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Sample records for mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase

  1. Structural Basis for Nucleotide Binding and Reaction Catalysis in Mevalonate Diphosphate Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, Michael L.; McWhorter, William J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2012-09-17

    Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) catalyzes the final step of the mevalonate pathway, the Mg{sup 2+}-ATP dependent decarboxylation of mevalonate 5-diphosphate (MVAPP), producing isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). Synthesis of IPP, an isoprenoid precursor molecule that is a critical intermediate in peptidoglycan and polyisoprenoid biosynthesis, is essential in Gram-positive bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus spp.), and thus the enzymes of the mevalonate pathway are ideal antimicrobial targets. MDD belongs to the GHMP superfamily of metabolite kinases that have been extensively studied for the past 50 years, yet the crystallization of GHMP kinase ternary complexes has proven to be difficult. To further our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of GHMP kinases with the purpose of developing broad spectrum antimicrobial agents that target the substrate and nucleotide binding sites, we report the crystal structures of wild-type and mutant (S192A and D283A) ternary complexes of Staphylococcus epidermidis MDD. Comparison of apo, MVAPP-bound, and ternary complex wild-type MDD provides structural information about the mode of substrate binding and the catalytic mechanism. Structural characterization of ternary complexes of catalytically deficient MDD S192A and D283A (k{sub cat} decreased 10{sup 3}- and 10{sup 5}-fold, respectively) provides insight into MDD function. The carboxylate side chain of invariant Asp{sup 283} functions as a catalytic base and is essential for the proper orientation of the MVAPP C3-hydroxyl group within the active site funnel. Several MDD amino acids within the conserved phosphate binding loop ('P-loop') provide key interactions, stabilizing the nucleotide triphosphoryl moiety. The crystal structures presented here provide a useful foundation for structure-based drug design.

  2. Functional and conformational transitions of mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase from Bacopa monniera.

    PubMed

    Abbassi, Shakeel; Patel, Krunal; Khan, Bashir; Bhosale, Siddharth; Gaikwad, Sushama

    2016-02-01

    Functional and conformational transitions of mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD), a key enzyme of mevalonate pathway in isoprenoid biosynthesis, from Bacopa monniera (BmMDD), cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli were studied under thermal, chemical and pH-mediated denaturation conditions using fluorescence and Circular dichroism spectroscopy. Native BmMDD is a helix dominant structure with 45% helix and 11% sheets and possesses seven tryptophan residues with two residues exposed on surface, three residues partially exposed and two situated in the interior of the protein. Thermal denaturation of BmMDD causes rapid structural transitions at and above 40°C and transient exposure of hydrophobic residues at 50°C, leading to aggregation of the protein. An acid induced molten globule like structure was observed at pH 4, exhibiting altered but compact secondary structure, distorted tertiary structure and exposed hydrophobic residues. The molten globule displayed different response at higher temperature and similar response to chemical denaturation as compared to the native protein. The surface tryptophans have predominantly positively charged amino acids around them, as indicated by higher KSV for KI as compared to that for CsCl. The native enzyme displayed two different lifetimes, τ1 (1.203±0.036 ns) and τ2 (3.473±0.12 ns) indicating two populations of tryptophan. PMID:26657583

  3. The Putative Mevalonate Diphosphate Decarboxylase from Picrophilus torridus Is in Reality a Mevalonate-3-Kinase with High Potential for Bioproduction of Isobutene

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Stephen J.; Eastham, Graham; Licence, Peter; Stephens, Gill

    2015-01-01

    Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MVD) is an ATP-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation/decarboxylation of (R)-mevalonate-5-diphosphate to isopentenyl pyrophosphate in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway. MVD is a key enzyme in engineered metabolic pathways for bioproduction of isobutene, since it catalyzes the conversion of 3-hydroxyisovalerate (3-HIV) to isobutene, an important platform chemical. The putative homologue from Picrophilus torridus has been identified as a highly efficient variant in a number of patents, but its detailed characterization has not been reported. In this study, we have successfully purified and characterized the putative MVD from P. torridus. We discovered that it is not a decarboxylase per se but an ATP-dependent enzyme, mevalonate-3-kinase (M3K), which catalyzes the phosphorylation of MVA to mevalonate-3-phosphate. The enzyme's potential in isobutene formation is due to the conversion of 3-HIV to an unstable 3-phosphate intermediate that undergoes consequent spontaneous decarboxylation to form isobutene. Isobutene production rates were as high as 507 pmol min−1 g cells−1 using Escherichia coli cells expressing the enzyme and 2,880 pmol min−1 mg protein−1 with the purified histidine-tagged enzyme, significantly higher than reported previously. M3K is a key enzyme of the novel MVA pathway discovered very recently in Thermoplasma acidophilum. We suggest that P. torridus metabolizes MVA by the same pathway. PMID:25636853

  4. Crystal Structures of Staphylococcus epidermidis Mevalonate Diphosphate Decarboxylase Bound to Inhibitory Analogs Reveal New Insight into Substrate Binding and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, Michael L.; Skaff, D. Andrew; McWhorter, William J.; Herdendorf, Timothy J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2011-10-28

    The polyisoprenoid compound undecaprenyl phosphate is required for biosynthesis of cell wall peptidoglycans in Gram-positive bacteria, including pathogenic Enterococcus, Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus spp. In these organisms, the mevalonate pathway is used to produce the precursor isoprenoid, isopentenyl 5-diphosphate. Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) catalyzes formation of isopentenyl 5-diphosphate in an ATP-dependent irreversible reaction and is therefore an attractive target for inhibitor development that could lead to new antimicrobial agents. To facilitate exploration of this possibility, we report the crystal structure of Staphylococcus epidermidis MDD (1.85 {angstrom} resolution) and, to the best of our knowledge, the first structures of liganded MDD. These structures include MDD bound to the mevalonate 5-diphosphate analogs diphosphoglycolyl proline (2.05 {angstrom} resolution) and 6-fluoromevalonate diphosphate (FMVAPP; 2.2 {angstrom} resolution). Comparison of these structures provides a physical basis for the significant differences in K{sub i} values observed for these inhibitors. Inspection of enzyme/inhibitor structures identified the side chain of invariant Ser{sup 192} as making potential contributions to catalysis. Significantly, Ser {yields} Ala substitution of this side chain decreases k{sub cat} by {approx}10{sup 3}-fold, even though binding interactions between FMVAPP and this mutant are similar to those observed with wild type MDD, as judged by the 2.1 {angstrom} cocrystal structure of S192A with FMVAPP. Comparison of microbial MDD structures with those of mammalian counterparts reveals potential targets at the active site periphery that may be exploited to selectively target the microbial enzymes. These studies provide a structural basis for previous observations regarding the MDD mechanism and inform future work toward rational inhibitor design.

  5. Structural analysis of mevalonate-3-kinase provides insight into the mechanisms of isoprenoid pathway decarboxylases

    PubMed Central

    Vinokur, Jeffrey M; Korman, Tyler P; Sawaya, Michael R; Collazo, Michael; Cascio, Duillio; Bowie, James U

    2015-01-01

    In animals, cholesterol is made from 5-carbon building blocks produced by the mevalonate pathway. Drugs that inhibit the mevalonate pathway such as atorvastatin (lipitor) have led to successful treatments for high cholesterol in humans. Another potential target for the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis is mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD), which catalyzes the phosphorylation of (R)-mevalonate diphosphate, followed by decarboxylation to yield isopentenyl pyrophosphate. We recently discovered an MDD homolog, mevalonate-3-kinase (M3K) from Thermoplasma acidophilum, which catalyzes the identical phosphorylation of (R)-mevalonate, but without concomitant decarboxylation. Thus, M3K catalyzes half the reaction of the decarboxylase, allowing us to separate features of the active site that are required for decarboxylation from features required for phosphorylation. Here we determine the crystal structure of M3K in the apo form, and with bound substrates, and compare it to MDD structures. Structural and mutagenic analysis reveals modifications that allow M3K to bind mevalonate rather than mevalonate diphosphate. Comparison to homologous MDD structures show that both enzymes employ analogous Arg or Lys residues to catalyze phosphate transfer. However, an invariant active site Asp/Lys pair of MDD previously thought to play a role in phosphorylation is missing in M3K with no functional replacement. Thus, we suggest that the invariant Asp/Lys pair in MDD may be critical for decarboxylation rather than phosphorylation. PMID:25422158

  6. Isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP)-bypass mevalonate pathways for isopentenol production.

    PubMed

    Kang, Aram; George, Kevin W; Wang, George; Baidoo, Edward; Keasling, Jay D; Lee, Taek Soon

    2016-03-01

    Branched C5 alcohols are promising biofuels with favorable combustion properties. A mevalonate (MVA)-based isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway for C5 alcohols was constructed in Escherichia coli using genes from several organisms, and the pathway was optimized to achieve over 50% theoretical yield. Although the MVA pathway is energetically less efficient than the native methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway, implementing the MVA pathway in bacterial hosts such as E. coli is advantageous due to its lack of endogenous regulation. The MVA and MEP pathways intersect at isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP), the direct precursor to isoprenoid-derived C5 alcohols and initial precursor to longer chain terpenes, which makes independent regulation of the pathways difficult. In pursuit of the complete "decoupling" of the MVA pathway from native cellular regulation, we designed novel IPP-bypass MVA pathways for C5 alcohol production by utilizing promiscuous activities of two enzymes, phosphomevalonate decarboxylase (PMD) and an E. coli-endogenous phosphatase (AphA). These bypass pathways have reduced energetic requirements, are further decoupled from intrinsic regulation, and are free from IPP-related toxicity. In addition to these benefits, we demonstrate that reduced aeration rate has less impact on the bypass pathway than the original MVA pathway. Finally, we showed that performance of the bypass pathway was primarily determined by the activity of PMD. We designed PMD mutants with improved activity and demonstrated titer increases in the mutant strains. These modified pathways would be a good platform for industrial production of isopentenol and related chemicals such as isoprene. PMID:26708516

  7. Disruption of the mevalonate pathway induces dNTP depletion and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Martín Sánchez, Covadonga; Pérez Martín, José Manuel; Jin, Jong-Sik; Dávalos, Alberto; Zhang, Wei; de la Peña, Gema; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Rodríguez-Acebes, Sara; Suárez, Yajaira; Hazen, María José; Gómez-Coronado, Diego; Busto, Rebeca; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Lasunción, Miguel A

    2015-09-01

    The mevalonate pathway is tightly linked to cell division. Mevalonate derived non-sterol isoprenoids and cholesterol are essential for cell cycle progression and mitosis completion respectively. In the present work, we studied the effects of fluoromevalonate, a competitive inhibitor of mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase, on cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in both HL-60 and MOLT-4 cells. This enzyme catalyzes the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate, the first isoprenoid in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, consuming ATP at the same time. Inhibition of mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase was followed by a rapid accumulation of mevalonate diphosphate and the reduction of ATP concentrations, while the cell content of cholesterol was barely affected. Strikingly, mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase inhibition also resulted in the depletion of dNTP pools, which has never been reported before. These effects were accompanied by inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest at S phase, together with the appearance of γ-H2AX foci and Chk1 activation. Inhibition of Chk1 in cells treated with fluoromevalonate resulted in premature entry into mitosis and massive cell death, indicating that the inhibition of mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase triggered a DNA damage response. Notably, the supply of exogenously deoxyribonucleosides abolished γ-H2AX formation and prevented the effects of mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase inhibition on DNA replication and cell growth. The results indicate that dNTP pool depletion caused by mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase inhibition hampered DNA replication with subsequent DNA damage, which may have important consequences for replication stress and genomic instability. PMID:26055626

  8. Change in the protein level of mevalonate pyrophosphate decarboxylase in tissues of mouse by pravastatin.

    PubMed

    Michihara, Akihiro; Akasaki, Kenji; Yamori, Yukio; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    2003-08-01

    We previously reported that treatment of rats with a diet containing 0.1% pravastatin and 5% cholestyramine markedly increased mevalonate pyrophosphate decarboxylase (MPD) activity in liver crude extracts compared with nontreated rats. In this study, we examined the change in the protein level of MPD in the tissues of mice administered pravastatin. When MPD content in the tissues of nontreated mice was analyzed by quantitative immunoblotting, a single protein band with an apparent molecular weight of 46 kDa was detected in all tissues and the specific protein content of MPD in liver and kidney was markedly higher than that in other tissues. When MPD content in the tissues of pravastatin-treated mice was analyzed by immunoblotting, MPD was markedly increased (9-fold) only in the liver compared with nontreated mice. Next, when MPD activity was measured in the liver between nontreated and pravastatin-treated mice, MPD activity as well as protein levels were markedly increased (11-fold) in the liver of pravastatin-treated mice compared with nontreated mice. These data suggest that a marked induction of MPD in the liver by pravastatin is responsible for the tissue-specific effect of pravastatin. PMID:12913254

  9. Synthesis of Mevalonate- and Fluorinated Mevalonate Prodrugs and Their in vitro Human Plasma Stability

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Soosung; Watanabe, Mizuki; Jacobs, JC; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Dahesh, Samira; Nizet, Victor; Leyh, Thomas S.; Silverman, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    The mevalonate pathway is essential for the production of many important molecules in lipid biosynthesis. Inhibition of this pathway is the mechanism of statin cholesterol-lowering drugs, as well as the target of drugs to treat osteoporosis, to combat parasites, and to inhibit tumor cell growth. Unlike the human mevalonate pathway, the bacterial pathway appears to be regulated by diphosphomevalonate (DPM). Enzymes in the mevalonate pathway act to produce isopentenyl diphosphate, the product of the DPM decarboxylase reaction, utilize phosphorylated (charged) intermediates, which are poorly bioavailable. It has been shown that fluorinated DPMs (6-fluoro- and 6,6,6-trifluoro-5-diphosphomevalonate) are excellent inhibitors of the bacterial pathway; however, highly charged DPM and analogues are not bioavailable. To increase cellular permeability of mevalonate analogues, we have synthesized various prodrugs of mevalonate and 6-fluoro- and 6,6,6-trifluoromevalonate that can be enzymatically transformed to the corresponding DPM or fluorinated DPM analogues by esterases or amidases. To probe the required stabilities as potentially bioavailable prodrugs, we measured the half-lives of esters, amides, carbonates, acetals, and ketal promoieties of mevalonate and the fluorinated mevalonate analogues in human blood plasma. Stability studies showed that the prodrugs are converted to the mevalonates in human plasma with a wide range of half-lives. These studies provide stability data for a variety of prodrug options having varying stabilities and should be very useful in the design of appropriate prodrugs of mevalonate and fluorinated mevalonates. PMID:25461893

  10. Structure of (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl diphosphate reductase, the terminal enzyme of the non-mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Rekittke, Ingo; Wiesner, Jochen; Röhrich, Rene; Demmer, Ulrike; Warkentin, Eberhard; Xu, Weiya; Troschke, Kathrin; Hintz, Martin; No, Joo Hwan; Duin, Evert C; Oldfield, Eric; Jomaa, Hassan; Ermler, Ulrich

    2008-12-24

    Molecular evolution has evolved two metabolic routes for isoprenoid biosynthesis: the mevalonate and the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. The MEP pathway is used by most pathogenic bacteria and some parasitic protozoa (including the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum) as well as by plants, but is not present in animals. The terminal reaction of the MEP pathway is catalyzed by (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl diphosphate (HMBPP) reductase (LytB), an enzyme that converts HMBPP into isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). Here, we present the structure of Aquifex aeolicus LytB, at 1.65 A resolution. The protein adopts a cloverleaf or trefoil-like structure with each monomer in the dimer containing three alpha/beta domains surrounding a central [Fe3S4] cluster ligated to Cys13, Cys96, and Cys193. Two highly conserved His (His 42 and His 124) and a totally conserved Glu (Glu126) are located in the same central site and are proposed to be involved in ligand binding and catalysis. Substrate access is proposed to occur from the front-side face of the protein, with the HMBPP diphosphate binding to the two His and the 4OH of HMBPP binding to the fourth iron thought to be present in activated clusters, while Glu126 provides the protons required for IPP/DMAPP formation. PMID:19035630

  11. Pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymomonas mobilis. Structure and re-activation of apoenzyme by the cofactors thiamin diphosphate and magnesium ion.

    PubMed Central

    Diefenbach, R J; Duggleby, R G

    1991-01-01

    To study the mechanism of re-activation of Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase apoenzyme by its cofactors thiamin diphosphate and Mg2+, cofactor-free enzyme was prepared by dialysis against 1 mM-dipicolinic acid at pH 8.2. This apoenzyme was then used in a series of experiments that included determination of: (a) the affinity towards one cofactor when the other was present at saturating concentrations; (b) cofactor-binding rates by measuring the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence on the apoenzyme; (c) the effect of replacement of cofactors with various analogues; (d) the stoichiometry of bound cofactors in holoenzyme; and (e) the molecular mass of apoenzyme by gel filtration. The results of these experiments form the basis for a proposed model for the re-activation of Z. mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase apoenzyme by its cofactors. In this model there exists two alterative but equivalent pathways for cofactor binding. In each pathway the first step is an independent reversible binding of either thiamin diphosphate (Kd 187 microM) or Mg2+ (Kd 1.31 mM) to free apoenzyme. When both cofactors are present, the second cofactor-binding step to form active holoenzyme is a slow quasi-irreversible step. This second binding step is a co-operative process for both thiamin diphosphate (Kd 0.353 microM) and Mg2+ (Kd 2.47 microM). Both the apo- and the holo-enzyme have a tetrameric subunit structure, with cofactors binding in a 1:1 ratio with each subunit. PMID:2049073

  12. Involvement of microRNA214 and transcriptional regulation in reductions in mevalonate pyrophosphate decarboxylase mRNA levels in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat livers.

    PubMed

    Michihara, Akihiro; Ide, Norie; Mizutani, Yurika; Okamoto, Manami; Uchida, Maya; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Akasaki, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Hypocholesterolemia has been epidemiologically identified as one of the causes of stroke (cerebral hemorrhage). We previously reported that lower protein levels of mevalonate pyrophosphate decarboxylase (MPD), which is responsible for reducing serum cholesterol levels in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP), in the liver were caused by a reduction in mRNA levels. However, the mechanism responsible for reducing MPD expression levels in the SHRSP liver remains unclear. Thus, we compared microRNA (miR)-214 combined with the 3'-untranslated region of MPD mRNA and heterogeneous nuclear RNA (hnRNA) between SHRSP and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY). miR-214 levels in the liver were markedly higher in SHRSP than in WKY, whereas hnRNA levels were significantly lower. These results indicate that the upregulation of miR-214 and downregulation of MPD transcription in the liver both play a role in the development of hypocholesterolemia in SHRSP. PMID:26158200

  13. Mevalonate Analogues as Substrates of Enzymes in the Isoprenoid Biosynthetic Pathway of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Kudoh, Takashi; Park, Chan Sun; Lefurgy, Scott T.; Sun, Meihao; Michels, Theodore; Leyh, Thomas S.; Silverman, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    Survival of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae requires a functional mevalonate pathway, which produces isopentenyl diphosphate, the essential building block of isoprenoids. Flux through this pathway appears to be regulated at the mevalonate kinase (MK) step, which is strongly feedback-inhibited by diphosphomevalonate (DPM), the penultimate compound in the pathway. The human mevalonate pathway is not regulated by DPM, making the bacterial pathway an attractive antibiotic target. Since DPM has poor drug characteristics, being highly charged, we propose to use unphosphorylated, cell-permeable prodrugs based on mevalonate that will be phosphorylated in turn by MK and phosphomevalonate kinase (PMK) to generate the active compound in situ. To test the limits of this approach, we synthesized a series of C3-substituted mevalonate analogues to probe the steric and electronic requirements of the MK and PMK active sites. MK and PMK accepted substrates with up to two additional carbons, showing a preference for small substitutents. This result establishes the feasibility of using a prodrug strategy for DPM-based antibiotics in S. pneumoniae and identified several analogues to be tested as inhibitors of MK. Among the substrates accepted by both enzymes were cyclopropyl, vinyl, and ethynyl mevalonate analogues that, when diphosphorylated, might be mechanism-based inactivators of the next enzyme in the pathway, diphosphomevalonate decarboxylase. PMID:20056424

  14. Discovery of a metabolic alternative to the classical mevalonate pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dellas, Nikki; Thomas, Suzanne T; Manning, Gerard; Noel, Joseph P

    2013-01-01

    Eukarya, Archaea, and some Bacteria encode all or part of the essential mevalonate (MVA) metabolic pathway clinically modulated using statins. Curiously, two components of the MVA pathway are often absent from archaeal genomes. The search for these missing elements led to the discovery of isopentenyl phosphate kinase (IPK), one of two activities necessary to furnish the universal five-carbon isoprenoid building block, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). Unexpectedly, we now report functional IPKs also exist in Bacteria and Eukarya. Furthermore, amongst a subset of species within the bacterial phylum Chloroflexi, we identified a new enzyme catalyzing the missing decarboxylative step of the putative alternative MVA pathway. These results demonstrate, for the first time, a functioning alternative MVA pathway. Key to this pathway is the catalytic actions of a newly uncovered enzyme, mevalonate phosphate decarboxylase (MPD) and IPK. Together, these two discoveries suggest that unforeseen variation in isoprenoid metabolism may be widespread in nature. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00672.001 PMID:24327557

  15. Detection and Time Course of Formation of Major Thiamin Diphosphate-Bound Covalent Intermediates Derived from a Chromophoric Substrate Analogue on Benzoylformate Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Sumit; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Balakrishnan, Anand; Brandt, Gabriel S.; Kneen, Malea M.; Yep, Alejandra; McLeish, Michael J.; Kenyon, George L.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ringe, Dagmar; Jordan, Frank

    2009-04-02

    The mechanism of the enzyme benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFDC), which carries out a typical thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent nonoxidative decarboxylation reaction, was studied with the chromophoric alternate substrate (E)-2-oxo-4(pyridin-3-yl)-3-butenoic acid (3-PKB). Addition of 3-PKB resulted in the appearance of two transient intermediates formed consecutively, the first one to be formed a predecarboxylation ThDP-bound intermediate with {lambda}{sub max} at 477 nm, and the second one corresponding to the first postdecarboxylation intermediate the enamine with {lambda}{sub max} at 437 nm. The time course of formation/depletion of the PKB-ThDP covalent complex and of the enamine showed that decarboxylation was slower than formation of the PKB-ThDP covalent adduct. When the product of decarboxylation 3-(pyridin-3-yl)acrylaldehyde (PAA) was added to BFDC, again an absorbance with {lambda}{sub max} at 473 nm was formed, corresponding to the tetrahedral adduct of PAA with ThDP. Addition of well-formed crystals of BFDC to a solution of PAA resulted in a high resolution (1.34 {angstrom}) structure of the BFDC-bound adduct of ThDP with PAA confirming the tetrahedral nature at the C2{alpha} atom, rather than of the enamine, and supporting the assignment of the {lambda}{sub max} at 473 nm to the PAA-ThDP adduct. The structure of the PAA-ThDP covalent complex is the first example of a product-ThDP adduct on BFDC. Similar studies with 3-PKB indicated that decarboxylation had taken place. Evidence was also obtained for the slow formation of the enamine intermediate when BFDC was incubated with benzaldehyde, the product of the decarboxylation reaction thus confirming its presence on the reaction pathway.

  16. Mevalonate-Farnesal Biosynthesis in Ticks: Comparative Synganglion Transcriptomics and a New Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiwei; Khalil, Sayed M.; Mitchell, Robert D.; Bissinger, Brooke W.; Egekwu, Noble; Sonenshine, Daniel E.; Roe, R. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) controls the growth, development, metamorphosis, and reproduction of insects. For many years, the general assumption has been that JH regulates tick and other acarine development and reproduction the same as in insects. Although researchers have not been able to find the common insect JHs in hard and soft tick species and JH applications appear to have no effect on tick development, it is difficult to prove the negative or to determine whether precursors to JH are made in ticks. The tick synganglion contains regions which are homologous to the corpora allata, the biosynthetic source for JH in insects. Next-gen sequencing of the tick synganglion transcriptome was conducted separately in adults of the American dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis, the deer tick, Ixodes scapularis, and the relapsing fever tick, Ornithodoros turicata as a new approach to determine whether ticks can make JH or a JH precursor. All of the enzymes that make up the mevalonate pathway from acetyl-CoA to farnesyl diphosphate (acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase, HMG-S, HMG-R, mevalonate kinase, phosphomevalonate kinase, diphosphomevalonate decarboxylase, and farnesyl diphosphate synthase) were found in at least one of the ticks studied but most were found in all three species. Sequence analysis of the last enzyme in the mevalonate pathway, farnesyl diphosphate synthase, demonstrated conservation of the seven prenyltransferase regions and the aspartate rich motifs within those regions typical of this enzyme. In the JH branch from farnesyl diphosphate to JH III, we found a putative farnesol oxidase used for the conversion of farnesol to farnesal in the synganglion transcriptome of I. scapularis and D. variabilis. Methyltransferases (MTs) that add a methyl group to farnesoic acid to make methyl farnesoate were present in all of the ticks studied with similarities as high as 36% at the amino acid level to insect JH acid methyltransferase (JHAMT). However, when the tick MTs were compared to

  17. Mevalonate-Farnesal Biosynthesis in Ticks: Comparative Synganglion Transcriptomics and a New Perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiwei; Khalil, Sayed M; Mitchell, Robert D; Bissinger, Brooke W; Egekwu, Noble; Sonenshine, Daniel E; Roe, R Michael

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) controls the growth, development, metamorphosis, and reproduction of insects. For many years, the general assumption has been that JH regulates tick and other acarine development and reproduction the same as in insects. Although researchers have not been able to find the common insect JHs in hard and soft tick species and JH applications appear to have no effect on tick development, it is difficult to prove the negative or to determine whether precursors to JH are made in ticks. The tick synganglion contains regions which are homologous to the corpora allata, the biosynthetic source for JH in insects. Next-gen sequencing of the tick synganglion transcriptome was conducted separately in adults of the American dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis, the deer tick, Ixodes scapularis, and the relapsing fever tick, Ornithodoros turicata as a new approach to determine whether ticks can make JH or a JH precursor. All of the enzymes that make up the mevalonate pathway from acetyl-CoA to farnesyl diphosphate (acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase, HMG-S, HMG-R, mevalonate kinase, phosphomevalonate kinase, diphosphomevalonate decarboxylase, and farnesyl diphosphate synthase) were found in at least one of the ticks studied but most were found in all three species. Sequence analysis of the last enzyme in the mevalonate pathway, farnesyl diphosphate synthase, demonstrated conservation of the seven prenyltransferase regions and the aspartate rich motifs within those regions typical of this enzyme. In the JH branch from farnesyl diphosphate to JH III, we found a putative farnesol oxidase used for the conversion of farnesol to farnesal in the synganglion transcriptome of I. scapularis and D. variabilis. Methyltransferases (MTs) that add a methyl group to farnesoic acid to make methyl farnesoate were present in all of the ticks studied with similarities as high as 36% at the amino acid level to insect JH acid methyltransferase (JHAMT). However, when the tick MTs were compared to

  18. Synthesis of ATP derivatives of compounds of the mevalonate pathway (isopentenyl di- and triphosphate; geranyl di- and triphosphate, farnesyl di- and triphosphate, and dimethylallyl diphosphate) catalyzed by T4 RNA ligase, T4 DNA ligase and other ligases Potential relationship with the effect of bisphosphonates on osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Sillero, Maria A Günther; de Diego, Anabel; Tavares, Janeth E F; Silva, Joana A D Catanho da; Pérez-Zúñiga, Francisco J; Sillero, Antonio

    2009-08-15

    Compounds of the mevalonate pathway containing a terminal di- or triphosphate (mev-PP or mev-PPP) were tested as substrates of several enzyme ligases (T4 RNA ligase, T4 DNA ligase, firefly luciferase and other ligases) for the synthesis of ATP derivatives of the mev-pppA or mev-ppppA type. T4 RNA ligase, in the presence of ATP and the substrates: geranyl, farnesyl or isopentenyl triphosphates, and geranyl, farnesyl, dimethylallyl or isopentenyl diphosphates, all at 0.3 mM concentration, catalyzed the synthesis of the corresponding ATP derivatives at a relative rate of activity of: 7.6+/-1.4 mU/mg or 100%; 39%; 42%; 24%; 18%; 12% and 6%, respectively. Inhibition (%) of the synthesis by excess of substrate (0.8 mM vs. 0.3 mM) was observed with farnesyl diphosphate (99%); farnesyl triphosphate (96%) and geranyl triphosphate (32%). V(max), K(m), K(cat) and K(cat)/K(m) values were also determined. The K(cat)/K(m) values calculated were for: farnesyl triphosphate, 166; geranyl triphosphate, 52.2; farnesyl diphosphate, 12.1; geranyl diphosphate, 8.6; isopentenyl triphosphate, 6.7; dimethylallyl diphosphate, 3.1 and isopentenyl diphosphate, 0.9. Similar results were obtained with T4 DNA ligase. The above-mentioned compounds were also substrates of firefly luciferase synthesizing the mev-pppA or mev-ppppA derivatives. In our hands, neither the acyl- or acetyl-CoA synthetases nor the ubiquiting activating enzyme (E1) catalyzed the synthesis of ATP derivatives of these compounds. The results here presented could be related with the mechanism of action of bisphosphonates on osteoclasts or tumor cells. PMID:19414000

  19. Identification of ten mevalonate enzyme-encoding genes and their expression in response to juvenile hormone levels in Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say).

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Meng, Qing-Wei; Lü, Feng-Gong; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2016-06-15

    The mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of many essential molecules important in insect development, reproduction, chemical communication and defense. Based on Leptinotarsa decemlineata transcriptome and genome data, we identified ten genes that encoded acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (LdAACT1 and LdAACT2), hydroxymethylglutaryl (HMA)-CoA synthase (LdHMGS), HMG-CoA reductase (LdHMGR1 and LdHMGR2), mevalonate kinase (LdMevK), phospho-mevalonate kinase (LdPMK), mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (LdMDD), isopentenyl-diphosphate isomerase (LdIDI) and farnesyl pyrophosphate synthetase (LdFPPS). Nine of these genes (except for LdAACT1) were mainly expressed in the larval brain-corpora cardiaca-corpora allata complex, and adult ovary and testis. The 9 genes were transcribed at high levels right after each ecdysis, and at low levels in the mid instar. Therefore, the 9 genes were indicated to be involved in JH biosynthesis. Moreover, knockdown of a JH biosynthesis gene LdJHAMT to lower JH titer significantly downregulated the transcription of the 9 genes. Ingestion of JH to activate JH signaling also significantly suppressed the expression of the 9 genes. It appears that the accumulation of JH precursors in LdJHAMT RNAi larvae and a high JH titer in JH-fed specimens may cause negative feedbacks to repress the expression of the 9 mevalonate enzyme-encoding genes (excluding LdAACT1) to balance the enzyme quantity in L. decemlineata. PMID:26899871

  20. Bifunctionality of the thiamin diphosphate cofactor: assignment of tautomeric/ionization states of the 4′-aminopyrimidine ring when various intermediates occupy the active sites during the catalysis of yeast pyruvate decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Anand; Gao, Yuhong; Moorjani, Prerna; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Tittmann, Kai; Jordan, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Thiamin diphosphate (ThDP) dependent enzymes perform crucial C-C bond forming and breaking reactions in sugar and amino acid metabolism and in biosynthetic pathways via a sequence of ThDP-bound covalent intermediates. A member of this superfamily, yeast pyruvate decarboxylase (YPDC) carries out the non-oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate and is mechanistically a simpler ThDP enzyme. YPDC variants created by substitution at the active center (D28A, E51X, E477Q) and on the substrate activation pathway (E91D and C221E) display varying activity, suggesting that they stabilize different covalent intermediates. To test the role of both rings of ThDP in YPDC catalysis (the 4′-aminopyrimidine as acid-base, and thiazolium as electrophilic covalent catalyst), we applied a combination of steady state and time-resolved circular dichroism experiments (assessing the state of ionization and tautomerization of enzyme-bound ThDP-related intermediates), and chemical quench of enzymatic reaction mixtures followed by NMR characterization of the ThDP-bound intermediates released from YPDC (assessing occupancy of active centers by these intermediates and rate-limiting steps). Results suggest that: (1) Pyruvate and analogs induce active site asymmetry in YPDC and variants. (2) The rare 1′,4′-iminopyrimidine ThDP tautomer participates in formation of ThDP-bound intermediates. (3) Propionylphosphinate also binds at the regulatory site and its binding is reflected by catalytic events at the active site 20Å away. (4) YPDC stabilizes an electrostatic model for the 4′-aminopyrimidinium ionization state, an important contribution of the protein to catalysis. The combination of tools used provides time-resolved details about individual events during ThDP catalysis; the methods are transferable to other ThDP superfamily members. PMID:22300533

  1. Mevalonate Biosynthesis Intermediates Are Key Regulators of Innate Immunity in Bovine Endometritis

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Christine; Griffin, Sholeem; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim; Sandra, Olivier; Smith, David G.; Mahan, Suman; Dieuzy-Labaye, Isabelle; Sheldon, I. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic changes can influence inflammatory responses to bacteria. To examine whether localized manipulation of the mevalonate pathway impacts innate immunity, we exploited a unique mucosal disease model, endometritis, where inflammation is a consequence of innate immunity. IL responses to pathogenic bacteria and LPS were modulated in bovine endometrial cell and organ cultures by small molecules that target the mevalonate pathway. Treatment with multiple statins, bisphosphonates, squalene synthase inhibitors, and small interfering RNA showed that inhibition of farnesyl-diphosphate farnesyl transferase (squalene synthase), but not 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase or farnesyl diphosphate synthase, reduced endometrial organ and cellular inflammatory responses to pathogenic bacteria and LPS. Although manipulation of the mevalonate pathway reduced cellular cholesterol, impacts on inflammation were independent of cholesterol concentration as cholesterol depletion using cyclodextrins did not alter inflammatory responses. Treatment with the isoprenoid mevalonate pathway-intermediates, farnesyl diphosphate and geranylgeranyl diphosphate, also reduced endometrial cellular inflammatory responses to LPS. These data imply that manipulating the mevalonate pathway regulates innate immunity within the endometrium, and that isoprenoids are regulatory molecules in this process, knowledge that could be exploited for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26673142

  2. Mevalonate Biosynthesis Intermediates Are Key Regulators of Innate Immunity in Bovine Endometritis.

    PubMed

    Healey, Gareth D; Collier, Christine; Griffin, Sholeem; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim; Sandra, Olivier; Smith, David G; Mahan, Suman; Dieuzy-Labaye, Isabelle; Sheldon, I Martin

    2016-01-15

    Metabolic changes can influence inflammatory responses to bacteria. To examine whether localized manipulation of the mevalonate pathway impacts innate immunity, we exploited a unique mucosal disease model, endometritis, where inflammation is a consequence of innate immunity. IL responses to pathogenic bacteria and LPS were modulated in bovine endometrial cell and organ cultures by small molecules that target the mevalonate pathway. Treatment with multiple statins, bisphosphonates, squalene synthase inhibitors, and small interfering RNA showed that inhibition of farnesyl-diphosphate farnesyl transferase (squalene synthase), but not 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase or farnesyl diphosphate synthase, reduced endometrial organ and cellular inflammatory responses to pathogenic bacteria and LPS. Although manipulation of the mevalonate pathway reduced cellular cholesterol, impacts on inflammation were independent of cholesterol concentration as cholesterol depletion using cyclodextrins did not alter inflammatory responses. Treatment with the isoprenoid mevalonate pathway-intermediates, farnesyl diphosphate and geranylgeranyl diphosphate, also reduced endometrial cellular inflammatory responses to LPS. These data imply that manipulating the mevalonate pathway regulates innate immunity within the endometrium, and that isoprenoids are regulatory molecules in this process, knowledge that could be exploited for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26673142

  3. Studies of the isoprenoid-mediated inhibition of mevalonate synthesis applied to cancer chemotherapy and chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Mo, Huanbiao; Elson, Charles E

    2004-07-01

    Pools of farnesyl diphosphate and other phosphorylated products of the mevalonate pathway are essential to the post-translational processing and physiological function of small G proteins, nuclear lamins, and growth factor receptors. Inhibitors of enzyme activities providing those pools, namely, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase and mevalonic acid-pyrophosphate decarboxylase, and of activities requiring substrates from the pools, the prenyl protein transferases, have potential for development as novel chemotherapeutic agents. Their potentials as suggested by the clinical responses recorded in Phase I and II investigations of inhibitors of HMG CoA reductase (the statins), of mevalonic acid-pyrophosphate decarboxylase (sodium phenylacetate and sodium phenylbutyrate), and of farnesyl protein transferase (R115777, SCH66336, BMS-214662, Tipifarnib, L-778,123, and, prematurely, perillyl alcohol) are dimmed by dose-limiting toxicities. These nondiscriminant growth-suppressive agents induce G1 arrest and initiate apoptosis and differentiation, effects attributed to modulation of cell signaling pathways either by modulating gene expression, suppressing the post-translational processing of signaling proteins and growth factor receptors, or altering diacylglycerol signaling. Diverse isoprenoids and the HMG CoA reductase inhibitor, lovastatin, modulate cell growth, induce cell cycle arrest, initiate apoptosis, and suppress cellular signaling activities. Perillyl alcohol, the isoprenoid of greatest clinical interest, initially was considered to inhibit farnesyl protein transferase; follow-up studies revealed that perillyl alcohol suppresses the synthesis of small G proteins and HMG CoA reductase. In sterologenic tissues, sterol feedback control, mediated by sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) 1a and 2, exerts the primary regulation on HMG CoA reductase activity at the transcriptional level. Secondary regulation, a nonsterol isoprenoid

  4. Mevalonate metabolism in cancer.

    PubMed

    Gruenbacher, Georg; Thurnher, Martin

    2015-01-28

    Cancer cells are characterized by sustained proliferative signaling, insensitivity to growth suppressors and resistance to apoptosis as well as by replicative immortality, the capacity to induce angiogenesis and to perform invasive growth. Additional hallmarks of cancer cells include the reprogramming of energy metabolism as well as the ability to evade immune surveillance. The current review focuses on the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells and on the immune system's capacity to detect such changes in cancer cell metabolism. Specifically, we focus on mevalonate metabolism, which is a target for drug and immune based cancer treatment. PMID:24467965

  5. A critical role of mevalonate for peptidoglycan synthesis in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Yasukawa, Jyunichiro; Ishii, Masaki; Hayashi, Yohei; Miyazaki, Shinya; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase, a mevalonate synthetase, is required for the growth of Staphylococcus aureus. However, the essential role of the enzyme in cell growth has remained unclear. Here we show that three mutants possessed single-base substitutions in the mvaA gene, which encodes HMG-CoA reductase, show a temperature-sensitive phenotype. The phenotype was suppressed by the addition of mevalonate or farnesyl diphosphate, which is a product synthesized from mevalonate. Farnesyl diphosphate is a precursor of undecaprenyl phosphate that is required for peptidoglycan synthesis. The rate of peptidoglycan synthesis was decreased in the mvaA mutants under the non-permissive conditions and the phenotype was suppressed by the addition of mevalonate. HMG-CoA reductase activities of mutant MvaA proteins in the temperature sensitive mutants were lower than that of wild-type MvaA protein. Our findings from genetic and biochemical analyses suggest that mevalonate produced by HMG-CoA reductase is required for peptidoglycan synthesis for S. aureus cell growth. PMID:26961421

  6. Biosynthesis of the labdane diterpene marrubiin in Marrubium vulgare via a non-mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Knöss, W; Reuter, B; Zapp, J

    1997-09-01

    The biosynthesis of the furanic labdane diterpene marrubiin has been studied in plantlets and shoot cultures of Marrubium vulgare (Lamiaceae). The use of [2-14C]acetate, [2-14C]pyruvate, [2-14C]mevalonic acid and [U-14C]glucose incorporation experiments showed that the labelling of sterols in etiolated shoot cultures of M. vulgare was in accordance with their biosynthesis via the acetate-mevalonate pathway. In contrast, the incorporation rates of these precursors into the diterpene marrubiin could not be explained by biosynthesis of this compound via the acetate-mevalonate pathway. Cultivation of etiolated shoot cultures of M. vulgare on medium containing [1-13C]glucose and subsequent 13C-NMR spectroscopy of marrubiin led to the conclusion that the biosynthesis of marrubiin follows a non-mevalonate pathway. All isoprenic units of 13C-labelled marrubiin were enriched in those carbons that correspond to positions 1 and 5 of a putative precursor isopentenyl diphosphate. This labelling pattern from [1-13C]glucose is consistent with an alternative pathway via trioses, which has already been shown to occur in Eubacteria and Gymnospermae. The labdane skeleton is a precursor of many other skeletal types of diterpenes. Therefore it becomes obvious that in connection with the few known examples of a non-mevalonate pathway to isoprenoids the formation of some isoprenoids in plants via a non-mevalonate pathway might be quite common. PMID:9291117

  7. Mevalonate kinase deficiency: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Favier, Leslie A; Schulert, Grant S

    2016-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is a recessively inherited autoinflammatory disorder with a spectrum of manifestations, including the well-defined clinical phenotypes of hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome and mevalonic aciduria. Patients with MKD have recurrent attacks of hyperinflammation associated with fever, abdominal pain, arthralgias, and mucocutaneous lesions, and more severely affected patients also have dysmorphisms and central nervous system anomalies. MKD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding mevalonate kinase, with the degree of residual enzyme activity largely determining disease severity. Mevalonate kinase is essential for the biosynthesis of nonsterol isoprenoids, which mediate protein prenylation. Although the precise pathogenesis of MKD remains unclear, increasing evidence suggests that deficiency in protein prenylation leads to innate immune activation and systemic hyperinflammation. Given the emerging understanding of MKD as an autoinflammatory disorder, recent treatment approaches have largely focused on cytokine-directed biologic therapy. Herein, we review the current genetic and pathologic understanding of MKD, its various clinical phenotypes, and the evolving treatment approach for this multifaceted disorder. PMID:27499643

  8. Negative Feedbacks by Isoprenoids on a Mevalonate Kinase Expressed in the Corpora Allata of Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, Fernando G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Juvenile hormones (JH) regulate development and reproductive maturation in insects. JHs are synthesized through the mevalonate pathway (MVAP), an ancient metabolic pathway present in the three domains of life. Mevalonate kinase (MVK) is a key enzyme in the MVAP. MVK catalyzes the synthesis of phosphomevalonate (PM) by transferring the γ-phosphoryl group from ATP to the C5 hydroxyl oxygen of mevalonic acid (MA). Despite the importance of MVKs, these enzymes have been poorly characterized in insects. Results We functionally characterized an Aedes aegypti MVK (AaMVK) expressed in the corpora allata (CA) of the mosquito. AaMVK displayed its activity in the presence of metal cofactors. Different nucleotides were used by AaMVK as phosphoryl donors. In the presence of Mg2+, the enzyme has higher affinity for MA than ATP. The activity of AaMVK was regulated by feedback inhibition from long-chain isoprenoids, such as geranyl diphosphate (GPP) and farnesyl diphosphate (FPP). Conclusions AaMVK exhibited efficient inhibition by GPP and FPP (Ki less than 1 μM), and none by isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and dimethyl allyl pyrophosphate (DPPM). These results suggest that GPP and FPP might act as physiological inhibitors in the synthesis of isoprenoids in the CA of mosquitoes. Changing MVK activity can alter the flux of precursors and therefore regulate juvenile hormone biosynthesis. PMID:26566274

  9. p53 regulates the mevalonate pathway in human glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Laezza, C; D'Alessandro, A; Di Croce, L; Picardi, P; Ciaglia, E; Pisanti, S; Malfitano, A M; Comegna, M; Faraonio, R; Gazzerro, P; Bifulco, M

    2015-01-01

    The mevalonate (MVA) pathway is an important metabolic pathway implicated in multiple aspects of tumorigenesis. In this study, we provided evidence that p53 induces the expression of a group of enzymes of the MVA pathway including 3′-hydroxy-3′-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, MVA kinase, farnesyl diphosphate synthase and farnesyl diphosphate farnesyl transferase 1, in the human glioblastoma multiforme cell line, U343 cells, and in normal human astrocytes, NHAs. Genetic and pharmacologic perturbation of p53 directly influences the expression of these genes. Furthermore, p53 is recruited to the gene promoters in designated p53-responsive elements, thereby increasing their transcription. Such effect was abolished by site-directed mutagenesis in the p53-responsive element of promoter of the genes. These findings highlight another aspect of p53 functions unrelated to tumor suppression and suggest p53 as a novel regulator of the MVA pathway providing insight into the role of this pathway in cancer progression. PMID:26469958

  10. Dilithium barium diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Dridi, Nezha; Arbib, E; Boukhari, Ali; Holt, Elizabeth M

    2002-06-01

    The crystal structure of the novel title diphosphate, Li(2)BaP(2)O(7), exists with a three-dimensional lattice composed of BaO(9) polyhedra linked to corner- and edge-sharing P(2)O(7) diphosphate groups, forming layers parallel to the (010) plane, the layers being linked by P[bond]O[bond]Ba bridges. Tunnels thus created between the layers are occupied by Li(+) cations, two of which lie on twofold axes. PMID:12050405

  11. The Mevalonate Auxotrophic Mutant of Staphylococcus aureus Can Adapt to Mevalonate Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wenqi; Leibig, Martina; Schäfer, Tina; Bertram, Ralph; Ohlsen, Knut

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to adopt the auxotrophic mevalonate synthase mutant (ΔmvaS mutant) of Staphylococcus aureus to study whether a nongrowing but viable cell population is tolerant to bactericidal antibiotics. The mevalonate-depleted nongrowing ΔmvaS mutant was found tolerant to antibiotics. Surprisingly, after prolonged cultivation, we obtained stable ΔmvaS variants that were able to grow without mevalonate, which suggested unknown mechanisms for compensating undecaprenyl pyrophosphate production without mevalonate in S. aureus. PMID:23959312

  12. Geranyl diphosphate synthase from mint

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wildung, Mark Raymond; Burke, Charles Cullen; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID No:1) is provided which codes for the expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2) from peppermint (Mentha piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of the geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith (e.g., antisense geranyl diphosphate synthase RNA or fragments of complementary geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA which are useful as polymerase chain reaction primers or as probes for geranyl diphosphate synthase or related genes). In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate the production, isolation and purification of significant quantities of recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase for subsequent use, to obtain expression or enhanced expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, to produce geranyl diphosphate in cancerous cells as a precursor to monoterpenoids having anti-cancer properties or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase or the production of geranyl diphosphate.

  13. Geranyl diphosphate synthase from mint

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.B.; Wildung, M.R.; Burke, C.C.; Gershenzon, J.

    1999-03-02

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID No:1) is provided which codes for the expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2) from peppermint (Mentha piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of the geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith (e.g., antisense geranyl diphosphate synthase RNA or fragments of complementary geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA which are useful as polymerase chain reaction primers or as probes for geranyl diphosphate synthase or related genes). In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate the production, isolation and purification of significant quantities of recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase for subsequent use, to obtain expression or enhanced expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, to produce geranyl diphosphate in cancerous cells as a precursor to monoterpenoids having anti-cancer properties or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase or the production of geranyl diphosphate. 5 figs.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: mevalonate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... cytoskeleton), gene activity (expression), and protein production and modification. Most MVK gene mutations that cause mevalonate kinase ... What are the different ways in which a genetic condition can be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic ...

  15. Structure and Mechanism of the Farnesyl Diphosphate Synthase from Trypanosoma cruzi: Implications for Drug Design

    SciTech Connect

    Gabelli,S.; McLellan, J.; Montalvetti, A.; Oldfield, E.; Docampo, R.; Amzel, L.

    2006-01-01

    Typanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, has recently been shown to be sensitive to the action of the bisphosphonates currently used in bone resorption therapy. These compounds target the mevalonate pathway by inhibiting farnesyl diphosphate synthase (farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, FPPS), the enzyme that condenses the diphosphates of C{sub 5} alcohols (isopentenyl and dimethylallyl) to form C{sub 10} and C{sub 15} diphosphates (geranyl and farnesyl). The structures of the T. cruzi FPPS (TcFPPS) alone and in two complexes with substrates and inhibitors reveal that following binding of the two substrates and three Mg2+ ions, the enzyme undergoes a conformational change consisting of a hinge-like closure of the binding site. In this conformation, it would be possible for the enzyme to bind a bisphosphonate inhibitor that spans the sites usually occupied by dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) and the homoallyl moiety of isopentenyl diphosphate. This observation may lead to the design of new, more potent anti-trypanosomal bisphosphonates, because existing FPPS inhibitors occupy only the DMAPP site. In addition, the structures provide an important mechanistic insight: after its formation, geranyl diphosphate can swing without leaving the enzyme, from the product site to the substrate site to participate in the synthesis of farnesyl diphosphate.

  16. A family of transketolases that directs isoprenoid biosynthesis via a mevalonate-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Lange, B M; Wildung, M R; McCaskill, D; Croteau, R

    1998-03-01

    Isopentenyl diphosphate, the common precursor of all isoprenoids, has been widely assumed to be synthesized by the acetate/mevalonate pathway in all organisms. However, based on in vivo feeding experiments, isopentenyl diphosphate formation in several eubacteria, a green alga, and plant chloroplasts has been demonstrated very recently to originate via a mevalonate-independent route from pyruvate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate as precursors. Here we describe the cloning from peppermint (Mentha x piperita) and heterologous expression in Escherichia coli of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first reaction of this pyruvate/glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate pathway. This synthase gene contains an ORF of 2,172 base pairs. When the proposed plastid targeting sequence is excluded, the deduced amino acid sequence indicates the peppermint synthase to be about 650 residues in length, corresponding to a native size of roughly 71 kDa. The enzyme appears to represent a novel class of highly conserved transketolases and likely plays a key role in the biosynthesis of plastid-derived isoprenoids essential for growth, development, and defense in plants. PMID:9482845

  17. The potential of the mevalonate pathway for enhanced isoprenoid production.

    PubMed

    Liao, Pan; Hemmerlin, Andréa; Bach, Thomas J; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-01-01

    The cytosol-localised mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway delivers the basic isoprene unit isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). In higher plants, this central metabolic intermediate is also synthesised by the plastid-localised methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. Both MVA and MEP pathways conspire through exchange of intermediates and regulatory interactions. Products downstream of IPP such as phytosterols, carotenoids, vitamin E, artemisinin, tanshinone and paclitaxel demonstrate antioxidant, cholesterol-reducing, anti-ageing, anticancer, antimalarial, anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities. Other isoprenoid precursors including isoprene, isoprenol, geraniol, farnesene and farnesol are economically valuable. An update on the MVA pathway and its interaction with the MEP pathway is presented, including the improvement in the production of phytosterols and other isoprenoid derivatives. Such attempts are for instance based on the bioengineering of microbes such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as plants. The function of relevant genes in the MVA pathway that can be utilised in metabolic engineering is reviewed and future perspectives are presented. PMID:26995109

  18. Determination of kinetics and crystal structure of a novel Type 2 Isopentenyl Diphosphate: Dimethylallyl Diphosphate Isomerase from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    de Ruyck, Jerome; Janczak, Matthew W.; Neti, Syam Sundar; Rothman, Steven C.; Schubert, Heidi L.; Cornish, Rita M.; Matagne, Andre; Wouters, Johan; Poulter, C. Dale

    2014-01-01

    Isopentenyl diphosphate dimethylallyl diphosphate isomerase (IDI) is a key enzyme in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway and is required for all organisms that synthesize isoprenoid metabolites from mevalonate. Type 1 IDI (IDI-1) is a metalloprotein and is found in eukaryotes, while the type-2 isoform (IDI-2) is a flavoenzyme found in bacteria and completely absent from human. IDI-2 from the pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae was recombinantly expressed in E. coli. Steady state kinetic studies of the enzyme indicated that FMNH2 (KM= 0.3 μM) bound before isopentenyl diphosphate (KM= 40 μM) in an ordered binding mechanism. An X-ray crystal structure at 1.4 Å resolution was obtained for the holo-enzyme, in the closed conformation with reduced flavin cofactor and two sulfate ions in the active site. These results helped to further approach the enzymatic mechanism of IDI-2 and, thus, open new possibilities for the rational design of antibacterial compounds against closely sequence and structure related pathogens such as E. faecalis or S. aureus. PMID:24910111

  19. Identification and characterization of phenylpyruvate decarboxylase genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Vuralhan, Zeynep; Morais, Marcos A; Tai, Siew-Leng; Piper, Matthew D W; Pronk, Jack T

    2003-08-01

    Catabolism of amino acids via the Ehrlich pathway involves transamination to the corresponding alpha-keto acids, followed by decarboxylation to an aldehyde and then reduction to an alcohol. Alternatively, the aldehyde may be oxidized to an acid. This pathway is functional in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, since during growth in glucose-limited chemostat cultures with phenylalanine as the sole nitrogen source, phenylethanol and phenylacetate were produced in quantities that accounted for all of the phenylalanine consumed. Our objective was to identify the structural gene(s) required for the decarboxylation of phenylpyruvate to phenylacetaldehyde, the first specific step in the Ehrlich pathway. S. cerevisiae possesses five candidate genes with sequence similarity to genes encoding thiamine diphosphate-dependent decarboxylases that could encode this activity: YDR380w/ARO10, YDL080C/THI3, PDC1, PDC5, and PDC6. Phenylpyruvate decarboxylase activity was present in cultures grown with phenylalanine as the sole nitrogen source but was absent from ammonia-grown cultures. Furthermore, the transcript level of one candidate gene (ARO10) increased 30-fold when phenylalanine replaced ammonia as the sole nitrogen source. Analyses of phenylalanine catabolite production and phenylpyruvate decarboxylase enzyme assays indicated that ARO10 was sufficient to encode phenylpyruvate decarboxylase activity in the absence of the four other candidate genes. There was also an alternative activity with a higher capacity but lower affinity for phenylpyruvate. The candidate gene THI3 did not itself encode an active phenylpyruvate decarboxylase but was required along with one or more pyruvate decarboxylase genes (PDC1, PDC5, and PDC6) for the alternative activity. The K(m) and V(max) values of the two activities differed, showing that Aro10p is the physiologically relevant phenylpyruvate decarboxylase in wild-type cells. Modifications to this gene could therefore be important for metabolic engineering

  20. Frontalin pheromone biosynthesis in the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, and the role of isoprenyl diphosphate synthases

    PubMed Central

    Keeling, Christopher I.; Chiu, Christine C.; Aw, Tidiane; Li, Maria; Henderson, Hannah; Tittiger, Claus; Weng, Hong-Biao; Blomquist, Gary J.; Bohlmann, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) is the most destructive pest of western North American pine forests. Adult males produce frontalin, an eight-carbon antiaggregation pheromone, via the mevalonate pathway, as part of several pheromones that initiate and modulate the mass attack of host trees. Frontalin acts as a pheromone, attractant, or kairomone in most Dendroctonus species, other insects, and even elephants. 6-Methylhept-6-en-2-one, a frontalin precursor, is hypothesized to originate from 10-carbon geranyl diphosphate (GPP), 15-carbon farnesyl diphosphate (FPP), or 20-carbon geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) via a dioxygenase- or cytochrome P450-mediated carbon–carbon bond cleavage. To investigate the role of isoprenyl diphosphate synthases in pheromone biosynthesis, we characterized a bifunctional GPP/FPP synthase and a GGPP synthase in the mountain pine beetle. The ratio of GPP to FPP produced by the GPP/FPP synthase was highly dependent on the ratio of the substrates isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate used in the assay. Transcript levels in various tissues and life stages suggested that GGPP rather than GPP or FPP is used as a precursor to frontalin. Reduction of transcript levels by RNA interference of the isoprenyl diphosphate synthases identified GGPP synthase as having the largest effect on frontalin production, suggesting that frontalin is derived from a 20-carbon isoprenoid precursor rather than from the 10- or 15-carbon precursors. PMID:24167290

  1. Weekly oral alendronate in mevalonate kinase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is caused by mutations in the MVK gene, encoding the second enzyme of mevalonate pathway, which results in subsequent shortage of downstream compounds, and starts in childhood with febrile attacks, skin, joint, and gastrointestinal symptoms, sometimes induced by vaccinations. Methods For a history of early-onset corticosteroid-induced reduction of bone mineral density in a 14-year-old boy with MKD, who also had presented three bone fractures, we administered weekly oral alendronate, a drug widely used in the management of osteoporosis and other high bone turnover diseases, which blocks mevalonate and halts the prenylation process. Results All of the patient’s MKD clinical and laboratory abnormalities were resolved after starting alendronate treatment. Conclusions This observation appears enigmatic, since alendronate should reinforce the metabolic block characterizing MKD, but is crucial because of the ultimate improvement shown by this patient. The anti-inflammatory properties of bisphosphonates are a new question for debate among physicians across various specialties, and requires further biochemical and clinical investigation. PMID:24360083

  2. Intracellular localization of mevalonate-activating enzymes in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, L. J.; Shah, S. P. J.; Goodwin, T. W.

    1966-01-01

    Mevalonate-activating enzymes are shown to be present in the chloroplasts of French-bean leaves. The chloroplast membrane is impermeable to mevalonic acid. Mevalonate-activating enzymes also appear to be found outside the chloroplast. These results support the view that terpenoid biosynthesis in the plant cell is controlled by a combination of enzyme segregation and specific membrane permeability. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2. PMID:5947149

  3. Methylerythritol and mevalonate pathway contributions to biosynthesis of mono-, sesqui-, and diterpenes in glandular trichomes and leaves of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni.

    PubMed

    Wölwer-Rieck, Ursula; May, Bianca; Lankes, Christa; Wüst, Matthias

    2014-03-19

    The biosynthesis of the diterpenoid steviol glycosides rebaudioside A and stevioside in nonrooted cuttings of Stevia rebaudiana was investigated by feeding experiments using the labeled key precursors [5,5-(2)H2]-mevalonic acid lactone (d2-MVL) and [5,5-(2)H2]-1-deoxy-d-xylulose (d2-DOX). Labeled glycosides were extracted from the leaves and stems and were directly analyzed by LC-(-ESI)-MS/MS and by GC-MS after hydrolysis and derivatization of the resulting isosteviol to the corresponding TMS-ester. Additionally, the incorporation of the proffered d2-MVL and d2-DOX into volatile monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and diterpenes in glandular trichomes on leaves and stems was investigated by headspace-solid phase microextraction-GC-MS (HS-SPME-GC-MS). Incorporation of the labeled precursors indicated that diterpenes in leaves and monoterpenes and diterpenes in glandular trichomes are predominately biosynthesized via the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway, whereas both the MEP and mevalonate (MVA) pathways contribute to the biosynthesis of sesquiterpenes at equal rates in glandular trichomes. These findings give evidence for a transport of MEP pathway derived farnesyl diphosphate precursors from plastids to the cytosol. Contrarily, the transport of MVA pathway derived geranyl diphosphate and geranylgeranyl diphosphate precursors from the cytosol to the plastid is limited. PMID:24579920

  4. Mevalonate Pathway Blockade, Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Autophagy: A Possible Link

    PubMed Central

    Tricarico, Paola Maura; Crovella, Sergio; Celsi, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The mevalonate pathway, crucial for cholesterol synthesis, plays a key role in multiple cellular processes. Deregulation of this pathway is also correlated with diminished protein prenylation, an important post-translational modification necessary to localize certain proteins, such as small GTPases, to membranes. Mevalonate pathway blockade has been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction: especially involving lower mitochondrial membrane potential and increased release of pro-apoptotic factors in cytosol. Furthermore a severe reduction of protein prenylation has also been associated with defective autophagy, possibly causing inflammasome activation and subsequent cell death. So, it is tempting to hypothesize a mechanism in which defective autophagy fails to remove damaged mitochondria, resulting in increased cell death. This mechanism could play a significant role in Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency, an autoinflammatory disease characterized by a defect in Mevalonate Kinase, a key enzyme of the mevalonate pathway. Patients carrying mutations in the MVK gene, encoding this enzyme, show increased inflammation and lower protein prenylation levels. This review aims at analysing the correlation between mevalonate pathway defects, mitochondrial dysfunction and defective autophagy, as well as inflammation, using Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency as a model to clarify the current pathogenetic hypothesis as the basis of the disease. PMID:26184189

  5. Enterococcus faecalis 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase, an enzyme of isopentenyl diphosphate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sutherlin, Autumn; Hedl, Matija; Sanchez-Neri, Barbara; Burgner, John W; Stauffacher, Cynthia V; Rodwell, Victor W

    2002-08-01

    Biosynthesis of the isoprenoid precursor isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) proceeds via two distinct pathways. Sequence comparisons and microbiological data suggest that multidrug-resistant strains of gram-positive cocci employ exclusively the mevalonate pathway for IPP biosynthesis. Bacterial mevalonate pathway enzymes therefore offer potential targets for development of active site-directed inhibitors for use as antibiotics. We used the PCR and Enterococcus faecalis genomic DNA to isolate the mvaS gene that encodes 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) synthase, the second enzyme of the mevalonate pathway. mvaS was expressed in Escherichia coli from a pET28 vector with an attached N-terminal histidine tag. The expressed enzyme was purified by affinity chromatography on Ni(2+)-agarose to apparent homogeneity and a specific activity of 10 micromol/min/mg. Analytical ultracentrifugation showed that the enzyme is a dimer (mass, 83.9 kDa; s(20,w), 5.3). Optimal activity occurred in 2.0 mM MgCl(2) at 37(o)C. The DeltaH(a) was 6,000 cal. The pH activity profile, optimum activity at pH 9.8, yielded a pK(a) of 8.8 for a dissociating group, presumably Glu78. The stoichiometry per monomer of acetyl-CoA binding was 1.2 +/- 0.2 and that of covalent acetylation was 0.60 +/- 0.02. The K(m) for the hydrolysis of acetyl-CoA was 10 microM. Coupled conversion of acetyl-CoA to mevalonate was demonstrated by using HMG-CoA synthase and acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase/HMG-CoA reductase from E. faecalis. PMID:12107122

  6. Mevalonate availability affects human and rat resistance vessel function.

    PubMed Central

    Roullet, J B; Xue, H; Roullet, C M; Fletcher, W S; Cipolla, M J; Harker, C T; McCarron, D A

    1995-01-01

    Previous data in rat conductance vessels indicated that cellular mevalonate contributes to vascular tone and systemic blood pressure control. Using exogenous mevalonate (M) or lovastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor (L), we characterized the role of mevalonate availability in resistance artery function, both in experimental animals and humans. Rat mesenteric artery resistance vessels (MARV, n = 9) were incubated for 48 h with either L, M, L + M, or vehicle (V) and tested for reactivity to NE, serotonin, acetylcholine, atrial natriuretic peptide, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Lovastatin increased sensitivity to NE (P < 0.03) and serotonin (P < 0.003), and significantly impaired the response to all three vasodilators. These effects were reversed by co-incubation with mevalonate. Mevalonate alone had no effect. In separate experiments, intravascular free Ca2+ concentration (ivfCa2+) was determined in fura-2AM loaded MARV. Basal ivfCa2+ was increased after a 48-h exposure to L (52.7 +/- 4.6 nM, L, vs. 29.7 +/- 2.4 nM, V, n = 12, P < 0.003), as were ivfCa2+ levels following stimulation with low (100 nM) NE concentrations. Similar ivfCa2+ concentrations were achieved during maximum contraction with NE (10 mM) in both groups. Human resistance arteries of human adipose tissue were also studied. Lovastatin increased the sensitivity to NE (ED50 = 372 +/- 56 nM, V, and 99 +/- 33 nM, L, P < 0.001) and significantly decreased the relaxation to acetylcholine and SNP of human vessels. We conclude that mevalonate availability directly contribute to resistance vessel function and vascular signal transduction systems in both experimental animals and humans. The study calls for the identification of non-sterol, mevalonate-derived vasoactive metabolites, and suggests that disorders of the mevalonate pathway can alter vascular tone and cause hypertension. PMID:7615793

  7. Bioconversion of methanol to value-added mevalonate by engineered Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 containing an optimized mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen-Liang; Cui, Jin-Yu; Cui, Lan-Yu; Liang, Wei-Fan; Yang, Song; Zhang, Chong; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2016-03-01

    Methylotrophic biosynthesis using methanol as a feedstock is a promising and attractive method to solve the over-dependence of the bioindustry on sugar feedstocks derived from grains that are used for food. In this study, we introduced and engineered the mevalonate pathway into Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 to achieve high mevalonate production from methanol, which could be a platform for terpenoid synthesis. We first constructed a natural operon (MVE) harboring the mvaS and mvaE genes from Enterococcus faecalis as well as an artificial operon (MVH) harboring the hmgcs1 gene from Blattella germanica and the tchmgr gene from Trypanosoma cruzi that encoded enzymes with the highest reported activities. We achieved mevalonate titers of 56 and 66 mg/L, respectively, in flask cultivation. Introduction of the phaA gene from Ralstonia eutropha into the operon MVH increased the mevalonate titer to 180 mg/L, 3.2-fold higher than that of the natural operon MVE. Further modification of the expression level of the phaA gene by regulating the strength of the ribosomal binding site resulted in an additional 20 % increase in mevalonate production to 215 mg/L. A fed-batch fermentation of the best-engineered strain yielded a mevalonate titer of 2.22 g/L, which was equivalent to an overall yield and productivity of 28.4 mg mevalonate/g methanol and 7.16 mg/L/h, respectively. The production of mevalonate from methanol, which is the initial, but critical step linking methanol with valuable terpenoids via methylotrophic biosynthesis, represents a proof of concept for pathway engineering in M. extorquens AM1. PMID:26521242

  8. Dysregulation of the mevalonate pathway promotes transformation

    PubMed Central

    Clendening, James W.; Pandyra, Aleks; Boutros, Paul C.; Ghamrasni, Samah El; Khosravi, Fereshteh; Trentin, Grace A.; Martirosyan, Anna; Hakem, Anne; Hakem, Razqallah; Jurisica, Igor; Penn, Linda Z.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of cancer metabolism has been appreciated for many years, but the intricacies of how metabolic pathways interconnect with oncogenic signaling are not fully understood. With a clear understanding of how metabolism contributes to tumorigenesis, we will be better able to integrate the targeting of these fundamental biochemical pathways into patient care. The mevalonate (MVA) pathway, paced by its rate-limiting enzyme, hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), is required for the generation of several fundamental end-products including cholesterol and isoprenoids. Despite years of extensive research from the perspective of cardiovascular disease, the contribution of a dysregulated MVA pathway to human cancer remains largely unexplored. We address this issue directly by showing that dysregulation of the MVA pathway, achieved by ectopic expression of either full-length HMGCR or its novel splice variant, promotes transformation. Ectopic HMGCR accentuates growth of transformed and nontransformed cells under anchorage-independent conditions or as xenografts in immunocompromised mice and, importantly, cooperates with RAS to drive the transformation of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts cells. We further explore whether the MVA pathway may play a role in the etiology of human cancers and show that high mRNA levels of HMGCR and additional MVA pathway genes correlate with poor prognosis in a meta-analysis of six microarray datasets of primary breast cancer. Taken together, our results suggest that HMGCR is a candidate metabolic oncogene and provide a molecular rationale for further exploring the statin family of HMGCR inhibitors as anticancer agents. PMID:20696928

  9. Metabolic control of YAP and TAZ by the mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Giovanni; Ruggeri, Naomi; Specchia, Valeria; Cordenonsi, Michelangelo; Mano, Miguel; Dupont, Sirio; Manfrin, Andrea; Ingallina, Eleonora; Sommaggio, Roberta; Piazza, Silvano; Rosato, Antonio; Piccolo, Stefano; Del Sal, Giannino

    2014-04-01

    The YAP and TAZ mediators of the Hippo pathway (hereafter called YAP/TAZ) promote tissue proliferation and organ growth. However, how their biological properties intersect with cellular metabolism remains unexplained. Here, we show that YAP/TAZ activity is controlled by the SREBP/mevalonate pathway. Inhibition of the rate-limiting enzyme of this pathway (HMG-CoA reductase) by statins opposes YAP/TAZ nuclear localization and transcriptional responses. Mechanistically, the geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate produced by the mevalonate cascade is required for activation of Rho GTPases that, in turn, activate YAP/TAZ by inhibiting their phosphorylation and promoting their nuclear accumulation. The mevalonate-YAP/TAZ axis is required for proliferation and self-renewal of breast cancer cells. In Drosophila melanogaster, inhibition of mevalonate biosynthesis and geranylgeranylation blunts the eye overgrowth induced by Yorkie, the YAP/TAZ orthologue. In tumour cells, YAP/TAZ activation is promoted by increased levels of mevalonic acid produced by SREBP transcriptional activity, which is induced by its oncogenic cofactor mutant p53. These findings reveal an additional layer of YAP/TAZ regulation by metabolic cues. PMID:24658687

  10. Substrate-Induced Change in the Quaternary Structure of Type 2 Isopentenyl Diphosphate Isomerase from Sulfolobus shibatae

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, Hitomi; Goda, Shuichiro; Unno, Hideaki; Nagai, Takuya; Yoshimura, Tohru

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase catalyzes the interconversion between two active units for isoprenoid biosynthesis, i.e., isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate, in almost all archaea and in some bacteria, including human pathogens. The enzyme is a good target for discovery of antibiotics because it is essential for the organisms that use only the mevalonate pathway to produce the active isoprene units and because humans possess a nonhomologous isozyme, type 1 isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase. However, type 2 enzymes were reportedly inhibited by mechanism-based drugs for the type 1 enzyme due to their surprisingly similar reaction mechanisms. Thus, a different approach is now required to develop new inhibitors specific to the type 2 enzyme. X-ray crystallography and gel filtration chromatography revealed that the enzyme from a thermoacidophilic archaeon, Sulfolobus shibatae, is in the octameric state at a high concentration. Interestingly, a part of the regions that are involved in the substrate binding in the previously reported tetrameric structures is integral to the formation of the tetramer-tetramer interface in the substrate-free octameric structure. Site-directed mutagenesis at such regions resulted in stabilization of the tetramer. Small-angle X-ray scattering, tryptophan fluorescence, and dynamic light scattering analyses showed that substrate binding causes the dissociation of an octamer into tetramers. This property, i.e., incompatibility between octamer formation and substrate binding, might provide clues to develop new specific inhibitors of the archaeal enzyme. PMID:22505674

  11. Mevalonate Pathway Regulates Cell Size Homeostasis and Proteostasis through Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Teemu P.; Björklund, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Balance between cell growth and proliferation determines cell size homeostasis, but little is known about how metabolic pathways are involved in the maintenance of this balance. Here, we perform a screen with a library of clinically used drug molecules for their effects on cell size. We find that statins, inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway, reduce cell proliferation and increase cell size and cellular protein density in various cell types, including primary human cells. Mevalonate pathway effects on cell size and protein density are mediated through geranylgeranylation of the small GTPase RAB11, which is required for basal autophagic flux. Our results identify the mevalonate pathway as a metabolic regulator of autophagy and expose a paradox in the regulation of cell size and proteostasis, where inhibition of an anabolic pathway can cause an increase in cell size and cellular protein density. PMID:26686643

  12. Improving monoterpene geraniol production through geranyl diphosphate synthesis regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianzhi; Bao, Xiaoming; Li, Chen; Shen, Yu; Hou, Jin

    2016-05-01

    Monoterpenes have wide applications in the food, cosmetics, and medicine industries and have recently received increased attention as advanced biofuels. However, compared with sesquiterpenes, monoterpene production is still lagging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, geraniol, a valuable acyclic monoterpene alcohol, was synthesized in S. cerevisiae. We evaluated three geraniol synthases in S. cerevisiae, and the geraniol synthase Valeriana officinalis (tVoGES), which lacked a plastid-targeting peptide, yielded the highest geraniol production. To improve geraniol production, synthesis of the precursor geranyl diphosphate (GPP) was regulated by comparing three specific GPP synthase genes derived from different plants and the endogenous farnesyl diphosphate synthase gene variants ERG20 (G) (ERG20 (K197G) ) and ERG20 (WW) (ERG20 (F96W-N127W) ), and controlling endogenous ERG20 expression, coupled with increasing the expression of the mevalonate pathway by co-overexpressing IDI1, tHMG1, and UPC2-1. The results showed that overexpressing ERG20 (WW) and strengthening the mevalonate pathway significantly improved geraniol production, while expressing heterologous GPP synthase genes or down-regulating endogenous ERG20 expression did not show positive effect. In addition, we constructed an Erg20p(F96W-N127W)-tVoGES fusion protein, and geraniol production reached 66.2 mg/L after optimizing the amino acid linker and the order of the proteins. The best strain yielded 293 mg/L geraniol in a fed-batch cultivation, a sevenfold improvement over the highest titer previously reported in an engineered S. cerevisiae strain. Finally, we showed that the toxicity of geraniol limited its production. The platform developed here can be readily used to synthesize other monoterpenes. PMID:26883346

  13. Genomic variations of the mevalonate pathway in porokeratosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenghua; Li, Caihua; Wu, Fei; Ma, Ruixiao; Luan, Jing; Yang, Feng; Liu, Weida; Wang, Li; Zhang, Shoumin; Liu, Yan; Gu, Jun; Hua, Wenlian; Fan, Min; Peng, Hua; Meng, Xuemei; Song, Ningjing; Bi, Xinling; Gu, Chaoying; Zhang, Zhen; Huang, Qiong; Chen, Lianjun; Xiang, Leihong; Xu, Jinhua; Zheng, Zhizhong; Jiang, Zhengwen

    2015-01-01

    Porokeratosis (PK) is a heterogeneous group of keratinization disorders. No causal genes except MVK have been identified, even though the disease was linked to several genomic loci. Here, we performed massively parallel sequencing and exonic CNV screening of 12 isoprenoid genes in 134 index PK patients (61 familial and 73 sporadic) and identified causal mutations in three novel genes (PMVK, MVD, and FDPS) in addition to MVK in the mevalonate pathway. Allelic expression imbalance (AEI) assays were performed in 13 lesional tissues. At least one mutation in one of the four genes in the mevalonate pathway was found in 60 (98%) familial and 53 (73%) sporadic patients, which suggests that isoprenoid biosynthesis via the mevalonate pathway may play a role in the pathogenesis of PK. Significantly reduced expression of the wild allele was common in lesional tissues due to gene conversion or some other unknown mechanism. A G-to-A RNA editing was observed in one lesional tissue without AEI. In addition, we observed correlations between the mutations in the four mevalonate pathway genes and clinical manifestations in the PK patients, which might support a new and simplified classification of PK under the guidance of genetic testing. PMID:26202976

  14. Genomic variations of the mevalonate pathway in porokeratosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenghua; Li, Caihua; Wu, Fei; Ma, Ruixiao; Luan, Jing; Yang, Feng; Liu, Weida; Wang, Li; Zhang, Shoumin; Liu, Yan; Gu, Jun; Hua, Wenlian; Fan, Min; Peng, Hua; Meng, Xuemei; Song, Ningjing; Bi, Xinling; Gu, Chaoying; Zhang, Zhen; Huang, Qiong; Chen, Lianjun; Xiang, Leihong; Xu, Jinhua; Zheng, Zhizhong; Jiang, Zhengwen

    2015-01-01

    Porokeratosis (PK) is a heterogeneous group of keratinization disorders. No causal genes except MVK have been identified, even though the disease was linked to several genomic loci. Here, we performed massively parallel sequencing and exonic CNV screening of 12 isoprenoid genes in 134 index PK patients (61 familial and 73 sporadic) and identified causal mutations in three novel genes (PMVK, MVD, and FDPS) in addition to MVK in the mevalonate pathway. Allelic expression imbalance (AEI) assays were performed in 13 lesional tissues. At least one mutation in one of the four genes in the mevalonate pathway was found in 60 (98%) familial and 53 (73%) sporadic patients, which suggests that isoprenoid biosynthesis via the mevalonate pathway may play a role in the pathogenesis of PK. Significantly reduced expression of the wild allele was common in lesional tissues due to gene conversion or some other unknown mechanism. A G-to-A RNA editing was observed in one lesional tissue without AEI. In addition, we observed correlations between the mutations in the four mevalonate pathway genes and clinical manifestations in the PK patients, which might support a new and simplified classification of PK under the guidance of genetic testing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06322.001 PMID:26202976

  15. Mevalonate-suppressive dietary isoprenoids for bone health.

    PubMed

    Mo, Huanbiao; Yeganehjoo, Hoda; Shah, Anureet; Mo, Warren K; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana; Shen, Chwan-Li

    2012-12-01

    Osteoclastogenesis and osteoblastogenesis, the balancing acts for optimal bone health, are under the regulation of small guanosine triphosphate-binding proteins (GTPases) including Ras, Rac, Rho and Rab. The activities of GTPases require post-translational modification with mevalonate-derived prenyl pyrophosphates. Mevalonate deprivation induced by competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase (e.g., statins) prevents the activation of GTPases, suppresses the expression of the receptor for activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) ligand (RANKL) and activation of NFκB and, consequently, inhibits osteoclast differentiation and induces osteoclast apoptosis. In contrast, statin-mediated inactivation of GTPases enhances alkaline phosphatase activity and the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2, vascular epithelial growth factor, and osteocalcin in osteoblasts and induces osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Animal studies show that statins inhibit bone resorption and increase bone formation. The anabolic effect of statins and other mevalonate pathway-suppressive pharmaceuticals resembles the anti-osteoclastogenic and bone-protective activities conferred by dietary isoprenoids, secondary products of plant mevalonate metabolism. The tocotrienols, vitamin E molecules with HMG CoA reductase-suppressive activity, induce mevalonate deprivation and concomitantly suppress the expression of RANKL and cyclooxygenase-2, the production of prostaglandin E2 and the activation of NFκB. Accordingly, tocotrienols inhibit osteoclast differentiation and induce osteoclast apoptosis, impacts reminiscent of those of statins. In vivo studies confirm the bone protective activity of tocotrienols at nontoxic doses. Blends of tocotrienols, statins and isoprenoids widely found in fruits, vegetables, grains, herbs, spices, and essential oils may synergistically suppress osteoclastogenesis while promoting osteoblastogenesis, offering a novel

  16. Mevalonates restore zoledronic acid-induced osteoclastogenesis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Y; Kajiya, H; Ozeki, S; Ikebe, T; Okabe, K

    2015-04-01

    Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is likely to be caused by continuous imperfection of bone healing after surgical treatments in patients with long-term administration of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (NBPs). NBPs inhibit osteoclastic bone resorption by impairing the mevalonic acid sterol pathway in osteoclasts. Thus, we hypothesized that exogenous mevalonic acid metabolites restore the inhibitory effects of NBPs on osteoclastogenesis and bone remodeling. To clarify the effects of mevalonic acid metabolites, especially geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) and geranylgeranyl transferase substrate geranylgeranyl acid (GGOH), we examined the effects of zoledronic acid with or without GGOH or GGPP on osteoclast differentiation, multinucleation, and bone mineral deposition in tooth-extracted sockets. Zoledronic acid decreased the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinuclear cells derived from mouse osteoclast precursors treated with receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand and macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Zoledronic acid simultaneously suppressed not only the expressions of osteoclastic differentiation-related molecules such as TRAP, cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, and vacuolar H-ATPase but also those of multinucleation-related molecules such as dendrocyte-expressed 7 transmembrane proteins and osteoclast stimulatory transmembrane protein. Treatment with GGOH or GGPP, but not farnesyl acid, restored the zoledronic acid-inhibited number of TRAP-positive multinuclear cells together with the expressions of these molecules. Although intraperitoneal administration of zoledronic acid and lipopolysaccharide into mice appeared to induce BRONJ-like lesions with empty bone lacunae and decreased mineral deposition in tooth-extracted socket, both GGOH and GGPP partially restored the inhibitory effects on zoledronic acid-related mineral deposition. These results suggest the potential of mevalonic acid

  17. Engineering the lactococcal mevalonate pathway for increased sesquiterpene production.

    PubMed

    Song, Adelene A; Abdullah, Janna Ong; Abdullah, Mohd P; Shafee, Norazizah; Othman, Roohaida; Noor, Normah Mohd; Rahim, Raha A

    2014-06-01

    Isoprenoids are a large, diverse group of secondary metabolites which has recently raised a renewed research interest due to genetic engineering advances, allowing specific isoprenoids to be produced and characterized in heterologous hosts. Many researches on metabolic engineering of heterologous hosts for increased isoprenoid production are focussed on Escherichia coli and yeasts. E. coli, as most prokaryotes, use the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway for isoprenoid production. Yeasts on the other hand, use the mevalonate pathway which is commonly found in eukaryotes. However, Lactococcus lactis is an attractive alternative host for heterologous isoprenoid production. Apart from being food-grade, this Gram-positive prokaryote uses the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid production instead of the MEP pathway. Previous studies have shown that L. lactis is able to produce sesquiterpenes through heterologous expression of plant sesquiterpene synthases. In this work, we analysed the gene expression of the lactococcal mevalonate pathway through RT-qPCR to successfully engineer L. lactis as an efficient host for isoprenoid production. We then overexpressed the mvk gene singly or co-expressed with the mvaA gene as an attempt to increase β-sesquiphellandrene production in L. lactis. It was observed that co-expression of mvk with mvaA doubled the amount of β-sesquiphellandrene produced. PMID:24828482

  18. Control of the innate immune response by the mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Akula, Murali K; Shi, Man; Jiang, Zhaozhao; Foster, Celia E; Miao, David; Li, Annie S; Zhang, Xiaoman; Gavin, Ruth M; Forde, Sorcha D; Germain, Gail; Carpenter, Susan; Rosadini, Charles V; Gritsman, Kira; Chae, Jae Jin; Hampton, Randolph; Silverman, Neal; Gravallese, Ellen M; Kagan, Jonathan C; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Kastner, Daniel L; Golenbock, Douglas T; Bergo, Martin O; Wang, Donghai

    2016-08-01

    Deficiency in mevalonate kinase (MVK) causes systemic inflammation. However, the molecular mechanisms linking the mevalonate pathway to inflammation remain obscure. Geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, a non-sterol intermediate of the mevalonate pathway, is the substrate for protein geranylgeranylation, a protein post-translational modification that is catalyzed by protein geranylgeranyl transferase I (GGTase I). Pyrin is an innate immune sensor that forms an active inflammasome in response to bacterial toxins. Mutations in MEFV (encoding human PYRIN) result in autoinflammatory familial Mediterranean fever syndrome. We found that protein geranylgeranylation enabled Toll-like receptor (TLR)-induced activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI(3)K) by promoting the interaction between the small GTPase Kras and the PI(3)K catalytic subunit p110δ. Macrophages that were deficient in GGTase I or p110δ exhibited constitutive release of interleukin 1β that was dependent on MEFV but independent of the NLRP3, AIM2 and NLRC4 inflammasomes. In the absence of protein geranylgeranylation, compromised PI(3)K activity allows an unchecked TLR-induced inflammatory responses and constitutive activation of the Pyrin inflammasome. PMID:27270400

  19. Genetics Home Reference: aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... PDF Open All Close All Description Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is an inherited disorder that ...

  20. Structure of the (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl-diphosphate reductase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Rekittke, Ingo; Olkhova, Elena; Wiesner, Jochen; Demmer, Ulrike; Warkentin, Eberhard; Jomaa, Hassan; Ermler, Ulrich

    2013-12-11

    Terpenoid precursor biosynthesis occurs in human and many pathogenic organisms via the mevalonate and 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathways, respectively. We determined the X-ray structure of the Fe/S containing (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl-diphosphate reductase (LytB) of the pathogenic protozoa Plasmodium falciparum which catalyzes the terminal step of the MEP pathway. The cloverleaf fold and the active site of P. falciparum LytB corresponds to those of the Aquifex aeolicus and Escherichia coli enzymes. Its distinct electron donor [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin was modeled to its binding site by docking calculations. The presented structural data provide a platform for a rational search of anti-malarian drugs. PMID:24188825

  1. Regulation of different inflammatory diseases by impacting the mevalonate pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zeiser, Robert; Maas, Kristina; Youssef, Sawsan; Dürr, Christoph; Steinman, Lawrence; Negrin, Robert S

    2009-01-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) interfere with the mevalonate pathway. While initially developed for their lipid-lowering properties, statins have been extensively investigated with respect to their impact on autoantigen and alloantigen driven immune responses. Mechanistically it was shown that statins modify immune responses on several levels, including effects on dendritic cells, endothelial cells, macrophages, B cells and T cells. Several lines of evidence suggest that statins act in a disease-specific manner and are not effective in each immune disorder. This review discusses possible modes of action of statins in modulating immunity towards autoantigens and alloantigens. PMID:19191903

  2. Cloning and characterization of indolepyruvate decarboxylase from Methylobacterium extorquens AM1.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, D N; Doronina, N V; Trotsenko, Yu A

    2010-12-01

    For the first time for methylotrophic bacteria an enzyme of phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, indole-3-pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.74), has been found. An open reading frame (ORF) was identified in the genome of facultative methylotroph Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 using BLAST. This ORF encodes thiamine diphosphate-dependent 2-keto acid decarboxylase and has similarity with indole-3-pyruvate decarboxylases, which are key enzymes of IAA biosynthesis. The ORF of the gene, named ipdC, was cloned into overexpression vector pET-22b(+). Recombinant enzyme IpdC was purified from Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and characterized. The enzyme showed the highest k(cat) value for benzoylformate, albeit the indolepyruvate was decarboxylated with the highest catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)). The molecular mass of the holoenzyme determined using gel-permeation chromatography corresponds to a 245-kDa homotetramer. An ipdC-knockout mutant of M. extorquens grown in the presence of tryptophan had decreased IAA level (46% of wild type strain). Complementation of the mutation resulted in 6.3-fold increase of IAA concentration in the culture medium compared to that of the mutant strain. Thus involvement of IpdC in IAA biosynthesis in M. extorquens was shown. PMID:21314613

  3. Defective macromolecule biosynthesis and cell-cycle progression in a mammalian cell starved for mevalonate.

    PubMed Central

    Sinensky, M; Logel, J

    1985-01-01

    The isolation of a somatic cell mutant (Mev-1) with a block in one of the mevalonate-biosynthesizing enzymes (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase, EC 4.1.3.5) has afforded us the opportunity to test and to extend the hypothesis that a product of mevalonate biosynthesis other than cholesterol is required for cellular proliferation. We present evidence here that both DNA synthesis and protein synthesis are inhibited in this mutant by mevalonate starvation, although RNA synthesis appears to be unaffected. The loss of DNA synthesis and the loss of protein synthesis in this mutant appear to be due to independent processes. DNA synthesis is reversibly inhibited by mevalonate starvation at a unique point in the cell cycle. Resumption of DNA synthesis after readdition of mevalonate exhibits a long lag; the peak of S-phase DNA synthesis occurs approximately 17 hr after mevalonate readdition, suggesting that mevalonate starvation puts cells into a quiescent (G0) state owing to their failure to transit a restriction point. The loss of DNA biosynthesis in the Mev-1 cell is well correlated with the rate of turnover of mevalonate label of certain terpenylated polypeptides. Images PMID:2582409

  4. Targeting tumor cell metabolism via the mevalonate pathway: Two hits are better than one

    PubMed Central

    Pandyra, Aleksandra; Penn, Linda Z

    2014-01-01

    Statins are promising anticancer agents that target the mevalonate pathway. Tumor cells are sensitive to depletion of mevalonate-derived products but this activity triggers a homeostatic feedback loop that blunts statin efficacy. We showed that dipyridamole inhibits this feedback response and potentiates statin antitumor activity. This study identifies statins plus dypridamole as a preclinically effective combination of approved agents. PMID:27308369

  5. [The clinical evaluation of the hypocholesterolemic effects of an inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis: mevalonic acid].

    PubMed

    Del Nero, E; Aloe, N; Augeri, C; Avola, F; Carta, G; Cavagnaro, A; De Grandi, R; Gianfreda, M; Magro, G P; Mazzarello, G P

    1992-07-01

    Twenty eight patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia were treated with mevalonic acid (an inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis) for 45 days. Patients received a daily dose of 750 to 1500 mg mevalonic acid depending on plasma cholesterol levels. Results showed a significant reduction in cholesterol values whereas no significant difference was observed in HDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels. PMID:1505176

  6. Metabolic Transformation of Mevalonic Acid by an Enzyme System from Peas 1

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, C. J.; Bonner, J.; Haagen-Smit, A. J.; Nimmo, C. C.

    1966-01-01

    En enzyme system has been found in peas which converts mevalonic acid to isoprenoid compounds. Among the intermediates in such conversion are mevalonic acid-5-phosphate and pyrophosphate, isopentenyl pyrophosphate and dimethylallylpyrophosphate. Among the products formed by the system are the pyrophosphates of geraniol, farnesol, nerolidol and higher isoprenoid alcohols. PMID:16656233

  7. Natural history of mevalonate kinase deficiency: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shumin

    2016-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), a very rare autosomal recessive autoinflammatory disease with multiple organ involvement, presents clinically as hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome (HIDS), a less severe phenotype and more common form, and mevalonic aciduria (MVA), a more severe phenotype and rare form. MKD is characterized by recurrent febrile attacks that are frequently accompanied by lymphadenopathy, gastrointestinal symptoms, arthralgia, myalgia, skin rash, and aphthous ulcers. Patients with MVA also have intrauterine growth retardation, congenital defects (cataracts, shortened limbs, and dysmorphic craniofacial features), neurological disease, and failure to thrive. Mean age at onset of symptoms is within the first year of life. There is a delay by several years between symptom onset and diagnosis, which is in part attributable to the initial misdiagnosis due to the rarity and nonspecific clinical manifestations of disease. The frequency of recurrent febrile attacks is highest in childhood and gradually decreases after adolescence. MKD is associated with rare long-term complications such as type AA amyloidosis, joint contractures, abdominal adhesions, renal angiomyolipoma, and severe pneumococcal infections. Frequent febrile attacks significantly impair several aspects of patients' and caregivers' quality of life, with an adverse impact on patients' daily activities, education, and employment. Lifespan is generally normal for HIDS whereas MVA can be fatal in early childhood. PMID:27142780

  8. From Protease to Decarboxylase: THE MOLECULAR METAMORPHOSIS OF PHOSPHATIDYLSERINE DECARBOXYLASE.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Yeon; Duraisingh, Manoj T; Marti, Matthias; Ben Mamoun, Choukri; Voelker, Dennis R

    2015-04-24

    Phosphatidylserine decarboxylase (PSDs) play a central role in the synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine in numerous species of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. PSDs are unusual decarboxylase containing a pyruvoyl prosthetic group within the active site. The covalently attached pyruvoyl moiety is formed in a concerted reaction when the PSD proenzyme undergoes an endoproteolytic cleavage into a large β-subunit, and a smaller α-subunit, which harbors the prosthetic group at its N terminus. The mechanism of PSD proenzyme cleavage has long been unclear. Using a coupled in vitro transcription/translation system with the soluble Plasmodium knowlesi enzyme (PkPSD), we demonstrate that the post-translational processing is inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. Comparison of PSD sequences across multiple phyla reveals a uniquely conserved aspartic acid within an FFXRX6RX12PXD motif, two uniquely conserved histidine residues within a PXXYHXXHXP motif, and a uniquely conserved serine residue within a GS(S/T) motif, suggesting that PSDs belong to the D-H-S serine protease family. The function of the conserved D-H-S residues was probed using site-directed mutagenesis of PkPSD. The results from these mutagenesis experiments reveal that Asp-139, His-198, and Ser-308 are all essential for endoproteolytic processing of PkPSD, which occurs in cis. In addition, within the GS(S/T) motif found in all PSDs, the Gly-307 residue is also essential, but the Ser/Thr-309 is non-essential. These results define the mechanism whereby PSDs begin their biochemical existence as proteases that execute one autoendoproteolytic cleavage reaction to give rise to a mature PSD harboring a pyruvoyl prosthetic group. PMID:25724650

  9. Perturbation of the Monomer-Monomer Interfaces of the Benzoylformate Decarboxylase Tetramer

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Forest H.; Rogers, Megan P.; Paul, Lake N.; McLeish, Michael J.

    2014-08-14

    The X-ray structure of benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFDC) from Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633 shows it to be a tetramer. This was believed to be typical of all thiamin diphosphate-dependent decarboxylases until recently when the structure of KdcA, a branched-chain 2-keto acid decarboxylase from Lactococcus lactis, showed it to be a homodimer. This lent credence to earlier unfolding experiments on pyruvate decarboxylase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that indicated that it might be active as a dimer. To investigate this possibility in BFDC, we sought to shift the equilibrium toward dimer formation. Point mutations were made in the noncatalytic monomer–monomer interfaces, but these had a minimal effect on both tetramer formation and catalytic activity. Subsequently, the R141E/Y288A/A306F variant was shown by analytical ultracentrifugation to be partially dimeric. It was also found to be catalytically inactive. Further experiments revealed that just two mutations, R141E and A306F, were sufficient to markedly alter the dimer–tetramer equilibrium and to provide an ~450-fold decrease in kcat. Equilibrium denaturation studies suggested that the residual activity was possibly due to the presence of residual tetramer. The structures of the R141E and A306F variants, determined to <1.5 Å resolution, hinted that disruption of the monomer interfaces will be accompanied by movement of a loop containing Leu109 and Leu110. As these residues contribute to the hydrophobicity of the active site and the correct positioning of the substrate, it seems that tetramer formation may well be critical to the catalytic activity of BFDC.

  10. Perturbation of the Monomer–Monomer Interfaces of the Benzoylformate Decarboxylase Tetramer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray structure of benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFDC) from Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633 shows it to be a tetramer. This was believed to be typical of all thiamin diphosphate-dependent decarboxylases until recently when the structure of KdcA, a branched-chain 2-keto acid decarboxylase from Lactococcus lactis, showed it to be a homodimer. This lent credence to earlier unfolding experiments on pyruvate decarboxylase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that indicated that it might be active as a dimer. To investigate this possibility in BFDC, we sought to shift the equilibrium toward dimer formation. Point mutations were made in the noncatalytic monomer–monomer interfaces, but these had a minimal effect on both tetramer formation and catalytic activity. Subsequently, the R141E/Y288A/A306F variant was shown by analytical ultracentrifugation to be partially dimeric. It was also found to be catalytically inactive. Further experiments revealed that just two mutations, R141E and A306F, were sufficient to markedly alter the dimer–tetramer equilibrium and to provide an ∼450-fold decrease in kcat. Equilibrium denaturation studies suggested that the residual activity was possibly due to the presence of residual tetramer. The structures of the R141E and A306F variants, determined to <1.5 Å resolution, hinted that disruption of the monomer interfaces will be accompanied by movement of a loop containing Leu109 and Leu110. As these residues contribute to the hydrophobicity of the active site and the correct positioning of the substrate, it seems that tetramer formation may well be critical to the catalytic activity of BFDC. PMID:24956165

  11. Geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Burke, Charles C.; Wildung, Mark R.

    2001-10-16

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit). In another aspect, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit. In yet another aspect, the present invention provides isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase protein comprising an isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit protein and an isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase small subunit protein. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase.

  12. The 1',4'-iminopyrimidine tautomer of thiamin diphosphate is poised for catalysis in asymmetric active centers on enzymes.

    PubMed

    Nemeria, Natalia; Chakraborty, Sumit; Baykal, Ahmet; Korotchkina, Lioubov G; Patel, Mulchand S; Jordan, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Thiamin diphosphate, a key coenzyme in sugar metabolism, is comprised of the thiazolium and 4'-aminopyrimidine aromatic rings, but only recently has participation of the 4'-aminopyrimidine moiety in catalysis gained wider acceptance. We report the use of electronic spectroscopy to identify the various tautomeric forms of the 4'-aminopyrimidine ring on four thiamin diphosphate enzymes, all of which decarboxylate pyruvate: the E1 component of human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, the E1 subunit of Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, yeast pyruvate decarboxylase, and pyruvate oxidase from Lactobacillus plantarum. It is shown that, according to circular dichroism spectroscopy, both the 1',4'-iminopyrimidine and the 4'-aminopyrimidine tautomers coexist on the E1 component of human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and pyruvate oxidase. Because both tautomers are seen simultaneously, these two enzymes provide excellent evidence for nonidentical active centers (asymmetry) in solution in these multimeric enzymes. Asymmetry of active centers can also be induced upon addition of acetylphosphinate, an excellent electrostatic pyruvate mimic, which participates in an enzyme-catalyzed addition to form a stable adduct, resembling the common predecarboxylation thiamin-bound intermediate, which exists in its 1',4'-iminopyrimidine form. The identification of the 1',4'-iminopyrimidine tautomer on four enzymes is almost certainly applicable to all thiamin diphosphate enzymes: this tautomer is the intramolecular trigger to generate the reactive ylide/carbene at the thiazolium C2 position in the first fundamental step of thiamin catalysis. PMID:17182735

  13. Biosynthesis of Taxadiene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae : selection of geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase directed by a computer-aided docking strategy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ming-Zhu; Yan, Hui-Fang; Li, Lin-Feng; Zhai, Fang; Shang, Lu-Qing; Yin, Zheng; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Identification of efficient key enzymes in biosynthesis pathway and optimization of the fitness between functional modules and chassis are important for improving the production of target compounds. In this study, the taxadiene biosynthesis pathway was firstly constructed in yeast by transforming ts gene and overexpressing erg20 and thmgr. Then, the catalytic capabilities of six different geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthases (GGPPS), the key enzyme in mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway catalyzing famesyl diphosphate (FPP) to geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP), were predicted using enzyme-substrate docking strategy. GGPPSs from Taxus baccata x Taxus cuspidate (GGPPSbc), Erwinia herbicola (GGPPSeh), and S. cerevisiae (GGPPSsc) which ranked 1st, 4th and 6th in docking with FPP were selected for construction. The experimental results were consistent with the computer prediction that the engineered yeast with GGPPSbc exhibited the highest production. In addition, two chassis YSG50 and W303-1A were chosen, and the titer of taxadiene reached 72.8 mg/L in chassis YSG50 with GGPPSbc. Metabolomic study revealed that the contents of tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) intermediates and their precursor amino acids in chassis YSG50 was lower than those in W303-1A, indicating less carbon flux was divided into TCA cycle. Furthermore, the levels of TCA intermediates in the taxadiene producing yeasts were lower than those in chassis YSG50. Thus, it may result in more carbon flux in MVA pathway in chassis YSG50, which suggested that YSG50 was more suitable for engineering the taxadiene producing yeast. These results indicated that computer-aided protein modeling directed isoenzyme selection strategy and metabolomic study could guide the rational design of terpenes biosynthetic cells. PMID:25295588

  14. Biosynthesis of Taxadiene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae : Selection of Geranylgeranyl Diphosphate Synthase Directed by a Computer-Aided Docking Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin-feng; Zhai, Fang; Shang, Lu-qing; Yin, Zheng; Yuan, Ying-jin

    2014-01-01

    Identification of efficient key enzymes in biosynthesis pathway and optimization of the fitness between functional modules and chassis are important for improving the production of target compounds. In this study, the taxadiene biosynthesis pathway was firstly constructed in yeast by transforming ts gene and overexpressing erg20 and thmgr. Then, the catalytic capabilities of six different geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthases (GGPPS), the key enzyme in mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway catalyzing famesyl diphosphate (FPP) to geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP), were predicted using enzyme-substrate docking strategy. GGPPSs from Taxus baccata x Taxus cuspidate (GGPPSbc), Erwinia herbicola (GGPPSeh), and S. cerevisiae (GGPPSsc) which ranked 1st, 4th and 6th in docking with FPP were selected for construction. The experimental results were consistent with the computer prediction that the engineered yeast with GGPPSbc exhibited the highest production. In addition, two chassis YSG50 and W303-1A were chosen, and the titer of taxadiene reached 72.8 mg/L in chassis YSG50 with GGPPSbc. Metabolomic study revealed that the contents of tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) intermediates and their precursor amino acids in chassis YSG50 was lower than those in W303-1A, indicating less carbon flux was divided into TCA cycle. Furthermore, the levels of TCA intermediates in the taxadiene producing yeasts were lower than those in chassis YSG50. Thus, it may result in more carbon flux in MVA pathway in chassis YSG50, which suggested that YSG50 was more suitable for engineering the taxadiene producing yeast. These results indicated that computer-aided protein modeling directed isoenzyme selection strategy and metabolomic study could guide the rational design of terpenes biosynthetic cells. PMID:25295588

  15. Structural and thermodynamic basis of the inhibition of Leishmania major farnesyl diphosphate synthase by nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates

    SciTech Connect

    Aripirala, Srinivas; Gonzalez-Pacanowska, Dolores; Oldfield, Eric; Kaiser, Marcel; Amzel, L. Mario; Gabelli, Sandra B.

    2014-03-01

    Structural insights into L. major farnesyl diphosphate synthase, a key enzyme in the mevalonate pathway, are described. Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) is an essential enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of sterols (cholesterol in humans and ergosterol in yeasts, fungi and trypanosomatid parasites) as well as in protein prenylation. It is inhibited by bisphosphonates, a class of drugs used in humans to treat diverse bone-related diseases. The development of bisphosphonates as antiparasitic compounds targeting ergosterol biosynthesis has become an important route for therapeutic intervention. Here, the X-ray crystallographic structures of complexes of FPPS from Leishmania major (the causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis) with three bisphosphonates determined at resolutions of 1.8, 1.9 and 2.3 Å are reported. Two of the inhibitors, 1-(2-hydroxy-2,2-diphosphonoethyl)-3-phenylpyridinium (300B) and 3-butyl-1-(2,2-diphosphonoethyl)pyridinium (476A), co-crystallize with the homoallylic substrate isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and three Ca{sup 2+} ions. A third inhibitor, 3-fluoro-1-(2-hydroxy-2,2-diphosphonoethyl)pyridinium (46I), was found to bind two Mg{sup 2+} ions but not IPP. Calorimetric studies showed that binding of the inhibitors is entropically driven. Comparison of the structures of L. major FPPS (LmFPPS) and human FPPS provides new information for the design of bisphosphonates that will be more specific for inhibition of LmFPPS. The asymmetric structure of the LmFPPS–46I homodimer indicates that binding of the allylic substrate to both monomers of the dimer results in an asymmetric dimer with one open and one closed homoallylic site. It is proposed that IPP first binds to the open site, which then closes, opening the site on the other monomer, which closes after binding the second IPP, leading to the symmetric fully occupied FPPS dimer observed in other structures.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of mevalonate kinase from Methanosarcina mazei

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Ningning; Seo, Kyung Hye; Chen, Cong; Zhou, Jia; Kim, Seon Won; Lee, Kon Ho

    2012-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase (MVK), which plays an important role in catalysing the biosynthesis of isoprenoid compounds derived from the mevalonate pathway, transforms mevalonate to 5-phosphomevalonate using ATP as a cofactor. Mevalonate kinase from Methanosarcina mazei (MmMVK) was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized for structural analysis. Diffraction-quality crystals of MmMVK were obtained by the vapour-diffusion method using 0.32 M MgCl2, 0.08 M bis-tris pH 5.5, 16%(w/v) PEG 3350. The crystals belonged to space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 97.11, b = 135.92, c = 46.03 Å. Diffraction data were collected to 2.08 Å resolution. PMID:23192048

  17. In Silico Prediction of the Effects of Mutations in the Human Mevalonate Kinase Gene: Towards a Predictive Framework for Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Browne, Claire; Timson, David J

    2015-11-01

    Mevalonate kinase (MVK) catalyses the phosphorylation of mevalonate. Deficiency of MVK is associated with two rare periodic fever syndromes, mevalonic aciduria (MA), a severe form and hyper-immunoglobulin-D syndrome (HIDS), a milder form. An in silico approach was used to analyse the physicochemical and structural effects of 47 disease-associated variants of MVK. A further 20 variants, which are present in human genome databases, were also analysed. Variants associated with MA are clustered into a "hotspot" consisting of residues 8-35 and 234-338 and tended to result in a prediction of severely reduced protein stability. Four of the uncharacterised variants, p.H24P, p.G198R, p. R253W, and p.G335S, were likely to be associated with MA. This method could be used as the basis for initial predictions of severity when new MVK variants are discovered. PMID:26420133

  18. Urinary excretion of mevalonic acid as an indicator of cholesterol synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lindenthal, B; Simatupang, A; Dotti, M T; Federico, A; Lütjohann, D; von Bergmann, K

    1996-10-01

    Urinary excretion of mevalonic acid was investigated as an indicator of cholesterol synthesis. In normolipemic volunteers, excretion of mevalonic acid averaged 3.51 +/- 0.59 (SD) micrograms/kg x day1; (n = 24) and was not different from patients with hypercholesterolemia (3.30 +/- 0.92 micrograms/kg x day1; n = 24). In patients with cerebrotendineous xanthomatosis, the excretion was significantly higher (8.55 +/- 1.92 micrograms/kg x day1; n = 6, P < 0.001) but comparable to volunteers treated with cholestyramine (6.69 +/- 2.6 micrograms/kg x day1; n = 5). A significant correlation was found between 24-h excretion of mevalonic acid and cholesterol synthesis (r = 0.835; n = 35; P < 0.001). The coefficient of variation of excretion of mevalonic acid during 3 consecutive days was small (9.8%; n = 7). However, urinary output of mevalonic acid was significantly higher during the night (164 +/- 14 micrograms/12-h) than during the day (129 +/- 9 micrograms/12-h; n = 11; P < 0.05). In patients treated with simvastatin (40 mg/day) for 6 weeks, the ratio of mevalonic acid to creatinine in a morning urine sample decreased significantly compared to pretreatment values (110 +/- 25 micrograms/g vs. 66 +/- 25 micrograms/g; P < 0.001). Furthermore, the ratio of mevalonic acid to creatinine in a morning urine sample correlated with the ratio from the 24-h collection period (r = 0.714; n = 34; P < 0.001). The results indicate that the analysis of urinary mevalonic acid, either in 24-h collection or in a single morning sample, is an attractive method for evaluation of long and very short term changes of the rates of cholesterol synthesis. PMID:8906596

  19. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Burke, Charles Cullen

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  20. Structure and function of uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Meech, R; Mackenzie, P I

    1997-12-01

    1. The uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) are a family of enzymes that catalyse the covalent addition of glucuronic acid to a wide range of lipophilic chemicals. They play a major role in the detoxification of many exogenous and endogenous compounds by generating products that are more polar and, thus, more readily excreted in bile or urine. 2. Inherited deficiencies in UGT forms are deleterious, as exemplified by the debilitating effects of hyperbilirubinaemia and neurotoxicity in subjects with mutations in the enzyme that converts bilirubin to its more polar glucuronide. 3. The UGT protein can be conceptually divided into two domains with the amino-terminal half of the protein demonstrating greater sequence divergence between isoforms. This region apparently determines aglycone specificity. The aglycone binding site is presumed to be a 'loose' fit, as many structurally diverse substrates can be bound by the same UGT isoform. The carboxyl-terminal half, which is more conserved in sequence between different isoforms, is believed to contain a binding site for the cosubstrate UDP glucuronic acid (UDPGA). 4. Uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and spans the membrane with a type I topology. The putative transmembrane domain is located near the carboxyl terminus of the protein such that only a small portion of the protein resides in the cytosol. This cytosolic tail is believed to contain an ER-targeting signal. The major portion of the protein is located in the ER lumen, including the proposed substrate-binding domains and the catalytic site. 5. The microsomal membrane impedes the access of UDPGA to the active site, resulting in latency of UGT activity in intact ER-derived microsomes. Active transport of UDPGA is believed to occur in hepatocytes, but the transport system has not been fully characterized. Uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase activity is also highly lipid dependent and the

  1. In Vivo Formation of the Protein Disulfide Bond That Enhances the Thermostability of Diphosphomevalonate Decarboxylase, an Intracellular Enzyme from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Ai; Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro; Motoyama, Kento; Yoshimura, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the present study, the crystal structure of recombinant diphosphomevalonate decarboxylase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus was solved as the first example of an archaeal and thermophile-derived diphosphomevalonate decarboxylase. The enzyme forms a homodimer, as expected for most eukaryotic and bacterial orthologs. Interestingly, the subunits of the homodimer are connected via an intersubunit disulfide bond, which presumably formed during the purification process of the recombinant enzyme expressed in Escherichia coli. When mutagenesis replaced the disulfide-forming cysteine residue with serine, however, the thermostability of the enzyme was significantly lowered. In the presence of β-mercaptoethanol at a concentration where the disulfide bond was completely reduced, the wild-type enzyme was less stable to heat. Moreover, Western blot analysis combined with nonreducing SDS-PAGE of the whole cells of S. solfataricus proved that the disulfide bond was predominantly formed in the cells. These results suggest that the disulfide bond is required for the cytosolic enzyme to acquire further thermostability and to exert activity at the growth temperature of S. solfataricus. IMPORTANCE This study is the first report to describe the crystal structures of archaeal diphosphomevalonate decarboxylase, an enzyme involved in the classical mevalonate pathway. A stability-conferring intersubunit disulfide bond is a remarkable feature that is not found in eukaryotic and bacterial orthologs. The evidence that the disulfide bond also is formed in S. solfataricus cells suggests its physiological importance. PMID:26303832

  2. Plasma mevalonate as a measure of cholesterol synthesis in man.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, T S; McNamara, D J; Brown, C D; Kolb, R; Ahrens, E H; Alberts, A W; Tobert, J; Chen, J; De Schepper, P J

    1984-01-01

    Measurement of mevalonic acid (MVA) concentrations in plasma or 24-h urine samples is shown to be useful in studies of the regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and cholesterol synthesis. Plasma MVA concentrations, measured either at 7-9 a.m. after an overnight fast, or throughout the 24-h cycle, were compared with cholesterol synthesis rates that were measured by the sterol balance method: plasma MVA concentrations were directly related to the rate of whole body cholesterol synthesis (r = 0.972; p less than 0.001; n = 18) over a tenfold range of cholesterol synthesis rates. Moreover, hourly examination of MVA concentrations throughout the day demonstrated that interventions such as fasting or cholesterol feeding cause suppression of the postmidnight diurnal rise in plasma MVA concentrations, with little change in the base-line of the rhythm. Thus, the daily rise and fall of plasma MVA appears to reflect changes in tissues and organs, such as the liver and intestine, that are known to be most sensitive to regulation by fasting or by dietary cholesterol. The hypothesis that short-term regulation of HMG-CoA reductase in tissues is quickly reflected by corresponding variations in plasma MVA was tested by using a specific inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase, mevinolin, to block MVA synthesis. Mevinolin caused a dose-dependent lowering of plasma MVA after a single dose; and in patients who received the drug twice a day for 4 wk, it decreased 24-h urinary MVA output. Significant lowering of plasma cholesterol was achieved through administration of mevinolin at doses that only moderately limit MVA production. PMID:6565710

  3. ALLYLISOPROPYLACETAMIDE INDUCES RAT HEPATIC ORNITHINE DECARBOXYLASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In rat liver, allylisopropylacetamide (AIA) treatment strongly induced (25-fold) the activity of rat hepatic ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). y either the oral or the subcutaneous routes, AIA produced a long-lasting induction (30 to 4O hours) of hepatic ODC activity. hree analogs o...

  4. Construction of Functional Monomeric Type 2 Isopentenyl Diphosphate:Dimethylallyl Diphosphate Isomerase.

    PubMed

    Neti, Syam Sundar; Eckert, Debra M; Poulter, C Dale

    2016-08-01

    Type 2 isopentenyl diphosphate:dimethylallyl diphosphate isomerase (IDI-2) catalyzes the interconversion of isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway. The enzyme from Streptomyces pneumoniae (spIDI-2) is a homotetramer in solution with behavior, including a substantial increase in the rate of FMN reduction by NADPH in the presence of IPP, suggesting that substrate binding at one subunit alters the kinetic and binding properties of another. We now report the construction of catalytically active monomeric spIDI-2. The monomeric enzyme contains a single-point mutation (N37A) and a six-residue C-terminal deletion that preserves the secondary structure of the subunits in the wild-type (wt) homotetramer. UV-vis spectra of the enzyme-bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor in FMNox, FMNred, and FMNred·IPP/DMAPP states are the same for monomeric and wt homotetrameric spIDI-2. The mutations in monomeric IDI-2 lower the melting temperature of the protein by 20 °C and reduce the binding affinities of FMN and IDI by 40-fold but have a minimal effect on kcat. Stopped-flow kinetic studies of monomeric spIDI-2 showed that the rate of reduction of FMN by NADH (k = 1.64 × 10(-3) s(-1)) is substantially faster when IPP is added to the monomeric enzyme (k = 0.57 s(-1)), similar to behavior seen for wt-spIDI-2. Our results indicate that cooperative interactions among subunits in the wt homotetramer are not responsible for the increased rate of reduction of spIDI-2·FMN by NADH, and two possible scenarios for the enhancement are suggested. PMID:27379573

  5. A woman with recurrent "infections" since birth--a new mevalonate kinase mutation.

    PubMed

    Farber, C M; Wanders, J A W; Goffard, J C; Parma, J

    2011-01-01

    A tired 32-year-old woman complaining of tiredness was referred for work-up of a possible immune deficiency. She had a history of recurrent infections since birth, which usually responded to antibiotics within a few days. Her mother, a nurse, had reported that early charts had disappeared. Munchausen's by proxy was suspected for years. Careful anamnesis indicated possible recurrent fever. Serum IgD levels were high, which led us to suspect Hyper IgD Syndrome. Sequencing of the mevalonate kinase gene revealed 2 mutations, leading to amino acid substitutions: one already described (V3771) and R40W: never reported before. Mevalonate kinase activity was very low in the patient's peripheral blood cells. We used the "Poly Phen" prediction program successfully. Our experiments confirmed the diagnosis of mevalonate kinase deficiency. We used steroids to abort recurrent crises. PMID:21630610

  6. Evidence for modification of lamin B by a product of mevalonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Wolda, S.L.; Glomset, J.A.

    1988-05-05

    Previous work from this laboratory has shown that a derivative of mevalonic acid is post-translationally incorporated into a number of specific proteins in Swiss 3T3 cells. Neither the nature of the modification nor the identities of the modified proteins have been determined to date. Here the authors describe results concerning modified proteins of approximately 67 kDa from HeLa cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells. They show that these proteins are specific to the nucleus and remain associated with a Triton/salt-insoluble nuclear fraction. Furthermore, immunological studies demonstrate that one of the modified proteins comigrates on two-dimensional gels with lamin B, a structural protein associated with the nuclear envelope. Using antibodies directed against lamin B in an immunoprecipitation experiment, they further show that this mevalonic acid-modified protein specifically coprecipitates with lamin B. These results support the hypothesis that lamin B is modified by a derivative of mevalonic acid.

  7. The mevalonate pathway as a metabolic requirement for autophagy-implications for growth control, proteostasis, and disease.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, Teemu P; Björklund, Mikael

    2016-05-01

    Autophagy is responsible for the degradation and recycling of cellular proteins and organelles. Our recent work shows that the mevalonate pathway influences cell size, growth, and proteostasis by regulating basal autophagic flux through geranylgeranylation of the small GTPase RAB11. The control of autophagy by the mevalonate/cholesterol pathway has potential implications for statin toxicity, inflammation, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27314093

  8. The "Mevalonate hypothesis": a cholesterol-independent alternative for the etiology of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Keizer, Hiskias G

    2012-01-01

    The "cholesterol hypothesis" is the leading theory to explain the cause of atherosclerosis. The "cholesterol hypothesis" assumes that plasma (LDL) cholesterol is an important causal factor for atherosclerosis.However, data of at least seven placebo controlled randomized prospective trials with various cholesterol lowering drugs show that plasma cholesterol lowering does not necessarily lead to protection against cardiovascular disease. Therefore an alternative hypothesis for the etiology of cardiovascular disease is formulated. This alternative hypothesis, the "mevalonate hypothesis", assumes that after stimulation of the mevalonate pathway in endothelial cells by inflammatory factors, these cells start producing cholesterol and free radicals. In this hypothesis, only the latter play a role in the etiology of atherosclerosis by contributing to the formation of oxidized cholesterol which is a widely accepted causal factor for atherosclerosis.Regardless of how the mevalonate pathway is activated (by withdrawal of statin drugs, by inflammatory factors or indirectly by reduced intracellular cholesterol levels) in all these cases free radical production is observed as well as cardiovascular disease. Since in the "mevalonate hypothesis" cholesterol is produced at the same time as the free radicals causing atherosclerosis, this hypothesis provides an explanation for the correlation which exists between cardiovascular disease and plasma cholesterol levels. From an evolutionary perspective, concomitant cholesterol production and free radical production in response to inflammatory factors makes sense if one realizes that both activities potentially protect cells and organisms from infection by gram-negative bacteria.In conclusion, data have been collected which suggest that activation of the mevalonate pathway in endothelial cells is likely to be a causal factor for atherosclerosis. This "mevalonate hypothesis" provides a better explanation for results obtained from recent

  9. Geranylfarnesyl diphosphate synthase from Methanosarcina mazei: Different role, different evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Takuya; Yoshimura, Tohru; Hemmi, Hisashi

    2010-02-26

    The gene of (all-E) geranylfarnesyl diphosphate synthase that is responsible for the biosynthesis of methanophenazine, an electron carrier utilized for methanogenesis, was cloned from a methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei Goe1. The properties of the recombinant enzyme and the results of phylogenetic analysis suggest that the enzyme is closely related to (all-E) prenyl diphosphate synthases that are responsible for the biosynthesis of respiratory quinones, rather than to the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of archaeal membrane lipids, including (all-E) geranylfarnesyl diphosphate synthase from a thermophilic archaeon.

  10. Substrate specificities of wild and mutated farnesyl diphosphate synthases from Bacillus stearothermophilus with artificial substrates.

    PubMed

    Nagaki, Masahiko; Nakada, Minori; Musashi, Tohru; Kawakami, Jun; Ohya, Norimasa; Kurihara, Masayo; Maki, Yuji; Nishino, Tokuzo; Koyama, Tanetoshi

    2007-07-01

    To determine the substrate specificities of wild and mutated types of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) synthases from Bacillus stearothermophilus, we examined the reactivities of 8-hydroxygeranyl diphosphate (HOGPP) and 8-methoxygeranyl diphosphate (CH(3)OGPP) as allylic substrate homologs. The wild-type FPP synthase reaction of HOGPP (and CH(3)OGPP) with isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) gave hydroxyfarnesyl- (and methoxyfarnesyl-) diphosphates that stopped at the first stage of condensation. On the other hand, with mutated type FPP synthase (Y81S), the former gave hydroxygeranylgeranyl diphosphate as the main double-condensation product together with hydroxyfarnesyl diphosphate as a single-condensation product and a small amount of hydroxygeranylfarnesyl diphosphate as a triple-condensation product. Moreover, the latter gave a double-condensation product, methoxygeranylgeranyl diphosphate, as the main product and only a trace of methoxyfarnesyl diphosphate was obtained. PMID:17617711

  11. Properties of ribulose diphosphate carboxylase immobilized on porous glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapira, J.; Hanson, C. L.; Lyding, J. M.; Reilly, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-diphosphate carboxylase from spinach has been bound to arylamine porous glass with a diazo linkage and to alklamine porous glass with glutaraldehyde. Stability at elevated temperatures and responses to changes of pH and ribulose-1,5-diphosphate, Mg(2+), and dithiothreitol concentrations were not significantly different from the soluble enzyme, though stability at 4 C was somewhat improved.

  12. Structures of Bacterial Biosynthetic Arginine Decarboxylases

    SciTech Connect

    F Forouhar; S Lew; J Seetharaman; R Xiao; T Acton; G Montelione; L Tong

    2011-12-31

    Biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC; also known as SpeA) plays an important role in the biosynthesis of polyamines from arginine in bacteria and plants. SpeA is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme and shares weak sequence homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases. Here, the crystal structure of PLP-bound SpeA from Campylobacter jejuni is reported at 3.0 {angstrom} resolution and that of Escherichia coli SpeA in complex with a sulfate ion is reported at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure of the SpeA monomer contains two large domains, an N-terminal TIM-barrel domain followed by a {beta}-sandwich domain, as well as two smaller helical domains. The TIM-barrel and {beta}-sandwich domains share structural homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases, even though the sequence conservation among these enzymes is less than 25%. A similar tetramer is observed for both C. jejuni and E. coli SpeA, composed of two dimers of tightly associated monomers. The active site of SpeA is located at the interface of this dimer and is formed by residues from the TIM-barrel domain of one monomer and a highly conserved loop in the {beta}-sandwich domain of the other monomer. The PLP cofactor is recognized by hydrogen-bonding, {pi}-stacking and van der Waals interactions.

  13. Kinetic and Binding Studies of Streptococcus pneumoniae Type 2 Isopentenyl Diphosphate:Dimethylallyl Diphosphate Isomerase.

    PubMed

    Janczak, Matthew Walter; Poulter, C Dale

    2016-04-19

    Type 2 isopentenyl diphosphate:dimethylallyl diphosphate isomerase (IDI-2) converts isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) to dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP), the two fundamental building blocks of isoprenoid molecules. IDI-2 is found in many species of bacteria and is a potential antibacterial target since this isoform is non-homologous to the type 1 enzyme in Homo sapiens. IDI-2 requires a reduced flavin mononucleotide to form the catalytically active ternary complex, IDI-2·FMNH2·IPP. For IDI-2 from the pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae, the flavin can be treated kinetically as a dissociable cosubstrate in incubations with IPP and excess NADH. Under these conditions, the enzyme follows a modified sequential ordered mechanism where FMN adds before IPP. Interestingly, the enzyme shows sigmoidal behavior when incubated with IPP and NADH with varied concentrations of FMN in aerobic conditions. In contrast, sigmoidal behavior is not seen in incubations under anaerobic conditions where FMN is reduced to FMNH2 before the reaction is initiated by addition of IPP. Stopped-flow experiments revealed that FMN, whether bound to IDI-2 or without enzyme in solution, is slowly reduced in a pseudo-first-order reaction upon addition of excess NADH (kred(FMN) = 5.7 × 10(-3) s(-1) and kred(IDI-2·FMN) = 2.8 × 10(-3) s(-1)), while reduction of the flavin is rapid upon addition of NADH to a mixture of IDI-2·FMN, and IPP (kred(IDI-2·FMN·IPP) = 8.9 s(-1)). Similar experiments with dithionite as the reductant gave kred(FMN) = 221 s(-1) and kred(IDI-2·FMN) = 411 s(-1). Dithionite reduction of FMN in the IDI-2·FMN and IPP mixture was biphasic with kred(IDI-2·FMN·IPP (fast)) = 326 s(-1) and kred(IDI-2·FMN·IPP (slow)) = 6.9 s(-1) The pseudo-first-order rate constant for the slow component was similar to those for NADH reduction of the flavin in the IDI-2·FMN and IPP mixture and may reflect a rate-limiting conformational change in the enzyme. PMID:27003727

  14. Enhancement of Terpenoid Biosynthesis from Mevalonate in a Fraction of the Latex from Euphorbia lathyris

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, George J.; Holzwarth, James A.

    1989-01-01

    A latex pellet fraction from Euphorbia lathyris incorporates mevalonate into triterpenols and their fatty acid esters. Conditions for improved incorporation were determined. CaCl2 or CaCl2 plus MnCl2 stimulated biosynthesis, and the metal ion chelator, ethylenebis(oxyethylenenitrilo)tetraacetic acid (EGTA) enhanced stimulation. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was almost as effective as EGTA, but phthalic acid and citric acid were relatively poor stimulators. The concentration of the Ca2+-EGTA complex was directly measured, and the incorporation data are best fitted by a curve that shows that the receptor for the complex is saturable. In the presence of the metal-chelate complex, the addition of fructose, 1,6-bisphosphate plus aldolase (triose-P) or malate provided additional stimulation. Incorporation was maximum at 40 micromolar R-mevalonate, and inhibition occurred at higher concentrations. The apparent Km for R-mevalonate was 15 micromolar. Under improved reaction conditions, the rate of triterpenoid biosynthesis from mevalonate is 25 times faster than was previously observed (GJ Piazza, EJ Saggese, KM Spletzer [1987] Plant Physiol 83: 177-180). PMID:16666601

  15. Undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase inhibitors: antibacterial drug leads.

    PubMed

    Sinko, William; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Yonghui; Feixas, Ferran; Cox, Courtney L; Mitchell, Douglas A; Oldfield, Eric; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-07-10

    There is a significant need for new antibiotics due to the rise in drug resistance. Drugs such as methicillin and vancomycin target bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, but methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) have now arisen and are of major concern. Inhibitors acting on new targets in cell wall biosynthesis are thus of particular interest since they might also restore sensitivity to existing drugs, and the cis-prenyl transferase undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS), essential for lipid I, lipid II, and thus, peptidoglycan biosynthesis, is one such target. We used 12 UPPS crystal structures to validate virtual screening models and then assayed 100 virtual hits (from 450,000 compounds) against UPPS from S. aureus and Escherichia coli. The most promising inhibitors (IC50 ∼2 μM, Ki ∼300 nM) had activity against MRSA, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus anthracis, and a vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus sp. with MIC or IC50 values in the 0.25-4 μg/mL range. Moreover, one compound (1), a rhodanine with close structural similarity to the commercial diabetes drug epalrestat, exhibited good activity as well as a fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) of 0.1 with methicillin against the community-acquired MRSA USA300 strain, indicating strong synergism. PMID:24827744

  16. Controlled sumoylation of the mevalonate pathway enzyme HMGS-1 regulates metabolism during aging

    PubMed Central

    Sapir, Amir; Tsur, Assaf; Koorman, Thijs; Ching, Kaitlin; Mishra, Prashant; Bardenheier, Annabelle; Podolsky, Lisa; Bening-Abu-Shach, Ulrike; Boxem, Mike; Chou, Tsui-Fen; Broday, Limor; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Many metabolic pathways are critically regulated during development and aging but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. One key metabolic cascade in eukaryotes is the mevalonate pathway. It catalyzes the synthesis of sterol and nonsterol isoprenoids, such as cholesterol and ubiquinone, as well as other metabolites. In humans, an age-dependent decrease in ubiquinone levels and changes in cholesterol homeostasis suggest that mevalonate pathway activity changes with age. However, our knowledge of the mechanistic basis of these changes remains rudimentary. We have identified a regulatory circuit controlling the sumoylation state of Caenorhabditis elegans HMG-CoA synthase (HMGS-1). This protein is the ortholog of human HMGCS1 enzyme, which mediates the first committed step of the mevalonate pathway. In vivo, HMGS-1 undergoes an age-dependent sumoylation that is balanced by the activity of ULP-4 small ubiquitin-like modifier protease. ULP-4 exhibits an age-regulated expression pattern and a dynamic cytoplasm-to-mitochondria translocation. Thus, spatiotemporal ULP-4 activity controls the HMGS-1 sumoylation state in a mechanism that orchestrates mevalonate pathway activity with the age of the organism. To expand the HMGS-1 regulatory network, we combined proteomic analyses with knockout studies and found that the HMGS-1 level is also governed by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. We propose that these conserved molecular circuits have evolved to govern the level of mevalonate pathway flux during aging, a flux whose dysregulation is associated with numerous age-dependent cardiovascular and cancer pathologies. PMID:25187565

  17. Two UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylases involved in the biosynthesis of a bacterial exopolysaccharide in Paenibacillus elgii.

    PubMed

    Li, Ou; Qian, Chao-Dong; Zheng, Dao-Qiong; Wang, Pin-Mei; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Xin-Hang; Wu, Xue-Chang

    2015-04-01

    Xylose is described as a component of bacterial exopolysaccharides in only a limited number of bacterial strains. A bacterial strain, Paenibacillus elgii, B69 was shown to be efficient in producing a xylose-containing exopolysaccharide. Sequence analysis was performed to identify the genes encoding the uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucuronic acid decarboxylase required for the synthesis of UDP-xylose, the precursor of the exopolysaccharide. Two sequences, designated as Peuxs1 and Peuxs2, were found as the candidate genes for such enzymes. The activities of the UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylases were proven by heterologous expression and real-time nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. The intracellular activity and effect of these genes on the synthesis of exopolysaccharide were further investigated by developing a thymidylate synthase based knockout system. This system was used to substitute the conventional antibiotic resistance gene system in P. elgii, a natural multi-antibiotic resistant strain. Results of intracellular nucleotide sugar analysis showed that the intracellular UDP-xylose and UDP-glucuronic acid levels were affected in Peuxs1 or Peuxs2 knockout strains. The knockout of either Peuxs1 or Peuxs2 reduced the polysaccharide production and changed the monosaccharide ratio. No polysaccharide was found in the Peuxs1/Peuxs2 double knockout strain. Our results show that P. elgii can be efficient in forming UDP-xylose, which is then used for the synthesis of xylose-containing exopolysaccharide. PMID:25573472

  18. Arginine kinase shows nucleoside diphosphate kinase-like activity toward deoxythymidine diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Hernandez-Flores, Jose M; Lugo-Sanchez, Maria E; Sugich-Miranda, Rocio; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D

    2016-06-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) (ATP: L-arginine phosphotransferase, E.C. 2.7.3.3) catalyzes the reversible transfer of ATP γ-phosphate group to L-arginine to synthetize phospho-arginine as a high-energy storage. Previous studies suggest additional roles for AK in cellular processes. Since AK is found only in invertebrates and it is homologous to creatine kinase from vertebrates, the objective of this work was to demonstrate nucleoside diphosphate kinase-like activity for shrimp AK. For this, AK from marine shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (LvAK) was purified and its activity was assayed for phosphorylation of TDP using ATP as phosphate donor. Moreover, by using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) the phosphate transfer reaction was followed. Also, LvAK tryptophan fluorescence emission changes were detected by dTDP titration, suggesting that the hydrophobic environment of Trp 221, which is located in the top of the active site, is perturbed upon dTDP binding. The kinetic constants for both substrates Arg and dTDP were calculated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Besides, docking calculations suggested that dTDP could bind LvAK in the same cavity where ATP bind, and LvAK basic residues (Arg124, 126 and 309) stabilize the dTDP phosphate groups and the pyrimidine base interact with His284 and Ser122. These results suggest that LvAK bind and phosphorylate dTDP being ATP the phosphate donor, thus describing a novel alternate nucleoside diphosphate kinase-like activity for this enzyme. PMID:27072556

  19. Positive control of lac operon expression in vitro by guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Primakoff, P; Artz, S W

    1979-04-01

    Maximal expression of the Escherichia coli lactose operon in a coupled in vitro transcription-translation system from a Salmonella typhimurium relA mutant was strongly dependent upon addition of guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate (ppGpp). Without added ppGpp, at saturating 3',5'-cyclic AMP (cAMP) concentrations, synthesis of beta-galactosidase (beta-D-galactoside galactohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.23) was reproducibly only 5-7% of that which can be obtained with 0.5-0.8 mM ppGpp. Experiments in which transcription was uncoupled from translation indicated that this 14- to 20-fold stimulation by ppGpp occurred at the level of transcription. When coupled beta-galactosidase synthesis was primed with a template containing a well-characterized mutant lac promoter (lacP(r)L8UV5), the dependence on ppGpp was greatly reduced. This result provides an important experimental control previously unavailable for verifying the significance of ppGpp effects on gene regulation in vitro; it indicates that activation of lacP(+) expression by ppGpp is specifically an effect of increased transcription initiations. Furthermore, the large ppGpp stimulation of lacP(+) DNA enabled the level of expression of this template to approach that of lacP(r)L8UV5 DNA, an observation expected from results in vivo but not obtained with other transcription-translation systems in vitro. The importance of these results is considered with respect to previous ideas on the physiological role of ppGpp as a supercontrol molecule in bacterial regulation. PMID:109832

  20. Taxodione and arenarone inhibit farnesyl diphosphate synthase by binding to the isopentenyl diphosphate site.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Liang; Lindert, Steffen; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Ke; McCammon, J Andrew; Oldfield, Eric

    2014-06-24

    We used in silico methods to screen a library of 1,013 compounds for possible binding to the allosteric site in farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS). Two of the 50 predicted hits had activity against either human FPPS (HsFPPS) or Trypanosoma brucei FPPS (TbFPPS), the most active being the quinone methide celastrol (IC50 versus TbFPPS ∼ 20 µM). Two rounds of similarity searching and activity testing then resulted in three leads that were active against HsFPPS with IC50 values in the range of ∼ 1-3 µM (as compared with ∼ 0.5 µM for the bisphosphonate inhibitor, zoledronate). The three leads were the quinone methides taxodone and taxodione and the quinone arenarone, compounds with known antibacterial and/or antitumor activity. We then obtained X-ray crystal structures of HsFPPS with taxodione+zoledronate, arenarone+zoledronate, and taxodione alone. In the zoledronate-containing structures, taxodione and arenarone bound solely to the homoallylic (isopentenyl diphosphate, IPP) site, not to the allosteric site, whereas zoledronate bound via Mg(2+) to the same site as seen in other bisphosphonate-containing structures. In the taxodione-alone structure, one taxodione bound to the same site as seen in the taxodione+zoledronate structure, but the second located to a more surface-exposed site. In differential scanning calorimetry experiments, taxodione and arenarone broadened the native-to-unfolded thermal transition (Tm), quite different to the large increases in ΔTm seen with biphosphonate inhibitors. The results identify new classes of FPPS inhibitors, diterpenoids and sesquiterpenoids, that bind to the IPP site and may be of interest as anticancer and antiinfective drug leads. PMID:24927548

  1. Inhibition of insulin-like growth factor receptor/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin axis targets colorectal cancer stem cells by attenuating mevalonate-isoprenoid pathway in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sharon, Chetna; Baranwal, Somesh; Patel, Nirmita J.; Rodriguez-Agudo, Daniel; Pandak, William M.; Majumdar, Adhip PN; Krystal, Geoffrey; Patel, Bhaumik B.

    2015-01-01

    We observed a co-upregulation of the insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) [InAT] axis and the mevalonate-isoprenoid biosynthesis (MIB) pathways in colorectal cancer stem cells (CSCs) in an unbiased approach. Hence, we hypothesized that the InAT axis might regulate the MIB pathway to govern colorectal CSCs growth. Stimulation (IGF-1) or inhibition (IGF-1R depletion and pharmacological inhibition of IGF-1R/mTOR) of the InAT axis produced induction or attenuation of CSC growth as well as expression of CSC markers and self-renewal factors respectively. Intriguingly, activation of the InAT axis (IGF-1) caused significant upregulation of the MIB pathway genes (both mRNA and protein); while its inhibition produced the opposite effects in colonospheres. More importantly, supplementation with dimethylallyl- and farnesyl-PP, MIB metabolites downstream of isopentenyl-diphosphate delta isomerase (IDI), but not mevalonate and isopentenyl-pp that are upstream of IDI, resulted in a near-complete reversal of the suppressive effect of the InAT axis inhibitors on CSCs growth. The latter findings suggest a specific regulation of the MIB pathway by the InAT axis distal to the target of statins that inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR). Effects of IGF-1R inhibition on colonic CSCs proliferation and the MIB pathway were confirmed in an ‘in vivo’ HCT-116 xenograft model. These observations establish a novel mechanistic link between the InAT axis that is commonly deregulated in colorectal cancer and the MIB pathway in regulation of colonic CSCs growth. Hence, the InAT-MIB corridor is a novel target for developing paradigm shifting optimum anti-CSCs therapies for colorectal cancer. PMID:25895029

  2. A new motif for inhibitors of geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Foust, Benjamin J; Allen, Cheryl; Holstein, Sarah A; Wiemer, David F

    2016-08-15

    The enzyme geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGDPS) is believed to receive the substrate farnesyl diphosphate through one lipophilic channel and release the product geranylgeranyl diphosphate through another. Bisphosphonates with two isoprenoid chains positioned on the α-carbon have proven to be effective inhibitors of this enzyme. Now a new motif has been prepared with one isoprenoid chain on the α-carbon, a second included as a phosphonate ester, and the potential for a third at the α-carbon. The pivaloyloxymethyl prodrugs of several compounds based on this motif have been prepared and the resulting compounds have been tested for their ability to disrupt protein geranylgeranylation and induce cytotoxicity in myeloma cells. The initial biological studies reveal activity consistent with GGDPS inhibition, and demonstrate a structure-function relationship which is dependent on the nature of the alkyl group at the α-carbon. PMID:27338660

  3. Geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase from Scoparia dulcis and Croton sublyratus. Plastid localization and conversion to a farnesyl diphosphate synthase by mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Sitthithaworn, W; Kojima, N; Viroonchatapan, E; Suh, D Y; Iwanami, N; Hayashi, T; Noji, M; Saito, K; Niwa, Y; Sankawa, U

    2001-02-01

    cDNAs encoding geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGPPS) of two diterpene-producing plants, Scoparia dulcis and Croton sublyratus, have been isolated using the homology-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Both clones contained highly conserved aspartate-rich motifs (DDXX(XX)D) and their N-terminal residues exhibited the characteristics of chloroplast targeting sequence. When expressed in Escherichia coli, both the full-length and truncated proteins in which the putative targeting sequence was deleted catalyzed the condensation of farnesyl diphosphate and isopentenyl diphosphate to produce geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP). The structural factors determining the product length in plant GGPPSs were investigated by constructing S. dulcis GGPPS mutants on the basis of sequence comparison with the first aspartate-rich motif (FARM) of plant farnesyl diphosphate synthase. The result indicated that in plant GGPPSs small amino acids, Met and Ser, at the fourth and fifth positions before FARM and Pro and Cys insertion in FARM play essential roles in determination of product length. Further, when a chimeric gene comprised of the putative transit peptide of the S. dulcis GGPPS gene and a green fluorescent protein was introduced into Arabidopsis leaves by particle gun bombardment, the chimeric protein was localized in chloroplasts, indicating that the cloned S. dulcis GGPPS is a chloroplast protein. PMID:11217109

  4. Incorporation of Mevalonic Acid into Ribosylzeatin in Tobacco Callus Ribonucleic Acid Preparations 1

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Norimoto; Armstrong, Donald J.; Skoog, Folke

    1975-01-01

    The incorporation of 14C-2-mevalonic acid into transfer RNA and ribosomal RNA (high molecular weight RNA) in rapidly growing, cytokinin-dependent tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var. Wisconsin No. 38) callus cultures has been investigated. Approximately 40% of the label incorporated into transfer RNA was present in a ribonucleoside with chromatographic properties identical to those of cis-ribosylzeatin. The remainder of the label in the transfer RNA appears to be nonspecific incorporation resulting from degradation and metabolism of 14C-2-mevalonic acid by the tobacco callus tissue. Although the total radioactivity incorporated into ribosomal RNA was roughly the same as in transfer RNA, the specific radioactivity of the transfer RNA was about four times higher than that of the ribosomal RNA, and the ribosomal RNA labeling could be distinguished from the cytokinin labeling observed in transfer RNA. The distributions of the 14C-2-mevalonic acid label and cytokinin activity in tobacco callus transfer RNA fractionated by benzoylated diethylaminoethylcellulose chromatography indicate that at least two cytokinin-containing transfer RNA species are present in this tissue. PMID:16659180

  5. Alendronate, a double-edged sword acting in the mevalonate pathway

    PubMed Central

    TRICARICO, PAOLA MAURA; GIRARDELLI, MARTINA; KLEINER, GIULIO; KNOWLES, ALESSANDRA; VALENCIC, ERICA; CROVELLA, SERGIO; MARCUZZI, ANNALISA

    2015-01-01

    Aminobisphosphonate aledronate is a compound commonly used clinically for the treatment of osteoporosis and other bone diseases, as a result of it preventing bone resorption. However, in previous years it has also been used to obtain cellular and animal models of a rare genetic disorder termed Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency (MKD). MKD is caused by mutations affecting the mevalonate kinase enzyme, in the cholesterol pathway and alendronate can be used to biochemically mimic the genetic defect as it inhibits farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase in the same pathway. Despite evidence in favor of the inhibition exerted on the mevalonate pathway, there is at least one clinical case of MKD in which alendronate improved not only skeletal and bone fractures, as expected, but also MKD clinical features. Based on this finding, the present study assessed the anti-inflammatory properties of this aminobisphosphonate in vitro. No anti-inflammatory effects of alendronate were observed in the in vitro experiments. Since MKD lacks specific treatments, these results may assist scientists and physicians in making the decision as to the most suitable choice of therapeutic compounds for this neglected disease. PMID:26096667

  6. Inhibition of the mevalonate pathway affects epigenetic regulation in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Karlic, Heidrun; Thaler, Roman; Gerner, Christopher; Grunt, Thomas; Proestling, Katharina; Haider, Florian; Varga, Franz

    2015-01-01

    The mevalonate pathway provides metabolites for post-translational modifications such as farnesylation, which are critical for the activity of RAS downstream signaling. Subsequently occurring regulatory processes can induce an aberrant stimulation of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1) as well as changes in histone deacetylases (HDACs) and microRNAs in many cancer cell lines. Inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway are increasingly recognized as anticancer drugs. Extensive evidence indicates an intense cross-talk between signaling pathways, which affect growth, differentiation, and apoptosis either directly or indirectly via epigenetic mechanisms. Herein, we show data obtained by novel transcriptomic and corresponding methylomic or proteomic analyses from cell lines treated with pharmacologic doses of respective inhibitors (i.e., simvastatin, ibandronate). Metabolic pathways and their epigenetic consequences appear to be affected by a changed concentration of NADPH. Moreover, since the mevalonate metabolism is part of a signaling network, including vitamin D metabolism or fatty acid synthesis, the epigenetic activity of associated pathways is also presented. This emphasizes the far-reaching epigenetic impact of metabolic therapies on cancer cells and provides some explanation for clinical observations, which indicate the anticancer activity of statins and bisphosphonates. PMID:25978957

  7. Block of the Mevalonate Pathway Triggers Oxidative and Inflammatory Molecular Mechanisms Modulated by Exogenous Isoprenoid Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Tricarico, Paola Maura; Kleiner, Giulio; Valencic, Erica; Campisciano, Giuseppina; Girardelli, Martina; Crovella, Sergio; Knowles, Alessandra; Marcuzzi, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    Deregulation of the mevalonate pathway is known to be involved in a number of diseases that exhibit a systemic inflammatory phenotype and often neurological involvements, as seen in patients suffering from a rare disease called mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD). One of the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathology could depend on the shortage of isoprenoid compounds and the subsequent mitochondrial damage, leading to oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines’ release. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that cellular death results from the balance between apoptosis and pyroptosis, both driven by mitochondrial damage and the molecular platform inflammasome. In order to rescue the deregulated pathway and decrease inflammatory markers, exogenous isoprenoid compounds were administered to a biochemical model of MKD obtained treating a murine monocytic cell line with a compound able to block the mevalonate pathway, plus an inflammatory stimulus. Our results show that isoprenoids acted in different ways, mainly increasing the expression of the evaluated markers [apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, nucleotide-binding oligomerization-domain protein-like receptors 3 (NALP3), cytokines and nitric oxide (NO)]. Our findings confirm the hypothesis that inflammation is triggered, at least partially, by the shortage of isoprenoids. Moreover, although further studies are necessary, the achieved results suggest a possible role for exogenous isoprenoids in the treatment of MKD. PMID:24758928

  8. Characterization of ribulose diphosphate carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase from Thiobacillus thioparus and Thiobacillus neapolitanus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. J.; Johnson, M. K.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1968-01-01

    Ribulose diphosphate carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase activity in chemosynthetic autotrophs Thiobacillus thioparus and Thiobacillus neapolitanus, noting sedimentation and gel filtration characteristics

  9. Non-enzymatic synthesis of the coenzymes, uridine diphosphate glucose and cytidine diphosphate choline, and other phosphorylated metabolic intermediates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mar, A.; Dworkin, J.; Oro, J.

    1987-01-01

    Using urea and cyanamide, the two condensing agents considered to have been present on the primitive earth, uridine diphosphate glucose (UDPG), cytidine diphosphate choline (CDP-choline), glucose-1-phosphate (G1P), and glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) were synthesized under simulated prebiotic conditions. The reaction products were separated and identified using paper chromatography, thin layer chromatography, enzymatic analyses, and ion-pair reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The possibility of nonenzymatic synthesis of metabolic intermediates on the primitive earth from simple precursors was thus demonstrated.

  10. ATP citrate lyase mediated cytosolic acetyl-CoA biosynthesis increases mevalonate production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rodriguez, Sarah; Denby, Charles M.; Van Vu, T.; Baidoo, Edward E. K.; Wang, George; Keasling, Jay D.

    2016-03-03

    With increasing concern about the environmental impact of a petroleum based economy, focus has shifted towards greener production strategies including metabolic engineering of microbes for the conversion of plant-based feedstocks to second generation biofuels and industrial chemicals. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an attractive host for this purpose as it has been extensively engineered for production of various fuels and chemicals. Many of the target molecules are derived from the central metabolite and molecular building block, acetyl-CoA. To date, it has been difficult to engineer S. cerevisiae to continuously convert sugars present in biomass-based feedstocks to acetyl-CoA derived products due to intrinsicmore » physiological constraints—in respiring cells, the precursor pyruvate is directed away from the endogenous cytosolic acetyl-CoA biosynthesis pathway towards the mitochondria, and in fermenting cells pyruvate is directed towards the byproduct ethanol. In this study we incorporated an alternative mode of acetyl-CoA biosynthesis mediated by ATP citrate lyase (ACL) that may obviate such constraints. We characterized the activity of several heterologously expressed ACLs in crude cell lysates, and found that ACL from Aspergillus nidulans demonstrated the highest activity. We employed a push/pull strategy to shunt citrate towards ACL by deletion of the mitochondrial NAD+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH1) and engineering higher flux through the upper mevalonate pathway. We demonstrated that combining the two modifications increases accumulation of mevalonate pathway intermediates, and that both modifications are required to substantially increase production. Finally, we incorporated a block strategy by replacing the native ERG12 (mevalonate kinase) promoter with the copper-repressible CTR3 promoter to maximize accumulation of the commercially important molecule mevalonate. In conclusion, by combining the push/pull/block strategies, we significantly

  11. Dopa decarboxylase activity of the living human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Gjedde, A.; Reith, J.; Dyve, S.; Leger, G.; Guttman, M.; Diksic, M.; Evans, A.; Kuwabara, H. )

    1991-04-01

    Monoaminergic neurons use dopa decarboxylase to form dopamine from L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa). We measured regional dopa decarboxylase activity in brains of six healthy volunteers with 6-({sup 18}F)fluoro-L-dopa and positron emission tomography. We calculated the enzyme activity, relative to its Km, with a kinetic model that yielded the relative rate of conversion of 6-({sup 18}F)fluoro-L-dopa to ({sup 18}F)fluorodopamine. Regional values of relative dopa decarboxylase activity ranged from nil in occipital cortex to 1.9 h-1 in caudate nucleus and putamen, in agreement with values obtained in vitro.

  12. Three Distinct Glutamate Decarboxylase Genes in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Grone, Brian P.; Maruska, Karen P.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a widely conserved signaling molecule that in animals has been adapted as a neurotransmitter. GABA is synthesized from the amino acid glutamate by the action of glutamate decarboxylases (GADs). Two vertebrate genes, GAD1 and GAD2, encode distinct GAD proteins: GAD67 and GAD65, respectively. We have identified a third vertebrate GAD gene, GAD3. This gene is conserved in fishes as well as tetrapods. We analyzed protein sequence, gene structure, synteny, and phylogenetics to identify GAD3 as a homolog of GAD1 and GAD2. Interestingly, we found that GAD3 was lost in the hominid lineage. Because of the importance of GABA as a neurotransmitter, GAD3 may play important roles in vertebrate nervous systems. PMID:27461130

  13. Characterization of arginine decarboxylase from Dianthus caryophyllus.

    PubMed

    Ha, Byung Hak; Cho, Ki Joon; Choi, Yu Jin; Park, Ky Young; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2004-04-01

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC, EC 4.1.1.9) is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of polyamines in higher plants, whereas ornithine decarboxylase represents the sole pathway of polyamine biosynthesis in animals. Previously, we characterized a genomic clone from Dianthus caryophyllus, in which the deduced polypeptide of ADC was 725 amino acids with a molecular mass of 78 kDa. In the present study, the ADC gene was subcloned into the pGEX4T1 expression vector in combination with glutathione S-transferase (GST). The fusion protein GST-ADC was water-soluble and thus was purified by sequential GSTrap-arginine affinity chromatography. A thrombin-mediated on-column cleavage reaction was employed to release free ADC from GST. Hiload superdex gel filtration FPLC was then used to obtain a highly purified ADC. The identity of the ADC was confirmed by immunoblot analysis, and its specific activity with respect to (14)C-arginine decarboxylation reaction was determined to be 0.9 CO(2) pkat mg(-1) protein. K(m) and V(max) of the reaction between ADC and the substrate were 0.077 +/- 0.001 mM and 6.0 +/- 0.6 pkat mg(-1) protein, respectively. ADC activity was reduced by 70% in the presence of 0.1 mM Cu(2+) or CO(2+), but was only marginally affected by Mg(2+), or Ca(2+) at the same concentration. Moreover, spermine at 1 mM significantly reduced its activity by 30%. PMID:15120115

  14. Purification of geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase from bovine brain.

    PubMed

    Sagami, H; Morita, Y; Korenaga, T; Ogura, K

    1994-01-01

    Geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) synthase was purified to homogeneity from bovine brain in a one-step affinity column procedure. For the construction of the affinity column, a farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) analog, O-(6-amino-1-hexyl)-P-farnesylmethyl phosphonophosphate, was synthesized and linked to the spacer of the matrix of Affigel 10 via the amino group. The native enzyme appeared to be homooligomer (150-195 kDa) with a molecular mass of the monomer of 37.5 kDa. The pI for the enzyme was 6.2. The Km values for dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP), geranyl diphosphate (GPP) and FPP were estimated to be 33 microM, 0.80 microM and 0.74 microM, respectively. The Km value for isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) in the presence of both IPP and FPP mixture was 2 microM. The ratio of the reaction velocity for formation of GGPP from DMAPP, GPP or FPP was 0.004:0.145:1. The intermediate FPP was formed in the reaction with GPP as an allylic primer. FPP synthase catalyzing the formation of FPP from DMAPP and IPP was also purified to homogeneity from the same organ by a similar affinity chromatography procedure using a GPP analog, O-(6-amino-1-hexyl)-P-geranylmethyl phosphonophosphate as a ligand. The enzyme was a homodimer with a monomeric molecular mass of 40.0 kDa. These results indicate that GGPP, a lipid precursor for the biosynthesis of a majority of prenylated proteins, is synthesized from DMAPP and IPP by the action of FPP synthase catalyzing the reactions C5-->C15 followed by the action of GGPP synthase catalyzing the reaction C15-->C20. PMID:7856400

  15. Structure of nucleoside diphosphate kinase from pacific shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) in binary complexes with purine and pyrimidine nucleoside diphosphates.

    PubMed

    López-Zavala, Alonso A; Quintero-Reyes, Idania E; Carrasco-Miranda, Jesús S; Stojanoff, Vivian; Weichsel, Andrzej; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R

    2014-09-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDK; EC 2.7.4.6) is an enzyme that catalyzes the third phosphorylation of nucleoside diphosphates, leading to nucleoside triphosphates for DNA replication. Expression of the NDK from Litopenaeus vannamei (LvNDK) is known to be regulated under viral infection. Also, as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry, LvNDK binds both purine and pyrimidine deoxynucleoside diphosphates with high binding affinity for dGDP and dADP and with no heat of binding interaction for dCDP [Quintero-Reyes et al. (2012), J. Bioenerg. Biomembr. 44, 325-331]. In order to investigate the differences in selectivity, LvNDK was crystallized as binary complexes with both acceptor (dADP and dCDP) and donor (ADP) phosphate-group nucleoside diphosphate substrates and their structures were determined. The three structures with purine or pyrimidine nucleotide ligands are all hexameric. Also, the binding of deoxy or ribonucleotides is similar, as in the former a water molecule replaces the hydrogen bond made by Lys11 to the 2'-hydroxyl group of the ribose moiety. This allows Lys11 to maintain a catalytically favourable conformation independently of the kind of sugar found in the nucleotide. Because of this, shrimp NDK may phosphorylate nucleotide analogues to inhibit the viral infections that attack this organism. PMID:25195883

  16. Structure of nucleoside diphosphate kinase from pacific shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) in binary complexes with purine and pyrimidine nucleoside diphosphates

    PubMed Central

    López-Zavala, Alonso A.; Quintero-Reyes, Idania E.; Carrasco-Miranda, Jesús S.; Stojanoff, Vivian; Weichsel, Andrzej; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDK; EC 2.7.4.6) is an enzyme that catalyzes the third phosphorylation of nucleoside diphosphates, leading to nucleoside triphosphates for DNA replication. Expression of the NDK from Litopenaeus vannamei (LvNDK) is known to be regulated under viral infection. Also, as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry, LvNDK binds both purine and pyrimidine deoxynucleoside diphosphates with high binding affinity for dGDP and dADP and with no heat of binding interaction for dCDP [Quintero-Reyes et al. (2012 ▶), J. Bioenerg. Biomembr. 44, 325–331]. In order to investigate the differences in selectivity, LvNDK was crystallized as binary complexes with both acceptor (dADP and dCDP) and donor (ADP) phosphate-group nucleoside diphosphate substrates and their structures were determined. The three structures with purine or pyrimidine nucleotide ligands are all hexameric. Also, the binding of deoxy or ribonucleotides is similar, as in the former a water molecule replaces the hydrogen bond made by Lys11 to the 2′-hydroxyl group of the ribose moiety. This allows Lys11 to maintain a catalytically favourable conformation independently of the kind of sugar found in the nucleotide. Because of this, shrimp NDK may phosphorylate nucleotide analogues to inhibit the viral infections that attack this organism. PMID:25195883

  17. Inhibition of nucleoside diphosphate kinase in rat liver mitochondria by added 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine.

    PubMed

    Valenti, D; Barile, M; Quagliariello, E; Passarella, S

    1999-02-12

    The effect of 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine on nucleoside diphosphate kinase of isolated rat liver mitochondria has been studied. This is done by monitoring the increase in the rate of oxygen uptake by nucleoside diphosphate (TDP, UDP, CDP or GDP) addition to mitochondria in state 4. It is shown that 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine inhibits the mitochondrial nucleoside diphosphate kinase in a competitive manner, with a Ki value of about 10 microM as measured for each tested nucleoside diphosphate. It is also shown that high concentrations of GDP prevent 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine inhibition of the nucleoside diphosphate kinase. PMID:10050777

  18. A kinetic analysis of Drosophila melanogaster dopa decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Black, B C; Smarrelli, J

    1986-03-01

    The kinetic mechanism of dopa decarboxylase (3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.28) was investigated in Drosophila melanogaster. Based on initial velocity and product inhibition studies, an ordered reaction is proposed for dopa decarboxylase. This kinetic mechanism is interpreted in the context of measured enzyme activities and the catecholamine pools in Drosophila. The 1(2)amd gene is immediately adjacent to the gene coding for dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) and determines hypersensitivity to alpha-methyldopa in Drosophila. Dopa decarboxylase does not decarboxylate alpha-methyldopa and hence does not generate a toxic product capable of inhibiting 1(2)amd gene function. We propose that the 1(2)amd gene is involved with an unknown catecholamine pathway involving dopa but not dopamine. PMID:3081033

  19. Keto-isovalerate decarboxylase enzymes and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    McElvain, Jessica; O'Keefe, Daniel P.; Paul, Brian James; Payne, Mark S.; Rothman, Steven Cary; He, Hongxian

    2016-01-19

    Provided herein are polypeptides and polynucleotides encoding such polypeptides which have ketoisovalerate decarboxylase activity. Also provided are recombinant host cells comprising such polypeptides and polynucleotides and methods of use thereof.

  20. The 1′,4′-iminopyrimidine tautomer of thiamin diphosphate is poised for catalysis in asymmetric active centers on enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Nemeria, Natalia; Chakraborty, Sumit; Baykal, Ahmet; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Patel, Mulchand S.; Jordan, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Thiamin diphosphate, a key coenzyme in sugar metabolism, is comprised of the thiazolium and 4′-aminopyrimidine aromatic rings, but only recently has participation of the 4′-aminopyrimidine moiety in catalysis gained wider acceptance. We report the use of electronic spectroscopy to identify the various tautomeric forms of the 4′-aminopyrimidine ring on four thiamin diphosphate enzymes, all of which decarboxylate pyruvate: the E1 component of human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, the E1 subunit of Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, yeast pyruvate decarboxylase, and pyruvate oxidase from Lactobacillus plantarum. It is shown that, according to circular dichroism spectroscopy, both the 1′,4′-iminopyrimidine and the 4′-aminopyrimidine tautomers coexist on the E1 component of human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and pyruvate oxidase. Because both tautomers are seen simultaneously, these two enzymes provide excellent evidence for nonidentical active centers (asymmetry) in solution in these multimeric enzymes. Asymmetry of active centers can also be induced upon addition of acetylphosphinate, an excellent electrostatic pyruvate mimic, which participates in an enzyme-catalyzed addition to form a stable adduct, resembling the common predecarboxylation thiamin-bound intermediate, which exists in its 1′,4′-iminopyrimidine form. The identification of the 1′,4′-iminopyrimidine tautomer on four enzymes is almost certainly applicable to all thiamin diphosphate enzymes: this tautomer is the intramolecular trigger to generate the reactive ylide/carbene at the thiazolium C2 position in the first fundamental step of thiamin catalysis. PMID:17182735

  1. Inhibition of monoterpene cyclases by inert analogues of geranyl diphosphate and linalyl diphosphate☆

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Frank; Zhao, Yuxin; Santhamma, Bindu; Assink, Bryce; Coates, Robert M.; Croteau, Rodney B.

    2007-01-01

    The tightly coupled nature of the reaction sequence catalyzed by monoterpene synthases has prevented direct observation of the topologically required isomerization step leading from geranyl diphosphate to the enzyme-bound, tertiary allylic intermediate linalyl diphosphate, which then cyclizes to the various monoterpene skeletons. X-ray crystal structures of these enzymes complexed with suitable analogues of the substrate and intermediate could provide a clearer view of this universal, but cryptic, step of monoterpenoid cyclase catalysis. Toward this end, the functionally inert analogues 2-fluorogeranyl diphosphate, (±)-2-fluorolinalyl diphosphate, and (3R)- and (3S)-homolinalyl diphosphates (2,6-dimethyl-2-vinyl-5-heptenyl diphosphates) were prepared, and compared to the previously described substrate analogue 3-azageranyl diphosphate (3-aza-2,3-dihydrogeranyl diphosphate) as inhibitors and potential crystallization aids with two representative monoterpenoid cyclases, (−)-limonene synthase and (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase. Although these enantioselective synthases readily distinguished between (3R)- and (3S)-homolinalyl diphosphates, both of which were more effective inhibitors than was 3-azageranyl diphosphate, the fluorinated analogues proved to be the most potent competitive inhibitors and have recently yielded informative liganded structures with limonene synthase. PMID:17949678

  2. Evaluation of oxalate decarboxylase and oxalate oxidase for industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Cassland, Pierre; Sjöde, Anders; Winestrand, Sandra; Jönsson, Leif J; Nilvebrant, Nils-Olof

    2010-05-01

    Increased recirculation of process water has given rise to problems with formation of calcium oxalate incrusts (scaling) in the pulp and paper industry and in forest biorefineries. The potential in using oxalate decarboxylase from Aspergillus niger for oxalic acid removal in industrial bleaching plant filtrates containing oxalic acid was examined and compared with barley oxalate oxidase. Ten different filtrates from chemical pulping were selected for the evaluation. Oxalate decarboxylase degraded oxalic acid faster than oxalate oxidase in eight of the filtrates, while oxalate oxidase performed better in one filtrate. One of the filtrates inhibited both enzymes. The potential inhibitory effect of selected compounds on the enzymatic activity was tested. Oxalate decarboxylase was more sensitive than oxalate oxidase to hydrogen peroxide. Oxalate decarboxylase was not as sensitive to chlorate and chlorite as oxalate oxidase. Up to 4 mM chlorate ions, the highest concentration tested, had no inhibitory effect on oxalate decarboxylase. Analysis of the filtrates suggests that high concentrations of chlorate present in some of the filtrates were responsible for the higher sensitivity of oxalate oxidase in these filtrates. Oxalate decarboxylase was thus a better choice than oxalate oxidase for treatment of filtrates from chlorine dioxide bleaching. PMID:19763895

  3. Unprecedented acetoacetyl-coenzyme A synthesizing enzyme of the thiolase superfamily involved in the mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Eiji; Tomita, Takeo; Sawa, Ryuichi; Nishiyama, Makoto; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa

    2010-06-22

    Acetoacetyl-CoA is the precursor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA in the mevalonate pathway, which is essential for terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. Acetoacetyl-CoA is also the precursor of poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate, a polymer belonging to the polyester class produced by microorganisms. The de novo synthesis of acetoacetyl-CoA is usually catalyzed by acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase via a thioester-dependent Claisen condensation reaction between two molecules of acetyl-CoA. Here, we report that nphT7, found in the mevalonate pathway gene cluster from a soil-isolated Streptomyces sp. strain, encodes an unusual acetoacetyl-CoA synthesizing enzyme. The recombinant enzyme overexpressed in Escherichia coli catalyzes a single condensation of acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA to give acetoacetyl-CoA and CoA. Replacement of malonyl-CoA with malonyl-(acyl carrier protein) resulted in loss of the condensation activity. No acetoacetyl-CoA synthesizing activity was detected through the condensation of two molecules of acetyl-CoA. Based on these properties of NphT7, we propose to name this unusual enzyme of the thiolase superfamily acetoacetyl-CoA synthase. Coexpression of nphT7 with the HMG-CoA synthase gene and the HMG-CoA reductase gene in a heterologous host allowed 3.5-fold higher production of mevalonate than when only the HMG-CoA synthase and HMG-CoA reductase genes were expressed. This result suggests that nphT7 can be used to significantly increase the concentration of acetoacetyl-CoA in cells, eventually leading to the production of useful terpenoids and poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate. PMID:20534558

  4. Synthesis, Raman and Rietveld analysis of thorium diphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Clavier, Nicolas Dacheux, Nicolas; Beaunier, Patricia

    2008-12-15

    We report the synthesis of thorium diphosphate ThP{sub 2}O{sub 7} and its study by Raman spectroscopy and Rietveld analysis. This compound has been found to be closely related to the zirconium diphosphate type, with space group Pa-3 and a=8.7601(3) A. No superstructure was observed. The metastability of ThP{sub 2}O{sub 7} appears to stem from the six-fold oxygen environment of Th{sup IV}, a unique case in the structural chemistry of this cation. - Grapical abstract: The cubic structure of ThP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, built of ThO{sub 6} octahedra and P{sub 2}O{sub 7} ditetrahedra.

  5. Inhibition of squalene synthase but not squalene cyclase prevents mevalonate-mediated suppression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase synthesis at a posttranscriptional level.

    PubMed

    Peffley, D M; Gayen, A K

    1997-01-15

    Previously, we found that mevalonate-derived products together with an oxysterol regulated reductase synthesis at a posttranscriptional level. To determine which products were responsible for this regulation, either the squalene synthase inhibitor zaragozic acid A or the squalene cyclase inhibitor 4,4,10-beta-trimethyl-trans-decal-3beta-ol (TMD) was added to lovastatin-treated Syrian hamster cells in conjunction with mevalonate. Mevalonate alone decreased reductase synthesis 50% compared with lovastatin-treated cells. In contrast, when both zaragozic acid A and mevalonate were added to lovastatin-treated cells, there was no change in reductase synthesis. With either treatment, reductase mRNA levels did not change compared with lovastatin-treated cells. When both 25-hydroxycholesterol and mevalonate were added to lovastatin-treated cells, reductase synthesis and mRNA levels were decreased 95 and 50%, respectively. The 10-fold difference between changes in reductase synthesis and mRNA levels under these conditions reflects a specific effect of mevalonate-derived isoprenoids on reductase synthesis at the translational level. In contrast, coincubation of cells with mevalonate plus 25-hydroxycholesterol in the presence of zaragozic acid decreased reductase synthesis and mRNA levels 60 and 50%, respectively, compared with lovastatin-treated cells. Moreover, degradation of reductase was increased approximately 7-fold in cells treated with mevalonate alone but only 3-fold in cells treated with mevalonate and zaragozic acid A. These results indicate that isoprenoid products between mevalonate and squalene affect reductase at a posttranslational level by increasing degradation but do not regulate reductase synthesis at a posttranscriptional level. In contrast, when both TMD and mevalonate were added to lovastatin-treated cells, reductase synthesis was decreased approximately 50% with no corresponding decrease in reductase mRNA levels, similar to mevalonate only. Reductase

  6. Formation of a Novel Macrocyclic Alkaloid from the Unnatural Farnesyl Diphosphate Analogue Anilinogeranyl Diphosphate by 5-Epi-Aristolochene Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Rising, Kathleen A.; Crenshaw, Charisse M.; Koo, Hyun Jo; Subramanian, Thangaiah; Chehade, Kareem A. H.; Starks, Courtney; Allen, Keith D.; Andres, Douglas A.; Spielmann, H. Peter; Noel, Joseph P.; Chappell, Joe

    2015-01-01

    As part of an effort to identify substrate analogs suitable for helping to resolve structural features important for terpene synthases, the inhibition of 5-epi-aristolochene biosynthesis from farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) by the tobacco 5-epi-aristolochene synthase incubated with anilinogeranyl diphosphate (AGPP) was examined. The apparent noncompetitive nature of the inhibition supported further assessment of how AGPP might be bound to crystallographic forms of the enzyme. Surprisingly, the bound form of the inhibitor appeared to have undergone a cyclization event consistent with the native mechanism associated with FPP catalysis. Biocatalytic formation of a novel 13-membered macrocyclic paracyclophane alkaloid was confirmed by high-resolution GC-MS and NMR analysis. This work provides insights into new biosynthetic means for generating novel, functionally diversified, medium-sized terpene alkaloids. PMID:25897591

  7. Synergy between methylerythritol phosphate pathway and mevalonate pathway for isoprene production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Gao, Xiang; Jiang, Yu; Sun, Bingbing; Gao, Fang; Yang, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Isoprene, a key building block of synthetic rubber, is currently produced entirely from petrochemical sources. In this work, we engineered both the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway and the mevalonate (MVA) pathway for isoprene production in E. coli. The synergy between the MEP pathway and the MVA pathway was demonstrated by the production experiment, in which overexpression of both pathways improved the isoprene yield about 20-fold and 3-fold, respectively, compared to overexpression of the MEP pathway or the MVA pathway alone. The (13)C metabolic flux analysis revealed that simultaneous utilization of the two pathways resulted in a 4.8-fold increase in the MEP pathway flux and a 1.5-fold increase in the MVA pathway flux. The synergy of the dual pathway was further verified by quantifying intracellular flux responses of the MEP pathway and the MVA pathway to fosmidomycin treatment and mevalonate supplementation. Our results strongly suggest that coupling of the complementary reducing equivalent demand and ATP requirement plays an important role in the synergy of the dual pathway. Fed-batch cultivation of the engineered strain overexpressing the dual pathway resulted in production of 24.0g/L isoprene with a yield of 0.267g/g of glucose. The synergy of the MEP pathway and the MVA pathway also successfully increased the lycopene productivity in E. coli, which demonstrates that it can be used to improve the production of a broad range of terpenoids in microorganisms. PMID:27174717

  8. In vitro and in vivo anticancer effects of mevalonate pathway modulation on human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, P; Mukthavaram, R; Chao, Y; Nomura, N; Bharati, I S; Fogal, V; Pastorino, S; Teng, D; Cong, X; Pingle, S C; Kapoor, S; Shetty, K; Aggrawal, A; Vali, S; Abbasi, T; Chien, S; Kesari, S

    2014-01-01

    Background: The increasing usage of statins (the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) has revealed a number of unexpected beneficial effects, including a reduction in cancer risk. Methods: We investigated the direct anticancer effects of different statins approved for clinical use on human breast and brain cancer cells. We also explored the effects of statins on cancer cells using in silico simulations. Results: In vitro studies showed that cerivastatin, pitavastatin, and fluvastatin were the most potent anti-proliferative, autophagy inducing agents in human cancer cells including stem cell-like primary glioblastoma cell lines. Consistently, pitavastatin was more effective than fluvastatin in inhibiting U87 tumour growth in vivo. Intraperitoneal injection was much better than oral administration in delaying glioblastoma growth. Following statin treatment, tumour cells were rescued by adding mevalonate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. Knockdown of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthetase-1 also induced strong cell autophagy and cell death in vitro and reduced U87 tumour growth in vivo. These data demonstrate that statins main effect is via targeting the mevalonate synthesis pathway in tumour cells. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates the potent anticancer effects of statins. These safe and well-tolerated drugs need to be further investigated as cancer chemotherapeutics in comprehensive clinical studies. PMID:25093497

  9. Effect of mevalonic acid on cholesterol synthesis in bovine intramuscular and subcutaneous adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaomu; You, Wei; Cheng, Haijian; Zhang, Qingfeng; Song, Enliang; Wan, Fachun; Han, Hong; Liu, Guifen

    2016-02-01

    Mevalonic acid (MVA) is a key material in the synthesis of cholesterol; indeed, intracellular cholesterol synthesis is also called the mevalonic acid pathway. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) is an essential enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. This study suggests that MVA may play an important role in the differentiation of bovine adipose tissue in vivo. We investigated differential mRNA expression in bovine intramuscular preadipocytes (BIPs) and bovine subcutaneous preadipocytes (BSPs) by culturing cells from the longissimus dorsi muscle and subcutaneous fat tissues of Luxi yellow cattle. The morphology of lipid accumulation of bovine preadipocytes was detected by Oil Red O staining, and total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) levels were measured. Temporospatial expression of HMGR was investigated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The TC, LDLC, and HDLC content did not significantly differ over time but increased slowly with increasing MVA concentration. HMGR expression increased over time and with increasing concentrations of MVA. MVA increased adipose cell proliferation in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. MVA stimulated HMGR expression in two cell types and its influence on adipocyte differentiation. PMID:26122311

  10. GAME9 regulates the biosynthesis of steroidal alkaloids and upstream isoprenoids in the plant mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Pablo D; Sonawane, Prashant D; Pollier, Jacob; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Dewangan, Veena; Weithorn, Efrat; Tal, Lior; Meir, Sagit; Rogachev, Ilana; Malitsky, Sergey; Giri, Ashok P; Goossens, Alain; Burdman, Saul; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-01-01

    Steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) are cholesterol-derived molecules produced by solanaceous species. They contribute to pathogen defence but are toxic to humans and considered as anti-nutritional compounds. Here we show that GLYCOALKALOID METABOLISM 9 (GAME9), an APETALA2/Ethylene Response Factor, related to regulators of alkaloid production in tobacco and Catharanthus roseus, controls SGA biosynthesis. GAME9 knockdown and overexpression in tomato and potato alters expression of SGAs and upstream mevalonate pathway genes including the cholesterol biosynthesis gene STEROL SIDE CHAIN REDUCTASE 2 (SSR2). Levels of SGAs, C24-alkylsterols and the upstream mevalonate and cholesterol pathways intermediates are modified in these plants. Δ(7)-STEROL-C5(6)-DESATURASE (C5-SD) in the hitherto unresolved cholesterol pathway is a direct target of GAME9. Transactivation and promoter-binding assays show that GAME9 exerts its activity either directly or cooperatively with the SlMYC2 transcription factor as in the case of the C5-SD gene promoter. Our findings provide insight into the regulation of SGA biosynthesis and means for manipulating these metabolites in crops. PMID:26876023

  11. GAME9 regulates the biosynthesis of steroidal alkaloids and upstream isoprenoids in the plant mevalonate pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Pablo D.; Sonawane, Prashant D.; Pollier, Jacob; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Dewangan, Veena; Weithorn, Efrat; Tal, Lior; Meir, Sagit; Rogachev, Ilana; Malitsky, Sergey; Giri, Ashok P.; Goossens, Alain; Burdman, Saul; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-01-01

    Steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) are cholesterol-derived molecules produced by solanaceous species. They contribute to pathogen defence but are toxic to humans and considered as anti-nutritional compounds. Here we show that GLYCOALKALOID METABOLISM 9 (GAME9), an APETALA2/Ethylene Response Factor, related to regulators of alkaloid production in tobacco and Catharanthus roseus, controls SGA biosynthesis. GAME9 knockdown and overexpression in tomato and potato alters expression of SGAs and upstream mevalonate pathway genes including the cholesterol biosynthesis gene STEROL SIDE CHAIN REDUCTASE 2 (SSR2). Levels of SGAs, C24-alkylsterols and the upstream mevalonate and cholesterol pathways intermediates are modified in these plants. Δ(7)-STEROL-C5(6)-DESATURASE (C5-SD) in the hitherto unresolved cholesterol pathway is a direct target of GAME9. Transactivation and promoter-binding assays show that GAME9 exerts its activity either directly or cooperatively with the SlMYC2 transcription factor as in the case of the C5-SD gene promoter. Our findings provide insight into the regulation of SGA biosynthesis and means for manipulating these metabolites in crops. PMID:26876023

  12. Ornithine Decarboxylase, Polyamines, and Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids in Senecio and Crotalaria

    PubMed Central

    Birecka, Helena; Birecki, Mieczyslaw; Cohen, Eric J.; Bitonti, Alan J.; McCann, Peter P.

    1988-01-01

    When tested for ornithine and arginine decarboxylases, pyrrolizidine alkaloid-bearing Senecio riddellii, S. longilobus (Compositae), and Crotalaria retusa (Leguminosae) plants exhibited only ornithine decarboxylase activity. This contrasts with previous studies of four species of pyrrolizidine alkaloid-bearing Heliotropium (Boraginaceae) in which arginine decarboxylase activity was very high relative to that of ornithine decarboxylase. Unlike Heliotropium angiospermum and Heliotropium indicum, in which endogenous arginine was the only detectable precursor of putrescine channeled into pyrrolizidines, in the species studied here—using difluoromethylornithine and difluoromethylarginine as the enzyme inhibitors—endogenous ornithine was the main if not the only precursor of putrescine converted into the alkaloid aminoalcohol moiety. In S. riddellii and C. retusa at flowering, ornithine decarboxylase activity was present mainly in leaves, especially the young ones. However, other very young organs such as inflorescence and growing roots exhibited much lower or very low activities; the enzyme activity in stems was negligible. There was no correlation between the enzyme activity and polyamine or alkaloid content in either species. In both species only free polyamines were detected except for C. retusa roots and inflorescence—with relatively very high levels of these compounds—in which conjugated putrescine, spermidine, and spermine were also found; agmatine was not identified by HPLC in any plant organ except for C. retusa roots with rhizobial nodules. Organ- or age-dependent differences in the polyamine levels were small or insignificant. The highest alkaloid contents were found in young leaves and inflorescence. PMID:16665870

  13. Acid-Base and Metal Ion-Coordinating Properties of Pyrimidine-Nucleoside 5'-Diphosphates (CDP, UDP, dTDP) and of Several Simple Diphosphate Monoesters. Establishment of Relations between Complex Stability and Diphosphate Basicity.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, S. Ali A.; Song, Bin; Gregán, Fridrich; Sigel, Helmut

    1999-02-01

    The stability constants of the 1:1 complexes formed between Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), or Cd(2+) and the pyrimidine-nucleoside 5'-diphosphates CDP(3)(-), UDP(3)(-), and dTDP(3)(-) (= NDP(3)(-)) were determined by potentiometric pH titration in aqueous solution (I = 0.1 M, NaNO(3); 25 degrees C). For comparison, the same values were measured for the corresponding complexes with the simple diphosphate monoesters (R-DP(3)(-)) phenyl diphosphate, methyl diphosphate, and n-butyl diphosphate. The acidity constants for H(3)(CDP)(+/-), H(2)(UDP)(-), H(2)(dTDP)(-), and H(2)(R-DP)(-) were measured also via potentiometric pH titration and various comparisons with related constants are made. By plotting log versus for the complexes of all six diphosphates mentioned and by a careful evaluation of the deviation of the various data pairs from the straight-line correlations, the expectation is confirmed that in the M(UDP)(-) and M(dTDP)(-) complexes the metal ion is only diphosphate-coordinated. The straight-line equations, which result from the mentioned correlations, together with the pK(a) value of a given monoprotonated diphosphate monoester allow now to predict the stability of the corresponding M(R-DP)(-) complexes. In this way, the experimentally determined stability constants for the M(CDP)(-) complexes are evaluated and it is concluded that the pyridine-like N3 of the cytosine residue does not participate in complex formation; i.e., the stability of the M(CDP)(-) complexes is also solely determined by the coordination tendency of the diphosphate residue. In all the monoprotonated M(H;NDP) and M(H;R-DP) complexes both, H(+) and M(2+), are bound at the diphosphate group. Only the Cu(H;CDP) complex exists in aqueous solution in the form of three different isomers: about 15% of the species have Cu(2+) and H(+) at the diphosphate residue, in about 13% Cu(2+) is bound at N3 and H(+) at the terminal beta-phosphate group, and the

  14. Unexpected reactivity of 2-fluorolinalyl diphosphate in the active site of crystalline 2-methylisoborneol synthase

    PubMed Central

    Köksal, Mustafa; Chou, Wayne K. W.; Cane, David E.; Christianson, David W.

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structure of 2-methylisoborneol synthase (MIBS) from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) has been determined in its unliganded state and in complex with 2 Mg2+ ions and cis-2-fluorogeranyl diphosphate at 1.85 Å and 2.00 Å resolution, respectively. Under normal circumstances, MIBS catalyzes the cyclization of the naturally-occurring, non-canonical 11-carbon isoprenoid substrate, 2-methylgeranyl diphosphate, which first undergoes an ionization-isomerization-ionization sequence through the tertiary diphosphate intermediate 2-methyllinalyl diphosphate to enable subsequent cyclization chemistry. MIBS does not exhibit catalytic activity with 2-fluorogeranyl diphosphate, and we recently reported the crystal structure of MIBS complexed with this unreactive substrate analogue [Köksal, M., Chou, W. K. W., Cane, D. E., Christianson, D. W. (2012) Biochemistry 51, 3011–3020]. However, cocrystallization of MIBS with the fluorinated analogue of the tertiary allylic diphosphate intermediate, 2-fluorolinalyl diphosphate, reveals unexpected reactivity for the intermediate analogue and yields the crystal structure of the complex with the primary allylic diphosphate, 2-fluoroneryl diphosphate. Comparison with the structure of the unliganded enzyme reveals that the crystalline enzyme active site remains partially open, presumably due to the binding of only 2 Mg2+ ions. Assays in solution indicate that MIBS catalyzes the generation of (1R)-(+)-camphor from the substrate 2-fluorolinalyl diphosphate, suggesting that both 2-fluorolinalyl diphosphate and 2-methyllinalyl diphosphate follow the identical cyclization mechanism leading to 2-substituted isoborneol products; however, the initially generated 2-fluoroisoborneol cyclization product is unstable and undergoes elimination of hydrogen fluoride to yield (1R)-(+)-camphor. PMID:23844678

  15. Snapshot of a Reaction Intermediate: Analysis of Benzoylformate Decarboxylase in Complex with a Benzoylphosphonate Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Gabriel S.; Kneen, Malea M.; Chakraborty, Sumit; Baykal, Ahmet T.; Nemeria, Natalia; Yep, Alejandra; Ruby, David I.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Kenyon, George L.; McLeish, Michael J.; Jordan, Frank; Ringe, Dagmar

    2009-04-22

    Benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFDC) is a thiamin diphosphate- (ThDP-) dependent enzyme acting on aromatic substrates. In addition to its metabolic role in the mandelate pathway, BFDC shows broad substrate specificity coupled with tight stereo control in the carbon-carbon bond-forming reverse reaction, making it a useful biocatalyst for the production of chiral-hydroxy ketones. The reaction of methyl benzoylphosphonate (MBP), an analogue of the natural substrate benzoylformate, with BFDC results in the formation of a stable analogue (C2{alpha}-phosphonomandelyl-ThDP) of the covalent ThDP-substrate adduct C2{alpha}-mandelyl-ThDP. Formation of the stable adduct is confirmed both by formation of a circular dichroism band characteristic of the 1',4'-iminopyrimidine tautomeric form of ThDP (commonly observed when ThDP forms tetrahedral complexes with its substrates) and by high-resolution mass spectrometry of the reaction mixture. In addition, the structure of BFDC with the MBP inhibitor was solved by X-ray crystallography to a spatial resolution of 1.37 {angstrom} (PDB ID 3FSJ). The electron density clearly shows formation of a tetrahedral adduct between the C2 atom of ThDP and the carbonyl carbon atom of the MBP. This adduct resembles the intermediate from the penultimate step of the carboligation reaction between benzaldehyde and acetaldehyde. The combination of real-time kinetic information via stopped-flow circular dichroism with steady-state data from equilibrium circular dichroism measurements and X-ray crystallography reveals details of the first step of the reaction catalyzed by BFDC. The MBP-ThDP adduct on BFDC is compared to the recently solved structure of the same adduct on benzaldehyde lyase, another ThDP-dependent enzyme capable of catalyzing aldehyde condensation with high stereospecificity.

  16. Genetic analysis of the pyruvate decarboxylase reaction in yeast glycolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, H D; Zimmermann, F K

    1982-01-01

    Six different pyruvate decarboxylase mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated. They belong to two unlinked complementation groups. Evidence is presented that one group is affected in a structural gene. The fact that five of the six mutants had residual pyruvate decarboxylase activity provided the opportunity for an intensive physiological characterization. It was shown that the loss of enzyme activity in vitro is reflected in a lower fermentation rate, an increased pyruvate secretion, and slower growth on a 2% glucose medium. The different effects of antimycin A on leaky mutants grown on ethanol versus the same mutants grown on glucose support the view that glucose induces some of the glycolytic enzymes, especially pyruvate decarboxylase. PMID:7050079

  17. Expression of the cytoplasmic mevalonate pathway in chloroplasts to reduce substrate limitations for cytoplasmically-produced terpenoid secondary products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    All products of isoprenoid metabolism originate with the C5 non-allylic substrate, isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP). IPP is produced in plants by two distinct pathways, the mevalonate pathway (MEV) in the cytosol and the 2 C methyl-D-erythritol 4 phosphate (MEP) pathway in plastids. A multi-gene a...

  18. Differential roles of the mevalonate pathway in the development and survival of mouse Purkinje cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Barszczyk, Andrew; Sun, Hong-Shuo; Quan, Yi; Zheng, Wenhua; Charlton, Milton P; Feng, Zhong-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is an important locus for motor learning and higher cognitive functions, and Purkinje cells constitute a key component of its circuit. Biochemically, significant turnover of cholesterol occurs in Purkinje cells, causing the activation of the mevalonate pathway. The mevalonate pathway has important roles in cell survival and development. In this study, we investigated the outcomes of mevalonate inhibition in immature and mature mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells in culture. Specifically, we found that the inhibition of the mevalonate pathway by mevastatin resulted in cell death, and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate (GGPP) supplementation significantly enhanced neuronal survival. The surviving immature Purkinje cells, however, exhibited dendritic developmental deficits. The morphology of mature cells was not affected. The inhibition of squalene synthase by zaragozic acid caused impaired dendritic development, similar to that seen in the GGPP-rescued Purkinje cells. Our results indicate GGPP is required for cell survival and squalene synthase for the cell development of Purkinje cells. Abnormalities in Purkinje cells are linked to motor-behavioral learning disorders such as cerebellar ataxia. Thus, serious caution should be taken when using drugs that inhibit geranylgeranylation or the squalene-cholesterol branch of the pathway in the developing stage. PMID:24973985

  19. Silver indium diphosphate, AgInP(2)O(7).

    PubMed

    Zouihri, Hafid; Saadi, Mohamed; Jaber, Boujemaa; El Ammari, Lehcen

    2010-01-01

    Polycrystalline material of the title compound, AgInP(2)O(7), was synthesized by traditional high-temperature solid-state methods and single crystals were grown from the melt of a mixture of AgInP(2)O(7) and B(2)O(3) as flux in a platinium crucible. The structure consists of InO(6) octa-hedra, which are corner-shared to PO(4) tetra-hedra into a three-dimensional network with hexa-gonal channels running parallel to the c axis. The silver cation, located in the channel, is bonded to seven O atoms of the [InP(2)O(7)] framework with Ag-O distances ranging from 2.370 (2) to 3.015 (2) Å. The P(2)O(7) diphosphate anion is characterized by a P-O-P angle of 137.27 (9) and a nearly eclipsed conformation. AgInP(2)O(7) is isotypic with the M(I)FeP(2)O(7) (M(I) = Na, K, Rb, Cs and Ag) diphosphate family. PMID:21522510

  20. Adenylate kinase complements nucleoside diphosphate kinase deficiency in nucleotide metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Q; Inouye, M

    1996-01-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase is a ubiquitous nonspecific enzyme that evidently is designed to catalyze in vivo ATP-dependent synthesis of ribo- and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates from the corresponding diphosphates. Because Escherichia coli contains only one copy of ndk, the structural gene for this enzyme, we were surprised to find that ndk disruption yields bacteria that are still viable. These mutant cells contain a protein with a small amount NDP kinase activity. The protein responsible for this activity was purified and identified as adenylate kinase. This enzyme, also called myokinase, catalyzes the reversible ATP-dependent synthesis of ADP from AMP. We found that this enzyme from E. coli as well as from higher eukaryotes has a broad substrate specificity displaying dual enzymatic functions. Among the nucleoside monophosphate kinases tested, only adenylate kinase was found to have NDP kinase activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of NDP kinase activity associated with adenylate kinase. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8650159

  1. MIREX INDUCES ORNITHINE DECARBOXYLASE ACTIVITY IN FEMALE RAT LIVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis, was significantly induced in female rat liver following oral administration of the pesticide, mirex. fter dual oral exposure (120 mg/kg; 21 and 4 hrs prior to sacrifice) induction of ODC activity in r...

  2. Structure and Function of a "Head-to-Middle" Prenyltransferase: Lavandulyl Diphosphate Synthase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meixia; Chen, Chun-Chi; Chen, Lu; Xiao, Xiansha; Zheng, Yingying; Huang, Jian-Wen; Liu, Weidong; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Cheng, Ya-Shan; Feng, Xinxin; Oldfield, Eric; Guo, Rey-Ting; Ma, Yanhe

    2016-04-01

    We report the first X-ray structure of the unique "head-to-middle" monoterpene synthase, lavandulyl diphosphate synthase (LPPS). LPPS catalyzes the condensation of two molecules of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) to form lavandulyl diphosphate, a precursor to the fragrance lavandulol. The structure is similar to that of the bacterial cis-prenyl synthase, undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS), and contains an allylic site (S1) in which DMAPP ionizes and a second site (S2) which houses the DMAPP nucleophile. Both S-thiolo-dimethylallyl diphosphate and S-thiolo-isopentenyl diphosphate bind intact to S2, but are cleaved to (thio)diphosphate, in S1. His78 (Asn in UPPS) is essential for catalysis and is proposed to facilitate diphosphate release in S1, while the P1 phosphate in S2 abstracts a proton from the lavandulyl carbocation to form the LPP product. The results are of interest since they provide the first structure and structure-based mechanism of this unusual prenyl synthase. PMID:26922900

  3. A procedure for the preparation and isolation of nucleoside-5’-diphosphates

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Heidi J; Bolt, Hannah L

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tris[bis(triphenylphosphoranylidene)ammonium] pyrophosphate (PPN pyrophosphate) was used in the SN2 displacements of the tosylate ion from 5’-tosylnucleosides to afford nucleoside-5’-diphosphates. Selective precipitation permitted the direct isolation of nucleoside-5’-diphosphates from crude reaction mixtures. PMID:25977720

  4. Synthesis of the coenzymes adenosine diphosphate glucose, guanosine diphosphate glucose, and cytidine diphosphoethanolamine under primitive Earth conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mar, A.; Oro, J.

    1991-01-01

    The nonenzymatic synthesis of the coenzymes adenosine diphosphate glucose (ADPG), guanosine diphosphate glucose (GDPG), and cytidine diphosphoethanolamine (CDP-ethanolamine) has been carried out under conditions considered to have been prevalent on the early Earth. The production of these compounds was performed by allowing simple precursor molecules to react under aqueous solutions, at moderate temperatures and short periods of time, with mediation by cyanamide or urea. These two condensing agents are considered to have been present in significant amounts on the primitive Earth and have been previously used in the nonenzymatic synthesis of several other important biochemical compounds. In our experiments, ADPG was obtained by heating glucose-1-phosphate (G1P) and ATP in the presence of cyanamide for 24 h at 70 degrees C. The reaction of G1P and GTP under the same conditions yielded GDPG. The cyanamide-mediated production of CDP-ethanolamine was carried out by reacting a mixture of ethanolamine phosphate and CTP for 24 h at 70 degrees C. The separation and identification of the reaction products was carried out by paper chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, high performance thin-layer chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, both normal and reverse-phase, UV spectroscopy, enzymatic assays, and acid hydrolysis. Due to the mild conditions employed, and to the relative ease of these reactions, these studies offer a simple attractive system for the nonenzymatic synthesis of phosphorylated high-energy metabolic intermediates under conditions considered to have been prevalent on the ancient Earth.

  5. Characterization of three novel isoprenyl diphosphate synthases from the terpenoid rich mango fruit.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ram; Pandit, Sagar; Chidley, Hemangi; Nagel, Raimund; Schmidt, Axel; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Pujari, Keshav; Giri, Ashok; Gupta, Vidya

    2013-10-01

    Mango (cv. Alphonso) is popular due to its highly attractive, terpenoid-rich flavor. Although Alphonso is clonally propagated, its fruit-flavor composition varies when plants are grown in different geo-climatic zones. Isoprenyl diphosphate synthases catalyze important branch-point reactions in terpenoid biosynthesis, providing precursors for common terpenoids such as volatile terpenes, sterols and carotenoids. Two geranyl diphosphate synthases and a farnesyl diphosphate synthase were isolated from Alphonso fruits, cloned for recombinant expression and found to produce the respective products. Although, one of the geranyl diphosphate synthases showed high sequence similarity to the geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthases, it did not exhibit geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthesizing activity. When modeled, this geranyl diphosphate synthase and farnesyl diphosphate synthase structures were found to be homologous with the reference structures, having all the catalytic side chains appropriately oriented. The optimum temperature for both the geranyl diphosphate synthases was 40 °C and that for farnesyl diphosphate synthase was 25 °C. This finding correlated well with the dominance of monoterpenes in comparison to sesquiterpenes in the fruits of Alphonso mango in which the mesocarp temperature is higher during ripening than development. The absence of activity of these enzymes with the divalent metal ion other than Mg(2+) indicated their adaptation to the Mg(2+) rich mesocarp. The typical expression pattern of these genes through the ripening stages of fruits from different cultivation localities depicting the highest transcript levels of these genes in the stage preceding the maximum terpene accumulation indicated the involvement of these genes in the biosynthesis of volatile terpenes. PMID:23911730

  6. A quinazoline-based HDAC inhibitor affects gene expression pathways involved in cholesterol biosynthesis and mevalonate in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z; Bishop, K S; Sutherland, H; Marlow, G; Murray, P; Denny, W A; Ferguson, L R

    2016-03-01

    Chronic inflammation can lead to the development of cancers and resolution of inflammation is an ongoing challenge. Inflammation can result from dysregulation of the epigenome and a number of compounds that modify the epigenome are in clinical use. In this study the anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects of a quinazoline epigenetic-modulator compound were determined in prostate cancer cell lines using a non-hypothesis driven transcriptomics strategy utilising the Affymetrix PrimeView® Human Gene Expression microarray. GATHER and IPA software were used to analyse the data and to provide information on significantly modified biological processes, pathways and networks. A number of genes were differentially expressed in both PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines. The top canonical pathways that frequently arose across both cell lines at a number of time points included cholesterol biosynthesis and metabolism, and the mevalonate pathway. Targeting of sterol and mevalonate pathways may be a powerful anticancer approach. PMID:26759180

  7. Binding of nucleotides to nucleoside diphosphate kinase: a calorimetric study.

    PubMed

    Cervoni, L; Lascu, I; Xu, Y; Gonin, P; Morr, M; Merouani, M; Janin, J; Giartosio, A

    2001-04-17

    The source of affinity for substrates of human nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinases is particularly important in that its knowledge could be used to design more effective antiviral nucleoside drugs (e.g., AZT). We carried out a microcalorimetric study of the binding of enzymes from two organisms to various nucleotides. Isothermal titration calorimetry has been used to characterize the binding in terms of Delta G degrees, Delta H degrees and Delta S degrees. Thermodynamic parameters of the interaction of ADP with the hexameric NDP kinase from Dictyostelium discoideum and with the tetrameric enzyme from Myxococcus xanthus, at 20 degrees C, were similar and, in both cases, binding was enthalpy-driven. The interactions of ADP, 2'deoxyADP, GDP, and IDP with the eukaryotic enzyme differed in enthalpic and entropic terms, whereas the Delta G degrees values obtained were similar due to enthalpy--entropy compensation. The binding of the enzyme to nonphysiological nucleotides, such as AMP--PNP, 3'deoxyADP, and 3'-deoxy-3'-amino-ADP, appears to differ in several respects. Crystallography of the protein bound to 3'-deoxy-3'-amino-ADP showed that the drug was in a distorted position, and was unable to interact correctly with active site side chains. The interaction of pyrimidine nucleoside diphosphates with the hexameric enzyme is characterized by a lower affinity than that with purine nucleotides. Titration showed the stoichiometry of the interaction to be abnormal, with 9--12 binding sites/hexamer. The presence of supplementary binding sites might have physiological implications. PMID:11294625

  8. Regulation of mevalonate synthesis in rat mammary glands by dietary n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    El-Sohemy, A; Archer, M C

    1997-09-01

    It is well established that dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PU-FAs) enhance rat mammary tumor development whereas n-3 PUFAs inhibit it, yet the mechanisms are unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate a mechanism by which n-3 and n-6 PUFAs could modulate mammary carcinogenesis. Female Sprague Dawley rats were fed diets containing either menhaden (n-3) or safflower oil (n-6) in a 7% fat diet for 1 week. In comparison to the n-6 diet, the n-3 diet significantly reduced the activity and levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase in mammary glands, thereby suppressing the formation of mevalonate. In addition to being essential for cholesterol biosynthesis, mevalonate is also required for DNA synthesis and may be involved in malignant transformation. Serum cholesterol was lower in the n-3 group than in the n-6 group (1.91 +/- 0.18 versus 2.61 +/- 0.37 mM; P < 0.01). Extrahepatic tissues meet most of their cholesterol requirements from circulating cholesterol, and the internalized cholesterol down-regulates HMG-CoA reductase. Thus, the concomitant decrease in serum cholesterol and mammary gland HMG-CoA reductase levels suggests that changes in circulating cholesterol levels do not solely determine the activity of extrahepatic reductase. We conclude that the mevalonate pathway may be a mechanism through which different types of dietary fat modulate breast cancer development. PMID:9288773

  9. Synthesis and Evaluation of Chlorinated Substrate Analogues for Farnesyl Diphosphate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Heaps, Nicole A.; Poulter, C. Dale

    2011-01-01

    Substrate analogues for isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP), where the C3 methyl groups were replaced by chlorine, were synthesized and evaluated as substrates for avian farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPase). The IPP analogue (3-ClIPP) was a co-substrate when incubated with dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) or geranyl diphosphate (GPP) to give the corresponding chlorinated analogues of geranyl diphosphate (3-ClGPP) and farnesyl diphosphate (3-ClFPP), respectively. No products were detected in incubations of 3-ClIPP with 3-ClDMAPP. Incubation of IPP with 3-ClDMAPP gave 11-ClFPP as the sole product. Values of KM3-ClIPP (with DMAPP) and KM3-ClDMAPP (with IPP) were similar to those for IPP and DMAPP, however values of kcat for both analogues were substantially lower. These results are consistent with a dissociative electrophilic alkylation mechanism where the rate-limiting step changes from heterolytic cleavage of the carbon-oxygen bond in the allylic substrate to alkylation of the double bond of the homoallylic substrate. PMID:21344952

  10. Arginine decarboxylase as the source of putrescine for tobacco alkaloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    The putrescine which forms a part of nicotine and other pyrrolidine alkaloids is generally assumed to arise through the action of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). However, we have previously noted that changes in the activity of arginine decarboxylase (ADC), an alternate source of putrescine, parallel changes in tissue alkaloids, while changes in ODC activity do not. This led us to undertake experiments to permit discrimination between ADC and ODC as enzymatic sources of putrescine destined for alkaloids. Two kinds of evidence presented here support a major role for ADC in the generation of putrescine going into alkaloids: (a) A specific 'suicide inhibitor' of ADC effectively inhibits the biosynthesis of nicotine and nornicotine in tobacco callus, while the analogous inhibitor of ODC is less effective, and (b) the flow of 14C from uniformly labelled arginine into nicotine is much more efficient than that from ornithine.

  11. A role for the mevalonate pathway in early plant symbiotic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Chabaud, Mireille; Genre, Andrea; Balloon, Allison J.; Maeda, Junko; Forshey, Kari; den Os, Désirée; Kwiecien, Nicholas W.; Coon, Joshua J.; Barker, David G.; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi produce signals that are perceived by host legume receptors at the plasma membrane and trigger sustained oscillations of the nuclear and perinuclear Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+ spiking), which in turn leads to gene expression and downstream symbiotic responses. The activation of Ca2+ spiking requires the plasma membrane-localized receptor-like kinase Does not Make Infections 2 (DMI2) as well as the nuclear cation channel DMI1. A key enzyme regulating the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl CoA Reductase 1 (HMGR1), interacts with DMI2 and is required for the legume–rhizobium symbiosis. Here, we show that HMGR1 is required to initiate Ca2+ spiking and symbiotic gene expression in Medicago truncatula roots in response to rhizobial and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal signals. Furthermore, MVA, the direct product of HMGR1 activity, is sufficient to induce nuclear-associated Ca2+ spiking and symbiotic gene expression in both wild-type plants and dmi2 mutants, but interestingly not in dmi1 mutants. Finally, MVA induced Ca2+ spiking in Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells expressing DMI1. This demonstrates that the nuclear cation channel DMI1 is sufficient to support MVA-induced Ca2+ spiking in this heterologous system. PMID:26199419

  12. [In vitro study over statins effects on cellular growth curves and its reversibility with mevalonate].

    PubMed

    Millan Núñez-Cortés, Jesús; Alvarez Rodriguez, Ysmael; Alvarez Novés, Granada; Recarte Garcia-Andrade, Carlos; Alvarez-Sala Walther, Luis

    2014-01-01

    HMG-CoA-Reductase inhibitors, also known as statins, are currently the most powerful cholesterol-lowering drugs available on the market. Clinical trials and experimental evidence suggest that statins have heavy anti-atherosclerotic effects. These are in part consequence of lipid lowering but also result from pleiotropic actions of the drugs. These so-called pleiotropic properties affect various aspects of cell function, inflammation, coagulation, and vasomotor activity. These effects are mediated either indirectly through LDL-c reduction or via a direct effect on cellular functions. Although many of the pleiotropic properties of statins may be a class effect, some may be unique to certain agents and account for differences in their pharmacological activity. So, although statins typically have similar effects on LDL-c levels, differences in chemical structure and pharmacokinetic profile can lead to variations in pleiotropic effects. In this paper we analize the in vitro effects of different statins over different cell lines from cells implicated in atherosclerotic process: endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and vascular muscular cells. In relation with our results we can proof that the effects of different dosis of different statins provides singular effects over growth curves of different cellular lines, a despite of a class-dependent effects. So, pleiotropic effects and its reversibility with mevalonate are different according with the molecule and the dosis. PMID:24126321

  13. P53- and mevalonate pathway-driven malignancies require Arf6 for metastasis and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ari; Oikawa, Tsukasa; Hashimoto, Shigeru; Sugino, Hirokazu; Yoshikawa, Ayumu; Otsuka, Yutaro; Handa, Haruka; Onodera, Yasuhito; Nam, Jin-Min; Oneyama, Chitose; Okada, Masato; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Sabe, Hisataka

    2016-04-11

    Drug resistance, metastasis, and a mesenchymal transcriptional program are central features of aggressive breast tumors. The GTPase Arf6, often overexpressed in tumors, is critical to promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition and invasiveness. The metabolic mevalonate pathway (MVP) is associated with tumor invasiveness and known to prenylate proteins, but which prenylated proteins are critical for MVP-driven cancers is unknown. We show here that MVP requires the Arf6-dependent mesenchymal program. The MVP enzyme geranylgeranyl transferase II (GGT-II) and its substrate Rab11b are critical for Arf6 trafficking to the plasma membrane, where it is activated by receptor tyrosine kinases. Consistently, mutant p53, which is known to support tumorigenesis via MVP, promotes Arf6 activation via GGT-II and Rab11b. Inhibition of MVP and GGT-II blocked invasion and metastasis and reduced cancer cell resistance against chemotherapy agents, but only in cells overexpressing Arf6 and components of the mesenchymal program. Overexpression of Arf6 and mesenchymal proteins as well as enhanced MVP activity correlated with poor patient survival. These results provide insights into the molecular basis of MVP-driven malignancy. PMID:27044891

  14. Evidence that lamin B is modified by a thioether-linked derivative of mevalonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Wolda, S.L.C.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a derivative of mevalonic acid (MVA) is post-translationally incorporated into a number of specific proteins in Swiss 3T3 cells. These proteins are potentially of interest because of minor, non-sterol product of MVA have been implicated in the control of both DNA synthesis and cell morphology. An attempt is made to characterize the MVA-modified proteins of Swiss 3T3 and HeLa cells. The modification appeared to be linked to cysteine because lamin B that was biosynthetically labeled with ({sup 3}H)MVA and ({sup 35}S)cysteine and then extensively digested with proteases yielded {sup 3}H- or {sup 35}S-labeled products that cochromatographed in five successive systems. The cysteine appeared to be linked to the modification by a thioether bond because treatment of either partially purified {sup 3}H-labeled digestion product or intact lamin B with Raney nickel released radioactive, pentane-extractable material that was similar, though not identical to material that could be released from S-farnesyl cysteine. The modified cysteine residue seemed to be located at the carboxyl-terminal end of lamin B because treatment of {sup 3}H-labeled lamin B with cyanogen bromide yielded a single labeled polypeptide that mapped to a domain of the reported, cDNA inferred sequence of human lamin B that contains a single cysteine near the carboxyl-terminus.

  15. Geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthases from Scoparia dulcis and Croton sublyratus. cDNA cloning, functional expression, and conversion to a farnesyl diphosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Kojima, N; Sitthithaworn, W; Viroonchatapan, E; Suh, D Y; Iwanami, N; Hayashi, T; Sankaw, U

    2000-07-01

    cDNAs encoding geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGPPS) of two diterpene producing plants, Scoparia dulcis and Croton sublyratus, were isolated using the homology-based polymerase chain reaction method. Both cloned genes showed high amino acid sequence homology (60-70%) to other plant GGPPSs and contained highly conserved aspartate-rich motifs. The obtained clones were functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and showed sufficient GGPPS activity to catalyze the condensation of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) and isopentenyl diphosphate to form geranylgeranyl diphosphate. To investigate the factor determining the product chain length of plant GGPPSs, S. dulcis GGPPS mutants in which either the small amino acids at the fourth and fifth positions before the first aspartate-rich motif (FARM) were replaced with aromatic amino acids or in which two additional amino acids in FARM were deleted were constructed. Both mutants behaved like FPPS-like enzymes and almost exclusively produced FPP when dimethylallyl diphosphate was used as a primer substrate, and failed to accept FPP as a primer substrate. These results indicate that both small amino acids at the fourth and fifth positions before FARM and the amino acid insertion in FARM play essential roles in product length determination in plant GGPPSs. PMID:10923851

  16. The crystal structure and mechanism of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Appleby, T C; Kinsland, C; Begley, T P; Ealick, S E

    2000-02-29

    The crystal structure of Bacillus subtilis orotidine 5'-monophosphate (OMP) decarboxylase with bound uridine 5'-monophosphate has been determined by multiple wavelength anomalous diffraction phasing techniques and refined to an R-factor of 19.3% at 2.4 A resolution. OMP decarboxylase is a dimer of two identical subunits. Each monomer consists of a triosephosphate isomerase barrel and contains an active site that is located across one end of the barrel and near the dimer interface. For each active site, most of the residues are contributed by one monomer with a few residues contributed from the adjacent monomer. The most highly conserved residues are located in the active site and suggest a novel catalytic mechanism for decarboxylation that is different from any previously proposed OMP decarboxylase mechanism. The uridine 5'-monophosphate molecule is bound to the active site such that the phosphate group is most exposed and the C5-C6 edge of the pyrimidine base is most buried. In the proposed catalytic mechanism, the ground state of the substrate is destabilized by electrostatic repulsion between the carboxylate of the substrate and the carboxylate of Asp60. This repulsion is reduced in the transition state by shifting negative charge from the carboxylate to C6 of the pyrimidine, which is close to the protonated amine of Lys62. We propose that the decarboxylation of OMP proceeds by an electrophilic substitution mechanism in which decarboxylation and carbon-carbon bond protonation by Lys62 occur in a concerted reaction. PMID:10681442

  17. Purification of acetoacetate decarboxylase from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and cloning of the acetoacetate decarboxylase gene in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, D.J.; Bennett, G.N. )

    1990-11-01

    In Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, acetoacetate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.4) is essential for solvent production, catalyzing the decarboxylation of acetoacetate to acetone. We report here the purification of the enzyme from C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and the cloning and expression of the gene encoding the acetoacetate decarboxylase enzyme in Escherichia coli. A bacteriophage lambda EMBL3 library of C. acetobutylicum DNA was screened by plaque hybridization, using oligodeoxynucleotide probes derived from the N-terminal amino acid sequence obtained from the purified protein. Phage DNA from positive plaques was analyzed by Southern hybridization. Restriction mapping and subsequent subcloning of DNA fragments hybridizing to the probes localized the gene within an {approximately}2.1-kb EcoRI/BglII fragment. A polypeptide with a molecular weight of {approximately}28,000 corresponding to that of the purified acetoacetate decarboxylase was observed in both Western blots (immunoblots) and maxicell analysis of whole-cell extracts of E. coli harboring the clostridial gene. Although the expression of the gene is tightly regulated in C. acetobutylicum, it was well expressed in E. coli, although from a promoter sequence of clostridial origin.

  18. Substrate specificity of undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takeshi; Ogawa, Takuya; Yoshimura, Tohru; Hemmi, Hisashi

    2013-06-28

    Cis-prenyltransferase from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified for characterization. Properties such as substrate specificity, product chain-length, thermal stability and cofactor requirement were investigated using the recombinant enzyme. In particular, the substrate specificity of the enzyme attracts interest because only dimethylallyl diphosphate and geranylfarnesyl diphosphate, both of which are unusual substrates for known cis-prenyltransferases, are likely available as an allylic primer substrate in A. pernix. From the enzymatic study, the archaeal enzyme was shown to be undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase that has anomalous substrate specificity, which results in a preference for geranylfarnesyl diphosphate. This means that the product of the enzyme, which is probably used as the precursor of the glycosyl carrier lipid, would have an undiscovered structure. PMID:23726912

  19. Activation and Inhibition of Ribulose 1,5-Diphosphate Carboxylase by 6-Phosphogluconate 1

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Douglas K.; Bassham, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-diphosphate carboxylase, when activated by preincubation with 1 mm bicarbonate and 10 mm MgCl2 in the absence of ribulose 1,5-diphosphate, remains activated for 20 minutes or longer after reaction is initiated by addition of ribulose diphosphate. If as little as 50 μm 6-phosphogluconate is added during this preincubation period, 5 minutes before the start of the reaction, a further 188% activation is observed. However, addition of 6-phosphogluconate at the same time or later than addition of ribulose diphosphate, or at any time with 50 mm bicarbonate, gives inhibition of the enzyme activity. Possible relevance of these effects in vivo regulatory effects is discussed. PMID:16658565

  20. Structure and mechanism of the diterpene cyclase ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Köksal, Mustafa; Hu, Huayou; Coates, Robert M.; Peters, Reuben J.; Christianson, David W.

    2011-09-20

    The structure of ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase reveals three {alpha}-helical domains ({alpha}, {beta} and {gamma}), as also observed in the related diterpene cyclase taxadiene synthase. However, active sites are located at the interface of the {beta}{gamma} domains in ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase but exclusively in the {alpha} domain of taxadiene synthase. Modular domain architecture in plant diterpene cyclases enables the evolution of alternative active sites and chemical strategies for catalyzing isoprenoid cyclization reactions.

  1. Product Rearrangement from Altering a Single Residue in the Rice syn-Copalyl Diphosphate Synthase.

    PubMed

    Potter, Kevin C; Jia, Meirong; Hong, Young J; Tantillo, Dean; Peters, Reuben J

    2016-03-01

    Through site-directed mutagenesis targeted at identification of the catalytic base in the rice (Oryza sativa) syn-copalyl diphosphate synthase OsCPS4, changes to a single residue (H501) were found to induce rearrangement rather than immediate deprotonation of the initially formed bicycle, leading to production of the novel compound syn-halimadienyl diphosphate. These mutational results are combined with quantum chemical calculations to provide insight into the underlying reaction mechanism. PMID:26878189

  2. Ribulose diphosphate carboxylase of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis

    SciTech Connect

    Terekhova, I.V.; Chernyad'ev, I.I.; Doman, N.G.

    1986-11-20

    The ribulose diphosphate (RDP) carboxylase activity of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis is represented by two peaks when a cell homogenate is centrifuged in a sucrose density gradient. In the case of differential centrifugation (40,000 g, 1 h), the activity of the enzyme was distributed between the supernatant liquid (soluble form) and the precipitate (carboxysomal form). From the soluble fraction, in which 80-95% of the total activity of the enzyme is concentrated, electrophoretically homogeneous RDP carboxylase was isolated by precipitation with ammonium sulfate and centrifugation in a sucrose density gradient. The purified enzyme possessed greater electrophoretic mobility in comparison with the RDP carboxylase of beans Vicia faba. The molecular weight of the enzyme, determined by gel filtration, was 450,000. The enzyme consists of monotypic subunits with a molecular weight of 53,000. The small subunits were not detected in electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel in the presence of SDS after fixation and staining of the gels by various methods.

  3. Potent Radical-Scavenging Activities of Thiamin and Thiamin Diphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Okai, Yasuji; Higashi-Okai, Kiyoka; F. Sato, Eisuke; Konaka, Ryusei; Inoue, Masayasu

    2007-01-01

    Various radical-scavenging activities of thiamin and thiamin diphosphate (TDP) were found in some in vitro experiments. Thiamin and TDP caused considerable suppressive effects on superoxide generation in hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase system which was measured by a sensitive chemiluminescence method using 2-methyl-6-[p-methylphenyl]-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2-alpha]pyrazin-3-one (MCLA), and their 50% inhibition (IC50) values were estimated to be 158 and 56 µM, respectively. They also showed the significant suppression against hydroperoxide generation derived from oxidized linoleic acid which was estimated by aluminum chloride method and their IC50 values were calculated to be 260 and 46 µM. They further prevented the oxygen radical generation in opsonized zymosan-stimulated human blood neutrophils which was shown by chemiluminescence method using luminol, and their IC50 values were calculated to be 169 and 38 µM. In contrast, they caused weak but significantly suppressive effects on the hydroxyl radical generation by Fenton reaction which was measured by electric spin resonance (ESR) method, their IC50 values were calculated to be 8.45 and 1.46 mM respectively. These results strongly suggest a possibility that thiamin and TDP play as radical scavengers in cell-free and cellular systems. PMID:18437212

  4. Preliminary study of irradiation effects on thorium phosphate-diphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichot, E.; Dacheux, N.; Emery, J.; Chaumont, J.; Brandel, V.; Genet, M.

    2001-03-01

    Thorium phosphate-diphosphate (TPD): Th 4(PO 4) 4P 2O 7 is proposed as a host matrix for the long-term storage of high level radioactive wastes. Indeed, γ-rays, α and β particles due to the incorporated actinides or fission products will certainly produce several effects, particularly structural and chemical modifications, in the host material. In order to investigate these effects, powdered samples were irradiated with 1.5 Gy dose of γ-rays. The formation of PO 32- and POO rad free radicals was detected using electron spin resonance (ESR) and thermoluminescence (TL) methods. These free radicals do not modify the macroscopic properties of the TPD and disappear when the sample is heated at 400°C. The implantation of He + ions of 1.6 MeV (fluence: 10 16 particles cm -2) and Au 3+ ions of 5 MeV (fluence 4×10 15 particles cm -2) causes some damages on the surface of sintered samples. Amorphization and chemical decomposition of the matrix were observed for the dose of 10 15 particles cm -2 and higher when irradiated with Pb 2+ (200 keV) and Au 3+ (5 MeV) ion beams. These effects were evidenced by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  5. Effects of cytidine diphosphate choline on rats with memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Petkov, V D; Kehayov, R A; Mosharrof, A H; Petkov, V V; Getova, D; Lazarova, M B; Vaglenova, J

    1993-08-01

    The effects of cytidine diphosphate choline (CDP-choline, CAS 987-78-0) on learning and memory in rats with memory deficits were examined using behavioral methods of active avoidance with punishment reinforcement (shuttle-box), passive avoidance with punishment reinforcement (step-through and step-down), and active avoidance with positive (alimentary) reinforcement (staircase-maze). In the majority of experiments CDP-choline was applied orally at doses of 10-50 or 100 mg/kg daily for 7 days before the training session. The experiments were carried out on young-adult (aged 5 months) and old (aged 22 months) rats and on rats with a low capability for retention of learned behavior. Memory deficits were induced by the muscarinic cholinoceptor antagonist scopolamine (in young and old rats and mice), by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine, by electroconvulsive shock, and by hypoxy. Memory deficits were also induced in rats offspring of dams that had been exposed to alcohol during pregnancy and lactation. The results suggest that CDP-choline acts as a memory-enhancing drug and that its effect is particularly pronounced in animals with memory deficits. PMID:8216435

  6. Mevalonosomes: specific vacuoles containing the mevalonate pathway in Plocamium brasiliense cortical cells (Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Paradas, Wladimir Costa; Crespo, Thalita Mendes; Salgado, Leonardo Tavares; de Andrade, Leonardo Rodrigues; Soares, Angélica Ribeiro; Hellio, Claire; Paranhos, Ricardo Rogers; Hill, Lilian Jorge; de Souza, Geysa Marinho; Kelecom, Alphonse Germaine Albert Charles; Da Gama, Bernardo Antônio Perez; Pereira, Renato Crespo; Amado-Filho, Gilberto Menezes

    2015-04-01

    This paper has identified, for the first time in a member of the Rhodophyta, a vacuolar organelle containing enzymes that are involved in the mevalonate pathway-an important step in red algal isoprenoid biosynthesis. These organelles were named mevalonosomes (Mev) and were found in the cortical cells (CC) of Plocamium brasiliense, a marine macroalgae that synthesizes several halogenated monoterpenes. P. brasiliense specimens were submitted to a cytochemical analysis of the activity of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGS). Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we confirmed the presence of HMGS activity within the Mev. Because HMGS is necessary for the biosynthesis of halogenated monoterpenes, we isolated a hexanic fraction (HF) rich in halogenated monoterpenes from P. brasiliense that contained a pentachlorinated monoterpene as a major metabolite. Because terpenes are often related to chemical defense, the antifouling (AF) activity of pentachlorinated monoterpene was tested. We found that the settlement of the mussel Perna perna was reduced by HF treatment (2.25 times less than control; 40% and 90% of fouled surface, respectively; P = 0.001; F9,9 = 1.13). The HF (at 10 μg · mL(-1) ) also inhibited three species of fouling microalgae (Chlorarachnion reptans, Cylindrotheca cloisterium, and Exanthemachrysis gayraliae), while at a higher concentration (50 μg · mL(-1) ), it inhibited the bacteria Halomonas marina, Polaribacter irgensii, Pseudoalteromonas elyakovii, Shewanella putrefaciens, and Vibrio aestuarianus. The AF activity of P. brasiliense halogenated monoterpenes and the localization of HMGS activity inside Mev suggest that this cellular structure found in CC may play a role in thallus protection against biofouling. PMID:26986518

  7. Targeting the Mevalonate Cascade as a New Therapeutic Approach in Heart Disease, Cancer and Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yeganeh, Behzad; Wiechec, Emmilia; Ande, Sudharsana R; Sharma, Pawan; Moghadam, Adel Rezaei; Post, Martin; Freed, Darren H.; Hashemi, Mohammad; Shojaei, Shahla; Zeki, Amir A.; Ghavami, Saeid

    2014-01-01

    The cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, also known as the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, is an essential cellular pathway that is involved in diverse cell functions. The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (HMGCR) is the rate-limiting step in cholesterol biosynthesis and catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to MVA. Given its role in cholesterol and isoprenoid biosynthesis, the regulation of HMGCR has been intensely investigated. Because all cells require a steady supply of MVA, both the sterol (i.e. cholesterol) and non-sterol (i.e. isoprenoid) products of MVA metabolism exert coordinated feedback regulation on HMGCR through different mechanisms. The proper functioning of HMGCR as the proximal enzyme in the MVA pathway is essential under both normal physiologic conditions and in many diseases given its role in cell cycle pathways and cell proliferation, cholesterol biosynthesis and metabolism, cell cytoskeletal dynamics and stability, cell membrane structure and fluidity, mitochondrial function, proliferation, and cell fate. The blockbuster statin drugs (‘statins’) directly bind to and inhibit HMGCR, and their use for the past thirty years has revolutionized the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular diseases, in particular coronary heart disease. Initially thought to exert their effects through cholesterol reduction, recent evidence indicates that statins also have pleiotropic immunomodulatory properties independent of cholesterol lowering. In this review we will focus on the therapeutic applications and mechanisms involved in the MVA cascade including Rho GTPase and Rho kinase (ROCK) signaling, statin inhibition of HMGCR, geranylgeranyltransferase (GGTase) inhibition, and farnesyltransferase (FTase) inhibition in cardiovascular disease, pulmonary diseases (e.g. asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cancer. PMID:24582968

  8. Priming by Hexanoic Acid Induce Activation of Mevalonic and Linolenic Pathways and Promotes the Emission of Plant Volatiles.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Eugenio; Camañes, Gemma; Lapeña, Leonor; García-Agustín, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Hexanoic acid (Hx) is a short natural monocarboxylic acid present in some fruits and plants. Previous studies reported that soil drench application of this acid induces effective resistance in tomato plants against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae and in citrus against Alternaria alternata and Xanthomonas citri. In this work, we performed an in deep study of the metabolic changes produced in citrus by the application of Hx in response to the challenge pathogen A. alternata, focusing on the response of the plant. Moreover, we used (13)C labeled hexanoic to analyze its behavior inside the plants. Finally, we studied the volatile emission of the treated plants after the challenge inoculation. Drench application of (13)C labeled hexanoic demonstrated that this molecule stays in the roots and is not mobilized to the leaves, suggesting long distance induction of resistance. Moreover, the study of the metabolic profile showed an alteration of more than 200 molecules differentially induced by the application of the compound and the inoculation with the fungus. Bioinformatics analysis of data showed that most of these altered molecules could be related with the mevalonic and linolenic pathways suggesting the implication of these pathways in the induced resistance mediated by Hx. Finally, the application of this compound showed an enhancement of the emission of 17 volatile metabolites. Taken together, this study indicates that after the application of Hx this compound remains in the roots, provoking molecular changes that may trigger the defensive response in the rest of the plant mediated by changes in the mevalonic and linolenic pathways and enhancing the emission of volatile compounds, suggesting for the first time the implication of mevalonic pathway in response to hexanoic application. PMID:27148319

  9. Priming by Hexanoic Acid Induce Activation of Mevalonic and Linolenic Pathways and Promotes the Emission of Plant Volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Llorens, Eugenio; Camañes, Gemma; Lapeña, Leonor; García-Agustín, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Hexanoic acid (Hx) is a short natural monocarboxylic acid present in some fruits and plants. Previous studies reported that soil drench application of this acid induces effective resistance in tomato plants against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae and in citrus against Alternaria alternata and Xanthomonas citri. In this work, we performed an in deep study of the metabolic changes produced in citrus by the application of Hx in response to the challenge pathogen A. alternata, focusing on the response of the plant. Moreover, we used 13C labeled hexanoic to analyze its behavior inside the plants. Finally, we studied the volatile emission of the treated plants after the challenge inoculation. Drench application of 13C labeled hexanoic demonstrated that this molecule stays in the roots and is not mobilized to the leaves, suggesting long distance induction of resistance. Moreover, the study of the metabolic profile showed an alteration of more than 200 molecules differentially induced by the application of the compound and the inoculation with the fungus. Bioinformatics analysis of data showed that most of these altered molecules could be related with the mevalonic and linolenic pathways suggesting the implication of these pathways in the induced resistance mediated by Hx. Finally, the application of this compound showed an enhancement of the emission of 17 volatile metabolites. Taken together, this study indicates that after the application of Hx this compound remains in the roots, provoking molecular changes that may trigger the defensive response in the rest of the plant mediated by changes in the mevalonic and linolenic pathways and enhancing the emission of volatile compounds, suggesting for the first time the implication of mevalonic pathway in response to hexanoic application. PMID:27148319

  10. Potentiated suppression of Dickkopf-1 in breast cancer by combined administration of the mevalonate pathway inhibitors zoledronic acid and statins.

    PubMed

    Göbel, Andy; Browne, Andrew J; Thiele, Stefanie; Rauner, Martina; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Rachner, Tilman D

    2015-12-01

    The Wnt-inhibitor dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) promotes cancer-induced osteolytic bone lesions by direct inhibition of osteoblast differentiation and indirect activation of osteoclasts. DKK-1 is highly expressed in human breast cancer cells and can be suppressed by inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway such as statins and amino-bisphosphonates. However, supraphysiological concentrations are required to suppress DKK-1. We show that a sequential mevalonate pathway blockade using statins and amino-bisphosphonates suppresses DKK-1 more significantly than the individual agents alone. Thus, the reduction of the DKK-1 expression and secretion in the human osteotropic tumor cell lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-MET, and MDA-BONE by zoledronic acid was potentiated by the combination with low concentrations of statins (atorvastatin, simvastatin, and rosuvastatin) by up to 75% (p < 0.05). The specific rescue of prenylation using farnesyl pyrophosphate or geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate revealed that these effects were mediated by suppressed geranylgeranylation rather than by suppressed farnesylation. Moreover, combining low concentrations of statins (1 µM atorvastatin or 0.25 µM simvastatin) and zoledronic acid at low concentrations resulted in an at least 50% reversal of breast cancer-derived DKK-1-mediated inhibition of osteogenic markers in C2C12 cells (p < 0.05). Finally, the intratumoral injection of atorvastatin and zoledronic acid in as subcutaneous MDA-MB-231 mouse model reduced the serum level of human DKK-1 by 25% compared to untreated mice. Hence our study reveals that a sequential mevalonate pathway blockade allows for the combined use of low concentration of statins and amino-bisphosphonates. This combination still significantly suppresses breast cancer-derived DKK-1 to levels where it can no longer inhibit Wnt-mediated osteoblast differentiation. PMID:26515701

  11. Molecular and functional analyses of amino acid decarboxylases involved in cuticle tanning in Tribolium castaneum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspartate 1-decarboxylase (ADC) and dopa decarboxylase (DDC) provide b–alanine and dopamine used in insect cuticle tanning. Beta-alanine is conjugated with dopamine to yield N-b-alanyldopamine (NBAD), a substrate for the phenoloxidase laccase that catalyzes the synthesis of cuticle protein cross-li...

  12. Vector-mediated chromosomal integration of the glutamate decarboxylase gene in streptococcus thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The integrative vector pINTRS was used to transfer glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity to Streptococcus thermophilus ST128, thus allowing for the production of '-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In pINTRS, the gene encoding glutamate decarboxylase, gadB, was flanked by DNA fragments homologous to a S. ...

  13. Retinoic acid modulation of ultraviolet light-induced epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, N.J.; Breeding, J.

    1982-02-01

    Irradiation of skin with ultraviolet light of sunburn range (UVB) leads to a large and rapid induction of the polyamine biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase in the epidermis. Induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase also occurs following application of the tumor promoting agent 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13 acetate and topical retinoic acid is able to block both this ornithine decarboxylase induction and skin tumor promotion. In the studies described below, topical application of retinoic acid to hairless mouse skin leads to a significant inhibition of UVB-induced epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity. The degree of this inhibition was dependent on the dose, timing, and frequency of the application of retinoic acid. To show significant inhibition of UVB-induced ornithine decarboxylase the retinoic acid had to be applied within 5 hr of UVB irradiation. If retinoic acid treatment was delayed beyond 7 hr following UVB, then no inhibition of UVB-induced ornithine decarboxylase was observed. The quantities of retinoic acid used (1.7 nmol and 3.4 nmol) have been shown effective at inhibiting 12-0-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13 acetate induced ornithine decarboxylase. The results show that these concentrations of topical retinoic acid applied either before or immediately following UVB irradiation reduces the UVB induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase. The effect of retinoic acid in these regimens on UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis is currently under study.

  14. Characterization of ornithine decarboxylase of tobacco cells and tomato ovaries.

    PubMed Central

    Heimer, Y M; Mizrahi, Y

    1982-01-01

    Some characteristics of L-ornithine decarboxylase of tomato ovaries and tobacco cells are described. The enzyme has a pH optimum of 8.0. It requires pyridoxal phosphate and thiol reagent (dithiothreitol) for activity. It is specific for L-ornithine and has an apparent Km of 1.4 X 10-4 M. It has an apparent molecular weight of 107000. Putrescine inhibited the activity in vitro. Spermidine and spermine also inhibit the enzyme, but less effectively. It is concluded that the enzyme is similar to that of mammalian origin and likewise fulfils a function related to cell proliferation. PMID:7082296

  15. Lithium-cation conductivity and crystal structure of lithium diphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Voronin, V.I.; Sherstobitova, E.A.; Blatov, V.A.; Shekhtman, G.Sh.

    2014-03-15

    The electrical conductivity of lithium diphosphate Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been measured and jump-like increasing of ionic conductivity at 913 K has been found. The crystal structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been refined using high temperature neutron diffraction at 300–1050 K. At 913 K low temperature triclinic form of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} transforms into high temperature monoclinic one, space group P2{sub 1}/n, a=8.8261(4) Å, b=5.2028(4) Å, c=13.3119(2) Å, β=104.372(6)°. The migration maps of Li{sup +} cations based on experimental data implemented into program package TOPOS have been explored. It was found that lithium cations in both low- and high temperature forms of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} migrate in three dimensions. Cross sections of the migrations channels extend as the temperature rises, but at the phase transition point have a sharp growth showing a strong “crystal structure – ion conductivity” correlation. -- Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} at 950 K. Red balls represent oxygen atoms; black lines show Li{sup +} ion migration channels in the layers perpendicular to [001] direction. Highlights: • Structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been refined using high temperature neutron diffraction. • At 913 K triclinic form of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} transforms into high temperature monoclinic one. • The migration maps of Li{sup +} implemented into program package TOPOS have been explored. • Cross sections of the migrations channels at the phase transition have a sharp growth.

  16. Branched-chain 2-keto acid decarboxylases derived from Psychrobacter.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiashi; Timler, Jacobe G; Knutson, Carolann M; Barney, Brett M

    2013-09-01

    The conversion of branched-chain amino acids to branched-chain acids or alcohols is an important aspect of flavor in the food industry and is dependent on the Ehrlich pathway found in certain lactic acid bacteria. A key enzyme in the pathway, the 2-keto acid decarboxylase (KDC), is also of interest in biotechnology applications to produce small branched-chain alcohols that might serve as improved biofuels or other commodity feedstocks. This enzyme has been extensively studied in the model bacterium Lactococcus lactis, but is also found in other bacteria and higher organisms. In this report, distinct homologs of the L. lactis KDC originally annotated as pyruvate decarboxylases from Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5 and P. arcticus 273-4 were cloned and characterized, confirming a related activity toward specific branched-chain 2-keto acids derived from branched-chain amino acids. Further, KDC activity was confirmed in intact cells and cell-free extracts of P. cryohalolentis K5 grown on both rich and defined media, indicating that the Ehrlich pathway may also be utilized in some psychrotrophs and psychrophiles. A comparison of the similarities and differences in the P. cryohalolentis K5 and P. arcticus 273-4 KDC activities to other bacterial KDCs is presented. PMID:23826991

  17. Crystal structure of pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae

    PubMed Central

    Buddrus, Lisa; Andrews, Emma S. V.; Leak, David J.; Danson, Michael J.; Arcus, Vickery L.; Crennell, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC; EC 4.1.1.1) is a thiamine pyrophosphate- and Mg2+ ion-dependent enzyme that catalyses the non-oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide. It is rare in bacteria, but is a key enzyme in homofermentative metabolism, where ethanol is the major product. Here, the previously unreported crystal structure of the bacterial pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae is presented. The crystals were shown to diffract to 2.15 Å resolution. They belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 204.56, b = 177.39, c = 244.55 Å and R r.i.m. = 0.175 (0.714 in the highest resolution bin). The structure was solved by molecular replacement using PDB entry 2vbi as a model and the final R values were R work = 0.186 (0.271 in the highest resolution bin) and R free = 0.220 (0.300 in the highest resolution bin). Each of the six tetramers is a dimer of dimers, with each monomer sharing its thiamine pyrophosphate across the dimer interface, and some contain ethylene glycol mimicking the substrate pyruvate in the active site. Comparison with other bacterial PDCs shows a correlation of higher thermostability with greater tetramer interface area and number of interactions. PMID:27599861

  18. Crystal structure of pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae.

    PubMed

    Buddrus, Lisa; Andrews, Emma S V; Leak, David J; Danson, Michael J; Arcus, Vickery L; Crennell, Susan J

    2016-09-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC; EC 4.1.1.1) is a thiamine pyrophosphate- and Mg(2+) ion-dependent enzyme that catalyses the non-oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide. It is rare in bacteria, but is a key enzyme in homofermentative metabolism, where ethanol is the major product. Here, the previously unreported crystal structure of the bacterial pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae is presented. The crystals were shown to diffract to 2.15 Å resolution. They belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 204.56, b = 177.39, c = 244.55 Å and Rr.i.m. = 0.175 (0.714 in the highest resolution bin). The structure was solved by molecular replacement using PDB entry 2vbi as a model and the final R values were Rwork = 0.186 (0.271 in the highest resolution bin) and Rfree = 0.220 (0.300 in the highest resolution bin). Each of the six tetramers is a dimer of dimers, with each monomer sharing its thiamine pyrophosphate across the dimer interface, and some contain ethylene glycol mimicking the substrate pyruvate in the active site. Comparison with other bacterial PDCs shows a correlation of higher thermostability with greater tetramer interface area and number of interactions. PMID:27599861

  19. Evolution of a novel lysine decarboxylase in siderophore biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Burrell, Matthew; Hanfrey, Colin C; Kinch, Lisa N; Elliott, Katherine A; Michael, Anthony J

    2012-10-01

    Structural backbones of iron-scavenging siderophore molecules include polyamines 1,3-diaminopropane and 1,5-diaminopentane (cadaverine). For the cadaverine-based desferroxiamine E siderophore in Streptomyces coelicolor, the corresponding biosynthetic gene cluster contains an ORF encoded by desA that was suspected of producing the cadaverine (decarboxylated lysine) backbone. However, desA encodes an l-2,4-diaminobutyrate decarboxylase (DABA DC) homologue and not any known form of lysine decarboxylase (LDC). The only known function of DABA DC is, together with l-2,4-aminobutyrate aminotransferase (DABA AT), to synthesize 1,3-diaminopropane. We show here that S. coelicolor desA encodes a novel LDC and we hypothesized that DABA DC homologues present in siderophore biosynthetic clusters in the absence of DABA AT ORFs would be novel LDCs. We confirmed this by correctly predicting the LDC activity of a DABA DC homologue from a Yersinia pestis siderophore biosynthetic pathway. The corollary was confirmed for a DABA DC homologue, adjacent to a DABA AT ORF in a siderophore pathway in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis, which was shown to be a bona fide DABA DC. These findings enable prediction of whether a siderophore pathway will utilize 1,3-diaminopropane or cadaverine, and suggest that the majority of bacteria use DABA AT and DABA DC for siderophore, rather than norspermidine/polyamine biosynthesis. PMID:22906379

  20. A corpora allata farnesyl diphosphate synthase in mosquitoes displaying a metal ion dependent substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Perez, Crisalejandra; Nyati, Pratik; Noriega, Fernando G

    2015-09-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) is a key enzyme in isoprenoid biosynthesis, it catalyzes the head-to-tail condensation of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) with two molecules of isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) to generate farnesyl diphosphate (FPP), a precursor of juvenile hormone (JH). In this study, we functionally characterized an Aedes aegypti FPPS (AaFPPS) expressed in the corpora allata. AaFPPS is the only FPPS gene present in the genome of the yellow fever mosquito, it encodes a 49.6 kDa protein exhibiting all the characteristic conserved sequence domains on prenyltransferases. AaFPPS displays its activity in the presence of metal cofactors; and the product condensation is dependent of the divalent cation. Mg(2+) ions lead to the production of FPP, while the presence of Co(2+) ions lead to geranyl diphosphate (GPP) production. In the presence of Mg(2+) the AaFPPS affinity for allylic substrates is GPP > DMAPP > IPP. These results suggest that AaFPPS displays "catalytic promiscuity", changing the type and ratio of products released (GPP or FPP) depending on allylic substrate concentrations and the presence of different metal cofactors. This metal ion-dependent regulatory mechanism allows a single enzyme to selectively control the metabolites it produces, thus potentially altering the flow of carbon into separate metabolic pathways. PMID:26188328

  1. Cyclohexane-1,2-Dione Hydrolase from Denitrifying Azoarcus sp. Strain 22Lin, a Novel Member of the Thiamine Diphosphate Enzyme Family▿†

    PubMed Central

    Steinbach, Alma K.; Fraas, Sonja; Harder, Jens; Tabbert, Anja; Brinkmann, Henner; Meyer, Axel; Ermler, Ulrich; Kroneck, Peter M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Alicyclic compounds with hydroxyl groups represent common structures in numerous natural compounds, such as terpenes and steroids. Their degradation by microorganisms in the absence of dioxygen may involve a C—C bond ring cleavage to form an aliphatic intermediate that can be further oxidized. The cyclohexane-1,2-dione hydrolase (CDH) (EC 3.7.1.11) from denitrifying Azoarcus sp. strain 22Lin, grown on cyclohexane-1,2-diol as a sole electron donor and carbon source, is the first thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme characterized to date that cleaves a cyclic aliphatic compound. The degradation of cyclohexane-1,2-dione (CDO) to 6-oxohexanoate comprises the cleavage of a C—C bond adjacent to a carbonyl group, a typical feature of reactions catalyzed by ThDP-dependent enzymes. In the subsequent NAD+-dependent reaction, 6-oxohexanoate is oxidized to adipate. CDH has been purified to homogeneity by the criteria of gel electrophoresis (a single band at ∼59 kDa; calculated molecular mass, 64.5 kDa); in solution, the enzyme is a homodimer (∼105 kDa; gel filtration). As isolated, CDH contains 0.8 ± 0.05 ThDP, 1.0 ± 0.02 Mg2+, and 1.0 ± 0.015 flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) per monomer as a second organic cofactor, the role of which remains unclear. Strong reductants, Ti(III)-citrate, Na+-dithionite, and the photochemical 5-deazaflavin/oxalate system, led to a partial reduction of the FAD chromophore. The cleavage product of CDO, 6-oxohexanoate, was also a substrate; the corresponding cyclic 1,3- and 1,4-diones did not react with CDH, nor did the cis- and trans-cyclohexane diols. The enzymes acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, pyruvate oxidase (POX) from Lactobacillus plantarum, benzoylformate decarboxylase from Pseudomonas putida, and pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymomonas mobilis were identified as the closest relatives of CDH by comparative amino acid sequence analysis, and a ThDP binding motif and a 2-fold Rossmann fold for

  2. Structural and Enzymatic Characterization of a Nucleoside Diphosphate Sugar Hydrolase from Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus

    PubMed Central

    Duong-ly, Krisna C.; Schoeffield, Andrew J.; Pizarro-Dupuy, Mario A.; Zarr, Melissa; Pineiro, Silvia A.; Amzel, L. Mario; Gabelli, Sandra B.

    2015-01-01

    Given the broad range of substrates hydrolyzed by Nudix (nucleoside diphosphate linked to X) enzymes, identification of sequence and structural elements that correctly predict a Nudix substrate or characterize a family is key to correctly annotate the myriad of Nudix enzymes. Here, we present the structure determination and characterization of Bd3179 –- a Nudix hydrolase from Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus–that we show localized in the periplasmic space of this obligate Gram-negative predator. We demonstrate that the enzyme is a nucleoside diphosphate sugar hydrolase (NDPSase) and has a high degree of sequence and structural similarity to a canonical ADP-ribose hydrolase and to a nucleoside diphosphate sugar hydrolase (1.4 and 1.3 Å Cα RMSD respectively). Examination of the structural elements conserved in both types of enzymes confirms that an aspartate-X-lysine motif on the C-terminal helix of the α-β-α NDPSase fold differentiates NDPSases from ADPRases. PMID:26524597

  3. Tenofovir diphosphate concentrations and prophylactic effect in a macaque model of rectal simian HIV transmission

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Peter L.; Glidden, David V.; Bushman, Lane R.; Heneine, Walid; García-Lerma, J. Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the relationship between intracellular tenofovir diphosphate concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and prophylactic efficacy in a macaque model for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Methods Macaques were challenged with simian HIV (SHIV) via rectal inoculation once weekly for up to 14 weeks. A control group (n = 34) received no drug, a second group (n = 6) received oral tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine 3 days before each virus challenge and a third group (n = 6) received the same dosing plus another dose 2 h after virus challenge. PBMCs were collected just before each weekly virus challenge. The relationship between tenofovir diphosphate in PBMCs and prophylactic efficacy was assessed with a Cox proportional hazards model. Results The percentages of animals infected in the control, one-dose and two-dose groups were 97, 83 and 17, respectively. The mean (SD) steady-state tenofovir diphosphate concentration (fmol/106 cells) was 15.8 (7.6) in the one-dose group and 30.7 (10.1) in the two-dose group. Each 5 fmol tenofovir diphosphate/106 cells was associated with a 40% (95% CI 17%–56%) reduction in risk of SHIV acquisition, P = 0.002. The tenofovir diphosphate concentration associated with a 90% reduction in risk (EC90) was 22.6 fmol/106 cells (95% CI 13.8–60.8). Conclusions The prophylactic EC90 for tenofovir diphosphate identified in macaques exposed rectally compares well with the EC90 previously identified in men who have sex with men (MSM; 16 fmol/106 cells, 95% CI 3–28). These results highlight the relevance of this model to inform human PrEP studies of oral tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine for MSM. PMID:24862094

  4. Isolation and characterization of the dopa decarboxylase gene of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, J; Davidson, N

    1981-01-01

    We have isolated chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid clones containing the Drosophila dopa decarboxylase gene. We describe an isolation procedure which can be applied to other nonabundantly expressed Drosophila genes. The dopa decarboxylase gene lies within or very near polytene chromosome band 37C1-2. The gene is interrupted by at least one intron, and the primary mode of regulation is pretranslational. At least two additional sequences hybridized by in vivo ribonucleic acid-derived probes are found within a 35-kilobase region surrounding the gene. The developmental profile of ribonucleic acid transcribed from one of these regions differs from that of the dopa decarboxylase transcript. Images PMID:6086012

  5. Bioconversion of lactose/whey to fructose diphosphate with recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells

    SciTech Connect

    Compagno, C.; Tura, A.; Ranzi, B.M.; Martegani, E. )

    1993-07-01

    Genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that express Escherichia coli [beta]-galactosidase gene are able to bioconvert lactose or whey into fructose-1,6-diphosphate (FDP). High FDP yields from whey were obtained with an appropriate ratio between cell concentration and inorganic phosphate. The biomass of transformed cells can be obtained from different carbon sources, according to the expression vector bearing the lacZ gene. The authors showed that whey can be used as the carbon source for S. cerevisiae growth and as the substrate for bioconversion to fructose diphosphate.

  6. Trans, trans-farnesol as a mevalonate-derived inducer of murine 3T3-F442A pre-adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Sheida; Mo, Huanbiao

    2016-03-01

    Based on our finding that depletion of mevalonate-derived metabolites inhibits adipocyte differentiation, we hypothesize that trans, trans-farnesol (farnesol), a mevalonate-derived sesquiterpene, induces adipocyte differentiation. Farnesol dose-dependently (25-75 μmol/L) increased intracellular triglyceride content of murine 3T3-F442A pre-adipocytes measured by AdipoRed™ Assay and Oil Red-O staining. Concomitantly, farnesol dose-dependently increased glucose uptake and glucose transport protein 4 (GLUT4) expression without affecting cell viability. Furthermore, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot showed that farnesol increased the mRNA and protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a key regulator of adipocyte differentiation, and the mRNA levels of PPARγ-regulated fatty acid-binding protein 4 and adiponectin; in contrast, farnesol downregulated Pref-1 gene, a marker of pre-adipocytes. GW9662 (10 µmol/L), an antagonist of PPARγ, reversed the effects of farnesol on cellular lipid content, suggesting that PPARγ signaling pathway may mediate the farnesol effect. Farnesol (25-75 μmol/L) did not affect the mRNA level of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate pathway. Farnesol may be the mevalonate-derived inducer of adipocyte differentiation and potentially an insulin sensitizer via activation of PPARγ and upregulation of glucose uptake. PMID:26660152

  7. An endosymbiont positively modulates ornithine decarboxylase in host trypanosomatids

    SciTech Connect

    Frossard, Mariana Lins; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; Matta, Renato Augusto da; Souza, Wanderley de; Garcia de Mello, Fernando; Motta, Maria Cristina Machado . E-mail: motta@biof.ufrj.br

    2006-05-05

    Summary: Some trypanosomatids, such as Crithidia deanei, are endosymbiont-containing species. Aposymbiotic strains are obtained after antibiotic treatment, revealing interesting aspects of this symbiotic association. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) promotes polyamine biosynthesis and contributes to cell proliferation. Here, we show that ODC activity is higher in endosymbiont-bearing trypanosomatids than in aposymbiotic cells, but isolated endosymbionts did not display this enzyme activity. Intriguingly, expressed levels of ODC were similar in both strains, suggesting that ODC is positively modulated in endosymbiont-bearing cells. When the aposymbiotic strain was grown in conditioned medium, obtained after cultivation of the endosymbiont-bearing strain, cellular proliferation as well as ODC activity and localization were similar to that observed in the endosymbiont-containing trypanosomatids. Furthermore, dialyzed-heated medium and trypsin treatment reduced ODC activity of the aposymbiont strain. Taken together, these data indicate that the endosymbiont can enhance the protozoan ODC activity by providing factors of protein nature, which increase the host polyamine metabolism.

  8. Altered subcellular localization of ornithine decarboxylase in Alzheimer's disease brain

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Tatjana . E-mail: Tatjana.Nilsson@ki.se; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Volkman, Inga; Winblad, Bengt; Folkesson, Ronnie; Benedikz, Eirikur

    2006-06-02

    The amyloid precursor protein can through ligand-mimicking induce expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis. We report here the regional distribution and cellular localization of ODC immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. In frontal cortex and hippocampus of control cases, the most pronounced ODC immunoreactivity was found in the nucleus. In possible and definite AD the immunoreactivity had shifted to the cytoplasm. In cerebellum of control cases, ODC staining was found in a small portion of Purkinje cells, mostly in the nucleus. In AD, both possible and definite, the number of stained Purkinje cells increased significantly and immunoreactivity was shifted to the cytoplasm, even though it was still prominent in the nucleus. In conclusion, our study reveals an early shift of the ODC immunoreactivity in AD from the nuclear compartment towards the cytoplasm.

  9. Detection and Time Course of Formation of Major Thiamin Diphosphate-Bound Covalent Intermediates Derived from a Chromophoric Substrate Analogue on Benzoylformate Decarboxylase†

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sumit; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Balakrishnan, Anand; Brandt, Gabriel S.; Kneen, Malea M.; Yep, Alejandra; McLeish, Michael J.; Kenyon, George L.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ringe, Dagmar; Jordan, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of the enzyme benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFDC), which carries out a typical thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent nonoxidative decarboxylation reaction, was studied with the chromophoric alternate substrate (E)-2-oxo-4(pyridin-3-yl)-3-butenoic acid (3-PKB). Addition of 3-PKB resulted in the appearance of two transient intermediates formed consecutively, the first one to be formed a predecarboxylation ThDP-bound intermediate with λmax at 477 nm, and the second one corresponding to the first postdecarboxylation intermediate the enamine with λmax at 437 nm. The time course of formation/depletion of the PKB–ThDP covalent complex and of the enamine showed that decarboxylation was slower than formation of the PKB–ThDP covalent adduct. When the product of decarboxylation 3-(pyridin-3-yl)acrylaldehyde (PAA) was added to BFDC, again an absorbance with λmax at 473 nm was formed, corresponding to the tetrahedral adduct of PAA with ThDP. Addition of well-formed crystals of BFDC to a solution of PAA resulted in a high resolution (1.34 Å) structure of the BFDC-bound adduct of ThDP with PAA confirming the tetrahedral nature at the C2α atom, rather than of the enamine, and supporting the assignment of the λmax at 473 nm to the PAA–ThDP adduct. The structure of the PAA–ThDP covalent complex is the first example of a product–ThDP adduct on BFDC. Similar studies with 3-PKB indicated that decarboxylation had taken place. Evidence was also obtained for the slow formation of the enamine intermediate when BFDC was incubated with benzaldehyde, the product of the decarboxylation reaction thus confirming its presence on the reaction pathway. PMID:19140682

  10. A Liquid-Based Colorimetric Assay of Lysine Decarboxylase and Its Application to Enzymatic Assay.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Hyun; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Kim, Hyun Joong; Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Seo, Hyung-Min; Kim, Jung-Ho; Song, Hun-Seok; Kim, Yun-Gon; Park, Kyungmoon; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2015-12-28

    A liquid-based colorimetric assay using a pH indicator was introduced for high-throughput monitoring of lysine decarboxylase activity. The assay is based on the color change of bromocresol purple, measured at 595 nm in liquid reaction mixture, due to an increase of pH by the production of cadaverine. Bromocresol purple was selected as the indicator because it has higher sensitivity than bromothymol blue and pheonol red within a broad range and shows good linearity within the applied pH. We applied this for simple determination of lysine decarboxylase reusability using 96-well plates, and optimization of conditions for enzyme overexpression with different concentrations of IPTG on lysine decarboxylase. This assay is expected to be applied for monitoring and quantifying the liquid-based enzyme reaction in biotransformation of decarboxylase in a high-throughput way. PMID:26282689

  11. Glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in transgenic mouse septum: an anti-GFP immunofluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Verimli, Ural; Sehirli, Umit S

    2016-09-01

    The septum is a basal forebrain region located between the lateral ventricles in rodents. It consists of lateral and medial divisions. Medial septal projections regulate hippocampal theta rhythm whereas lateral septal projections are involved in processes such as affective functions, memory formation, and behavioral responses. Gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons of the septal region possess the 65 and 67 isoforms of the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase. Although data on the glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in the septal region generally appears to indicate glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 dominance, different studies have given inconsistent results in this regard. The aim of this study was therefore to obtain information on the distributions of both of these glutamic acid decarboxylase isoforms in the septal region in transgenic mice. Two animal groups of glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein knock-in transgenic mice were utilized in the experiment. Brain sections from the region were taken for anti-green fluorescent protein immunohistochemistry in order to obtain estimated quantitative data on the number of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons. Following the immunohistochemical procedures, the mean numbers of labeled cells in the lateral and medial septal nuclei were obtained for the two isoform groups. Statistical analysis yielded significant results which indicated that the 65 isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase predominates in both lateral and medial septal nuclei (unpaired two-tailed t-test p < 0.0001 for LS, p < 0.01 for MS). This study is the first to reveal the dominance of glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform 65 in the septal region in glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice. PMID:26643381

  12. Chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase operates in planta as a bifunctional enzyme with chrysanthemol synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Gao, Liping; Hu, Hao; Stoopen, Geert; Wang, Caiyun; Jongsma, Maarten A

    2014-12-26

    Chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase (CDS) is the first pathway-specific enzyme in the biosynthesis of pyrethrins, the most widely used plant-derived pesticide. CDS catalyzes c1'-2-3 cyclopropanation reactions of two molecules of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) to yield chrysanthemyl diphosphate (CPP). Three proteins are known to catalyze this cyclopropanation reaction of terpene precursors. Two of them, phytoene and squalene synthase, are bifunctional enzymes with both prenyltransferase and terpene synthase activity. CDS, the other member, has been reported to perform only the prenyltransferase step. Here we show that the NDXXD catalytic motif of CDS, under the lower substrate conditions prevalent in plants, also catalyzes the next step, converting CPP into chrysanthemol by hydrolyzing the diphosphate moiety. The enzymatic hydrolysis reaction followed conventional Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with a Km value for CPP of 196 μm. For the chrysanthemol synthase activity, DMAPP competed with CPP as substrate. The DMAPP concentration required for half-maximal activity to produce chrysanthemol was ∼100 μm, and significant substrate inhibition was observed at elevated DMAPP concentrations. The N-terminal peptide of CDS was identified as a plastid-targeting peptide. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing CDS emitted chrysanthemol at a rate of 0.12-0.16 μg h(-1) g(-1) fresh weight. We propose that CDS should be renamed a chrysanthemol synthase utilizing DMAPP as substrate. PMID:25378387

  13. Control of phosphofructokinase from rat skeletal muscle. Effects of fructose diphosphate, AMP, ATP, and citrate.

    PubMed

    Tornheim, K; Lowenstein, J M

    1976-12-10

    Under conditions used previously for demonstrating glycolytic oscillations in muscle extracts (pH 6.65, 0.1 to 0.5 mM ATP), phosphofructokinase from rat skeletal muscle is strongly activated by micromolar concentrations of fructose diphosphate. The activation is dependent on the presence of AMP. Activation by fructose diphosphate and AMP, and inhibition by ATP, is primarily due to large changes in the apparent affinity of the enzyme for the substrate fructose 6-phosphate. These control properties can account for the generation of glycolytic oscillations. The enzyme was also studied under conditions approximating the metabolite contents of skeletal muscle in vivo (pH 7.0, 10mM ATP, 0.1 mM fructose 6-phosphate). Under these more inhibitory conditions, phosphofructokinase is strongly activated by low concentrations of fructose diphosphate, with half-maximal activation at about 10 muM. Citrate is a potent inhibitor at physiological concentrations, whereas AMP is a strong activator. Both AMP and citrate affect the maximum velocity and have little effect on affinity of the enzyme for fructose diphosphate. PMID:12161

  14. Inhibition of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase attenuates ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Vaschetto, Rosanna; Kuiper, Jan W.; Chiang, Johnson; Haitsma, Jack J.; Juco, Jonathan W.; Uhlig, Stefan; Plötz, Frans B.; Della Corte, Francesco; Zhang, Haibo; Slutsky, Arthur S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation can induce organ injury associated with overwhelming inflammatory responses. Excessive activation of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase enzyme following massive DNA damage may aggravate inflammatory responses. We thus hypothesized that the pharmacological inhibition of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase by PJ-34 will attenuate ventilator-induced lung injury. Methods Anesthetized rats were subjected to intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide at a dose of 6 mg/kg. The animals were then randomized to receive mechanical ventilation at either low tidal volume (6 mL/kg) with 5 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure or high tidal volume (15 mL/kg) with zero positive end-expiratory pressure, in the presence and absence of intravenous administration of PJ-34. Results The high tidal volume ventilation resulted in an increase in poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase activity in the lung. The treatment with PJ-34 maintained a greater oxygenation and a lower airway plateau pressure than the vehicle control group. This was associated with a decreased level of interleukin-6, active plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the lung, attenuated leukocyte lung transmigration and reduced pulmonary edema and apoptosis. The administration of PJ-34 also decreased the systemic levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, and attenuated the degree of apoptosis in the kidney. Conclusion The pharmacological inhibition of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase reduces ventilator-induced lung injury and protects kidney function. PMID:18212571

  15. Chrysanthemyl Diphosphate Synthase Operates in Planta as a Bifunctional Enzyme with Chrysanthemol Synthase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ting; Gao, Liping; Hu, Hao; Stoopen, Geert; Wang, Caiyun; Jongsma, Maarten A.

    2014-01-01

    Chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase (CDS) is the first pathway-specific enzyme in the biosynthesis of pyrethrins, the most widely used plant-derived pesticide. CDS catalyzes c1′-2-3 cyclopropanation reactions of two molecules of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) to yield chrysanthemyl diphosphate (CPP). Three proteins are known to catalyze this cyclopropanation reaction of terpene precursors. Two of them, phytoene and squalene synthase, are bifunctional enzymes with both prenyltransferase and terpene synthase activity. CDS, the other member, has been reported to perform only the prenyltransferase step. Here we show that the NDXXD catalytic motif of CDS, under the lower substrate conditions prevalent in plants, also catalyzes the next step, converting CPP into chrysanthemol by hydrolyzing the diphosphate moiety. The enzymatic hydrolysis reaction followed conventional Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with a Km value for CPP of 196 μm. For the chrysanthemol synthase activity, DMAPP competed with CPP as substrate. The DMAPP concentration required for half-maximal activity to produce chrysanthemol was ∼100 μm, and significant substrate inhibition was observed at elevated DMAPP concentrations. The N-terminal peptide of CDS was identified as a plastid-targeting peptide. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing CDS emitted chrysanthemol at a rate of 0.12–0.16 μg h−1 g−1 fresh weight. We propose that CDS should be renamed a chrysanthemol synthase utilizing DMAPP as substrate. PMID:25378387

  16. Structure and Function of 4-Hydroxyphenylacetate Decarboxylase and Its Cognate Activating Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Brinda; Buckel, Wolfgang; Golding, Bernard T; Ullmann, G Matthias; Martins, Berta M

    2016-01-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase (4Hpad) is the prototype of a new class of Fe-S cluster-dependent glycyl radical enzymes (Fe-S GREs) acting on aromatic compounds. The two-enzyme component system comprises a decarboxylase responsible for substrate conversion and a dedicated activating enzyme (4Hpad-AE). The decarboxylase uses a glycyl/thiyl radical dyad to convert 4-hydroxyphenylacetate into p-cresol (4-methylphenol) by a biologically unprecedented Kolbe-type decarboxylation. In addition to the radical dyad prosthetic group, the decarboxylase unit contains two [4Fe-4S] clusters coordinated by an extra small subunit of unknown function. 4Hpad-AE reductively cleaves S-adenosylmethionine (SAM or AdoMet) at a site-differentiated [4Fe-4S]2+/+ cluster (RS cluster) generating a transient 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical that produces a stable glycyl radical in the decarboxylase by the abstraction of a hydrogen atom. 4Hpad-AE binds up to two auxiliary [4Fe-4S] clusters coordinated by a ferredoxin-like insert that is C-terminal to the RS cluster-binding motif. The ferredoxin-like domain with its two auxiliary clusters is not vital for SAM-dependent glycyl radical formation in the decarboxylase, but facilitates a longer lifetime for the radical. This review describes the 4Hpad and cognate AE families and focuses on the recent advances and open questions concerning the structure, function and mechanism of this novel Fe-S-dependent class of GREs. PMID:26959876

  17. Cysteine-dependent inactivation of hepatic ornithine decarboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Y; Kameji, T; Hayashi, S

    1984-01-01

    When rat liver homogenate or its postmitochondrial supernatant was incubated with L-cysteine, but not D-cysteine, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) lost more than half of its catalytic activity within 30 min and, at a slower rate, its immunoreactivity. The inactivation correlated with production of H2S during the incubation. These changes did not occur in liver homogenates from vitamin B6-deficient rats. A heat-stable inactivating factor was found in both dialysed cytosol and washed microsomes obtained from the postmitochondrial supernatant incubated with cysteine. The microsomal inactivating factor was solubilized into Tris/HCl buffer, pH 7.4, containing dithiothreitol. Its absorption spectrum in the visible region resembled that of Fe2+ X dithiothreitol in Tris/HCl buffer. On the other hand FeSO4 inactivated partially purified ODC in a similar manner to the present inactivating factor. During the incubation of postmitochondrial supernatant with cysteine, there was a marked increase in the contents of Fe2+ loosely bound to cytosolic and microsomal macromolecules. Furthermore, the content of such reactive iron in the inactivating factor preparations was enough to account for their inactivating activity. These data suggested that H2S produced from cysteine by some vitamin B6-dependent enzyme(s) converted cytosolic and microsomal iron into a reactive loosely bound form that inactivated ODC. PMID:6696745

  18. Accumulation of ornithine decarboxylase-antizyme complex in HMOA cells.

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Y; Fujita, K; Kameji, T; Hayashi, S

    1985-01-01

    A new method was developed for the assay of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC)-antizyme complex, in which alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO)-inactivated ODC was used to release active ODC competitively from the complex. ODC-antizyme complex was present in the extracts of hepatoma tissue-culture (HTC) cells and of ODC-stabilized variant HMOA cells, in much larger amounts in the latter. Cellular amounts of the complex fluctuated after a change of medium in a similar manner in HTC and HMOA cells, increasing during the period of ODC decay. After treatment with cycloheximide, the decay of ODC-antizyme complex in HMOA cells was more rapid than the decay of free ODC, but it was much slower than the decay of free ODC or complexed ODC in HTC cells. Administration of putrescine caused a rapid increase in the amount of ODC-antizyme complex in both HTC and HMOA cells, but nevertheless the decay of total ODC (free ODC plus ODC-antizyme complex) was more rapid with putrescine than with cycloheximide. These results suggested the possibility that ODC is degraded through complex-formation with antizyme. In contrast with complexed antizyme, free antizyme was not stabilized in HMOA cells. PMID:3919709

  19. Dimerization of Bacterial Diaminopimelate Decarboxylase Is Essential for Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Peverelli, Martin G; Soares da Costa, Tatiana P; Kirby, Nigel; Perugini, Matthew A

    2016-04-29

    Diaminopimelate decarboxylase (DAPDC) catalyzes the final step in the diaminopimelate biosynthesis pathway of bacteria. The product of the reaction is the essential amino acid l-lysine, which is an important precursor for the synthesis of the peptidoglycan cell wall, housekeeping proteins, and virulence factors of bacteria. Accordingly, the enzyme is a promising antibacterial target. Previous structural studies demonstrate that DAPDC exists as monomers, dimers, and tetramers in the crystal state. However, the active oligomeric form has not yet been determined. We show using analytical ultracentrifugation, small angle x-ray scattering, and enzyme kinetic analyses in solution that the active form of DAPDC from Bacillus anthracis, Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Vibrio cholerae is a dimer. The importance of dimerization was probed further by generating dimerization interface mutants (N381A and R385A) of V. cholerae DAPDC. Our studies indicate that N381A and R385A are significantly attenuated in catalytic activity, thus confirming that dimerization of DAPDC is essential for function. These findings provide scope for the development of new antibacterial agents that prevent DAPDC dimerization. PMID:26921318

  20. Ornithine decarboxylase antizyme inhibitor 2 regulates intracellular vesicle trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Kanerva, Kristiina; Maekitie, Laura T.; Baeck, Nils; Andersson, Leif C.

    2010-07-01

    Antizyme inhibitor 1 (AZIN1) and 2 (AZIN2) are proteins that activate ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the key enzyme of polyamine biosynthesis. Both AZINs release ODC from its inactive complex with antizyme (AZ), leading to formation of the catalytically active ODC. The ubiquitously expressed AZIN1 is involved in cell proliferation and transformation whereas the role of the recently found AZIN2 in cellular functions is unknown. Here we report the intracellular localization of AZIN2 and present novel evidence indicating that it acts as a regulator of vesicle trafficking. We used immunostaining to demonstrate that both endogenous and FLAG-tagged AZIN2 localize to post-Golgi vesicles of the secretory pathway. Immuno-electron microscopy revealed that the vesicles associate mainly with the trans-Golgi network (TGN). RNAi-mediated knockdown of AZIN2 or depletion of cellular polyamines caused selective fragmentation of the TGN and retarded the exocytotic release of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. Exogenous addition of polyamines normalized the morphological changes and reversed the inhibition of protein secretion. Our findings demonstrate that AZIN2 regulates the transport of secretory vesicles by locally activating ODC and polyamine biosynthesis.

  1. Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody positive neurological syndromes.

    PubMed

    Tohid, Hassaan

    2016-07-01

    A rare kind of antibody, known as anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) autoantibody, is found in some patients. The antibody works against the GAD enzyme, which is essential in the formation of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter found in the brain. Patients found with this antibody present with motor and cognitive problems due to low levels or lack of GABA, because in the absence or low levels of GABA patients exhibit motor and cognitive symptoms. The anti-GAD antibody is found in some neurological syndromes, including stiff-person syndrome, paraneoplastic stiff-person syndrome, Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS), limbic encephalopathy, cerebellar ataxia, eye movement disorders, and epilepsy. Previously, excluding MFS, these conditions were calledhyperexcitability disorders. However, collectively, these syndromes should be known as "anti-GAD positive neurological syndromes." An important limitation of this study is that the literature is lacking on the subject, and why patients with the above mentioned neurological problems present with different symptoms has not been studied in detail. Therefore, it is recommended that more research is conducted on this subject to obtain a better and deeper understanding of these anti-GAD antibody induced neurological syndromes. PMID:27356651

  2. Multiple roles of the active site lysine of Dopa decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, Mariarita; Voltattorni, Carla Borri

    2009-08-15

    The pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent-enzyme Dopa decarboxylase, responsible for the irreversible conversion of l-Dopa to dopamine, is an attractive drug target. The contribution of the pyridoxal-Lys303 to the catalytic mechanisms of decarboxylation and oxidative deamination is analyzed. The K303A variant binds the coenzyme with a 100-fold decreased apparent equilibrium binding affinity with respect to the wild-type enzyme. Unlike the wild-type, K303A in the presence of l-Dopa displays a parallel progress course of formation of both dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (plus ammonia) with a burst followed by a linear phase. Moreover, the finding that the catalytic efficiencies of decarboxylation and of oxidative deamination display a decrease of 1500- and 17-fold, respectively, with respect to the wild-type, is indicative of a different impact of Lys303 mutation on these reactions. Kinetic analyses reveal that Lys303 is involved in external aldimine formation and hydrolysis as well as in product release which affects the rate-determining step of decarboxylation. PMID:19580779

  3. Localization of histidine decarboxylase mRNA in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, D A; Wang, Y M; Zahnow, C A; Joseph, D R; Millhorn, D E

    1990-08-01

    The recent cloning of a cDNA encoding fetal rat liver histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the synthesizing enzyme for histamine, allows the study of the central histaminergic system at the molecular level. To this end, Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses were used to determine the regional and cellular distribution of neurons which express HDC mRNA in rat brain. Three hybridizing species which migrate as 1.6-, 2.6-, and 3.5-kb RNA were identified with Northern blots. The major (2.6 kb) and minor (3.5 kb) species, characteristic of HDC mRNA in fetal liver, were expressed at high levels in diencephalon and at just detectable levels in hippocampus, but not in other brain regions. In contrast, the 1.6-kb species was present in all brain regions examined except the olfactory bulb. Cells which contain HDC mRNA were found by in situ hybridization in the hypothalamus; HDC mRNA-containing cells were not detected in other areas, including the hippocampus. Hypothalamic neurons which express HDC mRNA were localized to all aspects of the tuberomammillary nucleus, a result consistent with previous immunohistochemical findings. PMID:19912749

  4. Gene therapy for aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Tseng, Sheng-Hong; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Lee, Ni-Chung; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Snyder, Richard O; Byrne, Barry J; Tai, Chun-Hwei; Wu, Ruey-Meei

    2012-05-16

    Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) is required for the synthesis of the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin. Children with defects in the AADC gene show compromised development, particularly in motor function. Drug therapy has only marginal effects on some of the symptoms and does not change early childhood mortality. Here, we performed adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene transfer of the human AADC gene bilaterally into the putamen of four patients 4 to 6 years of age. All of the patients showed improvements in motor performance: One patient was able to stand 16 months after gene transfer, and the other three patients achieved supported sitting 6 to 15 months after gene transfer. Choreic dyskinesia was observed in all patients, but this resolved after several months. Positron emission tomography revealed increased uptake by the putamen of 6-[(18)F]fluorodopa, a tracer for AADC. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed increased dopamine and serotonin levels after gene transfer. Thus, gene therapy targeting primary AADC deficiency is well tolerated and leads to improved motor function. PMID:22593174

  5. Processing and topology of the yeast mitochondrial phosphatidylserine decarboxylase 1.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Susanne E; Böttinger, Lena; Vögtle, F-Nora; Wiedemann, Nils; Meisinger, Chris; Becker, Thomas; Daum, Günther

    2012-10-26

    The inner mitochondrial membrane plays a crucial role in cellular lipid homeostasis through biosynthesis of the non-bilayer-forming lipids phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the majority of cellular phosphatidylethanolamine is synthesized by the mitochondrial phosphatidylserine decarboxylase 1 (Psd1). The biogenesis of Psd1 involves several processing steps. It was speculated that the Psd1 precursor is sorted into the inner membrane and is subsequently released into the intermembrane space by proteolytic removal of a hydrophobic sorting signal. However, components involved in the maturation of the Psd1 precursor have not been identified. We show that processing of Psd1 involves the action of the mitochondrial processing peptidase and Oct1 and an autocatalytic cleavage at a highly conserved LGST motif yielding the α- and β-subunit of the enzyme. The Psd1 β-subunit (Psd1β) forms the membrane anchor, which binds the intermembrane space-localized α-subunit (Psd1α). Deletion of a transmembrane segment in the β-subunit results in mislocalization of Psd1 and reduced enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, autocatalytic cleavage does not depend on proper localization to the inner mitochondrial membrane. In summary, membrane integration of Psd1 is crucial for its functionality and for maintenance of mitochondrial lipid homeostasis. PMID:22984266

  6. Processing and Topology of the Yeast Mitochondrial Phosphatidylserine Decarboxylase 1*

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Susanne E.; Böttinger, Lena; Vögtle, F.-Nora; Wiedemann, Nils; Meisinger, Chris; Becker, Thomas; Daum, Günther

    2012-01-01

    The inner mitochondrial membrane plays a crucial role in cellular lipid homeostasis through biosynthesis of the non-bilayer-forming lipids phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the majority of cellular phosphatidylethanolamine is synthesized by the mitochondrial phosphatidylserine decarboxylase 1 (Psd1). The biogenesis of Psd1 involves several processing steps. It was speculated that the Psd1 precursor is sorted into the inner membrane and is subsequently released into the intermembrane space by proteolytic removal of a hydrophobic sorting signal. However, components involved in the maturation of the Psd1 precursor have not been identified. We show that processing of Psd1 involves the action of the mitochondrial processing peptidase and Oct1 and an autocatalytic cleavage at a highly conserved LGST motif yielding the α- and β-subunit of the enzyme. The Psd1 β-subunit (Psd1β) forms the membrane anchor, which binds the intermembrane space-localized α-subunit (Psd1α). Deletion of a transmembrane segment in the β-subunit results in mislocalization of Psd1 and reduced enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, autocatalytic cleavage does not depend on proper localization to the inner mitochondrial membrane. In summary, membrane integration of Psd1 is crucial for its functionality and for maintenance of mitochondrial lipid homeostasis. PMID:22984266

  7. Ethanolic fermentation in transgenic tobacco expressing Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, M; Brändle, R; Kuhlemeier, C

    1994-01-01

    During oxygen limitation in higher plants, energy metabolism switches from respiration to fermentation. As part of this anaerobic response the expression of genes encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) is strongly induced. In addition there is ample evidence for post-translational regulation. In order to understand this multi-level regulation of the anaerobic response, we provided tobacco with the constitutive capacity of ethanolic fermentation by expressing a PDC gene derived from the obligate anaerobe Zymomonas mobilis. The protein accumulated to high levels and was active in an in vitro assay. During the first 2-4 h of anoxia, acetaldehyde accumulated to 10- to 35-fold and ethanol to 8- to 20-fold higher levels than in wild-type. Under normoxic conditions no accumulation of acetaldehyde and ethanol could be measured. Instead, the two products may be immediately re-metabolized in tobacco leaf tissue. We show that aerobic fermentation takes place when the respiratory system is inhibited. Although these conditions enhance ethanolic fermentation under normoxia, they fail to increase ADH transcript levels. These results indicate that anaerobic transcription is triggered not by the metabolic consequences of oxygen limitation, but directly through an oxygen-sensing system. Images PMID:8026460

  8. Histidine Decarboxylase Deficiency Prevents Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Manal; Machavoine, François; Rignault, Rachel; Dam, Julie; Dy, Michel; Thieblemont, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has highlighted the role of histamine in inflammation. Since this monoamine has also been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of type-1 diabetes, we assessed its effect in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. To this end, we used mice (inactivated) knocked out for the gene encoding histidine decarboxylase, the unique histamine-forming enzyme, backcrossed on a NOD genetic background. We found that the lack of endogenous histamine in NOD HDC(-/-) mice decreased the incidence of diabetes in relation to their wild-type counterpart. Whereas the proportion of regulatory T and myeloid-derived suppressive cells was similar in both strains, histamine deficiency was associated with increased levels of immature macrophages, as compared with wild-type NOD mice. Concerning the cytokine pattern, we found a decrease in circulating IL-12 and IFN-γ in HDC(-/-) mice, while IL-6 or leptin remained unchanged, suggesting that histamine primarily modulates the inflammatory environment. Paradoxically, exogenous histamine given to NOD HDC(-/-) mice provided also protection against T1D. Our study supports the notion that histamine is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes, thus providing additional evidence for its role in the regulation of the immune response. PMID:26090474

  9. Chloroform induction of ornithine decarboxylase activity in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Savage, R E; Westrich, C; Guion, C; Pereira, M A

    1982-01-01

    Chloroform is a drinking water contaminant that has been demonstrated to be carcinogenic to mice and rats resulting in an increased incidence of liver and kidney tumors, respectively. The mechanism of chloroform carcinogenicity might be by tumor initiation and/or promotion. Since induction of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity has been proposed as a molecular marker for tumor promoters, we have investigated the effect of chloroform on ODC activity in rats. Chloroform induced a dose-dependent increase of hepatic ODC with an apparent threshold at 100 mg/kg body weight. Female rats were two to four times more susceptible to to chloroform. Upon daily dosing of chloroform for 7 days the liver became less susceptible, with the last dose of chloroform resulting in only 10% of the activity observed after a single dose. Nuclear RNA polymerase I activity was also induced by chloroform. Chloroform, rather than increasing the activity of renal ODC, resulted in a 35% reduction. The induction by chloroform of hepatic ODC activity might be associated with regenerative hyperplasia while the renal carcinogenicity of chloroform could not be demonstrated to be associated with ODC induction. PMID:7151757

  10. Arginase, Arginine Decarboxylase, Ornithine Decarboxylase, and Polyamines in Tomato Ovaries (Changes in Unpollinated Ovaries and Parthenocarpic Fruits Induced by Auxin or Gibberellin).

    PubMed Central

    Alabadi, D.; Aguero, M. S.; Perez-Amador, M. A.; Carbonell, J.

    1996-01-01

    Arginase (EC 3.5.3.1) activity has been found in the ovaries and Young fruits of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv Rutgers).Changes in arginase, arginine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.19), and ornithine decarboxylase activity (EC 4.1.1.17) and levels of free and conjugated putrescine, spermidine, and spermine were determined in unpollinated ovaries and in parthenocarpic fruits during the early stages of development induced by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) or gibberellic acid (GA3). Levels of arginase, free spermine, and conjugates of the three polyamines were constant in unpollinated ovaries and characteristic of a presenescent step. A marked decrease in arginase activity, free spermine, and polyamine conjugates was associated with the initiation of fruit growth due to cell division, and when cell expansion was initiated, the absence of arginase indicated a redirection of nitrogen metabolism to the synthesis of arginine. A transient increase in arginine decarboxylase and ornithine decarboxylase was also observed in 2,4-D-induced fruits. In general, 2,4-D treatments produced faster changes than GA3, and without treatment, unpollinated ovaries developed only slightly and senescence was hardly visible. Sensitivity to 2,4-D and GA3 treatment remained for at least 2 weeks postanthesis. PMID:12226441

  11. Mevalonic acid-dependent degradation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Correll, C C; Edwards, P A

    1994-01-01

    The microsomal enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is subject to rapid degradation when cells are incubated with sterols or mevalonic acid (MVA). It has been shown that this rapid degradation is dependent upon both a sterol and another MVA-derived metabolite (Nakanishi, M., Goldstein, J. L., and Brown, M. S. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 8929-8937). In the current study, inhibitors of the isoprene biosynthetic pathway were used to define further this mevalonic acid derivative involved in the accelerated degradation of HMG-CoA reductase. The accelerated degradation of HMG-CoA reductase in met-18b-2 cells, which is induced by the addition of MVA, was inhibited by the presence of the squalene synthase inhibitor, zaragozic acid/squalestatin, or the squalene epoxidase inhibitor, NB-598. Accelerated degradation of HMG-CoA reductase was observed when NB-598-treated cells were incubated with both MVA and sterols. In contrast, the addition of MVA and sterols to zaragozic acid/squalestatin-treated cells did not result in rapid enzyme degradation. This MVA- and sterol-dependent degradation of HMG-CoA reductase persisted in cells permeabilized with reduced streptolysin O. Finally, the selective degradation of HMG-CoA reductase was also observed in rat hepatic microsomes incubated in vitro in the absence of ATP and cytosol. We conclude that the MVA-derived component that is required for the accelerated degradation of HMG-CoA reductase is derived from farnesyl disphosphate and/or squalene in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway. We propose that this component has a permissive effect and does not, by itself, induce the degradation of HMG-CoA reductase. We also conclude that the degradation of HMG-CoA occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum, and, once the degradation of HMG-CoA reductase has been initiated by MVA and sterols, all necessary components for the continued degradation of HMG-CoA reductase reside in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:8276863

  12. Biosynthesis of monoterpenes and norisoprenoids in raspberry fruits (Rubus idaeus L.): the role of cytosolic mevalonate and plastidial methylerythritol phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Hampel, Daniela; Swatski, Anna; Mosandl, Armin; Wüst, Matthias

    2007-10-31

    The biosynthesis of the monoterpenes (-)-alpha-pinene, linalool, and the norisoprenoids alpha- and beta-ionone in raspberry fruits (rubus idaeus L.) was investigated by in vivo feeding experiments with [5,5-(2)H2]-mevalonic acid lactone and [5,5-(2)H2]-1-deoxy-D-xylulose. The volatile compounds were extracted by stirbar sorptive extraction and analyzed using thermal desorption-multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-enantio-MDGC-MS). The feeding experiments demonstrate that (-)-alpha-pinene and (S)-linalool are exclusively synthesized via the cytosolic mevalonic acid pathway. In contrast, (2)H-labeled (R)-(E)-alpha-ionone and (2)H-labeled (E)-beta-ionone are detectable after application of d2-1-deoxy-D-xylulose and d2-mevalonic acid lactone, respectively. However, (R)-linalool reveals no incorporation of either one of the fed precursors, even though this enantiomer is detectable in the fruit tissue. PMID:17907775

  13. Combined inhibition of the mevalonate pathway with statins and zoledronic acid potentiates their anti-tumor effects in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Göbel, Andy; Thiele, Stefanie; Browne, Andrew J; Rauner, Martina; Zinna, Valentina M; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Rachner, Tilman D

    2016-05-28

    Amino-bisphosphonates are antiresorptive drugs for the treatment of osteolytic bone metastases, which are frequently caused by breast and other solid tumors. Like statins, amino-bisphosphonates inhibit the mevalonate pathway. Direct anti-tumor effects of amino-bisphosphonates and statins have been proposed, although high concentrations are required to achieve these effects. Here, we demonstrate that the treatment of different human breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MDA-Bone, and MDA-Met) by combined inhibition of the mevalonate pathway using statins and zoledronic acid at the same time significantly reduces the concentrations required to achieve a meaningful anti-tumor effect over a single agent approach (50% reduction of cell vitality and 4-fold increase of apoptosis; p < 0.05). The effects were mediated by suppressed protein geranylation that caused an accumulation of GTP-bound RhoA and CDC42. Importantly, the knockdown of both proteins prior to mevalonate pathway inhibition reduced apoptosis by up to 65% (p < 0.01), indicating the accumulation of the GTP-bound GTPases as the mediator of apoptosis. Our results point to effective anti-tumor effects in breast cancer by the combination of statins and zoledronic acid and warrant further validation in preclinical settings. PMID:26968247

  14. [A pharmacological study of the hepatoprotective activity of fructose-1,6-diphosphate].

    PubMed

    Klouchek, E; Markov, M; Popov, A

    1993-01-01

    A fructose-1,6-diphosphate preparation was tested for hepatoprotective activity through biochemical and morphologic studies in experiments on Wistar rats sustaining D-galactosamine- and paracetamole-induced hepatotoxicity. Findings indicated the modeled hepatic lesions to be readily reproducible, to simulate some characteristics of human liver pathology, and to be suitable for testing substances expected to have hepatoprotective action; intraperitoneal administration of fructose-1,6-diphosphate at a dose of 1000 mg/kg body weight proved moderately protective against liver damage by D-galactosamine; the benefit observed concerned mostly dystrophic and inflammatory changes in the liver; in a number of cases, correlation was noted between biochemical serum parameters and pathomorphologic liver alterations. PMID:7805621

  15. The formation of mono-N-acetylhexosamine derivatives of dolichol diphosphate by pig liver microsomal fractions.

    PubMed Central

    Palamarczyk, G; Hemming, F W

    1975-01-01

    Incubation of pig liver microsomal preparations with UDP-N[U-14C]acetylglucosamine yields a 14C-labelled lipid. The requirement for Mn2+, the pH optimum, time-dependence and the reversibility by UMP of the transferase are reported. Evidence is presented in favour of the lipid being a mixture of dolichol diphosphate N-[14C]acetylglucosamine and dolichol diphosphate N-[14C]acetylmannosamine. Available data suggest that the epimerization takes place while the hexosamine is bound in this lipid-soluble form. The N-acetylmannosamine appeared not be be released into the medium. The subfractionation of the microsomal fraction to separate transferase activity from membrane-bound beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase activity is also reported. Images PLATE 1 PMID:239708

  16. A new case of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency with mild clinical features.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Tan, Dongqiong; Han, Lianshu; Ye, Jun; Qiu, Wenjuan; Gu, Xuefan; Zhang, Huiwen

    2016-05-01

    Malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency is an extremely rare autosomal recessive inborn error of fatty acid metabolism. It usually follows a severe disease course and presents poor prognosis without treatment. Here, we report an affected female juvenile with a mild clinical and biochemical phenotype who mainly featured poor schooling without cardiomyopathy and metabolic acidosis. She was suspected of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency due to a 57-kb deletion in 16q23.3 encompassing the MLCYD gene revealed by chromosome microarray. Malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency was then confirmed by acylcarnitine analysis and organic acid analysis. Real-time PCR analysis of the patient revealed the first three exon deletion of the MLYCD gene, which was maternally inherited. DNA sequencing of the MLYCD gene of the patient identified a novel heterozygous mutation (c.911G>A, p.G304E) in exon 4 that was paternally inherited. The patient urine malonic acid dissolved and had a better school record in 6 month after initiation of fat-limited diet. At 1 year post treatment, the blood malonylcarnitine level decreased remarkably. Our result expands the phenotype of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency and suggests attentions should be paid to the mild form of disorders, for example, malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency, which usually present a severe disease course. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26858006

  17. Stimulation of Lysine Decarboxylase Production in Escherichia coli by Amino Acids and Peptides1

    PubMed Central

    Cascieri, T.; Mallette, M. F.

    1973-01-01

    A commercial hydrolysate of casein stimulated production of lysine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.18) by Escherichia coli B. Cellulose and gel chromatography of this hydrolysate yielded peptides which were variably effective in this stimulation. Replacement of individual, stimulatory peptides by equivalent amino acids duplicated the enzyme levels attained with those peptides. There was no indication of specific stimulation by any peptide. The peptides were probably taken up by the oligopeptide transport system of E. coli and hydrolyzed intracellularly by peptidases to their constituent amino acids for use in enzyme synthesis. Single omission of amino acids from mixtures was used to screen them for their relative lysine decarboxylase stimulating abilities. Over 100 different mixtures were evaluated in establishing the total amino acid requirements for maximal synthesis of lysine decarboxylase by E. coli B. A mixture containing all of the common amino acids except glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and alanine increased lysine decarboxylase threefold over an equivalent weight of casein hydrolysate. The nine most stimulatory amino acids were methionine, arginine, cystine, leucine, isoleucine, glutamine, threonine, tyrosine, and asparagine. Methionine and arginine quantitatively were the most important. A mixture of these nine was 87% as effective as the complete mixture. Several amino acids were inhibitory at moderate concentrations, and alanine (2.53 mM) was the most effective. Added pyridoxine increased lysine decarboxylase activity 30%, whereas other B vitamins and cyclic adenosine 5′-monophosphate had no effect. PMID:4588201

  18. Farnesyl diphosphate synthase localizes to the cytoplasm of Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei.

    PubMed

    Ferella, Marcela; Li, Zhu-Hong; Andersson, Björn; Docampo, Roberto

    2008-06-01

    The farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) has previously been characterized in trypanosomes as an essential enzyme for their survival and as the target for bisphosphonates, drugs that are effective both in vitro and in vivo against these parasites. Enzymes from the isoprenoid pathway have been assigned to different compartments in eukaryotes, including trypanosomatids. We here report that FPPS localizes to the cytoplasm of both Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei, and is not present in other organelles such as the mitochondria and glycosomes. PMID:18406406

  19. Enantioselective Inhibition of Squalene Synthase by Aziridine Analogues of Presqualene Diphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Koohang, Ali; Bailey, Jessica L.; Erickson, Hans K.; Owen, David; Poulter, C. Dale

    2013-01-01

    Squalene synthase catalyzes the conversion of two molecules of (E,E)-farnesyl diphosphate to squalene via the cyclopropylcarbinyl intermediate, presqualene diphosphate (PSPP). Since this novel reaction constitutes the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis, there has been considerable interest and research on the stereochemistry and mechanism of the process and in the design of selective inhibitors of the enzyme. This paper reports the synthesis and characterization of five racemic and two enantiopure aziridine analogues of PSPP and the evaluation of their potencies as inhibitors of recombinant yeast squalene synthase. The key aziridine-2-methanol intermediates (6-OH, 7-OH, and 8-OH) were obtained by N-alkylations or by an N-acylation–reduction sequence of (±)-, (2R,3S)-, and (2S,3R)-2,3-aziridinofarnesol (9-OH) protected as tert-butyldi-methylsilyl ethers. SN2 displacements of the corresponding methanesulfonates with pyrophosphate and methanediphosphonate anions afforded aziridine 2-methyl diphosphates and methanediphosphonates bearing N-undecyl, N-bishomogeranyl, and N-(α-methylene)bishomogeranyl substituents as mimics for the 2,6,10-trimethylundeca-2,5,9-trienyl side chain of PSPP. The 2R,3S diphosphate enantiomer bearing the N-bishomogeranyl substituent corresponding in absolute stereochemistry to PSPP proved to be the most potent inhibitor (IC50 1.17 ± 0.08 μM in the presence of inorganic pyrophosphate), a value 4-fold less than that of its 2S,3R stereoisomer. The other aziridine analogues bearing the N-(α-methylene)bishomogeranyl and N-undecyl substituents, and the related methanediphosphonates, exhibited lower affinities for recombinant squalene synthase. PMID:20545375

  20. A cesium copper vanadyl-diphosphate: Synthesis, crystal structure and physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Shvanskaya, Larisa; Yakubovich, Olga; Bychkov, Andrey; Shcherbakov, Vasiliy; Golovanov, Alexey; Zvereva, Elena; Volkova, Olga; Vasiliev, Alexander

    2015-02-15

    A non-centrosymmetric orthorhombic diphosphate, Cs{sub 2}Cu{sub 1+x}(VO){sub 2−x}(P{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sub 2} (x=0.1) with a=13.7364(2) Å, b=9.2666(2) Å, c=11.5678(2) Å, Z=4, has been isolated. Its 3D framework is built from Cu atoms in square pyramidal and square planar coordination, VO{sub 5} tetragonal pyramids and P{sub 2}O{sub 7} diphosphate groups, sharing vertices. Large channels are fulfilled by cesium atoms. The ESR study reveals a similarity in behaviour of two paramagnetic (Cu and V) subsystems. The temperature dependences of the ESR linewidth and static magnetic susceptibility data present evidences for a cluster type magnetic ordering in the title compound at T⁎=22 K. The weakness of the relevant anomalies reflects presumably obvious Cu{sup 2+} ions and (VO){sup 2+} units disorder in the system. It is supposed that the charge and geometry of the framework are controlled by the Cu{sup 2+}/(VO){sup 2+} ratio; its variation may lead to a design of new materials. - Graphical abstract: A microporous 3D anionic framework of the first copper vanadium-diphosphate Cs{sub 2}Cu{sub 1.1}(VO){sub 1.9}(P{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sub 2}. The similarity in behaviour of Cu and V paramagnetic subsystems revealed by ESR study. - Highlights: • The first copper vanadium-diphosphate Cs{sub 2}Cu{sub 1.1}(VO){sub 1.9}(P{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sub 2} is reported. • A 3D anionic framework is characterized by disorder in distribution of Cu and V atoms. • Structural relations with topologically similar compounds are discussed. • The similarity in behaviour of Cu and V paramagnetic subsystems has been revealed.

  1. 6- and 14-Fluoro farnesyl diphosphate: mechanistic probes for the reaction catalysed by aristolochene synthase.

    PubMed

    Miller, David J; Yu, Fanglei; Knight, David W; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2009-03-01

    The catalytic mechanism of the enzyme aristolochene synthase from Penicillium roqueforti (PR-AS) has been probed with the farnesyl diphosphate analogues 6- and 14-fluoro farnesyl diphosphate (1a and 1c). Incubation of these analogues with PR-AS followed by analysis of the reaction products by GC-MS and NMR spectroscopy indicated that these synthetic FPP analogues were converted to the fluorinated germacrene A analogues 3b and 3c, respectively. In both cases the position of the fluorine atom prevented the formation of the eudesmane cation analogues 4b and 4c. These results highlight that germacrene A is an on-path reaction intermediate during PR-AS catalysis and shed light on the mechanism by which germacrene A is converted to eudesmane cation. They support the proposal that the role of PR-AS in the cyclisation is essentially passive in that it harnesses the inherent chemical reactivity present in the substrate by promoting the initial ionisation of farnesyl diphosphate and by acting as a productive template to steer the reaction through an effective series of cyclisations and rearrangements to (+)-aristolochene (7a). PMID:19225680

  2. Metal ion-binding properties of the diphosphate ester analogue, methylphosphonylphosphate, in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Song, B; Zhao, J; Gregán, F; Prónayová, N; Sajadi, S A; Sigel, H

    1999-01-01

    The stability constants of the 1:1 complexes formed between methylphosphonylphosphate (MePP(3-)), CH(3)P(O)(-) (2)-O-PO3(2-), and Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), or Cd(2+) (M(2+)) were determined by potentiometric pH titration in aqueous solution (25 degrees C; l = 0.1 M, NaNO(3)). Monoprotonated M(H;MePP) complexes play only a minor role. Based on previously established correlations for M(2+)-diphosphate monoester complex-stabilities and diphosphate monoester beta-group. basicities, it is shown that the M(Mepp)(-) complexes for Mg(2+) and the ions of the second half of the 3d series, including Zn(2+) and Cd(2+), are on average by about 0.15 log unit more stable than is expected based on the basicity of the terminal phosphate group in MePP(3-). In contrast, Ba(Mepp)(-) and Sr(Mepp)(-) are slightly less stable, whereas the stability for Ca(Mepp)(-) is as expected, based on the mentioned correlation. The indicated increased stabilities are explained by an increased basicity of the phosphonyl group compared to that of a phosphoryl one. For the complexes of the alkaline earth ions, especially for Ba(2+), it is suggested that outersphere complexation occurs to some extent. However, overall the M(Mepp)(-) complexes behave rather as expected for a diphosphate monoester ligand. PMID:18475908

  3. Cloning and Characterization of Farnesyl Diphosphate Synthase Gene Involved in Triterpenoids Biosynthesis from Poria cocos

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianrong; Li, Yangyuan; Liu, Danni

    2014-01-01

    Poria cocos (P. cocos) has long been used as traditional Chinese medicine and triterpenoids are the most important pharmacologically active constituents of this fungus. Farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPS) is a key enzyme of triterpenoids biosynthesis. The gene encoding FPS was cloned from P. cocos by degenerate PCR, inverse PCR and cassette PCR. The open reading frame of the gene is 1086 bp in length, corresponding to a predicted polypeptide of 361 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 41.2 kDa. Comparison of the P. cocos FPS deduced amino acid sequence with other species showed the highest identity with Ganoderma lucidum (74%). The predicted P. cocos FPS shares at least four conserved regions involved in the enzymatic activity with the FPSs of varied species. The recombinant protein was expressed in Pichia pastoris and purified. Gas chromatography analysis showed that the recombinant FPS could catalyze the formation of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) from geranyl diphosphate (GPP) and isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). Furthermore, the expression profile of the FPS gene and content of total triterpenoids under different stages of development and methyl jasmonate treatments were determined. The results indicated that there is a positive correlation between the activity of FPS and the amount of total triterpenoids produced in P. cocos. PMID:25474088

  4. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of a Geranyl Diphosphate-Specific Aromatic Prenyltransferase from Lemon1[W

    PubMed Central

    Munakata, Ryosuke; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Koeduka, Takao; Karamat, Fazeelat; Olry, Alexandre; Sugiyama, Akifumi; Takanashi, Kojiro; Dugrand, Audray; Froelicher, Yann; Tanaka, Ryo; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi; Azuma, Jun-Ichi; Hehn, Alain; Bourgaud, Frédéric; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2014-01-01

    Prenyl residues confer divergent biological activities such as antipathogenic and antiherbivorous activities on phenolic compounds, including flavonoids, coumarins, and xanthones. To date, about 1,000 prenylated phenolics have been isolated, with these compounds containing various prenyl residues. However, all currently described plant prenyltransferases (PTs) have been shown specific for dimethylallyl diphosphate as the prenyl donor, while most of the complementary DNAs encoding these genes have been isolated from the Leguminosae. In this study, we describe the identification of a novel PT gene from lemon (Citrus limon), ClPT1, belonging to the homogentisate PT family. This gene encodes a PT that differs from other known PTs, including flavonoid-specific PTs, in polypeptide sequence. This membrane-bound enzyme was specific for geranyl diphosphate as the prenyl donor and coumarin as the prenyl acceptor. Moreover, the gene product was targeted to plastid in plant cells. To our knowledge, this is the novel aromatic PT specific to geranyl diphosphate from citrus species. PMID:25077796

  5. The distribution of carbonic anhydrase and ribulose diphosphate carboxylase in maize leaves.

    PubMed

    Poincelot, R P

    1972-09-01

    Extraction of maize (Zea mays) leaves by progressive grinding under suitably protective conditions yields total carbonic anhydrase activities (4800 units per milligram chlorophyll) comparable to the activity in spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves. The total ribulose diphosphate carboxylase activity was also equal to or greater than the best literature values for maize. Of the total leaf carbonic anhydrase, 72.5% on a chlorophyll basis was present in the mesophyll cells and 14.2% in the bundle-sheath cells. The distribution of the total leaf ribulose diphosphate carboxylase between the mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells was 42.0 and 48.7% respectively. There was three times as much total chlorophyll in extracts of the mesophyll cells compared with the bundle-sheath cells of maize. Similar results for the above distribution of the two enzymes were found using a differential grinding technique. The possible function of carbonic anhydrase in photosynthesis is discussed. The equal distribution of ribulose diphosphate carboxylase activity between the mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells casts doubt upon the hypothesis that a rigid biochemical compartmentation exists between these cell types in maize. PMID:16658170

  6. Metal Ion-Binding Properties of the Diphosphate Ester Analogue, Methylphosphonylphosphate, in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bin; Zhao, Jing; Gregáň, Fridrich; Prónayová, Nadja; Sajadi, S. Ali A.

    1999-01-01

    The stability constants of the 1:1 complexes formed between methylphosphonylphosphate (MePP3-), CH3P(O)-2-O-PO32-, and Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, ​ or Cd2+ (M2+) were determined by potentiometric pH titration in aqueous solution (25 °C; l = 0.1 M, NaNO3). Monoprotonated M(H;MePP) complexes play only a minor role. Based on previously established correlations for M2+-diphosphate monoester complex-stabilities and diphosphate monoester β-group. basicities, it is shown that the M(Mepp)- complexes for Mg2+ and the ions of the second half of the 3d series, including Zn2+ and Cd2+, are on average by about 0.15 log unit more stable than is expected based on the basicity of the terminal phosphate group in MePP3-. In contrast, Ba(Mepp)- and Sr(Mepp)- are slightly less stable, whereas the stability for Ca(Mepp)- is as expected, based on the mentioned correlation. The indicated increased stabilities are explained by an increased basicity of the phosphonyl group compared to that of a phosphoryl one. For the complexes of the alkaline earth ions, especially for Ba2+, it is suggested that outersphere complexation occurs to some extent. However, overall the M(Mepp)- complexes behave rather as expected for a diphosphate monoester ligand. PMID:18475908

  7. Purification and properties of diaminopimelate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    White, P. J.; Kelly, Bridget

    1965-01-01

    1. Diaminopimelate decarboxylase from a soluble extract of Escherichia coli A.T.C.C. 9637 was purified 200-fold by precipitation of nucleic acids, fractionation with acetone and then with ammonium sulphate, adsorption on calcium phosphate gel and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose or DEAE-Sephadex. 2. The purified enzyme showed only one component in the ultracentrifuge, with a sedimentation coefficient of 5·4s. One major peak and three much smaller peaks were observed on electrophoresis of the enzyme at pH8·9. 3. The mol.wt. of the enzyme was approx. 200000. The catalytic constant was 2000mol. of meso-diaminopimelic acid decomposed/min./mol. of enzyme, at 37°. The relative rates of decarboxylation at 25°, 37° and 45° were 0·17:1·0:1·6. At 37° the Michaelis constant was 1·7mm and the optimum pH was 6·7–6·8. 4. There was an excess of acidic amino acids over basic amino acids in the enzyme, which was bound only on basic cellulose derivatives at pH6·8. 5. The enzyme had an absolute requirement for pyridoxal phosphate as a cofactor; no other derivative of pyridoxine had activity. A thiol compound (of which 2,3-dimercaptopropan-1-ol was the most effective) was also needed as an activator. 6. In the presence of 2,3-dimercaptopropan-1-ol (1mm), heavy-metal ions (Cu2+, Hg2+) did not inhibit the enzyme, but there was inhibition by several amino acids with analogous structures to diaminopimelate, generally at high concentrations relative to the substrate. Penicillamine was inhibitory at relatively low concentrations; its action was prevented by pyridoxal phosphate. PMID:14343156

  8. Ultraviolet radiation induction of ornithine decarboxylase in rat keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, C.F.; Gajic, D.; Drucker, D.J. )

    1990-05-01

    UV radiation plays an important role in the induction of cutaneous malignancy, including basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas and malignant melanoma. In addition to its effects on DNA damage and repair mechanisms, UV radiation has been shown to modulate the expression of specific genes, altering the levels of their mRNAs and the synthesis of their corresponding proteins. In order to gain further information about the molecular effects of UV radiation, we have studied the regulation of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene expression in response to UVB radiation. ODC is the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, is involved in growth and differentiation, and has been implicated in carcinogenesis. Keratinocytes grown in culture were either sham-irradiated or exposed to increasing doses of UVB (1-5 mJ/cm2). Northern blot analysis of keratinocyte RNA under basal conditions demonstrated the presence of two ODC mRNA transcripts. Increasing exposure to UVB resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the levels of both ODC mRNA transcripts. The induction of ODC gene expression following UVB was noted 2 h after UVB exposure, and ODC mRNA levels continued to increase up to 24 h after UVB exposure. The UVB-induced increase in ODC gene expression was not serum dependent, despite the ability of serum alone to induce ODC gene expression. The mRNA transcripts for actin and hexosaminidase A were not induced after UVB exposure. These studies show that the UVB-induced increase in ODC activity is due, at least in part, to an increase in ODC gene expression and they provide a useful model for the analysis of the molecular effects of UVB radiation.

  9. Theoretical study of the reaction mechanism of phenolic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xiang; Lind, Maria E S; Himo, Fahmi

    2015-12-01

    The cofactor-free phenolic acid decarboxylases (PADs) catalyze the non-oxidative decarboxylation of phenolic acids to their corresponding p-vinyl derivatives. Phenolic acids are toxic to some organisms, and a number of them have evolved the ability to transform these compounds, including PAD-catalyzed reactions. Since the vinyl derivative products can be used as polymer precursors and are also of interest in the food-processing industry, PADs might have potential applications as biocatalysts. We have investigated the detailed reaction mechanism of PAD from Bacillus subtilis using quantum chemical methodology. A number of different mechanistic scenarios have been considered and evaluated on the basis of their energy profiles. The calculations support a mechanism in which a quinone methide intermediate is formed by protonation of the substrate double bond, followed by C-C bond cleavage. A different substrate orientation in the active site is suggested compared to the literature proposal. This suggestion is analogous to other enzymes with p-hydroxylated aromatic compounds as substrates, such as hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA hydratase-lyase and vanillyl alcohol oxidase. Furthermore, on the basis of the calculations, a different active site residue compared to previous proposals is suggested to act as the general acid in the reaction. The mechanism put forward here is consistent with the available mutagenesis experiments and the calculated energy barrier is in agreement with measured rate constants. The detailed mechanistic understanding developed here might be extended to other members of the family of PAD-type enzymes. It could also be useful to rationalize the recently developed alternative promiscuous reactivities of these enzymes. PMID:26408050

  10. A porphomethene inhibitor of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase causes porphyria cutanea tarda

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, John D.; Bergonia, Hector A.; Reilly, Christopher A.; Franklin, Michael R.; Kushner, James P.

    2007-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), the most common form of porphyria in humans, is due to reduced activity of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D) in the liver. Previous studies have demonstrated that protein levels of URO-D do not change when catalytic activity is reduced, suggesting that an inhibitor of URO-D is generated in hepatocytes. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of an inhibitor of URO-D in liver cytosolic extracts from two murine models of PCT: wild-type mice treated with iron, δ-aminolevulinic acid, and polychlorinated biphenyls; and mice with one null allele of Uro-d and two null alleles of the hemochromatosis gene (Uro-d+/−, Hfe−/−) that develop PCT with no treatments. In both models, we identified an inhibitor of recombinant human URO-D (rhURO-D). The inhibitor was characterized by solid-phase extraction, chromatography, UV-visible spectroscopy, and mass spectroscopy and proved to be uroporphomethene, a compound in which one bridge carbon in the uroporphyrinogen macrocycle is oxidized. We synthesized uroporphomethene by photooxidation of enzymatically generated uroporphyrinogen I or III. Both uroporphomethenes inhibited rhURO-D, but the III isomer porphomethene was a more potent inhibitor. Finally, we detected an inhibitor of rhURO-D in cytosolic extracts of liver biopsy samples of patients with PCT. These studies define the mechanism underlying clinical expression of the PCT phenotype, namely oxidation of uroporphyrinogen to uroporphomethene, a competitive inhibitor of URO-D. The oxidation reaction is iron-dependent. PMID:17360334

  11. Unique behavior of Trypanosoma cruzi mevalonate kinase: A conserved glycosomal enzyme involved in host cell invasion and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Éden Ramalho; Horjales, Eduardo; Bonfim-Melo, Alexis; Cortez, Cristian; da Silva, Claudio Vieira; De Groote, Michel; Sobreira, Tiago José Paschoal; Cruz, Mário Costa; Lima, Fabio Mitsuo; Cordero, Esteban Mauricio; Yoshida, Nobuko; da Silveira, José Franco; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase (MVK) is an essential enzyme acting in early steps of sterol isoprenoids biosynthesis, such as cholesterol in humans or ergosterol in trypanosomatids. MVK is conserved from bacteria to mammals, and localizes to glycosomes in trypanosomatids. During the course of T. cruzi MVK characterization, we found that, in addition to glycosomes, this enzyme may be secreted and modulate cell invasion. To evaluate the role of TcMVK in parasite-host cell interactions, TcMVK recombinant protein was produced and anti-TcMVK antibodies were raised in mice. TcMVK protein was detected in the supernatant of cultures of metacyclic trypomastigotes (MTs) and extracellular amastigotes (EAs) by Western blot analysis, confirming its secretion into extracellular medium. Recombinant TcMVK bound in a non-saturable dose-dependent manner to HeLa cells and positively modulated internalization of T. cruzi EAs but inhibited invasion by MTs. In HeLa cells, TcMVK induced phosphorylation of MAPK pathway components and proteins related to actin cytoskeleton modifications. We hypothesized that TcMVK is a bifunctional enzyme that in addition to playing a classical role in isoprenoid synthesis in glycosomes, it is secreted and may modulate host cell signaling required for T. cruzi invasion. PMID:27113535

  12. Unique behavior of Trypanosoma cruzi mevalonate kinase: A conserved glycosomal enzyme involved in host cell invasion and signaling.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Éden Ramalho; Horjales, Eduardo; Bonfim-Melo, Alexis; Cortez, Cristian; da Silva, Claudio Vieira; De Groote, Michel; Sobreira, Tiago José Paschoal; Cruz, Mário Costa; Lima, Fabio Mitsuo; Cordero, Esteban Mauricio; Yoshida, Nobuko; da Silveira, José Franco; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase (MVK) is an essential enzyme acting in early steps of sterol isoprenoids biosynthesis, such as cholesterol in humans or ergosterol in trypanosomatids. MVK is conserved from bacteria to mammals, and localizes to glycosomes in trypanosomatids. During the course of T. cruzi MVK characterization, we found that, in addition to glycosomes, this enzyme may be secreted and modulate cell invasion. To evaluate the role of TcMVK in parasite-host cell interactions, TcMVK recombinant protein was produced and anti-TcMVK antibodies were raised in mice. TcMVK protein was detected in the supernatant of cultures of metacyclic trypomastigotes (MTs) and extracellular amastigotes (EAs) by Western blot analysis, confirming its secretion into extracellular medium. Recombinant TcMVK bound in a non-saturable dose-dependent manner to HeLa cells and positively modulated internalization of T. cruzi EAs but inhibited invasion by MTs. In HeLa cells, TcMVK induced phosphorylation of MAPK pathway components and proteins related to actin cytoskeleton modifications. We hypothesized that TcMVK is a bifunctional enzyme that in addition to playing a classical role in isoprenoid synthesis in glycosomes, it is secreted and may modulate host cell signaling required for T. cruzi invasion. PMID:27113535

  13. Analysis of the Impact of Rosuvastatin on Bacterial Mevalonate Production Using a UPLC-Mass Spectrometry Approach.

    PubMed

    Nolan, J A; Kinsella, M; Hill, C; Joyce, S A; Gahan, C G M

    2016-07-01

    Statins are widely prescribed cholesterol-lowering medications and act through inhibition of the human enzyme 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-R) which produces mevalonate (MVAL), a key substrate for cholesterol biosynthesis. Some important microbial species also express an isoform of HMG-R; however, the nature of the interaction between statins and bacteria is currently unclear and studies would benefit from protocols to quantify MVAL in complex microbial environments. The objective of this study was to develop a protocol for the analytical quantification of MVAL in bacterial systems and to utilise this approach to analyse the effects of Rosuvastatin (RSV) on bacterial MVAL formation. To determine the effective concentration range of RSV, we examined the dose-dependent inhibition of growth in the HMG-R(+) bacterial pathogens Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecium at various concentrations of pure RSV. Growth inhibition generally correlated with a reduction in bacterial MVAL levels, particularly in culture supernatants at high RSV concentrations, as determined using our ultra-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry protocol. This work therefore outlines a refined protocol for the analysis of MVAL in microbial cultures and provides evidence for statin-mediated inhibition of bacterial HMG-R. Furthermore, we show that MVAL is readily transported and secreted from bacterial cells into the growth media. PMID:26960292

  14. Chromosomal Integration and Expression of Two Bacterial α-Acetolactate Decarboxylase Genes in Brewer's Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Blomqvist, K.; Suihko, M.-L.; Knowles, J.; Penttilä, M.

    1991-01-01

    A bacterial gene encoding α-acetolactate decarboxylase, isolated from Klebsiella terrigena or Enterobacter aerogenes, was expressed in brewer's yeast. The genes were expressed under either the yeast phosphoglycerokinase (PGK1) or the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1) promoter and were integrated by gene replacement by using cotransformation into the PGK1 or ADH1 locus, respectively, of a brewer's yeast. The expression level of the α-acetolactate decarboxylase gene of the PGK1 integrant strains was higher than that of the ADH1 integrants. Under pilot-scale brewing conditions, the α-acetolactate decarboxylase activity of the PGK1 integrant strains was sufficient to reduce the formation of diacetyl below the taste threshold value, and no lagering was needed. The brewing properties of the recombinant yeast strains were otherwise unaltered, and the quality (most importantly, the flavor) of the trial beers produced was as good as that of the control beer. Images PMID:16348559

  15. Molecular Evolution and Functional Characterization of a Bifunctional Decarboxylase Involved in Lycopodium Alkaloid Biosynthesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bunsupa, Somnuk; Hanada, Kousuke; Maruyama, Akira; Aoyagi, Kaori; Komatsu, Kana; Ueno, Hideki; Yamashita, Madoka; Sasaki, Ryosuke; Oikawa, Akira; Yamazaki, Mami

    2016-01-01

    Lycopodium alkaloids (LAs) are derived from lysine (Lys) and are found mainly in Huperziaceae and Lycopodiaceae. LAs are potentially useful against Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia, and myasthenia gravis. Here, we cloned the bifunctional lysine/ornithine decarboxylase (L/ODC), the first gene involved in LA biosynthesis, from the LA-producing plants Lycopodium clavatum and Huperzia serrata. We describe the in vitro and in vivo functional characterization of the L. clavatum L/ODC (LcL/ODC). The recombinant LcL/ODC preferentially catalyzed the decarboxylation of l-Lys over l-ornithine (l-Orn) by about 5 times. Transient expression of LcL/ODC fused with the amino or carboxyl terminus of green fluorescent protein, in onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, showed LcL/ODC localization in the cytosol. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) hairy roots and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants expressing LcL/ODC enhanced the production of a Lys-derived alkaloid, anabasine, and cadaverine, respectively, thus, confirming the function of LcL/ODC in plants. In addition, we present an example of the convergent evolution of plant Lys decarboxylase that resulted in the production of Lys-derived alkaloids in Leguminosae (legumes) and Lycopodiaceae (clubmosses). This convergent evolution event probably occurred via the promiscuous functions of the ancestral Orn decarboxylase, which is an enzyme involved in the primary metabolism of polyamine. The positive selection sites were detected by statistical analyses using phylogenetic trees and were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis, suggesting the importance of those sites in granting the promiscuous function to Lys decarboxylase while retaining the ancestral Orn decarboxylase function. This study contributes to a better understanding of LA biosynthesis and the molecular evolution of plant Lys decarboxylase. PMID:27303024

  16. Ornithine Decarboxylase Activity Is Required for Prostatic Budding in the Developing Mouse Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Gamat, Melissa; Malinowski, Rita L.; Parkhurst, Linnea J.; Steinke, Laura M.; Marker, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    The prostate is a male accessory sex gland that produces secretions in seminal fluid to facilitate fertilization. Prostate secretory function is dependent on androgens, although the mechanism by which androgens exert their effects is still unclear. Polyamines are small cationic molecules that play pivotal roles in DNA transcription, translation and gene regulation. The rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis is ornithine decarboxylase, which is encoded by the gene Odc1. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA decreases in the prostate upon castration and increases upon administration of androgens. Furthermore, testosterone administered to castrated male mice restores prostate secretory activity, whereas administering testosterone and the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor D,L-α-difluromethylornithine (DFMO) to castrated males does not restore prostate secretory activity, suggesting that polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effects. To date, no one has examined polyamines in prostate development, which is also androgen dependent. In this study, we showed that ornithine decarboxylase protein was expressed in the epithelium of the ventral, dorsolateral and anterior lobes of the adult mouse prostate. Ornithine decarboxylase protein was also expressed in the urogenital sinus (UGS) epithelium of the male and female embryo prior to prostate development, and expression continued in prostatic epithelial buds as they emerged from the UGS. Inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase using DFMO in UGS organ culture blocked the induction of prostatic buds by androgens, and significantly decreased expression of key prostate transcription factor, Nkx3.1, by androgens. DFMO also significantly decreased the expression of developmental regulatory gene Notch1. Other genes implicated in prostatic development including Sox9, Wif1 and Srd5a2 were unaffected by DFMO. Together these results indicate that Odc1 and polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effect in mediating

  17. Ornithine Decarboxylase Activity Is Required for Prostatic Budding in the Developing Mouse Prostate.

    PubMed

    Gamat, Melissa; Malinowski, Rita L; Parkhurst, Linnea J; Steinke, Laura M; Marker, Paul C

    2015-01-01

    The prostate is a male accessory sex gland that produces secretions in seminal fluid to facilitate fertilization. Prostate secretory function is dependent on androgens, although the mechanism by which androgens exert their effects is still unclear. Polyamines are small cationic molecules that play pivotal roles in DNA transcription, translation and gene regulation. The rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis is ornithine decarboxylase, which is encoded by the gene Odc1. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA decreases in the prostate upon castration and increases upon administration of androgens. Furthermore, testosterone administered to castrated male mice restores prostate secretory activity, whereas administering testosterone and the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor D,L-α-difluromethylornithine (DFMO) to castrated males does not restore prostate secretory activity, suggesting that polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effects. To date, no one has examined polyamines in prostate development, which is also androgen dependent. In this study, we showed that ornithine decarboxylase protein was expressed in the epithelium of the ventral, dorsolateral and anterior lobes of the adult mouse prostate. Ornithine decarboxylase protein was also expressed in the urogenital sinus (UGS) epithelium of the male and female embryo prior to prostate development, and expression continued in prostatic epithelial buds as they emerged from the UGS. Inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase using DFMO in UGS organ culture blocked the induction of prostatic buds by androgens, and significantly decreased expression of key prostate transcription factor, Nkx3.1, by androgens. DFMO also significantly decreased the expression of developmental regulatory gene Notch1. Other genes implicated in prostatic development including Sox9, Wif1 and Srd5a2 were unaffected by DFMO. Together these results indicate that Odc1 and polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effect in mediating

  18. Molecular Evolution and Functional Characterization of a Bifunctional Decarboxylase Involved in Lycopodium Alkaloid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bunsupa, Somnuk; Hanada, Kousuke; Maruyama, Akira; Aoyagi, Kaori; Komatsu, Kana; Ueno, Hideki; Yamashita, Madoka; Sasaki, Ryosuke; Oikawa, Akira; Saito, Kazuki; Yamazaki, Mami

    2016-08-01

    Lycopodium alkaloids (LAs) are derived from lysine (Lys) and are found mainly in Huperziaceae and Lycopodiaceae. LAs are potentially useful against Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and myasthenia gravis. Here, we cloned the bifunctional lysine/ornithine decarboxylase (L/ODC), the first gene involved in LA biosynthesis, from the LA-producing plants Lycopodium clavatum and Huperzia serrata We describe the in vitro and in vivo functional characterization of the L. clavatum L/ODC (LcL/ODC). The recombinant LcL/ODC preferentially catalyzed the decarboxylation of l-Lys over l-ornithine (l-Orn) by about 5 times. Transient expression of LcL/ODC fused with the amino or carboxyl terminus of green fluorescent protein, in onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, showed LcL/ODC localization in the cytosol. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) hairy roots and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants expressing LcL/ODC enhanced the production of a Lys-derived alkaloid, anabasine, and cadaverine, respectively, thus, confirming the function of LcL/ODC in plants. In addition, we present an example of the convergent evolution of plant Lys decarboxylase that resulted in the production of Lys-derived alkaloids in Leguminosae (legumes) and Lycopodiaceae (clubmosses). This convergent evolution event probably occurred via the promiscuous functions of the ancestral Orn decarboxylase, which is an enzyme involved in the primary metabolism of polyamine. The positive selection sites were detected by statistical analyses using phylogenetic trees and were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis, suggesting the importance of those sites in granting the promiscuous function to Lys decarboxylase while retaining the ancestral Orn decarboxylase function. This study contributes to a better understanding of LA biosynthesis and the molecular evolution of plant Lys decarboxylase. PMID:27303024

  19. Cloning and sequencing of pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) genes from bacteria and uses therefor

    DOEpatents

    Maupin-Furlow, Julie A [Gainesville, FL; Talarico, Lee Ann [Gainesville, FL; Raj, Krishnan Chandra [Tamil Nadu, IN; Ingram, Lonnie O [Gainesville, FL

    2008-02-05

    The invention provides isolated nucleic acids molecules which encode pyruvate decarboxylase enzymes having improved decarboxylase activity, substrate affinity, thermostability, and activity at different pH. The nucleic acids of the invention also have a codon usage which allows for high expression in a variety of host cells. Accordingly, the invention provides recombinant expression vectors containing such nucleic acid molecules, recombinant host cells comprising the expression vectors, host cells further comprising other ethanologenic enzymes, and methods for producing useful substances, e.g., acetaldehyde and ethanol, using such host cells.

  20. Structure of PA4019, a putative aromatic acid decarboxylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kopec, Jolanta; Schnell, Robert; Schneider, Gunter

    2011-01-01

    The ubiX gene (PA4019) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been annotated as encoding a putative 3-octaprenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate decarboxylase from the ubiquinone-biosynthesis pathway. Based on a transposon mutagenesis screen, this gene was also implicated as being essential for the survival of this organism. The crystal structure of recombinant UbiX determined to 1.5 Å resolution showed that the protein belongs to the superfamily of homo-oligomeric flavine-containing cysteine decarboxylases. The enzyme assembles into a dodecamer with 23 point symmetry. The subunit displays a typical Rossmann fold and contains one FMN molecule bound at the interface between two subunits. PMID:22102023

  1. Inhibition of erythromycin synthesis by disruption of malonyl-coenzyme A decarboxylase gene eryM in Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Y J; Kolattukudy, P E

    1994-01-01

    Malonyl-coenzyme A (malonyl-CoA) decarboxylase is widely distributed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, the biological function of this enzyme has not been established in any organism. To elucidate the structure and function of this enzyme, the malonyl-CoA decarboxylase gene from Saccharopolyspora erythraea (formerly Streptomyces erythreaus) was cloned and sequenced. This gene would encode a polypeptide of 417 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence matched the experimentally determined amino acid sequences of 25 N-terminal residues each of the enzyme and of an internal peptide obtained by proteolysis of the purified enzyme. This decarboxylase showed homology with aminoglycoside N6'-acetyltransferases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Northern (RNA) blot analysis revealed a single transcript. The transcription initiation site was 220 bp upstream of the start codon. When expressed in Escherichia coli, the S. erythraea malonyl-CoA decarboxylase gene yielded a protein that cross-reacted with antiserum prepared against S. erythraea malonyl-CoA decarboxylase and catalyzed decarboxylation of [3-14C]malonyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA and 14CO2. The S. erythraea malonyl-CoA decarboxylase gene was disrupted by homologous recombination using an integrating vector pWHM3. The gene-disrupted transformant did not produce immunologically cross-reacting 45-kDa decarboxylase, lacked malonyl-CoA decarboxylase activity, and could not produce erythromycin. Exogenous propionate restored the ability to produce erythromycin. These results strongly suggest that the decarboxylase provides propionyl-CoA for erythromycin synthesis probably via decarboxylation of methylmalonyl-CoA derived from succinyl-CoA, and therefore the malonyl-CoA decarboxylase gene is designated eryM. The gene disrupted mutants also did not produce pigments. Images PMID:8300527

  2. Inhibition of human ornithine decarboxylase activity by enantiomers of difluoromethylornithine.

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Ning; Ignatenko, Natalia A; Yamauchi, Phillip; Stringer, David E; Levenson, Corey; Shannon, Patrick; Perrin, Scott; Gerner, Eugene W

    2003-01-01

    Racemic difluoromethylornithine (D/L-DFMO) is an inhibitor of ODC (ornithine decarboxylase), the first enzyme in eukaryotic polyamine biosynthesis. D/L-DFMO is an effective anti-parasitic agent and inhibitor of mammalian cell growth and development. Purified human ODC-catalysed ornithine decarboxylation is highly stereospecific. However, both DFMO enantiomers suppressed ODC activity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. ODC activity failed to recover after treatment with either L- or D-DFMO and dialysis to remove free inhibitor. The inhibitor dissociation constant (K(D)) values for the formation of enzyme-inhibitor complexes were 28.3+/-3.4, 1.3+/-0.3 and 2.2+/-0.4 microM respectively for D-, L- and D/L-DFMO. The differences in these K(D) values were statistically significant ( P <0.05). The inhibitor inactivation constants (K(inact)) for the irreversible step were 0.25+/-0.03, 0.15+/-0.03 and 0.15+/-0.03 min(-1) respectively for D-, L- and D/L-DFMO. These latter values were not statistically significantly different ( P >0.1). D-DFMO was a more potent inhibitor (IC50 approximately 7.5 microM) when compared with D-ornithine (IC50 approximately 1.5 mM) of ODC-catalysed L-ornithine decarboxylation. Treatment of human colon tumour-derived HCT116 cells with either L- or D-DFMO decreased the cellular polyamine contents in a concentration-dependent manner. These results show that both enantiomers of DFMO irreversibly inactivate ODC and suggest that this inactivation occurs by a common mechanism. Both enantiomers form enzyme-inhibitor complexes with ODC, but the probability of formation of these complexes is 20 times greater for L-DFMO when compared with D-DFMO. The rate of the irreversible reaction in ODC inactivation is similar for the L- and D-enantiomer. This unexpected similarity between DFMO enantiomers, in contrast with the high degree of stereospecificity of the substrate ornithine, appears to be due to the alpha-substituent of the inhibitor. The D

  3. Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndromes and Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ariño, Helena; Höftberger, Romana; Gresa-Arribas, Nuria; Martínez-Hernandez, Eugenia; Armangue, Thaís; Kruer, Michael C.; Arpa, Javier; Domingo, Julio; Rojc, Bojan; Bataller, Luis; Saiz, Albert; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Little is known of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-abs) in the paraneoplastic context. Clinical recognition of such cases will lead to prompt tumor diagnosis and appropriate treatment. OBJECTIVE To report the clinical and immunological features of patients with paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) and GAD-abs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective case series study and immunological investigations conducted in February 2014 in a center for autoimmune neurological disorders. Fifteen cases with GAD65-abs evaluated between 1995 and 2013 who fulfilled criteria of definite or possible PNS without concomitant onconeural antibodies were included in this study. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Analysis of the clinical records of 15 patients and review of 19 previously reported cases. Indirect immunofluorescence with rat hippocampal neuronal cultures and cell-based assays with known neuronal cell-surface antigens were used. One hundred six patients with GAD65-abs and no cancer served as control individuals. RESULTS Eight of the 15 patients with cancer presented as classic paraneoplastic syndromes (5 limbic encephalitis, 1 paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis, 1 paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration, and 1 opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome). When compared with the 106 non-PNS cases, those with PNS were older (median age, 60 years vs 48 years; P = .03), more frequently male (60% vs 13%; P < .001), and had more often coexisting neuronal cell-surface antibodies, mainly against γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (53%vs 11%; P < .001). The tumors more frequently involved were lung (n = 6) and thymic neoplasms (n = 4). The risk for an underlying tumor was higher if the presentation was a classic PNS, if it was different from stiff-person syndrome or cerebellar ataxia (odds ratio, 10.5; 95%CI, 3.2–34.5), or if the patient had coexisting neuronal cell-surface antibodies (odds ratio, 6.8; 95%CI, 1.1–40.5). Compared with the current series, the 19 previously

  4. Phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 in human malonyl-CoA decarboxylase expressed in silkworm Bombyx mori regulates catalytic decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Wook; Makishima, Yu; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Sungjo; Terzic, Andre; Chung, Shin-Kyo; Park, Enoch Y

    2015-11-01

    Decarboxylation of malonyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA by malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD; EC 4.1.1.9) is a vital catalytic reaction of lipid metabolism. While it is established that phosphorylation of MCD modulates the enzymatic activity, the specific phosphorylation sites associated with the catalytic function have not been documented due to lack of sufficient production of MCD with proper post-translational modifications. Here, we used the silkworm-based Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) bacmid system to express human MCD (hMCD) and mapped phosphorylation effects on enzymatic function. Purified MCD from silkworm displayed post-translational phosphorylation and demonstrated coherent enzymatic activity with high yield (-200 μg/silkworm). Point mutations in putative phosphorylation sites, Ser-204 or Tyr-405 of hMCD, identified by bioinformatics and proteomics analyses reduced the catalytic activity, underscoring the functional significance of phosphorylation in modulating decarboxylase-based catalysis. Identified phosphorylated residues are distinct from the decarboxylation catalytic site, implicating a phosphorylation-induced global conformational change of MCD as responsible in altering catalytic function. We conclude that phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 regulates the decarboxylase function of hMCD leveraging the silkworm-based BmNPV bacmid expression system that offers a fail-safe eukaryotic production platform implementing proper post-translational modification such as phosphorylation. PMID:26004805

  5. Detection of a novel missense mutation in the mevalonate kinase gene in one Chinese family with DSAP

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wen-Sheng; Zheng, Xiao-Dong; Yao, Xiu-Hua; Zhang, Lan-Fang; Hu, Bai; Lu, Yao-Juan

    2014-01-01

    Disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis (DSAP) is the most common form of porokeratosis and a severe chronic autosomal dominant cutaneous disorder with high genetic heterogeneity. Recently, the mevalonate kinase (MVK) gene has been identified as a candidate gene responsible for DSAP and multiple mutations have been reported. Here, we report identification of a novel missense mutation in the MVK gene in a Chinese family with DSAP. A 50-year-old male was diagnosed as proband of DSAP based on the clinical and histological findings, which show numerous hyperpigmented macules by physical examination and cornoid lamella by skin biopsy. Similar skin symptoms were also observed in his father, who died many years ago. We prepared genomic DNA from the proband, unaffected individuals from his family members, as well as 100 unrelated healthy controls. PCR was then conducted using the above genomic DNA as template and the MVK gene-specific primers. The PCR product was subjected to direct sequencing and the sequence was compared to that of MVK gene within the NCBI database. We detected a heterozygous C to G transition at nucleotide 643 in exon 7 of MVK gene of the proband. This will result in an amino acid change at codon 215 (P.Arg215Gly.), which is from an arginine codon (CGA) to a Glycine codon (GGA). We did not detect any mutation in the unaffected family members or the 100 unrelated healthy controls, demonstrating that this is a novel missense mutation in MVK gene and therefore, contributes to the molecular diagnosis of DSAP. PMID:24551296

  6. Observational Study of a French and Belgian Multicenter Cohort of 23 Patients Diagnosed in Adulthood With Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Durel, Cécile-Audrey; Aouba, Achille; Bienvenu, Boris; Deshayes, Samuel; Coppéré, Brigitte; Gombert, Bruno; Acquaviva-Bourdain, Cécile; Hachulla, Eric; Lecomte, Frédéric; Touitou, Isabelle; Ninet, Jacques; Philit, Jean-Baptiste; Messer, Laurent; Brouillard, Marc; Girard-Madoux, Marie-Hélène; Moutschen, Michel; Raison-Peyron, Nadia; Hutin, Pascal; Duffau, Pierre; Trolliet, Pierre; Hatron, Pierre-Yves; Heudier, Philippe; Cevallos, Ramiro; Lequerré, Thierry; Brousse, Valentine; Lesire, Vincent; Audia, Sylvain; Maucort-Boulch, Delphine; Cuisset, Laurence; Hot, Arnaud

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and biological features of Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) in patients diagnosed in adulthood. This is a French and Belgian observational retrospective study from 2000 to 2014. To constitute the cohort, we cross-check the genetic and biochemical databases. The clinical, enzymatic, and genetic data were gathered from medical records. Twenty-three patients were analyzed. The mean age at diagnosis was 40 years, with a mean age at onset of symptoms of 3 years. All symptomatic patients had fever. Febrile attacks were mostly associated with arthralgia (90.9%); lymphadenopathy, abdominal pain, and skin lesions (86.4%); pharyngitis (63.6%); cough (59.1%); diarrhea, and hepatosplenomegaly (50.0%). Seven patients had psychiatric symptoms (31.8%). One patient developed recurrent seizures. Three patients experienced renal involvement (13.6%). Two patients had angiomyolipoma (9.1%). All but one tested patients had elevated serum immunoglobulin (Ig) D level. Twenty-one patients had genetic diagnosis; most of them were compound heterozygote (76.2%). p.Val377Ile was the most prevalent mutation. Structural articular damages and systemic AA amyloidosis were the 2 most serious complications. More than 65% of patients displayed decrease in severity and frequency of attacks with increasing age, but only 35% achieved remission. MKD diagnosed in adulthood shared clinical and genetic features with classical pediatric disease. An elevated IgD concentration is a good marker for MKD in adults. Despite a decrease of severity and frequency of attacks with age, only one-third of patients achieved spontaneous remission. PMID:26986117

  7. Observational Study of a French and Belgian Multicenter Cohort of 23 Patients Diagnosed in Adulthood With Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Durel, Cécile-Audrey; Aouba, Achille; Bienvenu, Boris; Deshayes, Samuel; Coppéré, Brigitte; Gombert, Bruno; Acquaviva-Bourdain, Cécile; Hachulla, Eric; Lecomte, Frédéric; Touitou, Isabelle; Ninet, Jacques; Philit, Jean-Baptiste; Messer, Laurent; Brouillard, Marc; Girard-Madoux, Marie-Hélène; Moutschen, Michel; Raison-Peyron, Nadia; Hutin, Pascal; Duffau, Pierre; Trolliet, Pierre; Hatron, Pierre-Yves; Heudier, Philippe; Cevallos, Ramiro; Lequerré, Thierry; Brousse, Valentine; Lesire, Vincent; Audia, Sylvain; Maucort-Boulch, Delphine; Cuisset, Laurence; Hot, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and biological features of Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) in patients diagnosed in adulthood. This is a French and Belgian observational retrospective study from 2000 to 2014. To constitute the cohort, we cross-check the genetic and biochemical databases. The clinical, enzymatic, and genetic data were gathered from medical records. Twenty-three patients were analyzed. The mean age at diagnosis was 40 years, with a mean age at onset of symptoms of 3 years. All symptomatic patients had fever. Febrile attacks were mostly associated with arthralgia (90.9%); lymphadenopathy, abdominal pain, and skin lesions (86.4%); pharyngitis (63.6%); cough (59.1%); diarrhea, and hepatosplenomegaly (50.0%). Seven patients had psychiatric symptoms (31.8%). One patient developed recurrent seizures. Three patients experienced renal involvement (13.6%). Two patients had angiomyolipoma (9.1%). All but one tested patients had elevated serum immunoglobulin (Ig) D level. Twenty-one patients had genetic diagnosis; most of them were compound heterozygote (76.2%). p.Val377Ile was the most prevalent mutation. Structural articular damages and systemic AA amyloidosis were the 2 most serious complications. More than 65% of patients displayed decrease in severity and frequency of attacks with increasing age, but only 35% achieved remission. MKD diagnosed in adulthood shared clinical and genetic features with classical pediatric disease. An elevated IgD concentration is a good marker for MKD in adults. Despite a decrease of severity and frequency of attacks with age, only one-third of patients achieved spontaneous remission. PMID:26986117

  8. The Degradation of 14C-Glutamic Acid by L-Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Charles M; Dayan, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Describes procedures and semi-micro reaction apparatus (carbon dioxide trap) to demonstrate how a particular enzyme (L-Glutamic acid decarboxylase) may be used to determine the site or sites of labeling in its substrate (carbon-14 labeled glutamic acid). Includes calculations, solutions, and reagents used. (Author/SK)

  9. An inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase in the thymus and spleen of dexamethasone-treated rats.

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, P B; Young, J; Peng, T; Richards, J F

    1985-01-01

    A marked decrease in activity of ornithine decarboxylase in thymus and spleen occurs soon after treatment of rats with a glucocorticoid. In the present study, evidence was obtained that extracts of these tissues prepared 5 h after administration of dexamethasone, when the enzyme activity is very low, contain an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase. The inhibitor is also present at 12 h after treatment and, in lesser amount, at 2.5 h, but was not evident at 24 h. The inhibitory activity was destroyed by treatment with heat or with trypsin, and was not lost on dialysis of the extract. Preliminary experiments indicate that the Mr of the inhibitor is greater than 50 000, which differentiates it from antizyme, an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase found in several other cell types. The inhibitor seems to act by a non-catalytic and non-competitive mechanism. The inhibition is dependent on the amount of inhibitor and does not change with time. Since inhibition is not changed by dialysis of the inhibitory extract, its activity apparently does not require small-Mr substances. This differentiates it from inhibitors which inactivate ornithine decarboxylase by covalent modification, such as the polyamine-dependent protein kinase or transglutaminase. The formation of this inhibitor is an early event in lymphoid tissues in response to dexamethasone and may be important in causing the inhibition of cell division which precedes the destruction of lymphocytes. PMID:3977859

  10. Molecular analysis of the glutamate decarboxylase locus in Streptococcus thermophilus ST110

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GABA ('-aminobutyric acid) is generated from glutamate by the action of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and characterized by hypotensive, diuretic and tranquilizing effects in humans and animals. The production of GABA by lactic acid starter bacteria would enhance the functionality of fermented da...