Compton-backscattered photons. These applications range from medical imaging with X-ray photons to high-energy physics with {gamma}{gamma} colliders. In this paper we discuss the possibilities for nuclear physics studies using polarized Compton backscattered {gamma}-rays from the Duke storage-ring-driven UV-FEL. There are currently a number of projects that produce polarized {gamma}-rays for nuclear physics studies. All of these facilities operate by scattering conventional laser-light against electrons circulating in a storage ring. In our scheme, intra-cavity scattering of the UV-FEL light will produce a {gamma}-flux enhancement of approximately 10{sup 3} over existing sources. The Duke ring can operate at energies up to 1.2 GeV and can produce FEL photons up to 12.5 eV. We plan to generate {gamma}-rays up to 200 MeV in energy with an average flux in excess of 10{sup 7} /s/MeV, using a modest scattering beam of 10-mA average stored current. The {gamma}-ray energy may be tuned by varying the FEL wavelength or by adjusting the stored electron beam energy. Because of the intense flux, we can eliminate the need for photon energy tagging by collimating of the {gamma}-ray beam. We will discuss the characteristics of the device and its research opportunities.

  4. Computational determination of absorbed dose distributions from gamma ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanyu; Inanc, Feyzi

    2001-04-01

    A biomedical procedure known as brachytherapy involves insertion of many radioactive seeds into a sick gland for eliminating sick tissue. For such implementations, the spatial distribution of absorbed dose is very important. A simulation tool has been developed to determine the spatial distribution of absorbed dose in heterogeneous environments where the gamma ray source consists of many small internal radiation emitters. The computation is base on integral transport method and the computations are done in a parallel fashion. Preliminary results involving 137Cs and 125I sources surrounded by water and comparison of the results to the experimental and computational data available in the literature are presented.

  5. Gamma-rays of 3 to 25 MeV from the galactic anti-center and pulsar NP 0532

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Moon, S. H.; Ryan, J. M.; Zych, A. D.; White, R. S.; Dayton, B.

    1978-01-01

    Gamma-rays of 3 to 25 MeV are reported from the galactic anticenter region and the Crab Pulsar, NP 0532. The observations were carried out from Palestine, Texas, on May 13, 1975. Gamma-rays from the galactic anticenter were observed as the Crab Nebula passed overhead within 10 deg of the zenith. Pulsed gamma-rays from NP 0532 were observed at a 4.4-sigma significance level. The total flux from 3-25 MeV is 0.0049 + or - 0.002 photon/sq cm-sec. The pulsed flux from NP 0532 from 3 to 25 MeV is 0.00043 + or - 0.00026 photon/sq cm-sec. The ratio of the total to the pulsed flux from 3 to 25 MeV is 11 + or - 8.

  6. Nuclear gamma rays from 720-MeV alpha-induced reactions on Al-27 and Si-28

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieb, B. J.; Plendl, H. S.; Funsten, H. O.; Stronach, C. E.; Lind, V. G.

    1980-01-01

    Prompt gamma rays from the interaction of 720-MeV alpha particles with Al-27 and Si-28 were detected and analyzed to identify residual nuclei and to determine cross sections for production of specific levels. No gamma-ray transitions were detected from nuclei heavier than the target. From Doppler broadening, the momentum of the residual nuclei was estimated. The results are compared with previous results for 140- and 1600-MeV alphas on Al-27 and approximately 200-MeV positive or negative pions on Al-27 and Si-28 and fitted to a spallation-yield formula.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A PRECISION TUNABLE GAMMA-RAY SOURCE DRIVEN BY A COMPACT X-BAND LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Messerly, M J; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G

    2009-04-30

    A precision, tunable gamma-ray source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by the linac interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. The source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence lines in various isotopes; applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented.

  8. Advanced Laser-Compton Gamma-Ray Sources for Nuclear Materials Detection, Assay and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barty, C. P. J.

    2015-10-01

    Highly-collimated, polarized, mono-energetic beams of tunable gamma-rays may be created via the optimized Compton scattering of pulsed lasers off of ultra-bright, relativistic electron beams. Above 2 MeV, the peak brilliance of such sources can exceed that of the world's largest synchrotrons by more than 15 orders of magnitude and can enable for the first time the efficient pursuit of nuclear science and applications with photon beams, i.e. Nuclear Photonics. Potential applications are numerous and include isotope-specific nuclear materials management, element-specific medical radiography and radiology, non-destructive, isotope-specific, material assay and imaging, precision spectroscopy of nuclear resonances and photon-induced fission. This review covers activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory related to the design and optimization of mono-energetic, laser-Compton gamma-ray systems and introduces isotope-specific nuclear materials detection and assay applications enabled by them.

  9. A new class of galactic discrete gamma ray sources: Chaotic winds of massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wan; White, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    We propose a new class of galactic discrete gamma-ray sources, the chaotic, high mass-loss-rate winds from luminous early-type stars. Early-type stellar winds are highly unstable due to intrinsic line-driven instabilities, and so are permeated by numerous strong shocks. These shocks can accelerate a small fraction of thermal electrons and ions to relativistic energies via the first-order Fermi mechanism. A power-law-like photon spectrum extending from keV to above 10 MeV energies is produced by inverse Compton scattering of the extremely abundant stellar UV photons by the relativistic electrons. In addition, a typical pi(sup 0)-decay gamma-ray spectrum is generated by proton-ion interactions in the densest part of the winds.

  10. Method and System for Gamma-Ray Localization Induced Spacecraft Navigation Using Celestial Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheikh, Suneel I. (Inventor); Hisamoto, Chuck (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and system for spacecraft navigation using distant celestial gamma-ray bursts which offer detectable, bright, high-energy events that provide well-defined characteristics conducive to accurate time-alignment among spatially separated spacecraft. Utilizing assemblages of photons from distant gamma-ray bursts, relative range between two spacecraft can be accurately computed along the direction to each burst's source based upon the difference in arrival time of the burst emission at each spacecraft's location. Correlation methods used to time-align the high-energy burst profiles are provided. The spacecraft navigation may be carried out autonomously or in a central control mode of operation.

  11. The solar gamma ray spectrum between 4 and 8 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Suri, A. N.

    1976-01-01

    The properties of nuclear gamma ray emission in the 4 to 8 MeV range were evaluated. This emission consists of broad and narrow lines resulting from nuclear reactions of energetic H, He, C and O nuclei with ambient matter. Calculations were compared with observations of the 1972, August 4 flare and show that: (1) essentially all the observed radiation in the 4 to 8 MeV region is to the superposition of broad and narrow lines of nuclear origin with almost no contribution from other mechanisms; (2) the accelerated particles in the energy region from about 10 to 100 MeV/amu have a relatively flat Energy spectrum; (3) the calculated gamma ray spectrum, obtained from an isotropic distribution of accelerated particles, fits the observed spectrum better than the spectrum derived from an anisotropic distribution for which the particles' velocity vectors point towards the photosphere; and (4) it is possible to set a stringent upper limit on the ratio of relativistic electrons to protons in flares, consistent with the small, but finite, electron-to-proton ratio in galactic cosmic rays.

  12. New readout and data-acquisition system in an electron-tracking Compton camera for MeV gamma-ray astronomy (SMILE-II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumoto, T.; Matsuoka, Y.; Mizumura, Y.; Tanimori, T.; Kubo, H.; Takada, A.; Iwaki, S.; Sawano, T.; Nakamura, K.; Komura, S.; Nakamura, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Oda, M.; Miyamoto, S.; Takemura, T.; Parker, J. D.; Tomono, D.; Sonoda, S.; Miuchi, K.; Kurosawa, S.

    2015-11-01

    For MeV gamma-ray astronomy, we have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) as a MeV gamma-ray telescope capable of rejecting the radiation background and attaining the high sensitivity of near 1 mCrab in space. Our ETCC comprises a gaseous time-projection chamber (TPC) with a micro pattern gas detector for tracking recoil electrons and a position-sensitive scintillation camera for detecting scattered gamma rays. After the success of a first balloon experiment in 2006 with a small ETCC (using a 10×10×15 cm3 TPC) for measuring diffuse cosmic and atmospheric sub-MeV gamma rays (Sub-MeV gamma-ray Imaging Loaded-on-balloon Experiment I; SMILE-I), a (30 cm)3 medium-sized ETCC was developed to measure MeV gamma-ray spectra from celestial sources, such as the Crab Nebula, with single-day balloon flights (SMILE-II). To achieve this goal, a 100-times-larger detection area compared with that of SMILE-I is required without changing the weight or power consumption of the detector system. In addition, the event rate is also expected to dramatically increase during observation. Here, we describe both the concept and the performance of the new data-acquisition system with this (30 cm)3 ETCC to manage 100 times more data while satisfying the severe restrictions regarding the weight and power consumption imposed by a balloon-borne observation. In particular, to improve the detection efficiency of the fine tracks in the TPC from ~10% to ~100%, we introduce a new data-handling algorithm in the TPC. Therefore, for efficient management of such large amounts of data, we developed a data-acquisition system with parallel data flow.

  13. Overview of Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray Sources and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, Fred; Albert, Felicie; Anderson, Scott; Barty, Christopher; Bayramian, Andy; Chu, Tak Sum; Cross, R.; Ebbers, Chris; Gibson, David; Marsh, Roark; McNabb, Dennis; Messerly, Michael; Shverdin, Miroslav; Siders, Craig; Jongewaard, Erik; Raubenheimer, Tor; Tantawi, Sami; Vlieks, Arnold; Semenov, Vladimir; /UC, Berkeley

    2012-06-25

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of tunable gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development and construction at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by an X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC NAL will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped CPA laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. This MEGaray source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence in various isotopes. Applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented, along with important applications, including nuclear resonance fluorescence.

  14. Gamma-ray bursts during neutron star formation. Gamma-ray bursts and transient X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. M.; Desai, U. D.; Holt, S. S.

    1973-01-01

    Discussions are presented of the associations between cosmic gamma ray bursts and transient X-ray sources, and the release of gravitational binding energy during the formation of neutron stars. The model for studying the associations is described along with the release of neutrinos during the collapse of white dwarfs.

  15. Gamma ray lines from solar flares. [with 2.2 MeV line being strongest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The strongest line, both predicted theoretically and detected observationally at 2.2 MeV, is due to neutron capture by protons in the photosphere. The neutrons are produced in nuclear reactions of flare accelerated particles which also positrons and prompt nuclear gamma rays. From the comparison of the observed and calculated intensities of the lines at 4.4 or 6.1 MeV to that of the 2.2 MeV line, it is possible to deduce the spectrum of accelerated nuclei in the flare region; and from the absolute intensities of these lines, it is possible to obtain the total number of accelerated nuclei at the sun. The study of the 2.2 MeV line also gives information on the amount of He-3 in the photosphere. The study of the line at 0.51 MeV resulting from positron annihilation complements the data obtained from the other lines; in addition it gives information on the temperature and density in the annihilation region.

  16. Laser System for Livermore's Mono Energetic Gamma-Ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D; Albert, F; Bayramian, A; Marsh, R; Messerly, M; Ebbers, C; Hartemann, F

    2011-03-14

    A Mono-energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source, based on Compton scattering of a high-intensity laser beam off a highly relativistic electron beam, requires highly specialized laser systems. To minimize the bandwidth of the {gamma}-ray beam, the scattering laser must have minimal bandwidth, but also match the electron beam depth of focus in length. This requires a {approx}1 J, 10 ps, fourier-transform-limited laser system. Also required is a high-brightness electron beam, best provided by a photoinjector. This electron source requires a second laser system with stringent requirements on the beam including flat transverse and longitudinal profiles and fast rise times. Furthermore, these systems must be synchronized to each other with ps-scale accuracy. Using a novel hyper-dispersion compressor configuration and advanced fiber amplifiers and diode-pumped Nd:YAG amplifiers, we have designed laser systems that meet these challenges for the X-band photoinjector and Compton-scattering source being built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  17. An extended source of GeV gamma rays coincident with the supernova remnant HB 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, Ignasi; Oña-Wilhelmi, Emma De; Rico, Javier; Yang, Rui-zhi

    2012-12-01

    We analyze 3.5 years of public Fermi/LAT data around the position of the supernova remnant HB 21, where four point-like sources from the 2nd Fermi/LAT catalog are located. We determine that the gamma-ray source is produced by a single extended source. We model the observed morphology as a uniform circle. The spectral energy distribution is best described by a curved power law, with a maximum at 413+/-11 MeV. We divide the circle into three regions defined by previously identified shocked molecular clouds, and find that one of the se regions has a softer spectrum. The > 3GeV gamma-ray emission of the soft spectrum region is bow-shaped and coincident with the supernova remnant shell seen at radio wavelengths. We suggest that the gamma-ray emission from HB 21 can be understood as a combination of emission from shocked/illuminated molecular clouds, one of them coincident with the supernova remnant shell itself.

  18. An extended source of GeV gamma rays coincident with the supernova remnant HB 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, I.; de Oña-Wilhelmi, E.; Rico, J.; Yang, R.

    2012-10-01

    We analyze 3.5 years of public Fermi/LAT data around the position of the supernova remnant HB 21, where four point-like sources from the 2nd Fermi/LAT catalog are located. We determine that the gamma-ray source is produced by a single extended source. We model the observed morphology as a uniform circle. The spectral energy distribution is best described by a curved power law, with a maximum at 413 ± 11 MeV. We divide the circle into three regions defined by previously identified shocked molecular clouds, and find that one of these regions has a softer spectrum. The >3 GeV gamma-ray emission of the soft spectrum region is bow-shaped and coincident with the supernova remnant shell seen at radio wavelengths. We suggest that the gamma-ray emission from HB 21 can be understood as a combination of emission from shocked/illuminated molecular clouds, one of them coincident with the supernova remnant shell itself.

  19. Compact Gamma-ray Source Technology Development Study

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Rusnak, B

    2009-09-25

    This study focuses on the applicability of current accelerator and laser technologies to the construction of compact, narrow bandwidth, gamma-ray sources for DHS missions in illicit materials detection. It also identifies research and development areas in which advancement will directly benefit these light sources. In particular, we review the physics of Compton scattering based light sources and emphasize the source properties most important to Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) applications of interest. The influences of laser and electron beam properties on the light source are examined in order to evaluate the utility of different technologies for this application. Applicable bulk and fiber-based laser systems and laser recirculation technologies are discussed and Radio Frequency (RF) Linear Accelerator (linac) technologies are examined to determine the optimal frequency and pulse formats achievable.

  20. COMPTEL Studies of Gamma-Ray Bursts at MeV Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McConnell, Mark L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to analyse and interpret gamma-ray burst (GRB) data using both telescope mode data and single detector burst mode data from COMPTEL. Collectively, these data span the energy range from 300 keV up to 30 MeV. The initial goal of our proposal was to perform a standard analysis for each significant GRB event seen by COMPTEL. This includes GRBs that are registered by the telescope mode data as well as GRBs that are registered only in the burst mode data. (The latter category includes both GRBs that he outside of the FoV as well as GRBs within the FoV that are too weak to be seen in the telescope mode.) A second goal of our proposal was to define a set of data products (including deconvolved photon spectra) that, for each detected GRB event, would be made available via the COMPTEL GRB Web Page. The third goal of our program was to perform more detailed studies of selected GRB events. This represented a continuation of past GRB studies by the COMPTEL team. In general, we have met with only limited success in achieving these goals, in part due to the limited resources provided and our philosophy of utilizing local high school students to participate in this effort. Using local high school student support, however, we expect that considerable progress will be made in our efforts to catalog the COMPTEL gamma-ray burst data between now and the end of the current academic year. In addition, observations with COMPTEL contributed to an analysis of GRB 990123, the first gamma-ray burst with simultaneous optical observations.

  1. Measurements of galactic plane gamma ray emission in the energy range from 10 - 80 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertsch, D. L.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    A spark chamber gamma ray telescope was developed and flown to observe diffuse gamma ray emission from the central region of the galaxy. The extension of observations down to 10 MeV provides important new data indicating that the galactic diffuse gamma ray spectrum continues as a power law down to about 10 MeV, an observation in good agreement with recent theoretical predictions. Data from other experiments in the range from 100 keV to 10 MeV show a significant departure from the extension of the power-law fit to the medium energy observations reported here, possibly indicating that a different mechanism may be responsible for the emissions below and above a few MeV. The intensity of the spectrum above 10 MeV implies a galactic electron spectrum which is also very intense down to about 10 MeV. Electrons in this energy range cannot be observed in the solar cavity because of solar modulation effects. The galactic gamma ray data are compared with recent theoretical predictions.

  2. Collapsed White Dwarfs as Gamma-Ray Burst Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paolis, F.; Ingrosso, G.; Qadir, A.

    1995-09-01

    It has been suggested by Usov (1992) that accreting white dwarfs, collapsing to neutron stars may be the sources of the gamma-ray bursts observed at cosmological distances, provided they rotate very fast and have enormously high magnetic fields. In this model the burst's durationτ is given by the ratio of pulsar kinetic energy and magneticdipole luminosity, so that in order to account for the shortest (τ ˜ 0.1 s) bursts, the pulsars must rotate very fast (with periodP ˜ 0.5 ms) and have magnetic fields of 1016 - 1017 G. Though the high pulsar frequency was anticipated (Qadir and Rafique, 1986) and has been shown to be plausible (Abramowicz, 1990), the extremely high magnetic fields seem anomalous as observed neutron stars have fields below ˜ 1013 G. The problem with Usov's proposal is reduced by incorporating the relativistic corrections for fast rotating magnetic dipoles (Belinskyet al., 1994) or magnetic stars (De Paolis and Qadir, 1994). These corrections substantially enhance the radiation efficiency due to the existence of a magnetic synchrotron effect so that the magnetic field required for the explanation of the shortest gamma-ray bursts is strongly reduced. As such the model becomes much more plausible.

  3. SAS-2 galactic gamma ray results. 2. Localized sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1976-01-01

    Gamma-ray emission was detected from the radio pulsars PSR1818-04 and PSR1747-46, in addition to the previously reported gamma-ray emission from the Crab and Vela pulsars. Since the Crab pulsar is the only one observed in the optical and X-ray bands, these gamma-ray observations suggest a uniquely gamma-ray phenomenon occurring in a fraction of the radio pulsars. Using distance estimates it is found that PSR1818-04 has a gamma-ray luminosity comparable to that of the Crab pulsar, while the luminosities of PSR1747-46 and the Vela pulsar are approximately an order of magnitude lower. This survey of SAS-2 data for pulsar correlations has also yielded upper limits to gamma-ray luminosity for 71 other radio pulsars.

  4. Gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Cosmic gamma rays, the physical processes responsible for their production and the astrophysical sites from which they were seen are reported. The bulk of the observed gamma ray emission is in the photon energy range from about 0.1 MeV to 1 GeV, where observations are carried out above the atmosphere. There are also, however, gamma ray observations at higher energies obtained by detecting the Cerenkov light produced by the high energy photons in the atmosphere. Gamma ray emission was observed from sources as close as the Sun and the Moon and as distant as the quasar 3C273, as well as from various other galactic and extragalactic sites. The radiation processes also range from the well understood, e.g. energetic particle interactions with matter, to the still incompletely researched, such as radiation transfer in optically thick electron positron plasmas in intense neutron star magnetic fields.

  5. INTEGRAL Observations of the Galactic 511 keV Emission and MeV Gamma-ray Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, Ken

    2005-01-01

    Although there are a number of interesting phenomena, such as Nucleosynthesis in stars, in the MeV energy region, the observations have been difficult due to a small signal to noise (background) ratio (less than 1%). While NASA's Compton Gamma-ray Observatory (CGRO) enabled us to explore the Gamma-ray universe, ESA's INTEGRAL mission, launched in 2002, is providing us more detailed information with its superior energy and angular resolution. We will briefly discuss some of the current issues in MeV Gamma-ray Astrophysics. Then, we will focus on the Galactic 511 keV emission with the latest INTEGRAL observations, and talk about challenges we currently have.

  6. Detection and Location of Gamma-Ray Sources with a Modulating Coded Mask

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dale N.; Stromswold, David C.; Wunschel, Sharon C.; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Hansen, Randy R.

    2006-01-31

    This paper presents methods of detecting and locating a concelaed nuclear gamma-ray source with a coded aperture mask. Energetic gamma rays readily penetrate moderate amounts of shielding material and can be detected at distances of many meters. The detection of high energy gamma-ray sources is vitally important to national security for several reasons, including nuclear materials smuggling interdiction, monitoring weapon components under treaties, and locating nuclear weapons and materials in the possession terrorist organizations.

  7. SAS-2 galactic gamma-ray results. 2: Localized sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1977-01-01

    Gamma ray emission was detected from the radio pulsars PSR 1818-04 and PSR 1747-46, in addition to the previously reported gamma ray emission from the Crab and Vela pulsars. Because the Crab pulsar is the only one observed in the optical and X-ray bands, these gamma ray observations suggest a uniquely gamma ray phenomenon occurring in a fraction of the radio pulsars. PSR 1818-04 has a gamma ray luminosity comparable to that of the Crab pulsar, whereas the luminosities of PSR 1747-46 and the Vela pulsar are approximately an order of magnitude lower. SAS-2 data for pulsar correlations yielded upper limits to gamma ray luminosity for 71 other radio pulsars. For five of the closest pulsars, upper limits for gamma ray luminosity are found to be at least three orders of magnitude lower than that of the Crab pulsar. Gamma ray enhancement near the Milky Way satellite galaxy and the galactic plane in the Cygnus region is also discussed.

  8. A comparison of radiation damage in transistors from cobalt-60 gamma rays and 2.2 MeV electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, D. K.; Price, W. E.; Gauthier, M. K.

    1982-01-01

    The total ionizing dose response of ten bipolar transistor types has been measured using Co-60 gamma rays and 2.2 MeV electrons from exposure levels of 750, 1500, and 3000 Gy(Si). Gain measurements were made for a range of collector-emitter voltages and collector currents.

  9. Gamma rays of 1-30 MeV from the Vela Pulsar PSR 0833-45

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, T.; Long, J.; Oneill, T.; Zych, A.; White, R. S.; Dayton, B.

    1983-01-01

    Results are reported for observations of gamma rays of 1-30 MeV from the Vela Pulsar PSR 0833 - 45 carried out with the UCR double scatter gamma ray telescope on a balloon launched from Alice Springs, Australia on November 10, 1981. An integrated flux of (5.3 + or - 1.3) x 10 to the -4th photons/sq cm/s is found for the Vela region above 2 MeV. This value, together with those for the energy intervals of 2-4, 4-7, and 7-15 MeV are in reasonable agreement with the power law found by COS-B at energies above 50 MeV. A sky contour map of the fluxes is shown.

  10. Spectral evolution of gamma-rays from adiabatically expanding sources in dense clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    The excess of antiprotons (P) observed in cosmic ray was attributed to their production in supernova (SN) envelopes expanding in dense clouds. While creating P, gamma rays are also produced and these clouds would shine as gamma-ray sources. The evolution of the gamma-ray spectrum is calculated for clouds of r sub H = 10.000 and 100.000/cu cm.

  11. The first AGILE low-energy (< 30 MeV) Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, Martino; Fuschino, Fabio; Pittori, Carlotta; Verrecchia, Francesco; Giommi, Paolo; Tavani, Marco; Dietrich, Stefano; Price, Colin; Argan, Andrea; Labanti, Claudio; Galli, Marcello; Longo, Francesco; Del Monte, Ettore; Barbiellini, Guido; Giuliani, Andrea; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Gianotti, Fulvio; Trifoglio, Massimo; Trois, Alessio

    2014-05-01

    We present the first catalog of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detected by the Minicalorimeter (MCAL) instrument on-board the AGILE satellite. The catalog includes 308 TGFs detected during the period March 2009 - July 2012 in the +/- 2.5° latitude band and selected to have the maximum photon energy up to 30 MeV. The characteristics of the AGILE events are analysed and compared to the observational framework established by the two other currently active missions capable of detecting TGFs from space, RHESSI and Fermi. A detailed model of the MCAL dead time is presented, which is fundamental to properly interpret our observations, particularly concerning duration, intensity and correlation with lightning sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network. The TGFs cumulative spectrum supports a low production altitude, in agreement with previous measurements. The AGILE TGF catalog below 30 MeV is publicly accessible online at the website of the ASI Science Data Center (ASDC) http://www.asdc.asi.it/mcaltgfcat/ In addition to the TGF sample properties we also present the catalog website functionalities available to users.

  12. Skyshine Contribution to Gamma Ray Background Between 0 and 4 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Allison L.; Borgardt, James D.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2009-08-14

    Natural gamma-ray background is composed of four components; which include cosmic rays, cosmic ray produced atmospheric activity, terrestrial sources, and skyshine from terrestrial sources. Skyshine is radiation scattered from the air above a source that can produce a signal in radiation detection instrumentation. Skyshine has been studied for many years but its contribution to the natural background observed in a detector has not been studied. A large NaI(Tl) detector was used to investigate each of the four components of the natural background using a series of 48-hour measurements and appropriate lead shielding configured to discriminate contributions from each component. It was found that while the contribution from skyshine decreases rapidly with energy, it represents a significant portion of the background spectrum below ~500keV. A similar campaign of measurements using a HPGe detector is underway.

  13. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics: An observational overview (50 keV-20 MeV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    The observational status of gamma ray astronomy based on results reported prior to April 1978 is discussed. Specific line observations are reviewed from the Sun, the galactic plane, the Galactic Center region, the active Galaxy NGC 5128 (Cen A), the Crab Nebula region, and a transient source in the general direction of the anti-Galactic Center region. A statistical method is described which determines the relative probability that a given, reported observation is due to an external source as compared to a random fluctuation in the experimental background counting rate. Only a few of the many reported observations can be considered likely extraterrestrial observations of an extraterrestrial source made with a confidence level of 99%.

  14. Al-26: A galactic source of gamma ray line emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that Al26 is a very good candidate for producing a detectable gamma-ray line, and that this line is not only intense but also very narrow. By examining the chart of nuclides for other radioactive isotopes which could produce hiterto unnoticed gamma-ray lines following nucleosynthesis, it is found that for mass numbers less than 60, the isotopes Na22, Al26, K40, Ar42, Ti44, Sc46, Mn54, Co56, Co57, Co58, Co60 and Fe60 are the only ones with sufficiently long half lives (70) days to produce gamma rays in optically thin regions.

  15. Detection of a flaring low-energy gamma-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipen; Owens, Alan

    1994-01-01

    We report the detection of a flaring gamma-ray source by the University of New Hampshire (UNH) balloon-borne coded aperture gamma-ray telescope (DGT) on 1984 October 2. The source was detected at the significance level of 7.2 sigma over the energy range 160-2000 keV. The intensity in the range (160-200) keV was 1.1 Crab. The best-fit position of the source is given by R.A. = 3h 25.8m and Decl. = 67 deg 653 min and is located in the constellation of Camelopardia. The source was visible within the Field of View (FOV) of the telescope for approximately = 2 hr and exhibited signs of flaring. The derived photon spectrum can be equally fitted by an optically thin bremsstrahlung distribution of kT approximately = 52 keV or a power law of the form, dN(E)/dE = 3.7 x 10(exp -6) (E/400)(exp -4.5) photons/sq cm/keV. We compare its spectral characteristics ad energy output to various types of fast X-ray transients. No measurable flux could be detected from CG 135+1, the COS B source which was in the FOV and therefore, we present 2 sigma upper flux limits on its spectral emission over the energy range 160 keV to 9.3 MeV.

  16. Gamma-ray burst locations from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, M. N.; Meegan, C. A.; Roberts, F. E.; Fishman, G. J.; Wilson, R. B.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pendleton, G. N.

    1992-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) consists of eight anisotropic gamma-ray spectrometers at the corners of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. BATSE monitors the full sky from a fixed orientation and determines the direction of gamma-ray bursts with an accuracy appropriate for studying the bursts' celestial distribution. We describe the calculation of gamma-ray burst directions from measurements made by BATSE. We present a sample of calculated directions from BATSE's measurement of solar flaxes and compare the calculated directions with the solar direction. We describe the systematic errors apparent in these data and discuss ongoing efforts to correct them.

  17. Gamma rays from the de-excitation of C-12 resonance 15.11 MeV and C-12 resonance 4.44 MeV as probes of energetic particle spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Crannell, H.; Ramaty, R.

    1977-01-01

    The flux of 15.11 MeV gamma rays relative to the flux 4.44 MeV gamma rays was calculated from measured cross sections for excitation of the corresponding states of C-12 and from experimental determinations of the branching ratios for direct de-excitation of these states to the ground state. Because of the difference in threshold energies for excitation of these two levels, the relative intensities in the two lines are particularly sensitive to the spectral distribution of energetic particles which excite the corresponding nuclear levels. For both solar and cosmic emission, the observability of the 15.11 MeV line is expected to be enhances by low source-background continuum in this energy range.

  18. MeV gamma-ray Compton camera using a gaseous electron tracker for background-suppressed observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, A.; Tanimori, T.; Kubo, H.; Parker, J. D.; Mizumoto, T.; Mizumura, Y.; Sawano, T.; Nakamura, K.; Matsuoka, Y.; Komura, S.; Nakamura, S.; Oda, M.; Miuchi, K.; Kurosawa, S.

    2014-07-01

    As a next generation MeV gamma-ray telescope, we develop an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) that consists of a gaseous electron tracker surrounded by pixel scintillator arrays. The tracks of the Compton-recoil electron measured by the tracker restrict the incident gamma-ray direction to an arc region on the sky and reject background by using the energy loss rate dE/dx and a Compton-kinematics test. In 2013, we constructed, for a balloon experiment, a 30-cm-cubic ETCC with an effective area of ~1 cm2 for detecting sub-MeV gamma rays (5 σ detection of the Crab Nebula for 4 h). In future work, we will extend this ETCC to an effective area of ~10 cm2. In the present paper, we report the performance of the current ETCC.

  19. GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF CYGNUS X-1 ABOVE 100 MeV IN THE HARD AND SOFT STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatini, S.; Tavani, M.; Del Santo, M.; Campana, R.; Evangelista, Y.; Piano, G.; Del Monte, E.; Giusti, M.; Striani, E.; Pooley, G.; Chen, A.; Giuliani, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; and others

    2013-04-01

    We present the results of multi-year gamma-ray observations by the AGILE satellite of the black hole binary system Cygnus X-1. In a previous investigation we focused on gamma-ray observations of Cygnus X-1 in the hard state during the period mid-2007/2009. Here we present the results of the gamma-ray monitoring of Cygnus X-1 during the period 2010/mid-2012 which includes a remarkably prolonged 'soft state' phase (2010 June-2011 May). Previous 1-10 MeV observations of Cyg X-1 in this state hinted at a possible existence of a non-thermal particle component with substantial modifications of the Comptonized emission from the inner accretion disk. Our AGILE data, averaged over the mid-2010/mid-2011 soft state of Cygnus X-1, provide a significant upper limit for gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV of F{sub soft} < 20 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} , excluding the existence of prominent non-thermal emission above 100 MeV during the soft state of Cygnus X-1. We discuss theoretical implications of our findings in the context of high-energy emission models of black hole accretion. We also discuss possible gamma-ray flares detected by AGILE. In addition to a previously reported episode observed by AGILE in 2009 October during the hard state, we report a weak but important candidate for enhanced emission which occurred at the end of 2010 June (2010 June 30 10:00-2010 July 2 10:00 UT) exactly coinciding with a hard-to-soft state transition and before an anomalous radio flare. An appendix summarizes all previous high-energy observations and possible detections of Cygnus X-1 above 1 MeV.

  20. THE HIGH-ENERGY, ARCMINUTE-SCALE GALACTIC CENTER GAMMA-RAY SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyakova, M.; Malyshev, D.; Aharonian, F. A.; Crocker, R. M.; Jones, D. I.

    2011-01-10

    Employing data collected during the first 25 months of observations by the Fermi-LAT, we describe and subsequently seek to model the very high energy (>300 MeV) emission from the central few parsecs of our Galaxy. We analyze the morphological, spectral, and temporal characteristics of the central source, 1FGL J1745.6-2900. The data show a clear, statistically significant signal at energies above 10 GeV, where the Fermi-LAT has angular resolution comparable to that of HESS at TeV energies. This makes a meaningful joint analysis of the data possible. Our analysis of the Fermi data (alone) does not uncover any statistically significant variability of 1FGL J1745.6-2900 at GeV energies on the month timescale. Using the combination of Fermi data on 1FGL J1745.6-2900 and HESS data on the coincident, TeV source HESS J1745-290, we show that the spectrum of the central gamma-ray source is inflected with a relatively steep spectral region matching between the flatter spectrum found at both low and high energies. We model the gamma-ray production in the inner 10 pc of the Galaxy and examine cosmic ray (CR) proton propagation scenarios that reproduce the observed spectrum of the central source. We show that a model that instantiates a transition from diffusive propagation of the CR protons at low energy to almost rectilinear propagation at high energies can explain well the spectral phenomenology. We find considerable degeneracy between different parameter choices which will only be broken with the addition of morphological information that gamma-ray telescopes cannot deliver given current angular resolution limits. We argue that a future analysis performed in combination with higher-resolution radio continuum data holds out the promise of breaking this degeneracy.

  1. Fermi-LAT detection of ongoing gamma-ray activity from the new gamma-ray source Fermi J1654-1055 (PMN J1632-1052)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocevski, D.; Ajello, M.; Buson, S.; Buehler, R.; Giomi, M.

    2016-02-01

    During the week between February 8 and 15, 2016, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, observed gamma-ray activity from a new transient source, Fermi J1654-1055.

  2. Non-association of a celestial gamma ray source with the new Milky Way satellite galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    The newly discovered satellite galaxy located in the Milky Way galactic anti-center region is discussed along with the possibility that a nearby gamma ray source is associated with it. The factors which led to the conclusion that the gamma ray excess is not associated with the galaxy are considered.

  3. Gamma-ray astronomy in the medium energy (10-50 MeV) range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Bertsch, D. L.; Morris, D. J.; Palmeira, R. A. R.; Rao, K. R.

    1977-01-01

    To observe the medium energy component of the intense galactic center gamma-ray emission, two balloon flights of a medium energy gamma-ray spark chamber telescope were flown in Brazil in 1975. The results indicate the emission is higher than previously thought and above the predictions of a theoretical model proposed.

  4. Properties of terrestrial gamma ray flashes detected by AGILE MCAL below 30 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, M.; Fuschino, F.; Tavani, M.; Dietrich, S.; Price, C.; Galli, M.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Mereghetti, S.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Colafrancesco, S.; Argan, A.; Labanti, C.; Longo, F.; Del Monte, E.; Barbiellini, G.; Giuliani, A.; Bulgarelli, A.; Campana, R.; Chen, A.; Gianotti, F.; Giommi, P.; Lazzarotto, F.; Morselli, A.; Rapisarda, M.; Rappoldi, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Trois, A.; Vercellone, S.

    2014-02-01

    We present the characteristics of 308 terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) detected by the Minicalorimeter (MCAL) instrument on board the AGILE satellite during the period March 2009-July 2012 in the ±2.5° latitude band and selected to have the maximum photon energy up to 30 MeV. The characteristics of the AGILE events are analyzed and compared to the observational framework established by the two other currently active missions capable of detecting TGFs from space, RHESSI and Fermi. A detailed model of the MCAL dead time is presented, which is fundamental to properly interpret our observations. The most significant contribution to dead time is due to the anticoincidence shield in its current configuration and not to the MCAL detector itself. Longitude and local time distributions are compatible with previous observations, while the duration distribution is biased toward longer values because of dead time. The intensity distribution is compatible with previous observations, when dead time is taken into account. The TGFs cumulative spectrum supports a low production altitude, in agreement with previous measurements. We also compare our sample to lightning sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network and suggest a new method to assess quantitatively the consistency of two TGF populations based on the comparison of the associated lightning activity. According to this method, AGILE and RHESSI samples are compatible with the same parent population. The AGILE TGF catalog below 30 MeV is accessible online at the website of the ASI Science Data Center http://www.asdc.asi.it/mcaltgfcat/.

  5. Observation and search for gamma rays 1-20 MeV from the Crab, NGC 4151, Cyg X-1, Cyg X-3, CG 135+1 and 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. S.; Gibbons, R.; Long, J. L.; Zanrosso, E. M.; Zych, A. D.; Dayton, B.

    1980-01-01

    Observations and limiting values for the flux of 1-20 MeV gamma rays from the Crab, the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151, the black hole candidate Cyg X-1, Cyg X-3 and the two nearest quasars CG 135+1 and 3C 273 are reported. Measurements of the energy and scatter angle of gamma rays at zenith angles between 10 and 30 deg were obtained by a balloon-borne double-scatter gamma-ray telescope. The flux from the Crab from 1.2 to 10 MeV is found to be 0.0039 + or - 0.0020 photons/sq cm per sec, and the energy distribution of the flux from 1.2 to 20 MeV is determined. Two-standard-deviation upper limits to the gamma-ray flux in the intervals 1.2-3, 3-5, 5-10 and 10-20 MeV of 0.0003, 0.0002, 0.00006 and 0.00004 photons/sq cm/sec are found for NGC 4151, Cyg X-1 and Cyg X-3, while those of 0.0005, 0.0003, 0.0001 and 0.00004 photons/sq cm per sec are determined for both quasars. These upper limits are interpreted as restricting confirmed gamma-ray sources to the Crab and NP 0532, and as evidence against Seyfert galaxies as the source of cosmic diffuse radiation.

  6. Fermi Establishes Classical Novae as a Distinct Class of Gamma-ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Perkins, J. S.; Thompson, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    A classical nova results from runaway thermonuclear explosions on the surface of a white dwarf that accretes matter from a low-mass main-sequence stellar companion. In 2012 and 2013, three novae were detected in gamma rays and stood in contrast to the first gamma-ray detected nova V407 Cygni 2010, which belongs to a rare class of symbiotic binary systems. Despite likely differences in the compositions and masses of their white dwarf progenitors, the three classical novae are similarly characterized as soft spectrum transient gamma-ray sources detected over 2-3 week durations. The gamma-ray detections point to unexpected high-energy particle acceleration processes linked to the mass ejection from thermonuclear explosions in an unanticipated class of Galactic gamma-ray sources.

  7. Optimal Design of a Tunable Thomson-Scattering Based Gamma-Ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D J; Anderson, S G; Betts, S M; Hartemann, F V; Jovanovic, I; McNabb, D P; Messerly, M J; Pruet, J A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; Tremaine, A M; Barty, C J

    2007-06-07

    Thomson-Scattering based systems offer a path to high-brightness high-energy (> 1 MeV) x-ray and {gamma}-ray sources due to their favorable scaling with electron energy. LLNL is currently engaged in an effort to optimize such a device, dubbed the ''Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-Ray'' (T-REX) source, targeting up to 680 keV photon energy. Such a system requires precise design of the interaction between a high-intensity laser pulse and a high-brightness electron beam. Presented here are the optimal design parameters for such an interaction, including factors such as the collision angle, focal spot size, optimal bunch charge, and laser energy. These parameters were chosen based on extensive modeling using PARMELA and in-house, well-benchmarked scattering simulation codes.

  8. Solar gamma ray monitor for OSO-H (0.3-10 MeV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.; Gleske, I. U.; Forrest, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    A gamma ray experiment to be flown aboard the OSO-7 spacecraft is described along with a history of the development of the experiment, a description of the gamma ray detector and its operation, and a short preliminary review of the scientific information obtained during the instruments' lifetime. The gamma ray detector operated an average of 18 hours a day for approximately 15 months. The majority of the data was collected in the solar and antisolar direction, but data at right angles to the spacecraft-sun line was also accumulated. In all, at least two full scans of the celestial sphere were completed.

  9. Probing the Cosmic X-Ray and MeV Gamma-Ray Background Radiation through the Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Murase, Kohta; Madejski, Grzegorz M.; Uchiyama, Yasunobu

    2013-09-24

    While the cosmic soft X-ray background is very likely to originate from individual Seyfert galaxies, the origin of the cosmic hard X-ray and MeV gamma-ray background is not fully understood. It is expected that Seyferts including Compton thick population may explain the cosmic hard X-ray background. At MeV energy range, Seyferts having non-thermal electrons in coronae above accretion disks or MeV blazars may explain the background radiation. We propose that future measurements of the angular power spectra of anisotropy of the cosmic X-ray and MeV gamma-ray backgrounds will be key to deciphering these backgrounds and the evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). As AGNs trace the cosmic large-scale structure, spatial clustering of AGNs exists. We show that e-ROSITA will clearly detect the correlation signal of unresolved Seyferts at 0.5-2 keV and 2-10 keV bands and will be able to measure the bias parameter of AGNs at both bands. Once the future hard X-ray all sky satellites achieve the sensitivity better than 10-12 erg/cm2/s-1 at 10-30 keV or 30-50 keV - although this is beyond the sensitivities of current hard X-ray all sky monitors - angular power spectra will allow us to independently investigate the fraction of Compton-thick AGNs in all Seyferts. We also find that the expected angular power spectra of Seyferts and blazars in the MeV range are different by about an order of magnitude, where the Poisson term, so-called shot noise, is dominant. Current and future MeV instruments will clearly disentangle the origin of the MeV gamma-ray background through the angular power spectrum.

  10. Gamma-ray astrophysics with AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, M.

    2003-09-01

    Gamma-ray astrophysics above 30 MeV will soon be revitalized by a new generation of high-energy detectors in space. We discuss here the AGILE Mission that will be dedicated to gamma-ray astrophysics above 30 MeV during the period 2005-2006. The main characteristics of AGILE are: (1) excellent imaging and monitoring capabilities both in the γ-ray (30 MeV - 30 GeV) and hard X-ray (10-40 keV) energy ranges (reaching an arcminute source positioning), (2) very good timing (improving by three orders of magnitude the instrumental deadtime for γ-ray detection compared to previous instruments), and (3) excellent imaging and triggering capability for Gamma-Ray Bursts. The AGILE scientific program will emphasize a quick response to gamma-ray transients and multiwavelength studies of gamma-ray sources.

  11. A study of gamma-ray and neutron radiation in the interaction of a 2 MeV proton beam with various materials.

    PubMed

    Kasatov, D; Makarov, A; Shchudlo, I; Taskaev, S

    2015-12-01

    Epithermal neutron source based on a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation and lithium target has been proposed, developed and operated in Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The source is regarded as a prototype of a future compact device suitable for carrying out BNCT in oncology centers. In this work the measurements of gamma-ray and neutron radiation are presented for the interaction of a 2 MeV proton beam with various materials (Li, C, F, Al, V, Ti, Cu, Mo, stainless steel, and Ta). The obtained results enabled the optimization of the neutron-generating target and the high energy beam transportation path. PMID:26298434

  12. CGRO Guest Investigator Program: Cycle 7. Pt. 1; Exploring the Gamma-Ray Sky at 2.2 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McConnell, Mark L.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this project was to search for a counterpart to an apparent point source of 2.2 MeV gamma-rays that had been detected using data from the COMPTEL experiment on CGRO. The source detected by COMPTEL was of marginal significance (less than 4(sigma)) and a further, independent, confirmation by OSSE was highly desired. Unfortunately, the planned CGRO observations (with both COMPTEL and OSSE) during cycle 7 were superseded by ToO observations of SN 1998bu.

  13. A comparison of radiation damage in liner ICs from cobalt-60 gamma rays and 2.2-MeV electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauthier, M. K.; Nichols, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    The total ionizing dose response of fourteen IC types from eight manufacturers was measured using Co-60 gamma rays and 2.2-MeV electrons for exposure levels of 100 to 20,000 Gy(Si). Key parameter measurements were made and compared for each device type. The data show that a Co-60 source is not a suitable simulation source for some systems because of the generally more damaging nature of electrons as well as the unpredictable nature of the individual device response to the two types of radiations used here.

  14. A comparison of radiation damage in linear ICs from Cobalt-60 gamma rays and 2.2 MeV electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauthier, M. K.; Nichols, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    The total ionizing dose response of fourteen IC types from eight manufacturers have been measured using Co-60 gamma rays and 2.2 MeV electrons for exposure levels of 100 to 20,000 Gy(Si). Key parameter measurements were made and compared for each device type. The data show that a Co-60 source may not be a suitable simulation source for some systems, because of the generally more damaging nature of electrons as well as the unpredictable nature of the individual device response to the two types of radiations used here.

  15. Helios-2 Vela-Ariel-5 gamma-ray burst source position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Trainor, J. H.; Desai, U. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Ricketts, M.; Heluken, H.

    1979-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst of 28 January 1976, one of 18 events thus far detected in interplanetary space with Helios-2, was also observed with the Vela-5A, -6A and the Ariel-5 satellites. A small source field is obtained from the intersection of the region derived from the observed time delays between Helios-2 and Vela-5A and -6A with the source region independently found with the Ariel-5 X-ray detector. This area contains neither any steady X-ray source as scanned by HEAO-A nor any previously catalogued X-ray, radio or infrared sources, X-ray transients, quasars, seyferts, globular clusters, flare stars, pulsars, white dwarfs or high energy gamma-ray sources. The region is however, within the source field of a gamma-ray transient observed in 1974, which exhibited nuclear gamma-ray line structure.

  16. Helios 2-Vela-Ariel 5 gamma-ray burst source position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Trainor, J.; Pizzichini, G.; Spizzichino, A.; Klebesadel, R.; Ricketts, M.; Helmken, H.

    1979-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst of January 28, 1976, one of 18 events thus far detected in interplanetary space with Helios 2, was also observed with the Vela 5A and 6A and the Ariel 5 satellites. A small source field is obtained from the intersection of the region derived from the observed time delays between Helios 2 and Vela 5A and 6A, with the source region independently found with the Ariel 5 X-ray detector. This area contains neither any steady X-ray source as scanned by HEAO 1 nor any previously cataloged X-ray, radio, or infrared sources, X-ray transients, quasars, Seyferts, globular clusters, flare stars, pulsars, white dwarfs, or high enery gamma-ray sources. The region is, however, within the source field of a gamma-ray transient observed in 1974 by Jacobson et al. (1978) which exhibited nuclear gamma-ray line structure.

  17. Fermi LAT detection of a new high-energy transient gamma-ray source Fermi J0751-5136

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocevski, D.; Buson, S.

    2016-08-01

    During the week from 18 July through 25 July, 2016, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, observed gamma-ray activity from a previously unidentified transient source.

  18. Cosmic gamma-ray background from type Ia supernovae reexamined: Evidence for missing gamma rays at MeV energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyungjin; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Höflich, Peter

    2005-06-01

    The observed cosmic γ-ray background at ˜MeV has often been attributed to Type Ia supernovae (SNIa). Since SNIa is close to a standard candle, one can calculate the γ-ray intensity of SNIa integrated over redshifts fairly accurately, once the evolution of the SNIa rate is known. The latest SNIa rate measured at z≲1.6 [Dahlen et al., Astrophys. J., ASJOAB, 0004-637X 613, 189 (2004), 10.1086/422899] indicates that the previous calculations of the γ-ray background consistently overestimated the SNIa rate. With the new rate, we find that the SNIa contribution is an order of magnitude smaller than observed, and thus new population(s) of sources should be invoked.

  19. Benchmark test of 14-MeV neutron-induced gamma-ray production data in JENDL-3.2 and FENDL/E-1.0 through analysis of the OKTAVIAN experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Maekawa, F.; Oyama, F.

    1996-06-01

    Secondary gamma rays play an important role along with neutrons in influencing nuclear design parameters, such as nuclear heating, radiation dose, and material damage on the plasma-facing components, vacuum vessel, and superconducting magnets, of fusion devices. Because evaluated nuclear data libraries are used in the designs, one must examine the accuracy of secondary gamma-ray data in these libraries through benchmark tests of existing experiments. The validity of the data should be confirmed, or problems with the data should be pointed out through these benchmark tests to ensure the quality of the design. Here, gamma-ray production data of carbon, fluorine, aluminum, silicon, titanium, chromium, manganese, cobalt, copper, niobium, molybdenum, tungsten, and lead in JENDL-3.2 and FENDL/E-1.0 induced by 14-MeV neutrons are tested through benchmark analyses of leakage gamma-ray spectrum measurements conducted at the OKTAVIAN deuterium-tritium neutron source facility. The MCNP transport code is used along with the flagging method for detailed analyses of the spectra. As a result, several moderate problems are pointed out for secondary gamma-ray data of titanium, chromium, manganese, and lead in FENDL/E-1.0. Because no fatal errors are found, however, secondary gamma-ray data for the 13 elements in both libraries are reasonably well validated through these benchmark tests as far as 14-MeV neutron incidence is concerned.

  20. ATel draft: Fermi LAT detection of a new Gamma-ray Source PKS 2247-131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, S.

    2016-07-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed strong gamma-ray emission from a source positionally consistent with the radio source PKS 2247-131 with coordinates RA=342.4983854 deg, Dec=-12.8546736 deg (J2000; Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13). This source is not in any published LAT catalog and was not detected by AGILE or EGRET.

  1. Precise source location of the anomalous 1979 March 5 gamma ray transient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Evans, W. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.

    1981-01-01

    Refinements in the source direction analysis of the observations of the unusual gamma ray transient are presented. The final results from the interplanetary gamma ray burst network produce a 0.1 arc sq. min. error box. It is nested inside the initially determined 2 arc sq min. source region. This smaller source location is within both the optical and X-ray contours of N49 although not positioned at either contour center.

  2. Exploring the nature of the unidentified very-high-energy gamma-ray source HESS J1507-622

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domainko, W.; Ohm, S.

    2012-09-01

    Context. Several extended sources of very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) gamma rays have been found that lack counterparts belonging to an established class of VHE gamma-ray emitters. Aims: The nature of the first unidentified VHE gamma-ray source with significant angular offset from the Galactic plane of 3.5°, HESS J1507-622, is explored. Methods.Fermi-LAT data in the high-energy (HE, 100 MeV < E < 100 GeV) gamma-ray range collected over 34 month are used to describe the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the source. Additionally, implications of the off-plane location of the source for a leptonic and hadronic gamma-ray emission model are investigated. Results: HESS J1507-622 is detected in the Fermi energy range and its spectrum is best described by a power law in energy with Γ = 1.7 ± 0.1stat ± 0.2sys and integral flux between (0.3-300) GeV of F = (2.0 ± 0.5stat ± 1.0sys) × 10-9 cm-2 s-1. The SED constructed from the Fermi and H.E.S.S. data for this source does not support a smooth power-law continuation from the VHE to the HE gamma-ray range. With the available data it is not possible to discriminate between a hadronic and a leptonic scenario for HESS J1507-622. The location and compactness of the source indicate a considerable physical offset from the Galactic plane for this object. In case of a multiple-kpc distance, this challenges a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) origin for HESS J1507-622 since the time of travel for a pulsar born in the Galactic disk to reach such a location would exceed the inverse Compton (IC) cooling time of electrons that are energetic enough to produce VHE gamma-rays. However, an origin of this gamma-ray source connected to a pulsar that was born off the Galactic plane in the explosion of a hypervelocity star cannot be excluded. Conclusions: The nature of HESS J1507-622 is still unknown to date, and a PWN scenario cannot be ruled out in general. On the contrary HESS J1507-622 could be the first discovered representative of a

  3. COS-B gamma-ray sources and interstellar gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, A. M. T.; Bennett, K.; Bignami, G. F.; Bloemen, J. B. G. M.; Buccheri, R.; Caraveo, P. A.; Hermsen, W.; Kanbach, G.; Lebrun, F.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    Of the gamma-radiation observed above 100 MeV only a few percent is due to the catalogued sources which are viewed against intense background mission from the Galactic plane. There has been considerable recent success in modelling the Galactic plane emission as the interactions of cosmic rays with atomic and molecular interstellar gas; Bloemen, et al., demonstrate that large angular scale features of the observations are well reproduced in this way. By extending the analysis to small angular scales, which of the eCG sources might be due to conventional levels of cosmic rays within clumps of gas are shown and which cannot be so explained. With the use of a more sophisticated model the results presented improve and extend those of an earlier report. So far only the data above 300 MeV is used where the instrument's angular resolution is at its best.

  4. Science of Compact X- and Gamma-ray Sources: MAXI and GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dave

    2008-01-01

    MAXI and GLAST will be surveying the sky simultaneously. Compact objects that may show variability will be excellent targets for coordinated multiwavelength studies. Gamma-ray bursts (and afterglows), pulsars, high-mass X-ray binaries, microquasars, and active galactic nuclei are all objects whose X- and gamma-ray relationship can be explored by such observations. Of particular interest will be variable unidentified gamma-ray sources, whose contemporaneous observations by MAXI may prove decisive in identifying the source of the high-energy emission.

  5. The gamma rays associated with the inelastic scattering of 14 MeV neutrons in large samples of iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shalabi, B.; Cox, A. J.

    1983-02-01

    Iron is likely to be a common construction material in the first generation of fusion reactors and a knowledge of the effect of multiple scattering processes in large samples of this material is important for reactor design. In the present work, the angular distributions of gamma rays produced after the inelastic scattering of 14 MeV neutrons in increasing thicknesses of iron samples have been measured. The measurements were performed using an associated particle time of flight system to gate the gamma-ray signals and reduce the background to an acceptable level. The 14 MeV neutrons were produced by the T(d, n) 4He reaction with the deuterons being accelerated in a 150 KV SAMES type J accelerator at Aston and in the 3 MeV dynamitron at the Joint Radiation Centre, Birmingham. The incident neutron flux was monitored by counting the alpha particles associated with the neutrons passing through the sample. The gamma rays were detected by a NaI(Tl) scintillator mounted on a 56 AVP photo-multiplier tube. The samples of iron varied in thickness from 2 to 10.5 cm. In each case, the differential cross sections for gamma ray production at angles varying between 20° and 90° to the incident neutron beam were measured. The results were fitted to an even order Legendre polynomial. The increase in effective cross section σ due to multiple scattering effects as the sample thickness increased was found to obey the law σ = σ0 exp αx in the region considered for each sample where x is the sample thickness in mean free paths and α has an average value of 0.17 ± 1 (mean free paths) -1. The results have been analysed on a semi-empirical model based on the assumption of continuous slowing down.

  6. Intense {gamma}-Ray Source in the Giant-Dipole-Resonance Range Driven by 10-TW Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Giulietti, A.; Gamucci, A.; Gizzi, L. A.; Labate, L.; Bourgeois, N.; Marques, J. R.; Ceccotti, T.; Dobosz, S.; D'Oliveira, P.; Monot, P.; Popescu, H.; Reau, F.; Martin, P.; Galy, J.; Hamilton, D. J.; Giulietti, D.

    2008-09-05

    A {gamma}-ray source with an intense component around the giant dipole resonance for photonuclear absorption has been obtained via bremsstrahlung of electron bunches driven by a 10-TW tabletop laser. 3D particle-in-cell simulation proves the achievement of a nonlinear regime leading to efficient acceleration of several sequential electron bunches per each laser pulse. The rate of the {gamma}-ray yield in the giant dipole resonance region (8MeV) was measured, through the radio activation of a gold sample, to be 4x10{sup 8} photons per joule of laser energy. This novel all-optical, compact, and efficient electron-{gamma} source is suitable for photonuclear studies and medical uses.

  7. Intense gamma-ray source in the giant-dipole-resonance range driven by 10-TW laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Giulietti, A; Bourgeois, N; Ceccotti, T; Davoine, X; Dobosz, S; D'Oliveira, P; Galimberti, M; Galy, J; Gamucci, A; Giulietti, D; Gizzi, L A; Hamilton, D J; Lefebvre, E; Labate, L; Marquès, J R; Monot, P; Popescu, H; Réau, F; Sarri, G; Tomassini, P; Martin, P

    2008-09-01

    A gamma-ray source with an intense component around the giant dipole resonance for photonuclear absorption has been obtained via bremsstrahlung of electron bunches driven by a 10-TW tabletop laser. 3D particle-in-cell simulation proves the achievement of a nonlinear regime leading to efficient acceleration of several sequential electron bunches per each laser pulse. The rate of the gamma-ray yield in the giant dipole resonance region (8MeV) was measured, through the radio activation of a gold sample, to be 4 x 10;{8} photons per joule of laser energy. This novel all-optical, compact, and efficient electron-gamma source is suitable for photonuclear studies and medical uses. PMID:18851220

  8. Gamma ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  9. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF THE UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. III. GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR-LIKE COUNTERPARTS AT LOW RADIO FREQUENCIES

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Funk, S.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Giroletti, M.; Masetti, N.; Tosti, G.; Nori, M.

    2013-07-01

    About one-third of the {gamma}-ray sources listed in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog (2FGL) have no firmly established counterpart at lower energies and so are classified as unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs). Here, we propose a new approach to find candidate counterparts for the UGSs based on the 325 MHz radio survey performed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in the northern hemisphere. First, we investigate the low-frequency radio properties of blazars, the largest known population of {gamma}-ray sources; then we search for sources with similar radio properties combining the information derived from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) with those of the NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey. We present a list of candidate counterparts for 32 UGSs with at least one counterpart in the WENSS. We also performed an extensive research in the literature to look for infrared and optical counterparts of the {gamma}-ray blazar candidates selected using the low-frequency radio observations to confirm their nature. On the basis of our multifrequency research, we identify 23 new {gamma}-ray blazar candidates out of the 32 UGSs investigated. Comparison with previous results on the UGSs is also presented. Finally, we speculate on the advantages of using low-frequency radio observations to associate UGSs and to search for {gamma}-ray pulsar candidates.

  10. Application of a Multidimensional Wavelet Denoising Algorithm for the Detection and Characterization of Astrophysical Sources of Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Digel, S.W.; Zhang, B.; Chiang, J.; Fadili, J.M.; Starck, J.-L.; /Saclay /Stanford U., Statistics Dept.

    2005-12-02

    Zhang, Fadili, & Starck have recently developed a denoising procedure for Poisson data that offers advantages over other methods of intensity estimation in multiple dimensions. Their procedure, which is nonparametric, is based on thresholding wavelet coefficients. The restoration algorithm applied after thresholding provides good conservation of source flux. We present an investigation of the procedure of Zhang et al. for the detection and characterization of astrophysical sources of high-energy gamma rays, using realistic simulated observations with the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The LAT is to be launched in late 2007 on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope mission. Source detection in the LAT data is complicated by the low fluxes of point sources relative to the diffuse celestial background, the limited angular resolution, and the tremendous variation of that resolution with energy (from tens of degrees at {approx}30 MeV to 0.1{sup o} at 10 GeV). The algorithm is very fast relative to traditional likelihood model fitting, and permits immediate estimation of spectral properties. Astrophysical sources of gamma rays, especially active galaxies, are typically quite variable, and our current work may lead to a reliable method to quickly characterize the flaring properties of newly-detected sources.

  11. Discrimination between natural and other gamma ray sources from environmental gamma ray dose rate monitoring data.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, K; Ookubo, H; Kimura, H

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a method to discriminate between natural and other γ-ray sources from environmental γ-ray dose rate monitoring data was developed, and it was successfully applied to actual monitoring data around nuclear facilities. The environmental dose rate is generally monitored by NaI(Tl) detector systems in the low dose rate range. The background dose rate varies mainly as a result of the deposition of (222)Rn progeny in precipitation and shielding of the ground by snow cover. Increments in the environmental dose rate due to radionuclides released from nuclear facilities must be separated from these background variations. The method in the present study corrects for the dose rate variations from natural sources by multiple regression analysis based on the γ-ray counting rates of single-channel analysers opened in the energy ranges of γ-rays emitted by (214)Bi and (208)Tl. Assuming a normal distribution of the results and using the one-sided type I error of 0.01 while ignoring the type II error, the detection limit of the γ-ray dose rate from artificial sources was 0.77 nGy h(-1). PMID:25948830

  12. High energy gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    High energy gamma ray astronomy has evolved with the space age. Nonexistent twenty-five years ago, there is now a general sketch of the gamma ray sky which should develop into a detailed picture with the results expected to be forthcoming over the next decade. The galactic plane is the dominant feature of the gamma ray sky, the longitude and latitude distribution being generally correlated with galactic structural features including the spiral arms. Two molecular clouds were already seen. Two of the three strongest gamma ray sources are pulsars. The highly variable X-ray source Cygnus X-3 was seen at one time, but not another in the 100 MeV region, and it was also observed at very high energies. Beyond the Milky Way Galaxy, there is seen a diffuse radiation, whose origin remains uncertain, as well as at least one quasar, 3C 273. Looking to the future, the satellite opportunities for high energy gamma ray astronomy in the near term are the GAMMA-I planned to be launched in late 1987 and the Gamma Ray Observatory, scheduled for launch in 1990. The Gamma Ray Observatory will carry a total of four instruments covering the entire energy range from 30,000 eV to 3 x 10 to the 10th eV with over an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity relative to previous satellite instruments.

  13. The search for MeV gamma-ray pulsars with COMPTEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, K.; Buccheri, R.; Busetta, M.; Carraminana, A.; Connors, A.; Diehl, R.; Hermsen, W.; Kuiper, L.; Lichti, G. G.; Much, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) completed a full sky survey in November 1993 during which the number of known gamma-ray pulsars more than doubled. During this survey the Compton Telescope (COMPTEL) observed the classical isolated pulsars Crab and Vela and detected PSR 1509-58. Attempts to detect the newly discovered pulsars, Geminga, PSR 1706-44 and PSR 1055-52, in the COMPTEL energy range provide only upper limits. The results of these analyses are presented together with the outcome of a search for further candidate radio pulsars whose ephemerides are given in the Princeton Pulsar Catalogue.

  14. Picosecond Pulse Recirculation for High Average Brightness Thomson Scattering-based Gamma-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, V

    2009-05-28

    Pulse recirculation has been successfully demonstrated with the interaction laser system of LLNL's Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-ray (T-REX) source. The recirculation increased twenty-eight times the intensity of the light coming out of the laser system, demonstrating the capability of increasing the gamma-ray flux emitted by T-REX. The technical approach demonstrated could conceivably increase the average gamma-ray flux output by up to a hundred times.

  15. The GeV-TeV Connection in Galactic gamma-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; Reimer, O.; Torres, Diego F.; Hinton, J.A.; /Leeds U.

    2007-09-28

    Recent observations by atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S. and MAGIC have revealed a large number of new sources of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-rays above 100 GeV, mostly concentrated along the Galactic plane. At lower energies (100 MeV - 10 GeV) the satellite-based instrument EGRET revealed a population of sources clustering along the Galactic Plane. Given their adjacent energy bands a systematic correlation study between the two source classes seems appropriate. While only a few of the sources connect, both in terms of positional coincidence and spectral consistency, most of the detections occur only in one or the other energy domain. In these cases, for the first time consistent upper limits in the other energy band have been derived. Here, the populations of Galactic sources in both energy domains are characterized on observational as well as on theoretical grounds, followed by an interpretation on their similarities and differences. The observational data at this stage suggest rather different major source populations at GeV and TeV energies. With regards to preparations for the upcoming GLAST mission that will cover the energy range bridging GeV and TeV instruments this paper investigates the connection between the population of sources in these bands and concludes with predictions for commonly observable sources for GLAST-LAT detections.

  16. Local electron spectrum above 100 MeV derived from gamma-ray emissivity spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    Two new determinations of the local gamma-ray emmissivity spectrum are in good accord and were used to derive constraints on the local electron spectrum. The requirement for an electron intensity above 1 GeV larger than previously believed is confirmed and no low energy upturn is then needed.

  17. Gamma-Ray Bursts as Sources of Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granot, Jonathan; Piran, Tsvi; Bromberg, Omer; Racusin, Judith L.; Daigne, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the strongest explosions in the Universe, which due to their extreme character likely involve some of the strongest magnetic fields in nature. This review discusses the possible roles of magnetic fields in GRBs, from their central engines, through the launching, acceleration and collimation of their ultra-relativistic jets, to the dissipation and particle acceleration that power their γ-ray emission, and the powerful blast wave they drive into the surrounding medium that generates their long-lived afterglow emission. An emphasis is put on particular areas in which there have been interesting developments in recent years.

  18. Dual sightline measurements of MeV range deuterons with neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, J.; Nocente, M.; Binda, F.; Cazzaniga, C.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Giacomelli, L.; Gorini, G.; Hellesen, C.; Hellsten, T.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Johnson, T.; Kiptily, V.; Koskela, T.; Mantsinen, M.; Salewski, M.; Schneider, M.; Sharapov, S.; Skiba, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Weiszflog, M.; Contributors, JET

    2015-11-01

    Observations made in a JET experiment aimed at accelerating deuterons to the MeV range by third harmonic radio-frequency (RF) heating coupled into a deuterium beam are reported. Measurements are based on a set of advanced neutron and gamma-ray spectrometers that, for the first time, observe the plasma simultaneously along vertical and oblique lines of sight. Parameters of the fast ion energy distribution, such as the high energy cut-off of the deuteron distribution function and the RF coupling constant, are determined from data within a uniform analysis framework for neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy based on a one-dimensional model and by a consistency check among the individual measurement techniques. A systematic difference is seen between the two lines of sight and is interpreted to originate from the sensitivity of the oblique detectors to the pitch-angle structure of the distribution around the resonance, which is not correctly portrayed within the adopted one dimensional model. A framework to calculate neutron and gamma-ray emission from a spatially resolved, two-dimensional deuteron distribution specified by energy/pitch is thus developed and used for a first comparison with predictions from ab initio models of RF heating at multiple harmonics. The results presented in this paper are of relevance for the development of advanced diagnostic techniques for MeV range ions in high performance fusion plasmas, with applications to the experimental validation of RF heating codes and, more generally, to studies of the energy distribution of ions in the MeV range in high performance deuterium and deuterium-tritium plasmas.

  19. Radiation reaction in the interaction of ultraintense laser with matter and gamma ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, J. F.; Teo, W. R.; Moritaka, Toseo; Takabe, H.

    2016-05-01

    Radiation reaction (RR) force plays an important role in gamma ray production in the interaction of ultraintense laser with relativistic counterpropagating electron at intensity 1022 W/cm2 and beyond. The relationship between emission spectrum and initial kinetic energy of electron at such intensities is yet to be clear experimentally. On the other hand, the energy from both the relativistic electron beam and laser pulse may be converted into the gamma rays. Therefore, the conversion efficiency of energy purely from laser pulse into gamma rays is of great interest. We present simulation results of an electron dynamics in strong laser field by taking into account the RR effects. We investigated how the RR effects influence the emission spectrum and photon number distribution for different laser condition. We showed that the peaks of emission spectra are suppressed if higher initial kinetic energy of electron interacts with long laser pulse duration. We then list the conversion efficiencies of laser pulse energy into gamma ray. We note that an electron with energy of 40 MeV would convert up to 80% of the total of electromagnetic work and initial kinetic energy of electron when interacting with 10 fs laser pulse at intensity 2 ×1023 W/cm2. For a bunch of electron with charge 1 nC would emit around 0.1 J of energy into gamma ray emission.

  20. Identification of High Energy Gamma-Ray Sources And Source Populations in the Era of Deep All-Sky Coverage

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, Olaf; Torres, Diego F.; /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IEEC

    2007-04-17

    A large fraction of the anticipated source detections by the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST-LAT) will initially be unidentified. We argue that traditional approaches to identify individuals and/or populations of gamma ray sources will encounter procedural limitations. Those limitations are discussed on the background of source identifications from EGRET observations. Generally, our ability to classify (faint) source populations in the anticipated GLAST dataset with the required degree of statistical confidence will be hampered by sheer source wealth. A new paradigm for achieving the classification of gamma ray source populations is discussed.

  1. Gamma ray cosmology: The extra galactic gamma spectrum and methods to detect the underlying source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, David B.

    1990-01-01

    The possible sources of extragalactic gamma rays and methods to distinguish the different sources are discussed. The sources considered are early universe decays and annihilation of Particles, active galactic nuclei (AGN) sources, and baryon-antibaryon annihilation in a baryon symmetric cosmology. The energy spectrum and possible angular fluctuations due to these sources are described.

  2. Compton-Pair Production Space Telescope: Extending Fermi-LAT Discoveries into MeV Gamma-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Regina; ComPair Team

    2016-01-01

    The gamma-ray energy range from several hundred keV to a hundred MeV has remained largely unexplored, since the observations by instruments on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (1991- 2000) and on INTEGRAL (since 2002). Accurate measurements in this energy range are critical for answering a broad range of astrophysical questions, but they are particularly challenging because this range encompasses the Compton scattering/pairproduction transition zone (~10 MeV) where the interaction cross section is minimized. These interaction processes require different optimizations in both detection and event reconstruction. We are developing a MIDEX-scale wide-aperture discovery mission, Compton-Pair Production Space Telescope (ComPair), to investigate the energy range from 200 keV to >500 MeV with high energy and angular resolution and with sensitivity approaching a factor of 20-50 better than COMPTEL. This instrument will be capable of measuring both Compton-scattering events at lower energy and pair-production events at higher energy. ComPair will build on the heritage of successful space missions including Fermi-LAT, CGRO, INTEGRAL, AGILE, AMS and PAMELA, and will utilize well-developed space-qualified detector technologies including Si-strip and CdZnTe-strip detectors, heavy inorganic scintillators, and plastic scintillators.

  3. Demystifying an Unidentified EGRET Source by VHE gamma-ray Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, Olaf; Funk, Stefan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-04-17

    In a novel approach in observational high-energy gamma-ray astronomy, observations carried out by imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes provide necessary templates to pinpoint the nature of intriguing, yet unidentified EGRET gamma-ray sources. Using GeV-photons detected by CGRO EGRET and taking advantage of high spatial resolution images from H.E.S.S. observations, we were able to shed new light on the EGRET observed gamma-ray emission in the Kookaburra complex, whose previous coverage in the literature is some-what contradictory. 3EGJ1420-6038 very likely accounts for two GeV gamma-ray sources (E>1 GeV), both in positional coincidence with the recently reported pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) by HESS in the Kookaburra/Rabbit complex. PWN associations at VHE energies, supported by accumulating evidence from observations in the radio and X-ray band, are indicative for the PSR/plerionic origin of spatially coincident, but still unidentified Galactic gamma-ray sources from EGRET. This not only supports the already suggested connection between variable, but unidentified low-latitude gamma-ray sources with pulsar wind nebulae (3EGJ1420-6038 has been suggested as PWN candidate previously), it also documents the ability of resolving apparently confused EGRET sources by connecting the GeV emission as measured from a large-aperture space-based gamma-ray instrument with narrow field-of-view but superior spatial resolution observations by ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, a very promising identification technique for achieving convincing individual source identifications in the era of GLAST-LAT.

  4. COS-B gamma ray sources beyond the predicted diffuse emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Simpson, G.

    1990-01-01

    COS-B data were reanalyzed using for background subtraction the modeled galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission based on HI- and CO-line surveys and the gamma-ray data itself. A methodology was developed for this purpose with the following three features: automatic generation of source catalogs using correlation analysis, simulation of trials to derive significance thresholds for source detection, and bootstrap sampling to drive error boxes and confidence intervals for source parameters. The analysis shows that about half of the 2CG sources are explained by concentrations in the distribution of molecular hydrogen. Indication for a few weak new sources is also obtained.

  5. Ultracompact Accelerator Technology for a Next-Generation Gamma-Ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, R A; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Wu, S S; Hartemann, F V; Barty, C J

    2012-05-14

    This presentation reported on the technology choices and progress manufacturing and testing the injector and accelerator of the 250 MeV ultra-compact Compton Scattering gamma-ray Source under development at LLNL for homeland security applications. This paper summarizes the status of various facets of current accelerator activities at LLNL. The major components for the X-band test station have been designed, fabricated, and await installation. The XL-4 klystron has been delivered, and will shortly be dressed and installed in the ScandiNova modulator. High power testing of the klystron into RF loads will follow, including adjustment of the modulator for the klystron load as necessary. Assembly of RF transport, test station supports, and accelerator components will follow. Commissioning will focus on processing the RF gun to full operating power, which corresponds to 200 MV/m peak electric field on the cathode surface. Single bunch benchmarking of the Mark 1 design will provide confidence that this first structure operates as designed, and will serve as a solid starting point for subsequent changes, such as a removable photocathode, and the use of various cathode materials for enhanced quantum efficiency. Charge scaling experiments will follow, partly to confirm predictions, as well as to identify important causes of emittance growth, and their scaling with charge. Multi-bunch operation will conclude testing of the Mark 1 RF gun, and allow verification of code predictions, direct measurement of bunch-to-bunch effects, and initial implementation compensation mechanisms. Modeling will continue and focus on supporting the commissioning and experimental program, as well as seeking to improve all facets of linac produced Compton gamma-rays.

  6. Atmospheric gamma ray angle and energy distributions from sea level to 3.5 g/sq cm and 2 to 25 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Jennings, M. C.; Radwin, M. D.; Zych, A. D.; White, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    Differential fluxes of gamma rays were calculated for energies of 2-25 MeV, zenith angles of 0-50 deg and 180-130 deg, and atmospheric depths from nominal sea level, 1000 g/sq cm, to float altitude, 3.5 g/sq cm residual atmosphere. Above 100 g/sq cm growth curves were constructed to estimate the contribution of the extraterrestrial gamma ray flux to the total downward-moving flux, while the upward-moving gamma rays were taken to be strictly of atmospheric origin. Below 100 g/sq cm, all gamma rays originate in the atmosphere. The downward atmospheric flux increases by almost two orders of magnitude between float altitude and the Pfotzer maximum, while the extraterrestrial flux is attenuated exponentially. Gamma rays produced by neutron interactions with the carbon in the scintillator liquid are eliminated by constructing growth curves for downward-moving gamma rays at high altitudes and are negligible compared with downward-moving gamma rays at lower altitudes and upward-moving gamma rays at all altitudes.

  7. A liquid xenon imaging telescope for 1-30 MeV gamma-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena; Mukherjee, Reshmi; Suzuki, Masayo

    1989-01-01

    A study of the primary scintillation light in liquid xenon excited by 241 Am alpha particles and 207 Bi internal conversion electrons are discussed. The time dependence and the intensity of the light at different field strengths have been measured with a specifically designed chamber, equipped with a CaF sub 2 light transmitting window coupled to a UV sensitive PMT. The time correlation between the fast light signal and the charge signal shows that the scintillation signals produced in liquid xenon by ionizing particles provides an ideal trigger in a Time Projection type LXe detector aiming at full imaging of complex gamma-ray events. Researchers also started Monte Carlo calculations to establish the performance of a LXe imaging telescope for high energy gamma-rays.

  8. Correlation analysis of 1 to 30 MeV celestial gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of a method of producing celestial sky maps from the data generated by the University of California, Riverside's double Compton scatter gamma ray telescope. The method makes use of a correlation between the telescope's data and theoretical calculated response functions. The results of applying this technique to northern hemisphere data obtained from a 1978 balloon flight from Palestine, Texas are included.

  9. Computer vision for detecting and quantifying gamma-ray sources in coded-aperture images

    SciTech Connect

    Schaich, P.C.; Clark, G.A.; Sengupta, S.K.; Ziock, K.P.

    1994-11-02

    The authors report the development of an automatic image analysis system that detects gamma-ray source regions in images obtained from a coded aperture, gamma-ray imager. The number of gamma sources in the image is not known prior to analysis. The system counts the number (K) of gamma sources detected in the image and estimates the lower bound for the probability that the number of sources in the image is K. The system consists of a two-stage pattern classification scheme in which the Probabilistic Neural Network is used in the supervised learning mode. The algorithms were developed and tested using real gamma-ray images from controlled experiments in which the number and location of depleted uranium source disks in the scene are known.

  10. The Structure of the Strongly Lensed Gamma-Ray Source B2 0218+35

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnacka, Anna; Geller, Margaret J.; Dell’Antonio, Ian P.; Zitrin, Adi

    2016-04-01

    Strong gravitational lensing is a powerful tool for resolving the high-energy universe. We combine the temporal resolution of Fermi-LAT, the angular resolution of radio telescopes, and the independently and precisely known Hubble constant from the analysis by the Planck collaboration, to resolve the spatial origin of gamma-ray flares in the strongly lensed source B2 0218+35. The lensing model achieves 1 mas spatial resolution of the source at gamma-ray energies. The data imply that the gamma-ray flaring sites are separate from the radio core: the bright gamma-ray flare (MJD: 56160-56280) occurred 51+/- 8 pc from the 15 GHz radio core, toward the central engine. This displacement is significant at the ∼ 3σ level, and is limited primarily by the precision of the Hubble constant. B2 0218+35 is the first source where the position of the gamma-ray emitting region relative to the radio core can be resolved. We discuss the potential of an ensemble of strongly lensed high-energy sources for elucidating the physics of distant variable sources based on data from Chandra and SKA.

  11. Interpretation of gamma-ray burst source count statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, Vahe

    1993-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of gamma-ray bursts, the so-called log N-log S relation has been used for determination of their distances and distribution. This task has not been straightforward because of varying thresholds for the detection of bursts. Most of the current analyses of these data are couched in terms of ambiguous distributions, such as the distribution of Cp/Clim, the ratio of peak to threshold photon count rates, or the distribution of V/Vmax = (Cp/Clim) exp -3/2. It is shown that these distributions are not always a true reflection of the log N-log S relation. Some kind of deconvolution is required for obtaining the true log N-log S. Therefore, care is required in the interpretation of results of such analyses. A new method of analysis of these data is described, whereby the bivariate distribution of Cp and Clim is obtained directly from the data.

  12. Multiwavelength Studies of the Peculiar Gamma-ray Source 3EG J1835+5918

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimer, O.; Brazier, K. T. S.; Carraminana, A.; Kanbach, G.; Nolan, P. L.; Thompson, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    The source 3EG J1835+5918 was discovered early in the CGRO (Compton Gamma Ray Observatory) mission by EGRET as a bright unidentified gamma-ray source outside the galactic plane. Especially remarkable, it has not been possible to identify this object with any known counterpart in any other wavelengths band since then. Analyzing our recent ROSAT HRI observation, for the first time we are able to suggest X-ray counterparts of 3EG J1835+5918. The discovered X-ray sources were subject of deep optical investigations in order to reveal their nature and conclude on the possibility of being counterparts for this peculiar gamma-ray source.

  13. Statistical Measurement of the Gamma-Ray Source-count Distribution as a Function of Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechlin, Hannes-S.; Cuoco, Alessandro; Donato, Fiorenza; Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Statistical properties of photon count maps have recently been proven as a new tool to study the composition of the gamma-ray sky with high precision. We employ the 1-point probability distribution function of six years of Fermi-LAT data to measure the source-count distribution dN/dS and the diffuse components of the high-latitude gamma-ray sky as a function of energy. To that aim, we analyze the gamma-ray emission in five adjacent energy bands between 1 and 171 GeV. It is demonstrated that the source-count distribution as a function of flux is compatible with a broken power law up to energies of ˜50 GeV. The index below the break is between 1.95 and 2.0. For higher energies, a simple power-law fits the data, with an index of {2.2}-0.3+0.7 in the energy band between 50 and 171 GeV. Upper limits on further possible breaks as well as the angular power of unresolved sources are derived. We find that point-source populations probed by this method can explain {83}-13+7% ({81}-19+52%) of the extragalactic gamma-ray background between 1.04 and 1.99 GeV (50 and 171 GeV). The method has excellent capabilities for constraining the gamma-ray luminosity function and the spectra of unresolved blazars.

  14. Compton-Pair Production Space Telescope (ComPair) for MeV Gamma-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The gamma-ray energy range from a few hundred keV to a few hundred MeV has remained largely unexplored, mainly due to the challenging nature of the measurements, since the pioneering, but limited, observations by COMPTEL on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (1991- 2000). This energy range is a transition region between thermal and nonthermal processes, and accurate measurements are critical for answering a broad range of astrophysical questions. We are developing a MIDEX-scale wide-aperture discovery mission, ComPair (Compton-Pair Production Space Telescope), to investigate the energy range from 200 keV to > 500 MeV with high energy and angular resolution and with sensitivity approaching a factor of 100 better than COMPTEL. This instrument will be equally capable to detect both Compton-scattering events at lower energy and pair-production events at higher energy. ComPair will build on the heritage of successful space missions including Fermi LAT, AGILE, AMS and PAMELA, and will utilize well-developed space-qualified detector technologies including Si-strip and CdZnTe-strip detectors, heavy inorganic scintillators, and plastic scintillators.

  15. New Spherical Gamma-Ray and Neutron Emitting Sources for Testing of Radiation Detection Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, L.; Pibida, L.

    2009-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed new gamma-ray and neutron emitting sources for testing radiation detection systems. These radioactive sources were developed for testing of detection systems in maritime applications. This required special source characteristics.

  16. Summary Comments: Nuclear Physics and Gamma-Ray Sources for Nuclear Security and Nonproliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barty, C. P. J.

    2015-10-01

    The Nuclear Physics and Gamma-ray Sources for Nuclear Security and Nonproliferation (NPNSNP) meeting held in Tokai-mura, Japan from January 28th to 30th, 2014 revealed both the rapid evolution and growth of monoenergetic, laser-Compton, gamma-ray source technology and the emergence of numerous important applications enabled by this technology. More than 500M of large-scale source and development activities were represented at the meeting, including all of the major projects in the United States, Europe and Japan. The meeting was both highly stimulating intellectually and provided an excellent venue for the exploration of new collaborations between groups...

  17. EXPLORING THE NATURE OF THE GALACTIC CENTER {gamma}-RAY SOURCE WITH THE CHERENKOV TELESCOPE ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Tim; Profumo, Stefano

    2012-11-20

    Observations from multiple {gamma}-ray telescopes have uncovered a high-energy {gamma}-ray source spatially coincident with the Galactic center. Recently, a compelling model for the broadband {gamma}-ray emission has been formulated, which posits that high-energy protons emanating from Sgr A* could produce {gamma}-rays through {pi}{sup 0} decays resulting from inelastic collisions with the traversed interstellar gas in the region. Models of the gas distribution in the Galactic center region imply that the resulting {gamma}-ray morphology would be observed as a point source with all current telescopes, but that the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) may be able to detect an extended emission profile with an unmistakable morphology. Here, we critically evaluate this claim, employing a three-dimensional gas distribution model and a detailed Monte Carlo simulation, and using the anticipated effective area and angular resolution of CTA. We find that the impressive angular resolution of CTA will be key to test hadronic emission models conclusively against, for example, point source or dark matter annihilation scenarios. We comment on the relevance of this result for searches for dark matter annihilation in the Galactic center region.

  18. Can Astrophysical Gamma Ray Sources Mimic Dark Matter Annihilation in Galactic Satellites?

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, Edward A.; Taylor, James E.; Wai, Lawrence L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-11-01

    The nature of the cosmic dark matter is unknown. The most compelling hypothesis is that dark matter consists of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in the 100 GeV mass range. Such particles would annihilate in the galactic halo, producing high-energy gamma rays which might be detectable in gamma ray telescopes such as the GLAST satellite. We investigate the ability of GLAST to distinguish between the WIMP annihilation spectrum and the spectrum of known astrophysical source classes. Focusing on the emission from the galactic satellite halos predicted by the cold dark matter model, we find that the WIMP gamma-ray spectrum is unique; the separation from known source classes can be done in a convincing way. We discuss the follow-up of possible WIMP sources with Imaging Atmospheric Cerenkov Telescopes. Finally we discuss the impact that Large Hadron Collider data might have on the study of galactic dark matter.

  19. Predictions of Gamma-ray Emission from Globular Cluster Millisecond Pulsars Above 100 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venter, C.; de Jaker, O.C.; Clapson, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    The recent Fermi detection of the globular cluster (GC) 47 Tucanae highlighted the importance of modeling collective gamma-ray emission of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in GCs. Steady flux from such populations is also expected in the very high energy (VHE) domain covered by ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. We present pulsed curvature radiation (CR) as well as unpulsed inverse Compton (IC) calculations for an ensemble of MSPs in the GCs 47 Tucanae and Terzan 5. We demonstrate that the CR from these GCs should be easily detectable for Fermi, while constraints on the total number of MSps and the nebular B-field may be derived using the IC flux components.

  20. Effects of axion-photon mixing on gamma-ray spectra from magnetized astrophysical sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hochmuth, Kathrin A.; Sigl, Guenter

    2007-12-15

    Astrophysical {gamma}-ray sources come in a variety of sizes and magnetizations. We deduce general conditions under which {gamma}-ray spectra from such sources would be significantly affected by axion-photon mixing. We show that, depending on strength and coherence of the magnetic field, axion couplings down to {approx}(10{sup 13}GeV){sup -1} can give rise to significant axion-photon conversions in the environment of accreting massive black holes. Resonances can occur between the axion mass term and the plasma frequency term as well as between the plasma frequency term and the vacuum Cotton-Mouton shift. Both resonances and nonresonant transitions could induce detectable features or even strong suppressions in finite energy intervals of {gamma}-ray spectra from active galactic nuclei. Such effects can occur at keV to TeV energies for couplings that are currently allowed by all experimental constraints.

  1. Biological Evolution on the Earth Influenced by Astronomical Objects: Especially Gamma-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponert, J.; Príhoda, P.

    2009-12-01

    Taking in to account 20,000 explosions of intragalactic supernovae per million years, the sources estimated at 1056 - 1057 MeV producing the high intensity of gamma- and xray-radiation even after its reduction through the Earth atmosphere, may have a significant mutagenic action. During the time period of the last 4 billion years not less than one hundred explosions up to the mean distance 126 pc from the Earth. All such explosions were able to evoke a genetic revolution among most taxonomic groups of terrestrial organisms. For mountain organisms, the more frequent supernova explosions in distance up to 400-900 pc are of importance, maritime organisms could be influenced mainly by secondary radiation products, rather than directly by the gamma and X-rays from the supernovae. The mechanisms of macroevolution depending on supernovae is elucidated. Smaller genetical revolutions in the macroevolutional process (formation of genera) took place on the average once every 10 millions or more years, fundamental genetic revolutions once in 100 millions or more years. Also other newly discovered astronomical gamma-ray sources have to be taken in account.

  2. Source position loci for the gamma-ray bursts recorded October 20 and November 10, 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estulin, I. V.; Cline, T. L.; Vedrenne, G.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Mersov, G. A.; Niel, M.; Novak, B. L.; Hurley, K.

    1979-01-01

    Further constraints are imposed on the sites of the gamma-ray bursts recorded Oct. 20 and Nov. 10, 1977 with the Prognoz 6 satellite and the Helios 2 spacecraft. The loci of the burst sources are 1.7-arcmin-wide bands in which no X-ray sources, pulsars, supernova remnants, or galaxies brighter than 13m occur.

  3. The Figaro experiment for the observation of time marked sources in the low energy gamma-ray range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnetta, G.; Agrinier, B.; Chabaud, J. P.; Costa, E.; Diraffaele, R.; Frabel, P.; Gerardi, G.; Gouiffes, C.; Landrea, M. F.; Mandrou, P.

    1985-01-01

    The only two firmly identified galactic gamma-ray sources in the second COS B catalogue are the pulsars PSR 0531+21 (Crab) and PSR 0833-45 (Vela). In the region between 100 keV and 10 MeV the detailed shape of the emission is particularly important, since one expects a turn-off which is related to geometry of the source. A marginal evidence of such a turn-off just below 1 MeV has been reported for the Vela pulsar. In order to study sources with a well marked time signature in this energy band, the FIGARO - French Italian Gamma Ray Observatory was designed. The first version was launched in November 1983 from the Sao Manuel base (Brazil), and was destroyed in a free fall following a balloon burst at an altitude of 50 mbar. A brief description is given of the new improved version of the experiment, FIGARO 2, which is nearly completed and whose launch is scheduled before summer 1986.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of runaway MeV electron breakdown with application to red sprites and terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, N. G.; Bell, T. F.; Inan, U. S.

    1999-11-01

    A three-dimensional Monte Carlo model of the uniform relativistic runaway electron breakdown in air in the presence of static electric and magnetic fields is used to calculate electron distribution functions, avalanche rates, and the direction and velocity of avalanche propagation. We also derive the conditions required for an electron with a given momentum to start an avalanche in the absence of a magnetic field. The results are compared to previously developed kinetic and analytical models and our own analytical estimates, and it is concluded that the rates used in many early models [e.g., Lehtinen et al., 1997; Taranenko and Roussel-Dupré, 1996; Yukhimuk et al., 1998; Roussel-Dupré et al., 1998] are overestimated by a factor of ~10. The Monte Carlo simulation results are applied to a fluid model of runaway electron beams in the middle atmosphere accelerated by quasi-electrostatic fields following a positive lightning stroke. In particular, we consider the case of lightning discharges which drain positive charge from remote regions of a laterally extensive (>100 km) thundercloud, using a Cartesian two-dimensional model. The resulting optical emission intensities in red sprites associated with the runaway electrons are found to be negligible compared to the emissions from thermal electrons heated in the conventional type of breakdown. The calculated gamma ray flux is of the same order as the terrestrial gamma ray flashes observed by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment detector on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory.

  5. A Comprehensive Approach to Gamma-Ray Source Identification in the GLAST-LAT Era

    SciTech Connect

    Caraveo, Patrizia A.; Reimer, Olaf; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-11-13

    Unveiling the nature of a vast number of unidentified sources is the most compelling problem facing today's high-energy (MeV-to-GeV) gamma-ray astronomy. However, unidentified sources are not peculiar to high-energy gamma-ray astronomy, they have been an ever-present phenomenon in astronomy. Indeed, every time a new astronomical window was opened, astronomers found sources they were not able to identify, i.e. to associate with previously known objects. This can happen either because such sources belong to a genuinely new (thus unknown) class or because their positions are not known accurately enough to allow for an unambiguous association between the newly found emitter and a known object. Thus, the lack of identification is frequently ascribed to poor angular resolution. Being unidentified, however, is a 'temporary' status: sooner or later better tools will allow the source identification, i.e. either its classification within a given class of astronomical objects or its recognition as belonging to a new class. Owing to the intrinsic limitations of gamma-ray detection technique, however, the instruments' angular resolution has not yet reached the minimum level required to permit the transition from the unidentified limbo to the paradise of known objects, thus creating a continuing unidentified high-energy gamma-ray source problem. Different approaches towards source identification have been pursued in the past. Here we will review the state of the art as well as the strategies devised for the GLAST era.

  6. Variability of Point Sources of Gamma Rays Detected by the Fermi Large-Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Eric

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has revolutionized gamma-ray astronomy, allowing the detection of thousands of point sources of gamma rays. Variability studies are of significant interest as a potential source of information about the emission mechanisms, and as a means to identify gamma-ray sources with known sources in other wavelengths and to improve detection sensitivity in searches for new sources. The inclusion of temporal resolution, however, adds to the already considerable complexity of the required analysis, and as a result, variability studies have generally been limited either in scope or in detail, or both, compared to time-integrated spectral analyses. pointlike is a software package designed for fast maximum likelihood analysis of LAT data, allowing for interactive and large-scale analyses. Here, we present an application of pointlike to the characterization of the variability of the full sample of known gamma-ray point sources. We describe the construction of light curves in one-month time bins, spanning the first 42 months of the Fermi mission, for a sample of 2652 sources. We discuss the use of the detection significance in individual months to improve the significance of detection of marginal sources, and show that including that measure of significance increases the set of significantly detected sources by nearly 20% compared to using only the average significance. We describe a statistical measure of the significance of variability in a light curve, and examine the variability of thesample as whole, and of subsets associated with particular source types, especially pulsars. We discuss the use of pulsars, which are generally non-variable on long timescales, to calibrate variability statistics, and to assess the importance of systematic errors in estimates of variability. Finally, we discuss the potential to extend the method to produce light curves of longer duration and finer time binning, and to search

  7. Supernova explosion in dense clouds in the galaxy and the COS-B gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    Supernova (SN) exploding in dense cloudlets produce large fluxes of gamma-rays. They would shine on gamma-ray sources, but their life time is small. Flux distribution of these sources in the Galaxy are calculated and compared with the COS-B catalogue of sources.

  8. On the binary nature of cosmic gamma-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, S. A.; Joss, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    The binary model of gamma ray burst sources wherein the bursts are emitted by a collapsed object in a close-binary stellar system and a small fraction of the gamma radiation is reprocessed into optical radiation in the surface layers of a companion star is considered, and it is concluded that the model is viable. In particular, under the assumption that the optical flashes discovered by Schaefer (1981) and Schaefer et al. (1984) were produced by gamma-ray bursts of about the same intensity as those observed, it is found that nearby binary systems with secondaries whose masses are less than about 0.06 solar mass can fit all the observational constraints for the three optical/gamma-ray pair events.

  9. An Analysis of Gamma-ray Burst Time Profiles from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lestrade, John Patrick

    1996-01-01

    This proposal requested funding to measure the durations of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) in the 4B catalog as well as to study the structure of GRB time profiles returned by the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. The duration (T90) was to be measured using the same techniques and algorithms developed by the principal investigator for the 3B data. The profile structure studies fall into the two categories of variability and fractal analyses.

  10. Gamma-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W. (Editor); Trombka, J. I. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    Conference papers on gamma ray astrophysics are summarized. Data cover the energy region from about 0.3 MeV to a few hundred GeV and theoretical models of production mechanisms that give rise to both galactic and extragalactic gamma rays.

  11. An EAS experiment at mountain altitude for the detection of gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allkofer, O. C.; Samorski, M.; Stamm, W.

    1985-01-01

    The plan of an extensive air shower experiment 2.200 m above sea level for the detection of 10 to the 14th power eV to 10 to the 17th power eV gamma rays from sources in the declination band 0 deg to + 60 deg is described. The site selection, detector array and electronic layout are detailed.

  12. Search for very high energy gamma rays from the galactic plane and other possible galactic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Periale, L.; Vallania, P.

    An extensive air shower array is operating at the Plateau Rosa station (3.500 m.a.s.l.) since 1980 in the search for very high energy gamma-ray sources. The authors discuss the stability of the array and present the results obtained from Feb. 1982 to Aug. 1985, concerning D.C., periodic and sporadic emissions.

  13. Compton-Pair Production Space Telescope: Extending Fermi-LAT Discoveries into MeV Gamma-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Andrew; ComPair Team

    2016-03-01

    The keV-MeV gamma-ray energy range has remained largely unexplored over the last decade despite offering an exciting window into many astrophysical questions. This energy range is particularly challenging because it is firmly in the Compton-dominated regime where the interaction cross section is minimized. We are developing a MIDEX-scale wide-aperture discovery mission, Compton-Pair Production Space Telescope (ComPair), to investigate the energy range from 200 keV to >500 MeV with good energy and angular resolution and with sensitivity approaching a factor of 20-50 better than previous instruments. ComPair will build on the heritage of successful space missions including Fermi-LAT, AGILE, AMS and PAMELA, and will use well-developed space-qualified detector technologies including Si-strip and CdZnTe-strip detectors, heavy inorganic scintillators, and plastic scintillators. on behalf of the ComPair Team.

  14. Preliminary investigation of scintillator materials properties: SrI2:Eu, CeBr3 and GYGAG:Ce for gamma rays up to 9 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaz, A.; Hull, G.; Fossati, V.; Cherepy, N.; Camera, F.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Coelli, S.; Million, B.; Riboldi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we measured the performance of a 2ʺ×2ʺ cylindrical tapered crystal of SrI2:Eu, a 2ʺ×3ʺ cylindrical sample of CeBr3 and a 2ʺ×0.3ʺ cylindrical sample of GYGAG:Ce. These scintillators are prototypes in volume or material and were provided by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and by the Institut de Physique Nucléaire d'Orsay. The gamma-ray energy resolution was measured in the energy range of 0.1-9 MeV using different sources. Each scintillator was scanned along x, y and z axes, using a 400 MBq collimated 137Cs source. Owing to the GYGAG:Ce thickness, it was not possible to obtain the value of the energy resolution at 9 MeV and to scan the crystal along the z axis. The 662 keV full energy peak position and its FWHM were measured relative to the full energy peaks positions produced by a non-collimated 88Y source. The signals of the detectors were additionally digitized and compared, up to 9 MeV, using a 12 bit LeCroy 600 MHz oscilloscope.

  15. The gamma-ray observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) mission. Detection of gamma rays and gamma ray sources, operations using the Space Shuttle, and instruments aboard the GRO, including the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE), the Imaging Compton Telescope (COMPTEL), and the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) are among the topics surveyed.

  16. A New Paradigm for Identification of Classes of High Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, D F; Reimer, O

    2005-04-08

    A large fraction of the expected number of source detections of the forthcoming observatory Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will be initially unidentified. We argue that traditional methodological approaches to identify individual detections and/or populations of gamma-ray sources present procedural limitations. These limitations will hamper our ability to classify the populations lying in the anticipated dataset with the required degree of confidence, in particular for those for which no member has yet been detected convincingly with the predecessor experiment EGRET. Here we suggest a new paradigm for achieving the classification of gamma-ray source populations that is based on implementing an a priori protocol to search for theoretically-motivated candidates. It is essential that such paradigm will be defined before the data is unblinded, in order to protect the discovery potential of the sample. Key to the new procedure is a quantitative assessment of the confidence level by which new populations can be claimed to have been discovered. When needed, small number statistics is applied for population studies in gamma-ray astronomy. Although we refer here explicitly only to the case of GLAST, the scheme we present can certainly be adapted to other experiments confronted with a similar combination of problems.

  17. Constraining Very High-Energy Gamma Ray Sources Using IceCube Neutrino Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, Gregory; Feintzeig, J.; Karle, A.; IceCube Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Modern gamma ray astronomy has revealed the most violent, energetic objects in the known universe, from nearby supernova remnants to distant active galactic nuclei. In an effort to discover more about the fundamental nature of such objects, we present searches for astrophysical neutrinos in coincidence with known gamma ray sources. Searches were conducted using data from IceCube Neutrino Observatory, a cubic-kilometer neutrino detector that is sensitive to astrophysical particles with energies above 1 TeV. The detector is situated at the South Pole, and uses more than 5,000 photomultiplier tubes to detect Cherenkov light from the interactions of particles within the ice. Existing models of proton-proton interactions allow us to link gamma ray fluxes to the production of high-energy neutrinos, so neutrino data from IceCube can be used to constrain the mechanisms by which gamma ray sources create such energetic photons. For a few particularly bright sources, such as the blazar Markarian 421, IceCube is beginning to reach the point where actual constraints can be made. As more years of data are analyzed, the limits will improve and stronger constraints will become possible. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation's REU Program through NSF Award AST-1004881 to the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  18. Measurements of gamma-ray dose from a moderated /sup 252/Cf source

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Griffith, R.V.; Plato, P.; Miklos, J.

    1983-06-01

    The gamma-ray dose fraction from a moderated /sup 252/Cf source was determined by using three types of dosimetry systems. Measurements were carried out in air at a distance of 35 cm from the surface of the moderating sphere (50 cm from the source which is at the center of the sphere) to the geometrical center of each detector. The moderating sphere is 0.8-mm-thick stainless steel shell filled with D/sub 2/O and covered with 0.5 mm of cadmium. Measurements were also carried out with instruments and dosimeters positioned at the surface of a 40 cm x 40 cm x 15 cm plexiglass irradiation phantom whose front surface was also 35 cm from the surface of the moderating sphere. A-150 tissue-equivalent (TE) plastic ionization chambers and a TE proportional counter (TEPC) were used to measure tissue dose, from which the neutron dose equivalent was computed. The ratio of gamma-ray dose to the neutron dose equivalent was determined by using a relatively neutron-insensitive Geiger-Mueller (GM) counter and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). In addition, the event-size spectrum measured by the TEPC was also used to compute the gamma-ray dose fraction. The average value for the ratio of gamma-ray dose to neutron dose equivalent was found to be 0.18 with an uncertainty of about +-18%.

  19. Variable optical/infrared counterpart to the transient gamma-ray source J0109+6134

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Valenzuela, E.; Martí, J.; Luque-Escamilla, P. L.; Muñoz-Arjonilla, A. J.; Paredes, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Context. We investigate the optical/infrared counterpart to the flaring gamma-ray source J0109+6134, which is believed to be a blazar seen through the Galactic plane. Aims: The original aim of this work was to confirm the previously proposed optical counterpart by means of studying its temporal behaviour. The study was later extended to infrared wavelengths as new data became available. Methods: We conducted a long-term differential CCD photometry campaign using the robotic Liverpool telescope. In addition, we used infrared satellite observations to also explore the source variability at these longer wavelengths. Results: Evidence of variability well correlated with gamma-ray flares has been observed so far only in the infrared domain. This fact strongly supports that the proposed optical/infrared counterpart identification is correct. Moreover, our optical photometric campaign revealed an intense optical flare with 1.7 mag amplitude that occurs on time-scales of weeks. This optical event was observed to evolve without a counterpart in the nearly simultaneous gamma-ray monitoring by the Fermi satellite. Gamma-ray orphan optical flares have rarely been observed in other blazars, and J0109+6134 appears to be an interesting additional example for future studies.

  20. Investigating the peculiar emission from the new VHE gamma-ray source H1722+119

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Buson, S.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Clavero, R.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Di Pierro, F.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Fallah Ramazani, V.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Gora, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moretti, E.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Pedaletti, G.; Perri, L.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rodriguez Garcia, J.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Strzys, M.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Verguilov, V.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Wu, M. H.; Zanin, R.; D'Ammando, F.; Berdyugin, A.; Hovatta, T.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Raiteri, C. M.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Reinthal, R.; Richards, J. L.; Verrecchia, F.; Villata, M.

    2016-07-01

    The Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescopes observed the BL Lac object H1722+119 (redshift unknown) for six consecutive nights between 2013 May 17 and 22, for a total of 12.5 h. The observations were triggered by high activity in the optical band measured by the KVA (Kungliga Vetenskapsakademien) telescope. The source was for the first time detected in the very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) γ-ray band with a statistical significance of 5.9σ. The integral flux above 150 GeV is estimated to be (2.0 ± 0.5) per cent of the Crab nebula flux. We used contemporaneous high energy (HE, 100 MeV < E < 100 GeV) γ-ray observations from Fermi-Large Area Telescope to estimate the redshift of the source. Within the framework of the current extragalactic background light models, we estimate the redshift to be z = 0.34 ± 0.15. Additionally, we used contemporaneous X-ray to radio data collected by the instruments on board the Swift satellite, the KVA, and the Owens Valley Radio Observatory telescope to study multifrequency characteristics of the source. We found no significant temporal variability of the flux in the HE and VHE bands. The flux in the optical and radio wavebands, on the other hand, did vary with different patterns. The spectral energy distribution of H1722+119 shows surprising behaviour in the ˜3 × 1014-1018 Hz frequency range. It can be modelled using an inhomogeneous helical jet synchrotron self-Compton model.

  1. Investigating the peculiar emission from the new VHE gamma-ray source H1722+119

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; de Almeida, U. Barres; Barrio, J. A.; González, J. Becerra; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Buson, S.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Clavero, R.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; de O na Wilhelmi, E.; Pierro, F. Di; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Prester, D. Dominis; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Glawion, D. Eisenacher; Elsaesser, D.; Ramazani, V. Fallah; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; López, R. J. García; Garczarczyk, M.; Terrats, D. Garrido; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; Muñoz, A. González; Gora, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; Barbera, A. La; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moretti, E.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Rosillo, M. Nievas; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Pedaletti, G.; Perri, L.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Garcia, J. Rodriguez; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Strzys, M.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Verguilov, V.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Wu, M. H.; Zanin, R.; D'Ammando, F.; Hovatta, T.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Raiteri, C. M.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Reinthal, R.; Richards, J. L.; Verrecchia, F.; Villata, M.

    2016-03-01

    The MAGIC (Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov) telescopes observed the BL Lac object H1722+119 (redshift unknown) for six consecutive nights between 2013 May 17 and 22, for a total of 12.5 h. The observations were triggered by high activity in the optical band measured by the KVA (Kungliga Vetenskapsakademien) telescope. The source was for the first time detected in the very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) γ-ray band with a statistical significance of 5.9 σ. The integral flux above 150 GeV is estimated to be (2.0 ± 0.5) per cent of the Crab Nebula flux. We used contemporaneous high energy (HE, 100 MeV source. Within the framework of the current extragalactic background light models, we estimate the redshift to be z = 0.34 ± 0.15. Additionally, we used contemporaneous X-ray to radio data collected by the instruments on board the Swift satellite, the KVA, and the OVRO (Owens Valley Radio Observatory) telescope to study multifrequency characteristics of the source. We found no significant temporal variability of the flux in the HE and VHE bands. The flux in the optical and radio wavebands, on the other hand, did vary with different patterns. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of H1722+119 shows surprising behaviour in the ˜3 × 1014 - 1018 Hz frequency range. It can be modelled using an inhomogeneous helical jet synchrotron self-Compton model.

  2. Gamma-ray spectroscopy - Requirements and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The only previous space instrument which had sufficient spectral resolution and directionality for the resolution of astrophysical sources was the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer carried by HEAO-3. A broad variety of astrophysical investigations entail gamma-ray spectroscopy of E/Delta-E resolving power of the order of 500 at 1 MeV; it is presently argued that a sensitivity to narrow gamma-ray lines of a few millionths ph/sq cm, from about 10 keV to about 10 MeV, should typify the gamma-ray spectrometers of prospective missions. This performance is achievable with technology currently under development, and could be applied to the NASA's planned Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer.

  3. Gamma ray astronomy and black hole astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Edison P.

    1990-01-01

    The study of soft gamma emissions from black-hole candidates is identified as an important element in understanding black-hole phenomena ranging from stellar-mass black holes to AGNs. The spectra of Cyg X-1 and observations of the Galactic Center are emphasized, since thermal origins and MeV gamma-ray bumps are evident and suggest a thermal-pair cloud picture. MeV gamma-ray observations are suggested for studying black hole astrophysics such as the theorized escaping pair wind, the anticorrelation between the MeV gamma bump and the soft continuum, and the relationship between source compactness and temperature.

  4. On the high-energy gamma-ray signature of cosmic-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormes, J. F.; Ozel, M. E.; Morris, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of the gamma-ray emission from hypothetical cosmic-ray sources are performed. Sources which might correspond to acceleration by supernova shocks in 'average' interstellar conditions and deep within giant molecular clouds are considered. The consequences of dropping the common assumption that the cosmic-ray spectrum at the sources is the same as that observed at earth are examined. Spectral effects which can be related to the depth of the material shroud and the population of accelerated particles are explored using these simulations and are described. The results are compared with the COS B catalog of gamma-ray sources, and the implications for the underlying particle populations and source mechanisms are discussed.

  5. Preview of the BATSE Earth Occultation Catalog of Low Energy Gamma Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Wilson, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; McCollough, M. L.; Robinson, C. R.; Sahi, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Zhang, S. N.

    1999-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) has been detecting and monitoring point sources in the high energy sky since 1991. Although BATSE is best known for gamma ray bursts, it also monitors the sky for longer-lived sources of radiation. Using the Earth occultation technique to extract flux information, a catalog is being prepared of about 150 sources potential emission in the large area detectors (20-1000 keV). The catalog will contain light curves, representative spectra, and parametric data for black hole and neutron star binaries, active galaxies, and super-nova remnants. In this preview, we present light curves for persistent and transient sources, and also show examples of what type of information can be obtained from the BATSE Earth occultation database. Options for making the data easily accessible as an "on line" WWW document are being explored.

  6. SWIFT X-RAY TELESCOPE MONITORING OF FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES OF INTEREST

    SciTech Connect

    Stroh, Michael C.; Falcone, Abe D.

    2013-08-15

    We describe a long-term Swift monitoring program of Fermi gamma-ray sources, particularly the 23 gamma-ray ''sources of interest''.We present a systematic analysis of the Swift X-Ray Telescope light curves and hardness ratios of these sources, and we calculate excess variability. We present data for the time interval of 2004 December 22 through 2012 August 31. We describe the analysis methods used to produce these data products, and we discuss the availability of these data in an online repository, which continues to grow from more data on these sources and from a growing list of additional sources. This database should be of use to the broad astronomical community for long-term studies of the variability of these objects and for inclusion in multiwavelength studies.

  7. Astronomical telescope for photons-gamma rays of low energy (approximately 4 MeV using the difference method like a Venetian blind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Aguiar, O. D.; Martin, I. M.

    1980-07-01

    A description of a gamma ray telescope, which is sensitive to photons in the energy range of 3 - 10 MeV is presented. Collimation was provided by a passive shield which functioned somewhat like a 'venetian blind' to block the signal from one of the detectors. Signal subtraction techniques were used to obtain the desired information.

  8. AGILE detection of enhanced gamma-ray activity from a new unidentified source at high Galactic latitude, AGLJ0917+1511

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarelli, F.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Piano, G.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Tavani, M.; Donnarumma, I.; Vercellone, S.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Parmiggiani, N.; Ferrari, A.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-04-01

    AGILE is detecting intense gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from an unidentified source, AGLJ0917+1511, at Galactic coordinates (l,b)=(214.99, 39.00) deg (R.A., Dec.= 139.27, 15.196 deg, J2000), with a statistical 95% c.l. elliptical error region with major and minor axes of 0.58 deg and 0.47 deg, respectively.

  9. The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, N.; Chipman, E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (Compton) was launched by the Space Shuttle Atlantis on 5 April 1991. The spacecraft and instruments are in good health and returning exciting results. The mission provides nearly six orders of magnitude in spectral coverage, from 30 keV to 30 GeV, with sensitivity over the entire range an order of magnitude better than that of previous observations. The 16,000 kilogram observatory contains four instruments on a stabilized platform. The mission began normal operations on 16 May 1991 and is now over half-way through a full-sky survey. The mission duration is expected to be from six to ten years. A Science Support Center has been established at Goddard Space Flight Center for the purpose of supporting a vigorous Guest Investigator Program. New scientific results to date include: (1) the establishment of the isotropy, combined with spatial inhomogeneity, of the distribution of gamma-ray bursts in the sky; (2) the discovery of intense high energy (100 MeV) gamma-ray emission from 3C 279 and other quasars and BL Lac objects, making these the most distant and luminous gamma-ray sources ever detected; (3) one of the first images of a gamma-ray burst; (4) the observation of intense nuclear and position-annihilation gamma-ray lines and neutrons from several large solar flares; and (5) the detection of a third gamma-ray pulsar, plus several other transient and pulsing hard X-ray sources.

  10. A Fieldable-Prototype Large-Area Gamma-ray Imager for Orphan Source Search

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Fabris, Lorenzo; Carr, Dennis; Collins, Jeff; Cunningham, Mark F; Habte Ghebretatios, Frezghi; Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Marchant, William

    2008-01-01

    We have constructed a unique instrument for use in the search for orphan sources. The system uses gamma-ray imaging to "see through" the natural background variations that effectively limit the search range of normal devices to ~10 m. The imager is mounted in a 4.9- m-long trailer and can be towed by a large personal vehicle. Source locations are determined both in range and along the direction of travel as the vehicle moves. A fully inertial platform coupled to a Global Positioning System receiver is used to map the gamma-ray images onto overhead geospatial imagery. The resulting images provide precise source locations, allowing rapid follow-up work. The instrument simultaneously searches both sides of the street to a distance of 50 m (100-m swath) for milliCurieclass sources with near-perfect performance.

  11. On the possibility of observing cosmic ray sources in high energy gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormes, J. F.

    1987-01-01

    If cosmic rays are accelerated by strong shocks, then cosmic ray sources should be characterized by spectra, dN/dE alpha E exp -(2.0-2.2), reflecting the strength of those shocks. This is expected from the 'standard leaky box' model of cosmic ray propagation in which the source spectra are harder than the observed spectra because higher energy particles have shorter residence times in the galactic magnetic fields. Furthermore, data on cosmic ray nucleons suggest that these sources might be surrounded by material. If the latter is true, such sources should be observable in gamma rays at energies beyond 1 GeV where the angular resolution of gamma-ray telescopes is optimized and the background is significantly reduced. For identified sources, the source location accuracy can be shown to improve with increasing energy in spite of the decreasing statistics, as long as the gamma-ray spectrum is harder than dN/dE alpha E exp -gamma. A Monte Carlo model is used to predict the photon spectra which would be expected from cosmic ray sources under varying assumptions about the strength of the shocks in the acceleration region.

  12. Polarized gamma-rays with laser-Compton backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ohgaki, H.; Noguchi, T.; Sugiyama, S.

    1995-12-31

    Polarized gamma-rays were generated through laser-Compton backscattering (LCS) of a conventional Nd:YAG laser with electrons circulating in the electron storage ring TERAS at Electrotechnical Laboratory. We measured the energy, the energy spread, and the yield of the gamma-rays to characterize our gamma-ray source. The gamma-ray energy can be varied by changing the energy of the electrons circulating the storage ring. In our case, the energy of electrons in the storage ring were varied its energy from 200 to 750 MeV. Consequently, we observed gamma-ray energies of 1 to 10 MeV with 1064 run laser photons. Furthermore, the gamma-ray energy was extended to 20 MeV by using the 2nd harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser. This shows a good agreement with theoretical calculation. The gamma-ray energy spread was also measured to be 1% FWHM for -1 MeV gamma-rays and to be 4% FWHM for 10 MeV gamma-rays with a narrow collimator that defined the scattering cone. The gamma-ray yield was 47.2 photons/mA/W/s. This value is consistent with a rough estimation of 59.5 photons/mA/W/s derived from theory. Furthermore, we tried to use these gamma-rays for a nuclear fluorescence experiment. If we use a polarized laser beam, we can easily obtain polarized gamma-rays. Elastically scattered photons from {sup 208} Pb were clearly measured with the linearly polarized gamma-rays, and we could assign the parity of J=1 states in the nucleus. We should emphasize that the polarized gamma-ray from LCS is quit useful in this field, because we can use highly, almost completely, polarized gamma-rays. We also use the LCS gamma-rays to measure the photon absorption coefficients. In near future, we will try to generate a circular polarized gamma-ray. We also have a plan to use an FEL, because it can produce intense laser photons in the same geometric configuration as the LCS facility.

  13. High-precision source location of the 1978 November 19 gamma-ray burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Pizzichini, G.; Evans, W. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.

    1981-01-01

    The celestial source location of the November 19, 1978, intense gamma ray burst has been determined from data obtained with the interplanetary gamma-ray sensor network by means of long-baseline wave front timing instruments. Each of the instruments was designed for studying events with observable spectra of approximately greater than 100 keV, and each provides accurate event profile timing in the several millisecond range. The data analysis includes the following: the triangulated region is centered at (gamma, delta) 1950 = (1h16m32s, -28 deg 53 arcmin), at -84 deg galactic latitude, where the star density is very low and the obscuration negligible. The gamma-ray burst source region, consistent with that of a highly polarized radio source described by Hjellming and Ewald (1981), may assist in the source modeling and may facilitate the understanding of the source process. A marginally identifiable X-ray source was also found by an Einstein Observatory investigation. It is concluded that the burst contains redshifted positron annihilation and nuclear first-excited iron lines, which is consistent with a neutron star origin.

  14. The gamma ray continuum spectrum from the galactic center disk and point sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Tueller, Jack

    1992-01-01

    A light curve of gamma-ray continuum emission from point sources in the galactic center region is generated from balloon and satellite observations made over the past 25 years. The emphasis is on the wide field-of-view instruments which measure the combined flux from all sources within approximately 20 degrees of the center. These data have not been previously used for point-source analyses because of the unknown contribution from diffuse disk emission. In this study, the galactic disk component is estimated from observations made by the Gamma Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS) instrument in Oct. 1988. Surprisingly, there are several times during the past 25 years when all gamma-ray sources (at 100 keV) within about 20 degrees of the galactic center are turned off or are in low emission states. This implies that the sources are all variable and few in number. The continuum gamma-ray emission below approximately 150 keV from the black hole candidate 1E1740.7-2942 is seen to turn off in May 1989 on a time scale of less than two weeks, significantly shorter than ever seen before. With the continuum below 150 keV turned off, the spectral shape derived from the HEXAGONE observation on 22 May 1989 is very peculiar with a peak near 200 keV. This source was probably in its normal state for more than half of all observations since the mid-1960's. There are only two observations (in 1977 and 1979) for which the sum flux from the point sources in the region significantly exceeds that from 1E1740.7-2942 in its normal state.

  15. A method to improve observations of gamma-ray sources near 10 (15) eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommers, P.; Elbert, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Now that sources of gamma rays near 10 to the 15th power eV have been identified, there is a need for telescopes which can study in detail the high energy gamma ray emissions from these sources. The capabilities of a Cerenkov detector which can track a source at large zenith angle (small elevation angle) are analyzed. Because the observed showers must then develop far from the detector, the effective detection area is very large. During a single half-hour hot phase of Cygnus X-3, for example, it may be possible to detect 45 signal showers compared with 10 background showers. Time structure within the hot phase may then be discernible. The precise capabilities of the detector depend on its mirror size, angular acceptance, electronic speed, coincidence properties, etc. Calculations are presented for one feasible design using mirrors of an improved Fly's Eye type.

  16. Final SAS-2 gamma-ray results on sources in the galactic anticenter region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Final results are presented for SAS-2 observations of high-energy gamma-rays from the galactic anticenter region. Three main gamma-ray features are shown to characterize this region: a localized source associated with the Crab Nebula and its pulsar, another localized source near galactic coordinates 195 deg, +5 deg, and a general enhancement of the diffuse background 10 to 15 deg south of the galactic plane, which is associated with the Gould Belt. For the Crab, it is found that the radiation is mostly pulsed, the pulsed fraction increases with energy, and the intensity of the radiation in the main and interpulse peaks is approximately the same. The other localized source, provisionally designated as gamma 195+5, is found to have a harder spectrum than the Crab but no obvious radio counterpart; emission from an external galaxy is ruled out.

  17. The source altitude, electric current, and intrinsic brightness of terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Briggs, Michael S.; Dwyer, Joseph R.; Xiong, Shaolin; Connaughton, Valerie; Fishman, Gerald J.; Lu, Gaopeng; Lyu, Fanchao; Solanki, Rahulkumar

    2014-12-01

    Many details of how thunderstorms generate terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) and other forms of high-energy radiation remain uncertain, including the basic question of where they are produced. We exploit the association of distinct low-frequency radio emissions with generation of terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) to directly measure for the first time the TGF source altitude. Analysis of two events reveals source altitudes of 11.8 ± 0.4 km and 11.9 ± 0.9 km. This places the source region in the interior of the thunderstorm between the two main charge layers and implies an intrinsic TGF brightness of approximately 1018 runaway electrons. The electric current in this nontraditional lightning process is found to be strong enough to drive nonlinear effects in the ionosphere, and in one case is comparable to the highest peak current lightning processes on the planet.

  18. Nonthermal processes around collapsed objects: High energy gamma ray sources in the radio sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.; Ruderman, Malvin; Applegate, James H.; Becker, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    In our proposal responding to the initial Guest Observer NRA for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, 'Nonthermal Processes Around Collapsed Objects: High Energy Gamma Ray Sources in the Radio Sky', we stated that 'At high energies - the identity of the principal Galactic source population remains unknown' although the 'one certain source of high energy emission is young radio pulsars'. These two statements remain true, although at this writing, eighteen months after the beginning of the Compton allsky survey, much of the gamma-ray data required to greatly extend our knowledge of the Galaxy's high energy emission has been collected. The thrust of the program supported by our grant was to collect and analyze a complementary set of data on the Milky Way at radio wavelengths in order to help identify the dominant Pop 1 component of the Galaxy's gamma ray sources, and to pursue theoretical investigations on the origins and emission mechanisms of young pulsars, the one component of this population identified to date. We summarize here our accomplishments under the grant. In Section 2, we describe our VLA surveys of the Galactic Plane along with the current status of the radio source catalogs derived therefrom; unfortunately, owing to the TDRSS antenna problem and subsequent extension of the Sky Survey, we were not able to carry out a comparison with the EGRET data directly, although everything is now in place to do so as soon as it becomes available. In Section 2, we summarize our progress on the theoretical side, including the substantial completion of a dissertation on pulsar origins and work on the high energy emission mechanisms of isolated pulsars. We list the personnel supported by the grant in section 4 and provide a complete bibliography of publications supported in whole or in part by the grant in the final section.

  19. Persistent X-ray emission from a gamma-ray burst source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Cline, T.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Pizzichini, G.; Evans, W. D.; Laros, J. G.; Hurley, K. C.; Niel, M.; Klebesadel, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    A quiescent X-ray source detected with the Einstein X-ray Observatory in a location consistent with that of an intense gamma ray burst is shown to be also consistent with the location of the 1928 optical transient, the likely optical counterpart of the gamma ray burst source GBS0117-29. The system appears to be underluminous in X-rays by a factor of 10; possible reasons for this are discussed. The observed X-ray flux would require an accretion rate of about 10 to the -14th (d/1 kpc/)-squared solar masses per year, which is probably too low to be consistent with published nuclear flash models for gamma bursts, unless the distance is substantially greater than about 1 kpc or the burst recurrence time is greater than about 50 yrs, or the accretion rate is highly variable. Such a long recurrence time appears to be inconsistent with the detection of the optical burst.

  20. Locating very high energy gamma-ray sources with arcminute accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akerlof, C. W.; Cawley, M. F.; Chantell, M.; Harris, K.; Lawrence, M. A.; Fegan, D. J.; Lang, M. J.; Hillas, A. M.; Jennings, D. G.; Lamb, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    The angular accuracy of gamma-ray detectors is intrinsically limited by the physical processes involved in photon detection. Although a number of pointlike sources were detected by the COS B satellite, only two have been unambiguously identified by time signature with counterparts at longer wavelengths. By taking advantage of the extended longitudinal structure of VHE gamma-ray showers, measurements in the TeV energy range can pinpoint source coordinates to arcminute accuracy. This has now been demonstrated with new data analysis procedures applied to observations of the Crab Nebula using Cherenkov air shower imaging techniques. With two telescopes in coincidence, the individual event circular probable error will be 0.13 deg. The half-cone angle of the field of view is effectively 1 deg.

  1. Locating very high energy gamma ray sources with arc minute accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akerlof, C. W.; Cawley, M. F.; Chantell, M.; Fegan, D. J.; Harris, K.; Hillas, A. M.; Jennings, D. G.; Lamb, R. C.; Lawrence, M. A.; Lang, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The angular accuracy of gamma-ray detectors is intrinsically limited by the physical processes involved in photon detection. Although a number of point-like sources were detected by the COS-B satellite, only two were unambiguously identified by time signature with counterparts at longer wavelengths. By taking advantage of the extended longitudinal structure of Very High Energy gamma-ray showers, measurements in the TeV energy range can pinpoint source coordinates to arc minute accuracy. This was demonstrated using Cerenkov air shower imaging techniques. With two telescopes in coincidence, the individual event circular probable error will be 0.13 deg. The half-cone angle of the field of view is effectively 1 deg.

  2. Hints of the existence of axionlike particles from the gamma-ray spectra of cosmological sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conde, M. A.; Prada, F.; Paneque, D.; Bloom, E.; Dominguez, A.

    2009-06-15

    Axionlike particles (ALPs) are predicted to couple with photons in the presence of magnetic fields. This effect may lead to a significant change in the observed spectra of gamma-ray sources such as active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Here we carry out a detailed study that for the first time simultaneously considers in the same framework both the photon/axion mixing that takes place in the gamma-ray source and that one expected to occur in the intergalactic magnetic fields. An efficient photon/axion mixing in the source always means an attenuation in the photon flux, whereas the mixing in the intergalactic medium may result in a decrement and/or enhancement of the photon flux, depending on the distance of the source and the energy considered. Interestingly, we find that decreasing the value of the intergalactic magnetic field strength, which decreases the probability for photon/axion mixing, could result in an increase of the expected photon flux at Earth if the source is far enough. We also find a 30% attenuation in the intensity spectrum of distant sources, which occurs at an energy that only depends on the properties of the ALPs and the intensity of the intergalactic magnetic field, and thus independent of the AGN source being observed. Moreover, we show that this mechanism can easily explain recent puzzles in the spectra of distant gamma-ray sources, like the possible detection of TeV photons from 3C 66A (a source located at z=0.444) by MAGIC and VERITAS, which should not happen according to conventional models of photon propagation over cosmological distances. Another puzzle is the recent published lower limit to the extragalactic background light intensity at 3.6 {mu}m (which is almost twice larger as the previous one), which implies very hard spectra for some detected TeV gamma-ray sources located at z=0.1-0.2. The consequences that come from this work are testable with the current generation of gamma-ray instruments, namely Fermi (formerly known as GLAST) and

  3. Estimation of source altitudes of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes produced during the stepping of lighting leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Celestin, S. J.; Pasko, V. P.

    2011-12-01

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are high-energy photon bursts originating from the Earth's atmosphere. After their discovery in 1994 by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) detector aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory [Fishman et al., Science, 264, 1313, 1994], this phenomenon has been further observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) [Smith et al., Science, 307, 1085, 2005], the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope [Briggs et al., JGR, 115, A07323, 2010] and the Astrorivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero (AGILE) satellite [Marisaldi et al., JGR, 115, A00E13, 2010]. Photon spectra corresponding to well-established model of relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) usually provide a very good agreement with satellite observations [Dwyer and Smith, GRL, 32, L22804, 2005]. However, it has been suggested that long unbranched +IC lightning leaders could produce a sufficient number of energetic electrons to explain TGFs without invoking further amplification in RREAs [Celestin and Pasko, JGR, 116, A03315, 2011]. We have developed a detailed Monte Carlo model to simulate photon transport in the atmosphere. In the present study, we simulate photons with energies ranging from ~10 keV to ~100 MeV. Three different types of collisions are taken into account: Photoelectric absorption (main process for energies <30 keV), Compton scattering (main process for energies from 30 keV to 30 MeV) and pair production (main process for energies >30 MeV). The initial photons are generated from energetic electrons produced by lightning during negative corona flashes. We utilize electron energy distributions derived from the most recent Monte Carlo runaway models developed at Penn State to define spectral properties of these photons. The propagation of these photons is simulated up to 500 km, which is the typical altitude of satellites detecting TGFs. Based on the mechanism of direct TGFs production in the lightning leaders, we will

  4. MeV Science with the Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT), a High Sensitivity Medium-Energy Gamma-Ray Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venters, Tonia M.; Hunter, Stanley D.; De Nolfo, Georgia; Hanu, Andrei R.; Krizmanic, John F.; Stecker, Floyd W.; Timokhin, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Many high-energy astrophysical phenomena exhibit unique, transitory behavior, such as spectral breaks, bursts, and flares below ~200 MeV. However, while significant progress in gamma-rays has been made by instruments such as Fermi and AGILE, a significant sensitivity gap remains in the medium-energy regime (0.75 - 200 MeV) that has been explored only by COMPTEL and EGRET on CGRO. Tapping into this unexplored regime requires development of a telescope with significant improvement in sensitivity. Our mission concept, covering ~5 to ~200 MeV, is the Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT). The AdEPT telescope will achieve angular resolution of ~0.6 deg at 70 MeV, similar to the angular resolution of Fermi/LAT at ~1 GeV that brought tremendous success in identifying new sources. AdEPT will also provide unprecedented polarization sensitivity, ~1% for a 1 Crab source. The enabling technology for AdEPT is the Three-Dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) a low-density, large volume, gas time-projection chamber with a 2-dimensional readout. The 3-DTI provides high-resolution three-dimensional electron tracking with minimal Coulomb scattering that is essential to achieve high angular resolution and polarization sensitivity. We describe the design, fabrication, and performance of the 3-DTI detector, describe the development of a 50x50x100 cm3 AdEPT prototype, and highlight a few of the key science questions that AdEPT will address.

  5. Investigating Binary Wolf-Rayet Binary Stars as Potential Gamma-Ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, Jacqueline; Alexander, Michael J.; McSwain, M. Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Wolf-Rayets are massive, hot, and luminous evolved stars with strong stellar winds. When paired with another massive star emitting strong stellar winds, the region where their winds collide produces a bow shock that may emit gamma-rays. This work seeks to find such a colliding wind binary by correlating the orbital period of a binary Wolf-Rayet with periodic changes in flux in nearby gamma-ray sources observed by Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Large Area Telescope (LAT). We selected three binary Wolf-Rayet stars for analysis. WR 39 and WR 48 are in close proximity to unassociated sources from the LAT 2-Year Point Source Catalog (2FGL). WR 140 was selected on the basis of being a double-lined spectroscopic binary; the close passage of the two stars may contribute to colliding winds that could produce gamma-rays. We first used the Fermi Science Tools to calculate average flux values. The orbital period of WR 39 has not been established; so rather than creating a folded light curve, photon data for its proposed 2FGL counterpart were next analyzed using seven-day time bins in an attempt to use periodic behavior in the 2FGL source to find the orbital period of WR 39. However, no periodic behavior was evident in the plotted data. Since WR 48 lies just outside error ellipse of its proposed 2FGL counterpart, we performed the six-year likelihood analysis twice. First, WR 48 was manually inserted as a point source; this resulted in a non-converging fit. Instead, we used the proposed 2FGL counterpart as the object of interest. After calculating the average flux, we separated the photon data into phase bins based on the 18.34 day period of WR 48. The resulting folded light curve does not show any periodic behavior. WR 140 was also manually inserted as a point source; the analysis of the six-year data set failed to establish the existence of a gamma-ray source at the location of WR 140 and no further analysis was performed on this source.This research took place at Lehigh

  6. Parkes Radio Searches of Fermi Gamma-Ray Sources and Millisecond Pulsar Discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilo, F.; Kerr, M.; Ray, P. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Sarkissian, J.; Cromartie, H. T.; Johnston, S.; Reynolds, J. E.; Wolff, M. T.; Freire, P. C. C.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Ferrara, E. C.; Keith, M.; Michelson, P. F.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Wood, K. S.

    2015-09-01

    In a search with the Parkes radio telescope of 56 unidentified Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) gamma-ray sources, we have detected 11 millisecond pulsars (MSPs), 10 of them discoveries, of which five were reported by Kerr et al. We did not detect radio pulsations from six other pulsars now known in these sources. We describe the completed survey, which included multiple observations of many targets conducted to minimize the impact of interstellar scintillation, acceleration effects in binary systems, and eclipses. We consider that 23 of the 39 remaining sources may still be viable pulsar candidates. We present timing solutions and polarimetry for five of the MSPs and gamma-ray pulsations for PSR J1903-7051 (pulsations for five others were reported in the second Fermi-LAT catalog of gamma-ray pulsars). Two of the new MSPs are isolated and five are in \\gt 1 day circular orbits with 0.2-0.3 {M}⊙ presumed white dwarf companions. PSR J0955-6150, in a 24 day orbit with a ≈ 0.25 {M}⊙ companion but eccentricity of 0.11, belongs to a recently identified class of eccentric MSPs. PSR J1036-8317 is in an 8 hr binary with a \\gt 0.14 {M}⊙ companion that is probably a white dwarf. PSR J1946-5403 is in a 3 hr orbit with a \\gt 0.02 {M}⊙ companion with no evidence of radio eclipses.

  7. Are gamma-ray bursts the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baerwald, Philipp; Bustamante, Mauricio; Winter, Walter

    2015-03-01

    We reconsider the possibility that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) within the internal shock model, assuming a pure proton composition of the UHECRs. For the first time, we combine the information from gamma-rays, cosmic rays, prompt neutrinos, and cosmogenic neutrinos quantitatively in a joint cosmic ray production and propagation model, and we show that the information on the cosmic energy budget can be obtained as a consequence. In addition to the neutron model, we consider alternative scenarios for the cosmic ray escape from the GRBs, i.e., that cosmic rays can leak from the sources. We find that the dip model, which describes the ankle in UHECR observations by the pair production dip, is strongly disfavored in combination with the internal shock model because (a) unrealistically high baryonic loadings (energy in protons versus energy in electrons/gamma-rays) are needed for the individual GRBs and (b) the prompt neutrino flux easily overshoots the corresponding neutrino bound. On the other hand, GRBs may account for the UHECRs in the ankle transition model if cosmic rays leak out from the source at the highest energies. In that case, we demonstrate that future neutrino observations can efficiently test most of the parameter space - unless the baryonic loading is much larger than previously anticipated.

  8. Primary gamma-rays with E gamma or = to 10(15) eV: Evidence for ultrahigh energy particle acceleration in galactic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aharonian, F. A.; Mamidjanian, E. A.; Nikolsky, S. I.; Tukish, E. I.

    1985-01-01

    The recently observed primary ultra high energy gamma-rays (UHEGR) testify to the cosmic ray (CR) acceleration in the Galaxy. The available data may be interpreted as gamma-ray production due to photomeson production in CR sources.

  9. Gamma ray transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, Thomas L.

    1987-01-01

    The discovery of cosmic gamma ray bursts was made with systems designed at Los Alamos Laboratory for the detection of nuclear explosions beyond the atmosphere. HELIOS-2 was the first gamma ray burst instrument launched; its initial results in 1976, seemed to deepen the mystery around gamma ray transients. Interplanetary spacecraft data were reviewed in terms of explaining the behavior and source of the transients.

  10. Measurements and implications of the source altitude of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven; Lu, Gaopeng; Briggs, Michael; Connaughton, Valerie; Xiong, Shaolin; Fishman, Gerald; Dwyer, Joseph

    2014-05-01

    Radio emissions continue to provide a unique view into the electrodynamics of terrestrial gamma ray flash (TGF) production. It is generally agreed that most and perhaps all TGFs are produced during the early, upward leader stage of normal polarity IC lightning flashes. Observations have shown that at least some TGFs are effectively simultaneous with a distinct low frequency pulse, indicating likely production of that pulse by the TGF-generating electron acceleration process itself [Cummer et al., GRL, 2011]. Additional observations of an anti-correlation between the TGF-radio association rate and TGF duration [Connaughton et al., JGR, 2013], and detailed comparisons of simulation and measurement [Dwyer and Cummer, JGR, 2013] strongly support this picture. A subset of TGF events detected over the past several years by the GBM instrument on the Fermi satellite, and also measured by our network of low frequency radio sensors, produced radio emissions that are sufficiently distinct to estimate the TGF source altitude from multiple ground-ionosphere reflections. By combining the gamma ray measurements, radio measurements, and Monte Carlo modeling, the self consistency of the source altitude, gamma ray flux, and radio emission duration and magnitude can be rigorously and quantitatively tested in the context of TGF generation theories. We will present several of these observations and associated analysis, and attempt to draw some firm conclusions about the physics behind TGFs.

  11. CANGAROO-III OBSERVATION OF TeV GAMMA RAYS FROM THE UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCE HESS J1614-518

    SciTech Connect

    Mizukami, T.; Kubo, H.; Tanimori, T.; Kabuki, S.; Yoshida, T.; Nakamori, T.; Enomoto, R.; Kifune, T.; Akimoto, M.; Ishioka, H.; Kawachi, A.; Bicknell, G. V.; Clay, R. W.; Edwards, P. G.; Gunji, S.; Hara, S.; Hara, T.; Hayashi, S.; Kajino, F.; Katagiri, H. E-mail: kubo@cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2011-10-20

    We report the detection, with the CANGAROO-III imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope array, of a very high energy gamma-ray signal from the unidentified gamma-ray source HESS J1614-518, which was discovered in the H.E.S.S. Galactic plane survey. Diffuse gamma-ray emission was detected above 760 GeV at the 8.9{sigma} level during an effective exposure of 54 hr from 2008 May to August. The spectrum can be represented by a power law: (8.2 {+-} 2.2{sub stat} {+-} 2.5{sub sys}) x 10{sup -12} x (E/1 TeV){sup -}{gamma} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} TeV{sup -1} with a photon index {gamma} of 2.4 {+-} 0.3{sub stat} {+-} 0.2{sub sys}, which is compatible with that of the H.E.S.S. observations. By combining our result with multiwavelength data, we discuss the possible counterparts for HESS J1614-518 and consider radiation mechanisms based on hadronic and leptonic processes for a supernova remnant (SNR), stellar winds from massive stars, and a pulsar wind nebula (PWN). Although a leptonic origin from a PWN driven by an unknown pulsar remains possible, hadronic-origin emission from an unknown SNR is preferred.

  12. CANGAROO-III Observation of TeV Gamma Rays from the Unidentified Gamma-Ray Source HESS J1614-518

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukami, T.; Kubo, H.; Yoshida, T.; Nakamori, T.; Enomoto, R.; Tanimori, T.; Akimoto, M.; Bicknell, G. V.; Clay, R. W.; Edwards, P. G.; Gunji, S.; Hara, S.; Hara, T.; Hayashi, S.; Ishioka, H.; Kabuki, S.; Kajino, F.; Katagiri, H.; Kawachi, A.; Kifune, T.; Kiuchi, R.; Kunisawa, T.; Kushida, J.; Matoba, T.; Matsubara, Y.; Matsuzawa, I.; Mizumura, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Mori, M.; Muraishi, H.; Naito, T.; Nakayama, K.; Nishijima, K.; Ohishi, M.; Otake, Y.; Ryoki, S.; Saito, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Stamatescu, V.; Suzuki, T.; Swaby, D. L.; Thornton, G.; Tokanai, F.; Toyota, Y.; Tsuchiya, K.; Yanagita, S.; Yokoe, Y.; Yoshikoshi, T.; Yukawa, Y.

    2011-10-01

    We report the detection, with the CANGAROO-III imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope array, of a very high energy gamma-ray signal from the unidentified gamma-ray source HESS J1614-518, which was discovered in the H.E.S.S. Galactic plane survey. Diffuse gamma-ray emission was detected above 760 GeV at the 8.9σ level during an effective exposure of 54 hr from 2008 May to August. The spectrum can be represented by a power law: (8.2 ± 2.2stat ± 2.5sys) × 10-12 × (E/1 TeV)-γ cm-2 s-1 TeV-1 with a photon index γ of 2.4 ± 0.3stat ± 0.2sys, which is compatible with that of the H.E.S.S. observations. By combining our result with multiwavelength data, we discuss the possible counterparts for HESS J1614-518 and consider radiation mechanisms based on hadronic and leptonic processes for a supernova remnant (SNR), stellar winds from massive stars, and a pulsar wind nebula (PWN). Although a leptonic origin from a PWN driven by an unknown pulsar remains possible, hadronic-origin emission from an unknown SNR is preferred.

  13. Abstracts of papers to be presented at the fifth symposium on x- and gamma-ray sources and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The program and abstracts of papers are presented. Topics include radiation sources, radiation detectors, mathematical models and data analysis, gamma-ray spectroscopy, instrumentation, applications of x-ray fluorescence, PIXE, and x-ray absorption. (ACR)

  14. Design support of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, E. A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Engineering design specifications and development of the large area detector and photomultiplier tube assemblies for the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) mission are examined.

  15. Spectral properties of blast-wave models of gamma-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.; Rees, M. J.; Papathanassiou, H.

    1994-01-01

    We calculate the spectrum of blast-wave models of gamma-ray burst sources, for various assumptions about the magnetic field density and the relativistic particle acceleration efficiency. For a range of physically plausible models we find that the radiation efficiency is high and leads to nonthermal spectra with breaks at various energies comparable to those observed in the gamma-ray range. Radiation is also predicted at other wavebands, in particular at X-ray, optical/UV, and GeV/TeV energies. We discuss the spectra as a function of duration for three basic types of models, and for cosmological, halo, and galactic disk distances. We also evaluate the gamma-ray fluences and the spectral characteristics for a range of external densities. Impulsive burst models at cosmological distances can satisfy the conventional X-ray paucity constraint S(sub x)/S(sub gamma)less than a few percent over a wide range of durations, but galactic models can do so only for bursts shorter than a few seconds, unless additional assumptions are made. The emissivity is generally larger for bursts in a denser external environment, with the efficiency increasing up to the point where all the energy input is radiated away.

  16. Choked Jets and Low-Luminosity Gamma-Ray Bursts as Hidden Neutrino Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senno, Nicholas; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter

    2016-03-01

    I will discuss choked gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets as possible sources of very high-energy (VHE) cosmic neutrinos. The jet propagation physics and radiation constraints are taken into account. We find that efficient shock acceleration of cosmic rays inside a high density stellar environment is possible for sufficiently low-powered jets and/or jets buried in an extended optically think envelope. Such conditions are favorable also for the GRB jets to become stalled. Such choked jets may explain transrelativistic SNe or low-luminosity GRBs by launching quasi-spherical shocks that breakout in the optically thick wind. Focusing on this possibility, we calculate the resulting diffuse neutrino spectra using the latest results of the local llGRB rate and luminosity function. We confirm that llGRBs can potentially give a significant contribution to the measured neutrino flux. The results are compatible with the IceCube (IC) data around 10-100 TeV without contradicting other IC limits on classical GRBs. Choked and llGRBs are dark in GeV-TeV gamma rays, and do not contribute significantly to the Fermi diffuse gamma-ray background. Precursor TeV neutrinos emerging prior to the shock breakout emission can be used as smoking gun evidence for a choked jet model for llGRBs.

  17. Gamma-ray Astronomy and GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2007-01-01

    The high energy gamma-ray (30 MeV to 100 GeV) sky has been relatively poorly studied. Most of our current knowledge comes from observations made by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) detector on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), which revealed that the GeV gamma-ray sky is rich and vibrant. Studies of astrophysical objects at GeV energies are interesting for several reasons: The high energy gamma-rays are often produced by a different physical process than the better studied X-ray and optical emission, thus providing a unique information for understanding these sources. Production of such high-energy photons requires that charged particles are accelerated to equally high energies, or much greater. Thus gamma-ray astronomy is the study of extreme environments, with natural and fundamental connections to cosmic-ray and neutrino astrophysics. The launch of GLAST in 2008 will herald a watershed in our understanding of the high energy gamma-ray sky, providing dramatic improvements in sensitivity, angular resolution and energy range. GLAST will open a new avenue to study our Universe as well as to answer scientific questions EGRET observations have raised. In this talk, I will describe the GLAST instruments and capabilities and highlight some of the science we expect to address.

  18. Search for discrete gamma-ray sources emitting at energies greater than 10/sup 15/ eV

    SciTech Connect

    Samorski, M.; Stamm, W.

    1984-02-15

    The data of the extensive air shower experiment at Kiel have been scanned systematically for possible discrete ..gamma..-ray sources in the energy range E>10/sup 15/ eV and in the declination band delta = 25/sup 0/-75/sup 0/. Photon fluxes for celestial positions with the statistically most significant excesses of showers and 3 sigma upper limit photon fluxes for COS B ..gamma..-ray sources visible to the extensive air shower experiment at Kiel are presented.

  19. A WISE blazar candidate counterpart of the gamma-ray flaring source nearby NRAO 676 (TXS 2159+505)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, F.; Paggi, A.; D'Abrusco, R.

    2012-06-01

    Following the Fermi LAT detection of a new gamma-ray flaring source in the vicinity of the the flat spectrum radio quasar NRAO 676 (TXS 2159+505) (ATEL #4182), we searched in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; Wright et al. 2010 AJ, 140, 1868) catalog at the position of the Fermi source for a gamma-ray blazar candidate using the association procedure outlined in Massaro, F.......

  20. How Far Away Are the Sources of IceCube Neutrinos? Constraints from the Diffuse Teraelectronvolt Gamma-ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Xiao-Chuan; Liu, Ruo-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu

    2016-07-01

    The nearly isotropic distribution of teraelectronvolt to petaelectronvolt neutrinos recently detected by the IceCube Collaboration suggests that they come from sources at a distance beyond our Galaxy, but how far away they are is largely unknown because of a lack of any associations with known sources. In this paper, we propose that the cumulative TeV gamma-ray emission accompanying the production of neutrinos can be used to constrain the distance of these neutrino sources, since the opacity of TeV gamma rays due to absorption by the extragalactic background light depends on the distance these TeV gamma rays have traveled. As the diffuse extragalactic TeV background measured by Fermi is much weaker than the expected cumulative flux associated with IceCube neutrinos, the majority of IceCube neutrinos, if their sources are transparent to TeV gamma rays, must come from distances larger than the horizon of TeV gamma rays. We find that above 80% of the IceCube neutrinos should come from sources at redshift z > 0.5. Thus, the chance of finding nearby sources correlated with IceCube neutrinos would be small. We also find that, to explain the flux of neutrinos under the TeV gamma-ray emission constraint, the redshift evolution of neutrino source density must be at least as fast as the cosmic star formation rate.

  1. Determination of the optimum-size californium-252 neutron source for borehole capture gamma-ray analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Macy, R.J.; Mikesell, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The fast- and thermal-neutron fluence rates from a 3.7 ??g 252Cf neutron source in a simulated borehole have been measured as a function of the source-to-detector distance using air, water, coal, iron ore-concrete mix, and dry sand as borehole media. Gamma-ray intensity measurements were made for specific spectral lines at low and high energies for the same range of source-to-detector distances in the iron ore-concrete mix and in coal. Integral gamma-ray counts across the entire spectrum were also made at each source-to-detector distance. From these data, the specific neutron-damage rate, and the critical count-rate criteria, we show that in an iron ore-concrete mix (low hydrogen concentration), 252Cf neutron sources of 2-40 ??g are suitable. The source size required for optimum gamma-ray sensitivity depends on the energy of the gamma ray being measured. In a hydrogeneous medium such as coal, similar measurements were made. The results show that sources from 2 to 20 ??g are suitable to obtain the highest gamma-ray sensitivity, again depending on the energy of the gamma ray being measured. In a hydrogeneous medium, significant improvement in sensitivity can be achieved by using faster electronics; in iron ore, it cannot. ?? 1979 North-Holland Publishing Co.

  2. Observations of discrete gamma ray sources with SAS-2. [compact sources centered on Crab nebula and Vela X supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.

    1974-01-01

    Compact gamma ray sources centered on the Crab nebula and the Vela X supernova remnant are considered. An excess in the galactic radiation was observed in both regions. Data indicate that a large fraction of this flux is pulsed. The excess from the Vela region could reflect either a large-scale galactic feature, such as a superposition of spiral arm segments, or it could be associated with the Vela supernova remnant. Low-energy gamma ray bursts were observed in the SAS-2 anticoincidence shielding.

  3. REVISITING THE GAMMA-RAY SOURCE 2FGL J1823.8+4312

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto J.

    2013-02-20

    One of the great challenges of gamma-ray astronomy is identifying the lower energy counterparts to these high-energy sources. Recently, in this journal, Massaro et al. attempted to find the counterpart of 2FGL J1823.8+4312, a gamma-ray active galactic nucleus (AGN) of uncertain type from the Second Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog. After considering mid-infrared data in the field from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), those authors conclude that the preferred identification of 2FGL J1823.8+4312 is WISE J182352.33+431452.5, despite the fact that the mid-infrared source is undetected at radio energies. They claim that WISE J182352.33+431452.5 constitutes the discovery of a new class of extragalactic X-ray source, either a radio-faint blazar or the prototype of a new class of active galaxy with an enigmatic spectral energy distribution. This conclusion is claimed to be independent of whether or not the WISE source is the actual counterpart to 2FGL J1823.8+4312. Based on a re-analysis of public data in this field and new spectroscopy from Palomar, we conclude that WISE J182352.33+431452.5 is a dust-reddened quasar at z = 0.560, a representative example of a very common extragalactic AGN class. Were WISE J182352.33+431452.5 to be associated with the gamma-ray emission, this would be an unusual and exciting discovery. However, we argue that 2FGL J1823.8+4312 is more likely associated with either WISE J182409.25+431404.7 or, more likely, WISE J182419.04+430949.6, two radio-loud sources in the field. The former is a radio-loud quasar and the latter is an optically variable source with a featureless blue spectrum.

  4. An upper limit on the cosmic-ray luminosity of individual sources from gamma-ray observations

    SciTech Connect

    Supanitsky, A.D.; Souza, V. de E-mail: vitor@ifsc.usp.br

    2013-12-01

    Different types of extragalactic objects are known to produce TeV gamma-rays. Some of these objects are the most probable candidates to accelerate cosmic rays up to 10{sup 20} eV. It is very well known that gamma-rays can be produced as a result of the cosmic ray propagation through the intergalactic medium. These gamma-rays contribute to the total flux observed in the direction of the source. In this paper we propose a new method to derive an upper limit on the cosmic-ray luminosity of an individual source based on the measured upper limit on the integral flux of GeV-TeV gamma-rays. We show how it is possible to calculate an upper limit on the cosmic-ray luminosity of a particular source and we explore the parameter space in which the current GeV-TeV gamma-ray measurements can offer a useful determination. We study in detail two particular sources, Pictor A and NGC 7469, and we calculate the upper limit on the proton luminosity of each source based on the upper limit on the integral gamma-ray flux measured by the H.E.S.S. telescopes.

  5. Performance of the large-area detectors for the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, W. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Lestrade, J. P.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Wilson, R. B.; Parnell, T. A.; Austin, R. W.; Berry, F. A., Jr.; Horack, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    BATSE, one of four experiments on the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO), is expected to provide the most sensitive observations of gamma-ray bursts yet obtained, as well as to provide long-term monitoring of hard X-ray and low-energy gamma-ray emission from bright pulsating sources, transients, and solar flares. Eight uncollimated modules, positioned at the corners of the spacecraft to provide an unobstructed view of the sky, detect sources by various techniques based on time variability. Use of detectors with anisotropic response allows location of gamma-ray bursts to be determined to an accuracy of about 1 deg using BATSE data alone. The completed BATSE underwent intensive testing and calibration prior to its delivery in October 1988.

  6. Unveiling the Gamma-Ray Source Count Distribution Below the Fermi Detection Limit with Photon Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechlin, Hannes-S.; Cuoco, Alessandro; Donato, Fiorenza; Fornengo, Nicolao; Vittino, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    The source-count distribution as a function of their flux, {dN}/{dS}, is one of the main quantities characterizing gamma-ray source populations. We employ statistical properties of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) photon counts map to measure the composition of the extragalactic gamma-ray sky at high latitudes (| b| ≥slant 30°) between 1 and 10 GeV. We present a new method, generalizing the use of standard pixel-count statistics, to decompose the total observed gamma-ray emission into (a) point-source contributions, (b) the Galactic foreground contribution, and (c) a truly diffuse isotropic background contribution. Using the 6 yr Fermi-LAT data set (P7REP), we show that the {dN}/{dS} distribution in the regime of so far undetected point sources can be consistently described with a power law with an index between 1.9 and 2.0. We measure {dN}/{dS} down to an integral flux of ∼ 2× {10}-11 {{cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1, improving beyond the 3FGL catalog detection limit by about one order of magnitude. The overall {dN}/{dS} distribution is consistent with a broken power law, with a break at {2.1}-1.3+1.0× {10}-8 {{cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1. The power-law index {n}1={3.1}-0.5+0.7 for bright sources above the break hardens to {n}2=1.97+/- 0.03 for fainter sources below the break. A possible second break of the {dN}/{dS} distribution is constrained to be at fluxes below 6.4× {10}-11 {{cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1 at 95% confidence level. The high-latitude gamma-ray sky between 1 and 10 GeV is shown to be composed of ∼25% point sources, ∼69.3% diffuse Galactic foreground emission, and ∼6% isotropic diffuse background.

  7. Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2011-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has revolutionized the study of pulsar physics with the detection of over 80 gamma-ray pulsars. Several new populations have been discovered, including 24 radio quiet pulsars found through gamma-ray pulsations alone and about 20 millisecond gamma-ray pulsars. The gamma-ray pulsations from millisecond pulsars were discovered by both folding at periods of known radio millisecond pulsars or by detecting them as gamma-ray sources that are followed up by radio pulsar searches. The second method has resulted in a phenomenally successful synergy, with -35 new radio MSPs (to date) having been discovered at Fermi unidentified source locations and the gamma-ray pulsations having then been detected in a number of these using the radio timing solutions. The higher sensitivity and larger energy range of the Fermi Large Area Telescope has produced detailed energy-dependent light curves and phase-resolved spectroscopy on brighter pulsars, that have ruled out polar cap models as the major source of the emission in favor of outer magnetosphere accelerators. The large number of gamma-ray pulsars now allows for the first time meaningful population and sub-population studies that are revealing surprising properties of these fascinating sources.

  8. Photon-photon opacity constraints for relativistically expanding gamma-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, M. G.; Harding, A. K.

    1995-01-01

    Five bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) have also been detected at higher energies by EGRET. Four are consistent with power-law spectra extending to energies as high as, in the case of GRB930131, 1 GeV. The fifth, and most recent, GRB940217, has a more complex spectrum, with one photon detected at 18 GeV, the most energetic GRB photon detection to date. The optical depth to photon-photon pair production in these sources is extremely large for distances more than about 10pc away if the radiation is emitted isotropically in the observer's frame. This optical depth can be dramatically reduced if the source is moving with a relativstic bulk Lorentz factor Gamma, and recent calculations for this situation have been limited to cases of a beam with opening angle 1 Gamma, or expansions of infinitely thin spherical shells. This paper presents our extension of the pair production otpical depth calculation in relativistically expanding sources to more general geometries, including shells of finite thickness and arbitrary opening angle. We find that the minimum bulk Lorentz factors for the Energy Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) sources to be optically thin, i.e. display no spectral attenuation, is only moderately dependent on the shell thickness and its opening solid angle; these new limits on required velocity for given geometries will aid in placing realistic constraints on GRB source models.

  9. A variability study of the first catalog of gamma-ray sources on the 2.3 years AGILE data archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrecchia, Francesco; Pittori, C.; Bulgarelli, A.; Chen, A. W.; Tavani, M.; Giommi, P.; AGILE-Collaboration

    AGILE pointed observations performed from July 9, 2007 to October 30, 2009 are a recent, high quality gamma-ray data archive for monitoring studies of medium to high brightness gamma-ray sources in the 30 MeV -50 GeV energy range. We present a variability study of the 1AGL sources over the complete AGILE pointed Observation Blocks (OBs) dataset. The first AGILE Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) catalog (Pittori et al. 2009) included a significance-limited (4 sigma) sample of 47 sources (1AGL), detected with a conservative analysis over a first-year non-uniform sky coverage dataset. In this analysis we used data of an improved full Field of View (FOV) event filter, on a much larger (about 27.5 months) observation dataset, analyzing each OB separatedly. This data processing resulted in an improved source list as compared to the 1AGL one. We present here some results on the variability of some of these sources.

  10. Mapping Correlation of Two Point Sources in the Gamma-Ray Sky

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Alexander

    2015-08-20

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has been taking data on high energy photons or γ rays since June 11th, 2008, and people have been cataloging and profiling point sources of these γ rays ever since. After roughly one year of being in operation over 1400 sources were cataloged. Now, in 2015 we have 3033 sources cataloged. With the increasing amount of sources it’s important to think about the limitations of likelihood analysis for highly correlated sources. In this paper I will present the problems of using likelihood analysis for sources that are highly correlated as well as show under what circumstances sources can be considered highly correlated. Dark matter over densities may show up as a point source, so it is a necessary step to learn how the two signals will interact to allow for a proper search for dark matter.