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Sample records for mhc class i-like

  1. Viral MHC class I-like molecule allows evasion of NK cell effector responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pyzik, Michal; Dumaine, Anne; Dumaine, Anne A; Charbonneau, Benoît; Fodil-Cornu, Nassima; Jonjic, Stipan; Vidal, Silvia M

    2014-12-15

    The outcome of mouse CMV (MCMV) infection varies among different inbred mouse strains depending on NK cell effector functions governed through recognition receptor triggering. NK cells from different mouse strains possess diverse repertoires of activating or inhibitory Ly49 receptors, which share some of their polymorphic MHC class I (MHC-I) ligands. By examining the NK cell response to MCMV infection in novel BALB substrains congenic for different MHC (or H-2 in mice) haplotypes, we show that recognition of viral MHC-I-like protein m157 by inhibitory Ly49C receptor allows escape from NK cell control of viral replication. Dominant inhibition by Ly49C bound to self-H-2(b) encoded MHC-I molecules masks this effect, which only becomes apparent in distinct H-2 haplotypes, such as H-2(f). The recognition of m157-expressing cells by Ly49C resulted in both decreased NK cell killing in vitro and reduced rejection in vivo. Further, control of infection with m157-deletant (Δm157) MCMV was improved in mice carrying H-2 molecules unrecognized by Ly49C but allowing expansion of NK cell effectors expressing activating Ly49L receptors. Hence, our study is the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate that MHC-I mimicry strategies used by MCMV to avoid NK cell control are biologically relevant during in vivo viral infection. Of value for human studies is that only a few genetic assortments conditional on the repertoires of viral MHC-I-like proteins/host NK receptors/MHC haplotypes should allow efficient protection against CMV infection. PMID:25392524

  2. Structural and phylogenetic analysis of the MHC class I-like Fc receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kandil, Eman; Ishibashi, Teruo; Kasahara, Masanori

    1995-06-01

    The intestinal epithelium of neonatal mice and rats expresses an Fc receptor that mediates selective uptake of IgG in mothers`milk. This receptor (FcRn), which helps newborn animals to acquire passive immunity, is an MHC class I-like heterodimer made up of a heavy chain and {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin. In the present study, we determined the genomic structure of a mouse gene (FcRn) encoding the heavy of FcRn. The overall exon-intron organization of the Fcrn gene was similar to that of the Fcrn gene, thus providing structural evidence that Fcrn os a bona fide class I gene. The 5{prime}-flanking region of the Fcrn gene contained the binding motifs for two cytokine-inducible transcription factors, NF-IL6 and NF1. However, regulatory elements found in MHC class I genes (enhancer A, enhancer B, and the IFN response element) were absent. Phylogenetic tree analysis suggested that, like the MICA, AZGP1, and CD1 genes, the Fcrn gene diverged form MHC class I genes after the emergence of amphibians but before the split of placental and marsupial mammals. Consistent with this result, Southern blot analysis with a mouse Fcrn cDNA probe detected cross-hybridizing bands in various mammalian species and chickens. Sequence analysis of the Fcrn gene isolated from eight mouse strains showed that the membrane-distal domain of FcRn has at least three amino acid variants. The fact that Fcrn is a single copy gene indicates that it is expressed in both the neonatal intestine and the fetal yolk sac. 74 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Evolution of innate-like T cells and their selection by MHC class I-like molecules.

    PubMed

    Edholm, Eva-Stina; Banach, Maureen; Robert, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-like-restricted innate-like αβT (iT) cells expressing an invariant or semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire were thought to be a recent evolutionary acquisition restricted to mammals. However, molecular and functional studies in Xenopus laevis have demonstrated that iT cells, defined as MHC class I-like-restricted innate-like αβT cells with a semi-invariant TCR, are evolutionarily conserved and prominent from early development in amphibians. As these iT cells lack the specificity conferred by conventional αβ TCRs, it is generally considered that they are specialized to recognize conserved antigens equivalent to pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Thus, one advantage offered by the MHC class I-like iT cell-based recognition system is that it can be adapted to a common pathogen and function on the basis of a relatively small number of T cells. Although iT cells have only been functionally described in mammals and amphibians, the identification of non-classical MHC/MHC class I-like genes in other groups of endothermic and ectothermic vertebrates suggests that iT cells have a broader phylogenetic distribution than previously envisioned. In this review, we discuss the possible role of iT cells during the emergence of the jawed vertebrate adaptive immune system. PMID:27368412

  4. Alternative Splice Transcripts for MHC Class I-like MICA Encode Novel NKG2D Ligands with Agonist or Antagonist Functions.

    PubMed

    Gavlovsky, Pierre-Jean; Tonnerre, Pierre; Gérard, Nathalie; Nedellec, Steven; Daman, Andrew W; McFarland, Benjamin J; Charreau, Béatrice

    2016-08-01

    MHC class I chain-related proteins A and B (MICA and MICB) and UL16-binding proteins are ligands of the activating NKG2D receptor involved in cancer and immune surveillance of infection. Structurally, MICA/B proteins contain an α3 domain, whereas UL16-binding proteins do not. We identified novel alternative splice transcripts for MICA encoding five novel MICA isoforms: MICA-A, -B1, -B2, -C, and -D. Alternative splicing associates with MICA*015 and *017 and results from a point deletion (G) in the 5' splice donor site of MICA intron 4 leading to exon 3 and exon 4 skipping and/or deletions. These changes delete the α3 domain in all isoforms, and the α2 domain in the majority of isoforms (A, B1, C, and D). Endothelial and hematopoietic cells contained endogenous alternative splice transcripts and isoforms. MICA-B1, -B2, and -D bound NKG2D by surface plasmon resonance and were expressed at the cell surface. Functionally, MICA-B2 contains two extracellular domains (α1 and α2) and is a novel potent agonist ligand for NKG2D. We found that MICA-D is a new truncated form of MICA with weak affinity for NKG2D despite lacking α2 and α3 domains. MICA-D may functionally impair NKG2D activation by competing with full-length MICA or MICA-B2 for NKG2D engagement. Our study established NKG2D binding for recombinant MICA-B1 but found no function for this isoform. New truncated MICA isoforms exhibit a range of functions that may drive unexpected immune mechanisms and provide new tools for immunotherapy. PMID:27342847

  5. Organizing MHC Class II Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Fooksman, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules are ligands for CD4+ T cells and are critical for initiating the adaptive immune response. This review is focused on what is currently known about MHC class II organization at the plasma membrane of antigen presenting cells and how this affects antigen presentation to T cells. The organization and diffusion of class II molecules have been measured by a variety of biochemical and microscopic techniques. Membrane lipids and other proteins have been implicated in MHC class II organization and function. However, when compared with the organization of MHC class I or TCR complexes, much less is known about MHC class II. Since clustering of T cell receptors occurs during activation, the organization of MHC molecules prior to recognition and during synapse formation may be critical for antigen presentation. PMID:24782863

  6. Endogenous Antigen Presentation of MHC Class II Epitopes through Non-Autophagic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Carol S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Antigenic peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules are generally derived from exogenous proteins acquired by antigen presenting cells. However, in some circumstances, MHC class II molecules can present intracellular proteins expressed within the antigen-presenting cells. There are several described pathways by which endogenous antigens are degraded and gain access to MHC class II molecules. These include autophagy and other non-autophagic pathways; the latter category includes the MHC class I-like pathways, heat shock protein 90-mediated pathways, and internalization from the plasma membrane. This review will summarize and discuss the non-autophagic pathways. PMID:26441969

  7. The MHC class I genes of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Dirscherl, Hayley; McConnell, Sean C.; Yoder, Jeffrey A.; de Jong, Jill L. O.

    2014-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a central role in the immune response and in the recognition of non-self. Found in all jawed vertebrate species, including zebrafish and other teleosts, MHC genes are considered the most polymorphic of all genes. In this review we focus on the multi-faceted diversity of zebrafish MHC class I genes, which are classified into three sequence lineages: U, Z, and L. We examine the polygenic, polymorphic, and haplotypic diversity of the zebrafish MHC class I genes, discussing known and postulated functional differences between the different class I lineages. In addition, we provide the first comprehensive nomenclature for the L lineage genes in zebrafish, encompassing at least 15 genes, and characterize their sequence properties. Finally, we discuss how recent findings have shed new light on the remarkably diverse MHC loci of this species. PMID:24631581

  8. Rational design of class I MHC ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rognan, D.; Scapozza, L.; Folkers, G.; Daser, Angelika

    1995-04-01

    From the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of a class I MHC protein, several non natural peptides were designed in order to either optimize the interactions of one secondary anchor amino acid with its HLA binding pocket or to substitute the non interacting part with spacer residues. All peptides were synthesized and tested for binding to the class I MHC protein in an in vitro reconstitution assay. As predicted, the non natural peptides present an enhanced binding to the HLA-B27 molecule with respect to their natural parent peptides. This study constitutes the first step towards the rational design of non peptidic MHC ligands that should be very promising tools for the selective immunotherapy of autoimmune diseases.

  9. Towards a systems understanding of MHC class I and MHC class II antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Neefjes, Jacques; Jongsma, Marlieke L M; Paul, Petra; Bakke, Oddmund

    2011-12-01

    The molecular details of antigen processing and presentation by MHC class I and class II molecules have been studied extensively for almost three decades. Although the basic principles of these processes were laid out approximately 10 years ago, the recent years have revealed many details and provided new insights into their control and specificity. MHC molecules use various biochemical reactions to achieve successful presentation of antigenic fragments to the immune system. Here we present a timely evaluation of the biology of antigen presentation and a survey of issues that are considered unresolved. The continuing flow of new details into our understanding of the biology of MHC class I and class II antigen presentation builds a system involving several cell biological processes, which is discussed in this Review. PMID:22076556

  10. Blocking MHC class II on human endothelium mitigates acute rejection

    PubMed Central

    Abrahimi, Parwiz; Qin, Lingfeng; Chang, William G.; Bothwell, Alfred L.M.; Tellides, George; Saltzman, W. Mark; Pober, Jordan S.

    2016-01-01

    Acute allograft rejection is mediated by host CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) targeting graft class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. In experimental rodent models, rejection requires differentiation of naive CD8+ T cells into alloreactive CTL within secondary lymphoid organs, whereas in humans, CTL may alternatively develop within the graft from circulating CD8+ effector memory T cells (TEM) that recognize class I MHC molecules on graft endothelial cells (EC). This latter pathway is poorly understood. Here, we show that host CD4+ TEM, activated by EC class II MHC molecules, provide critical help for this process. First, blocking HLA-DR on EC lining human artery grafts in immunodeficient mice reduces CD8+ CTL development within and acute rejection of the artery by adoptively transferred allogeneic human lymphocytes. Second, siRNA knockdown or CRISPR/Cas9 ablation of class II MHC molecules on EC prevents CD4+ TEM from helping CD8+ TEM to develop into CTL in vitro. Finally, implanted synthetic microvessels, formed from CRISPR/Cas9-modified EC lacking class II MHC molecules, are significantly protected from CD8+ T cell–mediated destruction in vivo. We conclude that human CD8+ TEM–mediated rejection targeting graft EC class I MHC molecules requires help from CD4+ TEM cells activated by recognition of class II MHC molecules. PMID:26900601

  11. A new polymorphic and multicopy MHC gene family related to nonmammalian class I

    SciTech Connect

    Leelayuwat, C.; Degli-Esposti, M.A.; Abraham, L.J.; Townend, D.C.; Dawkins, R.L. ||

    1994-12-31

    The authors have used genomic analysis to characterize a region of the central major histocompatibility complex (MHC) spanning {approximately} 300 kilobases (kb) between TNF and HLA-B. This region has been suggested to carry genetic factors relevant to the development of autoimmune diseases such as myasthenia gravis (MG) and insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Genomic sequence was analyzed for coding potential, using two neural network programs, GRAIL and GeneParser. A genomic probe, JAB, containing putative coding sequences (PERB11) located 60 kb centromeric of HLA-B, was used for northern analysis of human tissues. Multiple transcripts were detected. Southern analysis of genomic DNA and overlapping YAC clones, covering the region from BAT1 to HLA-F, indicated that there are at least five copies of PERB11, four of which are located within this region of the MHC. The partial cDNA sequence of PERB11 was obtained from poly-A RNA derived from skeletal muscle. The putative amino acid sequence of PERB11 shares {approximately} 30% identity to MHC class I molecules from various species, including reptiles, chickens, and frogs, as well as to other MHC class I-like molecules, such as the IgG FcR of the mouse and rat and the human Zn-{alpha}2-glycoprotein. From direct comparison of amino acid sequences, it is concluded that PERB11 is a distinct molecule more closely related to nonmammalian than known mammalian MHC class I molecules. Genomic sequence analysis of PERB11 from five MHC ancestral haplotypes (AH) indicated that the gene is polymorphic at both DNA and protein level. The results suggest that the authors have identified a novel polymorphic gene family with multiple copies within the MHC. 48 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. DNA sequence of the Peromyscus leucopus MHC class II gene Aa (MhcPeleAa)

    SciTech Connect

    Crew, M.D.; Bates, L.M.

    1996-09-01

    The genus Peromyscus has been extensively studied by populations biologists and ecologists for over eighty years, with P. leucopus (the white-footed mouse) being one of the most intensively investigated species. Polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes have proven useful in population genetic studies and might be helpful in understanding the population dynamics of Peromyscus species which are ubiquitously distributed over North and Central America. Polymorphism of P. leucopus MHC (MhcPele) class II genes was evident by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses using human and mouse probes and Pele class II loci exhibited degrees of polymorphism similar to H2 class II genes (A-like>E-like). 8 refs., 2 figs.

  13. In vitro digestion with proteases producing MHC class II ligands.

    PubMed

    Tohmé, Mira; Maschalidi, Sophia; Manoury, Bénédicte

    2013-01-01

    Proteases generate peptides that bind to MHC class II molecules to interact with a wide diversity of CD4(+) T cells. They are expressed in dedicated organelles: endosomes and lysosomes of professional antigen presenting cells (pAPCs) such as B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. The identification of endosomal proteases which produce antigenic peptides is important, for example, for better vaccination and to prevent autoimmune diseases. Here, we describe a panel of technics (in vitro digestion assays of protein with recombinant proteases or purified endosomes/lysosomes, T cell stimulation) to monitor the production of MHC class II ligands. PMID:23329510

  14. MHC2SKpan: a novel kernel based approach for pan-specific MHC class II peptide binding prediction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Computational methods for the prediction of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II binding peptides play an important role in facilitating the understanding of immune recognition and the process of epitope discovery. To develop an effective computational method, we need to consider two important characteristics of the problem: (1) the length of binding peptides is highly flexible; and (2) MHC molecules are extremely polymorphic and for the vast majority of them there are no sufficient training data. Methods We develop a novel string kernel MHC2SK (MHC-II String Kernel) method to measure the similarities among peptides with variable lengths. By considering the distinct features of MHC-II peptide binding prediction problem, MHC2SK differs significantly from the recently developed kernel based method, GS (Generic String) kernel, in the way of computing similarities. Furthermore, we extend MHC2SK to MHC2SKpan for pan-specific MHC-II peptide binding prediction by leveraging the binding data of various MHC molecules. Results MHC2SK outperformed GS in allele specific prediction using a benchmark dataset, which demonstrates the effectiveness of MHC2SK. Furthermore, we evaluated the performance of MHC2SKpan using various benckmark data sets from several different perspectives: Leave-one-allele-out (LOO), 5-fold cross validation as well as independent data testing. MHC2SKpan has achieved comparable performance with NetMHCIIpan-2.0 and outperformed NetMHCIIpan-1.0, TEPITOPEpan and MultiRTA, being statistically significant. MHC2SKpan can be freely accessed at http://datamining-iip.fudan.edu.cn/service/MHC2SKpan/index.html. PMID:24564280

  15. Modo-UG, a marsupial nonclassical MHC class I locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modo-UG is a class I gene located in the MHC of the marsupial Monodelphis domestica, the gray short-tailed opossum. Modo-UG is expressed as three alternatively spliced mRNA forms, all of which encode a transmembrane form with a short cytoplasmic tail that lacks phosphorylation sites typically found...

  16. MHC class II DR allelic diversity in bighorn sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that decreased diversity and/or unique polymorphisms in MHC class II alleles of bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadensis) are responsible for lower titer of antibodies against Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin, in comparison to domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries). To test this hypothesis, DRA...

  17. Neurons Preferentially Respond to Self-MHC Class I Allele Products Regardless of Peptide Presented

    PubMed Central

    Escande-Beillard, Nathalie; Washburn, Lorraine; Zekzer, Dan; Wu, Zhongqi-Phyllis; Eitan, Shoshy; Ivkovic, Sonja; Lu, Yuxin; Dang, Hoa; Middleton, Blake; Bilousova, Tina V.; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka; Evans, Christopher J.; Joyce, Sebastian; Tian, Jide; Kaufman, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of mice lacking MHC class I (MHC I)-associated proteins have demonstrated a role for MHC I in neurodevelopment. A central question arising from these observations is whether neuronal recognition of MHC I has specificity for the MHC I allele product and the peptide presented. Using a well-established embryonic retina explant system, we observed that picomolar levels of a recombinant self-MHC I molecule inhibited neurite outgrowth. We then assessed the neurobiological activity of a panel of recombinant soluble MHC Is, consisting of different MHC I heavy chains with a defined self- or nonself-peptide presented, on cultured embryonic retinas from mice with different MHC I haplotypes. We observed that self-MHC I allele products had greater inhibitory neuroactivity than nonself-MHC I molecules, regardless of the nature of the peptide presented, a pattern akin to MHC I recognition by some innate immune system receptors. However, self-MHC I molecules had no effect on retinas from MHC I-deficient mice. These observations suggest that neuronal recognition of MHC I may be coordinated with the inherited MHC I alleles, as occurs in the innate immune system. Consistent with this notion, we show that MHC I and MHC I receptors are coexpressed by precursor cells at the earliest stages of retina development, which could enable such coordination. PMID:20018625

  18. MHC Class II haplotypes of Colombian Amerindian tribes

    PubMed Central

    Yunis, Juan J.; Yunis, Edmond J.; Yunis, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed 1041 individuals belonging to 17 Amerindian tribes of Colombia, Chimila, Bari and Tunebo (Chibcha linguistic family), Embera, Waunana (Choco linguistic family), Puinave and Nukak (Maku-Puinave linguistic families), Cubeo, Guanano, Tucano, Desano and Piratapuyo (Tukano linguistic family), Guahibo and Guayabero (Guayabero Linguistic Family), Curripaco and Piapoco (Arawak linguistic family) and Yucpa (Karib linguistic family). for MHC class II haplotypes (HLA-DRB1, DQA1, DQB1). Approximately 90% of the MHC class II haplotypes found among these tribes are haplotypes frequently encountered in other Amerindian tribes. Nonetheless, striking differences were observed among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes. The DRB1*04:04, DRB1*04:11, DRB1*09:01 carrying haplotypes were frequently found among non-Chibcha speaking tribes, while the DRB1*04:07 haplotype showed significant frequencies among Chibcha speaking tribes, and only marginal frequencies among non-Chibcha speaking tribes. Our results suggest that the differences in MHC class II haplotype frequency found among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes could be due to genetic differentiation in Mesoamerica of the ancestral Amerindian population into Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking populations before they entered into South America. PMID:23885196

  19. A nonclassical MHC class I U lineage locus in zebrafish with a null haplotypic variant

    PubMed Central

    Dirscherl, Hayley; Yoder, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Three sequence lineages of MHC class I genes have been described in zebrafish (Danio rerio): U, Z, and L. The U lineage genes encoded on zebrafish chromosome 19 are predicted to provide the classical function of antigen presentation. This MHC class I locus displays significant haplotypic variation and is the only MHC class I locus in zebrafish that shares conserved synteny with the core mammalian MHC. Here we describe two MHC class I U lineage genes, mhc1ula and mhc1uma, that map to chromosome 22. Unlike the U lineage proteins encoded on chromosome 19, Ula and Uma likely play a nonclassical role as they lack conservation of key peptide binding residues, display limited polymorphic variation, and exhibit tissue-specific expression. We also describe a null haplotype at this chromosome 22 locus in which the mhc1ula and mhc1uma genes are absent due to a ∼30 kb deletion with no other MHC class I sequences present. Functional and non-functional transcripts of mhc1ula and mhc1uma were identified; however, mhc1uma transcripts were often not amplified or amplified at low levels from individuals possessing an apparently bona fide gene. These distinct U lineage genes may be restricted to the superorder Ostariophysi as similar sequences only could be identified from the blind cavefish (Astyanyx mexicanus), fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), goldfish (Carassius auratus), and grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus). PMID:26254596

  20. A nonclassical MHC class I U lineage locus in zebrafish with a null haplotypic variant.

    PubMed

    Dirscherl, Hayley; Yoder, Jeffrey A

    2015-09-01

    Three sequence lineages of MHC class I genes have been described in zebrafish (Danio rerio): U, Z, and L. The U lineage genes encoded on zebrafish chromosome 19 are predicted to provide the classical function of antigen presentation. This MHC class I locus displays significant haplotypic variation and is the only MHC class I locus in zebrafish that shares conserved synteny with the core mammalian MHC. Here, we describe two MHC class I U lineage genes, mhc1ula and mhc1uma, that map to chromosome 22. Unlike the U lineage proteins encoded on chromosome 19, Ula and Uma likely play a nonclassical role as they lack conservation of key peptide binding residues, display limited polymorphic variation, and exhibit tissue-specific expression. We also describe a null haplotype at this chromosome 22 locus in which the mhc1ula and mhc1uma genes are absent due to a ~30 kb deletion with no other MHC class I sequences present. Functional and non-functional transcripts of mhc1ula and mhc1uma were identified; however, mhc1uma transcripts were often not amplified or amplified at low levels from individuals possessing an apparently bona fide gene. These distinct U lineage genes may be restricted to the superorder Ostariophysi as similar sequences only could be identified from the blind cavefish (Astyanax mexicanus), fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), goldfish (Carassius auratus), and grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). PMID:26254596

  1. Features of target cell lysis by class I and class II MHC restricted cytolytic T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Maimone, M.M.; Morrison, L.A.; Braciale, V.L.; Braciale, T.J.

    1986-12-01

    The lytic activity of influenza virus-specific muvine cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones that are restricted by either H-2K/D (class I) or H-2I (class II) major histocompatibility (MHC) locus products was compared on an influenza virus-infected target cell expressing both K/D and I locus products. With the use of two in vitro measurements of cytotoxicity, conventional /sup 51/Cr release, and detergent-releasable radiolabeled DNA (as a measure of nuclear disintegration in the early post-lethal hit period), the authors found no difference between class I and class II MHC-restricted CTL in the kinetics of target cell destruction. In addition, class II MHC-restricted antiviral CTL failed to show any lysis of radiolabeled bystander cells. Killing of labeled specific targets by these class II MHC-restricted CTL was also efficiently inhibited by unlabeled specific competitor cells in a cold target inhibition assay. In sum, these data suggest that class I and class II MHC-restricted CTL mediate target cell destruction by an essentially similar direct mechanism.

  2. FCRL6 is an MHC class II receptor1

    PubMed Central

    Schreeder, Daniel M.; Cannon, John P.; Wu, Jiongru; Li, Ran; Shakhmatov, Mikhail A.; Davis, Randall S.

    2016-01-01

    Receptors for the Fc portion (FCR) of Ig have been extensively characterized and are known to regulate humoral responses, but members of the closely related FCR-like (FCRL) family have not been found to bind Ig and to date no ligand has been identified for any FCRL. Using a cell-based GFP reporter system and a recombinant Fc chimeric protein, we show that human FCRL6, a receptor selectively expressed by cytotoxic T and NK cells, directly binds HLA-DR, a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule. Given the similarity among constant regions of Ig and MHC molecules, these findings suggest that representatives of the FCR and FCRL multigene families may have independently evolved to engage two ancestral elements fundamental to adaptive immunity. This discovery may offer new insight into the interaction between cytotoxic lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells and may have important implications for better understanding HLA disease susceptibility and pathogenesis. PMID:20519654

  3. Loss of MHC class-I expression in cervical carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Connor, M E; Stern, P L

    1990-12-15

    The expression of MHC class-I antigens was analysed in 67 cervical carcinoma biopsies; 16% of the biopsies showed complete or heterogeneous loss of HLA expression as judged by reactivity with antibodies recognizing monomorphic determinants of the class-I heavy chain bound to beta 2 microglobulin (beta 2m). In addition, other biopsies showed a loss in expression of particular allelic products: 23% for HLA-A2; 17% for HLA-A3; 23% for HLA-Bw4 and 19% for HLA-Bw6. Three biopsies showed changes at 2 alleles, 2 of which were at both HLA-A and -B loci. Down-regulation of class-I expression may be virally mediated and HPV DNA is frequently found in cervical carcinomas. However, there appeared to be no direct correlation between the detection of HPV 16 or 18 DNA in these tumours and changes in HLA expression. There was also no correlation with the expression of the oncofoetal antigen 5T4. Our results show that a significant proportion (at least 30%) of the cervical carcinomas showed some alteration in MHC class-I expression. Such changes may allow tumours to evade immune surveillance with more rapid progression. There was, however, no correlation with tumour type, degree of differentiation or stage of disease at presentation. PMID:2174412

  4. CITA/NLRC5: A critical transcriptional regulator of MHC class I gene expression.

    PubMed

    Downs, Isaac; Vijayan, Saptha; Sidiq, Tabasum; Kobayashi, Koichi S

    2016-07-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules play essential roles in the development and activation of the human adaptive immune system. An NLR protein, CIITA (MHC class II transactivator) has been recognized as a master regulator of MHC class II gene expression, albeit knowledge about the regulatory mechanism of MHC class I gene expression had been limited. Recently identified MHC class I transactivator (CITA), or NLRC5, also belongs to the NLR protein family and constitutes a critical regulator for the transcriptional activation of MHC class I genes. In addition to MHC class I genes, CITA/NLRC5 induces the expression of β2 -microglobulin, TAP1 and LMP2, essential components of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. Therefore, CITA/NLRC5 and CIITA are transcriptional regulators that orchestrate the concerted expression of critical components in the MHC class I and class II pathways, respectively. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(4):349-357, 2016. PMID:27087581

  5. An MHC class I immune evasion gene of Marek’s Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hearn, Cari; Preeyanon, Likit; Hunt, Henry D.

    2014-01-01

    Marek’s Disease Virus (MDV) is a widespread α-herpesvirus of chickens that causes T cell tumors. Acute, but not latent, MDV infection has previously been shown to lead to downregulation of cell-surface MHC class I (Virology 282:198–205 (2001)), but the gene(s) involved have not been identified. Here we demonstrate that an MDV gene, MDV012, is capable of reducing surface expression of MHC class I on chicken cells. Co-expression of an MHC class I-binding peptide targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (bypassing the requirement for the TAP peptide transporter) partially rescued MHC class I expression in the presence of MDV012, suggesting that MDV012 is a TAP-blocking MHC class I immune evasion protein. This is the first unique non-mammalian MHC class I immune evasion gene identified, and suggests that α-herpesviruses have conserved this function for at least 100 million years. PMID:25462349

  6. A CD74-DEPENDENT MHC CLASS I ENDOLYSOSOMAL CROSS-PRESENTATION PATHWAY

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Genc; Omilusik, Kyla; Chavez-Steenbock, Ana; Reinicke, Anna T.; Lack, Nathan; Choi, Kyung Bok; Jefferies, Wilfred A.

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses are initiated and primed by dendritic cells (DCs) that cross-present exogenous antigen. The CD74 (invariant chain) chaperone protein is thought to exclusively promote DC priming in the context of MHC class II. However, we demonstrate herein a CD74-dependent MHC class I cross-presentation pathway in DCs that plays a major role in the generation of MHC class I restricted, cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses against viral protein- and cell-associated antigens. CD74 associates with MHC class I molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum of DCs and mediates trafficking of MHC class I to endolysosomal compartments for loading with exogenous peptides. We conclude that CD74 plays a hitherto, undiscovered physiological function in endolysosomal DC cross-presentation for priming MHC class I-mediated CTL responses. PMID:22306692

  7. Sibling rivalry: competition between MHC class II family members inhibits immunity.

    PubMed

    Denzin, Lisa K; Cresswell, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peptide loading of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules in the endosomes and lysosomes of antigen-presenting cells is catalyzed by human leukocyte antigen-DM (HLA-DM) and modulated by HLA-DO. In a structural study in this issue, Guce et al. show that HLA-DO is an MHC class II mimic and functions as a competitive and essentially irreversible inhibitor of HLA-DM activity, thereby inhibiting MHC class II antigen presentation. PMID:23288359

  8. MHC class I loci of the Bar-Headed goose (Anser indicus)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    MHC class I proteins mediate functions in anti-pathogen defense. MHC diversity has already been investigated by many studies in model avian species, but here we chose the bar-headed goose, a worldwide migrant bird, as a non-model avian species. Sequences from exons encoding the peptide-binding region (PBR) of MHC class I molecules were isolated from liver genomic DNA, to investigate variation in these genes. These are the first MHC class I partial sequences of the bar-headed goose to be reported. A preliminary analysis suggests the presence of at least four MHC class I genes, which share great similarity with those of the goose and duck. A phylogenetic analysis of bar-headed goose, goose and duck MHC class I sequences using the NJ method supports the idea that they all cluster within the anseriforms clade. PMID:21637434

  9. Co-evolution of MHC class I and variable NK cell receptors in placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Norman, Paul J; Hilton, Hugo H G; Parham, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Shaping natural killer (NK) cell functions in human immunity and reproduction are diverse killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) that recognize polymorphic MHC class I determinants. A survey of placental mammals suggests that KIRs serve as variable NK cell receptors only in certain primates and artiodactyls. Divergence of the functional and variable KIRs in primates and artiodactyls predates placental reproduction. Among artiodactyls, cattle but not pigs have diverse KIRs. Catarrhine (humans, apes, and Old World monkeys) and platyrrhine (New World monkeys) primates, but not prosimians, have diverse KIRs. Platyrrhine and catarrhine systems of KIR and MHC class I are highly diverged, but within the catarrhines, a stepwise co-evolution of MHC class I and KIR is discerned. In Old World monkeys, diversification focuses on MHC-A and MHC-B and their cognate lineage II KIR. With evolution of C1-bearing MHC-C from MHC-B, as informed by orangutan, the focus changes to MHC-C and its cognate lineage III KIR. Evolution of C2 from C1 and fixation of MHC-C drove further elaboration of MHC-C-specific KIR, as exemplified by chimpanzee. In humans, the evolutionary trajectory changes again. Emerging from reorganization of the KIR locus and selective attenuation of KIR avidity for MHC class I are the functionally distinctive KIR A and KIR B haplotypes. PMID:26284483

  10. Positive selection of invariant V alpha 14+ T cells by non-major histocompatibility complex-encoded class I-like molecules expressed on bone marrow-derived cells.

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Y; Koseki, H; Zijlstra, M; Taniguchi, M

    1995-01-01

    V alpha 14+ T cells are a unique subset expressing an invariant T-cell antigen receptor alpha chain encoded by V alpha 14 and J alpha 281 gene fragments with a 1-nt N region. Most invariant V alpha 14+ T cells develop in extrathymic organs, independent of thymus, and expand at a high frequency in various mouse strains regardless of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype. In this paper, we show that the positive selection of invariant V alpha 14+ T cells requires a beta 2-microglobulin-associated MHC class I-like molecule not linked to the MHC on chromosome 17. This was determined by linkage analysis on DNA from recombinant mice generated by crossing a C57BL/6 mouse with a wild mouse, Mus musculus molossinus, that is negative for invariant V alpha 14 TCR expression. However, the peptide transporter TAP1 is not necessary for positive selection of invariant V alpha 14+ T cells, indicating the direct recognition of the MHC class I-like molecule without peptide by the invariant V alpha 14 TCR. Further, experiments with bone marrow-chimeric mice show that invariant V alpha 14+ T cells in the periphery are selected by bone marrow cells, suggesting a unique lineage of V alpha 14+ T cells differentiated through a selection process distinct from that of conventional alpha beta TCR+ T cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7862661

  11. Characterization and phylogenetic relationship of prosimian MHC class I genes.

    PubMed

    Flügge, Perris; Zimmermann, Elke; Hughes, Austin L; Günther, Eberhard; Walter, Lutz

    2002-12-01

    MHC class I cDNA sequences from the most divergent primate group of extant primates compared to human, the suborder Strepsirrhini (prosimians), are described. The sequences are derived from the gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) and the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), which are members of the malagasy Lemuriformes, as well as from the pygmy slow loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus), a prosimian from East Asia. The M. murinus sequences have been analyzed in detail. Analysis of the expression level, G/C content, and synonymous vs. nonsynonymous substitution rates in the peptide-binding region codons suggests that these cDNA clones represent classical class I (class Ia) genes. According to Southern blot analysis, the genome of the gray mouse lemur might contain about 10 class I genes. In gene tree analysis, the strepsirrhine class Ia genes described here cluster significantly separately from the known class I genes of Catarrhini (humans, apes, Old World monkeys) and Platyrrhini (New World monkeys) species, suggesting that the class I loci of Simiiformes arose by gene duplications which occurred after the divergence of prosimians. PMID:12486535

  12. Diversifying selection on MHC class I in the house sparrow (Passer domesticus).

    PubMed

    Loiseau, Claire; Richard, Murielle; Garnier, Stéphane; Chastel, Olivier; Julliard, Romain; Zoorob, Rima; Sorci, Gabriele

    2009-04-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are the most polymorphic loci known in vertebrates. Two main hypotheses have been put forward to explain the maintenance of MHC diversity: pathogen-mediated selection and MHC-based mate choice. Host-parasite interactions can maintain MHC diversity via frequency-dependent selection, heterozygote advantage, and diversifying selection (spatially and/or temporally heterogeneous selection). In this study, we wished to investigate the nature of selection acting on the MHC class I across spatially structured populations of house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in France. To infer the nature of the selection, we compared patterns of population differentiation based on two types of molecular markers: MHC class I and microsatellites. This allowed us to test whether the observed differentiation at MHC genes merely reflects demographic and/or stochastic processes. At the global scale, diversifying selection seems to be the main factor maintaining MHC diversity in the house sparrow. We found that (i) overall population differentiation at MHC was stronger than for microsatellites, (ii) MHC marker showed significant isolation by distance. In addition, the slope of the regression of F(ST) on geographical distance was significantly steeper for MHC than for microsatellites due to a stronger pairwise differentiation between populations located at large geographical distances. These results are in agreement with the hypothesis that spatially heterogeneous selective pressures maintain different MHC alleles at local scales, possibly resulting in local adaptation. PMID:19368641

  13. Variable NK cell receptors and their MHC class I ligands in immunity, reproduction and human evolution.

    PubMed

    Parham, Peter; Moffett, Ashley

    2013-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have roles in immunity and reproduction that are controlled by variable receptors that recognize MHC class I molecules. The variable NK cell receptors found in humans are specific to simian primates, in which they have progressively co-evolved with MHC class I molecules. The emergence of the MHC-C gene in hominids drove the evolution of a system of NK cell receptors for MHC-C molecules that is most elaborate in chimpanzees. By contrast, the human system of MHC-C receptors seems to have been subject to different selection pressures that have acted in competition on the immunological and reproductive functions of MHC class I molecules. We suggest that this compromise facilitated the development of the bigger brains that enabled archaic and modern humans to migrate out of Africa and populate other continents. PMID:23334245

  14. NLRC5/MHC class I transactivator is a target for immune evasion in cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshihama, Sayuri; Roszik, Jason; Downs, Isaac; Meissner, Torsten B; Vijayan, Saptha; Chapuy, Bjoern; Sidiq, Tabasum; Shipp, Margaret A; Lizee, Gregory A; Kobayashi, Koichi S

    2016-05-24

    Cancer cells develop under immune surveillance, thus necessitating immune escape for successful growth. Loss of MHC class I expression provides a key immune evasion strategy in many cancers, although the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. MHC class I transactivator (CITA), known as "NLRC5" [NOD-like receptor (NLR) family, caspase recruitment (CARD) domain containing 5], has recently been identified as a critical transcriptional coactivator of MHC class I gene expression. Here we show that the MHC class I transactivation pathway mediated by CITA/NLRC5 constitutes a target for cancer immune evasion. In all the 21 tumor types we examined, NLRC5 expression was highly correlated with the expression of MHC class I, with cytotoxic T-cell markers, and with genes in the MHC class I antigen-presentation pathway, including LMP2/LMP7, TAP1, and β2-microglobulin. Epigenetic and genetic alterations in cancers, including promoter methylation, copy number loss, and somatic mutations, were most prevalent in NLRC5 among all MHC class I-related genes and were associated with the impaired expression of components of the MHC class I pathway. Strikingly, NLRC5 expression was significantly associated with the activation of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells and patient survival in multiple cancer types. Thus, NLRC5 constitutes a novel prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target of cancers. PMID:27162338

  15. Contrasting evolutionary histories of MHC class I and class II loci in grouse-effects of selection and gene conversion.

    PubMed

    Minias, P; Bateson, Z W; Whittingham, L A; Johnson, J A; Oyler-McCance, S; Dunn, P O

    2016-05-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encode receptor molecules that are responsible for recognition of intracellular and extracellular pathogens (class I and class II genes, respectively) in vertebrates. Given the different roles of class I and II MHC genes, one might expect the strength of selection to differ between these two classes. Different selective pressures may also promote different rates of gene conversion at each class. Despite these predictions, surprisingly few studies have looked at differences between class I and II genes in terms of both selection and gene conversion. Here, we investigated the molecular evolution of MHC class I and II genes in five closely related species of prairie grouse (Centrocercus and Tympanuchus) that possess one class I and two class II loci. We found striking differences in the strength of balancing selection acting on MHC class I versus class II genes. More than half of the putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) of class II were under positive or episodic diversifying selection, compared with only 10% at class I. We also found that gene conversion had a stronger role in shaping the evolution of MHC class II than class I. Overall, the combination of strong positive (balancing) selection and frequent gene conversion has maintained higher diversity of MHC class II than class I in prairie grouse. This is one of the first studies clearly demonstrating that macroevolutionary mechanisms can act differently on genes involved in the immune response against intracellular and extracellular pathogens. PMID:26860199

  16. Contrasting evolutionary histories of MHC class I and class II loci in grouse—Effects of selection and gene conversion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minias, Piotr; Bateson, Zachary W; Whittingham, Linda A; Johnson, Jeff A.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Dunn, Peter O

    2016-01-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encode receptor molecules that are responsible for recognition of intracellular and extracellular pathogens (class I and class II genes, respectively) in vertebrates. Given the different roles of class I and II MHC genes, one might expect the strength of selection to differ between these two classes. Different selective pressures may also promote different rates of gene conversion at each class. Despite these predictions, surprisingly few studies have looked at differences between class I and II genes in terms of both selection and gene conversion. Here, we investigated the molecular evolution of MHC class I and II genes in five closely related species of prairie grouse (Centrocercus and Tympanuchus) that possess one class I and two class II loci. We found striking differences in the strength of balancing selection acting on MHC class I versus class II genes. More than half of the putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) of class II were under positive or episodic diversifying selection, compared with only 10% at class I. We also found that gene conversion had a stronger role in shaping the evolution of MHC class II than class I. Overall, the combination of strong positive (balancing) selection and frequent gene conversion has maintained higher diversity of MHC class II than class I in prairie grouse. This is one of the first studies clearly demonstrating that macroevolutionary mechanisms can act differently on genes involved in the immune response against intracellular and extracellular pathogens.

  17. A Case of Probable MHC Class II Deficiency with Disseminated BCGitis.

    PubMed

    Alyasin, Soheyla; Abolnezhadian, Farhad; Khoshkhui, Maryam

    2015-09-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II deficiency is a primary immunodeficiency disease characterized by abnormality of MHC class II molecules surface expression on peripheral blood lymphocytes and monocytes. Clinical manifestations include extreme susceptibility to viral, bacterial, and fungal infections but the immunodeficiency is not as severe as SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency), as evidenced by failure to develop disseminated infection after BCG vaccination. Therefore, MHC II deficiency with BCGosis, that is disseminated BCGitis, is not reported commonly. We report an interesting case of BCGosis after vaccination that was diagnosed to have probable MHC II deficiency. PMID:26412640

  18. Cohesin regulates major histocompatibility complex class II genes through interactions with MHC-II insulators1

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Parimal; Boss, Jeremy M.

    2011-01-01

    Cohesin is a multiprotein ringed complex that is most well known for its role in stabilizing the association of sister chromatids between S phase and M. More recently cohesin was found to be associated with transcriptional insulators, elements that are associated with the organization of chromatin into regulatory domains. The human major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) locuscontains ten intergenic elements, termed MHC-II insulators, which bind the transcriptional insulator protein CCCTC transcription factor (CTCF). MHC-II insulators interact with each other forming a base architecture of discrete loops and potential regulatory domains. When MHC-II genes are expressed, their proximal promoter regulatory regions reorganize to the foci established by the interacting MHC-II insulators. MHC-II insulators also bind cohesin, but the functional role of cohesin in regulating this system is not known. Here we show that the binding of cohesin to MHC-II insulators occurred irrespective of MHC-II expression but was required for optimal expression of the HLA-DR and HLA-DQ genes. In a DNA dependent manner, cohesin subunits interacted with CTCF and the MHC-II specific transcription factors RFX and CIITA. Intriguingly, cohesin subunits were important for DNA looping interactions between the HLA-DRA promoter region and a 5’ MHC-II insulator but were not required for interactions between the MHC-II insulators themselves. This latter observation introduces cohesin as a regulator of MHC-II expression by initiating or stabilizing MHC-II promoter regulatory element interactions with the MHC-II insulator elements; events which are required for maximal MHC-II transcription. PMID:21911605

  19. High Levels of MeCP2 Depress MHC Class I Expression in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Miralvès, Julie; Magdeleine, Eddy; Kaddoum, Lara; Brun, Hélène; Peries, Sophie; Joly, Etienne

    2007-01-01

    Background The expression of MHC class I genes is repressed in mature neurons. The molecular basis of this regulation is poorly understood, but the genes are particularly rich in CpG islands. MeCP2 is a transcriptional repressor that binds to methylated CpG dinucleotides; mutations in this protein also cause the neurodevelopmental disease called Rett syndrome. Because MHC class I molecules play a role in neuronal connectivity, we hypothesised that MeCP2 might repress MHC class I expression in the CNS and that this might play a role in the pathology of Rett syndrome. Methodology We show here that transiently transfected cells expressing high levels of MeCP2 specifically downregulate cell-surface expression of MHC class I molecules in the neuronal cell line N2A and they prevent the induction of MHC class I expression in response to interferon in these cells, supporting our first hypothesis. Surprisingly, however, overexpression of the mutated forms of MeCP2 that cause Rett syndrome had a similar effect on MHC class I expression as the wild-type protein. Immunohistological analyses of brain slices from MECP2 knockout mice (the MeCP2tm1.1Bird strain) demonstrated a small but reproducible increase in MHC class I when compared to their wild type littermates, but we found no difference in MHC class I expression in primary cultures of mixed glial cells (mainly neurons and astrocytes) from the knockout and wild-type mice. Conclusion These data suggest that high levels of MeCP2, such as those found in mature neurons, may contribute to the repression of MHC expression, but we find no evidence that MeCP2 regulation of MHC class I is important for the pathogenesis of Rett syndrome. PMID:18159237

  20. Heparan sulfates targeting increases MHC class I- and MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation and CD8(+) T-cell response.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Delphine; Gadzinski, Adeline; Hua, Stéphane; Denizeau, Jordan; Savatier, Alexandra; de la Rochère, Philippe; Boulain, Jean-Claude; Amigorena, Sebastian; Piaggio, Eliane; Sedlik, Christine; Léonetti, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Heparan sulfates (HS) are carbohydrate moieties of HS proteoglycans (HSPGs). They often represent alternative attachment points for proteins or microorganisms targeting receptors. HSPGs, which are ubiquitously expressed, thereby participate in numerous biological processes. We previously showed that MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation is increased when antigens are coupled to HS ligands, suggesting that HSPGs might contribute to adaptive immune responses. Here, we examined if HSPG targeting influences other aspects of immune responses. We found that coupling of an HS ligand to the antigen increases antigen presentation to CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells after antigen targeting to membrane immunoglobulins or to MHC-II molecules. Moreover, this increased stimulating capacity correlates with an enhanced CD8(+) immune response in mice. Last, animals control more effectively the growth of Ova-expressing tumour cells when they are immunized with an Ova construct targeting HSPGs and MHC-II molecules. Our results indicate that ubiquitous molecules can influence both MHC class I- and MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation and behave as co-receptors during T-cell stimulation. Moreover, they suggest that tumour-antigens endowed with the ability to target both HSPGs and MHC-II molecules could be of value to increase CD8(+) immune response and control tumour-growth, opening new perspectives for the design of highly immunogenic protein-based vaccines. PMID:27154391

  1. Regulation of calreticulin–major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I interactions by ATP

    PubMed Central

    Wijeyesakere, Sanjeeva Joseph; Gagnon, Jessica K.; Arora, Karunesh; Brooks, Charles L.; Raghavan, Malini

    2015-01-01

    The MHC class I peptide loading complex (PLC) facilitates the assembly of MHC class I molecules with peptides, but factors that regulate the stability and dynamics of the assembly complex are largely uncharacterized. Based on initial findings that ATP, in addition to MHC class I-specific peptide, is able to induce MHC class I dissociation from the PLC, we investigated the interaction of ATP with the chaperone calreticulin, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) luminal, calcium-binding component of the PLC that is known to bind ATP. We combined computational and experimental measurements to identify residues within the globular domain of calreticulin, in proximity to the high-affinity calcium-binding site, that are important for high-affinity ATP binding and for ATPase activity. High-affinity calcium binding by calreticulin is required for optimal nucleotide binding, but both ATP and ADP destabilize enthalpy-driven high-affinity calcium binding to calreticulin. ATP also selectively destabilizes the interaction of calreticulin with cellular substrates, including MHC class I molecules. Calreticulin mutants that affect ATP or high-affinity calcium binding display prolonged associations with monoglucosylated forms of cellular MHC class I, delaying MHC class I dissociation from the PLC and their transit through the secretory pathway. These studies reveal central roles for ATP and calcium binding as regulators of calreticulin–substrate interactions and as key determinants of PLC dynamics. PMID:26420867

  2. Transcriptional profiling of MHC class I genes in rainbow trout infected with infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landis, E.D.; Purcell, M.K.; Thorgaard, G.H.; Wheeler, P.A.; Hansen, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are important mediators of cell-mediated immunity in vertebrates. MHC class IA molecules are important for host anti-viral immunity as they present intracellular antigens and regulate natural killer cell (NK) activity. MHC class Ib molecules on the other hand are less understood and have demonstrated diverse immune and non-immune functions in mammals. Rainbow trout possess a single classical MHC IA locus (Onmy-UBA) that is believed to function similar to that of mammalian MHC class Ia. Numerous MHC class Ib genes with undetermined functions have also been described in trout. Here we utilize quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) techniques to survey the levels of basal and inducible transcription for selected trout MHC class Ib genes, sIgM and sentinels of IFN induction in response to viral infection. Basal transcription of all the class Ib genes examined in this study was lower than Onmy-UBA in nai??ve fish. UBA, along with all of the non-classical genes were induced in fish infected with virus but not in control fish. Our results support a non-classical designation for the majority of the class IB genes surveyed in this study based upon expression levels while also indicating that they may play an important role in anti-viral immunity in trout.

  3. Towards universal structure-based prediction of class II MHC epitopes for diverse allotypes.

    PubMed

    Bordner, Andrew J

    2010-01-01

    The binding of peptide fragments of antigens to class II MHC proteins is a crucial step in initiating a helper T cell immune response. The discovery of these peptide epitopes is important for understanding the normal immune response and its misregulation in autoimmunity and allergies and also for vaccine design. In spite of their biomedical importance, the high diversity of class II MHC proteins combined with the large number of possible peptide sequences make comprehensive experimental determination of epitopes for all MHC allotypes infeasible. Computational methods can address this need by predicting epitopes for a particular MHC allotype. We present a structure-based method for predicting class II epitopes that combines molecular mechanics docking of a fully flexible peptide into the MHC binding cleft followed by binding affinity prediction using a machine learning classifier trained on interaction energy components calculated from the docking solution. Although the primary advantage of structure-based prediction methods over the commonly employed sequence-based methods is their applicability to essentially any MHC allotype, this has not yet been convincingly demonstrated. In order to test the transferability of the prediction method to different MHC proteins, we trained the scoring method on binding data for DRB1*0101 and used it to make predictions for multiple MHC allotypes with distinct peptide binding specificities including representatives from the other human class II MHC loci, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ, as well as for two murine allotypes. The results showed that the prediction method was able to achieve significant discrimination between epitope and non-epitope peptides for all MHC allotypes examined, based on AUC values in the range 0.632-0.821. We also discuss how accounting for peptide binding in multiple registers to class II MHC largely explains the systematically worse performance of prediction methods for class II MHC compared with those for class I MHC

  4. Balancing selection on MHC class I in wild brown trout Salmo trutta.

    PubMed

    O'Farrell, B; Dennis, C; Benzie, J A; McGinnity, P; Carlsson, J; de Eyto, E; Coughlan, J P; Igoe, F; Meehan, R; Cross, T F

    2012-09-01

    Evidence is reported for balancing selection acting on variation at major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in wild populations of brown trout Salmo trutta. First, variation at an MHC class I (satr-uba)-linked microsatellite locus (mhc1) is retained in small S. trutta populations isolated above waterfalls although variation is lost at neutral microsatellite markers. Second, populations across several catchments are less differentiated at mhc1 than at neutral markers, as predicted by theory. The population structure of these fish was also elucidated. PMID:22957875

  5. MHC class II presentation is controlled by the lysosomal small GTPase, Arl8b.

    PubMed

    Michelet, Xavier; Garg, Salil; Wolf, Benjamin J; Tuli, Amit; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola; Brenner, Michael B

    2015-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized APCs with the ability to prime naive T cells. DCs first sample Ags from the environment and then orchestrate their processing and loading onto MHC class II (MHC II) Ag-presenting molecules in lysosomes. Once MHC II molecules have bound a peptide, the MHC II-peptide complex is delivered to the cell surface for presentation to CD4(+) T cells. Regulation of Ag uptake via macropinocytosis and phagocytosis has been extensively studied, as well as trafficking in early endocytic vesicles notably regulated by the small GTPase Rab5 and its effectors. However, little is known about the regulators of Ag delivery from early endosomes to lysosomal compartments where the proper pH, proteases, MHC II, invariant chain, and HLA-DM reside, awaiting exogenous Ags for loading. In this article, we report the crucial role of the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor-like 8b (Arl8b) in MHC II presentation in DCs. We show for the first time, to our knowledge, that Arl8b localizes to MHC II compartments in DCs and regulates formation of MHC II-peptide complexes. Arl8b-silenced DCs display a defect in MHC II-Ag complex formation and its delivery to the cell surface during infection resulting in a defect in T cell recognition. Our results highlight the role of Arl8b as a trafficking regulator of the late stage of complex formation and MHC II presentation in DCs. PMID:25637027

  6. Neuronal MHC Class I Expression Is Regulated by Activity Driven Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yaqin; Liu, Jiane; Miao, Fengqin; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2015-01-01

    MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules are important components of the immune system. Recently MHC-I have been reported to also play important roles in brain development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism(s) underlying activity-dependent MHC-I expression using hippocampal neurons. Here we report that neuronal expression level of MHC-I is dynamically regulated during hippocampal development after birth in vivo. Kainic acid (KA) treatment significantly increases the expression of MHC-I in cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, suggesting that MHC-I expression is regulated by neuronal activity. In addition, KA stimulation decreased the expression of pre- and post-synaptic proteins. This down-regulation is prevented by addition of an MHC-I antibody to KA treated neurons. Further studies demonstrate that calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) is important in relaying KA simulation activation signals to up-regulated MHC-I expression. This signaling cascade relies on activation of the MAPK pathway, which leads to increased phosphorylation of CREB and NF-κB p65 while also enhancing the expression of IRF-1. Together, these results suggest that expression of MHC-I in hippocampal neurons is driven by Ca2+ regulated activation of the MAPK signaling transduction cascade. PMID:26263390

  7. Molecular characterization of MHC class II in the Australian invasive cane toad reveals multiple splice variants.

    PubMed

    Lillie, Mette; Cui, Jian; Shine, Richard; Belov, Katherine

    2016-07-01

    The cane toad has gained notoriety for its invasion across the Australian landscape, with significant impacts on the native Australian fauna. The invasion has accelerated over time, with invading cane toads adapted for highly dispersive traits. This, however, has come at the cost of the immune system, with lower investment in some immune functions. To investigate the cane toad's immunogenetics, we characterized four major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class IIA and three MHC class IIB loci. Preliminary observations suggest very low allelic diversity at all loci. We also observed various splice isoforms. One isoform seen at one class IIA and two class IIB loci was missing exon 2, which is essential to peptide binding and presentation. The other isoform, observed at a class IIA locus, is likely to be a soluble MHC product. These results may suggest a significant role of alternative splicing of MHC loci in the Australian cane toad. PMID:27233954

  8. MHC evolution in three salmonid species: a comparison between class II alpha and beta genes.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Daniela; Conejeros, Pablo; Marshall, Sergio H; Consuegra, Sofia

    2010-08-01

    The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are amongst the most variable in vertebrates and represent some of the best candidates to study processes of adaptive evolution. However, despite the number of studies available, most of the information on the structure and function of these genes come from studies in mammals and birds in which the MHC class I and II genes are tightly linked and class II alpha exhibits low variability in many cases. Teleost fishes are among the most primitive vertebrates with MHC and represent good organisms for the study of MHC evolution because their class I and class II loci are not physically linked, allowing for independent evolution of both classes of genes. We have compared the diversity and molecular mechanisms of evolution of classical MH class II alpha and class II beta loci in farm populations of three salmonid species: Oncorhynchus kisutch, Oncorhynchus mykiss and Salmo salar. We found single classical class II loci and high polymorphism at both class II alpha and beta genes in the three species. Mechanisms of evolution were common for both class II genes, with recombination and point mutation involved in generating diversity and positive selection acting on the peptide-binding residues. These results suggest that the maintenance of variability at the class IIalpha gene could be a mechanism to increase diversity in the MHC class II in salmonids in order to compensate for the expression of one single classical locus and to respond to a wider array of parasites. PMID:20521040

  9. Assembly and characterization of the MHC class I region of the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis).

    PubMed

    Ruan, Rui; Wan, Xiao-Ling; Zheng, Yang; Zheng, Jin-Song; Wang, Ding

    2016-01-01

    The Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis; YFP) is the sole freshwater subspecies of N. asiaeorientalis and is now critically endangered. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a family of highly polymorphic genes that play an important immunological role in antigen presentation in the vertebrates. Currently, however, little is known about MHC region in the genome of the YFP, which hampers conservation genetics and evolutionary ecology study using MHC genes. In this work, a nucleotide sequence of 774,811 bp covering the YFP MHC class I region was obtained by screening a YFP bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library, followed by sequencing and assembly of positive BAC clones. A total of 45 genes were successfully annotated, of which four were MHC class I genes. There are high similarities among the four YFP MHC class I genes (>94%). Divergence in the coding region of the four YFP MHC class I genes is mainly localized to exons 2 and 3, which encode the antigen-binding sites of MHC class I genes. Additionally, comparison of the MHC structure in YFP to those of cattle, sheep, and pig showed that MHC class I genes are located in genome regions with regard to the conserved genes, and the YFP contains the fewest MHC class I genes among these species. This is the first report characterizing a cetacean MHC class I region and describing its organization, which would be valuable for further investigation of adaptation in natural populations of the YFP and other cetaceans. PMID:26585324

  10. Improved pan-specific MHC class I peptide-binding predictions using a novel representation of the MHC-binding cleft environment.

    PubMed

    Carrasco Pro, S; Zimic, M; Nielsen, M

    2014-02-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a key role in cell-mediated immune responses presenting bounded peptides for recognition by the immune system cells. Several in silico methods have been developed to predict the binding affinity of a given peptide to a specific MHC molecule. One of the current state-of-the-art methods for MHC class I is NetMHCpan, which has a core ingredient for the representation of the MHC class I molecule using a pseudo-sequence representation of the binding cleft amino acid environment. New and large MHC-peptide-binding data sets are constantly being made available, and also new structures of MHC class I molecules with a bound peptide have been published. In order to test if the NetMHCpan method can be improved by integrating this novel information, we created new pseudo-sequence definitions for the MHC-binding cleft environment from sequence and structural analyses of different MHC data sets including human leukocyte antigen (HLA), non-human primates (chimpanzee, macaque and gorilla) and other animal alleles (cattle, mouse and swine). From these constructs, we showed that by focusing on MHC sequence positions found to be polymorphic across the MHC molecules used to train the method, the NetMHCpan method achieved a significant increase in the predictive performance, in particular, of non-human MHCs. This study hence showed that an improved performance of MHC-binding methods can be achieved not only by the accumulation of more MHC-peptide-binding data but also by a refined definition of the MHC-binding environment including information from non-human species. PMID:24447175

  11. MHC class II antigen presentation pathway in murine tumours: tumour evasion from immunosurveillance?

    PubMed Central

    Walter, W; Lingnau, K; Schmitt, E; Loos, M; Maeurer, M J

    2000-01-01

    Qualitative differences in the MHC class II antigen processing and presentation pathway may be instrumental in shaping the CD4+ T cell response directed against tumour cells. Efficient loading of many MHC class II alleles with peptides requires the assistance of H2-M, a heterodimeric MHC class II-like molecule. In contrast to the HLA-DM region in humans, the β-chain locus is duplicated in mouse, with the H2-Mb1 (Mb1β-chain distal to H2-Mb2 (Mb2) and the H2-Ma (Ma) α-chain gene). Here, we show that murine MHC class II and H2-M genes are coordinately regulated in murine tumour cell lines by T helper cell 1 (IFN-γ) and T helper cell 2 (IL-4 or IL-10) cytokines in the presence of the MHC class II-specific transactivator CIITA as determined by mRNA expression and Western blot analysis. Furthermore, Mαβ1 and Mαβ2 heterodimers are differentially expressed in murine tumour cell lines of different histology. Both H2-M isoforms promote equally processing and presentation of native protein antigens to H2-Ad- and H2-Ed-restricted CD4+ T cells. Murine tumour cell lines could be divided into three groups: constitutive MHC class II and CIITA expression; inducible MHC class II and CIITA expression upon IFN-γ-treatment; and lack of constitutive and IFN-γ-inducible MHC class II and CIITA expression. These differences may impact on CD4+ T cell recognition of cancer cells in murine tumour models. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11027433

  12. MHC class II allosteric site drugs: new immunotherapeutics for malignant, infectious and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, M; Li, J; Gulfo, J V; Von Hofe, E; Humphreys, R E

    2001-01-01

    The discovery of the interactions of the 'Ii-Key' segment of the Ii protein with the major histocmpatibility complex (MHC) Class II allosteric site, which is adjacent to the antigenic peptide-binding site, creates therapeutic opportunities by regulating the antigenic peptide binding to MHC class II molecules. The binding of Ii-Key to the MHC class II allosteric site loosens the hold of the MHC Class II 'clamshell' on antigenic peptides and leads to highly efficient antigenic peptide charging to or releasing from the MHC class II antigenic peptide-binding groove. Ii-Key peptide-induced spilling of bound antigenic peptide, or replacement with inert blockers, leads to 'inert immunosuppression'. Highly efficient replacement of ambient with vaccine peptides by Ii-Key permits 'active immunosuppression' for antigen-specific control of autoimmune diseases in the absence of cytokines or adjuvants. On the other hand, active immunization against cancer or infectious disease can result from epitope replacement mediated by Ii-Key and accompanied by cytokines or other adjuvants. Finally, linking the Ii-Key peptide through a simple polymethylene bridge to an antigenic sequence vastly increases the potency of MHC Class II peptide vaccines. In summary, the discovery of the MHC class II allosteric site allows one to increase the efficiency of MHC class II-related, antigenic epitope-specific therapy for malignant, infectious, and autoimmune diseases. The focus of this review is on the mechanism and potential clinical use of such novel allosteric site-directed, Ii-key drugs. PMID:11439146

  13. Redirecting soluble antigen for MHC class I cross-presentation during phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hari, Aswin; Ganguly, Anutosh; Mu, Libing; Davis, Shevaun P.; Stenner, Melanie D.; Lam, Raymond; Munro, Fay; Namet, Inana; Alghamdi, Enaam; Fürstenhaupt, Tobias; Dong, Wei; Detampel, Pascal; Shen, Lian Jun; Amrein, Matthias W.; Yates, Robin M.; Shi, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Peptides presented by MHC class I molecules are derived mostly from proteins synthesized by the antigen-presenting cell itself, while peptides presented by MHC class II molecules are derived predominantly from materials acquired by endocytosis. External antigens can also be presented by MHC class I molecules in a process referred to as cross-presentation. We report that mouse dendritic cell engagement of a phagocytic target alters endocytic processing and inhibits their proteolytic activities. During phagocytosis, endosome maturation is delayed, shows less progression towards the lysosome, and the endocytosed soluble antigen is targeted for MHC class I cross-presentation. The antigen processing in these arrested endosomes is under the control of NAPDH oxidase associated ROS. We also show that cathepsin S is responsible for the generation of the MHC class I epitope. Our results suggest that in addition to solid structure uptake, DC phagocytosis simultaneously modifies the kinetics of endosomal trafficking and maturation. As a consequence, external soluble antigens are targeted into the MHC class I cross-presentation pathway. PMID:25378230

  14. HNRNPR Regulates the Expression of Classical and Nonclassical MHC Class I Proteins.

    PubMed

    Reches, Adi; Nachmani, Daphna; Berhani, Orit; Duev-Cohen, Alexandra; Shreibman, Dorin; Ophir, Yael; Seliger, Barbara; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2016-06-15

    MHC class I molecules, in addition to their role in specific activation of the CTL of adaptive immune system, function also as the main ligands for NK cell inhibitory receptors, which prevent NK cells from killing normal, healthy cells. MHC class I proteins are divided into classical and nonclassical proteins. The former group consists of hundreds of HLA-A, B, and C alleles, which are universally expressed, whereas several alleles of the latter group, such as HLA-G, manifest a restricted expression pattern. Despite the important role played by these molecules in innate and adaptive immune responses, their complex expression regulation is not fully known. In our study, we investigated the regulation processes controlling the expression of MHC class I molecules, with a particular focus on their 3' untranslated regions. We identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein R (HNRNPR) as an important positive regulator of classical and nonclassical MHC class I molecules. HNRNPR is a RNA-binding protein belonging to the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein family, which has a known role in processing of precursor mRNA. We demonstrated that HNRNPR binds MHC class I mRNAs in their 3' untranslated regions and enhances their stability and consequently their expression. Furthermore, regulation by HNRNPR modulates the cytotoxic activity of NK cells. In conclusion, we show that HNRNPR acts as a general positive regulator of MHC class I expression. PMID:27194785

  15. Immunological Functions of the Membrane Proximal Region of MHC Class II Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Harton, Jonathan; Jin, Lei; Hahn, Amy; Drake, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules present exogenously derived antigen peptides to CD4 T cells, driving activation of naïve T cells and supporting CD4-driven immune functions. However, MHC class II molecules are not inert protein pedestals that simply bind and present peptides. These molecules also serve as multi-functional signaling molecules delivering activation, differentiation, or death signals (or a combination of these) to B cells, macrophages, as well as MHC class II-expressing T cells and tumor cells. Although multiple proteins are known to associate with MHC class II, interaction with STING (stimulator of interferon genes) and CD79 is essential for signaling. In addition, alternative transmembrane domain pairing between class II α and β chains influences association with membrane lipid sub-domains, impacting both signaling and antigen presentation. In contrast to the membrane-distal region of the class II molecule responsible for peptide binding and T-cell receptor engagement, the membrane-proximal region (composed of the connecting peptide, transmembrane domain, and cytoplasmic tail) mediates these “non-traditional” class II functions. Here, we review the literature on the function of the membrane-proximal region of the MHC class II molecule and discuss the impact of this aspect of class II immunobiology on immune regulation and human disease. PMID:27006762

  16. But I Like PE: Factors Associated With Enjoyment of Physical Education Class in Middle School Girls

    PubMed Central

    Barr-Anderson, Daheia J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Schmitz, Kathryn H.; Ward, Dianne S.; Conway, Terry L.; Pratt, Charlotte; Baggett, Chris D.; Lytle, Leslie; Pate, Russell R.

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined associations between physical education (PE) class enjoyment and sociodemographic, personal, and perceived school environment factors among early adolescent girls. Participants included 1,511 sixth-grade girls who completed baseline assessments for the Trial of Activity in Adolescent Girls, with 50% indicating they enjoyed PE class a lot. Variables positively associated with PE class enjoyment included physical activity level, perceived benefits of physical activity, self-efficacy for leisure time physical activity, and perceived school climate for girls' physical activity as influenced by teachers, while body mass index was inversely associated with PE class enjoyment. After adjusting for all variables in the model, PE class enjoyment was significantly greater in Blacks than in Whites. In model testing, with mutual adjustment for all variables, self-efficacy was the strongest correlate of PE class enjoyment, followed by perceived benefits, race/ethnicity, and teacher's support for girls' physical activity, as compared to boys, at school. The overall model explained 11% of the variance in PE class enjoyment. Findings suggest that efforts to enhance girls' self-efficacy and perceived benefits and to provide a supportive PE class environment that promotes gender equality can potentially increase PE class enjoyment among young girls. PMID:18431947

  17. Use of MHC class II tetramers to investigate CD4+ T cell responses: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Cecconi, Virginia; Moro, Monica; Del Mare, Sara; Dellabona, Paolo; Casorati, Giulia

    2008-11-01

    MHC-class I tetramers technology enabled the characterization of peptide-specific T cells at the single cell level in a variety of studies. Several laboratories have also developed MHC-class II multimers to characterize Ag-specific CD4+ T cells. However, the generation and use of MHC-class II multimers seems more problematic than that of MHC-I multimers. We have generated HLA-DR*1101 tetramers in a versatile empty form, which can be loaded after purification with peptides of interest. We discuss the impact of critical biological and structural parameters for the optimal staining of Ag-specific CD4+ T cells using HLA-DR*1101 tetramers, such as: (i) activation state of CD4+ T cells; (ii) membrane trafficking in the target CD4+ T cells; (iii) binding characteristics of the loaded CD4 epitope. Our data indicate that reorganization of TCR on the plasma membrane upon CD4+ T cell activation, as well as an homogenous binding frame of the CD4 epitopes to the soluble HLA-DR monomer, are critical for a stable TCR/MHC-class II tetramer interaction. These factors, together with the low frequencies and affinities of specific CD4+ T cells, explain the need for in vitro expansion or ex vivo enrichment of specific T cells for the optimal visualization with MHC-class II tetramers. PMID:18612991

  18. Identifying the ERAD ubiquitin E3 ligases for viral and cellular targeting of MHC class I.

    PubMed

    van den Boomen, D J H; Lehner, P J

    2015-12-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US2 and US11 gene products hijack mammalian ER-associated degradation (ERAD) to induce rapid degradation of major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) molecules. The rate-limiting step in this pathway is thought to be the polyubiquitination of MHC-I by distinct host ERAD E3 ubiquitin ligases. TRC8 was identified as the ligase responsible for US2-mediated MHC-I degradation and shown to be required for the cleavage-dependent degradation of some tail-anchored proteins. In addition to MHC-I, plasma membrane profiling identified further immune receptors, which are also substrates for the US2/TRC8 complex. These include at least six α integrins, the coagulation factor thrombomodulin and the NK cell ligand CD112. US2's use of specific HCMV-encoded adaptors makes it an adaptable viral degradation hub. US11-mediated degradation is MHC-I-specific and genetic screens have identified TMEM129, an uncharacterised RING-C2 E3 ligase, as responsible for US11-mediated degradation. In a unique auto-regulatory loop, US11 readily responds to changes in cellular expression of MHC-I. Free US11 either rebinds more MHC-I or is itself degraded by the HRD1/SEL1L E3 ligase complex. While virally encoded US2 and US11 appropriate mammalian ERAD, the MHC-I complex also undergoes stringent cellular quality control and misfolded MHC-I is degraded by the HRD1/SEL1L complex. We discuss the identification and central role of E3 ubiquitin ligases in ER quality control and viral degradation of the MHC-I chain. PMID:26210183

  19. Identifying the ERAD ubiquitin E3 ligases for viral and cellular targeting of MHC class I

    PubMed Central

    van den Boomen, D.J.H.; Lehner, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US2 and US11 gene products hijack mammalian ER-associated degradation (ERAD) to induce rapid degradation of major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) molecules. The rate-limiting step in this pathway is thought to be the polyubiquitination of MHC-I by distinct host ERAD E3 ubiquitin ligases. TRC8 was identified as the ligase responsible for US2-mediated MHC-I degradation and shown to be required for the cleavage-dependent degradation of some tail-anchored proteins. In addition to MHC-I, plasma membrane profiling identified further immune receptors, which are also substrates for the US2/TRC8 complex. These include at least six α integrins, the coagulation factor thrombomodulin and the NK cell ligand CD112. US2’s use of specific HCMV-encoded adaptors makes it an adaptable viral degradation hub. US11-mediated degradation is MHC-I-specific and genetic screens have identified TMEM129, an uncharacterised RING-C2 E3 ligase, as responsible for US11-mediated degradation. In a unique auto-regulatory loop, US11 readily responds to changes in cellular expression of MHC-I. Free US11 either rebinds more MHC-I or is itself degraded by the HRD1/SEL1L E3 ligase complex. While virally encoded US2 and US11 appropriate mammalian ERAD, the MHC-I complex also undergoes stringent cellular quality control and misfolded MHC-I is degraded by the HRD1/SEL1L complex. We discuss the identification and central role of E3 ubiquitin ligases in ER quality control and viral degradation of the MHC-I chain. PMID:26210183

  20. But I like PE: Factors Associated with Enjoyment of Physical Education Class in Middle School Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr-Anderson, Daheia J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Schmitz, Kathryn H.; Ward, Dianne S.; Conway, Terry L.; Pratt, Charlotte; Baggett, Chris D.; Lytle, Leslie; Pate, Russell R.

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined associations between physical education (PE) class enjoyment and sociodemographic, personal, and perceived school environment factors among early adolescent girls. Participants included 1,511 sixth-grade girls who completed baseline assessments for the Trial of Activity in Adolescent Girls, with 50% indicating they…

  1. MHC-linked and un-linked class I genes in the wallaby

    PubMed Central

    Siddle, Hannah V; Deakin, Janine E; Coggill, Penny; Hart, Elizabeth; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Wong, Emily SW; Harrow, Jennifer; Beck, Stephan; Belov, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Background MHC class I antigens are encoded by a rapidly evolving gene family comprising classical and non-classical genes that are found in all vertebrates and involved in diverse immune functions. However, there is a fundamental difference between the organization of class I genes in mammals and non-mammals. Non-mammals have a single classical gene responsible for antigen presentation, which is linked to the antigen processing genes, including TAP. This organization allows co-evolution of advantageous class Ia/TAP haplotypes. In contrast, mammals have multiple classical genes within the MHC, which are separated from the antigen processing genes by class III genes. It has been hypothesized that separation of classical class I genes from antigen processing genes in mammals allowed them to duplicate. We investigated this hypothesis by characterizing the class I genes of the tammar wallaby, a model marsupial that has a novel MHC organization, with class I genes located within the MHC and 10 other chromosomal locations. Results Sequence analysis of 14 BACs containing 15 class I genes revealed that nine class I genes, including one to three classical class I, are not linked to the MHC but are scattered throughout the genome. Kangaroo Endogenous Retroviruses (KERVs) were identified flanking the MHC un-linked class I. The wallaby MHC contains four non-classical class I, interspersed with antigen processing genes. Clear orthologs of non-classical class I are conserved in distant marsupial lineages. Conclusion We demonstrate that classical class I genes are not linked to antigen processing genes in the wallaby and provide evidence that retroviral elements were involved in their movement. The presence of retroviral elements most likely facilitated the formation of recombination hotspots and subsequent diversification of class I genes. The classical class I have moved away from antigen processing genes in eutherian mammals and the wallaby independently, but both lineages

  2. Locus-specific de novo methylation down-regulates MHC class I in S49 lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Rubocki, R.J.; Berrigan, B.E.; Specks, S.L.

    1996-06-01

    Several tumors from distinct cell lineages can modulate their surface expression of key molecules, thereby avoiding recognition and elimination by the immune system. One group of molecules that has demonstrated this altered expression is encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes. The MHC encodes for a large multigene family of highly polymorphic class I molecules that are expressed on the cell surface of most nucleated cells. Class I molecules function as receptors for peptides derived from self or foreign (e.g., viral, tumor) proteins, thereby facilitating immune surveillance against infected or malignant cells. 39 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Crystal structure of the N-myristoylated lipopeptide-bound MHC class I complex

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Yukie; Mizutani, Tatsuaki; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Suzuki, Juri; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Mori, Naoki; Shiina, Takashi; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Fujita, Hiroaki; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Mikami, Bunzo; Sugita, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    The covalent conjugation of a 14-carbon saturated fatty acid (myristic acid) to the amino-terminal glycine residue is critical for some viral proteins to function. This protein lipidation modification, termed N-myristoylation, is targeted by host cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) that specifically recognize N-myristoylated short peptides; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying lipopeptide antigen (Ag) presentation remain elusive. Here we show that a primate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-encoded protein is capable of binding N-myristoylated 5-mer peptides and presenting them to specific CTLs. A high-resolution X-ray crystallographic analysis of the MHC class I:lipopeptide complex reveals an Ag-binding groove that is elaborately constructed to bind N-myristoylated short peptides rather than prototypic 9-mer peptides. The identification of lipopeptide-specific, MHC class I-restricted CTLs indicates that the widely accepted concept of MHC class I-mediated presentation of long peptides to CTLs may need some modifications to incorporate a novel MHC class I function of lipopeptide Ag presentation. PMID:26758274

  4. Crystal structure of the N-myristoylated lipopeptide-bound MHC class I complex.

    PubMed

    Morita, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Yukie; Mizutani, Tatsuaki; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Suzuki, Juri; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Mori, Naoki; Shiina, Takashi; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Fujita, Hiroaki; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Mikami, Bunzo; Sugita, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    The covalent conjugation of a 14-carbon saturated fatty acid (myristic acid) to the amino-terminal glycine residue is critical for some viral proteins to function. This protein lipidation modification, termed N-myristoylation, is targeted by host cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) that specifically recognize N-myristoylated short peptides; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying lipopeptide antigen (Ag) presentation remain elusive. Here we show that a primate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-encoded protein is capable of binding N-myristoylated 5-mer peptides and presenting them to specific CTLs. A high-resolution X-ray crystallographic analysis of the MHC class I:lipopeptide complex reveals an Ag-binding groove that is elaborately constructed to bind N-myristoylated short peptides rather than prototypic 9-mer peptides. The identification of lipopeptide-specific, MHC class I-restricted CTLs indicates that the widely accepted concept of MHC class I-mediated presentation of long peptides to CTLs may need some modifications to incorporate a novel MHC class I function of lipopeptide Ag presentation. PMID:26758274

  5. MHC class II proteins contain a potential binding site for the verotoxin receptor glycolipid CD77.

    PubMed

    George, T; Boyd, B; Price, M; Lingwood, C; Maloney, M

    2001-11-01

    Globotriaosyl ceramide or CD77 functions as a cell surface receptor for toxins of the Shiga toxin/verotoxin family and as a marker for germinal center stage B-cells. The B-cell protein CD19 and the interferon-alpha receptor possess verotoxin-like amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains, and CD77 has been shown to function in CD19-mediated adhesion and interferon-induced growth inhibition. The Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, Daudi, is similar to germinal center B-cells in their expression of CD77, CD19 and MHC class II molecules. Using the multiple sequence alignment program, ClustalW, we have identified a verotoxin-like amino acid sequence on the beta-chain of human and murine MHC class II molecules. Binding of CD77 at this site could modulate the peptide-binding properties of these MHC class II molecules. Using Western blot analysis of whole cell extracts, we found that CD77-positive Daudi cells have higher levels of HLA-D proteins than VT500 cells, a Daudi-derived CD77-deficient mutant cell line. In contrast, MHC class II-mediated adhesion and surface expression are similar in the two cell lines. Therefore, CD77 could play a functional or regulatory role in MHC class II-mediated functions specifically relating to antigen presentation by B-cells to T helper cells. PMID:11838965

  6. Molecular characterization of classical and nonclassical MHC class I genes from the golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus).

    PubMed

    Zeng, Q-Q; Zhong, G-H; He, K; Sun, D-D; Wan, Q-H

    2016-02-01

    Classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I allelic polymorphism is essential for competent antigen presentation. To improve the genotyping efforts in the golden pheasant, it is necessary to differentiate more accurately between classical and nonclassical class I molecules. In our study, all MHC class I genes were isolated from one golden pheasant based on two overlapping PCR amplifications. In total, six full-length class I nucleotide sequences (A-F) were identified, and four were novel. Two (A and C) belonged to the IA1 gene, two (B and D) were alleles derived from the IA2 gene through transgene amplification, and two (E and F) comprised a third novel locus, IA3 that was excluded from the core region of the golden pheasant MHC-B. IA1 and IA2 exhibited the broad expression profiles characteristic of classical loci, while IA3 showed no expression in multiple tissues and was therefore defined as a nonclassical gene. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the three IA genes in the golden pheasant share a much closer evolutionary relationship than the corresponding sequences in other galliform species. This observation was consistent with high sequence similarity among them, which likely arises from the homogenizing effect of recombination. Our careful distinction between the classical and nonclassical MHC class I genes in the golden pheasant lays the foundation for developing locus-specific genotyping and establishing a good molecular marker system of classical MHC I loci. PMID:26700854

  7. Multiple divergent haplotypes express completely distinct sets of class I MHC genes in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Sean C; Restaino, Anthony C; de Jong, Jill L O

    2014-03-01

    The zebrafish is an important animal model for stem cell biology, cancer, and immunology research. Histocompatibility represents a key intersection of these disciplines; however, histocompatibility in zebrafish remains poorly understood. We examined a set of diverse zebrafish class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes that segregate with specific haplotypes at chromosome 19, and for which donor-recipient matching has been shown to improve engraftment after hematopoietic transplantation. Using flanking gene polymorphisms, we identified six distinct chromosome 19 haplotypes. We describe several novel class I U lineage genes and characterize their sequence properties, expression, and haplotype distribution. Altogether, ten full-length zebrafish class I genes were analyzed, mhc1uba through mhc1uka. Expression data and sequence properties indicate that most are candidate classical genes. Several substitutions in putative peptide anchor residues, often shared with deduced MHC molecules from additional teleost species, suggest flexibility in antigen binding. All ten zebrafish class I genes were uniquely assigned among the six haplotypes, with dominant or codominant expression of one to three genes per haplotype. Interestingly, while the divergent MHC haplotypes display variable gene copy number and content, the different genes appear to have ancient origin, with extremely high levels of sequence diversity. Furthermore, haplotype variability extends beyond the MHC genes to include divergent forms of psmb8. The many disparate haplotypes at this locus therefore represent a remarkable form of genomic region configuration polymorphism. Defining the functional MHC genes within these divergent class I haplotypes in zebrafish will provide an important foundation for future studies in immunology and transplantation. PMID:24291825

  8. Evolution of MHC class I genes in the European badger (Meles meles)

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Yung Wa; Dugdale, Hannah L; Newman, Chris; Macdonald, David W; Burke, Terry

    2012-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a central role in the adaptive immune system and provides a good model with which to understand the evolutionary processes underlying functional genes. Trans-species polymorphism and orthology are both commonly found in MHC genes; however, mammalian MHC class I genes tend to cluster by species. Concerted evolution has the potential to homogenize different loci, whereas birth-and-death evolution can lead to the loss of orthologs; both processes result in monophyletic groups within species. Studies investigating the evolution of MHC class I genes have been biased toward a few particular taxa and model species. We present the first study of MHC class I genes in a species from the superfamily Musteloidea. The European badger (Meles meles) exhibits moderate variation in MHC class I sequences when compared to other carnivores. We identified seven putatively functional sequences and nine pseudogenes from genomic (gDNA) and complementary (cDNA) DNA, signifying at least two functional class I loci. We found evidence for separate evolutionary histories of the α1 and α2/α3 domains. In the α1 domain, several sequences from different species were more closely related to each other than to sequences from the same species, resembling orthology or trans-species polymorphism. Balancing selection and probable recombination maintain genetic diversity in the α1 domain, evidenced by the detection of positive selection and a recombination event. By comparison, two recombination breakpoints indicate that the α2/α3 domains have most likely undergone concerted evolution, where recombination has homogenized the α2/α3 domains between genes, leading to species-specific clusters of sequences. Our findings highlight the importance of analyzing MHC domains separately. PMID:22957169

  9. Rapid high resolution MHC class I genotyping of Chinese rhesus macaques by capillary reference strand mediated conformational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Blasky, Alex J.; Karl, Julie A.; Wiseman, Roger W.; Read, Daniel S.; O’Connor, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) provide well-established models for studying human disease pathogenesis and vaccine development. When challenged with infectious agents macaques exhibit individual differences in susceptibility. An important determinant of these differences is the complement of major histocompatability complex (MHC) class I sequences expressed by each animal. Although previous studies have reported strong associations between MHC expression and disease outcome, a rapid, cost effective method for high resolution MHC genotyping in macaques is lacking. Here, we adapted a modified heteroduplex assay, reference strand mediated conformational analysis (RSCA), to an ABI 3130xl capillary electrophoresis genetic analyzer for macaque MHC class I genotyping. For validation, we investigated the concordance of RSCA genotyping for fourteen MHC class I sequences in twelve Chinese rhesus macaques whose genotypes were established through cDNA cloning and sequencing of MHC class I sequences. We observed a concordance greater than 98% between RSCA and the cloning and sequencing data. Further, RSCA confirmed the presence of MHC haplotype sharing between three macaques as predicted previously by microsatellite analysis. RSCA genotyping of an additional 25 Chinese rhesus macaques demonstrated that the frequency of these fourteen MHC class I sequences ranged from 5 to 32%, with the Mamu-A1*2601 sequence being most common in this cohort. Capillary RSCA genotyping has the potential to enable researchers to rapidly evaluate MHC class I genotypes in rhesus macaques and associate specific MHC sequences with disease susceptibility. PMID:18629489

  10. Evolution of MHC class II E beta diversity within the genus Peromyscus.

    PubMed Central

    Richman, Adam D; Herrera, L Gerardo; Nash, Deanna

    2003-01-01

    Progress in understanding the evolution of variation at the MHC has been slowed by an inability to assess the relative roles of mutation vs. intragenic recombination in contributing to observed polymorphism. Recent theoretical advances now permit a quantitative treatment of the problem, with the result that the amount of recombination is at least an order of magnitude greater than that of mutation in the history of class II genes. We suggest that this insight allows progress in evaluating the importance of other factors affecting the evolution of the MHC. We investigated the evolution of MHC class II E beta sequence diversity in the genus Peromyscus. We find evidence for extensive recombination in the history of these sequences. Nevertheless, it appears that intragenic recombination alone is insufficient to account for evolution of MHC diversity in Peromyscus. Significant differences in silent variation among subgenera arose over a relatively short period of time, with little subsequent change. We argue that these observations are consistent with the effects of historical population bottleneck(s). Population restrictions may explain general features of MHC evolution, including the large amount of recombination in the history of MHC genes, because intragenic recombination may efficiently regenerate allelic polymorphism following a population constriction. PMID:12750340

  11. Leukocyte Ig-Like Receptors – A Model for MHC Class I Disease Associations

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Laura Emily; Allen, Rachel Louise

    2016-01-01

    MHC class I (MHC-I) polymorphisms are associated with the outcome of some viral infections and autoimmune diseases. MHC-I proteins present antigenic peptides and are recognized by receptors on natural killer cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, thus enabling the immune system to detect self-antigens and eliminate targets lacking self or expressing foreign antigens. Recognition of MHC-I, however, extends beyond receptors on cytotoxic leukocytes. Members of the leukocyte Ig-like receptor (LILR) family are expressed on monocytic cells and can recognize both classical and non-classical MHC-I alleles. Despite their relatively broad specificity when compared to the T cell receptor or killer Ig-like receptors, variations in the strength of LILR binding between different MHC-I alleles have recently been shown to correlate with control of HIV infection. We suggest that LILR recognition may mediate MHC-I disease association in a manner that does not depend on a binary discrimination of self/non-self by cytotoxic cells. Instead, the effects of LILR activity following engagement by MHC-I may represent a “degrees of self” model, whereby strength of binding to different alleles determines the degree of influence exerted by these receptors on immune cell functions. LILRs are expressed by myelomonocytic cells and lymphocytes, extending their influence across antigen-presenting cell subsets including dendritic cells, macrophages, and B cells. They have been identified as important players in the response to infection, inflammatory diseases, and cancer, with recent literature to indicate that MHC-I recognition by these receptors and consequent allelic effects could extend an influence beyond the immune system. PMID:27504110

  12. Characterization of MHC class I and II genes in a subantarctic seabird, the blue petrel, Halobaena caerulea (Procellariiformes).

    PubMed

    Strandh, Maria; Lannefors, Mimi; Bonadonna, Francesco; Westerdahl, Helena

    2011-10-01

    The great polymorphism observed in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes is thought to be maintained by pathogen-mediated selection possibly combined with MHC-disassortative mating, guided by MHC-determined olfactory cues. Here, we partly characterize the MHC class I and II B of the blue petrel, Halobaena caerulea (Procellariiformes), a bird with significant olfactory abilities that lives under presumably low pathogen burdens in Subantarctica. Blue petrels are long-lived, monogamous birds which suggest the necessity of an accurate mate choice process. The species is ancestral to songbirds (Passeriformes; many MHC loci), although not to gamefowls (Galliformes; few MHC loci). Considering the phylogenetic relationships and the low subantarctic pathogen burden, we expected few rather than many MHC loci in the blue petrel. However, when we analysed partial MHC class I and class II B cDNA and gDNA sequences we found evidence for as many as at least eight MHC class I loci and at least two class II B loci. These class I and II B sequences showed classical MHC characteristics, e.g. high nucleotide diversity, especially in putative peptide-binding regions where signatures of positive selection was detected. Trans-species polymorphism was found between MHC class II B sequences of the blue petrel and those of thin-billed prion, Pachyptila belcheri, two species that diverged ∼25 MYA. The observed MHC allele richness in the blue petrel may well serve as a basis for mate choice, especially since olfactory discrimination of MHC types may be possible in this species. PMID:21607694

  13. Extensive Allelic Diversity of MHC Class I in Wild Mallard Ducks.

    PubMed

    Fleming-Canepa, Ximena; Jensen, Shawna M; Mesa, Christine M; Diaz-Satizabal, Laura; Roth, Alexa J; Parks-Dely, Julie A; Moon, Debra A; Wong, Janet P; Evseev, Danyel; Gossen, Desolie A; Tetrault, David G; Magor, Katharine E

    2016-08-01

    MHC class I is critically involved in defense against viruses, and diversity from polygeny and polymorphism contributes to the breadth of the immune response and health of the population. In this article, we examine MHC class I diversity in wild mallard ducks, the natural host and reservoir of influenza A viruses. We previously showed domestic ducks predominantly use UAA, one of five MHC class I genes, but whether biased expression is also true for wild mallards is unknown. Using RT-PCR from blood, we examined expressed MHC class I alleles from 38 wild mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and identified 61 unique alleles, typically 1 or 2 expressed alleles in each individual. To determine whether expressed alleles correspond to UAA adjacent to TAP2 as in domestic ducks, we cloned and sequenced genomic UAA-TAP2 fragments from all mallards, which matched transcripts recovered and allowed us to assign most alleles as UAA Allelic differences are primarily located in α1 and α2 domains in the residues known to interact with peptide in mammalian MHC class I, suggesting the diversity is functional. Most UAA alleles have unique residues in the cleft predicting distinct specificity; however, six alleles have an unusual conserved cleft with two cysteine residues. Residues that influence peptide-loading properties and tapasin involvement in chicken are fixed in duck alleles and suggest tapasin independence. Biased expression of one MHC class I gene may make viral escape within an individual easy, but high diversity in the population places continual pressure on the virus in the reservoir species. PMID:27342841

  14. MHC class I-presented peptides and the DRiP hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Kenneth L.; Farfán-Arribas, Diego J.; Colbert, Jeff D.; Goldberg, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    MHC class I molecules present peptides derived from intracellular proteins, enabling immune surveillance by CD8+ T cells and the elimination of virally infected and cancerous cells. It has been argued that the dominant source of MHC class I-presented peptides is through proteasomal degradation of newly synthesized defective proteins, termed defective ribosomal products (DRiPs). Here, we critically examine the DRiP hypothesis and discuss recent studies indicating that antigenic peptides are generated from the entire proteome and not just from failures in protein synthesis or folding. PMID:24566257

  15. Donor MHC class II antigen is essential for induction of transplantation tolerance by bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Umemura, A; Monaco, A P; Maki, T

    2000-05-01

    Posttransplant infusion of donor bone marrow cells (BMC) induces tolerance to allografts in adult mice, dogs, nonhuman primates, and probably humans. Here we used a mouse skin allograft model and an allogeneic radiation chimera model to examine the role of MHC Ags in tolerance induction. Infusion of MHC class II Ag-deficient (CIID) BMC failed to prolong C57BL/6 (B6) skin grafts in ALS- and rapamycin-treated B10.A mice, whereas wild-type B6 or MHC class I Ag-deficient BMC induced prolongation. Removal of class II Ag-bearing cells from donor BMC markedly reduced the tolerogenic effect compared with untreated BMC, although graft survival was significantly longer in mice given depleted BMC than that in control mice given no BMC. Infusion of CIID BMC into irradiated syngeneic B6 or allogeneic B10.A mice produced normal lymphoid cell reconstitution including CD4+ T cells except for the absence of class II Ag-positive cells. However, irradiated B10.A mice reconstituted with CIID BMC rejected all B6 and a majority of CIID skin grafts despite continued maintenance of high degree chimerism. B10.A mice reconstituted with B6 BMC maintained chimerism and accepted both B6 and CIID skin grafts. Thus, expression of MHC class II Ag on BMC is essential for allograft tolerance induction and peripheral chimerism with cells deficient in class II Ag does not guarantee allograft acceptance. PMID:10779744

  16. Single-Molecule Motions of MHC Class II Rely on Bound Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kozono, Haruo; Matsushita, Yufuku; Ogawa, Naoki; Kozono, Yuko; Miyabe, Toshihiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Okimoto, Noriaki; Taiji, Makoto; Kanagawa, Osami; Sasaki, Yuji C.

    2015-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II protein can bind peptides of different lengths in the region outside the peptide-binding groove. Peptide-flanking residues (PFRs) contribute to the binding affinity of the peptide for MHC and change the immunogenicity of the peptide/MHC complex with regard to T cell receptor (TCR). The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are currently unknown. The molecular flexibility of the peptide/MHC complex may be an important determinant of the structures recognized by certain T cells. We used single-molecule x-ray analysis (diffracted x-ray tracking (DXT)) and fluorescence anisotropy to investigate these mechanisms. DXT enabled us to monitor the real-time Brownian motion of the peptide/MHC complex and revealed that peptides without PFRs undergo larger rotational motions than peptides with PFRs. Fluorescence anisotropy further revealed that peptides without PFRs exhibit slightly larger motions on the nanosecond timescale. These results demonstrate that peptides without PFRs undergo dynamic motions in the groove of MHC and consequently are able to assume diverse structures that can be recognized by T cells. PMID:25606683

  17. ERAAP Shapes the Peptidome Associated with Classical and Nonclassical MHC Class I Molecules.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Niranjana A; de Verteuil, Danielle A; Sriranganadane, Dev; Yahyaoui, Wafaa; Thibault, Pierre; Perreault, Claude; Shastri, Nilabh

    2016-08-15

    The peptide repertoire presented by classical as well as nonclassical MHC class I (MHC I) molecules is altered in the absence of the endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase associated with Ag processing (ERAAP). To characterize the extent of these changes, peptides from cells lacking ERAAP were eluted from the cell surface and analyzed by high-throughput mass spectrometry. We found that most peptides found in wild-type (WT) cells were retained in the absence of ERAAP. In contrast, a subset of "ERAAP-edited" peptides was lost in WT cells, and ERAAP-deficient cells presented a unique "unedited" repertoire. A substantial fraction of MHC-associated peptides from ERAAP-deficient cells contained N-terminal extensions and had a different molecular composition than did those from WT cells. We found that the number and immunogenicity of peptides associated with nonclassical MHC I was increased in the absence of ERAAP. Conversely, only peptides presented by classical MHC I were immunogenic in ERAAP-sufficient cells. Finally, MHC I peptides were also derived from different intracellular sources in ERAAP-deficient cells. PMID:27371725

  18. Influenza Virus Targets Class I MHC-Educated NK Cells for Immunoevasion

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Ahmad Bakur; Tu, Megan M.; Wight, Andrew; Zein, Haggag S.; Rahim, Mir Munir A.; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Sekhon, Harman S.; Brown, Earl G.; Makrigiannis, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    The immune response to influenza virus infection comprises both innate and adaptive defenses. NK cells play an early role in the destruction of tumors and virally-infected cells. NK cells express a variety of inhibitory receptors, including those of the Ly49 family, which are functional homologs of human killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). Like human KIR, Ly49 receptors inhibit NK cell-mediated lysis by binding to major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules that are expressed on normal cells. During NK cell maturation, the interaction of NK cell inhibitory Ly49 receptors with their MHC-I ligands results in two types of NK cells: licensed (“functional”), or unlicensed (“hypofunctional”). Despite being completely dysfunctional with regard to rejecting MHC-I-deficient cells, unlicensed NK cells represent up to half of the mature NK cell pool in rodents and humans, suggesting an alternative role for these cells in host defense. Here, we demonstrate that after influenza infection, MHC-I expression on lung epithelial cells is upregulated, and mice bearing unlicensed NK cells (Ly49-deficient NKCKD and MHC-I-deficient B2m-/- mice) survive the infection better than WT mice. Importantly, transgenic expression of an inhibitory self-MHC-I-specific Ly49 receptor in NKCKD mice restores WT influenza susceptibility, confirming a direct role for Ly49. Conversely, F(ab’)2-mediated blockade of self-MHC-I-specific Ly49 inhibitory receptors protects WT mice from influenza virus infection. Mechanistically, perforin-deficient NKCKD mice succumb to influenza infection rapidly, indicating that direct cytotoxicity is necessary for unlicensed NK cell-mediated protection. Our findings demonstrate that Ly49:MHC-I interactions play a critical role in influenza virus pathogenesis. We suggest a similar role may be conserved in human KIR, and their blockade may be protective in humans. PMID:26928844

  19. Expression levels of MHC class I molecules are inversely correlated with promiscuity of peptide binding.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Paul; Meziane, El Kahina; Harrison, Michael; Magiera, Łukasz; Hermann, Clemens; Mears, Laura; Wrobel, Antony G; Durant, Charlotte; Nielsen, Lise Lotte; Buus, Søren; Ternette, Nicola; Mwangi, William; Butter, Colin; Nair, Venugopal; Ahyee, Trudy; Duggleby, Richard; Madrigal, Alejandro; Roversi, Pietro; Lea, Susan M; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are at the heart of adaptive immune responses, playing crucial roles in many kinds of disease and in vaccination. We report that breadth of peptide presentation and level of cell surface expression of class I molecules are inversely correlated in both chickens and humans. This relationship correlates with protective responses against infectious pathogens including Marek's disease virus leading to lethal tumours in chickens and human immunodeficiency virus infection progressing to AIDS in humans. We propose that differences in peptide binding repertoire define two groups of MHC class I molecules strategically evolved as generalists and specialists for different modes of pathogen resistance. We suggest that differences in cell surface expression level ensure the development of optimal peripheral T cell responses. The inverse relationship of peptide repertoire and expression is evidently a fundamental property of MHC molecules, with ramifications extending beyond immunology and medicine to evolutionary biology and conservation. PMID:25860507

  20. Collapse and restoration of MHC class-I-dependent immune privilege: exploiting the human hair follicle as a model.

    PubMed

    Ito, Taisuke; Ito, Natsuho; Bettermann, Albrecht; Tokura, Yoshiki; Takigawa, Masahiro; Paus, Ralf

    2004-02-01

    The collapse of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class-I-dependent immune privilege can lead to autoimmune disease or fetal rejection. Pragmatic and instructive models are needed to clarify the as yet obscure controls of MHC class I down-regulation in situ, to dissect the principles of immune privilege generation, maintenance, and collapse as well as to develop more effective strategies for immune privilege restoration. Here, we propose that human scalp hair follicles, which are abundantly available and easily studied, are ideally suited for this purpose: interferon-gamma induces ectopic MHC class I expression in the constitutively MHC class-I-negative hair matrix epithelium of organ-cultured anagen hair bulbs, likely via interferon regulatory factor-1, along with up-regulation of the MHC class I pathway molecules beta(2)microglobulin and transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP-2). In the first report to identify natural immunomodulators capable of down-regulating MHC class I expression in situ in a normal, neuroectoderm-derived human tissue, we show that ectopic MHC class I expression in human anagen hair bulbs can be normalized by treatment with alpha-MSH, IGF-1, or TGF-beta1, all of which are locally generated, as well as by FK506. These agents are promising candidates for immune privilege restoration and for suppressing MHC class I expression where this is clinically desired (eg, in alopecia areata, multiple sclerosis, autoimmune uveitis, mumps orchitis, and fetal or allograft rejection). PMID:14742267

  1. Spectrum of MHC Class II Variability in Darwin’s Finches and Their Close Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Akie; Tichy, Herbert; Grant, Peter R.; Grant, B. Rosemary; Sato, Tetsuji; O’hUigin, Colm

    2011-01-01

    The study describes >400 major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B exon 2 and 114 intron 2 sequences of 36 passerine bird species, 13 of which belong to the group of Darwin’s finches (DFs) and the remaining 23 to close or more distant relatives of DFs in Central and South America. The data set is analyzed by a combination of judiciously selected statistical methods. The analysis reveals that reliable information concerning MHC organization, including the assignment of sequences to loci, and evolution, as well as the process of species divergence, can be obtained in the absence of genomic sequence data, if the analysis is taken several steps beyond the standard phylogenetic tree construction approach. The main findings of the present study are these: The MHC class II B region of the passerine birds is as elaborate in its organization, divergence, and genetic diversity as the MHC of the eutherian mammals, specifically the primates. Hence, the reported simplicity of the fowl MHC is an oddity. With the help of appropriate markers, the divergence of the MHC genes can be traced deep in the phylogeny of the bird taxa. Transspecies polymorphism is rampant at many of the bird MHC loci. In this respect, the DFs behave as if they were a single, genetically undifferentiated population. There is thus far no indication of alleles that could be considered species, genus, or even DF group specific. The implication of these findings is that DFs are in the midst of adaptive radiations, in which morphological differentiation into species is running ahead of genetic differentiation in genetic systems such as the MHC or the mitochondrial DNA. The radiations are so young that there has not been enough time to sort out polymorphisms at most of the loci among the morphologically differentiating species. These findings parallel those on Lake Victoria haplochromine fishes. Several of the DF MHC allelic lineages can be traced back to the MHC genes of the species Tiaris obscura

  2. Reversion of a transcriptionally defective MHC class II-negative human B-cell mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Ombra, M N; Perfetto, C; Autiero, M; Anzisi, A M; Pasquinelli, R; Maffei, A; Del Pozzo, G; Guardiola, J

    1993-01-01

    RJ2.2.5, a mutant derived from the human B-lymphoma cell, Raji, is unable to express the MHC class II genes because of a recessive transcriptional defect attributed to the lack of an activator function. We report the isolation of a RJ2.2.5 revertant, namely AR, in which the expression of the mRNAs encoded by these genes is restored. Comparison of the binding of nuclear extracts or of partially purified nuclear preparations from the wild-type, the mutant and the revertant cells to a conserved MHC class II promoter element, the X-box, showed no alteration in the mobility of the complexes thus formed. However, in extracts from RJ2.2.5, and other MHC class II negative cell lines, such as HeLa, the amount of complex observed was significantly higher than in wild-type Raji cells. Furthermore, the binding activity exhibited by the AR revertant was lower than that of the RJ2.2.5 and higher than that of Raji. The use of specific monoclonal antibodies indicated that in all cases c-Jun and c-Fos or antigenically related proteins were required for binding. An inverse correlation between the level of DNA-protein complex formed and the level of MHC class II gene mRNA expressed in the three cell lines was apparent, suggesting that overexpression of a DNA binding factor forming complexes with class II promoter elements may cause repression of MHC class II transcription. A model which reconciles the previously ascertained recessivity of the phenotype of the mutation carried by RJ2.2.5 with the findings reported here is discussed. Images PMID:8441650

  3. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In all vertebrate animals, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are controlled by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules, which are highly polymorphic peptide receptors selecting and presenting endogenously derived epitopes to circulating cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs). The polymorp...

  4. High-resolution analysis of the murine MHC class II immunopeptidome.

    PubMed

    Sofron, Adriana; Ritz, Danilo; Neri, Dario; Fugmann, Tim

    2016-02-01

    The reliable identification of peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II is fundamental for the study of the host immune response against pathogens and the pathogenesis of autoimmune conditions. Here, we describe an improved methodology combining immuno-affinity enrichment of MHC class II complexes, optimized elution conditions and quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometry-based characterization of the immunopeptidome. The methodology allowed the identification of over 1000 peptides with 1% false discovery rate from 10(8) murine A20 lymphoma cells. The study revealed the I-A(d) -specific motif in high resolution after multisequence alignment. The methodology was generally applied to the purification of MHC class II from cell lines and murine spleens. We identified 2963 peptides from BALB/c and 2712 from C57BL/6 mouse spleens. The identification of peptides bound to MHC class II in vitro and in vivo will facilitate the characterization of T-cell specificities, as well as the development of biotherapeutics and vaccines. PMID:26495903

  5. AN MHC class I immune evasion gene of Marek's disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a widespread a-herpesvirus of chickens that causes T cell tumors. Acute, but not latent, MDV infection has previously been shown to lead to downregulation of cell-surface MHC class I (Virology 282:198–205 (2001)), but the gene(s) involved have not been identified. Here...

  6. An MHC Class I Immune Evasion Gene of Marek's Disease Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s Disease Virus (MDV) is a widespread pathogen of chickens that causes T cell tumors. Acute, but not latent, MDV infection has previously been shown to lead to MHC class I down-regulation (Virology 282:198–205 (2001)), but the gene(s)involved have not been identified. Here we demonstrate tha...

  7. Characterization of anti-channel catfish MHC class II monoclonal antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study characterizes four monoclonal antibodies (mAb) developed against the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II beta chain of the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. Immunoprecipitations using catfish clonal B cells revealed that each of these mAbs immunoselected proteins of appro...

  8. Macroautophagy in Endogenous Processing of Self- and Pathogen-Derived Antigens for MHC Class II Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Duraes, Fernanda V.; Niven, Jennifer; Dubrot, Juan; Hugues, Stéphanie; Gannagé, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Although autophagy is a process that has been studied for several years its link with antigen presentation and T cell immunity has only recently emerged. Autophagy, which means “self-eating,” is important to maintain cell homeostasis and refers to a collection of mechanisms that delivers intracellular material for degradation into lysosomes. Among them, macroautophagy pathway has many implications in different biological processes, including innate and adaptive immunity. In particular, macroautophagy can provide a substantial source of intracellular antigens for loading onto MHC class II molecules using the alternative MHC class II pathway. Through autophagosomes, endogenous self-antigens as well as antigens derived from intracellular pathogens can be delivered to MHC class II compartment and presented to CD4+ T cells. The pathway will, therefore, impact both peripheral T cell tolerance and the pathogen specific immune response. This review will describe the contribution of autophagy to intracellular presentation of endogenous self- or pathogen-derived antigens via MHC class II and its consequences on CD4+ T cell responses. PMID:26441964

  9. Characterization and expression of MHC class II alpha and II beta genes in mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyan; Tan, Shangjin; Cai, Zhonghua

    2015-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II plays a key role in adaptive immunity by presenting foreign peptides to CD4(+) T cells and by triggering the adaptive immune response. While the structure and function of MHC class II have been well characterized in mammalian, limited research has been done on fishes. In this study, we characterized the gene structure and expression of MHC class II α (Lunar-DAA) and II β (Lunar-DAB) of mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus). Both genes shared, respectively, a high similarity and typical features with other vertebrate MHC class II α and II β. The phylogenetic analysis of the deduced peptides revealed that both Lunar-DAA and Lunar-DAB were located in the teleost subclass. Western blotting analyses indicated that both MHC class II α and II β were expressed ubiquitously in immune-related cells, tissues and organs, and that MHC class II α and II β chains existed mainly as heterodimers. While it was highly expressed in gills, thymus, head kidney (HK), spleen, head kidney macrophage and spleen leucocytes, MHC class II β chain was expressed with a low abundance in skin, intestine, stomach and heart. The highest expression of MHC class II β in thymus confirmed the conclusion that thymus is one of the primary lymphoid organs in fishes. The detection of MHC class II αβ dimers in HK macrophages and spleen leucocytes indicated that HK macrophages and spleen leucocytes play a critical role in the adaptive immunity in fishes. All these results provide valuable information for understanding the structure of MHC class II α and II β and their function in immune responses. PMID:26454477

  10. Monitoring peptide processing for MHC class I molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Shastri, Nilabh; Nagarajan, Niranjana; Lind, Kristin C; Kanaseki, Takayuki

    2014-02-01

    Classical MHC class I molecules open a window into the cell by presenting intracellular peptides (pMHC I) on the surface. The peptides are used for immune surveillance by circulating CD8+ T and NK cells to detect and eliminate infected or tumor cells. Not surprisingly, viruses and tumor cells have evolved immune evasion mechanisms to keep the window shades down and the cytotoxic cells oblivious to their presence. Here, we review counter mechanisms that nevertheless allow the immune system to detect and eliminate cells unable to properly process antigenic peptides in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:24556408

  11. Horse cDNA clones encoding two MHC class I genes

    SciTech Connect

    Barbis, D.P.; Maher, J.K.; Stanek, J.; Klaunberg, B.A.; Antczak, D.F.

    1994-12-31

    Two full-length clones encoding MHC class I genes were isolated by screening a horse cDNA library, using a probe encoding in human HLA-A2.2Y allele. The library was made in the pcDNA1 vector (Invitrogen, San Diego, CA), using mRNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from a Thoroughbred stallion (No. 0834) homozygous for a common horse MHC haplotype (ELA-A2, -B2, -D2; Antczak et al. 1984; Donaldson et al. 1988). The clones were sequenced, using SP6 and T7 universal primers and horse-specific oligonucleotides designed to extend previously determined sequences.

  12. Prediction of peptides binding to MHC class I and II alleles by temporal motif mining

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MHC (Major Histocompatibility Complex) is a key player in the immune response of most vertebrates. The computational prediction of whether a given antigenic peptide will bind to a specific MHC allele is important in the development of vaccines for emerging pathogens, the creation of possibilities for controlling immune response, and for the applications of immunotherapy. One of the problems that make this computational prediction difficult is the detection of the binding core region in peptides, coupled with the presence of bulges and loops causing variations in the total sequence length. Most machine learning methods require the sequences to be of the same length to successfully discover the binding motifs, ignoring the length variance in both motif mining and prediction steps. In order to overcome this limitation, we propose the use of time-based motif mining methods that work position-independently. Results The prediction method was tested on a benchmark set of 28 different alleles for MHC class I and 27 different alleles for MHC class II. The obtained results are comparable to the state of the art methods for both MHC classes, surpassing the published results for some alleles. The average prediction AUC values are 0.897 for class I, and 0.858 for class II. Conclusions Temporal motif mining using partial periodic patterns can capture information about the sequences well enough to predict the binding of the peptides and is comparable to state of the art methods in the literature. Unlike neural networks or matrix based predictors, our proposed method does not depend on peptide length and can work with both short and long fragments. This advantage allows better use of the available training data and the prediction of peptides of uncommon lengths. PMID:23368521

  13. Expressed MHC class II genes in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from geographically disparate populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, L.; Aldridge, B.M.; Miles, A.K.; Stott, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is central to maintaining the immunologic vigor of individuals and populations. Classical MHC class II genes were targeted for partial sequencing in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from populations in California, Washington, and Alaska. Sequences derived from sea otter peripheral blood leukocyte mRNAs were similar to those classified as DQA, DQB, DRA, and DRB in other species. Comparisons of the derived amino acid compositions supported the classification of these as functional molecules from at least one DQA, DQB, and DRA locus and at least two DRB loci. While limited in scope, phylogenetic analysis of the DRB peptide-binding region suggested the possible existence of distinct clades demarcated by geographic region. These preliminary findings support the need for additional MHC gene sequencing and expansion to a comprehensive study targeting additional otters. ?? 2006 Blackwell Munksgaard.

  14. Influence of kinship and MHC class II genotype on visual traits in zebrafish larvae (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Hinz, Cornelia; Gebhardt, Katharina; Hartmann, Alexander K; Sigman, Lauren; Gerlach, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Kin recognition can drive kin selection and the evolution of social behaviour. In zebrafish (Danio rerio, Hamilton 1822), kin recognition is based on olfactory and visual imprinting processes. If larvae are exposed to visual and chemical cues of kin at day 5 and 6 post fertilization they will recognize kin throughout life, while exposure to non-kin fails to trigger any recognition. Chemical imprinting signals are transcribed by polymorphic genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) code; however, the underlying mechanism for visual imprinting remains unclear. Here we provide evidence for the existence of family-specific differences in morphometry and pigmentation pattern of six day old zebrafish larvae. While rump, tail and body pigmentation were dependent on relatedness, iris pigmentation and morphometry were also influenced by MHC class II genotype. Our study revealed that the MHC not only influences the chemical signature of individuals, but also their visual appearance. PMID:23251449

  15. Differential Effects of a Saturated and a Monounsaturated Fatty Acid on MHC Class I Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, S. R.; Mitchell, D.; Carroll, E.; Li, M.; Schneck, J.; Edidin, M.

    2009-01-01

    Lipid overload, associated with metabolic disorders, occurs when fatty acids accumulate in non-adipose tissues. Cells of these tissues use major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to present antigen to T cells in order to eliminate pathogens. As obesity is associated with impaired immune responses, we tested the hypothesis that the early stages of lipid overload with saturated fatty acids (SFA) alters MHC class I antigen presentation. Antigen presenting cells (APC) were treated with either the saturated palmitic acid (PA), abundant in the high fat Western diet, or the monounsaturated oleic acid (OA), a component of the Mediterranean diet. PA-treatment lowered APC lysis by activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes and inhibited APC ability to stimulate naïve T cells. Inhibition of immune responses with PA was due to a significant reduction in MHC class I surface expression, inhibition in the rate of APC–T-cell conjugation, and lowering of plasma membrane F-actin levels. OA-treatment had no effect on antigen presentation and upon exposure with PA, prevented the phenotypic effects of PA. OA-treatment conferred protection against changes in antigen presentation by accumulating fatty acids into triglyceride-rich lipid droplets of APC. Our findings establish for the first time a link between the early stages of lipid overload and antigen presentation and suggest that dietary SFA could impair immunity by affecting MHC I-mediated antigen presentation; this could be prevented, paradoxically, by accumulation of triglycerides rich in monounsaturated fatty acids. PMID:18533931

  16. Differential effects of a saturated and a monounsaturated fatty acid on MHC class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, S R; Mitchell, D; Carroll, E; Li, M; Schneck, J; Edidin, M

    2008-07-01

    Lipid overload, associated with metabolic disorders, occurs when fatty acids accumulate in non-adipose tissues. Cells of these tissues use major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to present antigen to T cells in order to eliminate pathogens. As obesity is associated with impaired immune responses, we tested the hypothesis that the early stages of lipid overload with saturated fatty acids (SFA) alters MHC class I antigen presentation. Antigen presenting cells (APC) were treated with either the saturated palmitic acid (PA), abundant in the high fat Western diet, or the monounsaturated oleic acid (OA), a component of the Mediterranean diet. PA-treatment lowered APC lysis by activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes and inhibited APC ability to stimulate naïve T cells. Inhibition of immune responses with PA was due to a significant reduction in MHC class I surface expression, inhibition in the rate of APC-T-cell conjugation, and lowering of plasma membrane F-actin levels. OA-treatment had no effect on antigen presentation and upon exposure with PA, prevented the phenotypic effects of PA. OA-treatment conferred protection against changes in antigen presentation by accumulating fatty acids into triglyceride-rich lipid droplets of APC. Our findings establish for the first time a link between the early stages of lipid overload and antigen presentation and suggest that dietary SFA could impair immunity by affecting MHC I-mediated antigen presentation; this could be prevented, paradoxically, by accumulation of triglycerides rich in monounsaturated fatty acids. PMID:18533931

  17. Susceptibility of amphibians to chytridiomycosis is associated with MHC class II conformation.

    PubMed

    Bataille, Arnaud; Cashins, Scott D; Grogan, Laura; Skerratt, Lee F; Hunter, David; McFadden, Michael; Scheele, Benjamin; Brannelly, Laura A; Macris, Amy; Harlow, Peter S; Bell, Sara; Berger, Lee; Waldman, Bruce

    2015-04-22

    The pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) can cause precipitous population declines in its amphibian hosts. Responses of individuals to infection vary greatly with the capacity of their immune system to respond to the pathogen. We used a combination of comparative and experimental approaches to identify major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) alleles encoding molecules that foster the survival of Bd-infected amphibians. We found that Bd-resistant amphibians across four continents share common amino acids in three binding pockets of the MHC-II antigen-binding groove. Moreover, strong signals of selection acting on these specific sites were evident among all species co-existing with the pathogen. In the laboratory, we experimentally inoculated Australian tree frogs with Bd to test how each binding pocket conformation influences disease resistance. Only the conformation of MHC-II pocket 9 of surviving subjects matched those of Bd-resistant species. This MHC-II conformation thus may determine amphibian resistance to Bd, although other MHC-II binding pockets also may contribute to resistance. Rescuing amphibian biodiversity will depend on our understanding of amphibian immune defence mechanisms against Bd. The identification of adaptive genetic markers for Bd resistance represents an important step forward towards that goal. PMID:25808889

  18. Identification, inheritance, and linkage of B-G-like and MHC class I genes in cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarvi, S.I.; Goto, R.M.; Gee, G.F.; Briles, W.E.; Miller, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    We identified B-G-like genes in the whooping and Florida sandhill cranes and linked them to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We evaluated the inheritance of B-G-like genes in families of whooping and Florida sandhill cranes using restriction fragment patterns (RFPs). Two B-G-like genes, designated wcbgl and wcbg2, were located within 8 kb of one another. The fully sequenced wcbg2 gene encodes a B-G IgV-like domain, an additional Ig-like domain, a transmembrane domain, and a single heptad domain typical of '-helical coiled coils. Patterns of restriction fragments in DNA from the whooping crane and from a number of other species indicate that the B-G-like gene families of cranes are large with diverse sequences. Segregation of RFPs in families of Florida sandhill cranes provide evidence for genetic polymorphism in the B-G-like genes. The restriction fragments generally segregated in concert with MHC haplotypes assigned by serological typing and by single stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) assays based in the second exon of the crane MHC class I genes. This study supports the concept of a long-term association of polymorphic B-G-like genes with the MHC. It also establishes SSCP as a means for evaluating MHC genetic variability in cranes.

  19. Susceptibility of amphibians to chytridiomycosis is associated with MHC class II conformation

    PubMed Central

    Bataille, Arnaud; Cashins, Scott D.; Grogan, Laura; Skerratt, Lee F.; Hunter, David; McFadden, Michael; Scheele, Benjamin; Brannelly, Laura A.; Macris, Amy; Harlow, Peter S.; Bell, Sara; Berger, Lee; Waldman, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) can cause precipitous population declines in its amphibian hosts. Responses of individuals to infection vary greatly with the capacity of their immune system to respond to the pathogen. We used a combination of comparative and experimental approaches to identify major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) alleles encoding molecules that foster the survival of Bd-infected amphibians. We found that Bd-resistant amphibians across four continents share common amino acids in three binding pockets of the MHC-II antigen-binding groove. Moreover, strong signals of selection acting on these specific sites were evident among all species co-existing with the pathogen. In the laboratory, we experimentally inoculated Australian tree frogs with Bd to test how each binding pocket conformation influences disease resistance. Only the conformation of MHC-II pocket 9 of surviving subjects matched those of Bd-resistant species. This MHC-II conformation thus may determine amphibian resistance to Bd, although other MHC-II binding pockets also may contribute to resistance. Rescuing amphibian biodiversity will depend on our understanding of amphibian immune defence mechanisms against Bd. The identification of adaptive genetic markers for Bd resistance represents an important step forward towards that goal. PMID:25808889

  20. MHC class II transcription is associated with inflammatory responses in a wild marine mammal.

    PubMed

    Montano-Frías, Jorge E; Vera-Massieu, Camila; Álvarez-Martínez, Roberto; Flores-Morán, Adriana; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation is one of the most important non-specific and rapid responses that a vertebrate can elicit in response to damage or a foreign insult. To date, despite increasing evidence that the innate and adaptive branches of immunity are more intricately related than previously thought, few have examined interactions between the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC, a polymorphic region of the vertebrate genome that is involved with antigen presentation) and inflammation, and even less is known about these interactions in an eco-immunological context. Here, we examined the effect of MHC class II DRB gene multiplicity and transcription on phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced inflammation during the early stages of development of California sea lions. Neither constitutive nor expressed ZacaDRB diversity was found to be associated with pup responses to PHA at any of the stages of pup development. However, for two-month-old pups, those with a specific MHC-DRB locus (ZacaDRB-A) tended to have less efficient responsive inflammation. Transcription of distinct MHC-DRB loci was also linked to PHA-induced inflammation, with patterns that varied markedly between ages, and that suggested that ongoing infectious processes could limit the capacity to respond to a secondary challenge. Life history constraints and physiological processes associated with development of California sea lions, in conjunction with their changing pathogenic environment could explain the observed effects of MHC class II transcription on PHA-induced inflammation. To our knowledge, ours is the first study to examine the importance of expressed vs. constitutive MHC loci on inflammation in a natural population. PMID:27137083

  1. Immunotherapy augments the effect of 5-azacytidine on HPV16-associated tumours with different MHC class I-expression status

    PubMed Central

    Šímová, J; Polláková, V; Indrová, M; Mikyšková, R; Bieblová, J; Štěpánek, I; Bubeník, J; Reiniš, M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Epigenetic mechanisms have important roles in the tumour escape from immune responses, such as in MHC class I downregulation or altered expression of other components involved in antigen presentation. Chemotherapy with DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTi) can thus influence the tumour cell interactions with the immune system and their sensitivity to immunotherapy. Methods: We evaluated the therapeutic effects of the DNMTi 5-azacytidine (5AC) against experimental MHC class I-deficient and -positive tumours. The 5AC therapy was combined with immunotherapy, using a murine model for HPV16-associated tumours. Results: We have demonstrated 5AC additive effects against MHC class I-positive and -deficient tumours when combined with unmethylated CpG oligodeoxynucleotides or with IL-12-producing cellular vaccine. The efficacy of the combined chemoimmunotherapy against originally MHC class I-deficient tumours was partially dependent on the CD8+-mediated immune responses. Increased cell surface expression of MHC class I cell molecules, associated with upregulation of the antigen-presenting machinery-related genes, as well as of genes encoding selected components of the IFNγ-signalling pathway in tumours explanted from 5AC-treated animals, were observed. Conclusion: Our data suggest that chemotherapy of MHC class I-deficient tumours with 5AC combined with immunotherapy is an attractive setting in the treatment of MHC class I-deficient tumours. PMID:22015556

  2. Pan-Specific Prediction of Peptide-MHC Class I Complex Stability, a Correlate of T Cell Immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Michael; Fenoy, Emilio; Harndahl, Mikkel; Kristensen, Anne Bregnballe; Nielsen, Ida Kallehauge; Nielsen, Morten; Buus, Søren

    2016-08-15

    Binding of peptides to MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules is the most selective event in the processing and presentation of Ags to CTL, and insights into the mechanisms that govern peptide-MHC-I binding should facilitate our understanding of CTL biology. Peptide-MHC-I interactions have traditionally been quantified by the strength of the interaction, that is, the binding affinity, yet it has been shown that the stability of the peptide-MHC-I complex is a better correlate of immunogenicity compared with binding affinity. In this study, we have experimentally analyzed peptide-MHC-I complex stability of a large panel of human MHC-I allotypes and generated a body of data sufficient to develop a neural network-based pan-specific predictor of peptide-MHC-I complex stability. Integrating the neural network predictors of peptide-MHC-I complex stability with state-of-the-art predictors of peptide-MHC-I binding is shown to significantly improve the prediction of CTL epitopes. The method is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCstabpan. PMID:27402703

  3. Dual MHC class I and class II restriction of a single T cell receptor: distinct modes of tolerance induction by two classes of autoantigens.

    PubMed

    Arsov, I; Vukmanović, S

    1999-02-15

    In the final stages of thymic development, immature T cells undergo three distinct processes (positive selection, negative selection, and lineage commitment) that all depend on interactions of thymocyte TCRs with MHC molecules. It is currently thought that TCRs are preferentially restricted by either MHC class I or class II molecules. In this report, we present direct evidence that the TCR previously described as H-Y/H-2Db specific cross-reacts with H-2IAb if expressed in CD4+ cells. We also demonstrate an increase in thymocyte numbers in H-Y TCR-trangenic mice deficient in MHC class II, suggesting a relatively discrete form of negative selection by MHC class II compared with that induced by H-Y/H-2Db. We propose that inability to generate CD4+ T cells expressing H-Y TCR in different experimental settings may be due to tolerance to self-MHC class II. These results, therefore, support an intriguing possibility that tolerance to self may influence and/or interfere with the outcome of the lineage commitment. PMID:9973472

  4. MHC Class II Auto-Antigen Presentation is Unconventional

    PubMed Central

    Sadegh-Nasseri, Scheherazade; Kim, AeRyon

    2015-01-01

    Antigen presentation is highly critical in adoptive immunity. Only by interacting with antigens presented by major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, helper T cells can be stimulated to fight infections or diseases. The degradation of a full protein into small peptide fragments bound to class II molecules is a dynamic, lengthy process consisting of many steps and chaperons. Deregulation in any step of antigen processing could lead to the development of self-reactive T cells or defective immune response to pathogens. Indeed, human leukocyte antigens class II genes are the predominant contributors to susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. Conventional antigen-processing calls for internalization of extracellular antigens followed by processing and epitope selection within antigen-processing subcellular compartments, enriched with all necessary accessory molecules, processing enzymes, and proper pH and denaturing conditions. However, recent data examining the temporal relationship between antigen uptakes, processing, and epitope selection revealed unexpected characteristics for auto-antigenic epitopes, which were not shared with antigenic epitopes from pathogens. This review provides a discussion of the relevance of these findings to the mechanisms of autoimmunity. PMID:26257739

  5. Vaccinia Virus A35R Inhibits MHC Class II Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Kristina E.; Connor, Ramsey F.; Jones, Gwendolyn J.B.; Yimbu, Kenneth; Roper, Rachel L.

    2009-01-01

    The Vaccinia virus gene A35R (Copenhagen designation) is highly conserved in mammalian-tropic poxviruses and is an important virulence factor, but its function was unknown. We show herein that A35 does not affect viral infectivity, apoptosis induction, or replication; however, we found that A35 significantly inhibited MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation, immune priming of T lymphocytes, and subsequent chemokine and cytokine synthesis. A35 localized to endosomes and reduced the amount of a model antigenic peptide displayed in the cleft of class II MHC. In addition, A35 decreased VV specific T cell responses in vivo. Thus, this is the first report identifying a function for the A35 protein in virulence as well as the first report identifying a VV gene that inhibits peptide antigen presentation. PMID:19954808

  6. MHC class II B diversity in blue tits: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Juan Rivero-de; Schut, Elske; Merino, Santiago; Martínez, Javier; Komdeur, Jan; Westerdahl, Helena

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we partly characterize major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B in the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus). A total of 22 individuals from three different European locations: Spain, The Netherlands, and Sweden were screened for MHC allelic diversity. The MHC genes were investigated using both PCR-based methods and unamplified genomic DNA with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and southern blots. A total of 13 different exon 2 sequences were obtained independently from DNA and/or RNA, thus confirming gene transcription and likely functionality of the genes. Nine out of 13 alleles were found in more than one country, and two alleles appeared in all countries. Positive selection was detected in the region coding for the peptide binding region (PBR). A maximum of three alleles per individual was detected by sequencing and the RFLP pattern consisted of 4–7 fragments, indicating a minimum number of 2–4 loci per individual. A phylogenetic analysis, demonstrated that the blue tit sequences are divergent compared to sequences from other passerines resembling a different MHC lineage than those possessed by most passerines studied to date. PMID:23919136

  7. Intestinal immunization of mice with antigen conjugated to anti-MHC class II antibodies.

    PubMed

    Estrada, A; McDermott, M R; Underdown, B J; Snider, D P

    1995-07-01

    We have explored a new technique for immunization of the intestinal tract of mice, using protein antigens bound to antibodies with specificity for murine MHC class II molecules (MHC-II). Either of two protein antigens, hen avidin (AV) or hen egg lysozyme (HEL) were covalently conjugated to anti-MHC-II antibodies and the purified conjugates were given orally (p.o.) or by direct intraduodenal (i.d.) injection into the intestinal lumen of mice. A secondary immunization p.o. with the same conjugate or with the non-conjugated antigen in the presence of cholera toxin (CTX) resulted in production of both intestinal secretory IgA and serum IgA antibody by those mice. In addition, serum IgG antibodies were produced. Conjugates with appropriate MHC-II specificity targeted the antigen because they induced more IgA and IgG antibody than conjugates with irrelevant antibody specificity or antigen alone, and because they induced antibody in mice that were genetic low responders to antigen. The results indicate the feasibility of oral subunit type vaccines with antibody targeting technology. PMID:7483762

  8. The Minor MHC Class I Gene UDA of Ducks Is Regulated by Let-7 MicroRNA.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wing Fuk; Parks-Dely, Julie A; Magor, Brad G; Magor, Katharine E

    2016-08-15

    In many nonmammalian vertebrates, the genomic organization of the MHC class I region leads to biased expression of a single classical MHC class I gene coevolving with TAP transporters, whereas class I genes are poorly expressed. This contrasts to the three codominantly expressed classical MHC class I genes in humans and mice. In a sequenced haplotype from White Pekin duck, Anas platyrhynchos, there is one predominantly expressed MHC class I, UAA, although they have five MHC class I genes in the complex, arranged TAP1-TAP2-UAA-UBA-UCA-UDA-UEA The UAA gene, situated proximal to the TAP2 gene, is expressed at levels 10-fold greater than that of another expressed gene, UDA. Three duck MHC class I genes (UBA, UCA, and UEA) are predicted to be partially or completely inactivated by promoter defects, introduction of in-frame stop codon, or the lack of a polyadenylation signal. In this study, we confirm that UBA, UCA, and UEA are indeed inactivated through genetic defects at the promoter, whereas UAA and UDA have functionally equivalent promoters. To examine promoter accessibility, we performed bisulfite sequencing and show that none of the MHC class I promoters are inactivated by methylation. We determine that UDA is differentially regulated through its 3' untranslated region. Namely, expression of UDA is downregulated by let-7 microRNA, whereas the predominantly expressed MHC class I UAA is not. Regulation of UDA by let-7 microRNA suggests that the lower expression level is maintained for its function in immunity. PMID:27430716

  9. Paired immunoglobulin-like receptors and their MHC class I recognition.

    PubMed

    Takai, Toshiyuki

    2005-08-01

    The immunoglobulin-like receptors provide positive and negative regulation of immune cells upon recognition of various ligands, thus enabling those cells to respond properly to extrinsic stimuli. Murine paired immunoglobulin-like receptor (PIR)-A and PIR-B, a typical receptor pair of the immunoglobulin-like receptor family, are expressed on a wide range of cells in the immune system, such as B cells, mast cells, macrophages and dendritic cells, mostly in a pair-wise fashion. The PIR-A requires the homodimeric Fc receptor common gamma chain for its efficient cell-surface expression and for the delivery of an activation signal. In contrast, PIR-B inhibits receptor-mediated activation signals in vitro upon engagement with other activating-type receptors, such as the antigen receptor on B cells and the high-affinity Fc receptor for immunoglobulin E on mast cells. Recent identification of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules as the physiological ligands for PIR has enabled us to attribute various immunological phenotypes observed in PIR-B-deficient mice to the consequences of the absence of a balanced interaction between PIR and MHC class I molecules expressed ubiquitously. Thus, PIR-A and PIR-B constitute a novel and physiologically important MHC class I recognition system. PMID:16011512

  10. Intracellular recycling and cross-presentation by MHC class I molecules.

    PubMed

    van Endert, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Cross-presentation of internalized antigens by dendritic cells requires efficient delivery of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules to peptide-loading compartments. Strong evidence suggests that such loading can occur outside of the endoplasmic reticulum; however, the trafficking pathways and sources of class I molecules involved are poorly understood. Examination of non-professional, non-phagocytic cells has revealed a clathrin-independent, Arf6-dependent recycling pathway likely traveled by internalized optimally loaded (closed) class I molecules. Some closed and all open MHC class I molecules travel to late endosomes to be degraded but might also partly be re-loaded with peptides and recycled. Studies of viral interference revealed pathways in which class I molecules are directed to degradation in lysosomes upon ubiquitination at the surface, or upon AP-1 and HIV-nef-dependent misrouting from the Golgi network to lysosomes. While many observations made in non-professional cells remain to be re-examined in dendritic cells, available evidence suggests that both recycling and neo-synthesized class I molecules can be loaded with cross-presented peptides. Recycling molecules can be recruited to phagosomes triggered by innate signals such as TLR4 ligands, and may therefore specialize in loading with phagocytosed antigens. In contrast, AP-1-dependent accumulation at, or trafficking through, a Golgi compartment of newly synthesized molecules appears to be important for cross-presentation of soluble proteins and possibly of long peptides that are processed in the so-called vacuolar pathway. However, significant cell biological work will be required to confirm this or any other model and to integrate knowledge on MHC class I biochemistry and trafficking in models of CD8(+) T-cell priming by dendritic cells. PMID:27319344

  11. Equine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells are heterogeneous in MHC class II expression and capable of inciting an immune response in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The horse is a valuable species to assess the effect of allogeneic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in regenerative treatments. No studies to date have examined recipient response to major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched equine MSCs. The purposes of this study were to immunophenotype MSCs from horses of known MHC haplotype and to compare the immunogenicity of MSCs with differing MHC class II expression. Methods MSCs and peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) were obtained from Thoroughbred horses (n = 10) of known MHC haplotype (ELA-A2, -A3, and -A9 homozygotes). MSCs were cultured through P8; cells from each passage (P2 to P8) were cryopreserved until used. Immunophenotyping of MHC class I and II, CD44, CD29, CD90, LFA-1, and CD45RB was performed by using flow cytometry. Tri-lineage differentiation assays were performed to confirm MSC multipotency. Recombinant equine IFN-γ was used to stimulate MHC class II negative MSCs in culture, after which expression of MHC class II was re-examined. To assess the ability of MHC class II negative or positive MSCs to stimulate an immune response, modified one-way mixed leukocyte reactions (MLRs) were performed by using MHC-matched and mismatched responder PBLs and stimulator PBLs or MSCs. Proliferation of gated CFSE-labeled CD3+ responder T cells was evaluated via CFSE attenuation by using flow cytometry and reported as the number of cells in the proliferating T-cell gate. Results MSCs varied widely in MHC class II expression despite being homogenous in terms of “stemness” marker expression and ability to undergo trilineage differentiation. Stimulation of MHC class II negative MSCs with IFN-γ resulted in markedly increased expression of MHC class II. MLR results revealed that MHC-mismatched MHC class II-positive MSCs caused significantly increased responder T-cell proliferation compared with MHC-mismatched MHC class II-negative and MHC-matched MSCs, and equivalent to that of the positive control of

  12. DPA1*02012: A DPA1*0201-related Mhc class II allele in West Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, C.G.; May, J.; Spauke, D.; Schnittger, L.

    1994-12-31

    DNA techniques such as sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe (SSOP) hybridizations, restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses, and DNA sequencing have greatly supported the characterization of Mhc class II allelic polymorphism. Here the authors describe a DPA 1 allele which has been identified in two male individuals from Liberia and Benin, West Africa, during a survey study on Mhc class II associations with the different manifestations after infection with Onchocerca volvulus. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Cell-Extrinsic MHC Class I Molecule Engagement Augments Human NK Cell Education Programmed by Cell-Intrinsic MHC Class I.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Jeanette E; Liu, Xiao-Rong; Zhao, Zeguo; Zhang, Aaron; Shultz, Leonard D; Greiner, Dale L; Dupont, Bo; Hsu, Katharine C

    2016-08-16

    The effector potential of NK cells is counterbalanced by their sensitivity to inhibition by "self" MHC class I molecules in a process called "education." In humans, interactions between inhibitory killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and human MHC (HLA) mediate NK cell education. In HLA-B(∗)27:05(+) transgenic mice and in patients undergoing HLA-mismatched hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), NK cells derived from human CD34(+) stem cells were educated by HLA from both donor hematopoietic cells and host stromal cells. Furthermore, mature human KIR3DL1(+) NK cells gained reactivity after adoptive transfer to HLA-B(∗)27:05(+) mice or bone marrow chimeric mice where HLA-B(∗)27:05 was restricted to either the hematopoietic or stromal compartment. Silencing of HLA in primary NK cells diminished NK cell reactivity, while acquisition of HLA from neighboring cells increased NK cell reactivity. Altogether, these findings reveal roles for cell-extrinsic HLA in driving NK cell reactivity upward, and cell-intrinsic HLA in maintaining NK cell education. PMID:27496730

  14. IL-33 promotes MHC class II expression in murine mast cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomonobu; Egusa, Chizu; Maeda, Tatsuo; Numata, Takafumi; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2015-09-01

    Mast cells (MCs), recognized as tissue-resident cells of hematopoietic origin, are involved in cellular and pathological manifestations of allergic disorders including atopic dermatitis. IL-33, a member of the IL-1 cytokine family, activates Th2-type immune responses, and promotes the degranulation and maturation of MCs. However, it is uncertain whether IL-33 treatment induces mature mast cells to acquire the characteristics of the monocyte-dendritic cell lineage.We investigated the effect of IL-33 on the MHC class II expression and function of murine mast cells. IL-33-treated mature murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) were analyzed by FACS, real-time PCR, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, and Western blotting. The morphology and degranulation activity of BMMCs and T-cell activation by BMMCs were also examined. BMMCs treated with IL-33 for 10 days induced cell surface expression of the MHC class II protein, whereas the expression of FcεRI and c-kit was not affected by IL-33. The expression of CIITA, driven from pIII and pIV, was up-regulated in IL-33-treated BMMCs. The amount of PU.1 mRNA and protein significantly increased in IL-33-treated BMMCs. The ChIP assay showed PU.1 binding to CIITA pIII, and enhanced histone acetylation due to IL-33 treatment. Syngeneic T cells were activated by co-culture with IL-33-treated BMMCs, although the expression of the co-stimulatory molecules, CD40, CD80, CD86, and PDL-1, was not detected. Mast cells express MHC class II after prolonged exposure to IL-33, probably due to enhanced recruitment of PU.1 to CIITA pIII, resulting in transactivation of CIITA and MHC class II. IL-33 is an important cytokine in allergic disorders. Mast cells have the ability to express MHC class II after prolonged exposure to IL-33 in a murine model. IL-33 holds a key to understanding the etiology of atopic dermatitis. PMID:26417437

  15. IL-33 promotes MHC class II expression in murine mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tomonobu; Egusa, Chizu; Maeda, Tatsuo; Numata, Takafumi; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs), recognized as tissue-resident cells of hematopoietic origin, are involved in cellular and pathological manifestations of allergic disorders including atopic dermatitis. IL-33, a member of the IL-1 cytokine family, activates Th2-type immune responses, and promotes the degranulation and maturation of MCs. However, it is uncertain whether IL-33 treatment induces mature mast cells to acquire the characteristics of the monocyte-dendritic cell lineage.We investigated the effect of IL-33 on the MHC class II expression and function of murine mast cells. IL-33-treated mature murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) were analyzed by FACS, real-time PCR, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, and Western blotting. The morphology and degranulation activity of BMMCs and T-cell activation by BMMCs were also examined. BMMCs treated with IL-33 for 10 days induced cell surface expression of the MHC class II protein, whereas the expression of FcεRI and c-kit was not affected by IL-33. The expression of CIITA, driven from pIII and pIV, was up-regulated in IL-33-treated BMMCs. The amount of PU.1 mRNA and protein significantly increased in IL-33-treated BMMCs. The ChIP assay showed PU.1 binding to CIITA pIII, and enhanced histone acetylation due to IL-33 treatment. Syngeneic T cells were activated by co-culture with IL-33-treated BMMCs, although the expression of the co-stimulatory molecules, CD40, CD80, CD86, and PDL-1, was not detected. Mast cells express MHC class II after prolonged exposure to IL-33, probably due to enhanced recruitment of PU.1 to CIITA pIII, resulting in transactivation of CIITA and MHC class II. IL-33 is an important cytokine in allergic disorders. Mast cells have the ability to express MHC class II after prolonged exposure to IL-33 in a murine model. IL-33 holds a key to understanding the etiology of atopic dermatitis. PMID:26417437

  16. Expression levels of MHC class I molecules are inversely correlated with promiscuity of peptide binding

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Paul E; Meziane, El Kahina; Harrison, Michael; Magiera, Łukasz; Hermann, Clemens; Mears, Laura; Wrobel, Antoni G; Durant, Charlotte; Nielsen, Lise Lotte; Buus, Søren; Ternette, Nicola; Mwangi, William; Butter, Colin; Nair, Venugopal; Ahyee, Trudy; Duggleby, Richard; Madrigal, Alejandro; Roversi, Pietro; Lea, Susan M; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are at the heart of adaptive immune responses, playing crucial roles in many kinds of disease and in vaccination. We report that breadth of peptide presentation and level of cell surface expression of class I molecules are inversely correlated in both chickens and humans. This relationship correlates with protective responses against infectious pathogens including Marek's disease virus leading to lethal tumours in chickens and human immunodeficiency virus infection progressing to AIDS in humans. We propose that differences in peptide binding repertoire define two groups of MHC class I molecules strategically evolved as generalists and specialists for different modes of pathogen resistance. We suggest that differences in cell surface expression level ensure the development of optimal peripheral T cell responses. The inverse relationship of peptide repertoire and expression is evidently a fundamental property of MHC molecules, with ramifications extending beyond immunology and medicine to evolutionary biology and conservation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05345.001 PMID:25860507

  17. Immunotoxin Against a Donor MHC Class II Molecule Induces Indefinite Survival of Murine Kidney Allografts.

    PubMed

    Brown, K; Nowocin, A K; Meader, L; Edwards, L A; Smith, R A; Wong, W

    2016-04-01

    Rejection of donor organs depends on the trafficking of donor passenger leukocytes to the secondary lymphoid organs of the recipient to elicit an immune response via the direct antigen presentation pathway. Therefore, the depletion of passenger leukocytes may be clinically applicable as a strategy to improve graft survival. Because major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II(+) cells are most efficient at inducing immune responses, selective depletion of this population from donor grafts may dampen the alloimmune response and prolong graft survival. In a fully MHC mismatched mouse kidney allograft model, we describe the synthesis of an immunotoxin, consisting of the F(ab')2 fragment of a monoclonal antibody against the donor MHC class II molecule I-A(k) conjugated with the plant-derived ribosomal inactivating protein gelonin. This anti-I-A(k) gelonin immunotoxin depletes I-A(k) expressing cells specifically in vitro and in vivo. When given to recipients of kidney allografts, it resulted in indefinite graft survival with normal graft function, presence of Foxp3(+) cells within donor grafts, diminished donor-specific antibody formation, and delayed rejection of subsequent donor-type skin grafts. Strategies aimed at the donor arm of the immune system using agents such as immunotoxins may be a useful adjuvant to existing recipient-orientated immunosuppression. PMID:26799449

  18. Immunotoxin Against a Donor MHC Class II Molecule Induces Indefinite Survival of Murine Kidney Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Brown, K.; Nowocin, A. K.; Meader, L.; Edwards, L. A.; Smith, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    Rejection of donor organs depends on the trafficking of donor passenger leukocytes to the secondary lymphoid organs of the recipient to elicit an immune response via the direct antigen presentation pathway. Therefore, the depletion of passenger leukocytes may be clinically applicable as a strategy to improve graft survival. Because major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II+ cells are most efficient at inducing immune responses, selective depletion of this population from donor grafts may dampen the alloimmune response and prolong graft survival. In a fully MHC mismatched mouse kidney allograft model, we describe the synthesis of an immunotoxin, consisting of the F(ab′)2 fragment of a monoclonal antibody against the donor MHC class II molecule I‐Ak conjugated with the plant‐derived ribosomal inactivating protein gelonin. This anti–I‐Ak gelonin immunotoxin depletes I‐Ak expressing cells specifically in vitro and in vivo. When given to recipients of kidney allografts, it resulted in indefinite graft survival with normal graft function, presence of Foxp3+ cells within donor grafts, diminished donor‐specific antibody formation, and delayed rejection of subsequent donor‐type skin grafts. Strategies aimed at the donor arm of the immune system using agents such as immunotoxins may be a useful adjuvant to existing recipient‐orientated immunosuppression. PMID:26799449

  19. Pas de deux: Natural Killer Receptors and MHC Class I Ligands in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and NK cell receptor gene regions are a paradigm of genomic plasticity as they reveal a considerable degree of diversity, exemplified by high allelic polymorphism, genomic duplications and contractions, and formation of gene families. Both genetic components show signs of rapid evolution due to strong selective pressure to combat pathogens. Comparative analyses of these genomic regions in various primates revealed considerable differences, reflecting species-specific adaptations to pathogenic threat or different strategies to combat infections. MHC and NK receptor genomic diversity in populations are important factors that determine susceptibility or resistance to a variety of diseases including autoimmune and infectious diseases as well as reproductive success. PMID:18645628

  20. The repertoire of MHC class I genes in the common marmoset: evidence for functional plasticity.

    PubMed

    van der Wiel, Marit K; Otting, Nel; de Groot, Natasja G; Doxiadis, Gaby G M; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2013-12-01

    In humans, the classical antigen presentation function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is controlled by the human leukocyte antigen HLA -A, HLA-B and HLA-C loci. A similar observation has been made for great apes and Old World monkey species. In contrast, a New World monkey species such as the cotton-top tamarin (Saguinus oedipus) appears to employ the G locus for its classical antigen presentation function. At present, little is known about the classical MHC class I repertoire of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), another New World monkey that is widely used in biomedical research. In the present population study, no evidence has been found for abundant transcription of classical I class genes. However, in each common marmoset, four to seven different G-like alleles were detected, suggesting that the ancestral locus has been subject to expansion. Segregation studies provided evidence for at least two G-like genes present per haplotype, which are transcribed by a variety of cell types. The alleles of these Caja-G genes cluster in separate lineages, suggesting that the loci diversified considerably after duplication. Phylogenetic analyses of the introns confirm that the Caja-G loci cluster in the vicinity of HLA-G, indicating that both genes shared an ancestor. In contrast to HLA-G, Caja-G shows considerable polymorphism at the peptide-binding sites. This observation, together with the lack of detectable transcripts of A and B-like genes, indicates that Caja-G genes have taken over the function of classical class I genes. These data highlight the extreme plasticity of the MHC class I gene system. PMID:24018468

  1. NK Cell Responsiveness is Tuned Commensurate with the Number of Inhibitory Receptors for Self MHC Class I: the Rheostat Model

    PubMed Central

    Joncker, Nathalie T.; Fernandez, Nadine C.; Treiner, Emmanuel; Vivier, Eric; Raulet, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitory receptors that engage self-MHC class I molecules enable NK cells to detect disease-associated loss of MHC class I on surrounding cells. Previous studies showed that some NK cells lack all receptors for self-MHC class I, yet fail to exhibit autoimmunity because they are generally hyporesponsive to stimulation. We asked whether NK cells exist in only two states, responsive and hyporesponsive, corresponding to cells that express or fail to express inhibitory receptors for self-MHC class I. The alternative model is that NK cells vary continuously in their responsiveness, based on variations in the number of different inhibitory and stimulatory receptors they express, which is known to vary. Here we show in the murine system that NK cell responsiveness increases quantitatively with each added self MHC-specific inhibitory receptor. Genetic analysis demonstrated that interactions of each of the receptors with self-MHC class I were necessary to observe augmented responsiveness. These findings suggest that NK cell responsiveness is comparable to a rheostat: it is tuned to an optimal set point depending on the inhibitory and stimulatory interactions encountered in the normal environment, so as to ensure self-tolerance and yet optimize sensitivity to changes in normal cells. PMID:19342631

  2. The comings and goings of MHC class I molecules herald a new dawn in cross-presentation.

    PubMed

    Blander, J Magarian

    2016-07-01

    MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules are the centerpieces of cross-presentation. They are loaded with peptides derived from exogenous sources and displayed on the plasma membrane to communicate with CD8 T cells, relaying a message of tolerance or attack. The study of cross-presentation has been focused on the relative contributions of the vacuolar versus cytosolic pathways of antigen processing and the location where MHC-I molecules are loaded. While vacuolar processing generates peptides loaded onto vacuolar MHC-I molecules, how and where exogenous peptides generated by the proteasome and transported by TAP meet MHC-I molecules for loading has been a matter of debate. The source and trafficking of MHC-I molecules in dendritic cells have largely been ignored under the expectation that these molecules came from the Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or the plasma membrane. New studies reveal a concentrated pool of MHC-I molecules in the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC). These pools are rapidly mobilized to phagosomes carrying microbial antigens, and in a signal-dependent manner under the control of Toll-like receptors. The phagosome becomes a dynamic hub receiving traffic from multiple sources, the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment for delivering the peptide-loading machinery and the ERC for deploying MHC-I molecules that alert CD8 T cells of infection. PMID:27319343

  3. Low MHC class II diversity in the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuanyuan; Sanderson, Claire; Jones, Menna; Belov, Katherine

    2012-07-01

    The largest remaining carnivorous marsupial, the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), is currently under threat of extinction due to a fatal contagious cancer-devil facial tumour disease. Low major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I diversity is believed to have contributed to the transmission of the tumour allograft through devil populations. Here, we report low MHC class II variability in this species, with DA β chain genes (Saha-DAB1, 2 and 3) exhibiting very limited diversity and the sole α chain gene (Saha-DAA) monomorphic. Three, six and three alleles were found at Saha-DAB1, 2 and 3, respectively, with a predominant allele found at each locus. Heterozygosity at these three loci is low in the eastern population and modestly higher in northwestern individuals. The results are indicative of a selective sweep likely due to an infectious disease resulting in the fixation of selectively favoured alleles and depletion of genetic diversity at devil class II loci. Several attempts were made to isolate the other marsupial classical class II gene family, namely, DB, resulting in only one DBB pseudogene being found. These findings further support the view that this species has a compromised capacity to respond to pathogen evolution, emerging infectious diseases and environmental changes. PMID:22460528

  4. Inhibition of MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation by gamma 2-herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, P G; Efstathiou, S; Doherty, P C; Lehner, P J

    2000-07-18

    The gamma-herpesviruses, in contrast to the alpha- and beta-herpesviruses, are not known to inhibit antigen presentation to CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) during lytic cycle replication. However, murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 causes a chronic lytic infection in CD4(+) T cell-deficient mice despite the persistence of a substantial CTL response, suggesting that CTL evasion occurs. Here we show that, distinct from host protein synthesis shutoff, gamma-herpesvirus 68 down-regulates surface MHC class I expression on lytically infected fibroblasts and inhibits their recognition by antigen-specific CTLs. The viral K3 gene, encoding a zinc-finger-containing protein, dramatically reduced the half-life of nascent class I molecules and the level of surface MHC class I expression and was by itself sufficient to block antigen presentation. The homologous K3 and K5 genes of the related Kaposi's sarcoma-associated virus also inhibited antigen presentation and decreased cell surface expression of HLA class I antigens. Thus it appears that an immune evasion strategy shared by at least two gamma-herpesviruses allows continued lytic infection in the face of strong CTL immunity. PMID:10890918

  5. MHC class I antigen processing and presenting machinery: organization, function, and defects in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Leone, Patrizia; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Perosa, Federico; Vacca, Angelo; Dammacco, Franco; Racanelli, Vito

    2013-08-21

    The surface presentation of peptides by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is critical to all CD8(+) T-cell adaptive immune responses, including those against tumors. The generation of peptides and their loading on MHC class I molecules is a multistep process involving multiple molecular species that constitute the so-called antigen processing and presenting machinery (APM). The majority of class I peptides begin as proteasome degradation products of cytosolic proteins. Once transported into the endoplasmic reticulum by TAP (transporter associated with antigen processing), peptides are not bound randomly by class I molecules but are chosen by length and sequence, with peptidases editing the raw peptide pool. Aberrations in APM genes and proteins have frequently been observed in human tumors and found to correlate with relevant clinical variables, including tumor grade, tumor stage, disease recurrence, and survival. These findings support the idea that APM defects are immune escape mechanisms that disrupt the tumor cells' ability to be recognized and killed by tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. Detailed knowledge of APM is crucial for the optimization of T cell-based immunotherapy protocols. PMID:23852952

  6. Design of Peptide Immunotherapies for MHC Class-II-Associated Autoimmune Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune disorders, that occur when autoreactive immune cells are induced to activate their responses against self-tissues, affect one percent of the world population and represent one of the top 10 leading causes of death. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a principal susceptibility locus for many human autoimmune diseases, in which self-tissue antigens providing targets for pathogenic lymphocytes are bound to HLA molecules encoded by disease-associated alleles. In spite of the attempts to design strategies for inhibition of antigen presentation targeting the MHC-peptide/TCR complex via generation of blocking antibodies, altered peptide ligands (APL), or inhibitors of costimulatory molecules, potent therapies with minimal side effects have yet to be developed. Copaxone (glatiramer acetate, GA) is a random synthetic amino acid copolymer that reduces the relapse rate by about 30% in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Based on the elucidated binding motifs of Copaxone and of the anchor residues of the immunogenic myelin basic protein (MBP) peptide to HLA-DR molecules, novel copolymers have been designed and proved to be more effective in suppressing MS-like disease in mice. In this report, we describe the rationale for design of second-generation synthetic random copolymers as candidate drugs for a number of MHC class-II-associated autoimmune disorders. PMID:24324511

  7. Dendritic cell preactivation impairs MHC class II presentation of vaccines and endogenous viral antigens

    PubMed Central

    Young, Louise J.; Wilson, Nicholas S.; Schnorrer, Petra; Mount, Adele; Lundie, Rachel J.; La Gruta, Nicole L.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Heath, William R.; Villadangos, Jose A.

    2007-01-01

    When dendritic cells (DCs) encounter signals associated with infection or inflammation, they become activated and undergo maturation. Mature DCs are very efficient at presenting antigens captured in association with their activating signal but fail to present subsequently encountered antigens, at least in vitro. Such impairment of MHC class II (MHC II) antigen presentation has generally been thought to be a consequence of down-regulation of endocytosis, so it might be expected that antigens synthesized by the DCs themselves (for instance, viral antigens) would still be presented by mature DCs. Here, we show that DCs matured in vivo could still capture and process soluble antigens, but were unable to present peptides derived from these antigens. Furthermore, presentation of viral antigens synthesized by the DCs themselves was also severely impaired. Indeed, i.v. injection of pathogen mimics, which caused systemic DC activation in vivo, impaired the induction of CD4 T cell responses against subsequently encountered protein antigens. This immunosuppressed state could be reversed by adoptive transfer of DCs loaded exogenously with antigens, demonstrating that impairment of CD4 T cell responses was due to lack of antigen presentation rather than to overt suppression of T cell activation. The biochemical mechanism underlying this phenomenon was the down-regulation of MHC II–peptide complex formation that accompanied DC maturation. These observations have important implications for the design of prophylactic and therapeutic DC vaccines and contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms causing immunosuppression during systemic blood infections. PMID:17978177

  8. How did variable NK-cell receptors and MHC class I ligands influence immunity, reproduction and human evolution?

    PubMed Central

    Parham, Peter; Moffett, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Preface Natural killer (NK) cells have roles in immunity and reproduction that are controlled by variable receptors that recognize MHC class I molecules. The variable NK cell receptors found in humans are specific to simian primates, where they have progressively co-evolved with MHC class I molecules. The emergence of MHC-C in hominids drove the evolution of a system of MHC-C receptors that is most elaborate in chimpanzees. In contrast, the human system appears to have been subject to different and competing selection pressures that have acted on its immunological and reproductive functions. We suggest that this compromise facilitated development of the bigger brains that enabled archaic and modern humans to migrate out-of-Africa and populate other continents. PMID:23334245

  9. Targeting tumor-associated antigens to the MHC class I presentation pathway.

    PubMed

    Gross, G; Margalit, A

    2007-06-01

    There is little doubt that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can kill tumor cells in-vivo. However, most CTL-inducing immunization protocols examined so far in cancer patients have yielded only limited clinical benefits, underscoring the urge to improve current approaches for the effective induction of tumor-reactive CTLs. The tumor side of the immunological frontline is armed with large masses, high mutability and an arsenal of immune evasion and suppression mechanisms. Accordingly, the confronting CTLs should come in large numbers, recognize an assortment of MHC class I (MHC-I) bound tumor-associated peptides and be brought into action under effective immunostimulatory conditions. Naïve CTLs are activated to become effector cells in secondary lymphoid organs, following their productive encounter with MHC-I-bound peptides at the surface of dendritic cells (DCs). Therefore, many cancer vaccines under development focus on the optimization of peptide presentation by DCs at this critical stage. The elucidation of discrete steps and the subsequent identification of inherent bottlenecks in the MHC-I antigen presentation pathway have fueled elaborate efforts to enhance vaccine efficacy by the rational targeting of proteins or peptides, formulated into these vaccines, to this pathway. Protein- and gene-based strategies are accordingly devised to deliver tumor-associated peptides to selected cellular compartments, which are essential for the generation of functional CTL ligands. Many of these strategies target the conventional, endogenous route, while others harness the unique pathways that enable DCs to present exogenous antigens, known as cross-presentation. Here we dissect the intricate machinery that produces CTL ligands and examine how knowledge-based cancer vaccines can target the sequence of workstations, biochemical utensils and molecular intermediates comprising this production line. PMID:17584150

  10. Construction of bioactive chimeric MHC class I tetramer by expression and purification of human-murine chimeric MHC heavy chain and beta(2)m as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ding; Wang, Fang; He, Xiaowen; Jiang, Lei; Li, Dean; Ying, He; Sun, Shuhan

    2006-12-01

    Major histocompatibility (MHC) class I tetramers are used in the quantitative analysis of epitope peptide-specific CD8+ T-cells. An MHC class I tetramer was composed of 4 MHC class I complexes and a fluorescently labeled streptavidin (SA) molecule. Each MHC class I complex consists of an MHC heavy chain, a beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)m) molecule and a synthetic epitope peptide. In most previous studies, an MHC class I complex was formed in the refolding buffer with an expressed MHC heavy chain molecule and beta(2)m, respectively. This procedure inevitably resulted in the disadvantages of forming unwanted multimers and self-refolding products, and the purification of each kind of monomer was time-consuming. In the present study, the genes of a human/murine chimeric MHC heavy chain (HLA-A2 alpha1, HLA-A2 alpha2 and MHC-H2D alpha3) and beta(2)m were tandem-cloned into plasmid pET17b and expressed as a fusion protein. The recombinant fusion protein was refolded with each of the three HLA-A2 restricted peptides (HBc18-27 FLPSDFFPSI, HBx52-60 HLSLRGLPV, and HBx92-100 VLHKRTLGL) and thus three chimeric MHC class I complexes were obtained. Biotinylation was performed, and its level of efficiency was observed via a band-shift assay in non-reducing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Such chimeric MHC class I tetramers showed a sensitive binding activity in monitoring HLA/A2 restrictive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in immunized HLA/A*0201 transgenic mice. PMID:17046278

  11. Selection, diversity and evolutionary patterns of the MHC class II DAB in free-ranging Neotropical marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Lucht, Yvonne; Otten, Celine; Püttker, Thomas; Sommer, Simone

    2008-01-01

    Background Research on the genetic architecture and diversity of the MHC has focused mainly on eutherian mammals, birds and fish. So far, studies on model marsupials used in laboratory investigations indicated very little or even no variation in MHC class II genes. However, natural levels of diversity and selection are unknown in marsupials as studies on wild populations are virtually absent. We used two endemic South American mouse opossums, Gracilinanus microtarsus and Marmosops incanus, to investigate characteristic features of MHC selection. This study is the first investigation of MHC selection in free-ranging Neotropical marsupials. In addition, the evolutionary history of MHC lineages within the group of marsupials was examined. Results G. microtarsus showed extensive levels of MHC diversity within and among individuals as 47 MHC-DAB alleles and high levels of sequence divergence were detected at a minimum of four loci. Positively selected codon sites were identified, of which most were congruent with human antigen binding sites. The diversity in M. incanus was rather low with only eight observed alleles at presumably two loci. However, these alleles also revealed high sequence divergence. Again, positive selection was identified on specific codon sites, all congruent with human ABS and with positively selected sites observed in G. microtarsus. In a phylogenetic comparison alleles of M. incanus interspersed widely within alleles of G. microtarsus with four alleles being present in both species. Conclusion Our investigations revealed extensive MHC class II polymorphism in a natural marsupial population, contrary to previous assumptions. Furthermore, our study confirms for the first time in marsupials the presence of three characteristic features common at MHC loci of eutherian mammals, birds and fish: large allelic sequence divergence, positive selection on specific sites and trans-specific polymorphism. PMID:18534008

  12. Expression of the MHC Class II Transactivator (CIITA) type IV promoter in B lymphocytes and regulation by IFN-γ

    PubMed Central

    Piskurich, Janet F.; Gilbert, Carolyn A.; Ashley, Brittany D.; Zhao, Mojun; Chen, Han; Wu, Jian; Wright, Kenneth L.

    2006-01-01

    The MHC class II transactivator (CIITA), the master regulator of MHC class II (MHC II) expression, is a co-activator that controls MHC II transcription. Human B lymphocytes express MHC II constitutively due to persistent activity of CIITA promoter III (pIII), one of the four potential promoters (pI-pIV) of this gene. Although increases in MHC II expression in B cells in response to cytokines have been observed and induction of MHC II and CIITA by IFN-γ has been studied in a number of different cell types, the specific effects of IFN-γ on CIITA expression in B cells have not been studied. To investigate the regulation of CIITA expression by IFN-γ in B cells, RT-PCR, in vivo and in vitro protein/DNA binding studies, and functional promoter analyses were performed. Both MHC II and CIITA type IV-specific RNAs increased in human B lymphocytes in response to IFN-γ treatment. CIITA promoter analysis confirmed that pIV is IFN-γ inducible in B cells and that the GAS and IRF-E sites are necessary for full induction. DNA binding of IRF-1 and IRF-2, members of the IFN regulatory factor family, was up-regulated in B cells in response to IFN-γ and increased the activity of CIITA pIV. In vivo genomic footprint analysis demonstrated proteins binding at the GAS, IRF-E and E box sites of CIITA pIV. Although CIITA pIII is considered to be the hematopoietic-specific promoter of CIITA, these findings demonstrate that pIV is active in B lymphocytes and potentially contributes to the expression of CIITA and MHC II in these cells. PMID:15950283

  13. Translating DRiPs: MHC class I immunosurveillance of pathogens and tumors

    PubMed Central

    Antón, Luis C.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    MHC class I molecules display oligopeptides on the cell surface to enable T cell immunosurveillance of intracellular pathogens and tumors. Speed is of the essence in detecting viruses, which can complete a full replication cycle in just hours, whereas tumor detection is typically a finding-the-needle-in-the-haystack exercise. We review current evidence supporting a nonrandom, compartmentalized selection of peptidogenic substrates that focuses on rapidly degraded translation products as a main source of peptide precursors to optimize immunosurveillance of pathogens and tumors. PMID:24532645

  14. Role of PU.1 in MHC Class II Expression via CIITA Transcription in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Ryosuke; Kasakura, Kazumi; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Hara, Mutsuko; Maeda, Keiko; Okumura, Ko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Yashiro, Takuya; Nishiyama, Chiharu

    2016-01-01

    The cofactor CIITA is a master regulator of MHC class II expression and several transcription factors regulating the cell type-specific expression of CIITA have been identified. Although the MHC class II expression in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) is also mediated by CIITA, the transcription factors involved in the CIITA expression in pDCs are largely unknown. In the present study, we analyzed the role of a hematopoietic lineage-specific transcription factor, PU.1, in CIITA transcription in pDCs. The introduction of PU.1 siRNA into mouse pDCs and a human pDC cell line, CAL-1, reduced the mRNA levels of MHC class II and CIITA. When the binding of PU.1 to the 3rd promoter of CIITA (pIII) in CAL-1 and mouse pDCs was analyzed by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, a significant amount of PU.1 binding to the pIII was detected, which was definitely decreased in PU.1 siRNA-transfected cells. Reporter assays showed that PU.1 knockdown reduced the pIII promoter activity and that three Ets-motifs in the human pIII promoter were candidates of cis-enhancing elements. By electrophoretic mobility shift assays, it was confirmed that two Ets-motifs, GGAA (-181/-178) and AGAA (-114/-111), among three candidates, were directly bound with PU.1. When mouse pDCs and CAL-1 cells were stimulated by GM-CSF, mRNA levels of PU.1, pIII-driven CIITA, total CIITA, MHC class II, and the amount of PU.1 binding to pIII were significantly increased. The GM-CSF-mediated up-regulation of these mRNAs was canceled in PU.1 siRNA-introduced cells. Taking these results together, we conclude that PU.1 transactivates the pIII through direct binding to Ets-motifs in the promoter in pDCs. PMID:27105023

  15. Localization of type 1 diabetes susceptibility to the MHC class I genes HLA-B and HLA-A

    PubMed Central

    Nejentsev, Sergey; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Walker, Neil M.; Szeszko, Jeffrey; Field, Sarah F.; Stevens, Helen E.; Reynolds, Pamela; Hardy, Matthew; King, Erna; Masters, Jennifer; Hulme, John; Maier, Lisa M.; Smyth, Deborah; Bailey, Rebecca; Cooper, Jason D.; Ribas, Gloria; Campbell, R. Duncan; Clayton, David G.; Todd, John A.

    2009-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on chromosome 6 is associated with susceptibility to more common diseases than any other region of the human genome, including almost all disorders classified as autoimmune. In type 1 diabetes the major genetic susceptibility determinants have been mapped to the MHC class II genes HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DRB1 (refs 1-3), but these genes cannot completely explain the association between type 1 diabetes and the MHC region4-11. Owing to the region’s extreme gene density, the multiplicity of disease-associated alleles, strong associations between alleles, limited genotyping capability, and inadequate statistical approaches and sample sizes, which, and how many, loci within the MHC determine susceptibility remains unclear. Here, in several large type 1 diabetes data sets, we analyse a combined total of 1,729 polymorphisms, and apply statistical methods—recursive partitioning and regression—to pinpoint disease susceptibility to the MHC class I genes HLA-B and HLA-A (risk ratios>1.5; Pcombined=2.01×10-19 and 2.35×10-13, respectively) in addition to the established associations of the MHC class II genes. Other loci with smaller and/or rarer effects might also be involved, but to find these, future searches must take into account both the HLA class II and class I genes and use even larger samples. Taken together with previous studies4-8,10-16, we conclude that MHC-class-I-mediated events, principally involving HLA-B*39, contribute to the aetiology of type 1 diabetes. PMID:18004301

  16. Indirect recognition of MHC class I allopeptides accelerates lung allograft rejection in miniature swine.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Tsuyoshi; Wain, John C; Houser, Stuart L; Benjamin, Louis C; Johnston, Douglas R; Hoerbelt, Ruediger; Hasse, Rebecca S; Lee, Richard S; Muniappan, Ashok; Guenther, Dax A; Bravard, Marjory A; Ledgerwood, Levi G; Sachs, David H; Sayegh, Mohamed H; Madsen, Joren C; Allan, James S

    2005-07-01

    The role of indirect allorecognition in graft rejection is examined in two experiments using a swine lung transplantation model. First, two swine received class I mismatched grafts without immunosuppression; another two recipients were treated postoperatively with cyclosporine (CsA). These swine exhibited acute and chronic rejection, respectively. All four recipients developed T-cell reactivity to donor-derived class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) peptides. Second, six swine were immunized with synthetic donor-derived class I allopeptides prior to transplantation. Control groups consisted of nonimmunized recipients (n = 6) and recipients immunized with an irrelevant peptide (n = 3). These recipients all received a 12-day course of post-operative CsA. Swine immunized with allopeptides exhibited accelerated graft rejection, as compared to both control groups (p < 0.01 and p = 0.03, respectively). Within the experimental group, the dominant histologic finding was acute rejection (AR). Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) was seen in the graft with the longest survival. Both control groups showed a lesser degree of AR, with four out of six nonimmunized swine ultimately developing OB. These studies suggest that indirect allorecognition is operative during lung allograft rejection, and that pre-transplant sensitization to donor-derived MHC allopeptides can accelerate graft rejection. PMID:15943620

  17. The tetraspanin CD9 mediates lateral association of MHC class II molecules on the dendritic cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Unternaehrer, Julia J.; Chow, Amy; Pypaert, Marc; Inaba, Kayo; Mellman, Ira

    2007-01-01

    We have found that MHC class II (MHC II) molecules exhibit a distinctive organization on the dendritic cell (DC) plasma membrane. Both in DC lysates and on the surface of living cells, I-A and I-E molecules engaged in lateral interactions not observed on other antigen-presenting cells such as B blasts. Because DCs and B blasts express MHC II at comparable surface densities, the interaction was not due to simple mass action. Instead, it reflected the selective expression of the tetraspanin CD9 at the DC surface. I-A and I-E molecules coprecipitated with each other and with CD9. The association of heterologous MHC II molecules was abrogated in DCs from CD9−/− mice. Conversely, expression of exogenous CD9 in B cells induced MHC II interactions. CD9 is thus necessary for the association of heterologous MHC II, a specialization that would facilitate the formation of MHC II multimers expected to enhance T cell receptor stimulation by DCs. PMID:17190803

  18. Cloning, sequencing, and polymorphism analysis of novel classical MHC class I alleles in northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

    PubMed

    Lian, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xi-He; Dai, Zheng-Xi; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2016-04-01

    The northern pig-tailed macaque (Macaca leonina) has been confirmed to be an independent species from the pig-tailed macaque group of Old World monkey. We have previously reported that the northern pig-tailed macaques were also susceptible to HIV-1. Here, to make this animal a potential HIV/AIDS model and to discover the mechanism of virus control, we attempted to assess the role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted immune responses to HIV-1 infection, which was associated with viral replication and disease progression. As an initial step, we first cloned and characterized the classical MHC class I gene of northern pig-tailed macaques. In this study, we identified 39 MHC class I alleles including 17 MHC-A and 22 MHC-B alleles. Out of these identified alleles, 30 were novel and 9 were identical to alleles previously reported from other macaque species. The MHC-A and MHC-B loci were both duplicates as rhesus macaques and southern pig-tailed macaques. In addition, we also detected the patterns of positive selection in northern pig-tailed macaques and revealed the existence of balance selection with 20 positive selection sites in the peptide binding region. The analysis of B and F peptide binding pockets in northern and southern pig-tailed macaques and rhesus macaques suggested that they were likely to share a few common peptides to present. Thus, this study provides important MHC immunogenetics information and adds values to northern pig-tailed macaques as a promising HIV/AIDS model. PMID:26782049

  19. Diverse repertoire of the MHC class II-peptide complexes is required for presentation of viral superantigens.

    PubMed

    Golovkina, T; Agafonova, Y; Kazansky, D; Chervonsky, A

    2001-02-15

    Among other features, peptides affect MHC class II molecules, causing changes in the binding of bacterial superantigens (b-Sag). Whether peptides can alter binding of viral superantigens (v-Sag) to MHC class II was not known. Here we addressed the question of whether mutations limiting the diversity of peptides bound by the MHC class II molecules influenced the presentation of v-Sag and, subsequently, the life cycle of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). T cells reactive to v-Sag were found in mice lacking DM molecules as well as in A(b)Ep-transgenic mice in which MHC class II binding grooves were predominantly occupied by an invariant chain fragment or Ealpha(52-68) peptide, respectively. APCs from the mutant mice failed to present v-Sag, as determined by the lack of Sag-specific T cell activation, Sag-induced T cell deletion, and by the aborted MMTV infection. In contrast, mice that express I-A(b) with a variety of bound peptides presented v-Sag and were susceptible to MMTV infection. Comparison of v-Sag and b-Sag presentation by the same mutant cells suggested that presentation of v-Sag had requirements similar to that for presentation of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. Thus, MHC class II peptide repertoire is critical for recognition of v-Sag by the T cells and affects the outcome of infection with a retrovirus. PMID:11160278

  20. Polarisation of equine pregnancy outcome associated with a maternal MHC class I allele: Preliminary evidence.

    PubMed

    Kydd, J H; Case, R; Winton, C; MacRae, S; Sharp, E; Ricketts, S L; Rash, N; Newton, J R

    2016-05-30

    Identification of risk factors which are associated with severe clinical signs can assist in the management of disease outbreaks and indicate future research areas. Pregnancy loss during late gestation in the mare compromises welfare, reduces fecundity and has financial implications for horse owners. This retrospective study focussed on the identification of risk factors associated with pregnancy loss among 46 Thoroughbred mares on a single British stud farm, with some but not all losses involving equid herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) infection. In a sub-group of 30 mares, association between pregnancy loss and the presence of five common Thoroughbred horse haplotypes of the equine Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) was assessed. This involved development of sequence specific, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions and in several mares, measurement of cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity. Of the 46 mares, 10 suffered late gestation pregnancy loss or neonatal foal death, five of which were EHV-1 positive. Maternal factors including age, parity, number of EHV-1 specific vaccinations and the number of days between final vaccination and foaling or abortion were not significantly associated with pregnancy loss. In contrast, a statistically significant association between the presence of the MHC class I B2 allele and pregnancy loss was identified, regardless of the fetus/foal's EHV-1 status (p=0.002). In conclusion, this study demonstrated a significantly positive association between pregnancy loss in Thoroughbred mares and a specific MHC class I allele in the mother. This association requires independent validation and further investigation of the mechanism by which the mare's genetic background contributes to pregnancy outcome. PMID:27139027

  1. MHC Class I Cross-Presentation by Dendritic Cells Counteracts Viral Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Nopora, Katrin; Bernhard, Caroline A.; Ried, Christine; Castello, Alejandro A.; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Marconi, Peggy; Koszinowski, Ulrich; Brocker, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    DCs very potently activate CD8+ T cells specific for viral peptides bound to MHC class I molecules. However, many viruses have evolved immune evasion mechanisms, which inactivate infected DCs and might reduce priming of T cells. Then MHC class I cross-presentation of exogenous viral Ag by non-infected DCs may become crucial to assure CD8+ T cell responses. Although many vital functions of infected DCs are inhibited in vitro by many different viruses, the contributions of cross-presentation to T cell immunity when confronted with viral immune inactivation in vivo has not been demonstrated up to now, and remains controversial. Here we show that priming of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV)-, but not murine cytomegalovirus (mCMV)-specific CD8+ T cells was severely reduced in mice with a DC-specific cross-presentation deficiency. In contrast, while CD8+ T cell responses to mutant HSV, which lacks crucial inhibitory genes, also depended on CD8α+ DCs, they were independent of cross-presentation. Therefore HSV-specific CTL-responses entirely depend on the CD8α+ DC subset, which present via direct or cross-presentation mechanisms depending on the immune evasion equipment of virus. Our data establish the contribution of cross-presentation to counteract viral immune evasion mechanisms in some, but not all viruses. PMID:23189079

  2. Vaccinia virus infection induces dendritic cell maturation but inhibits antigen presentation by MHC class II

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yongxue; Li, Ping; Singh, Pratibha; Thiele, Allison T.; Wilkes, David S.; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J.; Brutkiewicz, Randy R.; Travers, Jeffrey B.; Luker, Gary D.; Hong, Soon-Cheol; Blum, Janice S.; Chang, Cheong-Hee

    2007-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) infection is known to inhibit dendritic cells (DC) functions in vitro. Paradoxically, VV is also highly immunogenic and thus has been used as a vaccine. In the present study, we investigated the effects of an in vivo VV infection on DC function by focusing on early innate immunity. Our data indicated that DC are activated upon in vivo VV infection of mice. Splenic DC from VV-infected mice expressed elevated levels of MHC class I and co-stimulatory molecules on their cell surface and exhibited the enhanced potential to produce cytokines upon LPS stimulation. DC from VV-infected mice also expressed a high level of interferon-β. However, a VV infection resulted in the down-regulation of MHC class II expression and the impairment of antigen presentation to CD4 T cells by DC. Thus, during the early stage of a VV infection, although DC are impaired in some of the critical antigen presentation functions, they can promote innate immune defenses against viral infection. PMID:17678637

  3. Force-Regulated In Situ TCR-Peptide-Bound MHC Class II Kinetics Determine Functions of CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jinsung; Persaud, Stephen P; Horvath, Stephen; Allen, Paul M; Evavold, Brian D; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-10-15

    We have recently shown that two-dimensional (2D) and force-regulated kinetics of TCR-peptide-bound MHC class I (pMHC-I) interactions predict responses of CD8(+) T cells. To test whether these findings are applicable to CD4(+) T cells, we analyzed the in situ 3.L2 TCR-pMHC-II interactions for a well-characterized panel of altered peptide ligands on the T cell surface using the adhesion frequency assay with a micropipette and the thermal fluctuation and force-clamp assays with a biomembrane force probe. We found that the 2D effective TCR-pMHC-II affinity and off-rate correlate with, but better predict the T cell response than, the corresponding measurements with the surface plasmon resonance in three dimensions. The 2D affinity of the CD4 for MHC-II was very low, approaching the detection limit, making it one to two orders of magnitude lower than the affinity of CD8 for MHC-I. In addition, the signal-dependent cooperation between TCR and coreceptor for pMHC binding previously observed for CD8 was not observed for CD4. Interestingly, force elicited TCR-pMHC-II catch-slip bonds for agonists but slip-only bonds for antagonists, thereby amplifying the power of discrimination between altered peptide ligands. These results show that the force-regulated 2D binding kinetics of the 3.L2 TCR for pMHC-II determine functions of CD4(+) T cells. PMID:26336148

  4. DNA Vaccine that Targets Hemagglutinin to MHC Class II Molecules Rapidly Induces Antibody-Mediated Protection against Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Mjaaland, Siri; Roux, Kenneth H.; Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik

    2013-01-01

    New influenza A viruses with pandemic potential periodically emerge due to viral genomic reassortment. In the face of pandemic threats, production of conventional egg-based vaccines is time consuming and of limited capacity. We have developed in this study a novel DNA vaccine in which viral hemagglutinin (HA) is bivalently targeted to MHC class II (MHC II) molecules on APCs. Following DNA vaccination, transfected cells secreted vaccine proteins that bound MHC II on APCs and initiated adaptive immune responses. A single DNA immunization induced within 8 d protective levels of strain-specific Abs and also cross-reactive T cells. During the Mexican flu pandemic, a targeted DNA vaccine (HA from A/California/07/2009) was generated within 3 wk after the HA sequences were published online. These results suggest that MHC II–targeted DNA vaccines could play a role in situations of pandemic threats. The vaccine principle should be extendable to other infectious diseases. PMID:23956431

  5. Distinct Conformations of Ly49 Natural Killer Cell Receptors Mediate MHC Class I Recognition in Trans and Cis

    SciTech Connect

    Back, J.; Malchiodi, E; Cho, S; Scarpellino, L; Schneider, P; Kerzic, M; Mariuzza, R; Held, W

    2009-01-01

    Certain cell-surface receptors engage ligands expressed on juxtaposed cells and ligands on the same cell. The structural basis for trans versus cis binding is not known. Here, we showed that Ly49 natural killer (NK) cell receptors bound two MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules in trans when the two ligand-binding domains were backfolded onto the long stalk region. In contrast, dissociation of the ligand-binding domains from the stalk and their reorientation relative to the NK cell membrane allowed monovalent binding of MHC-I in cis. The distinct conformations (backfolded and extended) define the structural basis for cis-trans binding by Ly49 receptors and explain the divergent functional consequences of cis versus trans interactions. Further analyses identified specific stalk segments that were not required for MHC-I binding in trans but were essential for inhibitory receptor function. These data identify multiple distinct roles of stalk regions for receptor function.

  6. Internalization of MHC class I molecules is a prerequisite for endocytosis of endorphin by lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Mommaas, A M; Wijsman, M C; Verduijn, W; Vermeer, B J; Claas, F M

    1991-01-01

    The nature of the interaction between gamma-type endorphins and the HLA class I molecules was studied by immunoelectronmicroscopy. The HLA molecules were not involved in the actual binding of endorphin to the cell. In contrast, for the endocytosis of gamma-endorphin, co-internalization of the HLA class I molecules is essential. The internalization process starts with clustering of gamma-endorphin and HLA class I molecules in coated pits. Cells that do not carry HLA class I molecules (Daudi) or do not internalize HLA class I molecules (EBV-transformed B cells) bind but do not internalize gamma-endorphin. On the basis of these observations, we suggest that the MHC class I molecules may function as transport molecules. Whether it is a general phenomenon that non-immunological ligands use the HLA class I molecules to get into the cell and immunological ligands (viral proteins) to reach the cell surface, remains to be established. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2015708

  7. Trans-species polymorphism and selection in the MHC class II DRA genes of domestic sheep.

    PubMed

    Ballingall, Keith T; Rocchi, Mara S; McKeever, Declan J; Wright, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Highly polymorphic genes with central roles in lymphocyte mediated immune surveillance are grouped together in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in higher vertebrates. Generally, across vertebrate species the class II MHC DRA gene is highly conserved with only limited allelic variation. Here however, we provide evidence of trans-species polymorphism at the DRA locus in domestic sheep (Ovis aries). We describe variation at the Ovar-DRA locus that is far in excess of anything described in other vertebrate species. The divergent DRA allele (Ovar-DRA*0201) differs from the sheep reference sequences by 20 nucleotides, 12 of which appear non-synonymous. Furthermore, DRA*0201 is paired with an equally divergent DRB1 allele (Ovar-DRB1*0901), which is consistent with an independent evolutionary history for the DR sub-region within this MHC haplotype. No recombination was observed between the divergent DRA and B genes in a range of breeds and typical levels of MHC class II DR protein expression were detected at the surface of leukocyte populations obtained from animals homozygous for the DRA*0201, DRB1*0901 haplotype. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis groups Ovar-DRA*0201 with DRA sequences derived from species within the Oryx and Alcelaphus genera rather than clustering with other ovine and caprine DRA alleles. Tests for Darwinian selection identified 10 positively selected sites on the branch leading to Ovar-DRA*0201, three of which are predicted to be associated with the binding of peptide antigen. As the Ovis, Oryx and Alcelaphus genera have not shared a common ancestor for over 30 million years, the DRA*0201 and DRB1*0901 allelic pair is likely to be of ancient origin and present in the founding population from which all contemporary domestic sheep breeds are derived. The conservation of the integrity of this unusual DR allelic pair suggests some selective advantage which is likely to be associated with the presentation of pathogen antigen to T-cells and the

  8. Trans-Species Polymorphism and Selection in the MHC Class II DRA Genes of Domestic Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Ballingall, Keith T.; Rocchi, Mara S.; McKeever, Declan J.; Wright, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Highly polymorphic genes with central roles in lymphocyte mediated immune surveillance are grouped together in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in higher vertebrates. Generally, across vertebrate species the class II MHC DRA gene is highly conserved with only limited allelic variation. Here however, we provide evidence of trans-species polymorphism at the DRA locus in domestic sheep (Ovis aries). We describe variation at the Ovar-DRA locus that is far in excess of anything described in other vertebrate species. The divergent DRA allele (Ovar-DRA*0201) differs from the sheep reference sequences by 20 nucleotides, 12 of which appear non-synonymous. Furthermore, DRA*0201 is paired with an equally divergent DRB1 allele (Ovar-DRB1*0901), which is consistent with an independent evolutionary history for the DR sub-region within this MHC haplotype. No recombination was observed between the divergent DRA and B genes in a range of breeds and typical levels of MHC class II DR protein expression were detected at the surface of leukocyte populations obtained from animals homozygous for the DRA*0201, DRB1*0901 haplotype. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis groups Ovar-DRA*0201 with DRA sequences derived from species within the Oryx and Alcelaphus genera rather than clustering with other ovine and caprine DRA alleles. Tests for Darwinian selection identified 10 positively selected sites on the branch leading to Ovar-DRA*0201, three of which are predicted to be associated with the binding of peptide antigen. As the Ovis, Oryx and Alcelaphus genera have not shared a common ancestor for over 30 million years, the DRA*0201 and DRB1*0901 allelic pair is likely to be of ancient origin and present in the founding population from which all contemporary domestic sheep breeds are derived. The conservation of the integrity of this unusual DR allelic pair suggests some selective advantage which is likely to be associated with the presentation of pathogen antigen to T-cells and the

  9. Natural selection on marine carnivores elaborated a diverse family of classical MHC class I genes exhibiting haplotypic gene content variation and allelic polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Hammond, John A; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Norman, Paul J; Parham, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Pinnipeds, marine carnivores, diverged from terrestrial carnivores ~45 million years ago, before their adaptation to marine environments. This lifestyle change exposed pinnipeds to different microbiota and pathogens, with probable impact on their MHC class I genes. Investigating this question, genomic sequences were determined for 71 MHC class I variants: 27 from harbor seal and 44 from gray seal. These variants form three MHC class I gene lineages, one comprising a pseudogene. The second, a candidate nonclassical MHC class I gene, comprises a nonpolymorphic transcribed gene related to dog DLA-79 and giant panda Aime-1906. The third is the diversity lineage, which includes 62 of the 71 seal MHC class I variants. All are transcribed, and they minimally represent six harbor and 12 gray seal MHC class I genes. Besides species-specific differences in gene number, seal MHC class I haplotypes exhibit gene content variation and allelic polymorphism. Patterns of sequence variation, and of positions for positively selected sites, indicate the diversity lineage genes are the seals' classical MHC class I genes. Evidence that expansion of diversity lineage genes began before gray and harbor seals diverged is the presence in both species of two distinctive sublineages of diversity lineage genes. Pointing to further expansion following the divergence are the presence of species-specific genes and greater MHC class I diversity in gray seals than harbor seals. The elaboration of a complex variable family of classical MHC class I genes in pinnipeds contrasts with the single, highly polymorphic classical MHC class I gene of dog and giant panda, terrestrial carnivores. PMID:23001684

  10. Natural selection on marine carnivores elaborated a diverse family of classical MHC class I genes exhibiting haplotypic gene content variation and allelic polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Paul J.; Parham, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Pinnipeds, marine carnivores, diverged from terrestrial carnivores ~45 million years ago, before their adaptation to marine environments. This lifestyle change exposed pinnipeds to different microbiota and pathogens, with probable impact on their MHC class I genes. Investigating this question, genomic sequences were determined for 71 MHC class I variants: 27 from harbor seal and 44 from gray seal. These variants form three MHC class I gene lineages, one comprising a pseudogene. The second, a candidate nonclassical MHC class I gene, comprises a nonpolymorphic transcribed gene related to dog DLA-79 and giant panda Aime-1906. The third is the diversity lineage, which includes 62 of the 71 seal MHC class I variants. All are transcribed, and they minimally represent six harbor and 12 gray seal MHC class I genes. Besides species-specific differences in gene number, seal MHC class I haplotypes exhibit gene content variation and allelic polymorphism. Patterns of sequence variation, and of positions for positively selected sites, indicate the diversity lineage genes are the seals’ classical MHC class I genes. Evidence that expansion of diversity lineage genes began before gray and harbor seals diverged is the presence in both species of two distinctive sublineages of diversity lineage genes. Pointing to further expansion following the divergence are the presence of species-specific genes and greater MHC class I diversity in gray seals than harbor seals. The elaboration of a complex variable family of classical MHC class I genes in pinnipeds contrasts with the single, highly polymorphic classical MHC class I gene of dog and giant panda, terrestrial carnivores. PMID:23001684

  11. Extraordinary MHC class II B diversity in a non-passerine, wild bird: the Eurasian Coot Fulica atra (Aves: Rallidae)

    PubMed Central

    Alcaide, Miguel; Muñoz, Joaquin; Martínez-de la Puente, Josué; Soriguer, Ramón; Figuerola, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) hosts the most polymorphic genes ever described in vertebrates. The MHC triggers the adaptive branch of the immune response, and its extraordinary variability is considered an evolutionary consequence of pathogen pressure. The last few years have witnessed the characterization of the MHC multigene family in a large diversity of bird species, unraveling important differences in its polymorphism, complexity, and evolution. Here, we characterize the first MHC class II B sequences isolated from a Rallidae species, the Eurasian Coot Fulica atra. A next-generation sequencing approach revealed up to 265 alleles that translated into 251 different amino acid sequences (β chain, exon 2) in 902 individuals. Bayesian inference identified up to 19 codons within the presumptive peptide-binding region showing pervasive evidence of positive, diversifying selection. Our analyses also detected a significant excess of high-frequency segregating sites (average Tajima's D = 2.36, P < 0.05), indicative of balancing selection. We found one to six different alleles per individual, consistent with the occurrence of at least three MHC class II B gene duplicates. However, the genotypes comprised of three alleles were by far the most abundant in the population investigated (49.4%), followed by those with two (29.6%) and four (17.5%) alleles. We suggest that these proportions are in agreement with the segregation of MHC haplotypes differing in gene copy number. The most widespread segregating haplotypes, according to our findings, would contain one single gene or two genes. The MHC class II of the Eurasian Coot is a valuable system to investigate the evolutionary implications of gene copy variation and extensive variability, the greatest ever found, to the best of our knowledge, in a wild population of a non-passerine bird. PMID:24683452

  12. Evolution of MHC class I genes in the endangered loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) revealed by 454 amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In evolutionary and conservation biology, parasitism is often highlighted as a major selective pressure. To fight against parasites and pathogens, genetic diversity of the immune genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are particularly important. However, the extensive degree of polymorphism observed in these genes makes it difficult to conduct thorough population screenings. Methods We utilized a genotyping protocol that uses 454 amplicon sequencing to characterize the MHC class I in the endangered loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) and to investigate their evolution at multiple relevant levels of organization. Results MHC class I genes revealed signatures of trans-species polymorphism across several reptile species. In the studied loggerhead turtle individuals, it results in the maintenance of two ancient allelic lineages. We also found that individuals carrying an intermediate number of MHC class I alleles are larger than those with either a low or high number of alleles. Conclusions Multiple modes of evolution seem to maintain MHC diversity in the loggerhead turtles, with relatively high polymorphism for an endangered species. PMID:23627726

  13. Common chimpanzees have greater diversity than humans at two of the three highly polymorphic MHC class I genes.

    PubMed

    Adams, E J; Cooper, S; Thomson, G; Parham, P

    2000-05-01

    MHC class I polymorphism improves the defense of vertebrate species against viruses and other intracellular pathogens. To see how polymorphism at the same class I genes can evolve in different species we compared the MHC-A, MHC-B, and MHC-C loci of common chimpanzees and humans. Diversity in 23 Patr-A, 32 Patr-B, and 18 Patr-C alleles obtained from study of 48 chimpanzees was compared to diversity in 66 HLA-A, 149 HLA-B, and 41 HLA-C alleles obtained from a study of over 1 million humans. At each locus, alleles group hierarchically into families and then lineages. No alleles or families are shared by the two species, commonality being seen only at the lineage level. The overall nucleotide sequence diversity of MHC class I is estimated to be greater for modern chimpanzees than humans. Considering the numbers of lineages, families, and alleles, Patr-B and Patr-C have greater diversity than the HLA-B and HLA-C, respectively. In contrast, Patr-A has less polymorphism than HLA-A, due to the absence of A2 lineage alleles. The results are consistent with ancestral humans having passed through a narrower population bottleneck than chimpanzees, and with pathogen-mediated selection having favored either preservation of A2 lineage alleles on the human line and/or their extinction on the chimpanzee line. PMID:10866107

  14. MHC Class IIB Exon 2 Polymorphism in the Grey Partridge (Perdix perdix) Is Shaped by Selection, Recombination and Gene Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Bryjová, Anna; Albrecht, Tomáš; Bryja, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Among bird species, the most studied major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is the chicken MHC. Although the number of studies on MHC in free-ranging species is increasing, the knowledge on MHC variation in species closely related to chicken is required to understand the peculiarities of bird MHC evolution. Here we describe the variation of MHC class IIB (MHCIIB) exon 2 in a population of the Grey partridge (Perdix perdix), a species of high conservation concern throughout Europe and an emerging galliform model in studies of sexual selection. We found 12 alleles in 108 individuals, but in comparison to other birds surprisingly many sites show signatures of historical positive selection. Individuals displayed between two to four alleles both on genomic and complementary DNA, suggesting the presence of two functional MHCIIB loci. Recombination and gene conversion appear to be involved in generating MHCIIB diversity in the Grey partridge; two recombination breakpoints and several gene conversion events were detected. In phylogenetic analysis of galliform MHCIIB, the Grey partridge alleles do not cluster together, but are scattered through the tree instead. Thus, our results indicate that the Grey partridge MHCIIB is comparable to most other galliforms in terms of copy number and population polymorphism. PMID:23935938

  15. Partial MHC class II constructs inhibit MIF/CD74 binding and downstream effects.

    PubMed

    Benedek, Gil; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Andrew, Shayne; Leng, Lin; Burrows, Gregory G; Bourdette, Dennis; Offner, Halina; Bucala, Richard; Vandenbark, Arthur A

    2013-05-01

    MIF and its receptor, CD74, are pivotal regulators of the immune system. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that partial MHC class II constructs comprised of linked β1α1 domains with covalently attached antigenic peptides (also referred to as recombinant T-cell receptor ligands - RTLs) can inhibit MIF activity by not only blocking the binding of rhMIF to immunopurified CD74, but also downregulating CD74 cell-surface expression. This bifunctional inhibition of MIF/CD74 interactions blocked downstream MIF effects, including enhanced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, anti-apoptotic activity, and inhibition of random migration that all contribute to the reversal of clinical and histological signs of EAE. Moreover, we demonstrate that enhanced CD74 cell-surface expression on monocytes in mice with EAE and subjects with multiple sclerosis can be downregulated by humanized RTLs, resulting in reduced MIF binding to the cells. Thus, binding of partial MHC complexes to CD74 blocks both the accessibility and availability of CD74 for MIF binding and downstream inflammatory activity. PMID:23576302

  16. High levels of MHC class II allelic diversity in lake trout from Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorschner, M.O.; Duris, T.; Bronte, C.R.; Burnham-Curtis, M. K.; Phillips, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    Sequence variation in a 216 bp portion of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II B1 domain was examined in 74 individual lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from different locations in Lake Superior. Forty-three alleles were obtained which encoded 71-72 amino acids of the mature protein. These sequences were compared with previous data obtained from five Pacific salmon species and Atlantic salmon using the same primers. Although all of the lake trout alleles clustered together in the neighbor-joining analysis of amino acid sequences, one amino acid allelic lineage was shared with Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), a species in another genus which probably diverged from Salvelinus more than 10-20 million years ago. As shown previously in other salmonids, the level of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution (d(N)) exceeded the level of synonymous substitution (d(S)). The level of nucleotide diversity at the MHC class II B1 locus was considerably higher in lake trout than in the Pacific salmon (genus Oncorhynchus). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that lake trout colonized Lake Superior from more than one refuge following the Wisconsin glaciation. Recent population bottlenecks may have reduced nucleotide diversity in Pacific salmon populations.

  17. Partial MHC class II constructs inhibit MIF/CD74 binding and downstream effects

    PubMed Central

    Benedek, Gil; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Andrew, Shayne; Leng, Lin; Burrows, Gregory G.; Bourdette, Dennis; Offner, Halina; Bucala, Richard; Vandenbark, Arthur A.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and its receptor, CD74, are pivotal regulators of the immune system. Here we demonstrate for the first time that partial MHC class II constructs comprised of linked β1α1 domains with covalently attached antigenic peptides (also referred to as recombinant T-cell receptor ligands - RTLs) can inhibit MIF activity by not only blocking the binding of rhMIF to immunopurified CD74, but also down-regulating CD74 cell-surface expression. This bi-functional inhibition of MIF/CD74 interactions blocked downstream MIF effects, including enhanced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, anti-apoptotic activity and inhibition of random migration that all contribute to the reversal of clinical and histological signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Moreover, we demonstrate that enhanced CD74 cell surface expression on monocytes in mice with EAE and subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS) can be down-regulated by humanized RTLs, resulting in reduced MIF binding to the cells. Thus, binding of partial MHC complexes to CD74 blocks both the accessibility and availability of CD74 for MIF binding and downstream inflammatory activity. PMID:23576302

  18. Porcine MHC classical class I genes are coordinately expressed in superantigen-activated mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kametani, Yoshie; Ohshima, Shino; Kita, Yuki F; Shimada, Shin; Kamiguchi, Hiroshi; Shiina, Takashi; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Kulski, Jerzy K; Ando, Asako

    2012-08-15

    The expression of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) classical class I genes is important for the adaptive immune response to target virus-infected cells and cancer cells. The up-regulation of the MHC is achieved by hormonal/cytokine signals including IFN-γ-inducible elements. The swine leukocyte antigen (SLA), the MHC class I region of pigs, consists of the duplicated classical class I genes, SLA-1, SLA-2 and SLA-3, but the molecular mechanisms involved in their up-regulation after T cell stimulation have not been fully elucidated. In order to better understand some of the putative regulatory mechanisms of SLA class I gene expression in activated T cells, we examined the coordinated expression of the SLA classical class I, IFN-γ and interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) genes in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of SLA homozygous Clawn miniature swine stimulated for 72 h with either IFN-γ or an enterotoxin produced by Staphylococcus aureus. This enterotoxin, toxic shock syndrome-1 (TSST-1), is known to act as a superantigen (sAG) to activate the T cells in various vertebrate species. We showed by using mAbs and flow cytometry that the CD4(+)CD25(+) cell number of swine PBMCs was also increased by TSST-1 and to a lesser degree by IFN-γ. Time course analyses of the expression of the IFN-γ, IRF-1 and the three classical class I genes, SLA-1, SLA-2, and SLA-3, in PBMCs by quantitative real-time PCR revealed a transitory response to TSST-1 or IFN-γ stimulation. The IFN-γ mRNA levels in the PBMCs were continuously up-regulated over the first 48 h by TSST-1 or IFN-γ. In contrast, SLA class I expression moderately increased at 24h and then decreased to a baseline level or less at 72 h of IFN-γ or TSST-1 stimulation. The three classical SLA class I genes showed similar expression kinetics, although SLA-3 mRNA level was consistently lower than those of SLA-1 and -2. The expression of IRF-1, a modulator of SLA expression, showed similar

  19. Inflammatory bowel diseases influence major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) and II compartments in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bär, F; Sina, C; Hundorfean, G; Pagel, R; Lehnert, H; Fellermann, K; Büning, J

    2013-05-01

    Antigen presentation by intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) is crucial for intestinal homeostasis. Disturbances of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I)- and II-related presentation pathways in IEC appear to be involved in an altered activation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in inflammatory bowel disease. However, a comprehensive analysis of MHC I- and II-enriched compartments in IEC of the small and large bowel in the healthy state as opposed to inflammatory bowel diseases is lacking. The aim of this study was to characterize the subcellular expression of MHC I and II in the endocytic pathway of IEC throughout all parts of the intestinal tract, and to identify differences between the healthy state and inflammatory bowel diseases. Biopsies were taken by endoscopy from the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon in healthy individuals (n = 20). In Crohn's disease (CD), biopsies were obtained from the ileum and colon and within the colon from ulcerative colitis (UC) patients (n = 15). Analysis of IEC was performed by immunoelectron microscopy. MHC I and II were identified in early endosomes and multi-vesicular, multi-lamellar, electrondense and vacuolar late endosomes. Both molecules were enriched in multi-vesicular bodies. No differences were found between the distinct parts of the gut axis. In CD and UC the expression of MHC I and II showed a shift from multi-vesicular bodies towards the basolateral membranes. Within the multi-vesicular bodies, MHC I and II moved from internal vesicles to the limiting membranes upon inflammation in CD and UC. MHC I- and II-enriched compartments in IEC were identical in all parts of the small and large bowel. CD and UC appear to modulate the MHC I- and II-related presentation pathways of exogenous antigens in IEC. PMID:23574324

  20. Identification and characterization of a novel splicing variant of the MHC classI-related Neonatal Fc receptor for IgG

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The neonatal Fc receptor for IgG (FcRn), a MHC class I-related molecule, functions to transport maternal IgG into the fetus or newborn via placenta and/or intestine and protects IgG from catabolism. The mRNAs of several MHC class I-related molecules have multiple splicing variants. In the course of ...

  1. Genetic characterization of MHC class II DQB exon 2 variants in gayal (Bos frontalis)

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yongke; Xi, Dongmei; Li, Guozhi; Hao, Tiantian; Chen, Yuhan; Yang, Yuai

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, exon 2 of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II DQB gene from 39 gayals (Bos frontalis) was isolated, characterized and compared with previously reported patterns for other bovidae. It was revealed by sequence analyses that there are 36 DQB exon 2 variants among 39 gayals. These variants exhibited a high degree of nucleotide and amino acid substitutions with most amino acid variations occurring at positions forming the peptide-binding sites (PBS). The DQB loci were analysed for patterns of synonymous (d S) and non-synonymous (d N) substitution. The gayals were observed to be under strong balancing selection in the DQB exon 2 PBS (d N = 0.094, P = 0.001). It appears that this variability among gayals could confer the ability to mount immune responses to a wide variety of peptides or pathogens. PMID:26019566

  2. Quantitating MHC class II trafficking in primary dendritic cells using imaging flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Hennies, Cassandra M.; Lehn, Maria A.; Janssen, Edith M.

    2015-01-01

    Presentation of antigenic peptides in MHC class II (MHCII) on dendritic cells (DCs) is the first step in the activation of antigen-specific CD4+T cells. The expression of surface MHCII-peptide complexes is tightly regulated as the frequency of MHCII-peptide complexes can affect the magnitude, as well as the phenotype of the ensuing CD4+T cell response. The surface MHCII-peptide levels are determined by the balance between expression of newly generated complexes, complex internalization, and their subsequent re-emergence or degradation. However, the molecular mechanisms that underpin these processes are still poorly understood. Here we describe a multispectral imaging flow cytometry assay to visualize MHCII trafficking that can be used as a tool to dissect the molecular mechanisms that regulate MHCII homeostasis in primary mouse and human DCs. PMID:25967952

  3. Exploring genome-wide datasets of MHC class II antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Wijdeven, Ruud H; Bakker, Jeroen M; Paul, Petra; Neefjes, Jacques

    2013-09-01

    MHC class II molecules (MHCII) are critical for presenting antigens to CD4(+) T-cells. They control ignition of CD4(+) T cells and are as such involved in most auto-immune diseases. To define proteins and pathways controlling MHCII antigen presentation and expression, we performed a genome-wide flow cytometry based RNAi screen. Hits were subsequently classified by two screens that monitored the intracellular distribution and transcription of MHCII. This multi-dimensional approach allowed subclassification of hits into functional groups as a first step to defining new pathways controlling MHCII antigen presentation. The datasets from this screen are used as a template for several follow-up studies. This overview focuses on how data from genome-wide screens can be used for target-lead finding, data mining, systems biology and systematic cell biology. PMID:23137594

  4. Cross-Presentation of Cell-Associated Antigens by MHC Class I in Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Martínez, Enric; Planès, Remi; Anselmi, Giorgio; Reynolds, Matthew; Menezes, Shinelle; Adiko, Aimé Cézaire; Saveanu, Loredana; Guermonprez, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have the unique ability to pick up dead cells carrying antigens in tissue and migrate to the lymph nodes where they can cross-present cell-associated antigens by MHC class I to CD8+ T cells. There is strong in vivo evidence that the mouse XCR1+ DCs subset acts as a key player in this process. The intracellular processes underlying cross-presentation remain controversial and several pathways have been proposed. Indeed, a wide number of studies have addressed the cellular process of cross-presentation in vitro using a variety of sources of antigen and antigen-presenting cells. Here, we review the in vivo and in vitro evidence supporting the current mechanistic models and disscuss their physiological relevance to the cross-presentation of cell-associated antigens by DCs subsets. PMID:26236315

  5. Absence of MHC class II on cDCs results in microbial-dependent intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Loschko, Jakob; Schreiber, Heidi A; Rieke, Gereon J; Esterházy, Daria; Meredith, Matthew M; Pedicord, Virginia A; Yao, Kai-Hui; Caballero, Silvia; Pamer, Eric G; Mucida, Daniel; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-04-01

    Conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) play an essential role in host immunity by initiating adaptive T cell responses and by serving as innate immune sensors. Although both innate and adaptive functions of cDCs are well documented, their relative importance in maintaining immune homeostasis is poorly understood. To examine the significance of cDC-initiated adaptive immunity in maintaining homeostasis, independent of their innate activities, we generated a cDC-specific Cre mouse and crossed it to a floxed MHC class II (MHCII) mouse. Absence of MHCII on cDCs resulted in chronic intestinal inflammation that was alleviated by antibiotic treatment and entirely averted under germ-free conditions. Uncoupling innate and adaptive functions of cDCs revealed that innate immune functions of cDCs are insufficient to maintain homeostasis and antigen presentation by cDCs is essential for a mutualistic relationship between the host and intestinal bacteria. PMID:27001748

  6. Differential MHC class II expression on human peripheral blood monocytes and dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, C F; Moore, M

    1988-01-01

    Both monocytes (MO) and dendritic cells (DC) in human peripheral blood are of a plastic-adherent nature. The expression of the MHC class II sublocus products HLA-DP, -DQ and -DR on human peripheral blood transiently adherent cells (TA) was examined by an immunocytochemical staining technique. While most TA showed strong expression of molecules of the HLA-DR subtype, only a small proportion of cells (2-6%) showed strong HLA-DP or -DQ positivity. This strong expression of the HLA-DP and HLA-DQ sublocus products by a subset of TA was seen only after short-term culture; freshly isolated cells expressed comparatively low levels of these molecules. Enrichment for Fc receptor-negative or low-density cells from TA produced populations with strong HLA-DQ and -DP expression. Such co-enrichment of the strongly HLA-DQ+ and strongly HLA-DP+ cells suggests that the same cells express high levels of both types of MHC class II molecule. Immunocytochemical analysis of TA indicated that the strongly HLA-DQ+ cells, at least, were only weakly or non-reactive with the MO-specific monoclonal antibodies OKM1, UCHM1, MO2 and EB11. In addition, strongly HLA-DQ- or -DP-positive cells were poorly phagocytic in comparison with the majority of adherent cells. The apparent FcR-negative, low-density and weakly phagocytic nature of the strongly HLA-DQ/DP+ cells, combined with their lack of reactivity with several MO-specific antibodies, suggests that they may represent the DC component of TA. Such strong HLA-DQ/DP expression by DC may aid their positive identification in human peripheral blood and may be of relevance to DC function in antigen presentation. Images Figure 1 PMID:3350576

  7. Analysis of T-cell hybridomas with an unusual MHC class II-dependent ligand specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Mendiratta, S K; Singh, N; Bal, V; Rath, S

    1996-01-01

    We have characterized two unusual T-cell hybridomas, 1E3 and 3B8, from H-2k mice immunized with I-Ab-transfected L cells (H-2k), that are stimulated by L cells transfected with I-Ab, I-Ak or I-Eb, but not by non-transfected L cells. These hybridomas could not be stimulated by spleen cells from H-2i3, H-2k, H-2b or H-2d mice. Monoclonal anti-I-A antibodies did not block their responses, suggesting that mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules may be peptide donors rather than restriction elements for them. The stimulation of these hybridomas by fibroblast targets was not blocked by an anti-H-2kk, Dk-specific monoclonal antibody. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated splenic and peritoneal exudate cells from H-2k, H-2d, H-2i3, H-2b as well as beta 2-microglobulin-deficient, TAP-1-deficient and I-A alpha-deficient H-2b mice stimulated these hybridomas. LPS could also activate a macrophage cell line, but not a B-cell line, to become stimulatory for 1E3. A rat antiserum against untransfected L cells specifically and significantly blocked the response of 1E3. Thus, 1E3 may recognize a conserved murine MHC class II peptide loaded in a TAP-1-independent fashion on a non-classical, monomorphic, beta 2-microglobulin-independent restriction element. PMID:8943720

  8. Mutant MHC class II epitopes drive therapeutic immune responses to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kreiter, Sebastian; Vormehr, Mathias; van de Roemer, Niels; Diken, Mustafa; Löwer, Martin; Diekmann, Jan; Boegel, Sebastian; Schrörs, Barbara; Vascotto, Fulvia; Castle, John C.; Tadmor, Arbel D.; Schoenberger, Stephen P.; Huber, Christoph; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Tumour-specific mutations are ideal targets for cancer immunotherapy as they lack expression in healthy tissues and can potentially be recognized as neo-antigens by the mature T-cell repertoire. Their systematic targeting by vaccine approaches, however, has been hampered by the fact that every patient’s tumour possesses a unique set of mutations (‘the mutanome’) that must first be identified. Recently, we proposed a personalized immunotherapy approach to target the full spectrum of a patient’s individual tumour-specific mutations1. Here we show in three independent murine tumour models that a considerable fraction of non-synonymous cancer mutations is immunogenic and that, unexpectedly, the majority of the immunogenic mutanome is recognized by CD4+ T cells. Vaccination with such CD4+ immunogenic mutations confers strong antitumour activity. Encouraged by these findings, we established a process by which mutations identified by exome sequencing could be selected as vaccine targets solely through bioinformatic prioritization on the basis of their expression levels and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-binding capacity for rapid production as synthetic poly-neo-epitope messenger RNA vaccines. We show that vaccination with such polytope mRNA vaccines induces potent tumour control and complete rejection of established aggressively growing tumours in mice. Moreover, we demonstrate that CD4+ T cell neo-epitope vaccination reshapes the tumour microenvironment and induces cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses against an independent immunodominant antigen in mice, indicating orchestration of antigen spread. Finally, we demonstrate an abundance of mutations predicted to bind to MHC class II in human cancers as well by employing the same predictive algorithm on corresponding human cancer types. Thus, the tailored immunotherapy approach introduced here may be regarded as a universally applicable blueprint for comprehensive exploitation of the substantial neo

  9. Alternative Antigen Processing for MHC Class I: Multiple Roads Lead to Rome

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Cláudia C.; van Hall, Thorbald

    2015-01-01

    The well described conventional antigen-processing pathway is accountable for most peptides that end up in MHC class I molecules at the cell surface. These peptides experienced liberation by the proteasome and transport by the peptide transporter TAP. However, there are multiple roads that lead to Rome, illustrated by the increasing number of alternative processing pathways that have been reported during last years. Interestingly, TAP-deficient individuals do not succumb to viral infections, suggesting that CD8 T cell immunity is sufficiently supported by alternative TAP-independent processing pathways. To date, a diversity of viral and endogenous TAP-independent peptides have been identified in the grooves of different MHC class I alleles. Some of these peptides are not displayed by normal TAP-positive cells and we therefore called them TEIPP, for “T-cell epitopes associated with impaired peptide processing.” TEIPPs are hidden self-antigens, are derived from normal housekeeping proteins, and are processed via unconventional processing pathways. Per definition, TEIPPs are presented via TAP-independent pathways, but recent data suggest that part of this repertoire still depend on proteasome and metalloprotease activity. An exception is the C-terminal peptide of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-membrane-spanning ceramide synthase Trh4 that is surprisingly liberated by the signal peptide peptidase (SPP), the proteolytic enzyme involved in cleaving leader sequences. The intramembrane cleaving SPP is thereby an important contributor of TAP-independent peptides. Its family members, like the Alzheimer’s related presenilins, might contribute as well, according to our preliminary data. Finally, alternative peptide routing is an emerging field and includes processes like the unfolded protein response, the ER-associated degradation, and autophagy-associated vesicular pathways. These data convince us that there is a world to be discovered in the field of unconventional

  10. MHC class I-restricted cytotoxic lymphocyte responses induced by enterotoxin-based mucosal adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Simmons, C P; Mastroeni, P; Fowler, R; Ghaem-maghami, M; Lycke, N; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R; Dougan, G

    1999-12-15

    The ability of enterotoxin-based mucosal adjuvants to induce CD8+ MHC class I-restricted CTL responses to a codelivered bystander Ag was examined. Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin (LT), or derivatives of LT carrying mutations in the A subunit (LTR72, LTK63), were tested in parallel with cholera toxin (CT) or a fusion protein consisting of the A1 subunit of CT fused to the Ig binding domain of Staphylococcus aureus protein A (called CTA1-DD). Intranasal (i.n.) immunization of C57BL/6 mice with CT, CTA1-DD, LT, LTR72, LTK63, but not rLT-B, elicited MHC class I-restricted CD8+ T cell responses to coadministered OVA or the OVA CTL peptide SIINFEKL (OVA257-264). CT, LT, and LTR72 also induced CTL responses to OVA after s.c. or oral coimmunization whereas LTK63 only activated responses after s.c. coimmunization. rLT-B was unable to adjuvant CTL responses to OVA or OVA257-264 administered by any route. Mice treated with an anti-CD4 mAb to deplete CD4+ T cells mounted significant OVA-specific CTL responses after i.n. coadministration of LT with OVA or OVA257-264. Both 51Cr release assays and IFN-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot assays indicated that IFN-gamma-/- and IL-12 p40-/- gene knockout mice developed CTL responses equivalent to those detected in normal C57BL/6 mice. The results highlight the versatility of toxin-based adjuvants and suggest that LT potentiates CTL responses independently of IL-12 and IFN-gamma and probably by a mechanism unrelated to cross-priming. PMID:10586042

  11. A predominant role for the HLA class II region in the association of the MHC region with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, Matthew R; Montpetit, Alexandre; Cader, M Zameel; Saarela, Janna; Dyment, David A; Tiislar, Milvi; Ferretti, Vincent; Tienari, Pentti J; Sadovnick, A Dessa; Peltonen, Leena; Ebers, George C; Hudson, Thomas J

    2005-10-01

    Genetic susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is associated with genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), particularly HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 (ref. 1). Both locus and allelic heterogeneity have been reported in this genomic region. To clarify whether HLA-DRB1 itself, nearby genes in the region encoding the MHC or combinations of these loci underlie susceptibility to multiple sclerosis, we genotyped 1,185 Canadian and Finnish families with multiple sclerosis (n = 4,203 individuals) with a high-density SNP panel spanning the genes encoding the MHC and flanking genomic regions. Strong associations in Canadian and Finnish samples were observed with blocks in the HLA class II genomic region (P < 4.9 x 10(-13) and P < 2.0 x 10(-16), respectively), but the strongest association was with HLA-DRB1 (P < 4.4 x 10(-17)). Conditioning on either HLA-DRB1 or the most significant HLA class II haplotype block found no additional block or SNP association independent of the HLA class II genomic region. This study therefore indicates that MHC-associated susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is determined by HLA class II alleles, their interactions and closely neighboring variants. PMID:16186814

  12. Presence of specific MHC Class II expressed alleles associates with clinical disease in ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) infected sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genetic tool hypothesized to predict which OPPV infected sheep will progress to debilitating clinical disease is MHC Class II Ovis aries (Ovar)-DRB1. Previously, fifteen Ovar-DRB1 beta 1 expressed alleles were identified in a ewe-lamb flock of 32 originating from an Idaho flock using RT-PCR, clon...

  13. Upregulation of MHC class I in transgenic mice results in reduced force-generating capacity in slow-twitch muscle.

    PubMed

    Salomonsson, Stina; Grundtman, Cecilia; Zhang, Shi-Jin; Lanner, Johanna T; Li, Charles; Katz, Abram; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Westerblad, Håkan

    2009-05-01

    Expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I in skeletal muscle fibers is an early and consistent finding in inflammatory myopathies. To test if MHC class I has a primary role in muscle impairment, we used transgenic mice with inducible overexpression of MHC class I in their skeletal muscle cells. Contractile function was studied in isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL, fast-twitch) and soleus (slow-twitch) muscles. We found that EDL was smaller, whereas soleus muscle was slightly larger. Both muscles generated less absolute force in myopathic compared with control mice; however, when force was expressed per cross-sectional area, only soleus muscle generated less force. Inflammation was markedly increased, but no changes were found in the activities of key mitochondrial and glycogenolytic enzymes in myopathic mice. The induction of MHC class I results in muscle atrophy and an intrinsic decrease in force-generation capacity. These observations may have important implications for our understanding of the pathophysiological processes of muscle weakness seen in inflammatory myopathies. Muscle Nerve, 2008. PMID:19229963

  14. Pulse-chase analysis for studies of MHC class II biosynthesis, maturation, and peptide loading

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Tieying; Rinderknecht, Cornelia H; Hadjinicolaou, Andreas V; Busch, Robert; Mellins, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Pulse-chase analysis is a commonly used technique for studying the synthesis, processing and transport of proteins. Cultured cells expressing proteins of interest are allowed to take up radioactively labeled amino acids for a brief interval (“pulse”), during which all newly synthesized proteins incorporate the label. The cells are then returned to non-radioactive culture medium for various times (“chase”), during which proteins may undergo conformational changes, trafficking, or degradation. Proteins of interest are isolated (usually by immunoprecipitation) and resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and the fate of radiolabeled molecules is examined by autoradiography. This chapter describes a pulse-chase protocol suitable for studies of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II biosynthesis and maturation. We discuss how results are affected by the recognition by certain anti-class II antibodies of distinct class II conformations associated with particular biosynthetic states. Our protocol can be adapted to follow the fate of many other endogenously synthesized proteins, including viral or transfected gene products, in cultured cells. PMID:23329504

  15. Outer membrane proteins preferentially load MHC class II peptides: Implications for as a Chlamydia trachomatis T cell vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Karuna P.; Yu, Hong; Jiang, Xiaozhou; Chan, Queenie; Moon, Kyung-Mee; Foster, Leonard J.; Brunham, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    CD4 T cell immune responses such as interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α secretion are necessary for Chlamydia immunity. We used an immunoproteomic approach in which Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia muridarum-derived peptides presented by MHC class II molecules on the surface of infected dendritic cells (DCs) were identified by tandem mass spectrometry using bone marrow derived DCs (BMDCs) from mice of different MHC background. We first compared the C. muridarum immunoproteome in C3H mice to that previously identified in C57BL/6 mice. Fourteen MHC class II binding peptides from 11 Chlamydia proteins were identified from C3H infected BMDCs. Two C. muridarum proteins overlapped between C3H and C57B/6 mice and both were polymorphic membrane proteins (Pmps) which presented distinct class II binding peptides. Next we studied DCs from C57BL/6 mice infected with the human strain, C. trachomatis serovar D. Sixty MHC class II binding peptides derived from 27 C. trachomatis proteins were identified. Nine proteins were orthologous T cell antigens between C. trachomatis and C. muridarum and 2 of the nine were Pmps which generated MHC class II binding epitopes at distinct sequences within the proteins. As determined by antigen specific splenocyte responses outer membrane proteins PmpF, -G and -H and the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) were antigenic in mice previously infected with C. muridarum or C. trachomatis. Furthermore a recombinant protein vaccine consisting of the four Pmps (PmpEFGH) with MOMP formulated with a Th1 polarizing adjuvant significantly accelerated (p < 0.001) clearance in the C57BL/6 mice C. trachomatis transcervical infection model. We conclude that Chlamydia outer membrane proteins are important T cell antigens useful in the development of a C. trachomatis subunit vaccine. PMID:25738816

  16. Domain structures and molecular evolution of class I and class II major histocompatibility gene complex (MHC) products deduced from amino acid and nucleotide sequence homologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Koji

    1984-12-01

    Domain structures of class I and class II MHC products were analyzed from a viewpoint of amino acid and nucleotide sequence homologies. Alignment statistics revealed that class I (transplantation) antigen H chains consist of four mutually homologous domains, and that class II (HLA-DR) antigen β and α chains are both composed of three mutually homologous ones. The N-terminal three and two domains of class I and class II (both β and α) gene products, respectively, all of which being ˜90 residues long, were concluded to be homologous to β2-microglobulin (β2M). The membraneembedded C-terminal shorter domains of these MHC products were also found to be homologous to one another and to the third domain of class I H chains. Class I H chains were found to be more closely related to class II α chains than to class II β chains. Based on these findings, an exon duplication history from a common ancestral gene encoding a β2M-like primodial protein of one-domain-length up to the contemporary MHC products was proposed.

  17. Giving CD4+ T cells the slip: viral interference with MHC class II-restricted antigen processing and presentation.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Katherine S; Eisenlohr, Laurence C

    2016-06-01

    Activation of CD4+ T cells through interactions with peptides bound to Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II (MHC-II) molecules is a crucial step in clearance of most pathogens. Consequently, many viruses have evolved ways of blocking this aspect of adaptive immunity, from specific targeting of processing and presentation components to modulation of signaling pathways that regulate peptide presentation in addition to many other host defense mechanisms. Such cases of interference are far less common compared to what has been elucidated in MHC-I processing and presentation. This may be attributable in part to the complexity of MHC-II antigen processing, the scope of which is only now coming to light. PMID:27115617

  18. The orthology of HLA-E and H2-Qa1 is hidden by their concerted evolution with other MHC class I molecules

    PubMed Central

    Joly, Etienne; Rouillon, Virginie

    2006-01-01

    Background Whether MHC molecules undergo concerted evolution or not has been the subject of a long-standing debate. Results By comparing sequences of eight functional homologues of HLA-E from primates and rodents with those of MHC class Ia molecules from the same eight species, we find that different portions of MHC class I molecules undergo different patterns of evolution. By focusing our analyses sequentially on these various portions, we have obtained clear evidence for concerted evolution of MHC class I molecules, suggesting the occurrence of extensive interallelic and intergenic exchanges. Intra-species homogenisation of sequences is particularly noticeable at the level of exon 4, which codes for the α3 domain, but our results suggest that homogenisation also concerns certain residues of the α1–α2 codomain that lie outside the antigen recognition site. Conclusion A model is presented in which Darwinian selective pressures due to pathogens could, at the same time, favour diversification of MHC class Ia molecules and promote concerted evolution of separate loci by spreading advantageous motifs arising by mutations in individual MHC molecules to other alleles and to other loci of the MHC region. This would also allow MHC molecules to co-evolve with the proteins with which they interact to fulfil their functions of antigen presentation and regulation of NK cell activity. One of the raisons d'être of the MHC may therefore be to favour at the same time both diversification of MHC class Ia molecules and homogenisation of the whole pool of MHC class I molecules (Ia and Ib) involved in antigen presentation. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Stephan Beck, Lutz Walter and Pierre Pontarotti. PMID:16542007

  19. Characterisation of non-classical MHC class I genes in the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine

    2014-12-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is a carnivorous marsupial that is under threat of extinction due to an unusual transmissible disease called Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). Previous studies on the classical MHC genes have provided important insights into immune responses in this endangered species; however, so far, very little is known about the non-classical MHC genes of this species, which can also play significant roles in the immune system. Here, we report characterisation of five non-classical class I genes in the Tasmanian devil, including Saha-UD, -UK, -UM, -MR1 and -CD1. Saha-UD has been isolated previously and is known to have low genetic polymorphism, though its categorisation as classical or non-classical gene has remained undetermined. In this study, we observed tissue-specific expression of Saha-UD, suggesting that it is more characteristic of a non-classical gene. Restricted tissue expression patterns were also observed for other genes, with an exception of Saha-MR1 being ubiquitously expressed in all examined tissues. Saha-UK, -UM and -MR1 were found to be genetically monomorphic, while four alleles were found at Saha-CD1 with signs of positive selection detected within the α1 domain. Among the four Saha-CD1 alleles, one predominant allele (Saha-CD1*01) showed a high allele frequency of 0.906 in the Tasmanian devil population, resulting in a low heterozygosity (0.188) at this locus. Alternative splicing takes place in Saha-CD1, giving rise to a full-length transcript and a splice variant lacking intact antigen-binding, β2m-binding, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. PMID:25267059

  20. Absence of nonhematopoietic MHC class II expression protects mice from experimental autoimmune myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Thelemann, Christoph; Haller, Sergio; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Kania, Gabriela; Rosa, Muriel; Eriksson, Urs; Rotman, Samuel; Reith, Walter; Acha-Orbea, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) is a CD4(+) T-cell-mediated model of human inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathies. Heart-specific CD4(+) T-cell activation is dependent on autoantigens presented by MHC class II (MHCII) molecules expressed on professional APCs. In this study, we addressed the role of inflammation-induced MHCII expression by cardiac nonhematopoietic cells on EAM development. EAM was induced in susceptible mice lacking inducible expression of MHCII molecules on all nonhematopoietic cells (pIV-/- K14 class II transactivator (CIITA) transgenic (Tg) mice) by immunization with α-myosin heavy chain peptide in CFA. Lack of inducible nonhematopoietic MHCII expression in pIV-/- K14 CIITA Tg mice conferred EAM resistance. In contrast, cardiac pathology was induced in WT and heterozygous mice, and correlated with elevated cardiac endothelial MHCII expression. Control mice with myocarditis displayed an increase in infiltrating CD4(+) T cells and in expression of IFN-γ, which is the major driver of nonhematopoietic MHCII expression. Mechanistically, IFN-γ neutralization in WT mice shortly before disease onset resulted in reduced cardiac MHCII expression and pathology. These findings reveal a previously overlooked contribution of IFN-γ to induce endothelial MHCII expression in the heart and to progress cardiac pathology during myocarditis. PMID:26621778

  1. Alternative donor SCT for the treatment of MHC class II deficiency.

    PubMed

    Small, T N; Qasim, W; Friedrich, W; Chiesa, R; Bleesing, J J; Scurlock, A; Veys, P; Sparber-Sauer, M

    2013-02-01

    MHC Class II deficiency is a rare primary immunodeficiency disease characterized by absent HLA Class II expression resulting in CD4 lymphopenia, lack of Ag-specific responses and recurrent infection. Without successful allogeneic SCT, most children succumb to infection within the first decade of life. To date, alternative donor transplants for this disorder have been inferior to SCT for other forms of combined immunodeficiency disease due to an increased incidence of graft rejection, GVHD and death from infections generally acquired before haematopoietic cell transplantation. This study details the transplant outcome of 16 affected children consecutively transplanted at four centers since 1990, 8 of whom required mechanical ventilation pretransplant. Stem cells were derived from an HLA-mismatched family member (n=10), an HLA-matched unrelated adult donor (n=4), or an unrelated cord blood donor (n=2). Graft failure occurred in five children, all of whom underwent a second SCT. Six patients developed acute GVHD although no patient developed chronic GVHD after primary transplantation. CD4 T-cell reconstitution remained below the normal range for age, suggesting defective thymopoiesis after allo-SCT. Nonetheless, 69% of children survive without GVHD at a median follow-up of 5.7 years, indicating improved outcomes compared with previous studies. PMID:23000650

  2. New polymorphic microsatellite markers in the human MHC class III region.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaka, Y; Makino, S; Nakajima, K; Tomizawa, M; Oka, A; Bahram, S; Kulski, J K; Tamiya, G; Inoko, H

    2001-05-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class III region spanning approximately 760 kb is characterized by a remarkably high gene density with 59 expressed genes (one gene every 12.9 kb). Recently, susceptibility loci to numerous diseases, such as Graves disease, Crohn disease, and SLE have been suggested to be localized to this region, as assessed by associations mainly with genetic polymorphisms of TNF and TNF-linked microsatellite loci. However, it has been difficult to precisely localize these susceptibility loci to a single gene due to a paucity to date of polymorphic markers in the HLA class III region. To facilitate disease mapping within this region, we have analyzed 2 approximately 5 bases short tandem repeats (microsatellites) in this region. A total of 297 microsatellites were identified from the genomic sequence, consisting of 69 di-, 62 tri-, 107 tetra-, and 59 penta-nucleotide repeats. It was noted that among them as many as 17 microsatellites were located within the coding sequence of expressed genes (NOTCH4, PBX2, RAGE, G16, LPAAT, PPT2, TNXB, P450-CYP21B, G9a, HSP70-2, HSP70-1, HSP-hom, MuTSH5 and BAT2). Eight microsatellite repeats were collected as polymorphic markers due to their high number of alleles (11.9 on average) as well as their high polymorphic content value (PIC) (0.63). By combining the 38 and the 22 polymorphic microsatellites we have previously collected in the HLA class I and class II regions, respectively, we have now established a total of 68 novel genetic markers which are uniformly interspersed with a high density of one every 63.3 kb throughout the HLA region. This collection of polymorphic microsatellites will enable us to search for the location of any disease susceptible loci within the HLA region by association analysis. PMID:11556964

  3. MHC class II alleles and haplotypes in patients with pemphigus vulgaris from India.

    PubMed

    Delgado, J C; Yunis, D E; Bozón, M V; Salazar, M; Deulofeut, R; Turbay, D; Mehra, N K; Pasricha, J S; Raval, R S; Patel, H; Shah, B K; Bhol, K; Alper, C A; Ahmed, A R; Yunis, E J

    1996-12-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes characterized by an autoantibody response against a keratinocyte adhesion molecule, desmoglein 3, causing acantholysis and blister formation. We compared high resolution MHC class II alleles and haplotype frequencies (HLA-DRB, DQA1 and DQB1) in 37 patients with PV to 89 haplotypes of normal relatives from New Delhi and Ahmedabad. We found that PV patients had significantly increased frequencies of DRB1*1404 (P < 0.0001), DQA1*0101 (P = 0.001), and DQB1*0503 (P < 0.0001). These associations were due to the increased frequencies of the haplotype HLA-DRB1*1404, DRB3*0202, DQA1*0101, DQB1*0503 in patients compared to control haplotypes (p < 0.0001). Also, patients from Ahmedabad had a significant increase in HLA-DQB1*0302 (p = 0.03). An identical amino acid sequence (Leu-Leu-Glu-Arg-Arg-Arg-Ala-Glu), in positions 67-74 of the beta domain of DRB alleles is restricted to some DR14 alleles. Therefore, there are three possible explanations for class II allele involvement in autoantibody in PV patients with class II haplotypes marked by HLA-DR14. First, the class II alleles could be markers for an unidentified susceptibility gene in linkage disequilibrium with them. Second, the primary association could be with DQB1*0503 and the association with HLA-DR14 alleles would be the result of linkage disequilibrium. Third, the HLA-DRB1 locus susceptibility could involve a specific amino acid sequence in the third hypervariable region shared by several HLA-DR14 alleles. PMID:9008309

  4. MHC Class I Expression by Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cells Is Required to Prevent NK Cell Attack in Allogeneic, but Not Syngeneic Recipient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Yuichi; Li, Hao-Wei; Takahashi, Kazuko; Ishii, Hiroshi; Sykes, Megan; Fujisaki, Joji

    2015-01-01

    NK cells resist engraftment of syngeneic and allogeneic bone marrow (BM) cells lacking major histocompatibility (MHC) class I molecules, suggesting a critical role for donor MHC class I molecules in preventing NK cell attack against donor hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), and their derivatives. However, using high-resolution in vivo imaging, we demonstrated here that syngeneic MHC class I knockout (KO) donor HSPCs persist with the same survival frequencies as wild-type donor HSPCs. In contrast, syngeneic MHC class I KO differentiated hematopoietic cells and allogeneic MHC class I KO HSPCs were rejected in a manner that was significantly inhibited by NK cell depletion. In vivo time-lapse imaging demonstrated that mice receiving allogeneic MHC class I KO HSPCs showed a significant increase in NK cell motility and proliferation as well as frequencies of NK cell contact with and killing of HSPCs as compared to mice receiving wild-type HSPCs. The data indicate that donor MHC class I molecules are required to prevent NK cell-mediated rejection of syngeneic differentiated cells and allogeneic HSPCs, but not of syngeneic HSPCs. PMID:26544200

  5. Macroautophagy Proteins Control MHC Class I Levels on Dendritic Cells and Shape Anti-viral CD8(+) T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Loi, Monica; Müller, Anne; Steinbach, Karin; Niven, Jennifer; Barreira da Silva, Rosa; Paul, Petra; Ligeon, Laure-Anne; Caruso, Assunta; Albrecht, Randy A; Becker, Andrea C; Annaheim, Nicolas; Nowag, Heike; Dengjel, Jörn; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Merkler, Doron; Münz, Christian; Gannagé, Monique

    2016-05-01

    The macroautophagy machinery has been implicated in MHC class II restricted antigen presentation. Here, we report that this machinery assists in the internalization of MHC class I molecules. In the absence of the autophagy factors Atg5 and Atg7, MHC class I surface levels are elevated due to decreased endocytosis and degradation. Internalization of MHC class I molecules occurs less efficiently if AAK1 cannot be recruited via Atg8/LC3B. In the absence of Atg-dependent MHC class I internalization, dendritic cells stimulate CD8(+) T cell responses more efficiently in vitro and in vivo. During viral infections, lack of Atg5 results in enhanced influenza- and LCMV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in vivo. Elevated influenza-specific CD8(+) T cell responses are associated with better immune control of this infection. Thus, the macroautophagy machinery orchestrates T cell immunity by supporting MHC class II but compromises MHC class I restricted antigen presentation. PMID:27117419

  6. A single nomenclature and associated database for alleles at the MHC class II DRB1 locus of sheep: IPD-MHC-OLA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of standardised nomenclatures with associated databases containing reference sequences for alleles at polymorphic loci within the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) has been facilitated by the development of the Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD-MHC). Recently, included within I...

  7. Enhanced Detection of Antigen-Specific CD4+ T Cells Using Altered Peptide Flanking Residue Peptide–MHC Class II Multimers

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Christopher J.; Dolton, Garry; Scurr, Martin; Ladell, Kristin; Schauenburg, Andrea J.; Miners, Kelly; Madura, Florian; Sewell, Andrew K.; Price, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorochrome-conjugated peptide–MHC (pMHC) class I multimers are staple components of the immunologist’s toolbox, enabling reliable quantification and analysis of Ag-specific CD8+ T cells irrespective of functional outputs. In contrast, widespread use of the equivalent pMHC class II (pMHC-II) reagents has been hindered by intrinsically weaker TCR affinities for pMHC-II, a lack of cooperative binding between the TCR and CD4 coreceptor, and a low frequency of Ag-specific CD4+ T cell populations in the peripheral blood. In this study, we show that peptide flanking regions, extending beyond the central nonamer core of MHC-II–bound peptides, can enhance TCR–pMHC-II binding and T cell activation without loss of specificity. Consistent with these findings, pMHC-II multimers incorporating peptide flanking residue modifications proved superior for the ex vivo detection, characterization, and manipulation of Ag-specific CD4+ T cells, highlighting an unappreciated feature of TCR–pMHC-II interactions. PMID:26553072

  8. Comparative molecular dynamics analysis of tapasin-dependent and -independent MHC class I alleles.

    SciTech Connect

    Sieker, Florian; Springer, Sebastian; Zacharias, Martin W.

    2007-02-01

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. MHC class I molecules load antigenic peptides in the endoplasmic reticulum and present them at the cell surface. Efficiency of peptide loading depends on the class I allele and can involve interaction with tapasin and other proteins of the loading complex. Allele HLA-B*4402 (Asp at position 116) depends on tapasin for efficient peptide loading, whereas HLA-B*4405 (identical to B*4402 except for Tyr116) can efficiently load peptides in the absence of tapasin. Both alleles adopt very similar structures in the presence of the same peptide. Comparative unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations on the 1/2 peptide binding domains performed in the presence of bound peptides resulted in structures in close agreement with experiments for both alleles. In the absence of peptides, allele-specific conformational changes occurred in the first segment of the 2-helix that flanks the peptide C-terminal binding region (F-pocket) and contacts residue 116. This segment is also close to the proposed tapasin contact region. For B*4402, a shift toward an altered F-pocket structure deviating significantly from the bound form was observed. Subsequent free energy simulations on induced F-pocket opening in B*4402 confirmed a conformation that deviated significantly from the bound structure. For B*4405, a free energy minimum close to the bound structure was found. The simulations suggest that B*4405 has a greater tendency to adopt a peptide receptive conformation in the absence of peptide, allowing tapasin-independent peptide loading. A possible role of tapasin could be the stabilization of a peptide-receptive class I conformation for HLA-B*4402 and other tapasin-dependent alleles.

  9. Positive Regulatory Domain I-Binding Factor 1 mediates repression of the MHC Class II Transactivator (CIITA) type IV promoter

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han; Gilbert, Carolyn A.; Hudson, John A.; Bolick, Sophia C.; Wright, Kenneth L.; Piskurich, Janet F.

    2006-01-01

    MHC class II transactivator (CIITA), a co-activator that controls MHC class II (MHC II) transcription, functions as the master regulator of MHC II expression. Persistent activity of the CIITA type III promoter (pIII), one of the four potential promoters of this gene, is responsible for constitutive expression of MHC II by B lymphocytes. In addition, IFN-γ induces expression of CIITA in these cells through the type IV promoter (pIV). Positive regulatory domain 1-binding factor 1 (PRDI-BF1), called B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp-1) in mice, represses the expression of CIITA pIII in plasma and multiple myeloma cells. To investigate regulation of CIITA pIV expression by PRDI-BF1 in the B lymphocyte lineage, protein/DNA binding studies, and functional promoter analyses were performed. PRDI-BF1 bound to the IRF-E site in CIITA pIV. Ectopic expression of either PRDI-BF1 or Blimp-1 repressed this promoter in B lymphocytes. In vitro binding and functional analyses of CIITA pIV demonstrated that the IFN regulatory factor-element (IRF-E) is the target of this repression. In vivo genomic footprint analysis demonstrated protein binding at the IRF-E site of CIITA pIV in U266 myeloma cells, which express PRDI-BF1. PRDI-BF1β, a truncated form of PRDI-BF1 that is co-expressed in myeloma cells, also bound to the IRF-E site and repressed CIITA pIV. These findings demonstrate for the first time that, in addition to silencing expression of CIITA pIII in B lymphocytes, PRDI-BF1 is capable of binding and suppressing CIITA pIV. PMID:16765445

  10. Translational diffusion of individual class II MHC membrane proteins in cells.

    PubMed Central

    Vrljic, Marija; Nishimura, Stefanie Y; Brasselet, Sophie; Moerner, W E; McConnell, Harden M

    2002-01-01

    Single-molecule epifluorescence microscopy was used to observe the translational motion of GPI-linked and native I-E(k) class II MHC membrane proteins in the plasma membrane of CHO cells. The purpose of the study was to look for deviations from Brownian diffusion that might arise from barriers to this motion. Detergent extraction had suggested that these proteins may be confined to lipid microdomains in the plasma membrane. The individual I-E(k) proteins were visualized with a Cy5-labeled peptide that binds to a specific extracytoplasmic site common to both proteins. Single-molecule trajectories were used to compute a radial distribution of displacements, yielding average diffusion coefficients equal to 0.22 (GPI-linked I-E(k)) and 0.18 microm(2)/s (native I-E(k)). The relative diffusion of pairs of proteins was also studied for intermolecular separations in the range 0.3-1.0 microm, to distinguish between free diffusion of a protein molecule and diffusion of proteins restricted to a rapidly diffusing small domain. Both analyses show that motion is predominantly Brownian. This study finds no strong evidence for significant confinement of either GPI-linked or native I-E(k) in the plasma membrane of CHO cells. PMID:12414700

  11. MHC class I-related molecule, MR1, and mucosal-associated invariant T cells.

    PubMed

    Franciszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Salou, Marion; Legoux, Francois; Zhou, Qian; Cui, Yue; Bessoles, Stéphanie; Lantz, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    The MHC-related 1, MR1, molecule presents a new class of microbial antigens (derivatives of the riboflavin [Vitamin B2] biosynthesis pathway) to mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. This raises many questions regarding antigens loading and intracellular trafficking of the MR1/ligand complexes. The MR1/MAIT field is also important because MAIT cells are very abundant in humans and their frequency is modified in many infectious and non-infectious diseases. Both MR1 and the invariant TCRα chain expressed by MAIT cells are strikingly conserved among species, indicating important functions. Riboflavin is synthesized by plants and most bacteria and yeasts but not animals, and its precursor derivatives activating MAIT cells are short-lived unless bound to MR1. The recognition of MR1 loaded with these compounds is therefore an exquisite manner to detect invasive bacteria. Herein, we provide an historical perspective of the field before describing the main characteristics of MR1, its ligands, and the few available data regarding its cellular biology. We then summarize the current knowledge of MAIT cell differentiation and discuss the definition of MAIT cells in comparison to related subsets. Finally, we describe the phenotype and effector activities of MAIT cells. PMID:27319347

  12. Polyubiquitination of lysine-48 is an essential but indirect signal for MHC class I antigen processing.

    PubMed

    Fiebiger, Benjamin M; Pfister, Heike; Behrends, Uta; Mautner, Josef

    2015-03-01

    Peptides presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules are generated via cytosolic proteolysis. However, the nature of the endogenous peptide precursors and the intracellular processing steps preceding protein degradation remain poorly defined. Here, we assessed whether ubiquitination is an essential signal for proteasomal cleavage of antigen substrates in human cells. Conversion into antigenic peptides occurred in the absence of any detectable N-terminal ubiquitination of the model antigens, and did not require the presence of any of the four types, nor a minimum number of ubiquitinatable amino acids within the antigen substrate. However, the knockdown of ubiquitin, expression of a lysine 48 (K48) ubiquitin mutant, or inhibition of proteasome-associated deubiquitinases significantly impaired antigen presentation. The results presented here are consistent with a model in which the binding of the antigen substrate by an adaptor protein leads to its K48-polyubiquitination and the subsequent delivery of the antigen cargo for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Altogether, these findings show an important but indirect role of K48-polyubiquitination in preproteasomal antigen sampling. PMID:25500897

  13. Transport of Streptococcus pneumoniae Capsular Polysaccharide in MHC Class II Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, Tom Li; Fabri, Mario; Groneck, Laura; Röhn, Till A; Hafke, Helena; Robinson, Nirmal; Rietdorf, Jens; Schrama, David; Becker, Jürgen C; Plum, Georg; Krönke, Martin; Kropshofer, Harald; Kalka-Moll, Wiltrud M

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial capsular polysaccharides are virulence factors and are considered T cell–independent antigens. However, the capsular polysaccharide Sp1 from Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 1 has been shown to activate CD4+ T cells in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II–dependent manner. The mechanism of carbohydrate presentation to CD4+ T cells is unknown. We show in live murine dendritic cells (DCs) that Sp1 translocates from lysosomal compartments to the plasma membrane in MHCII-positive tubules. Sp1 cell surface presentation results in reduction of self-peptide presentation without alteration of the MHCII self peptide repertoire. In DM-deficient mice, retrograde transport of Sp1/MHCII complexes resulting in T cell–dependent immune responses to the polysaccharide in vitro and in vivo is significantly reduced. The results demonstrate the capacity of a bacterial capsular polysaccharide antigen to use DC tubules as a vehicle for its transport as an MHCII/saccharide complex to the cell surface for the induction of T cell activation. Furthermore, retrograde transport requires the functional role of DM in self peptide–carbohydrate exchange. These observations open new opportunities for the design of vaccines against microbial encapsulated pathogens. PMID:17367207

  14. ERAAP and Tapasin independently edit the amino and carboxyl termini of MHC class I peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kanaseki, Takayuki; Lind, Kristin Camfield; Escobar, Hernando; Nagarajan, Niranjana; Reyes-Vargas, Eduardo; Rudd, Brant; Rockwood, Alan L.; Van Kaer, Luc; Sato, Noriyuki; Delgado, Julio C.; Shastri, Nilabh

    2013-01-01

    Effective CD8+ T cell responses depend upon presentation of a stable peptide repertoire by MHC I molecules on the cell surface. The overall quality of pMHC I is determined by poorly understood mechanisms that generate and load peptides with appropriate consensus motifs onto MHC I. Here we show that both tapasin, a key component of the peptide loading complex, and ERAAP, the ER aminopeptidase associated with antigen processing, are quintessential editors of distinct structural features of the peptide repertoire. We carried out reciprocal immunization of wild-type mice with cells from tapasin- or ERAAP-deficient mice. Specificity analysis of T cell responses showed that absence of tapasin or ERAAP independently altered the peptide repertoire by causing loss as well as gain of new pMHC I. Changes in amino acid sequences of MHC bound-peptides revealed that ERAAP and tapasin respectively defined the characteristic amino and carboxy termini of canonical MHC I peptides. Thus, the optimal pMHC I repertoire is produced by two distinct peptide editing steps in the ER. PMID:23863903

  15. Sequence analysis of MHC class I alpha 2 domain exon variants in one diploid and two haploid Atlantic salmon pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Grimholt, U; Olsaker, I; Lingaas, F; Lie, O

    1997-12-01

    Genetic diversity in the second domain exon of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class I was investigated in two dams and nine of their haploid offspring by means of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequence analysis. A similar study was also performed on nine diploid offspring from one of these dams. The complex segregation patterns and sequence similarities between variants make definitive allele, haplotype and locus assignments difficult. There are, however, indications of six Mhc-Sasa class I loci and a fairly well-defined haplotype of four variants. One non-polymorphic variant present in most specimens could be a salmon analogue to the human non-classical loci. PMID:9589580

  16. P2X7 Receptor Activation Impairs Exogenous MHC Class I Oligopeptides Presentation in Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a potent molecule to activate CD8+ T cells and initiate immunity. P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are present on the plasma membrane of APCs to sense the extracellular danger signal adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP). P2X7R activates the inflammasome and the release of IL-1β in macrophages and other immune cells to initiate the inflammatory response. Here we show that P2X7R stimulation by ATP in APCs decreased the amount of MHC I at the plasma membrane. Specific antagonism or genetic ablation of P2X7R inhibited the effects of ATP on levels of cellular MHC I. Furthermore, P2X7R stimulation was able to inhibit activation of CD8+ T cells via specific MHC I-oligopeptide complexes. Our study suggests that P2X7R activation on APCs is a novel inhibitor of adaptive CD8+ T cell immunity. PMID:23940597

  17. P2X7 receptor activation impairs exogenous MHC class I oligopeptides presentation in antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a potent molecule to activate CD8(+) T cells and initiate immunity. P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are present on the plasma membrane of APCs to sense the extracellular danger signal adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP). P2X7R activates the inflammasome and the release of IL-1β in macrophages and other immune cells to initiate the inflammatory response. Here we show that P2X7R stimulation by ATP in APCs decreased the amount of MHC I at the plasma membrane. Specific antagonism or genetic ablation of P2X7R inhibited the effects of ATP on levels of cellular MHC I. Furthermore, P2X7R stimulation was able to inhibit activation of CD8(+) T cells via specific MHC I-oligopeptide complexes. Our study suggests that P2X7R activation on APCs is a novel inhibitor of adaptive CD8(+) T cell immunity. PMID:23940597

  18. NetMHCIIpan-3.0, a common pan-specific MHC class II prediction method including all three human MHC class II isotypes, HLA-DR, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ

    PubMed Central

    Karosiene, Edita; Rasmussen, Michael; Blicher, Thomas; Lund, Ole; Buus, Søren; Nielsen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) molecules play an important role in cell-mediated immunity. They present specific peptides derived from endosomal proteins for recognition by T helper cells. The identification of peptides that bind to MHCII molecules is therefore of great importance for understanding the nature of immune responses and identifying T cell epitopes for the design of new vaccines and immunotherapies. Given the large number of MHC variants, and the costly experimental procedures needed to evaluate individual peptide–MHC interactions, computational predictions have become particularly attractive as first-line methods in epitope discovery. However, only a few so-called pan-specific prediction methods capable of predicting binding to any MHC molecule with known protein sequence are currently available, and all of them are limited to HLA-DR. Here, we present the first pan-specific method capable of predicting peptide binding to any HLA class II molecule with a defined protein sequence. The method employs a strategy common for HLA-DR, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ molecules to define the peptide-binding MHC environment in terms of a pseudo sequence. This strategy allows the inclusion of new molecules even from other species. The method was evaluated in several benchmarks and demonstrates a significant improvement over molecule-specific methods as well as the ability to predict peptide binding of previously uncharacterised MHCII molecules. To the best of our knowledge, the NetMHCIIpan-3.0 method is the first pan-specific predictor covering all HLA class II molecules with known sequences including HLA-DR, HLA-DP, and HLA-DQ. The NetMHCpan-3.0 method is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCIIpan-3.0. PMID:23900783

  19. Immunologic Hierarchy, Class II MHC Promiscuity, and Epitope Spreading of a Melanoma Helper Peptide Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yinin; Petroni, Gina R.; Olson, Walter C.; Czarkowski, Andrea; Smolkin, Mark E.; Grosh, William W.; Chianese-Bullock, Kimberly A.; Slingluff, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    Immunization with a combination melanoma helper peptide (6MHP) vaccine has been shown to induce CD4+ T-cell responses, which are associated with patient survival. In the present study, we define the relative immunogenicity and HLA allele promiscuity of individual helper peptides, and identify helper peptide-mediated augmentation of specific CD8+ T-cell responses. Thirty-seven participants with stage IIIB-IV melanoma were vaccinated with 6MHP in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant. The 6MHP vaccine is comprised of 6 peptides representing melanocytic differentiation proteins gp100, tyrosinase, Melan-A/MART-1 and cancer-testis antigens from the MAGE family. CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses were assessed in peripheral blood and in sentinel immunized nodes (SIN) by thymidine uptake after exposure to helper peptides and by direct interferon-γ ELI spot assay against 14 MHC class I-restricted peptides. Vaccine-induced CD4+ T cell responses to individual epitopes were detected in the SIN of 63% (22/35) and in the peripheral blood of 38% (14/37) of participants for an overall response rate of 65% (24/37). The most frequently immunogenic peptides were MAGE-A3281-295 (49%) and tyrosinase 386-406 (32%). Responses were not limited to HLA restrictions originally described. Vaccine-associated CD8+ T-cell responses against class I-restricted peptides were observed in 45% (5/11) of evaluable participants. The 6MHP vaccine induces both CD4+ and CD8 + T cell responses against melanoma antigens. CD4+ T-cell responses were detected beyond reported HLA-DR restrictions. Induction of CD8+ T-cell responses suggests epitope spreading and systemic activity mediated at the tumor site. PMID:24756419

  20. Insights into MHC class I peptide loading from the structure of the Tapasin-ERp57 thiol oxidoreductase heterodimer

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, G.; Wearsch, P.A.; Peaper, D.R.; Cresswell, P.; Reinisch, K.M.

    2009-03-02

    Tapasin is a glycoprotein critical for loading major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules with high-affinity peptides. It functions within the multimeric peptide-loading complex (PLC) as a disulfide-linked, stable heterodimer with the thiol oxidoreductase ERp57, and this covalent interaction is required to support optimal PLC activity. Here, we present the 2.6 {angstrom} resolution structure of the tapasin-ERp57 core of the PLC. The structure revealed that tapasin interacts with both ERp57 catalytic domains, accounting for the stability of the heterodimer, and provided an example of a protein disulfide isomerase family member interacting with substrate. Mutational analysis identified a conserved surface on tapasin that interacted with MHC class I molecules and was critical for peptide loading and editing functions of the tapasin-ERp57 heterodimer. By combining the tapasin-ERp57 structure with those of other defined PLC components, we present a molecular model that illuminates the processes involved in MHC class I peptide loading.

  1. Skewing of the NK cell repertoire by MHC class I via quantitatively controlled enrichment and contraction of specific Ly49 subsets.

    PubMed

    Brodin, Petter; Lakshmikanth, Tadepally; Kärre, Klas; Höglund, Petter

    2012-03-01

    A major task for the immune system is to secure powerful immune reactions while preserving self-tolerance. This process is particularly challenging for NK cells, for which tolerizing inhibitory receptors for self-MHC class I is both cross-reactive and expressed in an overlapping fashion between NK cells. We show in this study that during an education process, self-MHC class I molecules enrich for potentially useful and contract potentially dangerous NK cell subsets. These processes were quantitatively controlled by the expression level of the educating MHC class I allele, correlated with susceptibility to IL-15 and sensitivity to apoptosis in relevant NK cell subsets, and were linked to their functional education. Controlling the size of NK cell subsets with unique compositions of inhibitory receptors may represent one mechanism by which self-MHC class I molecules generate a population of tolerant NK cells optimally suited for efficient missing self-recognition. PMID:22287714

  2. Patterns of genetic differentiation at MHC class I genes and microsatellites identify conservation units in the giant panda

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evaluating patterns of genetic variation is important to identify conservation units (i.e., evolutionarily significant units [ESUs], management units [MUs], and adaptive units [AUs]) in endangered species. While neutral markers could be used to infer population history, their application in the estimation of adaptive variation is limited. The capacity to adapt to various environments is vital for the long-term survival of endangered species. Hence, analysis of adaptive loci, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, is critical for conservation genetics studies. Here, we investigated 4 classical MHC class I genes (Aime-C, Aime-F, Aime-I, and Aime-L) and 8 microsatellites to infer patterns of genetic variation in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and to further define conservation units. Results Overall, we identified 24 haplotypes (9 for Aime-C, 1 for Aime-F, 7 for Aime-I, and 7 for Aime-L) from 218 individuals obtained from 6 populations of giant panda. We found that the Xiaoxiangling population had the highest genetic variation at microsatellites among the 6 giant panda populations and higher genetic variation at Aime-MHC class I genes than other larger populations (Qinling, Qionglai, and Minshan populations). Differentiation index (FST)-based phylogenetic and Bayesian clustering analyses for Aime-MHC-I and microsatellite loci both supported that most populations were highly differentiated. The Qinling population was the most genetically differentiated. Conclusions The giant panda showed a relatively higher level of genetic diversity at MHC class I genes compared with endangered felids. Using all of the loci, we found that the 6 giant panda populations fell into 2 ESUs: Qinling and non-Qinling populations. We defined 3 MUs based on microsatellites: Qinling, Minshan-Qionglai, and Daxiangling-Xiaoxiangling-Liangshan. We also recommended 3 possible AUs based on MHC loci: Qinling, Minshan-Qionglai, and Daxiangling

  3. Characterization of the Antigen Processing Machinery and Endogenous Peptide Presentation of a Bat MHC Class I Molecule.

    PubMed

    Wynne, James W; Woon, Amanda P; Dudek, Nadine L; Croft, Nathan P; Ng, Justin H J; Baker, Michelle L; Wang, Lin-Fa; Purcell, Anthony W

    2016-06-01

    Bats are a major reservoir of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, including severe acute respiratory syndrome-like coronaviruses, henipaviruses, and Ebola virus. Although highly pathogenic to their spillover hosts, bats harbor these viruses, and a large number of other viruses, with little or no clinical signs of disease. How bats asymptomatically coexist with these viruses is unknown. In particular, little is known about bat adaptive immunity, and the presence of functional MHC molecules is mostly inferred from recently described genomes. In this study, we used an affinity purification/mass spectrometry approach to demonstrate that a bat MHC class I molecule, Ptal-N*01:01, binds antigenic peptides and associates with peptide-loading complex components. We identified several bat MHC class I-binding partners, including calnexin, calreticulin, protein disulfide isomerase A3, tapasin, TAP1, and TAP2. Additionally, endogenous peptide ligands isolated from Ptal-N*01:01 displayed a relatively broad length distribution and an unusual preference for a C-terminal proline residue. Finally, we demonstrate that this preference for C-terminal proline residues was observed in Hendra virus-derived peptides presented by Ptal-N*01:01 on the surface of infected cells. To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify endogenous and viral MHC class I ligands for any bat species and, as such, provides an important avenue for monitoring and development of vaccines against major bat-borne viruses both in the reservoir and spillover hosts. Additionally, it will provide a foundation to understand the role of adaptive immunity in bat antiviral responses. PMID:27183594

  4. Does the parasite-mediated selection drive the MHC class IIB diversity in wild populations of European chub (Squalius cephalus)?

    PubMed

    Seifertová, Mária; Jarkovský, Jiří; Šimková, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The genes of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) provide an excellent opportunity to study host-parasite relationships because they are expected to evolve in response to parasites and variation in parasite communities. In this study, we investigated the potential role of parasite-mediated selection acting on MHC class IIB (DAB) genes in European chub (Squalius cephalus) natural populations. We found significant differences between populations in metazoan parasites, neutral and adaptive genetic diversities. The analyses based on pairwise data revealed that populations with dissimilar MHC allelic profiles were geographically distant populations with significantly different diversity in microsatellites and a dissimilar composition of parasite communities. The results from the generalized estimating equations method (GEE) on the level of individuals revealed that metazoan parasite load in European chub was influenced by the diversity of DAB alleles as well as by the diversity of neutral genetic markers and host traits reflecting condition and immunocompetence. The multivariate co-inertia analysis showed specific associations between DAB alleles and parasite species. DAB1-like alleles were more involved in associations with ectoparasites, while DAB3-like alleles were positively associated with endoparasites which could suggest potential differences between DAB genes caused by different selection pressure. Our study revealed that parasite-mediated selection is not the only variable affecting MHC diversity in European chub; however, we strongly support the role of neutral processes as the main driver of DAB diversity across populations. In addition, our study contributes to the understanding of the evolution of MHC genes in wild living fish. PMID:26693717

  5. Bacterial superantigens promote acute nasopharyngeal infection by Streptococcus pyogenes in a human MHC Class II-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Katherine J; Zeppa, Joseph J; Wakabayashi, Adrienne T; Xu, Stacey X; Mazzuca, Delfina M; Welch, Ian; Baroja, Miren L; Kotb, Malak; Cairns, Ewa; Cleary, P Patrick; Haeryfar, S M Mansour; McCormick, John K

    2014-05-01

    Establishing the genetic determinants of niche adaptation by microbial pathogens to specific hosts is important for the management and control of infectious disease. Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent human-specific bacterial pathogen that secretes superantigens (SAgs) as 'trademark' virulence factors. SAgs function to force the activation of T lymphocytes through direct binding to lateral surfaces of T cell receptors and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) molecules. S. pyogenes invariably encodes multiple SAgs, often within putative mobile genetic elements, and although SAgs are documented virulence factors for diseases such as scarlet fever and the streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), how these exotoxins contribute to the fitness and evolution of S. pyogenes is unknown. Here we show that acute infection in the nasopharynx is dependent upon both bacterial SAgs and host MHC-II molecules. S. pyogenes was rapidly cleared from the nasal cavity of wild-type C57BL/6 (B6) mice, whereas infection was enhanced up to ∼10,000-fold in B6 mice that express human MHC-II. This phenotype required the SpeA superantigen, and vaccination with an MHC -II binding mutant toxoid of SpeA dramatically inhibited infection. Our findings indicate that streptococcal SAgs are critical for the establishment of nasopharyngeal infection, thus providing an explanation as to why S. pyogenes produces these potent toxins. This work also highlights that SAg redundancy exists to avoid host anti-SAg humoral immune responses and to potentially overcome host MHC-II polymorphisms. PMID:24875883

  6. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells suppress MHC class II expression on rat vascular endothelium and prolong survival time of cardiac allograft

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ying; Yun, Mark M; Han, Xia; Zhao, Ruidong; Zhou, Erxia; Yun, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (UC-MSCs) have low immunogenicity and immune regulation. To investigate immunomodulatory effects of human UC-MSCs on MHC class II expression and allograft, we transplanted heart of transgenic rats with MHC class II expression on vascular endothelium. Methods: UC-MSCs were obtained from human umbilical cords and confirmed with flow cytometry analysis. Transgenic rat line was established using the construct of human MHC class II transactivator gene (CIITA) under mouse ICAM-2 promoter control. The induced MHC class II expression on transgenic rat vascular endothelial cells (VECs) was assessed with immunohistological staining. And the survival time of cardiac allograft was compared between the recipients with and without UC-MSC transfusion. Results: Flow cytometry confirmed that the human UC-MSCs were positive for CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD271, and negative for CD34 and HLA-DR. Repeated infusion of human UC-MSCs reduced MHC class II expression on vascular endothelia of transplanted hearts, and increased survival time of allograft. The UC-MSCs increased regulatory cytokines IL10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and suppressed proinflammatory cytokines IL2 and IFN-γ in vivo. The UC-MSC culture supernatant had similar effects on cytokine expression, and decreased lymphocyte proliferation in vitro. Conclusions: Repeated transfusion of the human UC-MSCs reduced MHC class II expression on vascular endothelia and prolonged the survival time of rat cardiac allograft. PMID:25126177

  7. Diversified Anchoring Features the Peptide Presentation of DLA-88*50801: First Structural Insight into Domestic Dog MHC Class I.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jin; Xiang, Wangzhen; Chai, Yan; Haywood, Joel; Qi, Jianxun; Ba, Limin; Qi, Peng; Wang, Ming; Liu, Jun; Gao, George F

    2016-09-15

    Canines represent a crucial animal model for studying human diseases and organ transplantation, as well as the evolution of domestic animals. MHCs, with a central role in cellular immunity, are commonly used in the study of dog population genetics and genome evolution. However, the molecular basis for the peptide presentation of dog MHC remains largely unknown. In this study, peptide presentation by canine MHC class I DLA-88*50801 was structurally determined, revealing diversified anchoring modes of the binding peptides. Flexible and large pockets composed of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues can accommodate pathogen-derived peptides with diverse anchor residues, as confirmed by thermostability measurements. Furthermore, DLA-88*50801 contains an unusual α2 helix with a large coil in the TCR contact region. These results further our understanding of canine T cell immunity through peptide presentation of MHC class I and shed light on the molecular basis for vaccine development for canine infectious diseases, for example, canine distemper virus. PMID:27511732

  8. Coordinated changes of histone modifications and HDAC mobilization regulate the induction of MHC class II genes by Trichostatin A

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    The deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA) induces the transcription of the Major Histocompatibility Class II (MHC II) DRA gene in a way independent of the master coactivator CIITA. To analyze the molecular mechanisms by which this epigenetic regulator stimulates MHC II expression, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays to monitor the alterations in histone modifications that correlate with DRA transcription after TSA treatment. We found that a dramatic increase in promoter linked histone acetylation is followed by an increase in Histone H3 lysine 4 methylation and a decrease of lysine 9 methylation. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments showed that TSA increases the mobility of HDAC while decreasing the mobility of the class II enhanceosome factor RFX5. These data, in combination with ChIP experiments, indicate that the TSA-mediated induction of DRA transcription involves HDAC relocation and enhanceosome stabilization. In order to gain a genome-wide view of the genes responding to inhibition of deacetylases, we compared the transcriptome of B cells before and after TSA treatment using Affymetrix microarrays. This analysis showed that in addition to the DRA gene, the entire MHC II family and the adjacent histone cluster that are located in chromosome 6p21-22 locus are strongly induced by TSA. A complex pattern of gene reprogramming by TSA involves immune recognition, antiviral, apoptotic and inflammatory pathways and extends the rationale for using Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors (HDACi) to modulate the immune response. PMID:16452299

  9. MMTV superantigens coerce an unconventional topology between the TCR and MHC class II.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Jean-Simon; Genève, Laetitia; Gauthier, Catherine; Shoukry, Naglaa H; Azar, Georges A; Younes, Souheil; Yassine-Diab, Bader; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre; Fremont, Daved H; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2014-02-15

    Mouse mammary tumor virus superantigens (vSAGs) are notorious for defying structural characterization, and a consensus has yet to be reached regarding their ability to bridge the TCR to MHC class II (MHCII). In this study, we determined the topology of the T cell signaling complex by examining the respective relation of vSAG7 with the MHCII molecule, MHCII-associated peptide, and TCR. We used covalently linked peptide/MHCII complexes to demonstrate that vSAG presentation is tolerant to variation in the protruding side chains of the peptide, but can be sensitive to the nature of the protruding N-terminal extension. An original approach in which vSAG was covalently linked to either MHCII chain confirmed that vSAG binds outside the peptide binding groove. Also, whereas the C-terminal vSAG segment binds to the MHCII α-chain in a conformation-sensitive manner, the membrane-proximal N-terminal domain binds the β-chain. Because both moieties of the mature vSAG remain noncovalently associated after processing, our results suggest that vSAG crosslinks MHCII molecules. Comparing different T cell hybridomas, we identified key residues on the MHCII α-chain that are differentially recognized by the CDR3β when engaged by vSAG. Finally, we show that the highly conserved tyrosine residue found in the vSAg TGXY motif is required for T cell activation. Our results reveal a novel SAG/MHCII/TCR architecture in which vSAGs coerce a near-canonical docking between MHCII and TCR that allows eschewing of traditional CDR3 binding with the associated peptide in favor of MHCII α-chain binding. Our findings highlight the plasticity of the TCR CDRs. PMID:24453254

  10. Presentation of antagonist peptides to naive CD4+ T cells abrogates spatial reorganization of class II MHC peptide complexes on the surface of dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Chmielowski, Bartosz; Pacholczyk, Rafal; Kraj, Piotr; Kisielow, Pawel; Ignatowicz, Leszek

    2002-01-01

    By using dendritic cells (DCs) transduced with retroviruses encoding covalent Abβ/peptide fusion proteins tagged with fluorescent proteins, we followed the relocation of class II MHC molecules loaded with agonist or null peptides during the onset of activation of naive and effector CD4+ T cells. Clusters of T cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 complex formed in parallel with clusters of agonist class II MHC/peptide complexes on the surface of DCs. However, activation of naive but not effector T cells was accompanied by expulsion of the null class II MHC/peptide complexes from the T cell–DC interface. These effects were perturbed in the presence of exogenously supplied antagonist peptide. These results suggest that interference with selective relocation of agonist and null MHC/peptide complexes in the immunological synapse contributes to the inhibitory effect of antagonist peptides on the response of naive CD4+ T cells to agonist ligands. PMID:12411579

  11. Evolution of Mhc Class i Complex Region with Special Reference to Fragmentary Line Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateno, Yoshio; Fukami-Kobayashi, Kaoru; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2008-03-01

    We reviewed the origin and evolution of the two pairs of immune genes, (MHC-B and MHC-C) and (MICA and MICB) in man, chimpanzee and rhesus monkey based mainly on our previous work. Since those genes were well known to have been subject to strong natural selection in evolution, they themselves were not suitable for our study. We thus took another approach to use fragmented and nonfunctional LINEs that had coevolved with the two pairs in the same genomic fragments. Our results showed that MHC-B and MHC-C duplicated about 22 Mry (million years) ago, and MICA and MICB duplicated about 14 Myr ago. Interestingly, rhesus monkey was found not to have either pair but many repeats similar to MHC-B. Therefore, we estimated the divergence time of the monkey, and found that it diverged out from a common ancestor of man and chimpanzee about 30 Myr ago. The divergence time was consistent with the duplication times of the two pairs of immune genes. Based on our results we would predict that orangutan and gorilla also have the two pairs, because the both primate species are considered to have diverged less than 14 Myr ago.

  12. MHC class I BFIV gene polymorphisms in four Chinese native chicken breeds.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yin; Liu, Xue-Lan; Tang, Qing-Feng; Hu, Xiao-Miao; Shen, Xue-Huai; Zhang, Dan-Jun

    2016-09-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) includes the most polymorphic genes in vertebrates, and balancing selection has been proposed as a main evolutionary force. Here we present one of the first data sets examining the genetic characteristics of chicken MHC I BFIV molecules in four Chinese native breeds, sourced from different regions in China. In all, 89 BFIV alleles were isolated from 102 individuals sampled, and 13 repeated alleles were observed. No significant correlation was found between genetic differentiation and geographical distance in the phylogenetic tree. BFIV genes exhibited a high level of nucleotide polymorphisms, and most of the polymorphic sites were located in the peptide-binding region (PBR) encoded in exons 2 and 3. A comparison of the three-dimensional structures of PBRs in chicken BFIV and human HLA-A molecules revealed evident structural and functional similarities. The results suggested that MHC I molecules had similar structural features in different species. PMID:27168230

  13. MHC class I expression in HPV 16 positive cervical carcinomas is post-transcriptionally controlled and independent from c-myc overexpression.

    PubMed

    Cromme, F V; Snijders, P J; van den Brule, A J; Kenemans, P; Meijer, C J; Walboomers, J M

    1993-11-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix (n = 23) were selected for the presence of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16) using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Localization of transcripts coding for the E7 protein was demonstrated in neoplastic cells with RNA in situ hybridization. Consecutive tissue sections were investigated for expression of the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and c-myc using immunohistochemical double staining procedures, since a role has been suggested for the c-myc protein in MHC-I down-regulation and c-myc overexpression has been described in cervical carcinomas. Reduced expression of class I heavy chains was observed in neoplastic cells from 18 out of 23 carcinomas (78%). Varying levels of c-myc overexpression were observed in 12 carcinomas (52%), from which four showed positive MHC-I expression in c-myc overexpressing cells. In the remaining eight c-myc overexpressing carcinomas MHC-I down-regulation was observed. Additional RNA in situ hybridization with class I heavy chain locus-specific RNA-probes revealed presence of class I mRNAs in those neoplastic cells that show negative staining for MHC-I protein. These data strongly indicate that MHC-I down-regulation in cervical carcinomas involves post-transcriptional mechanisms, not directly related to E7 transcription and overexpression of c-myc. PMID:8414499

  14. Analysis of MHC class I and II expression in relation to presence of HPV genotypes in premalignant and malignant cervical lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Cromme, F. V.; Meijer, C. J.; Snijders, P. J.; Uyterlinde, A.; Kenemans, P.; Helmerhorst, T.; Stern, P. L.; van den Brule, A. J.; Walboomers, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grades I to III lesions (n = 94) and squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix (n = 27) were analysed for MHC class I and II expression and presence of HPV genotypes. MHC class I and II expression was studied by immunohistochemistry and HPV typing was performed by general primer- and type-specific primer mediated PCR (GP/TS PCR). Both techniques were performed on paraffin embedded tissue sections. Results show disturbed MHC class I heavy chain expression in CIN I to CIN III, as well as in cervical carcinomas. Upregulated MHC class II expression on dysplastic epithelial cells was also found in the different CIN groups and carcinomas. Prevalence of HPV genotypes increased with the severity of the lesion, mainly due to the contribution of the HPV types 16 and 18. No correlation could be established between the presence of specific HPV genotypes and any MHC expression pattern in the different CIN groups or cervical carcinomas. In some cases these data were confirmed by RNA in situ hybridisation showing HPV 16 E7 transcripts in the same dysplastic/neoplastic cells from which MHC status was determined. The results indicate that local differences may exist in the type of cellular immune response to HPV induced lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:8390286

  15. Heligmosomoides polygyrus infection is associated with lower MHC class II gene expression in Apodemus flavicollis: indication for immune suppression?

    PubMed

    Axtner, Jan; Sommer, Simone

    2011-12-01

    Due to their key role in recognizing foreign antigens and triggering the subsequent immune response the genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) provide a potential target for parasites to attack in order to evade detection and expulsion from the host. A diminished MHC gene expression results in less activated T cells and might serve as a gateway for pathogens and parasites. Some parasites are suspected to be immune suppressors and promote co-infections of other parasites even in other parts of the body. In our study we found indications that the gut dwelling nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus might exert a systemic immunosuppressive effect in yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis). The amount of hepatic MHC class II DRB gene RNA transcripts in infected mice was negatively associated with infection intensity with H. polygyrus. The hepatic expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, such as transforming growth factor β and interleukin 10 was not associated with H. polygyrus infection. We did not find direct positive associations of H. polygyrus with other helminth species. But the prevalence and infection intensity of the nematodes Syphacia stroma and Trichuris muris were higher in multiple infected individuals. Furthermore, our data indicated antagonistic effects in the helminth community of A. flavicollis as cestode infection correlated negatively with H. polygyrus and helminth species richness. Our study shows that expression analyses of immune relevant genes can also be performed in wildlife, opening new aspects and possibilities for future ecological and evolutionary research. PMID:21983561

  16. Direct recognition by alphabeta cytolytic T cells of Hfe, a MHC class Ib molecule without antigen-presenting function.

    PubMed

    Rohrlich, Pierre S; Fazilleau, Nicolas; Ginhoux, Florent; Firat, Hüseyin; Michel, Frédérique; Cochet, Madeleine; Laham, Nihay; Roth, Marie Paule; Pascolo, Steve; Nato, Faridabano; Coppin, Hélène; Charneau, Pierre; Danos, Olivier; Acuto, Oreste; Ehrlich, Rachel; Kanellopoulos, Jean; Lemonnier, François A

    2005-09-01

    Crystallographic analysis of human Hfe has documented an overall structure similar to classical (class Ia) MHC molecules with a peptide binding groove deprived of ligand. Thus, to address the question of whether alphabeta T cells could recognize MHC molecules independently of bound ligands, we studied human and mouse Hfe interactions with T lymphocytes. We provide formal evidence of direct cytolytic recognition of human Hfe by mouse alphabeta T cell receptors (TCR) in HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice and that this interaction results in ZAP-70 phosphorylation. Furthermore, direct recognition of mouse Hfe molecules by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) was demonstrated in DBA/2 Hfe knockout mice. These CTLs express predominantly two T cell antigen receptor alpha variable gene segments (AV6.1 and AV6.6). Interestingly, in wild-type mice we identified a subset of CD8+ T cells positively selected by Hfe that expresses the AV6.1/AV6.6 gene segments. T cell antigen receptor recognition of MHC molecules independently of bound ligand has potential general implications in alloreactivity and identifies in the Hfe case a cognitive link supporting the concept that the immune system could be involved in the control of iron metabolism. PMID:16123136

  17. Structural Basis for the Presentation of Tumor-Associated MHC Class II-Restricted Phosphopeptides to CD4+ T Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Depontieu, F; Sidney, J; Salay, T; Engelhard, V; Hunt, D; Sette, A; Topalian, S; Mariuzza, R

    2010-01-01

    Dysregulated protein phosphorylation is a hallmark of malignant transformation. Transformation can generate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-bound phosphopeptides that are differentially displayed on tumor cells for specific recognition by T cells. To understand how phosphorylation alters the antigenic identity of self-peptides and how MHC class II molecules present phosphopeptides for CD4{sup +} T-cell recognition, we determined the crystal structure of a phosphopeptide derived from melanoma antigen recognized by T cells-1 (pMART-1), selectively expressed by human melanomas, in complex with HLA-DR1. The structure revealed that the phosphate moiety attached to the serine residue at position P5 of pMART-1 is available for direct interactions with T-cell receptor (TCR) and that the peptide N-terminus adopts an unusual conformation orienting it toward TCR. This structure, combined with measurements of peptide affinity for HLA-DR1 and of peptide-MHC recognition by pMART-1-specific T cells, suggests that TCR recognition is focused on the N-terminal portion of pMART-1. This recognition mode appears to be distinct from that of foreign antigen complexes but is remarkably reminiscent of the way autoreactive TCRs engage self- or altered self-peptides, consistent with the tolerogenic nature of tumor-host immune interactions.

  18. Genetic variation of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II B gene) in the threatened Hume's pheasant, Syrmaticus humiae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weicai; Bei, Yongjian; Li, Hanhua

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are the most polymorphic genes in vertebrates and encode molecules that play a crucial role in pathogen resistance. As a result of their diversity, they have received much attention in the fields of evolutionary and conservation biology. Here, we described the genetic variation of MHC class II B (MHCIIB) exon 2 in a wild population of Hume's pheasant (Syrmaticus humiae), which has suffered a dramatic decline in population over the last three decades across its ranges in the face of heavy exploitation and habitat loss. Twenty-four distinct alleles were found in 73 S. humiae specimens. We found seven shared alleles among four geographical groups as well as six rare MHCIIB alleles. Most individuals displayed between one to five alleles, suggesting that there are at least three MHCIIB loci of the Hume's pheasant. The dN ⁄ dS ratio at putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) was significantly greater than one, indicating balancing selection is acting on MHCIIB exon 2. Additionally, recombination and gene conversion contributed to generating MHCIIB diversity in the Hume's pheasant. One to three recombination events and seventy-five significant gene conversion events were observed within the Hume's pheasant MHCIIB loci. The phylogenetic tree and network analysis revealed that the Hume's pheasant alleles do not cluster together, but are scattered through the tree or network indicating a trans-species evolutionary mode. These findings revealed the evolution of the Hume's pheasant MHC after suffering extreme habitat fragmentation. PMID:25629763

  19. A non-canonical ESCRT pathway, including histidine domain phosphotyrosine phosphatase (HD-PTP), is used for down-regulation of virally ubiquitinated MHC class I

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Michael D.J.; Piper, Siân C.; Bright, Nicholas A.; Evans, Jennifer L.; Boname, Jessica M.; Bowers, Katherine; Lehner, Paul J.; Luzio, J. Paul

    2015-01-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) K3 viral gene product effectively down-regulates cell surface MHC class I. K3 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that promotes Lys63-linked polyubiquitination of MHC class I, providing the signal for clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Endocytosis is followed by sorting into the intralumenal vesicles (ILVs) of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and eventual delivery to lysosomes. The sorting of MHC class I into MVBs requires many individual proteins of the four endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs). In HeLa cells expressing the KSHV K3 ubiquitin ligase, the effect of RNAi-mediated depletion of individual proteins of the ESCRT-0 and ESCRT-I complexes and three ESCRT-III proteins showed that these are required to down-regulate MHC class I. However, depletion of proteins of the ESCRT-II complex or of the ESCRT-III protein, VPS20 (vacuolar protein sorting 20)/CHMP6 (charged MVB protein 6), failed to prevent the loss of MHC class I from the cell surface. Depletion of histidine domain phosphotyrosine phosphatase (HD-PTP) resulted in an increase in the cell surface concentration of MHC class I in HeLa cells expressing the KSHV K3 ubiquitin ligase. Rescue experiments with wild–type (WT) and mutant HD-PTP supported the conclusion that HD-PTP acts as an alternative to ESCRT-II and VPS20/CHMP6 as a link between the ESCRT-I and those ESCRT-III protein(s) necessary for ILV formation. Thus, the down-regulation of cell surface MHC class I, polyubiquitinated by the KSHV K3 ubiquitin ligase, does not employ the canonical ESCRT pathway, but instead utilizes an alternative pathway in which HD-PTP replaces ESCRT-II and VPS20/CHMP6. PMID:26221024

  20. A non-canonical ESCRT pathway, including histidine domain phosphotyrosine phosphatase (HD-PTP), is used for down-regulation of virally ubiquitinated MHC class I.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Michael D J; Piper, Siân C; Bright, Nicholas A; Evans, Jennifer L; Boname, Jessica M; Bowers, Katherine; Lehner, Paul J; Luzio, J Paul

    2015-10-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) K3 viral gene product effectively down-regulates cell surface MHC class I. K3 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that promotes Lys(63)-linked polyubiquitination of MHC class I, providing the signal for clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Endocytosis is followed by sorting into the intralumenal vesicles (ILVs) of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and eventual delivery to lysosomes. The sorting of MHC class I into MVBs requires many individual proteins of the four endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs). In HeLa cells expressing the KSHV K3 ubiquitin ligase, the effect of RNAi-mediated depletion of individual proteins of the ESCRT-0 and ESCRT-I complexes and three ESCRT-III proteins showed that these are required to down-regulate MHC class I. However, depletion of proteins of the ESCRT-II complex or of the ESCRT-III protein, VPS20 (vacuolar protein sorting 20)/CHMP6 (charged MVB protein 6), failed to prevent the loss of MHC class I from the cell surface. Depletion of histidine domain phosphotyrosine phosphatase (HD-PTP) resulted in an increase in the cell surface concentration of MHC class I in HeLa cells expressing the KSHV K3 ubiquitin ligase. Rescue experiments with wild-type (WT) and mutant HD-PTP supported the conclusion that HD-PTP acts as an alternative to ESCRT-II and VPS20/CHMP6 as a link between the ESCRT-I and those ESCRT-III protein(s) necessary for ILV formation. Thus, the down-regulation of cell surface MHC class I, polyubiquitinated by the KSHV K3 ubiquitin ligase, does not employ the canonical ESCRT pathway, but instead utilizes an alternative pathway in which HD-PTP replaces ESCRT-II and VPS20/CHMP6. PMID:26221024

  1. Non-neutral evolution and reciprocal monophyly of two expressed Mhc class II B genes in Leach's storm-petrel.

    PubMed

    Dearborn, Donald C; Gager, Andrea B; Gilmour, Morgan E; McArthur, Andrew G; Hinerfeld, Douglas A; Mauck, Robert A

    2015-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) is subject to pathogen-mediated balancing selection and can link natural selection with mate choice. We characterized two Mhc class II B loci in Leach's storm-petrel, Oceanodroma leucorhoa, focusing on exon 2 which encodes the portion of the protein that binds pathogen peptides. We amplified and sequenced exon 2 with locus-specific nested PCR and Illumina MiSeq using individually barcoded primers. Repeat genotyping of 78 single-locus genotypes produced identical results in 77 cases (98.7%). Sequencing of messenger RNA (mRNA) from three birds confirmed expression of both loci, consistent with the observed absence of stop codons or frameshifts in all alleles. In 48 birds, we found 9 and 12 alleles at the two loci, respectively, and all 21 alleles translated to unique amino acid sequences. Unlike many studies of duplicated Mhc genes, alleles of the two loci clustered into monophyletic groups. Consistent with this phylogenetic result, interlocus gene conversion appears to have affected only two short fragments of the exon. As predicted under a paradigm of pathogen-mediated selection, comparison of synonymous and non-synonymous substitution rates found evidence of a history of positive selection at putative peptide binding sites. Overall, the results suggest that the gene duplication event leading to these two loci is not recent and that point mutations and positive selection on the peptide binding sites may be the predominant forces acting on these genes. Characterization of these loci sets the stage for population-level work on the evolutionary ecology of Mhc in this species. PMID:25416539

  2. Neurons are MHC Class I-Dependent Targets for CD8 T Cells upon Neurotropic Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Grégoire; Suberbielle, Elsa; Monnet, Céline; Duplan, Valérie; Martin-Blondel, Guillaume; Farrugia, Fanny; Le Masson, Gwendal; Liblau, Roland; Gonzalez-Dunia, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Following infection of the central nervous system (CNS), the immune system is faced with the challenge of eliminating the pathogen without causing significant damage to neurons, which have limited capacities of renewal. In particular, it was thought that neurons were protected from direct attack by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) because they do not express major histocompatibility class I (MHC I) molecules, at least at steady state. To date, most of our current knowledge on the specifics of neuron-CTL interaction is based on studies artificially inducing MHC I expression on neurons, loading them with exogenous peptide and applying CTL clones or lines often differentiated in culture. Thus, much remains to be uncovered regarding the modalities of the interaction between infected neurons and antiviral CD8 T cells in the course of a natural disease. Here, we used the model of neuroinflammation caused by neurotropic Borna disease virus (BDV), in which virus-specific CTL have been demonstrated as the main immune effectors triggering disease. We tested the pathogenic properties of brain-isolated CD8 T cells against pure neuronal cultures infected with BDV. We observed that BDV infection of cortical neurons triggered a significant up regulation of MHC I molecules, rendering them susceptible to recognition by antiviral CTL, freshly isolated from the brains of acutely infected rats. Using real-time imaging, we analyzed the spatio-temporal relationships between neurons and CTL. Brain-isolated CTL exhibited a reduced mobility and established stable contacts with BDV-infected neurons, in an antigen- and MHC-dependent manner. This interaction induced rapid morphological changes of the neurons, without immediate killing or impairment of electrical activity. Early signs of neuronal apoptosis were detected only hours after this initial contact. Thus, our results show that infected neurons can be recognized efficiently by brain-isolated antiviral CD8 T cells and uncover the unusual

  3. Characterization of MHC class IIB for four endangered Australian freshwater fishes obtained from ecologically divergent populations.

    PubMed

    Bracamonte, Seraina E; Smith, Steve; Hammer, Michael; Pavey, Scott A; Sunnucks, Paul; Beheregaray, Luciano B

    2015-10-01

    Genetic diversity is an essential aspect of species viability, and assessments of neutral genetic diversity are regularly implemented in captive breeding and conservation programs. Despite their importance, information from adaptive markers is rarely included in such programs. A promising marker of significance in fitness and adaptive potential is the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), a key component of the adaptive immune system. Populations of Australian freshwater fishes are generally declining in numbers due to human impacts and the introduction of exotic species, a scenario of particular concern for members of the family Percichthyidae, several of which are listed as nationally vulnerable or endangered, and hence subject to management plans, captive breeding, and restoration plans. We used a next-generation sequencing approach to characterize the MHC IIB locus and provide a conservative description of its levels of diversity in four endangered percichthyids: Gadopsis marmoratus, Macquaria australasica, Nannoperca australis, and Nannoperca obscura. Evidence is presented for a duplicated MHC IIB locus, positively selected sites and recombination of MHC alleles. Relatively moderate levels of diversity were detected in the four species, as well as in different ecotypes within each species. Phylogenetic analyses revealed genus specific clustering of alleles and no allele sharing among species. There were also no shared alleles observed between two ecotypes within G. marmoratus and within M. australasica, which might be indicative of ecologically-driven divergence and/or long divergence times. This represents the first characterization and assessment of MHC diversity for Percichthyidae, and also for Australian freshwater fishes in general, providing key genetic resources for a vertebrate group of increasing conservation concern. PMID:26093210

  4. MHC restriction of synovial fluid lymphocyte responses to the triggering organism in reactive arthritis. Absence of a class I-restricted response.

    PubMed Central

    Hassell, A B; Pilling, D; Reynolds, D; Life, P F; Bacon, P A; Gaston, J S

    1992-01-01

    Synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMC) from patients with reactive arthritis (ReA) show marked proliferative responses to preparations of the organism triggering the arthritis. Initial studies with MHC-specific MoAbs have indicated that a significant element of these proliferative responses is mediated by class II MHC-restricted CD4+ T cells. It is imperative to establish the presence or absence of a class I-restricted response, for two reasons. Firstly, the association of ReA with the MHC class I molecule, HLA B27, raises the possibility of there being a B27-restricted response to the triggering organism. Secondly, a number of the organisms associated with ReA are intracellular pathogens, whose antigens might be expected to be presented by class I MHC molecules. In an effort to identify a class I MHC-restricted pathogen-specific response in the SFMC of ReA patients, we have assessed the proliferative responses of SFMC depleted of CD4+ T cells. Responses were grossly diminished by CD4+ T cell depletion. We also investigated Chlamydia-specific cytotoxicity in the SFMC of patients with sexually acquired ReA in a system using productive chlamydial infection to produce both targets and effectors. Significant antigen specific cytotoxicity was not seen. These experiments do not provide evidence to support the existence of pathogen-specific responses by CD8+, class I-restricted synovial fluid T cells in ReA. PMID:1606728

  5. ZBTB32 is an early repressor of the class II transactivator and MHC class II gene expression during B cell differentiation to plasma cells1

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyesuk; Scharer, Christopher D.; Majumder, Parimal; Davis, Carl W.; Butler, Royce; Zinzow-Kramer, Wendy; Skountzou, Ioanna; Koutsonanos, Dimitrios G.; Ahmed, Rafi; Boss, Jeremy M.

    2012-01-01

    The MHC class II transactivator (CIITA) and MHC class II expression is silenced during the differentiation of B cells to plasma cells. When B cell differentiation is carried out ex vivo, CIITA silencing occurs rapidly but the factors contributing to this event are not known. ZBTB32, also known as repressor of GATA3, was identified as an early repressor of CIITA in an ex vivo plasma cell differentiation model. ZBTB32 activity occurred at a time when Blimp-1, the regulator of plasma cell fate and suppressor of CIITA, was minimally induced. Ectopic expression of ZBTB32 suppressed CIITA and I-A gene expression in B cells. ShRNA depletion of ZBTB32 in a plasma cell line resulted in reexpression of CIITA and I-A. Compared to conditional Blimp-1 knock out and wild-type B cells, B cells from ZBTB32/ROG-knock out mice displayed delayed kinetics in silencing CIITA during ex vivo plasma cell differentiation. ZBTB32 was found to bind to the CIITA gene, suggesting that ZBTB32 directly regulates CIITA. Lastly, ZBTB32 and Blimp-1 coimmunoprecipitated, suggesting that the two repressors may ultimately function together to silence CIITA expression. These results introduce ZBTB32 as a novel regulator of MHC-II gene expression and a potential regulatory partner of Blimp-1 in repressing gene expression. PMID:22851713

  6. Expression, refolding and crystallization of murine MHC class I H-2D{sup b} in complex with human β{sub 2}-microglobulin

    SciTech Connect

    Sandalova, Tatyana; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Harris, Robert A.; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Kärre, Klas; Schneider, Gunter; Achour, Adnane

    2005-12-01

    Mouse MHC class I H-2Db in complex with human β2m and the LCMV-derived peptide gp33 has been produced and crystallized. Resolution of the structure of this complex combined with the structural comparison with the previously solved crystal structure of H-2Db/mβ2m/gp33 should lead to a better understanding of how the β2m subunit affects the overall conformation of MHC complexes as well as the stability of the presented peptides. β{sub 2}-Microglobulin (β{sub 2}m) is non-covalently linked to the major histocompatibility (MHC) class I heavy chain and interacts with CD8 and Ly49 receptors. Murine MHC class I can bind human β{sub 2}m (hβ{sub 2}m) and such hybrid molecules are often used in structural and functional studies. The replacement of mouse β{sub 2}m (mβ{sub 2}m) by hβ{sub 2}m has important functional consequences for MHC class I complex stability and specificity, but the structural basis for this is unknown. To investigate the impact of species-specific β{sub 2}m subunits on MHC class I conformation, murine MHC class I H-2D{sup b} in complex with hβ{sub 2}m and the peptide gp33 derived from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) has been expressed, refolded in vitro and crystallized. Crystals containing two complexes per asymmetric unit and belonging to the space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.1, b = 65.2, c = 101.9 Å, β = 102.4°, were obtained.

  7. TCR-like antibodies distinguish conformational and functional differences in two- versus four-domain auto reactive MHC class II-peptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Rony; Tabul, Moran; Chou, Yuan K; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Andrew, Shayne; Ferro, Adolph J; Burrows, Gregory G; Offner, Halina; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Reiter, Yoram

    2011-05-01

    Antigen-presenting cell-associated four-domain MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules play a central role in activating autoreactive CD4(+) T cells involved in multiple sclerosis (MS) and type 1 diabetes (T1D). In contrast, two-domain MHC-II structures with the same covalently attached self-peptide (recombinant T-cell receptor ligands (RTLs)) can regulate pathogenic CD4(+) T cells and reverse clinical signs of experimental autoimmune diseases. RTL1000, which is composed of the β1α1 domains of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR2 linked to the encephalitogenic human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-35-55 peptide, was recently shown to be safe and well tolerated in a phase I clinical trial in MS. To evaluate the opposing biological effects of four- versus two-domain MHC-II structures, we screened phage Fab antibodies (Abs) for the neutralizing activity of RTL1000. Five different TCR-like Abs were identified that could distinguish between the two- versus four-domain MHC-peptide complexes while the cognate TCR was unable to make such a distinction. Moreover, Fab detection of native two-domain HLA-DR structures in human plasma implies that there are naturally occurring regulatory MHC-peptide complexes. These results demonstrate for the first time distinct conformational determinants characteristic of activating versus tolerogenic MHC-peptide complexes involved in human autoimmunity. PMID:21469129

  8. Asparagine endopeptidase is not essential for class II MHC antigen presentation but is required for processing of cathepsin L in mice.

    PubMed

    Maehr, René; Hang, Howard C; Mintern, Justine D; Kim, You-Me; Cuvillier, Armelle; Nishimura, Mikio; Yamada, Kenji; Shirahama-Noda, Kanae; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2005-06-01

    Class II MHC molecules survey the endocytic compartments of APCs and present antigenic peptides to CD4 T cells. In this context, lysosomal proteases are essential not only for the generation of antigenic peptides but also for proteolysis of the invariant chain to allow the maturation of class II MHC molecules. Recent studies with protease inhibitors have implicated the asparagine endopeptidase (AEP) in class II MHC-restricted Ag presentation. We now report that AEP-deficient mice show no differences in processing of the invariant chain or maturation of class II MHC products compared with wild-type mice. In the absence of AEP, presentation to primary T cells of OVA and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, two Ags that contain asparagine residues within or in proximity to the relevant epitopes was unimpaired. Cathepsin (Cat) L, a lysosomal cysteine protease essential for the development to CD4 and NK T cells, fails to be processed into its mature two-chain form in AEP-deficient cells. Despite this, the numbers of CD4 and NK T cells are normal, showing that the single-chain form of Cat L is sufficient for its function in vivo. We conclude that AEP is essential for processing of Cat L but not for class II MHC-restricted Ag presentation. PMID:15905550

  9. Loss in CD4 T-cell responses to multiple epitopes in influenza due to expression of one additional MHC class II molecule in the host

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Jennifer L; Sant, Andrea J

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of factors controlling CD4 T-cell immunodominance is needed to pursue CD4 T-cell epitope-driven vaccine design, yet our understanding of this in humans is limited by the complexity of potential MHC class II molecule expression. In the studies described here, we took advantage of genetically restricted, well-defined mouse strains to better understand the effect of increasing MHC class II molecule diversity on the CD4 T-cell repertoire and the resulting anti-influenza immunodominance hierarchy. Interferon-γ ELISPOT assays were implemented to directly quantify CD4 T-cell responses to I-Ab and I-As restricted peptide epitopes following primary influenza virus infection in parental and F1 hybrid strains. We found striking and asymmetric declines in the magnitude of many peptide-specific responses in F1 animals. These declines could not be accounted for by the lower surface density of MHC class II on the cell or by antigen-presenting cells failing to stimulate T cells with lower avidity T-cell receptors. Given the large diversity of MHC class II expressed in humans, these findings have important implications for the rational design of peptide-based vaccines that are based on the premise that CD4 T-cell epitope specificity can be predicted by a simple cataloguing of an individual’s MHC class II genotype. PMID:22747522

  10. Combining molecular evolution and environmental genomics to unravel adaptive processes of MHC class IIB diversity in European minnows (Phoxinus phoxinus)

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Helene; Burri, Reto; Comtesse, Fabien; Fumagalli, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Host–pathogen interactions are a major evolutionary force promoting local adaptation. Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) represent unique candidates to investigate evolutionary processes driving local adaptation to parasite communities. The present study aimed at identifying the relative roles of neutral and adaptive processes driving the evolution of MHC class IIB (MHCIIB) genes in natural populations of European minnows (Phoxinus phoxinus). To this end, we isolated and genotyped exon 2 of two MHCIIB gene duplicates (DAB1 and DAB3) and 1′665 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers in nine populations, and characterized local bacterial communities by 16S rDNA barcoding using 454 amplicon sequencing. Both MHCIIB loci exhibited signs of historical balancing selection. Whereas genetic differentiation exceeded that of neutral markers at both loci, the populations' genetic diversities were positively correlated with local pathogen diversities only at DAB3. Overall, our results suggest pathogen-mediated local adaptation in European minnows at both MHCIIB loci. While at DAB1 selection appears to favor different alleles among populations, this is only partially the case in DAB3, which appears to be locally adapted to pathogen communities in terms of genetic diversity. These results provide new insights into the importance of host–pathogen interactions in driving local adaptation in the European minnow, and highlight that the importance of adaptive processes driving MHCIIB gene evolution may differ among duplicates within species, presumably as a consequence of alternative selective regimes or different genomic context. Using next-generation sequencing, the present manuscript identifies the relative roles of neutral and adaptive processes driving the evolution of MHC class IIB (MHCIIB) genes in natural populations of a cyprinid fish: the European minnow (Phoxinus phoxinus). We highlight that the relative importance of neutral

  11. Degradation, Promoter Recruitment and Transactivation Mediated by the Extreme N-Terminus of MHC Class II Transactivator CIITA Isoform III

    PubMed Central

    Ethier, Sylvain; Gaudreau, Luc; Steimle, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Multiple relationships between ubiquitin-proteasome mediated protein turnover and transcriptional activation have been well documented, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. One way to induce degradation is via ubiquitination of the N-terminal α-amino group of proteins. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transactivator CIITA is the master regulator of MHC class II gene expression and we found earlier that CIITA is a short-lived protein. Using stable and transient transfections of different CIITA constructs into HEK-293 and HeLa cell lines, we show here that the extreme N-terminal end of CIITA isoform III induces both rapid degradation and transactivation. It is essential that this sequence resides at the N-terminal end of the protein since blocking of the N-terminal end with an epitope-tag stabilizes the protein and reduces transactivation potential. The first ten amino acids of CIITA isoform III act as a portable degron and transactivation sequence when transferred as N-terminal extension to truncated CIITA constructs and are also able to destabilize a heterologous protein. The same is observed with the N-terminal ends of several known N-terminal ubiquitination substrates, such as Id2, Cdt1 and MyoD. Arginine and proline residues within the N-terminal ends contribute to rapid turnover. The N-terminal end of CIITA isoform III is responsible for efficient in vivo recruitment to the HLA-DRA promoter and increased interaction with components of the transcription machinery, such as TBP, p300, p400/Domino, the 19S ATPase S8, and the MHC-II promoter binding complex RFX. These experiments reveal a novel function of free N-terminal ends of proteins in degradation-dependent transcriptional activation. PMID:26871568

  12. Degradation, Promoter Recruitment and Transactivation Mediated by the Extreme N-Terminus of MHC Class II Transactivator CIITA Isoform III.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Yves B; Leon Machado, Jorge A; Ethier, Sylvain; Gaudreau, Luc; Steimle, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Multiple relationships between ubiquitin-proteasome mediated protein turnover and transcriptional activation have been well documented, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. One way to induce degradation is via ubiquitination of the N-terminal α-amino group of proteins. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transactivator CIITA is the master regulator of MHC class II gene expression and we found earlier that CIITA is a short-lived protein. Using stable and transient transfections of different CIITA constructs into HEK-293 and HeLa cell lines, we show here that the extreme N-terminal end of CIITA isoform III induces both rapid degradation and transactivation. It is essential that this sequence resides at the N-terminal end of the protein since blocking of the N-terminal end with an epitope-tag stabilizes the protein and reduces transactivation potential. The first ten amino acids of CIITA isoform III act as a portable degron and transactivation sequence when transferred as N-terminal extension to truncated CIITA constructs and are also able to destabilize a heterologous protein. The same is observed with the N-terminal ends of several known N-terminal ubiquitination substrates, such as Id2, Cdt1 and MyoD. Arginine and proline residues within the N-terminal ends contribute to rapid turnover. The N-terminal end of CIITA isoform III is responsible for efficient in vivo recruitment to the HLA-DRA promoter and increased interaction with components of the transcription machinery, such as TBP, p300, p400/Domino, the 19S ATPase S8, and the MHC-II promoter binding complex RFX. These experiments reveal a novel function of free N-terminal ends of proteins in degradation-dependent transcriptional activation. PMID:26871568

  13. Coevolution of MHC genes (LMP/TAP/class Ia; NKT-class Ib; NKp30-B7H6): Lessons from cold-blooded vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Yuko; Flajnik, Martin F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Comparative immunology provides the long view of what is conserved across all vertebrate taxa versus what is specific to particular organisms or group of organisms. Regarding the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and coevolution, three striking cases have been revealed in cold-blooded vertebrates: lineages of class Ia antigen-processing and -presenting genes, evolutionary conservation of NKT-class Ib recognition, and the ancient emergence of the natural cytotoxicity receptor NKp30 and its ligand B7H6. While coevolution of transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and class Ia has been documented in endothermic birds and two mammals, lineages of LMP7 are restricted to ectotherms. The unambiguous discovery of natural killer T (NKT) cells in Xenopus demonstrated that NKT cells are not restricted to mammals and are likely to have emerged at the same time in evolution as classical α/β and γ/δ T cells. NK cell receptors evolve at a rapid rate, and orthologues are nearly impossible to identify in different vertebrate classes. By contrast, we have detected NKp30 in all gnathostomes, except in species where it was lost. The recently discovered ligand of NKp30, B7H6, shows strong signs of coevolution with NKp30 throughout evolution, i.e. coincident loss or expansion of both genes in some species. NKp30 also offers an attractive IgSF candidate for the invasion of the RAG transposon, which is believed to have initiated T-cell receptor/immunoglobulin adaptive immunity. Besides reviewing these intriguing features of MHC evolution and coevolution, we offer suggestions for future studies and propose a model for the primordial or proto MHC. PMID:26284468

  14. Coevolution of MHC genes (LMP/TAP/class Ia, NKT-class Ib, NKp30-B7H6): lessons from cold-blooded vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yuko; Flajnik, Martin F

    2015-09-01

    Comparative immunology provides the long view of what is conserved across all vertebrate taxa versus what is specific to particular organisms or group of organisms. Regarding the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and coevolution, three striking cases have been revealed in cold-blooded vertebrates: lineages of class Ia antigen-processing and -presenting genes, evolutionary conservation of NKT-class Ib recognition, and the ancient emergence of the natural cytotoxicity receptor NKp30 and its ligand B7H6. While coevolution of transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and class Ia has been documented in endothermic birds and two mammals, lineages of LMP7 are restricted to ectotherms. The unambiguous discovery of natural killer T (NKT) cells in Xenopus demonstrated that NKT cells are not restricted to mammals and are likely to have emerged at the same time in evolution as classical α/β and γ/δ T cells. NK cell receptors evolve at a rapid rate, and orthologues are nearly impossible to identify in different vertebrate classes. By contrast, we have detected NKp30 in all gnathostomes, except in species where it was lost. The recently discovered ligand of NKp30, B7H6, shows strong signs of coevolution with NKp30 throughout evolution, i.e. coincident loss or expansion of both genes in some species. NKp30 also offers an attractive IgSF candidate for the invasion of the RAG transposon, which is believed to have initiated T-cell receptor/immunoglobulin adaptive immunity. Besides reviewing these intriguing features of MHC evolution and coevolution, we offer suggestions for future studies and propose a model for the primordial or proto MHC. PMID:26284468

  15. Definition of Proteasomal Peptide Splicing Rules for High-Efficiency Spliced Peptide Presentation by MHC Class I Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Berkers, Celia R.; de Jong, Annemieke; Schuurman, Karianne G.; Linnemann, Carsten; Meiring, Hugo D.; Janssen, Lennert; Neefjes, Jacques J.; Schumacher, Ton N. M.; Rodenko, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Peptide splicing, in which two distant parts of a protein are excised and then ligated to form a novel peptide, can generate unique MHC class I–restricted responses. Because these peptides are not genetically encoded and the rules behind proteasomal splicing are unknown, it is difficult to predict these spliced Ags. In the current study, small libraries of short peptides were used to identify amino acid sequences that affect the efficiency of this transpeptidation process. We observed that splicing does not occur at random, neither in terms of the amino acid sequences nor through random splicing of peptides from different sources. In contrast, splicing followed distinct rules that we deduced and validated both in vitro and in cells. Peptide ligation was quantified using a model peptide and demonstrated to occur with up to 30% ligation efficiency in vitro, provided that optimal structural requirements for ligation were met by both ligating partners. In addition, many splicing products could be formed from a single protein. Our splicing rules will facilitate prediction and detection of new spliced Ags to expand the peptidome presented by MHC class I Ags. PMID:26401003

  16. Induction of tolerance against the arthritogenic antigen with type-II collagen peptide-linked soluble MHC class II molecules.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoon-Kyung; Jung, Sundo; Park, Se-Ho

    2016-06-01

    In murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), self-reactive T cells can recognize peptide antigens derived from type-II collagen (CII). Activation of T cells is an important mediator of autoimmune diseases. Thus, T cells have become a focal point of study to treat autoimmune diseases. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of recombinant MHC class II molecules in the regulation of antigen-specific T cells by using a self peptide derived from CII (CII260-274; IAGFKGEQGPKGEPG) linked to mouse I-A(q) in a murine CIA model. We found that recombinant I-A(q)/CII260-274 molecules could be recognized by CII-specific T cells and inhibit the same T cells in vitro. Furthermore, the development of CIA in mice was successfully prevented by in vivo injection of recombinant I-A(q)/CII260-274 molecules. Thus, treatment with recombinant soluble MHC class II molecules in complex with an immunodominant self-peptide might offer a potential therapeutic for chronic inflammation in autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 331-336]. PMID:26779996

  17. The Thermodynamic Mechanism of Peptide–MHC Class II Complex Formation Is a Determinant of Susceptibility to HLA-DM

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Megan; Hoffman, Megan; Castellini, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Peptides bind MHC class II molecules through a thermodynamically nonadditive process consequent to the flexibility of the reactants. Currently, how the specific outcome of this binding process affects the ensuing epitope selection needs resolution. Calorimetric assessment of binding thermodynamics for hemagglutinin 306–319 peptide variants to the human MHC class II HLA-DR1 (DR1) and a mutant DR1 reveals that peptide/DR1 complexes can be formed with different enthalpic and entropic contributions. Complexes formed with a smaller entropic penalty feature circular dichroism spectra consistent with a non–compact form, and molecular dynamics simulation shows a more flexible structure. The opposite binding mode, compact and less flexible, is associated with greater entropic penalty. These structural variations are associated with rearrangements of residues known to be involved in HLA-DR (DM) binding, affinity of DM for the complex, and complex susceptibility to DM-mediated peptide exchange. Thus, the thermodynamic mechanism of peptide binding to DR1 correlates with the structural rigidity of the complex, and DM mediates peptide exchange by “sensing” flexible complexes in which the aforementioned residues are rearranged at a higher frequency than in more rigid ones. PMID:26116504

  18. The identification of additional zebrafish DICP genes reveals haplotype variation and linkage to MHC class I genes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Nunez, Ivan; Wcisel, Dustin J; Litman, Ronda T; Litman, Gary W; Yoder, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-01

    Bony fish encode multiple multi-gene families of membrane receptors that are comprised of immunoglobulin (Ig) domains and are predicted to function in innate immunity. One of these families, the diverse immunoglobulin (Ig) domain-containing protein (DICP) genes, maps to three chromosomal loci in zebrafish. Most DICPs possess one or two Ig ectodomains and include membrane-bound and secreted forms. Membrane-bound DICPs include putative inhibitory and activating receptors. Recombinant DICP Ig domains bind lipids with varying specificity, a characteristic shared with mammalian CD300 and TREM family members. Numerous DICP transcripts amplified from different lines of zebrafish did not match the zebrafish reference genome sequence suggesting polymorphic and haplotypic variation. The expression of DICPs in three different lines of zebrafish has been characterized employing PCR-based strategies. Certain DICPs exhibit restricted expression in adult tissues whereas others are expressed ubiquitously. Transcripts of a subset of DICPs can be detected during embryonic development suggesting roles in embryonic immunity or other developmental processes. Transcripts representing 11 previously uncharacterized DICP sequences were identified. The assignment of two of these sequences to an unplaced genomic scaffold resulted in the identification of an alternative DICP haplotype that is linked to a MHC class I Z lineage haplotype on zebrafish chromosome 3. The linkage of DICP and MHC class I genes also is observable in the genomes of the related grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio) suggesting that this is a shared character with the last common Cyprinidae ancestor. PMID:26801775

  19. Three-dimensional structure of a peptide extending from one end of a class I MHC binding site.

    PubMed

    Collins, E J; Garboczi, D N; Wiley, D C

    1994-10-13

    Class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules present peptides to CD8+ T cells for immunological surveillance (reviewed in ref. 1). The structures of complexes of class I MHC molecules with octamer, nonamer and decamer peptides determined until now show a common binding mode, with both peptide termini bound in conserved pockets at the ends of the peptide binding site. Length variations were accommodated by the peptide bulging or zig-zagging in the middle. Here we describe the structure of a decamer peptide which binds with the carboxy-terminal residue positioned outside the peptide binding site. Several protein side chains have rearranged to allow the peptide to exit. The structure suggests that even longer peptides could bind. The energetic effect of the altered mode of binding has been assessed by measuring the stability of the complex to thermal denaturation. Peptides bound in this novel manner are stable at physiological temperature, raising questions about their role in T-cell recognition and their production by proteolytic processing. PMID:7935798

  20. Global proteogenomic analysis of human MHC class I-associated peptides derived from non-canonical reading frames.

    PubMed

    Laumont, Céline M; Daouda, Tariq; Laverdure, Jean-Philippe; Bonneil, Éric; Caron-Lizotte, Olivier; Hardy, Marie-Pierre; Granados, Diana P; Durette, Chantal; Lemieux, Sébastien; Thibault, Pierre; Perreault, Claude

    2016-01-01

    In view of recent reports documenting pervasive translation outside of canonical protein-coding sequences, we wished to determine the proportion of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-associated peptides (MAPs) derived from non-canonical reading frames. Here we perform proteogenomic analyses of MAPs eluted from human B cells using high-throughput mass spectrometry to probe the six-frame translation of the B-cell transcriptome. We report that ∼ 10% of MAPs originate from allegedly noncoding genomic sequences or exonic out-of-frame translation. The biogenesis and properties of these 'cryptic MAPs' differ from those of conventional MAPs. Cryptic MAPs come from very short proteins with atypical C termini, and are coded by transcripts bearing long 3'UTRs enriched in destabilizing elements. Relative to conventional MAPs, cryptic MAPs display different MHC class I-binding preferences and harbour more genomic polymorphisms, some of which are immunogenic. Cryptic MAPs increase the complexity of the MAP repertoire and enhance the scope of CD8 T-cell immunosurveillance. PMID:26728094

  1. Structural Basis for the Recognition of Mutant Self by a Tumor-Specific, MHC Class II-Restricted T Cell Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Deng,L.; Langley, R.; Brown, P.; Xu, G.; Teng, L.; Wang, Q.; Gonzales, M.; Callender, G.; Nishimura, M.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Structural studies of complexes of T cell receptor (TCR) and peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) have focused on TCRs specific for foreign antigens or native self. An unexplored category of TCRs includes those specific for self determinants bearing alterations resulting from disease, notably cancer. We determined here the structure of a human melanoma-specific TCR (E8) bound to the MHC molecule HLA-DR1 and an epitope from mutant triosephosphate isomerase. The structure had features intermediate between 'anti-foreign' and autoimmune TCR-peptide-MHC class II complexes that may reflect the hybrid nature of altered self. E8 manifested very low affinity for mutant triosephosphate isomerase-HLA-DR1 despite the highly tumor-reactive properties of E8 cells. A second TCR (G4) had even lower affinity but underwent peptide-specific formation of dimers, suggesting this as a mechanism for enhancing low-affinity TCR-peptide-MHC interactions for T cell activation.

  2. A Novel HURRAH Protocol Reveals High Numbers of Monomorphic MHC Class II Loci and Two Asymmetric Multi-Locus Haplotypes in the Père David's Deer

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qiu-Hong; Zhang, Pei; Ni, Xiao-Wei; Wu, Hai-Long; Chen, Yi-Yan; Kuang, Ye-Ye; Ge, Yun-Fa; Fang, Sheng-Guo

    2011-01-01

    The Père David's deer is a highly inbred, but recovered, species, making it interesting to consider their adaptive molecular evolution from an immunological perspective. Prior to this study, genomic sequencing was the only method for isolating all functional MHC genes within a certain species. Here, we report a novel protocol for isolating MHC class II loci from a species, and its use to investigate the adaptive evolution of this endangered deer at the level of multi-locus haplotypes. This protocol was designated “HURRAH” based on its various steps and used to estimate the total number of MHC class II loci. We confirmed the validity of this novel protocol in the giant panda and then used it to examine the Père David's deer. Our results revealed that the Père David's deer possesses nine MHC class II loci and therefore has more functional MHC class II loci than the eight genome-sequenced mammals for which full MHC data are currently available. This could potentially account at least in part for the strong survival ability of this species in the face of severe bottlenecking. The results from the HURRAH protocol also revealed that: (1) All of the identified MHC class II loci were monomorphic at their antigen-binding regions, although DRA was dimorphic at its cytoplasmic tail; and (2) these genes constituted two asymmetric functional MHC class II multi-locus haplotypes: DRA1*01 ∼ DRB1 ∼ DRB3 ∼ DQA1 ∼ DQB2 (H1) and DRA1*02 ∼ DRB2 ∼ DRB4 ∼ DQA2 ∼ DQB1 (H2). The latter finding indicates that the current members of the deer species have lost the powerful ancestral MHC class II haplotypes of nine or more loci, and have instead fixed two relatively weak haplotypes containing five genes. As a result, the Père David's deer are currently at risk for increased susceptibility to infectious pathogens. PMID:21267075

  3. Molecular cloning, expression pattern, and 3D structural analysis of the MHC class IIB gene in the Chinese longsnout catfish (Leiocassis longirostris).

    PubMed

    Shen, Tong; Xu, Shixia; Yang, Mei; Pang, Shuying; Yang, Guang

    2011-05-15

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules encode glycoproteins which mediate the specificity of the vertebrate adaptive immune response. In this study, MHC class IIB gene from the Chinese longsnout catfish (Leiocassis longirostris) was cloned and sequenced, which encoded a predicted protein of 248 amino acids (28.06 kDa) containing a signal peptide, a beta 1 domain, a beta 2 domain, a connecting peptide, a transmembrane region, and a cytoplasmic tail. Using PCR with primers designed from known fish MHC class IIB sequences followed by elongation of the 5' and 3' ends using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), the full-length cDNA of longsnout catfish MHC class IIB was identified to be 1293 bp, consisting of a 26 bp 5'-terminal untranslated region (UTR), a 520 bp 3'-UTR, and a 747 bp open reading frame (ORF) bearing characteristics of the immunoglobulin C-type 1 (IGc1) family. The deduced amino acid sequences of the Chinese longsnout catfish MHC class IIB gene had 58-75% identity with those of other fishes. Six class IIB alleles were identified from five individuals. At most two different alleles observed in each individual may infer the existence of a single locus of class IIB gene in the Chinese longsnout catfish genome. An extensive study of polymorphism was examined in 60 individuals. A total of 11 haplotypes of exon 2 were detected in the sampled Chinese longsnout catfish. The rates of nonsynonymous substitutions (d(N)) occurred at a higher frequency than that of synonymous substitutions (d(S)), suggesting the polymorphism of exon 2 seemed to be maintained by the balancing selection. By using long PCR technique, the genomic sequence was further identified to be 2345 bp in length, which contained six exons and five introns. Interestingly, a 98 bp intron 5 cut the 3'-UTR into two parts. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated high expression of MHC IIB in gills, spleen, head kidney, and intestine, moderate expression in liver and

  4. Intranasal antigen targeting to MHC class II molecules primes local IgA and serum IgG antibody responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Snider, D P; Underdown, B J; McDermott, M R

    1997-03-01

    Covalent conjugates of hen egg lysozyme (HEL) and anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were used to immunize mice intranasally. Three weeks after intranasal (IN) priming, mice responded rapidly to IN challenge with a mixture of HEL and cholera toxin (CT), by producing large titres of anti-HEL IgA and IgG1 antibody in serum, and IgA antibody in nasal secretions. No secondary response to HEL plus CT occurred in mice that received no priming or mice primed with HEL alone. The secondary serum IgG antibody response was dominated by the IgG1 subclass. HEL combined with CT adjuvant worked much better than HEL alone in producing the secondary response. Control conjugates, containing an IgG isotype-matched mAb without specificity for mouse tissues, provided poor priming. Mice expressing MHC class II molecules, to which the anti-MHC II mAb could not bind, produced a weak antibody response compared with those that expressed the appropriate. MHC class II molecule. Our results demonstrate that immunotargeting to MHC class II molecules via the IN route allows priming of the local IgA and circulating IgG antibody, and indicate that this technique is a feasible approach for delivery of subunit vaccines in the upper respiratory tract. PMID:9155636

  5. In vitro analysis of a primary, major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response to avian leukosis virus (ALV), using target cells expressing MHC class I cDNA inserted into a recombinant ALV vector.

    PubMed

    Thacker, E L; Fulton, J E; Hunt, H D

    1995-10-01

    The interaction between the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is an important component of the host's resistance to viral infections and tumor formation. In this study, an avian leukosis virus (ALV) vector system, RCASBP, expressing MHC chicken class I (B-F) cDNA was used to develop target cells expressing the chicken class I glycoproteins complexed with ALV antigens on the cell surface. Peripheral blood from chickens inoculated with ALV was shown to contain antigen-specific, MHC-restricted, CD8+ effector CTLs, using a 51Cr release assay utilizing the RCASBP B-F target cells. The stimulated effector cells were also predominantly alpha beta T-cell receptor-positive (TCR2) T cells. The CTL response varied between two haplotypes of chickens which differed in their response to Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-induced tumors. Chickens with the B21 haplotype which regress RSV-induced tumors showed maximal cytolytic activity, while chickens with the B13 haplotype which do not regress RSV-induced tumors had minimal to no cytolytic activity. In addition to assessing the CTL response to ALV, the creation of MHC-specific immortal target cell lines will be extremely useful in evaluating CTL responses to other viral disease in chickens. PMID:7666545

  6. Dissection of the interferon gamma-MHC class II signal transduction pathway reveals that type I and type II interferon systems share common signalling component(s).

    PubMed Central

    Loh, J E; Chang, C H; Fodor, W L; Flavell, R A

    1992-01-01

    We have used a herpes virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) based metabolic selection system to isolate mutants defective in the interferon gamma mediated induction of the MHC class II promoter. All the mutations act in trans and result in no detectable induction of MHC and invariant chain (Ii) gene expression. Scatchard analysis indicates that the mutants have a normal number of surface IFN gamma receptors with the same affinity constant. The mutants fall into two broad categories. One class of mutants is still able to induce MHC class I, IRF-1, 9-27, 1-8 and GBP genes by IFN gamma. A second class of mutants is defective for the IFN gamma induction of all the genes tested; surprisingly, the IFN alpha/beta induction of MHC class I, 9-27, ISG54 and ISG15 genes is also defective in these mutants, although different members of this class can be discriminated by the response of the GBP and IRF-1 genes to type I interferons. These data demonstrate that the signalling pathways of both type I and type II interferon systems share common signal transduction component(s). These mutants will be useful for the study of IFN gamma regulation of class II genes and Ii chain, and to elucidate molecular components of type I and type II interferon signal transduction. Images PMID:1314162

  7. Recognition of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class Ib Molecule H2-Q10 by the Natural Killer Cell Receptor Ly49C.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Lucy C; Berry, Richard; Sosnin, Natasha; Widjaja, Jacqueline M L; Deuss, Felix A; Balaji, Gautham R; LaGruta, Nicole L; Mirams, Michiko; Trapani, Joseph A; Rossjohn, Jamie; Brooks, Andrew G; Andrews, Daniel M

    2016-09-01

    Murine natural killer (NK) cells are regulated by the interaction of Ly49 receptors with major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC-I). Although the ligands for inhibitory Ly49 were considered to be restricted to classical MHC (MHC-Ia), we have shown that the non-classical MHC molecule (MHC-Ib) H2-M3 was a ligand for the inhibitory Ly49A. Here we establish that another MHC-Ib, H2-Q10, is a bona fide ligand for the inhibitory Ly49C receptor. H2-Q10 bound to Ly49C with a marginally lower affinity (∼5 μm) than that observed between Ly49C and MHC-Ia (H-2K(b)/H-2D(d), both ∼1 μm), and this recognition could be prevented by cis interactions with H-2K in situ To understand the molecular details underpinning Ly49·MHC-Ib recognition, we determined the crystal structures of H2-Q10 and Ly49C bound H2-Q10. Unliganded H2-Q10 adopted a classical MHC-I fold and possessed a peptide-binding groove that exhibited features similar to those found in MHC-Ia, explaining the diverse peptide binding repertoire of H2-Q10. Ly49C bound to H2-Q10 underneath the peptide binding platform to a region that encompassed residues from the α1, α2, and α3 domains, as well as the associated β2-microglobulin subunit. This docking mode was conserved with that previously observed for Ly49C·H-2K(b) Indeed, structure-guided mutation of Ly49C indicated that Ly49C·H2-Q10 and Ly49C·H-2K(b) possess similar energetic footprints focused around residues located within the Ly49C β4-stand and L5 loop, which contact the underside of the peptide-binding platform floor. Our data provide a structural basis for Ly49·MHC-Ib recognition and demonstrate that MHC-Ib represent an extended family of ligands for Ly49 molecules. PMID:27385590

  8. Intracellular transport of MHC class II and associated invariant chain in antigen presenting cells from AP-3-deficient mocha mice.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, L M; Richter, S S; Miller, J

    2001-06-15

    MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation requires trafficking of newly synthesized class II-invariant chain complexes from the trans-Golgi network to endosomal, peptide-loading compartments. This transport is mediated by dileucine-like motifs within the cytosolic tail of the invariant chain. Although these signals have been well characterized, the cytosolic proteins that interact with these dileucine signals and mediate Golgi sorting and endosomal transport have not been identified. Recently, an adaptor complex, AP-3, has been identified that interacts with dileucine motifs and mediates endosomal/lysosomal transport in yeast, Drosophila, and mammals. In this report, we have assessed class II-invariant chain trafficking in a strain of mice (mocha) which lacks expression of AP-3. Our studies demonstrate that the lack of AP-3 does not affect the kinetics of invariant chain degradation, the route of class II-invariant chain transport, or the rate and extent of class II-peptide binding as assessed by the generation of SDS-stable dimers. The possible role of other known or unknown adaptor complexes in class II-invariant chain transport is discussed. PMID:11520080

  9. Differential presentation of tumor antigen-derived epitopes by MHC-class I and antigen-positive tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Held, Gerhard; Neumann, Frank; Sturm, Christine; Kaestner, Lars; Dauth, Nina; de Bruijn, Diederik R; Renner, Christoph; Lipp, Peter; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2008-10-15

    SSX2 is a member of the family of cancer/testis antigens. The SSX2 derived peptide SSX2(103-111) has been shown to be presented to cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) by Major-Histocompatibility (MHC) Class-I complexes after endogenous processing, more precisely by the allele HLA-A*0201. The HLA-A*0201- and SSX2-positive melanoma cell line SK-Mel-37 but not Me275 had been shown to elicit reactivity in SSX2(103-111) specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. To analyze the correlation between SSX2(103-111) presentation and T-cell stimulation, we intended to visualize presentation of SSX2(103-111) in these melanoma cell lines. Fab-antibodies were established from a human phage library with specificity for SSX2(103-111)/HLA-A*0201 complexes (but non-reactive with HLA-A*0201 or SSX2(103-111) alone) and used to visualize the presentation of SSX2(103-111) in the context of HLA-A*0201 by fluorescence microscopy. Presentation of SSX2(103-111) the context of HLA-A*0201 was demonstrated for the majority of SK-Mel-37, but for only a small fraction (<1%) of Me275 as indicated by a clear membrane-staining pattern in fluorescence microscopy. The presentation of SSX2(103-111) on SK-Mel37 and Me275, but not the expression of the SSX2 protein correlated with the capability of these cells to stimulate cells of an SSX2(103-111)-specific T-cell clone. MHC-peptide specific antibodies are a valuable tool for the analysis of antigenic peptides in the context of MHC-I molecules and for the structural definition of immunodominant epitopes. PMID:18688854

  10. A Genome-Wide Screen for Machinery Involved in Downregulation of MHC Class I by HIV-1 Nef

    PubMed Central

    Choma, Maja K.; Lumb, Jennifer; Kozik, Patrycja; Robinson, Margaret S.

    2015-01-01

    The HIV-1-encoded protein, Nef, plays a key role in the development of AIDS. One of Nef’s functions is to keep MHC class I off the surface of infected cells, a process that requires the host proteins clathrin and AP-1. To identify other proteins involved in this pathway, we carried out a genome-wide siRNA library screen on HeLa cells co-expressing HLA-A2 and an inducible form of Nef. Out of 21,121 siRNA pools, 100 were selected for further analysis, based on their ability to either inhibit or enhance downregulation of MHC-I by Nef. When cells were treated with the same siRNA pools as those used in the screen, 79% produced a similar phenotype. However, when the cells were treated with different siRNA reagents targeting the same genes, only 16% produced a similar phenotype. This indicates that most of the hits found in the original screen are likely to have been off-target, an important concern that is often not taken into account in siRNA screening studies. Nevertheless, we identified novel host factors involved in Nef-induced downregulation of MHC-I, including four genes, MIIP, CAMSAP3, SLC6A3, and KCTD19, where multiple reagents produced a strong inhibitory effect on Nef activity. Other hits slightly below our very high stringency cutoff point may also deserve further study. Thus, our dataset is a valuable resource for scientists investigating the pathogenesis of HIV. PMID:26466362

  11. Narrow Groove and Restricted Anchors of MHC Class I Molecule BF2*0401 Plus Peptide Transporter Restriction can Explain Disease Susceptibility of B4 Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianhua; Chen, Yong; Qi, Jianxun; Gao, Feng; Liu, Yanjie; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Xuyu; Kaufman, Jim; Xia, Chun; Gao, George F.

    2016-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has genetic associations with many diseases, often due to differences in presentation of antigenic peptides by polymorphic MHC molecules to T lymphocytes of the immune system. In chickens, only a single classical class I molecule in each MHC haplotype is expressed well due to co-evolution with the polymorphic transporters associated with antigen presentation (TAPs), which means that resistance and susceptibility to infectious pathogens are particularly easy to observe. Previously, structures of chicken MHC class I molecule BF2*2101 from B21 haplotype showed an unusually large peptide-binding groove that accommodates a broad spectrum of peptides to present as epitopes to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), explaining the MHC-determined resistance of B21 chickens to Marek's disease. Here, we report the crystal structure of BF2*0401 from the B4 (also known as B13) haplotype, showing a highly positively-charged surface hitherto unobserved in other MHC molecules, as well as a remarkably narrow groove due to the allele-specific residues with bulky side chains. Together, these properties limit the number of epitope peptides that can bind this class I molecule. However, peptide-binding assays show that in vitro BF2*0401 can bind a wider variety of peptides than are found on the surface of B4 cells. Thus, a combination of the specificities of the polymorphic TAP transporter and the MHC results in a very limited set of BF2*0401 peptides with negatively charged anchors to be presented to T lymphocytes. PMID:23041567

  12. MHC class II variation in a rare and ecological specialist mouse lemur reveals lower allelic richness and contrasting selection patterns compared to a generalist and widespread sympatric congener.

    PubMed

    Pechouskova, Eva; Dammhahn, Melanie; Brameier, Markus; Fichtel, Claudia; Kappeler, Peter M; Huchard, Elise

    2015-04-01

    The polymorphism of immunogenes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is thought to influence the functional plasticity of immune responses and, consequently, the fitness of populations facing heterogeneous pathogenic pressures. Here, we evaluated MHC variation (allelic richness and divergence) and patterns of selection acting on the two highly polymorphic MHC class II loci (DRB and DQB) in the endangered primate Madame Berthe's mouse lemur (Microcebus berthae). Using 454 pyrosequencing, we examined MHC variation in a total of 100 individuals sampled over 9 years in Kirindy Forest, Western Madagascar, and compared our findings with data obtained previously for its sympatric congener, the grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus). These species exhibit a contrasting ecology and demography that were expected to affect MHC variation and molecular signatures of selection. We found a lower allelic richness concordant with its low population density, but a similar level of allelic divergence and signals of historical selection in the rare feeding specialist M. berthae compared to the widespread generalist M. murinus. These findings suggest that demographic factors may exert a stronger influence than pathogen-driven selection on current levels of allelic richness in M. berthae. Despite a high sequence similarity between the two congeners, contrasting selection patterns detected at DQB suggest its potential functional divergence. This study represents a first step toward unravelling factors influencing the adaptive divergence of MHC genes between closely related but ecologically differentiated sympatric lemurs and opens new questions regarding potential functional discrepancy that would explain contrasting selection patterns detected at DQB. PMID:25687337

  13. Relationship between target antigens and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes in producing two pathogenic antibodies simultaneously

    PubMed Central

    Zakka, L R; Keskin, D B; Reche, P; Ahmed, A R

    2010-01-01

    In this report, we present 15 patients with histological and immunopathologically proven pemphigus vulgaris (PV). After a mean of 80 months since the onset of disease, when evaluated serologically, they had antibodies typical of PV and pemphigoid (Pg). Similarly, 18 patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP) and mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP) were diagnosed on the basis of histology and immunopathology. After a mean of 60 months since the onset of disease, when their sera were evaluated they were found to have Pg and PV autoantibodies. In both groups of patients the diseases were characterized by a chronic course, which included several relapses and recurrences and were non-responsive to conventional therapy. The major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) genes were studied in both groups of patients and phenotypes associated typically with them were observed. Hence, in 33 patients, two different pathogenic autoantibodies were detected simultaneously. The authors provide a computer model to show that each MHC II gene has relevant epitopes that recognize the antigens associated with both diseases. Using the databases in these computer models, the authors present the hypothesis that these two autoantibodies are produced simultaneously due to the phenomena of epitope spreading. PMID:21069937

  14. Copy number variation and genetic diversity of MHC Class IIb alleles in an alien population of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Mable, Barbara K; Kilbride, Elizabeth; Viney, Mark E; Tinsley, Richard C

    2015-10-01

    Xenopus laevis (the African clawed frog), which originated through hybridisation and whole genome duplication, has been used as a model for genetics and development for many years, but surprisingly little is known about immune gene variation in natural populations. The purpose of this study was to use an isolated population of X. laevis that was introduced to Wales, UK in the past 50 years to investigate how variation at the MHC compares to that at other loci, following a severe population bottleneck. Among 18 individuals, we found nine alleles based on exon 2 sequences of the Class IIb region (which includes the peptide binding region). Individuals carried from one to three of the loci identified from previous laboratory studies. Genetic variation was an order of magnitude higher at the MHC compared with three single-copy nuclear genes, but all loci showed high levels of heterozygosity and nucleotide diversity and there was not an excess of homozygosity or decrease in diversity over time that would suggest extensive inbreeding in the introduced population. Tajima's D was positive for all loci, which is consistent with a bottleneck. Moreover, comparison with published sequences identified the source of the introduced population as the Western Cape region of South Africa, where most commercial suppliers have obtained their stocks. These factors suggest that despite founding by potentially already inbred individuals, the alien population in Wales has maintained substantial genetic variation at both adaptively important and neutral genes. PMID:26329765

  15. An approach to mapping haplotype-specific recombination sites in human MHC class III

    SciTech Connect

    Levo, A.; Westman, P.; Partanen, J.

    1996-12-31

    Studies of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in mouse indicate that the recombination sites are not randomly distributed and their occurrence is haplotype-dependent. No data concerning haplotype-specific recombination sites in human are available due to the low number of informative families. To investigate haplotype-specific recombination sites in human MHC, we describe an approach based on identification of recombinant haplotypes derived from one conserved haplotype at the population level. The recombination sites were mapped by comparing polymorphic markers between the recombinant and assumed original haplotypes. We tested this approach on the extended haplotype HLA A3; B47; Bf{sup *}F; C4A{sup *}1; C4B{sup *}Q0; DR7, which is most suitable for this analysis. First, it carries a number of rare markers, and second, the haplotype, albeit rare in the general population, is frequent in patients with 21-hydroxylase (21OH) defect. We observed recombinants derived from this haplotype in patients with 21OH defect. All these haplotypes had the centromeric part (from Bf to DR) identical to the original haplotype, but they differed in HLA A and B. We therefore assumed that they underwent recombinations in the segment that separates the Bf and HLA B genes. Polymorphic markers indicated that all break points mapped to two segments near the TNF locus. This approach makes possible the mapping of preferential recombination sites in different haplotypes. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans Promote Telomerase Internalization and MHC Class II Presentation on Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Galaine, Jeanne; Kellermann, Guillaume; Guillaume, Yves; Boidot, Romain; Picard, Emilie; Loyon, Romain; Queiroz, Lise; Boullerot, Laura; Beziaud, Laurent; Jary, Marine; Mansi, Laura; André, Claire; Lethier, Lydie; Ségal-Bendirdjian, Evelyne; Borg, Christophe; Godet, Yann; Adotévi, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Telomerase is a prototype-shared tumor Ag and represents an attractive target for anticancer immunotherapy. We have previously described promiscuous and immunogenic HLA-DR-restricted peptides derived from human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and referred as universal cancer peptide (UCP). In nonsmall cell lung cancer, the presence of spontaneous UCP-specific CD4 T cell responses increases the survival of chemotherapy-responding patients. However, the precise mechanisms of hTERT's uptake, processing, and presentation on MHC-II molecules to stimulate CD4 T cells are poorly understood. In this work, by using well-characterized UCP-specific CD4 T cell clones, we showed that hTERT processing and presentation on MHC-II involve both classical endolysosomal and nonclassical cytosolic pathways. Furthermore, to our knowledge, we demonstrated for the first time that hTERT's internalization by dendritic cells requires its interaction with surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Altogether, our findings provide a novel mechanism of tumor-specific CD4 T cell activation and will be useful for the development of novel cancer immunotherapies that harness CD4 T cells. PMID:27481844

  17. Characterization of expressed class II MHC sequences in the banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis) reveals multiple DRB loci.

    PubMed

    Busch, Joseph D; Waser, Peter M; DeWoody, J Andrew

    2008-11-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are exceptionally polymorphic due to the combined effects of natural and sexual selection. Most research in wild populations has focused on the second exon of a single class II locus (DRB), but complete gene sequences can provide an illuminating backdrop for studies of intragenic selection, recombination, and organization. To this end, we characterized class II loci in the banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis). Seven DRB-like sequences (provisionally named MhcDisp-DRB*01 through *07) were isolated from spleen cDNA and most likely comprise > or =5 loci; this multiformity is quite unlike the situation in muroid rodents such as Mus, Rattus, and Peromyscus. In silico translation revealed the presence of important structural residues for glycosylation sites, salt bonds, and CD4+ T-cell recognition. Amino-acid distances varied widely among the seven sequences (2-34%). Nuclear DNA sequences from the Disp-DRB*07 locus (approximately 10 kb) revealed a conventional exon/intron structure as well as a number of microsatellites and short interspersed nuclear elements (B4, Alu, and IDL-Geo subfamilies). Rates of nucleotide substitution at Disp-DRB*07 are similar in both exons and introns (pi = 0.015 and 0.012, respectively), which suggests relaxed selection and may indicate that this locus is an expressed pseudogene. Finally, we performed BLASTn searches against Dipodomys ordii genomic sequences (unassembled reads) and find 90-97% nucleotide similarity between the two kangaroo rat species. Collectively, these data suggest that class II diversity in heteromyid rodents is based on polylocism and departs from the muroid architecture. PMID:18836711

  18. Structure of the Epstein-Barr virus gp42 protein bound to the MHC class II recepter HLA-DR1

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, M.; Haan, K.M.; Longnecker, R.; Jardetzky, T.

    2010-03-08

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) causes infectious mononucleosis, establishes long-term latent infections, and is associated with a variety of human tumors. The EBV gp42 glycoprotein binds MHC class II molecules, playing a critical role in infection of B lymphocytes. EBV gp42 belongs to the C-type lectin superfamily, with homology to NK receptors of the immune system. We report the crystal structure of gp42 bound to the human MHC class II molecule HLA-DR1. The gp42 binds HLA-DR1 using a surface site that is distinct from the canonical lectin and NK receptor ligand binding sites. At the canonical ligand binding site, gp42 forms a large hydrophobic groove, which could interact with other ligands necessary for EBV entry, providing a mechanism for coupling MHC recognition and membrane fusion.

  19. Identification and quantitation of MHC class II-bound peptides from mouse spleen dendritic cells by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bozzacco, Leonia; Yu, Haiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Summary Advances in immunology and immune therapies require knowledge of antigenic peptide sequences that are presented on MHC class II and class I molecules of antigen presenting cells. The most specialized antigen presenting cells are dendritic cells (DCs). In the past, the small number of DCs that can be isolated from mouse spleen prevented direct analysis of the MHC II peptide repertoire presented by DCs. Here we describe a protocol that integrates immunological methods (in vivo enrichment of mouse spleen DCs by Flt3L treatment and immunoprecipation of MHC II-peptide complexes), mass spectrometry analysis and peptide synthesis (LC-MS/MS and quantitation analysis for non tryptic peptides) to identify and quantitate the endogenous peptides that are bound to MHC II molecules on DCs. The described method produces quantitative data that are reproducible and reliable enough to cover a wide range of peptide copy numbers. We propose the application of this method in future studies to quantitatively investigate the MHC II repertoire on DCs presented during viral infections or different immunizations in vaccine development research. PMID:23963941

  20. The role of zinc in the binding of killer cell Ig-like receptors to class I MHC proteins

    PubMed Central

    Valés-Gómez, Mar; Erskine, Robert A.; Deacon, Matthew P.; Strominger, Jack L.; Reyburn, Hugh T.

    2001-01-01

    The binding of killer cell Ig-like Receptors (KIR) to their Class I MHC ligands was shown previously to be characterized by extremely rapid association and dissociation rate constants. During experiments to investigate the biochemistry of receptor–ligand binding in more detail, the kinetic parameters of the interaction were observed to alter dramatically in the presence of Zn2+ but not other divalent cations. The basis of this phenomenon is Zn2+-induced multimerization of the KIR molecules as demonstrated by BIAcore, analytical ultracentrifugation, and chemical cross-linking experiments. Zn2+-dependent multimerization of KIR may be critical for formation of the clusters of KIR and HLA-C molecules, the “natural killer (NK) cell immune synapse,” observed at the site of contact between the NK cell and target cell. PMID:11172020

  1. The Role of Insulin-Regulated Aminopeptidase in MHC Class I Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Saveanu, Loredana; van Endert, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Production of MHC-I ligands from antigenic proteins generally requires multiple proteolytic events. While the proteolytic steps required for antigen processing in the endogenous pathway are clearly established, persisting gaps of knowledge regarding putative cross-presentation compartments have made it difficult to map the precise proteolytic events required for generation of cross-presented antigens. It is only in the past decade that the importance of aminoterminal trimming as the final step in the endogenous presentation pathway has been recognized and that the corresponding enzymes have been described. This review focuses on the aminoterminal trimming of exogenous cross-presented peptides, with particular emphasis on the identification of insulin responsive aminopeptidase (IRAP) as the principal trimming aminopeptidase in endosomes and phagosomes. PMID:22566938

  2. The Forgotten: Identification and Functional Characterization of MHC Class II Molecules H2-Eb2 and RT1-Db2.

    PubMed

    Monzón-Casanova, Elisa; Rudolf, Ronald; Starick, Lisa; Müller, Ingrid; Söllner, Christian; Müller, Nora; Westphal, Nico; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Uchiyama, Takehiko; Berberich, Ingolf; Walter, Lutz; Herrmann, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we report the complete coding sequence and to our knowledge, the first functional analysis of two homologous nonclassical MHC class II genes: RT1-Db2 of rat and H2-Eb2 of mouse. They differ in important aspects compared with the classical class II β1 molecules: their mRNA expression by APCs is much lower, they show minimal polymorphism in the Ag-binding domain, and they lack N-glycosylation and the highly conserved histidine 81. Also, their cytoplasmic region is completely different and longer. To study and compare them with their classical counterparts, we transduced them in different cell lines. These studies show that they can pair with the classical α-chains (RT1-Da and H2-Ea) and are expressed at the cell surface where they can present superantigens. Interestingly, compared with the classical molecules, they have an extraordinary capacity to present the superantigen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis mitogen. Taken together, our findings suggest that the b2 genes, together with the respective α-chain genes, encode for H2-E2 or RT1-D2 molecules, which could function as Ag-presenting molecules for a particular class of Ags, as modulators of Ag presentation like nonclassical nonpolymorphic class II molecules DM and DO do, or even as players outside the immune system. PMID:26740108

  3. Expression and purification of human MHC class I-related chain molecule B-α1 domain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shufen; Xiang, Zemin; Wang, Ya; Xu, Huanhuan; Zhang, Dengyang; Wang, Xuanjun; Sheng, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related chain A/B (MICA/B) is a type of stress-induced molecule that plays an important role in tumor surveillance. MICA/B shares a similar structure with MHC class I molecules, but MICA/B contains a closed cleft, not an open one, in its N-terminal alpha1 domain. The alpha 1 domain was believed to have no roles in antigen presentation, because the closed cleft provides limited space for binding with known molecules, and the cleft of MICA/B have been reported no known functions. To study the possible function of the cleft located in human MICA/B's alpha 1 domain, we attempted to express the human MICB-α1 (hMICB-α1) domain allele protein, which is approximately 20.5 kDa, by utilizing an Escherichia coli (E. coli) secretory pathway. Protein expression was accomplished through the phosphate-limited inducible promoter. After purification using ammonium sulfate precipitation, phenyl hydrophobic Sepharose, SP Sepharose and HisTrap affinity Sepharose, recombinant human MICB-α1 (rhMICB-α1) was obtained with 94.3% purity. The binding capacity of rhMICB-α1 with natural killer group 2, member D (NKG2D) was evaluated in vitro. The results demonstrated that rhMICB-α1 can be prepared through the E. coli secretory pathway. Purified rhMICB-α1 protein was able to functionally bind with NKG2D. This method can be further used to obtain functionally active rhMICB-α1 protein, which can served as the basis for further studies of the possible function of the MICB cleft. PMID:27036081

  4. Trans-species polymorphism of the Mhc class II DRB-like gene in banded penguins (genus Spheniscus).

    PubMed

    Kikkawa, Eri F; Tsuda, Tomi T; Sumiyama, Daisuke; Naruse, Taeko K; Fukuda, Michio; Kurita, Masanori; Wilson, Rory P; LeMaho, Yvon; Miller, Gary D; Tsuda, Michio; Murata, Koichi; Kulski, Jerzy K; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2009-05-01

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (Mhc) class II DRB locus of vertebrates is highly polymorphic and some alleles may be shared between closely related species as a result of balancing selection in association with resistance to parasites. In this study, we developed a new set of PCR primers to amplify, clone, and sequence overlapping portions of the Mhc class II DRB-like gene from the 5'UTR end to intron 3, including exons 1, 2, and 3 and introns 1 and 2 in four species (20 Humboldt, six African, five Magellanic, and three Galapagos penguins) of penguin from the genus Spheniscus (Sphe). Analysis of gene sequence variation by the neighbor-joining method of 21 Sphe sequences and 20 previously published sequences from four other penguin species revealed overlapping clades within the Sphe species, but species-specific clades for the other penguin species. The overlap of the DRB-like gene sequence variants between the four Sphe species suggests that, despite their allopatric distribution, the Sphe species are closely related and that some shared DRB1 alleles may have undergone a trans-species inheritance because of balancing selection and/or recent rapid speciation. The new primers and PCR assays that we have developed for the identification of the DRB1 DNA and protein sequence variations appear to be useful for the characterization of the molecular evolution of the gene in closely related Penguin species and might be helpful for the assessment of the genetic health and the management of the conservation and captivity of these endangered species. PMID:19319519

  5. Predominant Occupation of the Class I MHC Molecule H-2Kwm7 with a Single Self-peptide Suggests a Mechanism for its Diabetes-protective Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Brims, D.; Qian, J; Jarchum, I; Mikesh, L; Palmieri, E; Ramagopal, U; Malashkevich, V; Chaparro, R; Lund, T; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by T cell-mediated destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic {beta} cells. In both humans and the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of T1D, class II MHC alleles are the primary determinant of disease susceptibility. However, class I MHC genes also influence risk. These findings are consistent with the requirement for both CD{sup 4+} and CD{sup 8+} T cells in the pathogenesis of T1D. Although a large body of work has permitted the identification of multiple mechanisms to explain the diabetes-protective effect of particular class II MHC alleles, studies examining the protective influence of class I alleles are lacking. Here, we explored this question by performing biochemical and structural analyses of the murine class I MHC molecule H-2K{sup wm7}, which exerts a diabetes-protective effect in NOD mice. We have found that H-2K{sup wm7} molecules are predominantly occupied by the single self-peptide VNDIFERI, derived from the ubiquitous protein histone H2B. This unexpected finding suggests that the inability of H-2K{sup wm7} to support T1D development could be due, at least in part, to the failure of peptides from critical {beta}-cell antigens to adequately compete for binding and be presented to T cells. Predominant presentation of a single peptide would also be expected to influence T-cell selection, potentially leading to a reduced ability to select a diabetogenic CD{sup 8+} T-cell repertoire. The report that one of the predominant peptides bound by T1D-protective HLA-A*31 is histone derived suggests the potential translation of our findings to human diabetes-protective class I MHC molecules.

  6. Activating Receptors for Self-MHC Class I Enhance Effector Functions and Memory Differentiation of NK Cells during Mouse Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Nabekura, Tsukasa; Lanier, Lewis L

    2016-07-19

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important in host defense against pathogens, and they can subsequently differentiate into memory NK cells. The Ly49 and KIR gene families in rodents and humans encode both inhibitory and activating receptors for MHC class I. The physiological role of activating KIR or Ly49 receptors that recognize self-MHC class I during immune response to viral infections is unknown. Here, we address how the activating Ly49D receptor impacts the NK cell response to mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection by comparing the activation and differentiation of Ly49D-bearing NK cells in mice lacking or expressing H-2D(d), the cognate MHC class I ligand of Ly49D. After MCMV infection, Ly49D augmented IFN-γ production by MCMV-specific Ly49H(+) NK cells and preferentially promoted the generation of memory Ly49H(+) NK cells. Thus, activating receptors for self-MHC class I modulate the differentiation of MCMV-specific NK cells and are beneficial for host defense against MCMV infection. PMID:27438766

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Down-Modulates the Immunoproteasome Biosynthesis and the MHC Class I Cell Surface Expression in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Ricardo; Faria, Liliam O.; Kloss, Alexander; Favali, Cecília B. F.; Kuckelkorn, Ulrike; Kloetzel, Peter-Michael; de Sá, Cezar Martins; Lima, Beatriz D.

    2014-01-01

    Generally, Trypanosoma cruzi infection in human is persistent and tends to chronicity, suggesting that the parasite evade the immune surveillance by down regulating the intracellular antigen processing routes. Within the MHC class I pathway, the majority of antigenic peptides are generated by the proteasome. However, upon IFN-γ stimulation, the catalytic constitutive subunits of the proteasome are replaced by the subunits β1i/LMP2, β2i/MECL-1 and β5i/LMP7 to form the immunoproteasome. In this scenario, we analyzed whether the expression and activity of the constitutive and the immunoproteasome as well as the expression of other components of the MHC class I pathway are altered during the infection of HeLa cells with T. cruzi. By RT-PCR and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis, we showed that the expression and composition of the constitutive proteasome is not affected by the parasite. In contrast, the biosynthesis of the β1i, β2i, β5i immunosubunits, PA28β, TAP1 and the MHC class I molecule as well as the proteasomal proteolytic activities were down-regulated in infected-IFN-γ-treated cell cultures. Taken together, our results provide evidence that the protozoan T. cruzi specifically modulates its infection through an unknown posttranscriptional mechanism that inhibits the expression of the MHC class I pathway components. PMID:24752321

  8. Identification and characterization of a novel splicing variant of the MHC class 1-related neonatal Fe receptor for IgG.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The neonatal Fc receptor for IgG (FcRn), a MHC class I-related molecule, functions to transport maternal IgG to the fetus or newborn via placenta or intestine and protects IgG from catabolism. In the course of cloning porcine FcRn from the intestinal epithelial cell line IPEC, two cDNAs were identif...

  9. Selective pressures on MHC class II genes in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) as inferred by hierarchical analysis of population structure.

    PubMed

    Herdegen, M; Babik, W; Radwan, J

    2014-11-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex, which are the most polymorphic of all vertebrate genes, are a pre-eminent system for the study of selective pressures that arise from host-pathogen interactions. Balancing selection capable of maintaining high polymorphism should lead to the homogenization of MHC allele frequencies among populations, but there is some evidence to suggest that diversifying selection also operates on the MHC. However, the pattern of population structure observed at MHC loci is likely to depend on the spatial and/or temporal scale examined. Here, we investigated selection acting on MHC genes at different geographic scales using Venezuelan guppy populations inhabiting four regions. We found a significant correlation between MHC and microsatellite allelic richness across populations, which suggests the role of genetic drift in shaping MHC diversity. However, compared to microsatellites, more MHC variation was explained by differences between populations within larger geographic regions and less by the differences between the regions. Furthermore, among proximate populations, variation in MHC allele frequencies was significantly higher compared to microsatellites, indicating that selection acting on MHC may increase population structure at small spatial scales. However, in populations that have significantly diverged at neutral markers, the population-genetic signature of diversifying selection may be eradicated in the long term by that of balancing selection, which acts to preserve rare alleles and thus maintain a common pool of MHC alleles. PMID:25244157

  10. IFNγ producing CD8+ T cells modified to resist major immune checkpoints induce regression of MHC class I-deficient melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Buferne, Michel; Chasson, Lionel; Grange, Magali; Mas, Amandine; Arnoux, Fanny; Bertuzzi, Mélanie; Naquet, Philippe; Leserman, Lee; Schmitt-Verhulst, Anne-Marie; Auphan-Anezin, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Tumors with reduced expression of MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules may be unrecognized by tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and thus constitute a challenge for cancer immunotherapy. Here we monitored development of autochthonous melanomas in TiRP mice that develop tumors expressing a known tumor antigen as well as a red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter knock in gene. The latter permits non-invasive monitoring of tumor growth by biofluorescence. One developing melanoma was deficient in cell surface expression of MHC-I, but MHC-I expression could be rescued by exposure of these cells to IFNγ. We show that CD8+ T cells specific for tumor antigen/MHC-I were efficient at inducing regression of the MHC-I-deficient melanoma, provided that the T cells were endowed with properties permitting their migration into the tumor and their efficient production of IFNγ. This was the case for CD8+ T cells transfected to express an active form of STAT5 (STAT5CA). The amount of IFNγ produced ex vivo from T cells present in tumors after adoptive transfer of the CD8+ T cells was correlated with an increase in surface expression of MHC-I molecules by the tumor cells. We also show that these CD8+ T cells expressed PD-1 and upregulated its ligand PDL-1 on melanoma cells within the tumor. Despite upregulation of this immunosuppressive pathway, efficient IFNγ production in the melanoma microenvironment was found associated with resistance of STAT5CA-expressing CD8+ T cells to inhibition both by PD-1/PDL-1 engagement and by TGFβ1, two main immune regulatory mechanisms hampering the efficiency of immunotherapy in patients. PMID:25949872

  11. The Carboxy Terminus of the Ligand Peptide Determines the Stability of the MHC Class I Molecule H-2Kb: A Combined Molecular Dynamics and Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Abualrous, Esam Tolba; Saini, Sunil Kumar; Ramnarayan, Venkat Raman; Ilca, Florin Tudor; Zacharias, Martin; Springer, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules (proteins) bind peptides of eight to ten amino acids to present them at the cell surface to cytotoxic T cells. The class I binding groove binds the peptide via hydrogen bonds with the peptide termini and via diverse interactions with the anchor residue side chains of the peptide. To elucidate which of these interactions is most important for the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of the peptide-bound state, we have combined molecular dynamics simulations and experimental approaches in an investigation of the conformational dynamics and binding parameters of a murine class I molecule (H-2Kb) with optimal and truncated natural peptide epitopes. We show that the F pocket region dominates the conformational and thermodynamic properties of the binding groove, and that therefore the binding of the C terminus of the peptide to the F pocket region plays a crucial role in bringing about the peptide-bound state of MHC class I. PMID:26270965

  12. MHC and Evolution in Teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Grimholt, Unni

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are key players in initiating immune responses towards invading pathogens. Both MHC class I and class II genes are present in teleosts, and, using phylogenetic clustering, sequences from both classes have been classified into various lineages. The polymorphic and classical MHC class I and class II gene sequences belong to the U and A lineages, respectively. The remaining class I and class II lineages contain nonclassical gene sequences that, despite their non-orthologous nature, may still hold functions similar to their mammalian nonclassical counterparts. However, the fact that several of these nonclassical lineages are only present in some teleost species is puzzling and questions their functional importance. The number of genes within each lineage greatly varies between teleost species. At least some gene expansions seem reasonable, such as the huge MHC class I expansion in Atlantic cod that most likely compensates for the lack of MHC class II and CD4. The evolutionary trigger for similar MHC class I expansions in tilapia, for example, which has a functional MHC class II, is not so apparent. Future studies will provide us with a more detailed understanding in particular of nonclassical MHC gene functions. PMID:26797646

  13. MHC and Evolution in Teleosts.

    PubMed

    Grimholt, Unni

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are key players in initiating immune responses towards invading pathogens. Both MHC class I and class II genes are present in teleosts, and, using phylogenetic clustering, sequences from both classes have been classified into various lineages. The polymorphic and classical MHC class I and class II gene sequences belong to the U and A lineages, respectively. The remaining class I and class II lineages contain nonclassical gene sequences that, despite their non-orthologous nature, may still hold functions similar to their mammalian nonclassical counterparts. However, the fact that several of these nonclassical lineages are only present in some teleost species is puzzling and questions their functional importance. The number of genes within each lineage greatly varies between teleost species. At least some gene expansions seem reasonable, such as the huge MHC class I expansion in Atlantic cod that most likely compensates for the lack of MHC class II and CD4. The evolutionary trigger for similar MHC class I expansions in tilapia, for example, which has a functional MHC class II, is not so apparent. Future studies will provide us with a more detailed understanding in particular of nonclassical MHC gene functions. PMID:26797646

  14. The central repeat domain 1 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency associated-nuclear antigen 1 (LANA1) prevents cis MHC class I peptide presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwun, Hyun Jin; Ramos da Silva, Suzane; Qin Huilian; Ferris, Robert L.; Tan Rusung; Chang Yuan; Moore, Patrick S.

    2011-04-10

    KSHV LANA1, a latent protein expressed during chronic infection to maintain a viral genome, inhibits major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) peptide presentation in cis as a means of immune evasion. Through deletional cloning, we localized this function to the LANA1 central repeat 1 (CR1) subregion. Other CR subregions retard LANA1 translation and proteasomal processing but do not markedly inhibit LANA1 peptide processing by MHC I. Inhibition of proteasomal processing ablates LANA1 peptide presentation. Direct expression of LANA1 within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) overcomes CR1 inhibition suggesting that CR1 acts prior to translocation of cytoplasmic peptides into the ER. By physically separating CR1 from other subdomains, we show that LANA1 evades MHC I peptide processing by a mechanism distinct from other herpesviruses including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Although LANA1 and EBV EBNA1 are functionally similar, they appear to use different mechanisms to evade host cytotoxic T lymphocyte surveillance.

  15. Sequence analysis of the promoter regions of the classical class I gene RT1.A and two other class I genes of the rat MHC

    SciTech Connect

    Lambracht, D.; Wonigeit, K.

    1995-04-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules present peptides to CD8+ T cells and thus play key role in immunosurveillance by T-cell-mediated mechanisms. Their expression depends on complex control mechanisms at two major levels: (1) regulation of transcription mediated through the promoter region and additional regulatory elements of the individual class I gene, and (2) availability of appropriate peptides in the endoplasmic reticulum required to stabilize the ternary complex consisting of class I {alpha} chain, {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}m), and peptide. In addition, differences in the ability of different {alpha} chains to bind {beta}{sub 2}m can influence the transport to and turnover within the cell membrane. We have now analyzed the promoter regions of class I genes of the LEW rat strain carrying the RT1{sup 1} haplotype. The analysis of three class I genes in this region has led to the identification of characteristic regulatory sequences. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  16. CD8 T cell memory recall is enhanced by novel direct interactions with CD4 T cells enabled by MHC class II transferred from APCs.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Pablo A; Premenko-Lanier, Mary F; Loria, Gilbert D; Altman, John D

    2013-01-01

    Protection against many intracellular pathogens is provided by CD8 T cells, which are thought to need CD4 T cell help to develop into effective memory CD8 T cells. Because murine CD8 T cells do not transcribe MHC class II (MHC-II) genes, several models have proposed antigen presenting cells (APCs) as intermediaries required for CD4 T cells to deliver their help to CD8 T cells. Here, we demonstrate the presence of MHC-II molecules on activated murine CD8 T cells in vitro as well as in vivo. These MHC-II molecules are acquired via trogocytosis by CD8 T cells from their activating APCs, particularly CD11c positive dendritic cells (DCs). Transferred MHC-II molecules on activated murine CD8 T cells were functionally competent in stimulating specific indicator CD4 T cells. CD8 T cells that were "helped" in vitro and subsequently allowed to rest in vivo showed enhanced recall responses upon challenge compared to "helpless" CD8 T cells; in contrast, no differences were seen upon immediate challenge. These data indicate that direct CD8:CD4 T cell interactions may significantly contribute to help for CD8 T cells. Furthermore, this mechanism may enable CD8 T cells to communicate with different subsets of interacting CD4 T cells that could modulate immune responses. PMID:23441229

  17. MHC-class-II are expressed in a subpopulation of human neural stem cells in vitro in an IFNγ-independent fashion and during development.

    PubMed

    Vagaska, B; New, S E P; Alvarez-Gonzalez, C; D'Acquisto, F; Gomez, S G; Bulstrode, N W; Madrigal, A; Ferretti, P

    2016-01-01

    Expression of major histocompatibility antigens class-2 (MHC-II) under non-inflammatory conditions is not usually associated with the nervous system. Comparative analysis of immunogenicity of human embryonic/fetal brain-derived neural stem cells (hNSCs) and human mesenchymal stem cells with neurogenic potential from umbilical cord (UC-MSCs) and paediatric adipose tissue (ADSCs), while highlighting differences in their immunogenicity, led us to discover subsets of neural cells co-expressing the neural marker SOX2 and MHC-II antigen in vivo during human CNS development. MHC-II proteins in hNSCs are functional, and differently regulated upon differentiation along different lineages. Mimicking an inflammatory response using the inflammatory cytokine IFNγ induced MHC-II up-regulation in both astrocytes and hNSCs, but not in UC-MSCs and ADSCs, either undifferentiated or differentiated, though IFNγ receptor expression was comparable. Together, hypoimmunogenicity of both UC-MSCs and ADSCs supports their suitability for allogeneic therapy, while significant immunogenicity of hNSCs and their progeny may at least in part underlie negative effects reported in some patients following embryonic neural cell grafts. Crucially, we show for the first time that MHC-II expression in developing human brains is not restricted to microglia as previously suggested, but is present in discrete subsets of neural progenitors and appears to be regulated independently of inflammatory stimuli. PMID:27080443

  18. Molecular cloning, organization, expression and 3D structural analysis of the MHC class Ia gene in the whitespotted bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum).

    PubMed

    Shen, Tong; Lei, Meiling; Wang, Jingru; He, Xiaoshun; Li, Xiuming; Li, Jianming

    2014-01-15

    Cartilaginous fishes are the oldest jawed vertebrates, from which the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) derived approximately 500 MYA; however, full-length genomic sequences for MHC genes in these species remain undescribed. This lack of basic information about MHC organization in cartilaginous fish is hindering investigations into the relationship between MHC polymorphism and disease, and leaves a large gap in our understanding of shark MHC evolution. Here, we obtained a complete 4887 bp genomic DNA of chplUAA (designated as chplUAA) from the whitespotted bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) using long PCR. The full-length cDNA sequence was 1385 bp, with a 1029 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding 343 amino acids. Six unique sequences (chplUAA*01-06) were detected from 51 sequences from three samples. No more than two sequences were found in each individual, suggesting that only one UAA locus was amplified in each sample. Phylogenetic analysis supports monophyly of all available shark classical class Ia sequences. PMID:24315118

  19. MHC-class-II are expressed in a subpopulation of human neural stem cells in vitro in an IFNγ–independent fashion and during development

    PubMed Central

    Vagaska, B.; New, S. E. P.; Alvarez-Gonzalez, C.; D’Acquisto, F.; Gomez, S. G.; Bulstrode, N. W.; Madrigal, A.; Ferretti, P.

    2016-01-01

    Expression of major histocompatibility antigens class-2 (MHC-II) under non-inflammatory conditions is not usually associated with the nervous system. Comparative analysis of immunogenicity of human embryonic/fetal brain-derived neural stem cells (hNSCs) and human mesenchymal stem cells with neurogenic potential from umbilical cord (UC-MSCs) and paediatric adipose tissue (ADSCs), while highlighting differences in their immunogenicity, led us to discover subsets of neural cells co-expressing the neural marker SOX2 and MHC-II antigen in vivo during human CNS development. MHC-II proteins in hNSCs are functional, and differently regulated upon differentiation along different lineages. Mimicking an inflammatory response using the inflammatory cytokine IFNγ induced MHC-II up-regulation in both astrocytes and hNSCs, but not in UC-MSCs and ADSCs, either undifferentiated or differentiated, though IFNγ receptor expression was comparable. Together, hypoimmunogenicity of both UC-MSCs and ADSCs supports their suitability for allogeneic therapy, while significant immunogenicity of hNSCs and their progeny may at least in part underlie negative effects reported in some patients following embryonic neural cell grafts. Crucially, we show for the first time that MHC-II expression in developing human brains is not restricted to microglia as previously suggested, but is present in discrete subsets of neural progenitors and appears to be regulated independently of inflammatory stimuli. PMID:27080443

  20. Localized populations of CD8 MHC class I tetramer SIV-specific T cells in lymphoid follicles and genital epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jung Joo; Reynolds, Matthew R; Mattila, Teresa L; Hage, Aaron; Watkins, David I; Miller, Christopher J; Skinner, Pamela J

    2009-01-01

    CD8 T cells play an important role in controlling viral infections. We investigated the in situ localization of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-specific T cells in lymph and genital tissues from SIV-infected macaques using MHC-class I tetramers. The majority of tetramer-binding cells localized in T cell zones and were CD8(+). Curiously, small subpopulations of tetramer-binding cells that had little to no surface CD8 were detected in situ both early and late post-infection, and in both vaginally and rectally inoculated macaques. These tetramer(+)CD8(low/-) cells were more often localized in apparent B cell follicles relative to T cell zones and more often found near or within the genital epithelium than the submucosa. Cells analyzed by flow cytometry showed similar populations of cells. Further immunohistological characterization revealed small populations of tetramer(+)CD20(-) cells inside B cell follicles and that tetramer(+) cells did not stain with gammadelta-TCR nor CD4 antibodies. Negative control tetramer staining indicated that tetramer(+)CD8(low/-) cells were not likely NK cells non-specifically binding to MHC tetramers. These findings have important implications for SIV-specific and other antigen-specific T cell function in these specific tissue locations, and suggest a model in which antigen-specific CD8+ T cells down modulate CD8 upon entering B cell follicles or the epithelial layer of tissues, or alternatively a model in which only antigen-specific CD8 T cells that down-modulate CD8 can enter B cell follicles or the epithelium. PMID:19122815

  1. Structural Illumination of Equine MHC Class I Molecules Highlights Unconventional Epitope Presentation Manner That Is Evolved in Equine Leukocyte Antigen Alleles.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shugang; Liu, Jun; Qi, Jianxun; Chen, Rong; Zhang, Nianzhi; Liu, Yanjie; Wang, Junya; Wu, Yanan; Gao, George Fu; Xia, Chun

    2016-02-15

    MHC class I (MHC I)-restricted virus-specific CTLs are implicated as critical components in the control of this naturally occurring lentivirus and in the protective immune response to the successfully applied attenuated equine infectious anemia virus vaccine in the horse. Nevertheless, the structural basis for how the equine MHC I presents epitope peptides remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the binding of several equine infectious anemia virus-derived epitope peptides by the ability to refold recombinant molecules and by thermal stability, and then by determining the x-ray structure of five peptide-MHC I complexes: equine MHC class I allele (Eqca)-N*00602/Env-RW12, Eqca-N*00602/Gag-GW12, Eqca-N*00602/Rev-QW11, Eqca-N*00602/Gag-CF9, and Eqca-N*00601/Gag-GW12. Although Eqca-N*00601 and Eqca-N*00602 differ by a single amino acid, Eqca-N*00601 exhibited a drastically different peptide presentation when binding a similar CTL epitope, Gag-GW12; the result makes the previously reported function clear to be non-cross-recognition between these two alleles. The structures plus Eqca-N*00602 complexed with a 9-mer peptide are particularly noteworthy in that we illuminated differences in apparent flexibility in the center of the epitope peptides for the complexes with Gag-GW12 as compared with Env-RW12, and a strict selection of epitope peptides with normal length. The featured preferences and unconventional presentations of long peptides by equine MHC I molecules provide structural bases to explain the exceptional anti-lentivirus immunity in the horse. We think that the beneficial reference points could serve as an initial platform for other human or animal lentiviruses. PMID:26764037

  2. Non-classical antigen processing pathways are required for MHC class II-restricted direct tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells that directly recognize cancer cells are important for orchestrating antitumor immune responses at the local tumor sites. However, the mechanisms of direct MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation of intracellular tumor antigen by cancer cells are poorly understood. We found that two functionally distinct subsets of CD4+ T cells were expanded after HLA-DPB1*04 (DP04)-binding NY-ESO-1157–170 peptide vaccination in ovarian cancer patients. While both subsets similarly recognized exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein pulsed on DP04+ target cells, only one type recognized target cells with intracellular expression of NY-ESO-1. The tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells more efficiently recognized the short 8–9-mer peptides than the non-tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells. In addition to endosomal/lysosomal proteases that are typically involved in MHC-II antigen presentation, several pathways in the MHC class I presentation pathways such as the proteasomal degradation and transporter-associated with antigen-processing (TAP)-mediated peptide transport were also involved in the presentation of intracellular NY-ESO-1 on MHC-II. The presentation was inhibited significantly by primaquine, a small molecule that inhibits endosomal recycling, consistent with findings that pharmacological inhibition of new protein synthesis enhances antigen presentation. Together, our data demonstrated that cancer cells selectively present peptides from intracellular tumor antigens on MHC-II by multiple non-classical antigen-processing pathways. Harnessing direct tumor-recognizing ability of CD4+ T cells could be a promising strategy to enhance antitumor immune responses in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. PMID:24764581

  3. Nonclassical antigen-processing pathways are required for MHC class II-restricted direct tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel; Old, Lloyd J; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-04-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that directly recognize cancer cells are important for orchestrating antitumor immune responses at the local tumor sites. However, the mechanisms of direct MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation of intracellular tumor antigen by cancer cells are poorly understood. We found that two functionally distinct subsets of CD4(+) T cells were expanded after HLA-DPB1*04 (DP04)-binding NY-ESO-1157-170 peptide vaccination in patients with ovarian cancer. Although both subsets recognized exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein pulsed on DP04(+) target cells, only one type recognized target cells with intracellular expression of NY-ESO-1. The tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells more efficiently recognized the short 8-9-mer peptides than the non-tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells. In addition to endosomal/lysosomal proteases that are typically involved in MHC-II antigen presentation, several pathways in the MHC class I presentation pathways, such as the proteasomal degradation and transporter-associated with antigen-processing-mediated peptide transport, were also involved in the presentation of intracellular NY-ESO-1 on MHC-II. The presentation was inhibited significantly by primaquine, a small molecule that inhibits endosomal recycling, consistent with findings that pharmacologic inhibition of new protein synthesis enhances antigen presentation. Together, our data demonstrate that cancer cells selectively present peptides from intracellular tumor antigens on MHC-II by multiple nonclassical antigen-processing pathways. Harnessing the direct tumor-recognizing ability of CD4(+) T cells could be a promising strategy to enhance antitumor immune responses in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. PMID:24764581

  4. Is alopecia areata an autoimmune-response against melanogenesis-related proteins, exposed by abnormal MHC class I expression in the anagen hair bulb?

    PubMed Central

    Paus, R.; Slominski, A.; Czarnetzki, B. M.

    1993-01-01

    The etiology of alopecia areata (AA), a putative autoimmune disease characterized by sudden hair loss, has remained obscure. It is not understood, how the characteristic inflammatory infiltrate that selectively attacks anagen hair follicles in AA is generated. We hypothesize that this reflects an unexplored form of autoimmunity, a cytotoxic T cell attack on rhythmically synthesized autoantigens normally sequestered by a lack or very low level of MHC class I (MHC I)-expression, and suggest the following mechanism of AA pathogenesis: Microtrauma, neurogenic inflammation, or microbial antigens cause a localized breakdown of MHC I-"negativity" in the proximal anagen hair bulb via proinflammatory cytokines. This exposes autoantigens derived from melanogenesis-related proteins (MRP-DP), which are only generated during anagen, and triggers two successive waves of autoimmune responses: CD8+ cytotoxic T cells initiate AA after recognizing MRP-DP abnormally presented by MHC I molecules on hair matrix melanocytes and/or keratinocytes; a secondary attack, carried by CD4+ T cells and antigen presenting cells, is then mounted against MHC class II--presented additional autoantigens exposed by damaged melanocytes and keratinocytes. The latter causes most of the follicular damage, and extrafollicular disease, and depends greatly on the immunogenetic background of affected individuals. This unifying hypothesis explains the clinical heterogeneity and all salient features of AA, and argues that only the unlikely coincidence of multiple predisposing events triggers AA. The suppression of MHC I--expression and synthesis of MRP in the hair bulb, and the "tolerization" of MRP-DP autoreactive CD8+ T cells may be promising strategies for treating AA. PMID:7716973

  5. F pocket flexibility influences the tapasin dependence of two differentially disease-associated MHC Class I proteins.

    PubMed

    Abualrous, Esam T; Fritzsche, Susanne; Hein, Zeynep; Al-Balushi, Mohammed S; Reinink, Peter; Boyle, Louise H; Wellbrock, Ursula; Antoniou, Antony N; Springer, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    The human MHC class I protein HLA-B*27:05 is statistically associated with ankylosing spondylitis, unlike HLA-B*27:09, which differs in a single amino acid in the F pocket of the peptide-binding groove. To understand how this unique amino acid difference leads to a different behavior of the proteins in the cell, we have investigated the conformational stability of both proteins using a combination of in silico and experimental approaches. Here, we show that the binding site of B*27:05 is conformationally disordered in the absence of peptide due to a charge repulsion at the bottom of the F pocket. In agreement with this, B*27:05 requires the chaperone protein tapasin to a greater extent than the conformationally stable B*27:09 in order to remain structured and to bind peptide. Taken together, our data demonstrate a method to predict tapasin dependence and physiological behavior from the sequence and crystal structure of a particular class I allotype. Also watch the Video Abstract. PMID:25615938

  6. Genetic diversity of MHC class I loci in six non-model frogs is shaped by positive selection and gene duplication

    PubMed Central

    Kiemnec-Tyburczy, K M; Richmond, J Q; Savage, A E; Lips, K R; Zamudio, K R

    2012-01-01

    Comparative studies of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes across vertebrate species can reveal the evolutionary processes that shape the structure and function of immune regulatory proteins. In this study, we characterized MHC class I sequences from six frog species representing three anuran families (Hylidae, Centrolenidae and Ranidae). Using cDNA from our focal species, we amplified a total of 79 unique sequences spanning exons 2–4 that encode the extracellular domains of the functional alpha chain protein. We compared intra- and interspecific nucleotide and amino-acid divergence, tested for recombination, and identified codon sites under selection by estimating the rate of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions with multiple codon-based maximum likelihood methods. We determined that positive (diversifying) selection was acting on specific amino-acid sites located within the domains that bind pathogen-derived peptides. We also found significant signals of recombination across the physical distance of the genes. Finally, we determined that all the six species expressed two or three putative classical class I loci, in contrast to the single locus condition of Xenopus laevis. Our results suggest that MHC evolution in anurans is a dynamic process and that variation in numbers of loci and genetic diversity can exist among taxa. Thus, the accumulation of genetic data for more species will be useful in further characterizing the relative importance of processes such as selection, recombination and gene duplication in shaping MHC loci among amphibian lineages. PMID:22549517

  7. Drift Rather than Selection Dominates MHC Class II Allelic Diversity Patterns at the Biogeographical Range Scale in Natterjack Toads Bufo calamita

    PubMed Central

    Zeisset, Inga; Beebee, Trevor J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Study of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) loci has gained great popularity in recent years, partly due to their function in protecting vertebrates from infections. This is of particular interest in amphibians on account of major threats many species face from emergent diseases such as chytridiomycosis. In this study we compare levels of diversity in an expressed MHC class II locus with neutral genetic diversity at microsatellite loci in natterjack toad (Bufo (Epidalea) calamita) populations across the whole of the species’ biogeographical range. Variation at both classes of loci was high in the glacial refugium areas (REF) and much lower in postglacial expansion areas (PGE), especially in range edge populations. Although there was clear evidence that the MHC locus was influenced by positive selection in the past, congruence with the neutral markers suggested that historical demographic events were the main force shaping MHC variation in the PGE area. Both neutral and adaptive genetic variation declined with distance from glacial refugia. Nevertheless, there were also some indications from differential isolation by distance and allele abundance patterns that weak effects of selection have been superimposed on the main drift effect in the PGE zone. PMID:24937211

  8. The diabetogenic mouse MHC class II molecule I-A[subscript g7] is endowed with a switch that modulates TCR affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kenji; Corper, Adam L.; Herro, Rana; Jabri, Bana; Wilson, Ian A.; Teyton, Luc

    2011-11-16

    Genetic susceptibility to autoimmunity is frequently associated with specific MHC alleles. Diabetogenic MHC class II molecules, such as human HLA-DQ8 and mouse I-A{sub g7}, typically have a small, uncharged amino acid residue at position 57 of their {beta} chain ({beta}57); this results in the absence of a salt bridge between {beta}57 and Arg{alpha}76, which is adjacent to the P9 pocket of the peptide-binding groove. However, the influence of Arg{alpha}76 on the selection of the TCR repertoire remains unknown, particularly when the MHC molecule binds a peptide with a neutral amino acid residue at position P9. Here, we have shown that diabetogenic MHC class II molecules bound to a peptide with a neutral P9 residue primarily selected and expanded cells expressing TCRs bearing a negatively charged residue in the first segment of their complementarity determining region 3{beta}. The crystal structure of one such TCR in complex with I-A{sub g7} bound to a peptide containing a neutral P9 residue revealed that a network of favorable long-range (greater than 4 {angstrom}) electrostatic interactions existed among Arg{alpha}76, the neutral P9 residue, and TCR, which supported the substantially increased TCR/peptide-MHC affinity. This network could be modulated or switched to a lower affinity interaction by the introduction of a negative charge at position P9 of the peptide. Our results support the existence of a switch at residue {beta}57 of the I-Ag7 and HLA-DQ8 class II molecules and potentially link normal thymic TCR selection with abnormal peripheral behavior.

  9. The diabetogenic mouse MHC class II molecule I-A[superscript g7] is endowed with a switch that modulates TCR affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kenji; Corper, Adam L.; Herro, Rana; Jabri, Bana; Wilson, Ian A.; Teyton, Luc

    2010-07-22

    Genetic susceptibility to autoimmunity is frequently associated with specific MHC alleles. Diabetogenic MHC class II molecules, such as human HLA-DQ8 and mouse I-A{sup g7}, typically have a small, uncharged amino acid residue at position 57 of their {beta} chain ({beta}57); this results in the absence of a salt bridge between {beta}57 and Arg{alpha}76, which is adjacent to the P9 pocket of the peptide-binding groove. However, the influence of Arg{alpha}76 on the selection of the TCR repertoire remains unknown, particularly when the MHC molecule binds a peptide with a neutral amino acid residue at position P9. Here, we have shown that diabetogenic MHC class II molecules bound to a peptide with a neutral P9 residue primarily selected and expanded cells expressing TCRs bearing a negatively charged residue in the first segment of their complementarity determining region 3{beta}. The crystal structure of one such TCR in complex with I-Ag7 bound to a peptide containing a neutral P9 residue revealed that a network of favorable long-range (greater than 4 {angstrom}) electrostatic interactions existed among Arg{alpha}76, the neutral P9 residue, and TCR, which supported the substantially increased TCR/peptide-MHC affinity. This network could be modulated or switched to a lower affinity interaction by the introduction of a negative charge at position P9 of the peptide. Our results support the existence of a switch at residue {beta}57 of the I-A{sup g7} and HLA-DQ8 class II molecules and potentially link normal thymic TCR selection with abnormal peripheral behavior.

  10. Mass spectral data for 64 eluted peptides and structural modeling define peptide binding preferences for class I alleles in two chicken MHC-B haplotypes associated with opposite responses to Marek's disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Major histocompatibility complex haplotypes are known to influence disease resistance in the chicken. The MHC-B*21 haplotype is especially associated with resistance to the T-cell lymphomas that form following infection with the highly oncogenic Marek’s herpesvirus. Since only a single MHC class I ...

  11. HLA-G and MHC Class II Protein Expression in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jesionek-Kupnicka, Dorota; Bojo, Marcin; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Szumera-Ciećkiewicz, Anna; Jabłońska, Joanna; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Kordek, Radzisław; Młynarski, Wojciech; Robak, Tadeusz; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Lech-Maranda, Ewa

    2016-06-01

    The expression of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) and HLA class II protein was studied by immunohistochemical staining of lymph nodes from 148 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and related to the clinical course of the disease. Negative HLA-G expression was associated with a lower probability of achieving a complete remission (p = 0.04). Patients with negative HLA-G expression tended towards a lower 3-year overall survival (OS) rate compared to those with positive expression of HLA-G (p = 0.08). When restricting the analysis to patients receiving chemotherapy with rituximab, the estimated 3-year OS rate of patients with positive HLA-G expression was 73.3 % compared with 47.5 % (p = 0.03) in those with negative expression. Patients with negative HLA class II expression presented a lower 3-year OS rate compared to subjects with positive expression (p = 0.04). The loss of HLA class II expression (p = 0.05) and belonging to the intermediate high/high IPI risk group (p = 0.001) independently increased the risk of death. HLA class II expression also retained its prognostic value in patients receiving rituximab; the 3-year OS rate was 65.3 % in patients with positive HLA class II expression versus 29.6 % (p = 0.04) in subjects that had loss of HLA class II expression. To our knowledge, for the first time, the expression of HLA-G protein in DLBCL and its association with the clinical course of the disease was demonstrated. Moreover, the link between losing HLA class II protein expression and poor survival of patients treated with immunochemotherapy was confirmed. PMID:26667793

  12. Genomic analysis of Ovis aries (Ovar)MHC Class IIa loci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determining the genomic organization of the Ovis aries (Ovar) major histocompatibility complex class IIa region is essential for future functional studies related to antigen presentation. In this study, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of genomic DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes ...

  13. Nα-terminal acetylation for T cell recognition: molecular basis of MHC class I-restricted nα-acetylpeptide presentation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingwei; Liu, Jun; Qi, Jianxun; Tefsen, Boris; Shi, Yi; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George F

    2014-06-15

    As one of the most common posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of eukaryotic proteins, N(α)-terminal acetylation (Nt-acetylation) generates a class of N(α)-acetylpeptides that are known to be presented by MHC class I at the cell surface. Although such PTM plays a pivotal role in adjusting proteolysis, the molecular basis for the presentation and T cell recognition of N(α)-acetylpeptides remains largely unknown. In this study, we determined a high-resolution crystallographic structure of HLA (HLA)-B*3901 complexed with an N(α)-acetylpeptide derived from natural cellular processing, also in comparison with the unmodified-peptide complex. Unlike the α-amino-free P1 residues of unmodified peptide, of which the α-amino group inserts into pocket A of the Ag-binding groove, the N(α)-linked acetyl of the acetylated P1-Ser protrudes out of the groove for T cell recognition. Moreover, the Nt-acetylation not only alters the conformation of the peptide but also switches the residues in the α1-helix of HLA-B*3901, which may impact the T cell engagement. The thermostability measurements of complexes between N(α)-acetylpeptides and a series of MHC class I molecules derived from different species reveal reduced stability. Our findings provide the insight into the mode of N(α)-acetylpeptide-specific presentation by classical MHC class I molecules and shed light on the potential of acetylepitope-based immune intervene and vaccine development. PMID:24829406

  14. Fish oil disrupts MHC class II lateral organization on the B-cell side of the immunological synapse independent of B-T cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Rockett, Benjamin Drew; Melton, Mark; Harris, Mitchel; Bridges, Lance C; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2013-11-01

    Fish oil-enriched long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids disrupt the molecular organization of T-cell proteins in the immunological synapse. The impact of fish oil derived n-3 fatty acids on antigen-presenting cells, particularly at the animal level, is unknown. We previously demonstrated B-cells isolated from mice fed with fish oil-suppressed naïve CD4(+) T-cell activation. Therefore, here we determined the mechanistic effects of fish oil on murine B-cell major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecular distribution using a combination of total internal reflection fluorescence, Förster resonance energy transfer and confocal imaging. Fish oil had no impact on presynaptic B-cell MHC II clustering. Upon conjugation with transgenic T-cells, fish-oil suppressed MHC II accumulation at the immunological synapse. As a consequence, T-cell protein kinase C theta (PKCθ) recruitment to the synapse was also diminished. The effects were independent of changes in B-T cell adhesion, as measured with microscopy, flow cytometry and static cell adhesion assays with select immune ligands. Given that fish oil can reorganize the membrane by lowering membrane cholesterol levels, we then compared the results with fish oil to cholesterol depletion using methyl-B-cyclodextrin (MβCD). MβCD treatment of B-cells suppressed MHC II and T-cell PKCθ recruitment to the immunological synapse, similar to fish oil. Overall, the results reveal commonality in the mechanism by which fish oil manipulates protein lateral organization of B-cells compared to T-cells. Furthermore, the data establish MHC class II lateral organization on the B-cell side of the immunological synapse as a novel molecular target of fish oil. PMID:23791516

  15. Transplantation Tolerance to a Single Noninherited MHC Class I Maternal Alloantigen Studied in a TCR-Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Yoshinobu; Caucheteux, Stéphane M.; Vernochet, Cécile; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Tanaka, Katsunori; Kanellopoulos-Langevin, Colette; Benichou, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying tolerance to noninherited maternal Ags (NIMA) are not fully understood. In this study, we designed a double-transgenic model in which all the offspring’s CD8+ T cells corresponded to a single clone recognizing the Kb MHC class I protein. In contrast, the mother and the father of the offspring differed by the expression of a single Ag, Kb, that served as NIMA. We investigated the influence of NIMA exposure on the offspring thymic T cell selection during ontogeny and on its peripheral T cell response during adulthood. We observed that anti-Kb thymocytes were exposed to NIMA and became activated during fetal life but were not deleted. Strikingly, adult mice exposed to NIMA accepted permanently Kb+ heart allografts despite the presence of normal levels of anti-Kb TCR transgenic T cells. Transplant tolerance was associated with a lack of a proinflammatory alloreactive T cell response and an activation/expansion of T cells producing IL-4 and IL-10. In addition, we observed that tolerance to NIMA Kb was abrogated via depletion of CD4+ but not CD8+ T cells and could be transferred to naive nonexposed mice via adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25high T cell expressing Foxp3 isolated from NIMA mice. PMID:21178009

  16. Generation of MHC class I-restricted cytotoxic T cell lines and clones against colonic epithelial cells from ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Yonamine, Y; Watanabe, M; Kinjo, F; Hibi, T

    1999-01-01

    We established CTL lines and clones against colonic epithelial cells from PBLs of patients with ulcerative colitis by continuous stimulation with HLA-A locus-matched colonic epithelial cell lines. We developed a nonradioactive europium release cytotoxicity assay to detect CTLs. PBLs from 3 of 12 patients but not from any of 14 normal controls who shared at least one haplotype of HLA-A locus with two colonic epithelial cell lines, CW2 and ACM, showed increased cytotoxicity against these lines. Three CTL lines established from the PBLs of patients showed increased cytotoxicity against HLA-A locus-matched CW2 or ACM but not against matched lung or esophagus cell lines. The phenotypes of CTL lines were alpha beta-TCR+ CD3+ CD8+ CD16-. The CTL line MS showed increased cytotoxicity against freshly isolated colonic epithelial cells but not against cells with a different HLA-A locus. Two CTL clones were generated from MS and clone 3-2, expressing CD3+ CD8+ CD4- CD56-, showed high MHC class I-restricted cytotoxicity against the colonic epithelial cells. These results indicated that CTLs against colonic epithelial cells may contribute to epithelial cell damage in ulcerative colitis. PMID:10080107

  17. Crystal structure of a γδ T-cell receptor specific for the human MHC class I homolog MICA

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Pizarro, Juan C.; Holmes, Margaret A.; McBeth, Christine; Groh, Veronika; Spies, Thomas; Strong, Roland K.

    2011-01-01

    γδ T cells play important roles in bridging innate and adaptive immunity, but their recognition mechanisms remain poorly understood. Human γδ T cells of the Vδ1 subset predominate in intestinal epithelia and respond to MICA and MICB (MHC class I chain-related, A and B; MIC) self-antigens, mediating responses to tumorigenesis or viral infection. The crystal structure of an MIC-reactive Vδ1 γδ T-cell receptor (TCR) showed expected overall structural homology to antibodies, αβ, and other γδ TCRs, but complementary determining region conformations and conservation of Vδ1 use revealed an uncharacteristically flat potential binding surface. MIC, likewise, serves as a ligand for the activating immunoreceptor natural killer group 2, D (NKG2D), also expressed on γδ T cells. Although MIC recognition drives both the TCR-dependent stimulatory and NKG2D-dependent costimulatory signals necessary for activation, interaction analyses showed that MIC binding by the two receptors was mutually exclusive. Analysis of relative binding kinetics suggested sequential recognition, defining constraints for the temporal organization of γδ T-cell/target cell interfaces. PMID:21262824

  18. Crystal structure of a Gammadelta T-cell Receptor Specific for the Human MHC class I Homolog MICA

    SciTech Connect

    B Xu; J Pizarro; M Holmes; C McBeth; V Groh; T Spies; R Strong

    2011-12-31

    {gamma}{delta} T cells play important roles in bridging innate and adaptive immunity, but their recognition mechanisms remain poorly understood. Human {gamma}{delta} T cells of the V{sub {delta}}1 subset predominate in intestinal epithelia and respond to MICA and MICB (MHC class I chain-related, A and B; MIC) self-antigens, mediating responses to tumorigenesis or viral infection. The crystal structure of an MIC-reactive V{sub {delta}}1 {gamma}{delta} T-cell receptor (TCR) showed expected overall structural homology to antibodies, {alpha}{beta}, and other {gamma}{delta} TCRs, but complementary determining region conformations and conservation of V{sub {delta}}1 use revealed an uncharacteristically flat potential binding surface. MIC, likewise, serves as a ligand for the activating immunoreceptor natural killer group 2, D (NKG2D), also expressed on {gamma}{delta} T cells. Although MIC recognition drives both the TCR-dependent stimulatory and NKG2D-dependent costimulatory signals necessary for activation, interaction analyses showed that MIC binding by the two receptors was mutually exclusive. Analysis of relative binding kinetics suggested sequential recognition, defining constraints for the temporal organization of {gamma}{delta} T-cell/target cell interfaces.

  19. High-throughput identification and dendritic cell-based functional validation of MHC class I-restricted Mycobacterium tuberculosis epitopes.

    PubMed

    Nair, Smita K; Tomaras, Georgia D; Sales, Ana Paula; Boczkowski, David; Chan, Cliburn; Plonk, Kelly; Cai, Yongting; Dannull, Jens; Kepler, Thomas B; Pruitt, Scott K; Weinhold, Kent J

    2014-01-01

    Emergence of drug-resistant strains of the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and the ineffectiveness of BCG in curtailing Mtb infection makes vaccine development for tuberculosis an important objective. Identifying immunogenic CD8+ T cell peptide epitopes is necessary for peptide-based vaccine strategies. We present a three-tiered strategy for identifying and validating immunogenic peptides: first, identify peptides that form stable complexes with class I MHC molecules; second, determine whether cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) raised against the whole protein antigen recognize and lyse target cells pulsed with peptides that passed step 1; third, determine whether peptides that passed step 2, when administered in vivo as a vaccine in HLA-A2 transgenic mice, elicit CTLs that lyse target cells expressing the whole protein antigen. Our innovative approach uses dendritic cells transfected with Mtb antigen-encoding mRNA to drive antigen expression. Using this strategy, we have identified five novel peptide epitopes from the Mtb proteins Apa, Mtb8.4 and Mtb19. PMID:24755960

  20. High-throughput identification and dendritic cell-based functional validation of MHC class I-restricted Mycobacterium tuberculosis epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Smita K.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Sales, Ana Paula; Boczkowski, David; Chan, Cliburn; Plonk, Kelly; Cai, Yongting; Dannull, Jens; Kepler, Thomas B.; Pruitt, Scott K.; Weinhold, Kent J.

    2014-01-01

    Emergence of drug-resistant strains of the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and the ineffectiveness of BCG in curtailing Mtb infection makes vaccine development for tuberculosis an important objective. Identifying immunogenic CD8+ T cell peptide epitopes is necessary for peptide-based vaccine strategies. We present a three-tiered strategy for identifying and validating immunogenic peptides: first, identify peptides that form stable complexes with class I MHC molecules; second, determine whether cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) raised against the whole protein antigen recognize and lyse target cells pulsed with peptides that passed step 1; third, determine whether peptides that passed step 2, when administered in vivo as a vaccine in HLA-A2 transgenic mice, elicit CTLs that lyse target cells expressing the whole protein antigen. Our innovative approach uses dendritic cells transfected with Mtb antigen-encoding mRNA to drive antigen expression. Using this strategy, we have identified five novel peptide epitopes from the Mtb proteins Apa, Mtb8.4 and Mtb19. PMID:24755960

  1. Characterization of 40 full-length MHC class IIA functional alleles in miiuy croaker: Polymorphism and positive selection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tianjun; Liu, Jiang; Sun, Yueyan; Zhu, Zhihuang; Liu, Tianxing

    2016-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex is a highly polymorphic gene superfamily in vertebrates that plays an important role in adaptive immune response. In the present study, we identified 40 full-length miiuy croaker MHC class IIA (Mimi-DAA) functional alleles from 26 miiuy croaker individuals and found that the alleles encode 30 amino acid sequences. A high level of polymorphism in Mimi-DAA was detected in miiuy croaker. The rate of non-synonymous substitutions (d(N)) occurred at a significantly higher frequency than that of synonymous substitutions (d(S)) in the peptide-binding region (PBR) and non-PBR. This result suggests that balancing selection maintains polymorphisms at the Mimi-DAA locus. Phylogenetic analysis based on the full-length sequences showed that the Mimi-DAA alleles clustered into three groups. However, the phylogenetic tree constructed using the exon 2 sequences indicated that the Mimi-DAA alleles clustered into two groups. A total of 22 positively selected sites were identified on the Mimi-DAA alleles after testing for positive selection, and five sites were predicted to be associated with the binding of peptide antigen, suggesting that a few selected residues may play a significant role in immune function. PMID:26598111

  2. Adrenomedullin 2 Improves Early Obesity-Induced Adipose Insulin Resistance by Inhibiting the Class II MHC in Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song-Yang; Lv, Ying; Zhang, Heng; Gao, Song; Wang, Ting; Feng, Juan; Wang, Yuhui; Liu, George; Xu, Ming-Jiang; Wang, Xian; Jiang, Changtao

    2016-08-01

    MHC class II (MHCII) antigen presentation in adipocytes was reported to trigger early adipose inflammation and insulin resistance. However, the benefits of MHCII inhibition in adipocytes remain largely unknown. Here, we showed that human plasma polypeptide adrenomedullin 2 (ADM2) levels were negatively correlated with HOMA of insulin resistance in obese human. Adipose-specific human ADM2 transgenic (aADM2-tg) mice were generated. The aADM2-tg mice displayed improvements in high-fat diet-induced early adipose insulin resistance. This was associated with increased insulin signaling and decreased systemic inflammation. ADM2 dose-dependently inhibited CIITA-induced MHCII expression by increasing Blimp1 expression in a CRLR/RAMP1-cAMP-dependent manner in cultured adipocytes. Furthermore, ADM2 treatment restored the high-fat diet-induced early insulin resistance in adipose tissue, mainly via inhibition of adipocyte MHCII antigen presentation and CD4(+) T-cell activation. This study demonstrates that ADM2 is a promising candidate for the treatment of early obesity-induced insulin resistance. PMID:27207558

  3. Amyloid Precursor-like Protein 2 Increases the Endocytosis, Instability, and Turnover of the H2-Kd MHC Class I Molecule1

    PubMed Central

    Tuli, Amit; Sharma, Mahak; McIlhaney, Mary M.; Talmadge, James E.; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve; Solheim, Joyce C.

    2008-01-01

    The defense against the invasion of viruses and tumors relies on the presentation of viral and tumor-derived peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes by cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Previously, we showed that the ubiquitously expressed protein amyloid precursor-like protein 2 (APLP2) associates with the folded form of the MHC class I molecule Kd. In the current study, APLP2 was found to associate with folded Kd molecules following their endocytosis and to increase the amount of endocytosed Kd. In addition, increased expression of APLP2 was shown to decrease Kd surface expression and thermostability. Correspondingly, Kd thermostability and surface expression were increased by down-regulation of APLP2 expression. Overall, these data suggest that APLP2 modulates the stability and endocytosis of Kd molecules. PMID:18641335

  4. DC-expressed MHC class I single-chain trimer-based vaccines prime cytotoxic T lymphocytes against exogenous but not endogenous antigens.

    PubMed

    Ordaz, Maria L; Larmonier, Nicolas; Lybarger, Lonnie

    2010-01-01

    The poor immunogenicity of many tumors can be partly explained by the inefficiency of the MHC class I peptide presentation pathway. MHC-I-based single-chain trimers (SCT) represent a new class of molecules with the potential to overcome this limitation. We here evaluated the ability of SCT presenting a melanoma antigen peptide (TRP-2) to prime cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses in mice when given as DNA vaccines via Gene Gun or when expressed by dendritic cells. The SCT was unable to induce detectable priming or significant anti-tumor activity of CTL using either vaccination strategy, whereas control SCT (with an exogenous peptide) primed strong responses. This study thus provides the first data related to the use of SCT in combination with DC and their application toward self antigens and suggest this potent technology, alone, is insufficient to overcome self tolerance. PMID:20199770

  5. Genetic Variation at Exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB Locus in Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) from the Gulf of California

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Santillán, Diana D.; Lacey, Eileen A.; Gendron, Diane; Ortega, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) play an important role in the vertebrate immune response and are among the most polymorphic genes known in vertebrates. In some marine mammals, MHC genes have been shown to be characterized by low levels of polymorphism compared to terrestrial taxa; this reduction in variation is often explained as a result of lower pathogen pressures in marine habitats. To determine if this same reduction in variation applies to the migratory population of blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) that occurs in the Gulf of California, we genotyped a 172 bp fragment of exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB locus for 80 members of this population. Twenty-two putatively functional DQB allotypes were identified, all of which were homologous with DQB sequences from other cetacean species. Up to 5 putative alleles per individual were identified, suggesting that gene duplication has occurred at this locus. Rates of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions (ω) and maximum likelihood analyses of models of nucleotide variation provided potential evidence of ongoing positive selection at this exon. Phylogenetic analyses of DQB alleles from B. musculus and 16 other species of cetaceans revealed trans-specific conservation of MHC variants, suggesting that selection has acted on this locus over prolonged periods of time. Collectively our findings reveal that immunogenic variation in blue whales is comparable to that in terrestrial mammals, thereby providing no evidence that marine taxa are subject to reduced pathogen-induced selective pressures. PMID:26761201

  6. Genetic variation of the MHC class II DRB genes in the Japanese weasel, Mustela itatsi, endemic to Japan, compared with the Siberian weasel, Mustela sibirica.

    PubMed

    Nishita, Y; Abramov, A V; Kosintsev, P A; Lin, L-K; Watanabe, S; Yamazaki, K; Kaneko, Y; Masuda, R

    2015-12-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes encode proteins that play a critical role in vertebrate immune system and are highly polymorphic. To further understand the molecular evolution of the MHC genes, we compared MHC class II DRB genes between the Japanese weasel (Mustela itatsi), a species endemic to Japan, and the Siberian weasel (Mustela sibirica), a closely related species on the continent. We sequenced a 242-bp region of DRB exon 2, which encodes antigen-binding sites (ABS), and found 24 alleles from 31 M. itatsi individuals and 17 alleles from 21 M. sibirica individuals, including broadly distributed, species-specific and/or geographically restricted alleles. Our results suggest that pathogen-driven balancing selection have acted to maintain the diversity in the DRB genes. For predicted ABS, nonsynonymous substitutions exceeded synonymous substitutions, also indicating positive selection, which was not seen at non-ABS. In a Bayesian phylogenetic tree, two M. sibirica DRB alleles were basal to the rest of the sequences from mustelid species and may represent ancestral alleles. Trans-species polymorphism was evident between many mustelid DRB alleles, especially between M. itatsi and M. sibirica. These two Mustela species divided about 1.7 million years ago, but still share many MHC alleles, indicative of their close phylogenetic relationship. PMID:26593752

  7. Genetic Variation at Exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB Locus in Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) from the Gulf of California.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Santillán, Diana D; Lacey, Eileen A; Gendron, Diane; Ortega, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) play an important role in the vertebrate immune response and are among the most polymorphic genes known in vertebrates. In some marine mammals, MHC genes have been shown to be characterized by low levels of polymorphism compared to terrestrial taxa; this reduction in variation is often explained as a result of lower pathogen pressures in marine habitats. To determine if this same reduction in variation applies to the migratory population of blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) that occurs in the Gulf of California, we genotyped a 172 bp fragment of exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB locus for 80 members of this population. Twenty-two putatively functional DQB allotypes were identified, all of which were homologous with DQB sequences from other cetacean species. Up to 5 putative alleles per individual were identified, suggesting that gene duplication has occurred at this locus. Rates of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions (ω) and maximum likelihood analyses of models of nucleotide variation provided potential evidence of ongoing positive selection at this exon. Phylogenetic analyses of DQB alleles from B. musculus and 16 other species of cetaceans revealed trans-specific conservation of MHC variants, suggesting that selection has acted on this locus over prolonged periods of time. Collectively our findings reveal that immunogenic variation in blue whales is comparable to that in terrestrial mammals, thereby providing no evidence that marine taxa are subject to reduced pathogen-induced selective pressures. PMID:26761201

  8. A novel type of class I gene organization in vertebrates: a large family of non-MHC-linked class I genes is expressed at the RNA level in the amphibian Xenopus.

    PubMed Central

    Flajnik, M F; Kasahara, M; Shum, B P; Salter-Cid, L; Taylor, E; Du Pasquier, L

    1993-01-01

    A Xenopus class I cDNA clone, isolated from a cDNA expression library using antisera, is a member of a large family of non-classical class I genes (class Ib) composed of at least nine subfamilies, all of which are expressed at the RNA level. The subfamilies are well conserved in their immunoglobulin-like alpha 3 domains, but their peptide-binding regions (PBRs) and cytoplasmic domains are very divergent. In contrast to the great allelic diversity found in the PBR of classical class I genes, the alleles of one of the Xenopus non-classical subfamilies are extremely well conserved in all regions. Several of the invariant amino acids essential for the anchoring of peptides in the classical class I groove are not conserved in some subfamilies, but the class Ib genes are nevertheless more closely related in the PBR to classical and non-classical genes linked to the MHC in mammals and birds than to any other described class I genes like CD1 and the neonatal rat intestinal Fc receptor. Comparison with the Xenopus MHC-linked class Ia protein indicate that amino acids presumed to interact with beta 2-microglobulin are identical or conservatively changed in the two major class I families. Genomic analyses of Xenopus species suggest that the classical and non-classical families diverged from a common ancestor before the emergence of the genus Xenopus over 100 million years ago; all of the non-classical genes appear to be linked on a chromosome distinct from the one harboring the MHC. We hypothesize that this class Ib gene family is under very different selection pressures from the classical MHC genes, and that each subfamily may have evolved for a particular function. Images PMID:8223448

  9. Structure of the Adenovirus Type 4 (Species E) E3-19K/HLA-A2 Complex Reveals Species-Specific Features in MHC Class I Recognition.

    PubMed

    Li, Lenong; Santarsiero, Bernard D; Bouvier, Marlene

    2016-08-15

    Adenoviruses (Ads) subvert MHC class I Ag presentation and impair host anti-Ad cellular activities. Specifically, the Ad-encoded E3-19K immunomodulatory protein targets MHC class I molecules for retention within the endoplasmic reticulum of infected cells. We report the x-ray crystal structure of the Ad type 4 (Ad4) E3-19K of species E bound to HLA-A2 at 2.64-Å resolution. Structural analysis shows that Ad4 E3-19K adopts a tertiary fold that is shared only with Ad2 E3-19K of species C. A comparative analysis of the Ad4 E3-19K/HLA-A2 structure with our x-ray structure of Ad2 E3-19K/HLA-A2 identifies species-specific features in HLA-A2 recognition. Our analysis also reveals common binding characteristics that explain the promiscuous, and yet high-affinity, association of E3-19K proteins with HLA-A and HLA-B molecules. We also provide structural insights into why E3-19K proteins do not associate with HLA-C molecules. Overall, our study provides new information about how E3-19K proteins selectively engage with MHC class I to abrogate Ag presentation and counteract activation of CD8(+) T cells. The significance of MHC class I Ag presentation for controlling viral infections, as well as the threats of viral infections in immunocompromised patients, underline our efforts to characterize viral immunoevasins, such as E3-19K. PMID:27385781

  10. Detection of Foreign Antigen-specific CD4+Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells by MHC Class II Tetramer and Intracellular CD154 Staining

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin Young

    2013-01-01

    The unrestricted population of CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells, which have been known to control the expression of autoimmune diseases and protective immunity to inflammatory reactions, has led to greater appreciation of functional plasticity. Detecting and/or isolating Ag-specific CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs at the single cell level are required to study their function and plasticity. In this study, we established and compared both MHC class II tetramer and intracellular CD154 staining, in order to detect CD4+Foxp3+ Treg specific for foreign Ag in acute and chronic infections with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Our results revealed that MHC class II tetramer staining showed a lower detection rate of LCMV GP66-77-specific CD4+ T cells because most of MHC class II tetramers were unbound and unstable when combined staining was performed with intracellular cytokines. In contrast, intracellular CD154 staining was revealed to be easier and simple for detecting LCMV GP66-77-specific CD4+ T cells, compared to MHC class II tetramer staining. Subsequently, we employed intracellular CD154 staining to detect LCMV GP66-77-specific CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs using Foxp3GFP knock-in mouse, and found that LCMV GP66-77-specific CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs and polyclonal CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs showed differential expansion in mice infected with LCMV Arms or Cl13 at acute (8 and 13 days pi) and chronic phases (35 days pi). Therefore, our results provide insight into the valuable use of intracellular CD154 staining to detect and characterize foreign Ag-specific CD4+Foxp3+ Treg in various models. PMID:24385945

  11. Expression of the mouse MHC class Ib H2-T11 gene product, a paralog of H2-T23 (Qa-1) with shared peptide-binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lili; Reyes-Vargas, Eduardo; Dai, Hu; Escobar, Hernando; Rudd, Brant; Fairbanks, Jared; Ho, Alexander; Cusick, Mathew F; Kumánovics, Attila; Delgado, Julio; He, Xiao; Jensen, Peter E

    2014-08-01

    The mouse MHC class Ib gene H2-T11 is 95% identical at the DNA level to H2-T23, which encodes Qa-1, one of the most studied MHC class Ib molecules. H2-T11 mRNA was observed to be expressed widely in tissues of C57BL/6 mice, with the highest levels in thymus. To circumvent the availability of a specific mAb, cells were transduced with cDNA encoding T11 with a substituted α3 domain. Hybrid T11D3 protein was expressed at high levels similar to control T23D3 molecules on the surface of both TAP(+) and TAP(-) cells. Soluble T11D3 was generated by folding in vitro with Qa-1 determinant modifier, the dominant peptide presented by Qa-1. The circular dichroism spectrum of this protein was similar to that of other MHC class I molecules, and it was observed to bind labeled Qa-1 determinant modifier peptide with rapid kinetics. By contrast to the Qa-1 control, T11 tetramers did not react with cells expressing CD94/NKG2A, supporting the conclusion that T11 cannot replace Qa-1 as a ligand for NK cell inhibitory receptors. T11 also failed to substitute for Qa-1 in the presentation of insulin to a Qa-1-restricted T cell hybridoma. Despite divergent function, T11 was observed to share peptide-loading specificity with Qa-1. Direct analysis by tandem mass spectrometry of peptides eluted from T11D3 and T23D3 isolated from Hela cells demonstrated a diversity of peptides with a clear motif that was shared between the two molecules. Thus, T11 is a paralog of T23 encoding an MHC class Ib molecule that shares peptide-binding specificity with Qa-1 but differs in function. PMID:24958902

  12. Vanilloid Receptor 1 Agonists, Capsaicin and Resiniferatoxin, Enhance MHC Class I-restricted Viral Antigen Presentation in Virus-infected Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Hee; Im, Sun-A; Kim, Ji-Wan

    2016-01-01

    DCs, like the sensory neurons, express vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1). Here we demonstrate that the VR1 agonists, capsaicin (CP) and resiniferatoxin (RTX), enhance antiviral CTL responses by increasing MHC class I-restricted viral antigen presentation in dendritic cells (DCs). Bone marrow-derived DCs (BM-DCs) were infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) expressing OVA (VV-OVA), and then treated with CP or RTX. Both CP and RTX increased MHC class I-restricted presentation of virus-encoded endogenous OVA in BM-DCs. Oral administration of CP or RTX significantly increased MHC class I-restricted OVA presentation by splenic and lymph node DCs in VV-OVA-infected mice, as assessed by directly measuring OVA peptide SIINFEKL-Kb complexes on the cell surface and by performing functional assays using OVA-specific CD8 T cells. Accordingly, oral administration of CP or RTX elicited potent OVA-specific CTL activity in VV-OVA-infected mice. The results from this study demonstrate that VR1 agonists enhance anti-viral CTL responses, as well as a neuro-immune connection in anti-viral immune responses. PMID:27574502

  13. Genome-wide association study identifies SNPs in the MHC class II loci that are associated with self-reported history of whooping cough.

    PubMed

    McMahon, George; Ring, Susan M; Davey-Smith, George; Timpson, Nicholas J

    2015-10-15

    Whooping cough is currently seeing resurgence in countries despite high vaccine coverage. There is considerable variation in subject-specific response to infection and vaccine efficacy, but little is known about the role of human genetics. We carried out a case-control genome-wide association study of adult or parent-reported history of whooping cough in two cohorts from the UK: the ALSPAC cohort and the 1958 British Birth Cohort (815/758 cases and 6341/4308 controls, respectively). We also imputed HLA alleles using dense SNP data in the MHC region and carried out gene-based and gene-set tests of association and estimated the amount of additive genetic variation explained by common SNPs. We observed a novel association at SNPs in the MHC class II region in both cohorts [lead SNP rs9271768 after meta-analysis, odds ratio [95% confidence intervals (CIs)] 1.47 (1.35, 1.6), P-value 1.21E - 18]. Multiple strong associations were also observed at alleles at the HLA class II loci. The majority of these associations were explained by the lead SNP rs9271768. Gene-based and gene-set tests and estimates of explainable common genetic variation could not establish the presence of additional associations in our sample. Genetic variation at the MHC class II region plays a role in susceptibility to whooping cough. These findings provide additional perspective on mechanisms of whooping cough infection and vaccine efficacy. PMID:26231221

  14. Antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells regulate function of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in cancer via retrograde MHC class II signaling.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Srinivas; Nelson, Allison; Youn, Je-in; Cheng, Pingyan; Quiceno, David; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2012-02-15

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) play a major role in cancer-related immune suppression, yet the nature of this suppression remains controversial. In this study, we evaluated the ability of MDSCs to elicit CD4(+) T-cell tolerance in different mouse tumor models. In contrast to CD8(+) T-cell tolerance, which could be induced by MDSCs in all the tumor models tested, CD4(+) T-cell tolerance could be elicited in only one of the models (MC38) in which a substantial level of MHC class II was expressed on MDSCs compared with control myeloid cells. Mechanistic investigations revealed that MDSCs deficient in MHC class II could induce tolerance to CD8(+) T cells but not to CD4(+) T cells. Unexpectedly, antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells (but not CD8(+) T cells) could dramatically enhance the immune suppressive activity of MDSCs by converting them into powerful nonspecific suppressor cells. This striking effect was mediated by direct cell-cell contact through cross-linking of MHC class II on MDSCs. We also implicated an Ets-1 transcription factor-regulated increase in expression of Cox-2 and prostaglandin E2 in MDSCs in mediating this effect. Together, our findings suggest that activated CD4(+) T cells that are antigen specific may enhance the immune suppressive activity of MDSCs, a mechanism that might serve normally as a negative feedback loop to control immune responses that becomes dysregulated in cancer. PMID:22237629

  15. Vanilloid Receptor 1 Agonists, Capsaicin and Resiniferatoxin, Enhance MHC Class I-restricted Viral Antigen Presentation in Virus-infected Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Hee; Im, Sun-A; Kim, Ji-Wan; Lee, Chong-Kil

    2016-08-01

    DCs, like the sensory neurons, express vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1). Here we demonstrate that the VR1 agonists, capsaicin (CP) and resiniferatoxin (RTX), enhance antiviral CTL responses by increasing MHC class I-restricted viral antigen presentation in dendritic cells (DCs). Bone marrow-derived DCs (BM-DCs) were infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) expressing OVA (VV-OVA), and then treated with CP or RTX. Both CP and RTX increased MHC class I-restricted presentation of virus-encoded endogenous OVA in BM-DCs. Oral administration of CP or RTX significantly increased MHC class I-restricted OVA presentation by splenic and lymph node DCs in VV-OVA-infected mice, as assessed by directly measuring OVA peptide SIINFEKL-K(b) complexes on the cell surface and by performing functional assays using OVA-specific CD8 T cells. Accordingly, oral administration of CP or RTX elicited potent OVA-specific CTL activity in VV-OVA-infected mice. The results from this study demonstrate that VR1 agonists enhance anti-viral CTL responses, as well as a neuro-immune connection in anti-viral immune responses. PMID:27574502

  16. Genome-wide association study identifies SNPs in the MHC class II loci that are associated with self-reported history of whooping cough

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, George; Ring, Susan M.; Davey-Smith, George; Timpson, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Whooping cough is currently seeing resurgence in countries despite high vaccine coverage. There is considerable variation in subject-specific response to infection and vaccine efficacy, but little is known about the role of human genetics. We carried out a case–control genome-wide association study of adult or parent-reported history of whooping cough in two cohorts from the UK: the ALSPAC cohort and the 1958 British Birth Cohort (815/758 cases and 6341/4308 controls, respectively). We also imputed HLA alleles using dense SNP data in the MHC region and carried out gene-based and gene-set tests of association and estimated the amount of additive genetic variation explained by common SNPs. We observed a novel association at SNPs in the MHC class II region in both cohorts [lead SNP rs9271768 after meta-analysis, odds ratio [95% confidence intervals (CIs)] 1.47 (1.35, 1.6), P-value 1.21E − 18]. Multiple strong associations were also observed at alleles at the HLA class II loci. The majority of these associations were explained by the lead SNP rs9271768. Gene-based and gene-set tests and estimates of explainable common genetic variation could not establish the presence of additional associations in our sample. Genetic variation at the MHC class II region plays a role in susceptibility to whooping cough. These findings provide additional perspective on mechanisms of whooping cough infection and vaccine efficacy. PMID:26231221

  17. Btn2a2, a T cell immunomodulatory molecule coregulated with MHC class II genes

    PubMed Central

    Sarter, Kerstin; Leimgruber, Elisa; Gobet, Florian; Agrawal, Vishal; Dunand-Sauthier, Isabelle; Barras, Emmanuèle; Mastelic-Gavillet, Béatris; Kamath, Arun; Fontannaz, Paola; Guéry, Leslie; Duraes, Fernanda do Valle; Lippens, Carla; Ravn, Ulla; Santiago-Raber, Marie-Laure; Magistrelli, Giovanni; Fischer, Nicolas; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Hugues, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has recently emerged that butyrophilins, which are members of the extended B7 family of co-stimulatory molecules, have diverse functions in the immune system. We found that the human and mouse genes encoding butyrophilin-2A2 (BTN2A2) are regulated by the class II trans-activator and regulatory factor X, two transcription factors dedicated to major histocompatibility complex class II expression, suggesting a role in T cell immunity. To address this, we generated Btn2a2-deficient mice. Btn2a2−/− mice exhibited enhanced effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, impaired CD4+ regulatory T cell induction, potentiated antitumor responses, and exacerbated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Altered immune responses were attributed to Btn2a2 deficiency in antigen-presenting cells rather than T cells or nonhematopoietic cells. These results provide the first genetic evidence that BTN2A2 is a co-inhibitory molecule that modulates T cell–mediated immunity. PMID:26809444

  18. A novel regulatory pathway for autoimmune disease: Binding of partial MHC class II constructs to monocytes reduces CD74 expression and induces both specific and bystander T-cell tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Shayne; Huan, Jianya; Chou, Yuan K.; Buenafe, Abigail C.; Dahan, Rony; Reiter, Yoram; Mooney, Jeffery L.; Offner, Halina; Burrows, Gregory G.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment with partial (p)MHC class II-β1α1 constructs (also referred to as recombinant T-cell receptor ligands – RTL) linked to antigenic peptides can induce T-cell tolerance, inhibit recruitment of inflammatory cells and reverse autoimmune diseases. Here we demonstrate a novel regulatory pathway that involves RTL binding to CD11b+ mononuclear cells through a receptor comprised of MHC class II invariant chain (CD74), cell-surface histones and MHC class II itself for treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Binding of RTL constructs with CD74 involved a previously unrecognized MHC class II-α1/CD74 interaction that inhibited CD74 expression, blocked activity of its ligand, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, and reduced EAE severity. These findings implicate binding of RTL constructs to CD74 as a key step in both antigen-driven and bystander T-cell tolerance important in treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23026773

  19. Measurement of Peptide Binding to MHC Class II Molecules by Fluorescence Polarization.

    PubMed

    Yin, Liusong; Stern, Lawrence J

    2014-01-01

    Peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) molecules is a key process in antigen presentation and CD4+ T cell epitope selection. This unit describes a fairly simple but powerful fluorescence polarization-based binding competition assay to measure peptide binding to soluble recombinant MHCII molecules. The binding of a peptide of interest to MHCII molecules is assessed based on its ability to inhibit the binding of a fluorescence-labeled probe peptide, with the strength of binding characterized as IC50 (concentration required for 50% inhibition of probe peptide binding). Data analysis related to this method is discussed. In addition, this unit includes a support protocol for fluorescence labeling peptide using an amine-reactive probe. The advantage of this protocol is that it allows simple, fast, and high-throughput measurements of binding for a large set of peptides to MHCII molecules. PMID:25081912

  20. The source of MHC class I presented peptides and its implications.

    PubMed

    Apcher, Sébastien; Prado Martins, Rodrigo; Fåhraeus, Robin

    2016-06-01

    The source of peptides that enter the major histocompatibility class I (MHCI) pathway has been intensively debated over the last two decades. The initial assumption that peptides are derived from degradation of full length proteins was challenged by a model in which alternative translation products are a source of peptides. This model has been tested and supported by scientific data. We now need new hypotheses on the physiological implications of different sources of peptides for the MHCI pathway. The aim of this overview is to give an up-to-date account of the source of antigenic peptide material for the MHCI pathway and to incorporate the more recent observations of alternative mRNA translation products into existing models of the direct and cross-presentation pathways. PMID:27105144

  1. MHC Class II Antigen Presentation by Dendritic Cells Regulated through Endosomal Sorting

    PubMed Central

    ten Broeke, Toine; Wubbolts, Richard; Stoorvogel, Willem

    2013-01-01

    For the initiation of adaptive immune responses, dendritic cells present antigenic peptides in association with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) to naïve CD4+ T lymphocytes. In this review, we discuss how antigen presentation is regulated through intracellular processing and trafficking of MHCII. Newly synthesized MHCII is chaperoned by the invariant chain to endosomes, where peptides from endocytosed pathogens can bind. In nonactivated dendritic cells, peptide-loaded MHCII is ubiquitinated and consequently sorted by the ESCRT machinery to intraluminal vesicles of multivesicular bodies, ultimately leading to lysosomal degradation. Ubiquitination of newly synthesized MHCII is blocked when dendritic cells are activated, now allowing its transfer to the cell surface. This mode of regulation for MHCII is a prime example of how molecular processing and sorting at multivesicular bodies can determine the expression of signaling receptors at the plasma membrane. PMID:24296169

  2. The Atlantic Salmon MHC class II alpha and beta promoters are active in mammalian cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vestrheim, O; Lundin, M; Syed, M

    2007-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) genes are only constitutively expressed in certain immune response cells such as B cells, macrophages, dendritic cells and other antigen presenting cells. This cell specific expression pattern and the presence of conserved regions such as the X-, X2-, Y-, and W-boxes make the MHCII promoters especially interesting as vector constructs. We tested whether the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) MHCII promoters can function in cell lines from other organisms. We found that the salmon MHCII alpha and MHCII beta promoters could drive expression of a LacZ reporter gene in adherent lymphoblast cell lines from dog (DH82) and rabbit (HybL-L). This paper shows that the promoters of Atlantic salmon MHCII alpha and beta genes can function in mammalian cell lines. PMID:17934904

  3. HIV-Infected Dendritic Cells Present Endogenous MHC Class II-Restricted Antigens to HIV-Specific CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Pierre-Grégoire; Richetta, Clémence; Rouers, Angéline; Blanchet, Fabien P; Urrutia, Alejandra; Guerbois, Mathilde; Piguet, Vincent; Theodorou, Ioannis; Bet, Anne; Schwartz, Olivier; Tangy, Frédéric; Graff-Dubois, Stéphanie; Cardinaud, Sylvain; Moris, Arnaud

    2016-07-15

    It is widely assumed that CD4(+) T cells recognize antigenic peptides (epitopes) derived solely from incoming, exogenous, viral particles or proteins. However, alternative sources of MHC class II (MHC-II)-restricted Ags have been described, in particular epitopes derived from newly synthesized proteins (so-called endogenous). In this study, we show that HIV-infected dendritic cells (DC) present MHC-II-restricted endogenous viral Ags to HIV-specific (HS) CD4(+) T cells. This endogenous pathway functions independently of the exogenous route for HIV Ag presentation and offers a distinct possibility for the immune system to activate HS CD4(+) T cells. We examined the implication of autophagy, which plays a crucial role in endogenous viral Ag presentation and thymic selection of CD4(+) T cells, in HIV endogenous presentation. We show that infected DC do not use autophagy to process MHC-II-restricted HIV Ags. This is unlikely to correspond to a viral escape from autophagic degradation, as infecting DC with Nef- or Env-deficient HIV strains did not impact HS T cell activation. However, we demonstrate that, in DC, specific targeting of HIV Ags to autophagosomes using a microtubule-associated protein L chain 3 (LC3) fusion protein effectively enhances and broadens HS CD4(+) T cell responses, thus favoring an endogenous MHC-II-restricted presentation. In summary, in DC, multiple endogenous presentation pathways lead to the activation of HS CD4(+) T cell responses. These findings will help in designing novel strategies to activate HS CD4(+) T cells that are required for CTL activation/maintenance and B cell maturation. PMID:27288536

  4. Isolation over 35 years in a heated biotest basin causes selection on MHC class IIß genes in the European perch (Perca fluviatilis L.)

    PubMed Central

    Björklund, Mats; Aho, Teija; Behrmann-Godel, Jasminca

    2015-01-01

    Genes that play key roles in host immunity such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in vertebrates are expected to be major targets of selection. It is well known that environmental conditions can have an effect on host–parasite interactions and may thus influence the selection on MHC. We analyzed MHC class IIß variability over 35 years in a population of perch (Perca fluviatilis) from the Baltic Sea that was split into two populations separated from each other. One population was subjected to heating from cooling water of a nuclear power plant and was isolated from the surrounding environment in an artificial lake, while the other population was not subjected to any change in water temperature (control). The isolated population experienced a change of the allelic composition and a decrease in allelic richness of MHC genes compared to the control population. The two most common MHC alleles showed cyclic patterns indicating ongoing parasite–host coevolution in both populations, but the alleles that showed a cyclic behavior differed between the two populations. No such patterns were observed at alleles from nine microsatellite loci, and no genetic differentiation was found between populations. We found no indications for a genetic bottleneck in the isolated population during the 35 years. Additionally, differences in parasitism of the current perch populations suggest that a change of the parasite communities has occurred over the isolation period, although the evidence in form of in-depth knowledge of the change of the parasite community over time is lacking. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis of a selective sweep imposed by a change in the parasite community. PMID:25897384

  5. MHC class II diversity of koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) populations across their range.

    PubMed

    Lau, Q; Jaratlerdsiri, W; Griffith, J E; Gongora, J; Higgins, D P

    2014-10-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) genes code for proteins that bind and present antigenic peptides and trigger the adaptive immune response. We present a broad geographical study of MHCII DA β1 (DAB) and DB β1 (DBB) variants of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus; n=191) from 12 populations across eastern Australia, with a total of 13 DAB and 7 DBB variants found. We identified greater MHCII variation and, possibly, additional gene copies in koala populations in the north (Queensland and New South Wales) relative to the south (Victoria), confirmed by STRUCTURE analyses and genetic differentiation using analysis of molecular variance. The higher MHCII diversity in the north relative to south could potentially be attributed to (i) significant founder effect in Victorian populations linked to historical translocation of bottlenecked koala populations and (ii) increased pathogen-driven balancing selection and/or local genetic drift in the north. Low MHCII genetic diversity in koalas from the south could reduce their potential response to disease, although the three DAB variants found in the south had substantial sequence divergence between variants. This study assessing MHCII diversity in the koala with historical translocations in some populations contributes to understanding the effects of population translocations on functional genetic diversity. PMID:24690756

  6. ITAM signaling in dendritic cells controls T helper cell priming by regulating MHC class II recycling

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Daniel B.; Akilesh, Holly M.; Gmyrek, Grzegorz B.; Piccio, Laura; Gilfillan, Susan; Sim, Julia; Belizaire, Roger; Carrero, Javier A.; Wang, Yinan; Blaufuss, Gregory S.; Sandoval, Gabriel; Fujikawa, Keiko; Cross, Anne H.; Russell, John H.; Cella, Marina

    2010-01-01

    Immature dendritic cells (DCs) specialize in antigen capture and maintain a highly dynamic pool of intracellular major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) that continuously recycles from peptide loading compartments to the plasma membrane and back again. This process facilitates sampling of environmental antigens for presentation to T helper cells. Here, we show that a signaling pathway mediated by the DC immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)–containing adaptors (DAP12 and FcRγ) and Vav family guanine nucleotide exchange factors controls the half-life of surface peptide-MHCII (pMHCII) complexes and is critical for CD4 T-cell triggering in vitro. Strikingly, mice with disrupted DC ITAMs show defective T helper cell priming in vivo and are protected from experimental autoimmune encephalitis. Mechanistically, we show that deficiency in ITAM signaling results in increased pMHCII internalization, impaired recycling, and an accumulation of ubiquitinated MHCII species that are prematurely degraded in lysosomes. We propose a novel mechanism for control of T helper cell priming. PMID:20634378

  7. MHC class II compatibility in aborted fetuses and term infants of couples with recurrent spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    Ober, C; Steck, T; van der Ven, K; Billstrand, C; Messer, L; Kwak, J; Beaman, K; Beer, A

    1993-12-01

    Maternal-fetal histocompatibility for alleles at HLA class II loci, HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1, was examined in 40 abortuses and 31 liveborn children of 68 couples with a history of idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSAB) who underwent leukocyte immunization prior to the index pregnancy. Significantly more couples with RSAB shared two HLA-DQA1 alleles as compared with fertile control couples (0.18 vs. 0.03, respectively; P = 0.031). There were no differences in HLA sharing between couples with RSAB who experienced a repeat abortion in the index pregnancy as compared with couples with RSAB who were delivered of a liveborn child. Non-significant deficits of abortuses who were compatible for alleles at the HLA-DQA1 (6 observed vs. 8.5 expected; P = 0.225) and the HLA-DQB1 (7 observed vs. 9.2 expected; P = 0.254) loci were observed. A significant deficit of HLA-DQA1 compatible liveborn children was observed (1 observed vs. 5.5 expected; P = 0.0069). The overall deficit of HLA-DQA1 compatible fetuses (7 observed vs. 14.0 expected; P = 0.0018) after approximately 8 weeks gestation suggests that HLA-DQA1 compatible fetuses may be aborted early in pregnancy, prior to the time when fetal tissue can be recovered for genetic studies. PMID:8207709

  8. Structural Mechanism of ER Retrieval of MHC Class I by Cowpox

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, William H.; Wang, Xiaoli; Yokoyama, Wayne M.; Hansen, Ted H.; Fremont, Daved H.

    2012-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of viral immune evasion is the capacity to disrupt major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) antigen presentation to evade T-cell detection. Cowpox virus encoded protein CPXV203 blocks MHCI surface expression by exploiting the KDEL-receptor recycling pathway, and here we show that CPXV203 directly binds a wide array of fully assembled MHCI proteins, both classical and non-classical. Further, the stability of CPXV203/MHCI complexes is highly pH dependent, with dramatically increased affinities at the lower pH of the Golgi relative to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Crystallographic studies reveal that CPXV203 adopts a beta-sandwich fold similar to poxvirus chemokine binding proteins, and binds the same highly conserved MHCI determinants located under the peptide-binding platform that tapasin, CD8, and natural killer (NK)-receptors engage. Mutagenesis of the CPXV203/MHCI interface identified the importance of two CPXV203 His residues that confer low pH stabilization of the complex and are critical to ER retrieval of MHCI. These studies clarify mechanistically how CPXV203 coordinates with other cowpox proteins to thwart antigen presentation. PMID:23209377

  9. MHC class I protects motor neurons from astrocyte-induced toxicity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Lyndsey; Meyer, Kathrin; Frakes, Ashley E.; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Likhite, Shibi; Bevan, Adam K.; Foust, Kevin D.; McConnell, Michael J.; Walker, Christopher M.; Kaspar, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes isolated from individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are toxic towards motor neurons (MNs) and play a non-cell autonomous role in disease pathogenesis. The mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of motor neurons to cell death remains unclear. Here, we report that astrocytes derived from mice bearing ALS mutations and from individuals with ALS reduce expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) on MNs. Reduced MHCI expression makes these MNs susceptible to astrocyte-induced cell death. Increasing MHCI expression on MNs increases survival and motor performance in a mouse model of ALS and protects MN against astrocyte toxicity. A single MHCI molecule, HLA-F, protects MNs from ALS astrocyte-mediated toxicity, while knockdown of its receptor, the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor KIR3DL2, an inhibitory receptor that recognizes MHCI, on astrocytes results in enhanced MN death. These data indicate that in ALS upon loss of MHCI expression MNs become vulnerable to astrocyte-mediated toxicity. PMID:26928464

  10. Developmental Sculpting of Intracortical Circuits by MHC Class I H2-Db and H2-Kb.

    PubMed

    Adelson, Jaimie D; Sapp, Richard W; Brott, Barbara K; Lee, Hanmi; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Luo, Liqun; Cheng, Sarah; Djurisic, Maja; Shatz, Carla J

    2016-04-01

    Synapse pruning is an activity-regulated process needed for proper circuit sculpting in the developing brain. Major histocompatibility class I (MHCI) molecules are regulated by activity, but little is known about their role in the development of connectivity in cortex. Here we show that protein for 2 MHCI molecules H2-Kb and H2-Db is associated with synapses in the visual cortex. Pyramidal neurons in mice lacking H2-Kb and H2-Db (KbDb KO) have more extensive cortical connectivity than normal. Modified rabies virus tracing was used to monitor the extent of pyramidal cell connectivity: Horizontal connectivity is greater in the visual cortex of KbDb KO mice. Basal dendrites of L2/3 pyramids, where many horizontal connections terminate, are more highly branched and have elevated spine density in the KO. Furthermore, the density of axonal boutons is elevated within L2/3 of mutant mice. These increases are accompanied by elevated miniature excitatory postsynaptic current frequency, consistent with an increase in functional synapses. This functional and anatomical increase in intracortical connectivity is also associated with enhanced ocular dominance plasticity that persists into adulthood. Thus, these MHCI proteins regulate sculpting of local cortical circuits and in their absence, the excess connectivity can function as a substrate for cortical plasticity throughout life. PMID:25316337

  11. Upregulation and induction of surface antigens with special reference to MHC class II expression in microglia in postnatal rat brain following intravenous or intraperitoneal injections of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, J; Ling, E A

    1994-01-01

    The effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the expression of surface antigens including major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and complement type 3 (CR3) receptors on microglial cells in the corpus callosum in postnatal rat brain were investigated. When LPS was injected intravenously (i.v.) in 1-d-old rats, the immunostaining of callosal amoeboid microglial cells with OX-18 directed against MHC class I antigen was enhanced 24 h after the injection in comparison with the controls. The expression of MHC class II (Ia) antigen on the same cell type as shown by its immunoreactivity with OX-6 was also elicited especially after 2 intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of LPS. Thus 7 d after a single i.p. injection of LPS into 1-d-old rats, only a few OX-6 positive cells showing a moderate staining reaction were observed in the corpus callosum. The immunoreactivity diminished 14 d after the injection. However, in rats receiving 2 successive i.p. injections of LPS at 1 and 4 d of age and killed 7 d after the 1st injection, a significant number of intensely stained OX-6 positive amoeboid microglial cells were observed in the corpus callosum. The expression of MHC class II antigens induced by 2 injections of LPS was sustained at least until d 14 when the callosal ramified microglial cells, known to be derived from gradual metamorphic transformation of amoeboid microglia, still exhibited intense immunoreactivity with OX-6. The effect of LPS on the expression of CR3 on amoeboid microglial cells was not obvious after a single injection, but the immunoreactivity with OX-42 was also augmented in rats given 2 i.p. administration of LPS into rats at 1 an 4 d of age. It is concluded from this study that the expression of MHC class I and class II antigens on amoeboid microglial cells in corpus callosum was upregulated and induced respectively after i.v. or i.p. injection of LPS into early postnatal rats. Although relatively fewer in number when compared with OX-18 and OX-42

  12. Sequence diversity between class I MHC loci of African native and introduced Bos taurus cattle in Theileria parva endemic regions: in silico peptide binding prediction identifies distinct functional clusters.

    PubMed

    Obara, Isaiah; Nielsen, Morten; Jeschek, Marie; Nijhof, Ard; Mazzoni, Camila J; Svitek, Nicholas; Steinaa, Lucilla; Awino, Elias; Olds, Cassandra; Jabbar, Ahmed; Clausen, Peter-Henning; Bishop, Richard P

    2016-05-01

    There is strong evidence that the immunity induced by live vaccination for control of the protozoan parasite Theileria parva is mediated by class I MHC-restricted CD8(+) T cells directed against the schizont stage of the parasite that infects bovine lymphocytes. The functional competency of class I MHC genes is dependent on the presence of codons specifying certain critical amino acid residues that line the peptide binding groove. Compared with European Bos taurus in which class I MHC allelic polymorphisms have been examined extensively, published data on class I MHC transcripts in African taurines in T. parva endemic areas is very limited. We utilized the multiplexing capabilities of 454 pyrosequencing to make an initial assessment of class I MHC allelic diversity in a population of Ankole cattle. We also typed a population of exotic Holstein cattle from an African ranch for class I MHC and investigated the extent, if any, that their peptide-binding motifs overlapped with those of Ankole cattle. We report the identification of 18 novel allelic sequences in Ankole cattle and provide evidence of positive selection for sequence diversity, including in residues that predominantly interact with peptides. In silico functional analysis resulted in peptide binding specificities that were largely distinct between the two breeds. We also demonstrate that CD8(+) T cells derived from Ankole cattle that are seropositive for T. parva do not recognize vaccine candidate antigens originally identified in Holstein and Boran (Bos indicus) cattle breeds. PMID:26852329

  13. Differential tapasin dependence of MHC class I molecules correlates with conformational changes upon peptide dissociation: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Sieker, Florian; Straatsma, TP; Springer, Sebastian; Zacharias, Martin W

    2008-08-01

    Efficiency of peptide loading to MHC class I molecules in the endoplasmatic reticulum depends on the class I allele and can involve interaction with tapasin and other proteins of the loading complex. Allele HLA-B*4402 (Asp at position 116) depends on tapasin for efficient peptide loading whereas HLA-B*4405 (identical to B*4402 except for Tyr116) can efficiently load peptides in the absence of tapasin. Both alleles adopt very similar structures in the presence of the same peptide. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on induced peptide termini dissociation from the α1/α2 peptide binding domains have been performed to characterize free energy changes and associated structural changes in the two alleles. A smooth free energy change along the distance dissociation coordinate was obtained for N terminus dissociation. A different shape and magnitude of the calculated free energy change and was obtained for induced peptide C terminus dissociation in case of the tapasin independent allele B*4405 compared to B*4402. Structural changes during C terminus dissociation occurred mainly in the first segment of the α2-1 helix that flanks the peptide C-terminus binding region (F-pocket) and contacts residue 116. This segment is also close to the proposed tapasin contact region. For B*4402, a stable shift towards an altered open F-pocket structure deviating significantly from the bound form was observed. In contrast, B*4405 showed only a transient opening of the F-pocket followed by relaxation towards a structure close to the bound form upon C terminus dissociation. The greater tendency for peptide-receptive conformation in the absence of peptide combined with a more long-range character of the interactions with the peptide C terminus facilitates peptide binding to B*4405 and could be responsible for the tapasin independence of this allele. A possible role of tapasin in case of HLA-B*4402 and other tapasin-dependent alleles could be the stabilization of a peptide receptive class I

  14. Mamu-A*01/K{sup b} transgenic and MHC Class I knockout mice as a tool for HIV vaccine development

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jinliang; Srivastava, Tumul; Rawal, Ravindra; Manuel, Edwin; Isbell, Donna; Tsark, Walter; La Rosa, Corinna; Wang Zhongde; Li Zhongqi; Barry, Peter A.; Hagen, Katharine D.; Longmate, Jeffrey; Diamond, Don J.

    2009-04-25

    We have developed a murine model expressing the rhesus macaque (RM) Mamu-A*01 MHC allele to characterize immune responses and vaccines based on antigens of importance to human disease processes. Towards that goal, transgenic (Tg) mice expressing chimeric RM (alpha1 and alpha2 Mamu-A*01 domains) and murine (alpha3, transmembrane, and cytoplasmic H-2K{sup b} domains) MHC Class I molecules were derived by transgenesis of the H-2K{sup b}D{sup b} double MHC Class I knockout strain. After immunization of Mamu-A*01/K{sup b} Tg mice with rVV-SIVGag-Pol, the mice generated CD8{sup +} T-cell IFN-gamma responses to several known Mamu-A*01 restricted epitopes from the SIV Gag and Pol antigen sequence. Fusion peptides of highly recognized CTL epitopes from SIV Pol and Gag and a strong T-help epitope were shown to be immunogenic and capable of limiting an rVV-SIVGag-Pol challenge. Mamu-A*01/K{sup b} Tg mice provide a model system to study the Mamu-A*01 restricted T-cell response for various infectious diseases which are applicable to a study in RM.

  15. Clonal expansion of double-positive intraepithelial lymphocytes by MHC class I-related chain A expressed in mouse small intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Jeong; Takahashi, Ichiro; Ikeda, Junko; Kawahara, Kazuko; Okamoto, Tetsuji; Kweon, Mi-Na; Fukuyama, Satoshi; Groh, Veronika; Spies, Thomas; Obata, Yuichi; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2003-10-15

    Expression of a distant homologue MHC class I molecule, MHC class I-related chain A (MICA), has been found to be stress inducible and limited to the intestinal epithelium. This nonclassical MHC molecule is associated with various carcinomas in humans. To understand the biological consequences of MICA expression in the gut, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice (T3(b)-MICA Tg) under the control of the T3(b) promoter. The T3(b)-MICA Tg mice expressed MICA selectively in the intestine and had an increased number of TCRalphabeta CD4CD8alphaalpha, double-positive (DP) intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) in the small bowel. These MICA-expanded DP IELs exhibited a bias to Vbeta8.2 and overlapped motifs of the complementarity-determining region 3 region among various Tg mice. Hence, the overexpression of MICA resulted in a clonal expansion of DP IELs. Studies in model of inflammatory bowel disease showed that transgenic MICA was able to attenuate the acute colitis induced by dextran sodium sulfate administration. Therefore, this unique in vivo model will enable investigation of possible influences of stress-inducible MICA on the gut immune surveillance. PMID:14530335

  16. LAMP-2C Inhibits MHC Class II Presentation of Cytoplasmic Antigens by Disrupting Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Liliana; McLetchie, Shawna; Gardiner, Gail J; Deffit, Sarah N; Zhou, Delu; Blum, Janice S

    2016-03-15

    Cells use multiple autophagy pathways to sequester macromolecules, senescent organelles, and pathogens. Several conserved isoforms of the lysosome-associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2) regulate these pathways influencing immune recognition and responses. LAMP-2A is required for chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), which promotes Ag capture and MHC class II (MHCII) presentation in B cells and signaling in T cells. LAMP-2B regulates lysosome maturation to impact macroautophagy and phagocytosis. Yet, far less is known about LAMP-2C function. Whereas LAMP2A and LAMP2B mRNA were broadly detected in human tissues, LAMP2C expression was more limited. Transcripts for the three LAMP2 isoforms increased with B cell activation, although specific gene induction varied depending on TLR versus BCR engagement. To examine LAMP-2C function in human B cells and specifically its role in Ag presentation, we used ectopic gene expression. Increased LAMP-2C expression in B cells did not alter MHCII expression or invariant chain processing, but did perturb cytoplasmic Ag presentation via CMA. MHCII presentation of epitopes from exogenous and membrane Ags was not affected by LAMP-2C expression in B cells. Similarly, changes in B cell LAMP-2C expression did not impact macroautophagy. The gene expression of other LAMP2 isoforms and proteasome and lysosomal proteases activities were unperturbed by LAMP-2C ectopic expression. LAMP-2C levels modulated the steady-state expression of several cytoplasmic proteins that are targeted for degradation by CMA and diminished peptide translocation via this pathway. Thus, LAMP-2C serves as a natural inhibitor of CMA that can selectively skew MHCII presentation of cytoplasmic Ags. PMID:26856698

  17. FOXP1 suppresses immune response signatures and MHC class II expression in activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Brown, P J; Wong, K K; Felce, S L; Lyne, L; Spearman, H; Soilleux, E J; Pedersen, L M; Møller, M B; Green, T M; Gascoyne, D M; Banham, A H

    2016-03-01

    The FOXP1 (forkhead box P1) transcription factor is a marker of poor prognosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Here microarray analysis of FOXP1-silenced DLBCL cell lines identified differential regulation of immune response signatures and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) genes as some of the most significant differences between germinal center B-cell (GCB)-like DLBCL with full-length FOXP1 protein expression versus activated B-cell (ABC)-like DLBCL expressing predominantly short FOXP1 isoforms. In an independent primary DLBCL microarray data set, multiple MHC II genes, including human leukocyte antigen DR alpha chain (HLA-DRA), were inversely correlated with FOXP1 transcript expression (P<0.05). FOXP1 knockdown in ABC-DLBCL cells led to increased cell-surface expression of HLA-DRA and CD74. In R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone)-treated DLBCL patients (n=150), reduced HLA-DRA (<90% frequency) expression correlated with inferior overall survival (P=0.0003) and progression-free survival (P=0.0012) and with non-GCB subtype stratified by the Hans, Choi or Visco-Young algorithms (all P<0.01). In non-GCB DLBCL cases with <90% HLA-DRA, there was an inverse correlation with the frequency (P=0.0456) and intensity (P=0.0349) of FOXP1 expression. We propose that FOXP1 represents a novel regulator of genes targeted by the class II MHC transactivator CIITA (MHC II and CD74) and therapeutically targeting the FOXP1 pathway may improve antigen presentation and immune surveillance in high-risk DLBCL patients. PMID:26500140

  18. FOXP1 suppresses immune response signatures and MHC class II expression in activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Brown, P J; Wong, K K; Felce, S L; Lyne, L; Spearman, H; Soilleux, E J; Pedersen, L M; Møller, M B; Green, T M; Gascoyne, D M; Banham, A H

    2016-01-01

    The FOXP1 (forkhead box P1) transcription factor is a marker of poor prognosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Here microarray analysis of FOXP1-silenced DLBCL cell lines identified differential regulation of immune response signatures and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) genes as some of the most significant differences between germinal center B-cell (GCB)-like DLBCL with full-length FOXP1 protein expression versus activated B-cell (ABC)-like DLBCL expressing predominantly short FOXP1 isoforms. In an independent primary DLBCL microarray data set, multiple MHC II genes, including human leukocyte antigen DR alpha chain (HLA-DRA), were inversely correlated with FOXP1 transcript expression (P<0.05). FOXP1 knockdown in ABC-DLBCL cells led to increased cell-surface expression of HLA-DRA and CD74. In R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone)-treated DLBCL patients (n=150), reduced HLA-DRA (<90% frequency) expression correlated with inferior overall survival (P=0.0003) and progression-free survival (P=0.0012) and with non-GCB subtype stratified by the Hans, Choi or Visco–Young algorithms (all P<0.01). In non-GCB DLBCL cases with <90% HLA-DRA, there was an inverse correlation with the frequency (P=0.0456) and intensity (P=0.0349) of FOXP1 expression. We propose that FOXP1 represents a novel regulator of genes targeted by the class II MHC transactivator CIITA (MHC II and CD74) and therapeutically targeting the FOXP1 pathway may improve antigen presentation and immune surveillance in high-risk DLBCL patients. PMID:26500140

  19. Non-classical MHC class Ib-restricted cytotoxic T cells monitor antigen processing in the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Niranjana A.; Gonzalez, Federico; Shastri, Nilabh

    2012-01-01

    The ER aminopeptidase associated with antigen processing, ERAAP, is essential for trimming peptides presented by MHC I molecules. ERAAP inhibition by cytomegalovirus causes immune evasion, and ERAAP polymorphisms are associated with autoimmune disorders. How normal ERAAP function is monitored is unknown. We found that ERAAP inhibition rapidly induced presentation of the FL9 peptide by the Qa-1b MHC Ib molecule. Antigen-experienced T cells specific for the Qa-1b-FL9 complex were frequent in naïve mice. Wild-type mice immunized with ERAAP-deficient cells mounted a potent CD8+ T cell response specific for the Qa-1b-FL9- complex. MHC Ib-restricted cytolytic effectors specifically eliminated ERAAP-deficient cells in vitro and in vivo. Thus, non-classical peptide-Qa-1b complexes direct cytotoxic T cells to targets with defective antigen processing in the ER. PMID:22522492

  20. Processing and MHC class II presentation of exogenous soluble antigen involving a proteasome-dependent cytosolic pathway in CD40-activated B cells.

    PubMed

    Becker, Hans Jiro; Kondo, Eisei; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander; Theurich, Sebastian; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    Activated B cells have the capacity to present antigen and induce immune responses as potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs). As in other APCs, antigen presentation by B cells involves antigen internalization, antigen processing, and peptide loading onto MHC molecules. However, while the mechanism of antigen processing has been studied extensively in other APCs, this pathway remains elusive in B cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the MHC class II processing pathway in CD40-activated B cells (CD40Bs), as a model for activated, antigen-presenting B cells. Using CMV pp65 as a model antigen, we evaluated processing and presentation of the CD4 + T-cell epitope 509-523 (K509) by human CD40Bs in ELISPOT assays. As expected, stimulation of specific CD4 + T-cell clones was attenuated after pretreatment of CD40Bs with inhibitors of classic class II pathway components. However, proteasome inhibitors such as epoxomicin limited antigen presentation as well. This suggests that the antigen is processed in a non-classical, cytosolic MHC class II pathway. Further experiments with truncated protein variants revealed involvement of the proteasome in processing of the N and C extensions of the epitope. Access to the cytosol was shown to be size dependent. Epoxomicin sensitivity exclusively in CD40B cells, but not in dendritic cells, suggests a novel processing mechanism unique to this APC. Our data suggest that B cells process antigen using a distinct, non-classical class II pathway. PMID:26561366

  1. Patterns of MHC-G-Like and MHC-B Diversification in New World Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Lugo, Juan S.; Cadavid, Luis F.

    2015-01-01

    The MHC class I (MHC-I) region in New World monkeys (Platyrrhini) has remained relatively understudied. To evaluate the diversification patterns and transcription behavior of MHC-I in Platyrrhini, we first analyzed public genomic sequences from the MHC-G-like subregion in Saimiri boliviensis, Ateles geoffroyi and Callicebus moloch, and from the MHC-B subregion in Saimiri boliviensis. While S. boliviensis showed multiple copies of both MHC-G-like (10) and –B (15) loci, A. geoffroyi and C. moloch had only three and four MHC-G-like genes, respectively, indicating that not all Platyrrhini species have expanded their MHC-I loci. We then sequenced MHC-G-like and -B cDNAs from nine Platyrrhini species, recovering two to five unique cDNAs per individual for both loci classes. In two Saguinus species, however, no MHC-B cDNAs were found. In phylogenetic trees, MHC-G-like cDNAs formed genus-specific clusters whereas the MHC-B cDNAs grouped by Platyrrhini families, suggesting a more rapid diversification of the former. Furthermore, cDNA sequencing in 12 capuchin monkeys showed that they transcribe at least four MHC-G-like and five MHC-B polymorphic genes, showing haplotypic diversity for gene copy number and signatures of positive natural selection at the peptide binding region. Finally, a quantitative index for MHC:KIR affinity was proposed and tested to predict putative interacting pairs. Altogether, our data indicate that i) MHC-I genes has expanded differentially among Platyrrhini species, ii) Callitrichinae (tamarins and marmosets) MHC-B loci have limited or tissue-specific expression, iii) MHC-G-like genes have diversified more rapidly than MHC-B genes, and iv) the MHC-I diversity is generated mainly by genetic polymorphism and gene copy number variation, likely promoted by natural selection for ligand binding. PMID:26121030

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and TLR2 Agonists Inhibit Induction of Type I IFN and Class I MHC Antigen Cross Processing by TLR9

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Daimon P.; Canaday, David H.; Liu, Yi; Li, Qing; Huang, Alex; Boom, W. Henry; Harding, Clifford V.

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) cross process exogenous Ags and present them by class I MHC (MHC-I) molecules to CD8+ T cells specific for Ags from viruses and bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Unmethylated CpG DNA signals through TLR9 to induce type I IFN (IFN-α/β), which enhances MHC-I Ag cross processing, but lipoproteins that signal through TLR2 do not induce IFN-α/β. In these studies we observed that M. tuberculosis, which expresses agonists of both TLR9 and TLR2, did not induce production of IFN-α/β or cross processing by murine DCs. Furthermore, M. tuberculosis and TLR2 agonists inhibited induction of IFN-α/β and DC cross processing by CpG DNA. Exogenous IFN-α/β effectively enhanced cross processing of M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin expressing OVA, bypassing the inhibition of induction of endogenous IFN-α/β. In addition, inhibition of TLR9-induced cross processing of M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin expressing OVA could be circumvented by pretreating cells with CpG DNA to induce IFN-α/β and MHC-I cross processing before inhibitory mycobacterial TLR2 agonists were present. Inhibition of the response to one TLR by another may affect the ultimate response to pathogens like M. tuberculosis that express agonists of multiple TLRs, including TLR2 and TLR9. This mechanism may contribute to immune evasion and explain why IFN-α/β provides little contribution to host immunity to M. tuberculosis. However, downregulation of certain TLR responses may benefit the host by preventing detrimental excessive inflammation that may occur in the presence of persistent infection. PMID:20660347

  3. IRF1 and NF-kB Restore MHC Class I-Restricted Tumor Antigen Processing and Presentation to Cytotoxic T Cells in Aggressive Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Cifaldi, Loredana; Antonucci, Chiara; Citti, Arianna; Boldrini, Renata; Pezzullo, Marco; Castellano, Aurora; Russo, Vincenzo; van der Bruggen, Pierre; Giacomini, Patrizio; Locatelli, Franco; Fruci, Doriana

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB), the most common solid extracranial cancer of childhood, displays a remarkable low expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) and Antigen Processing Machinery (APM) molecules, including Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Aminopeptidases, and poorly presents tumor antigens to Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes (CTL). We have previously shown that this is due to low expression of the transcription factor NF-kB p65. Herein, we show that not only NF-kB p65, but also the Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 (IRF1) and certain APM components are low in a subset of NB cell lines with aggressive features. Whereas single transfection with either IRF1, or NF-kB p65 is ineffective, co-transfection results in strong synergy and substantial reversion of the MHC-I/APM-low phenotype in all NB cell lines tested. Accordingly, linked immunohistochemistry expression patterns between nuclear IRF1 and p65 on the one hand, and MHC-I on the other hand, were observed in vivo. Absence and presence of the three molecules neatly segregated between high-grade and low-grade NB, respectively. Finally, APM reconstitution by double IRF1/p65 transfection rendered a NB cell line susceptible to killing by anti MAGE-A3 CTLs, lytic efficiency comparable to those seen upon IFN-γ treatment. This is the first demonstration that a complex immune escape phenotype can be rescued by reconstitution of a limited number of master regulatory genes. These findings provide molecular insight into defective MHC-I expression in NB cells and provide the rational for T cell-based immunotherapy in NB variants refractory to conventional therapy. PMID:23071666

  4. Changes in variation at the MHC class II DQA locus during the final demise of the woolly mammoth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pečnerová, Patrícia; Díez-Del-Molino, David; Vartanyan, Sergey; Dalén, Love

    2016-05-01

    According to the nearly-neutral theory of evolution, the relative strengths of selection and drift shift in favour of drift at small population sizes. Numerous studies have analysed the effect of bottlenecks and small population sizes on genetic diversity in the MHC, which plays a central role in pathogen recognition and immune defense and is thus considered a model example for the study of adaptive evolution. However, to understand changes in genetic diversity at loci under selection, it is necessary to compare the genetic diversity of a population before and after the bottleneck. In this study, we analyse three fragments of the MHC DQA gene in woolly mammoth samples radiocarbon dated to before and after a well-documented bottleneck that took place about ten thousand years ago. Our results indicate a decrease in observed heterozygosity and number of alleles, suggesting that genetic drift had an impact on the variation on MHC. Based on coalescent simulations, we found no evidence of balancing selection maintaining MHC diversity during the Holocene. However, strong trans-species polymorphism among mammoths and elephants points to historical effects of balancing selection on the woolly mammoth lineage.

  5. Changes in variation at the MHC class II DQA locus during the final demise of the woolly mammoth.

    PubMed

    Pečnerová, Patrícia; Díez-Del-Molino, David; Vartanyan, Sergey; Dalén, Love

    2016-01-01

    According to the nearly-neutral theory of evolution, the relative strengths of selection and drift shift in favour of drift at small population sizes. Numerous studies have analysed the effect of bottlenecks and small population sizes on genetic diversity in the MHC, which plays a central role in pathogen recognition and immune defense and is thus considered a model example for the study of adaptive evolution. However, to understand changes in genetic diversity at loci under selection, it is necessary to compare the genetic diversity of a population before and after the bottleneck. In this study, we analyse three fragments of the MHC DQA gene in woolly mammoth samples radiocarbon dated to before and after a well-documented bottleneck that took place about ten thousand years ago. Our results indicate a decrease in observed heterozygosity and number of alleles, suggesting that genetic drift had an impact on the variation on MHC. Based on coalescent simulations, we found no evidence of balancing selection maintaining MHC diversity during the Holocene. However, strong trans-species polymorphism among mammoths and elephants points to historical effects of balancing selection on the woolly mammoth lineage. PMID:27143688

  6. Changes in variation at the MHC class II DQA locus during the final demise of the woolly mammoth

    PubMed Central

    Pečnerová, Patrícia; Díez-del-Molino, David; Vartanyan, Sergey; Dalén, Love

    2016-01-01

    According to the nearly-neutral theory of evolution, the relative strengths of selection and drift shift in favour of drift at small population sizes. Numerous studies have analysed the effect of bottlenecks and small population sizes on genetic diversity in the MHC, which plays a central role in pathogen recognition and immune defense and is thus considered a model example for the study of adaptive evolution. However, to understand changes in genetic diversity at loci under selection, it is necessary to compare the genetic diversity of a population before and after the bottleneck. In this study, we analyse three fragments of the MHC DQA gene in woolly mammoth samples radiocarbon dated to before and after a well-documented bottleneck that took place about ten thousand years ago. Our results indicate a decrease in observed heterozygosity and number of alleles, suggesting that genetic drift had an impact on the variation on MHC. Based on coalescent simulations, we found no evidence of balancing selection maintaining MHC diversity during the Holocene. However, strong trans-species polymorphism among mammoths and elephants points to historical effects of balancing selection on the woolly mammoth lineage. PMID:27143688

  7. Resistance of novel mouse strains different in MHC class I and the NKC domain to the development of experimental tumors.

    PubMed

    Fišerová, Anna; Richter, Jan; Čapková, Katarína; Bieblová, Jana; Mikyšková, Romana; Reiniš, Milan; Indrová, Marie

    2016-08-01

    To elucidate the immunological mechanisms critical for tumor progression, we bred novel mouse strains, different in the NKC and H-2D domains. We used inbreeding to generate hybrids of Balb/c and C57BL/6 of stable H-2Db+d-NK1.1neg and H-2Db-d+NK1.1high phenotypes. We analyzed the growth of three established MHC class I-deficient tumor cell lines: TC-1/A9 tumor (HPV-associated) and B16F10 melanoma, both syngeneic to C57BL/6, and the MCB8 (3-methycholanthrene-induced tumor) syngeneic to Balb/c. Furthermore, we induced colorectal carcinoma by azoxymethane-DSS treatment to test the susceptibility to chemically-induced primary cancer. We found that the novel strains spontaneously regressed the tumor transplants syngeneic to both Balb/c (MCB8) and C57BL/6 (B16F10 and TC-1/A9) mice. The H2-Db+d-NK1.1neg, but not the H2-Db-d+NK1.1high strain was also highly resistant to chemically-induced colorectal cancer in comparison to the parental mice. The immune changes during TC-1/A9 cancer development involved an increase of the NK cell distribution in the peripheral blood and spleen along with higher expression of NKG2D activation antigen; this was in correlation with the time-dependent rise of cytotoxic activity in comparison to C57BL/6 mice. The TC-1/A9 cancer regression was accompanied by higher proportion of B cells in the spleen and B220+/CD86+ activated antigen-presenting B cells distributed in the lymphoid organs, as well as in the periphery. The changes in the T-cell population were represented mainly by the prevalence of T helper cells reflected by grown CD4/CD8 ratio, most prominent in the b+d-NK1.1neg strain. The results of the present study imply usefulness of the two novel mouse strains as an experimental model for further studies of tumor resistance mechanisms. PMID:27279019

  8. Dissection of the role of MHC class II A and E genes in autoimmune susceptibility in murine lupus models with intragenic recombination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Danqing; Fujio, Keishi; Jiang, Yi; Zhao, Jingyuan; Tada, Norihiro; Sudo, Katsuko; Tsurui, Hiromichi; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Nishimura, Hiroyuki; Shira, Toshikazu; Hirose, Sachiko

    2004-09-21

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multigenic autoimmune disease, and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II polymorphism serves as a key genetic element. In SLE-prone (NZB x NZW)F(1) mice, the MHC H-2(d/z) heterozygosity (H-2(d) of NZB and H-2(z) of NZW) has a strong impact on disease; thus, congenic H-2(d/d) homozygous F(1) mice do not develop severe disease. In this study, we used Ea-deficient intra-H-2 recombination to establish A(d/d)-congenic (NZB x NZW)F(1) mice, with or without E molecule expression, and dissected the role of class II A and E molecules. Here we found that A(d/d) homozygous F(1) mice lacking E molecules developed severe SLE similar to that seen in wild-type F1 mice, including lupus nephritis, autoantibody production, and spontaneously occurring T cell activation. Additional evidence revealed that E molecules prevent the disease in a dose-dependent manner; however, the effect is greatly influenced by the haplotype of A molecules, because wild-type H-2(d/z) F(1) mice develop SLE, despite E molecule expression. Studies on the potential of dendritic cells to present a self-antigen chromatin indicated that dendritic cells from wild-type F(1) mice induced a greater response of chromatin-specific T cells than did those from A(d/d) F(1) mice, irrespective of the presence or absence of E molecules, suggesting that the self-antigen presentation is mediated by A, but not by E, molecules. Our mouse models are useful for analyzing the molecular mechanisms by which MHC class II regions regulate the process of autoimmune responses. PMID:15361580

  9. Proteomic screening identifies calreticulin as a miR-27a direct target repressing MHC class I cell surface exposure in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, T; Polcaro, G; Ziccardi, P; Pucci, B; Muccillo, L; Galgani, M; Fucci, A; Milone, M R; Budillon, A; Santopaolo, M; Votino, C; Pancione, M; Piepoli, A; Mazzoccoli, G; Binaschi, M; Bigioni, M; Maggi, C A; Fassan, M; Laudanna, C; Matarese, G; Sabatino, L; Colantuoni, V

    2016-01-01

    Impairment of the immune response and aberrant expression of microRNAs are emerging hallmarks of tumour initiation/progression, in addition to driver gene mutations and epigenetic modifications. We performed a preliminary survey of independent adenoma and colorectal cancer (CRC) miRnoma data sets and, among the most dysregulated miRNAs, we selected miR-27a and disclosed that it is already upregulated in adenoma and further increases during the evolution to adenocarcinoma. To identify novel genes and pathways regulated by this miRNA, we employed a differential 2DE-DIGE proteome analysis. We showed that miR-27a modulates a group of proteins involved in MHC class I cell surface exposure and, mechanistically, demonstrated that calreticulin is a miR-27a direct target responsible for most downstream effects in epistasis experiments. In vitro miR-27a affected cell proliferation and angiogenesis; mouse xenografts of human CRC cell lines expressing different miR-27a levels confirmed the protein variations and recapitulated the cell growth and apoptosis effects. In vivo miR-27a inversely correlated with MHC class I molecules and calreticulin expression, CD8+ T cells infiltration and cytotoxic activity (LAMP-1 exposure and perforin release). Tumours with high miR-27a, low calreticulin and CD8+ T cells' infiltration were associated with distant metastasis and poor prognosis. Our data demonstrate that miR-27a acts as an oncomiRNA, represses MHC class I expression through calreticulin downregulation and affects tumour progression. These results may pave the way for better diagnosis, patient stratification and novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26913609

  10. MHC class II super-enhancer increases surface expression of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ and affects cytokine production in autoimmune vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Cavalli, Giulio; Hayashi, Masahiro; Jin, Ying; Yorgov, Daniel; Santorico, Stephanie A.; Holcomb, Cherie; Rastrou, Melinda; Erlich, Henry; Tengesdal, Isak W.; Dagna, Lorenzo; Neff, C. Preston; Palmer, Brent E.; Spritz, Richard A.; Dinarello, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic risk for autoimmunity in HLA genes is most often attributed to structural specificity resulting in presentation of self-antigens. Autoimmune vitiligo is strongly associated with the MHC class II region. Here, we fine-map vitiligo MHC class II genetic risk to three SNPs only 47 bp apart, located within a predicted super-enhancer in an intergenic region between HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQA1, localized by a genome-wide association study of 2,853 Caucasian vitiligo patients. The super-enhancer corresponds to an expression quantitative trait locus for expression of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ RNA; we observed elevated surface expression of HLA-DR (P = 0.008) and HLA-DQ (P = 0.02) on monocytes from healthy subjects homozygous for the high-risk SNP haplotype. Unexpectedly, pathogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from subjects homozygous for the high-risk super-enhancer haplotype exhibited greater increase in production of IFN-γ and IL-1β than cells from subjects homozygous for the low-risk haplotype. Specifically, production of IFN-γ on stimulation of dectin-1, mannose, and Toll-like receptors with Candida albicans and Staphylococcus epidermidis was 2.5- and 2.9-fold higher in high-risk subjects than in low-risk subjects, respectively (P = 0.007 and P = 0.01). Similarly, production of IL-1β was fivefold higher in high-risk subjects than in low-risk subjects (P = 0.02). Increased production of immunostimulatory cytokines in subjects carrying the high-risk haplotype may act as an “adjuvant” during the presentation of autoantigens, tying together genetic variation in the MHC with the development of autoimmunity. This study demonstrates that for risk of autoimmune vitiligo, expression level of HLA class II molecules is as or more important than antigen specificity. PMID:26787888

  11. Structure and evolution of a new avian MHC class II B gene in a sub-Antarctic seabird, the thin-billed prion (Procellariiformes: Pachyptila belcheri).

    PubMed

    Silva, Mónica C; Edwards, Scott V

    2009-03-01

    The major histocompatibility complex encodes molecules that present foreign peptides to T cells of the immune system. The peptide binding region (PBR) of these molecules is among the most polymorphic regions found in vertebrate taxa. Genomic cloning approaches are improving our understanding of the evolution of this multigene family in nonmodel avian groups. By building a cosmid library, a new MHC class II B gene, Pabe-DAB1, was isolated and characterized at the genomic level in a sub-Antarctic seabird, the thin-billed prion (Pachyptila belcheri). Pabe-DAB1 exhibits the hallmark structural features of functional MHC class II loci. Direct sequencing of the PBR encoding exon in a panel of prions revealed significantly higher levels of genetic diversity compared to two noncoding neutral loci, with most alleles differing by at least one replacement substitution in the peptide binding codons. We estimated evolutionary dynamics for Pabe-DAB1 using a variety of Bayesian and other approaches. Evidence for balancing selection comes from a spatially variable ratio of nonsynonymous-to-synonymous substitutions (mean d (N)/d (S) = 2.87) in the PBR, with sites predicted to be functionally relevant exhibiting the highest omega values. We estimate the population recombination rate to be approximately 0.3 per site per generation, indicating an important role for recombination in generating polymorphism at this locus. Pabe-DAB1 is among the few avian class II loci characterized at the genomic level and with a known intron-exon structure, a feature that greatly facilitated the amplification and sequencing of a single MHC locus in this species. PMID:19209378

  12. Structure of the N-linked oligosaccharides of MHC class I molecules from cells deficient in the antigenic peptide transporter. Implications for the site of peptide association.

    PubMed

    Hayes, B K; Esquivel, F; Bennink, J R; Yewdell, J W; Varki, A

    1995-10-15

    Class I molecules are N-linked glycoproteins encoded by the MHC. They carry cytosolic protein-derived peptides to the cell surface, displaying them to enable immune surveillance of cellular processes. Peptides are delivered to class I molecules by the transporter associated with Ag processing (TAP). Peptide association is known to occur before exposure of class I molecules to the medial Golgi-processing enzyme alpha-mannosidase II, but there is limited information regarding the location or timing of peptide binding within the earlier regions of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi pathway. A reported association of newly synthesized class I molecules with the ER chaperonin calnexin raises the possibility of persistence of the monoglycosylated N-linked oligosaccharide (NLO) Glc1Man8GlcNAc2, known to be recognized by this lectin. To explore these matters, we determined the structure of the NLOs on the subset of newly synthesized class I molecules awaiting the loading of peptide. We pulse-labeled murine MHC H-2Db class I molecules in RMA/S cells, which lack one of the TAP subunits, causing the great majority of the molecules to be retained for prolonged periods in an early secretory compartment, awaiting peptide binding. MHC molecules pulse-labeled with [3H]glucosamine were isolated, the NLOs specifically released and structurally analyzed by a variety of techniques. Within the chosen window of biosynthetic time, most Db molecules from parental RMA cells carried mature NLOs of the biantennary complex-type, with one to two sialic acid residues. In RMA/S cells, such chains were in the minority, the majority consisting of the precursor forms Man8GlcNAc2 and Man9GlcNAc2. No glucosylated forms were detected, nor were the later processing intermediates Man5-7GlcNAc2 or GlcNAc1Man4-5GlcNAc2. Thus, most Db molecules in TAP-deficient cells are retained in an early compartment of the secretory pathway, before the point of first access to the Golgi alpha-mannosidase I, which

  13. Quantum chemical calculations predict biological function: the case of T cell receptor interaction with a peptide/MHC class I

    PubMed Central

    Antipas, Georgios S. E.; Germenis, Anastasios E.

    2015-01-01

    A combination of atomic correlation statistics and quantum chemical calculations are shown to predict biological function. In the present study, various antigenic peptide-Major Histocompatibility Complex (pMHC) ligands with near-identical stereochemistries, in complexation with the same T cell receptor (TCR), were found to consistently induce distinctly different quantum chemical behavior, directly dependent on the peptide's electron spin density and intrinsically expressed by the protonation state of the peptide's N-terminus. Furthermore, the cumulative coordination difference of any variant in respect to the native peptide was found to accurately reflect peptide biological function and immerges as the physical observable which is directly related to the immunological end-effect of pMHC-TCR interaction. PMID:25713797

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cif Protein Enhances the Ubiquitination and Proteasomal Degradation of the Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP) and Reduces Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Antigen Presentation*

    PubMed Central

    Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Ely, Kenneth H.; Bangia, Naveen; Ye, Siying; Green, Kathy A.; Green, William R.; Enelow, Richard I.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Cif (PA2934), a bacterial virulence factor secreted in outer membrane vesicles by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, increases the ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of some, but not all, plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC), including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and P-glycoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine whether Cif enhances the ubiquitination and degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2), members of the ABC transporter family that play an essential role in antigen presentation and intracellular pathogen clearance. Cif selectively increased the amount of ubiquitinated TAP1 and increased its degradation in the proteasome of human airway epithelial cells. This effect of Cif was mediated by reducing USP10 deubiquitinating activity, resulting in increased polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TAP1. The reduction in TAP1 abundance decreased peptide antigen translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum, an effect that resulted in reduced antigen available to MHC class I molecules for presentation at the plasma membrane of airway epithelial cells and recognition by CD8+ T cells. Cif is the first bacterial factor identified that inhibits TAP function and MHC class I antigen presentation. PMID:24247241

  15. Differential regulation of expression of the MHC class II molecules RT1.B and RT1.D on rat B lymphocytes: effects of interleukin-4, interleukin-13 and interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, A; Schilder-Tol, E J; Chand, M A; Claessen, N; Lakkis, F G; Pascual, D W; Weening, J J; Aten, J

    1998-01-01

    Susceptibility to induction of both T helper 1- (Th1) and Th2-mediated autoimmunity is multifactorial and involves genetic linkage to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II haplotype. Brown Norway (BN) rats exposed to mercuric chloride develop a Th2-dependent systemic autoimmunity, whereas Lewis rats, which are highly susceptible to Th1-mediated autoimmunity, develop immune suppression after mercuric chloride exposure. Exposure to mercuric chloride is known to enhance B-lymphocyte expression of the MHC class II molecule RT1.B, predominantly in BN rats. We demonstrate that, in contrast, expression of RT1.D was unmodified on these B cells, whereas both RT1.B and RT1.D were up-regulated on epithelial cells. Regulation of B-cell MHC class II isotype expression was further studied in vitro, using BN rat lymph node (LN) cells. Interleukin-4 (IL-4) strongly enhanced B-cell expression of RT1.B (2.8-fold), whereas RT1.D expression was only slightly, although significantly, modified (1.2-fold). B cells from Lewis rats showed a similar IL-4-induced enhancement of RT1.B expression (2.5-fold), whereas, in contrast, RT1.D expression was unmodified. Exposure of LN cells from BN rats to interferon-gamma induced a moderate increase of B-cell MHC class II expression, predominantly of RT1.B. Strong and rapid enhancement of B-cell RT1.D expression was observed after stimulation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin. Rat IL-13 did not modify B-cell MHC class II expression; however, it induced typical morphological changes in peritoneal macrophages. These experiments demonstrate isotype-specific and strain-dependent regulation of MHC class II expression on rat B lymphocytes, which may be of pathophysiological relevance for the strain-dependent susceptibility for Th1- or Th2-mediated autoimmunity. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 PMID:9536116

  16. Adaptor protein complexes AP-1 and AP-3 are required by the HHV-7 Immunoevasin U21 for rerouting of class I MHC molecules to the lysosomal compartment.

    PubMed

    Kimpler, Lisa A; Glosson, Nicole L; Downs, Deanna; Gonyo, Patrick; May, Nathan A; Hudson, Amy W

    2014-01-01

    The human herpesvirus-7 (HHV-7) U21 gene product binds to class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and reroutes them to a lysosomal compartment. Trafficking of integral membrane proteins to lysosomes is mediated through cytoplasmic sorting signals that recruit heterotetrameric clathrin adaptor protein (AP) complexes, which in turn mediate protein sorting in post-Golgi vesicular transport. Since U21 can mediate rerouting of class I molecules to lysosomes even when lacking its cytoplasmic tail, we hypothesize the existence of a cellular protein that contains the lysosomal sorting information required to escort class I molecules to the lysosomal compartment. If such a protein exists, we expect that it might recruit clathrin adaptor protein complexes as a means of lysosomal sorting. Here we describe experiments demonstrating that the μ adaptins from AP-1 and AP-3 are involved in U21-mediated trafficking of class I molecules to lysosomes. These experiments support the idea that a cellular protein(s) is necessary for U21-mediated lysosomal sorting of class I molecules. We also examine the impact of transient versus chronic knockdown of these adaptor protein complexes, and show that the few remaining μ subunits in the cells are eventually able to reroute class I molecules to lysosomes. PMID:24901711

  17. Genetic Variation of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC Class II B Gene) in the Threatened Hume’s Pheasant, Syrmaticus humiae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weicai; Bei, Yongjian; Li, Hanhua

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are the most polymorphic genes in vertebrates and encode molecules that play a crucial role in pathogen resistance. As a result of their diversity, they have received much attention in the fields of evolutionary and conservation biology. Here, we described the genetic variation of MHC class II B (MHCIIB) exon 2 in a wild population of Hume’s pheasant (Syrmaticus humiae), which has suffered a dramatic decline in population over the last three decades across its ranges in the face of heavy exploitation and habitat loss. Twenty-four distinct alleles were found in 73 S. humiae specimens. We found seven shared alleles among four geographical groups as well as six rare MHCIIB alleles. Most individuals displayed between one to five alleles, suggesting that there are at least three MHCIIB loci of the Hume’s pheasant. The dN ⁄ dS ratio at putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) was significantly greater than one, indicating balancing selection is acting on MHCIIB exon 2. Additionally, recombination and gene conversion contributed to generating MHCIIB diversity in the Hume’s pheasant. One to three recombination events and seventy-five significant gene conversion events were observed within the Hume’s pheasant MHCIIB loci. The phylogenetic tree and network analysis revealed that the Hume’s pheasant alleles do not cluster together, but are scattered through the tree or network indicating a trans-species evolutionary mode. These findings revealed the evolution of the Hume’s pheasant MHC after suffering extreme habitat fragmentation. PMID:25629763

  18. Spatial separation of the processing and MHC class I loading compartments for cross-presentation of the tumor-associated antigen HER2/neu by human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Rietscher, René; Diedrich, Andrea; Czaplewska, Justyna A; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Scherließ, Regina; Hanefeld, Andrea; Gottschaldt, Michael; Walden, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cross-presentation is the process by which professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) (B cells, dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages) present endocytosed antigens (Ags) via MHC-I to CD8+ T cells. This process is crucial for induction of adaptive immune responses against tumors and infected cells. The pathways and cellular compartments involved in cross-presentation are unresolved and controversial. Among the cells with cross-presenting capacity, DCs are the most efficient, which was proposed to depend on prevention of endosomal acidification to block degradation of the epitopes. Contrary to this view, we show in this report that some cargoes induce strong endosomal acidification following uptake by human DCs, while others not. Moreover, processing of the tumor-associated antigen HER2/neu delivered in nanoparticles (NP) for cross-presentation of the epitope HER2/neu369–377 on HLA-A2 depended on endosomal acidification and cathepsin activity as well as proteasomes, and newly synthesized HLA class I. However, the HLA-A*0201/HER2/neu369–377 complexes were not found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) nor in endolysosomes but in hitherto not described vesicles. The data thus indicate spatial separation of antigen processing and loading of MHC-I for cross-presentation: antigen processing occurs in the uptake compartment and the cytosol whereas MHC-I loading with peptide takes place in a distinct subcellular compartment. The findings further elucidate the cellular pathways involved in the cross-presentation of a full-length, clinically relevant tumor-associated antigen by human DCs, and the impact of the vaccine formulation on antigen processing and CD8+ T cell induction. PMID:26985398

  19. miR-9 modulates the expression of interferon-regulated genes and MHC class I molecules in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Zhao, Zun-Lan; Zhao, Wen-Tao; Fan, Quan-Rong; Wang, Sheng-Chun; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Shi, Jun-Wen; Lin, Xiao-Lin; Yang, Sheng; Xie, Rao-Ying; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Sun, Yong-Liang; Xu, Kang; Yao, Kai-Tai; Xiao, Dong

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► miR-9 can negatively or positively modulate interferon-induced gene expression. ► miR-9 can up-regulate major histocompatibility complex class I molecule expression. ► miR-9 can down-regulate the expression of interleukin-related genes. -- Abstract: The functions of miR-9 in some cancers are recently implicated in regulating proliferation, epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), invasion and metastasis, apoptosis, and tumor angiogenesis, etc. miR-9 is commonly down-regulated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), but the exact roles of miR-9 dysregulation in the pathogenesis of NPC remains unclear. Therefore, we firstly used miR-9-expressing CNE2 cells to determine the effects of miR-9 overexpression on global gene expression profile by microarray analysis. Microarray-based gene expression data unexpectedly demonstrated a significant number of up- or down-regulated immune- and inflammation-related genes, including many well-known interferon (IFN)-induced genes (e.g., IFI44L, PSMB8, IRF5, PSMB10, IFI27, PSB9{sub H}UMAN, IFIT2, TRAIL, IFIT1, PSB8{sub H}UMAN, IRF1, B2M and GBP1), major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules (e.g., HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-F and HLA-H) and interleukin (IL)-related genes (e.g., IL20RB, GALT, IL7, IL1B, IL11, IL1F8, IL1A, IL6 and IL7R), which was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Moreover, the overexpression of miR-9 with the miRNA mimics significantly up- or down-regulated the expression of above-mentioned IFN-inducible genes, MHC class I molecules and IL-related genes; on the contrary, miR-9 inhibition by anti-miR-9 inhibitor in CNE2 and 5–8F cells correspondingly decreased or increased the aforementioned immune- and inflammation-related genes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that miR-9 can modulate the expression of IFN-induced genes and MHC class I molecules in human cancer cells, suggesting a novel role of miR-9 in linking inflammation and cancer, which remains to be fully characterized.

  20. Lysis of pig endothelium by IL-2 activated human natural killer cells is inhibited by swine and human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I gene products.

    PubMed

    Itescu, S; Artrip, J H; Kwiatkowski, P A; Wang, S F; Minanov, O P; Morgenthau, A S; Michler, R E

    1997-01-01

    We have previously described a form of xenograft rejection, mediated by natural killer (NK) cells, occurring in pig-to-primate organ transplants beyond the period of antibody-mediated hyperacute rejection. In this study, two distinct NK activation pathways were identified as mechanisms of pig aortic endotheliual cell (PAEC) lysis by human NK cells. Using an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay, a progressive increase in human NK lysis of PAEC was observed following incubation with human IgG at increasing serum titer. In the absence of IgG, a second mechanism of PAEC lysis by human NK cells was observed following activation with IL-2. IL-2 activation of human NK cells increased lysis of PAEC by over 3-fold compared with ADCC. These results indicate that IL-2 activation of human NK cells induces significantly higher levels of lytic activity than does conventional ADCC involving IgG and FcRIII. We next investigated the role of MHC class I molecules in the regulation of NK lysis following IL-2 activation. PAEC expression of SLA class I molecules was increased by up to 75% by treatment with human TNFa. Following treatment with TNFa at 1 u/ml, IL-2 activated human NK lysis of PAEC was inhibited at every effector:target (E:T) ratio tested. Maximal effect occurred at an E:T ratio of 10:1, with TNFa inhibiting specific lysis by 59% (p < 0.01). Incubation with an anti-SLA class I Mab, but not IgG isotype control, abrogated the protective effects of TNFa on NK lysis of PAEC, suggesting direct inhibitory effects of SLA class I molecules on human NK function. To investigate whether human MHC class I molecules might have similar effects on human NK lysis of PAEC, further experiments were performed using a soluble peptide derived from the alpha-helical region of HLA-B7. Incubation with the HLA-B7 derived peptide significantly reduced the IL-2 activated NK lytic activity against PAEC in a dose-dependent fashion. Maximal effect occurred at a concentration of 10 mg

  1. An ATF/CREB binding motif is required for aberrant constitutive expression of the MHC class II DR alpha promoter and activation by SV40 T-antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, P M; Goding, C R

    1992-01-01

    Constitutive expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) antigens normally occurs in B-lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. However, many malignant tumours and transformed cells express these proteins aberrantly. We demonstrate here that the MHC II DR alpha promoter is constitutively active both in the SV40 large T antigen transformed cell line, COS, and in CV1 cells from which they are derived. As an approach to understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying aberrant DR alpha expression we have examined the cis- and trans-acting requirements for DR alpha transcription in these cell types. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the region immediately 3' to the X-box was bound by a member of the ATF/CREB family of transcription factors. Using deletions and point mutations in the DR alpha promoter we demonstrate that, in contrast to B-cells, the octamer motif and conserved X- and Y-boxes make only a minor contribution to promoter function while single point mutations in the ATF/CREB motif reduced transcription up to 20-fold. In addition, we show that the DR alpha promoter is activated by SV40 large T-antigen and that activation requires an intact ATF/CREB motif. Similar data were obtained using B16 melanoma cells. These results suggest that the ATF/CREB motif may be a target for transcription deregulation in several transformed cell types. Images PMID:1329030

  2. Reversal of epigenetic silencing of MHC class I chain-related protein A and B improves immune recognition of Merkel cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Cathrin; Fan, Kaiji; Paulson, Kelly G.; Nghiem, Paul; Schrama, David; Becker, Jürgen C.

    2016-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a virally associated cancer characterized by its aggressive behavior and strong immunogenicity. Both viral infection and malignant transformation induce expression of MHC class I chain-related protein (MIC) A and B, which signal stress to cells of the immune system via Natural Killer group 2D (NKG2D) resulting in elimination of target cells. However, despite transformation and the continued presence of virally-encoded proteins, MICs are only expressed in a minority of MCC tumors in situ and are completely absent on MCC cell lines in vitro. This lack of MIC expression was due to epigenetic silencing via MIC promoter hypo-acetylation; indeed, MIC expression was re-induced by pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) both in vitro and in vivo. This re-induction of MICs rendered MCC cells more sensitive to immune-mediated lysis. Thus, epigenetic silencing of MICs is an important immune escape mechanism of MCCs. PMID:26902929

  3. MHC Class I-Restricted Myelin Epitopes Are Cross-Presented by Tip-DCs That Promote Determinant Spreading to CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Qingyong; Castelli, Luca; Goverman, Joan M.

    2013-01-01

    Myelin presentation to T cells within the central nervous system (CNS) sustains inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS). CD4+ and CD8+ T cells contribute to MS; however, only cells that present myelin to CD4+ T cells have been identified. We show that MHC class I-restricted myelin basic protein (MBP) was presented by oligodendrocytes and cross-presented by Tip-dendritic cells (DCs) during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS initiated by CD4+ T cells. Tip-DCs activated naïve and effector CD8+ T cells ex vivo, and naïve MBP-specific CD8+ T cells were activated within the CNS during CD4+ T cell-induced EAE. These results demonstrate that CD4+ T cell-mediated CNS autoimmunity leads to determinant spreading to myelin-specific CD8+ T cells that are capable of direct recognition of oligodendrocytes. PMID:23291597

  4. Selection and Phylogenetics of Salmonid MHC Class I: Wild Brown Trout (Salmo trutta) Differ from a Non-Native Introduced Strain

    PubMed Central

    O'Farrell, Brian; Benzie, John A. H.; McGinnity, Phil; de Eyto, Elvira; Dillane, Eileen; Coughlan, James; Cross, Tom F.

    2013-01-01

    We tested how variation at a gene of adaptive importance, MHC class I (UBA), in a wild, endemic Salmo trutta population compared to that in both a previously studied non-native S. trutta population and a co-habiting Salmo salar population (a sister species). High allelic diversity is observed and allelic divergence is much higher than that noted previously for co-habiting S. salar. Recombination was found to be important to population-level divergence. The α1 and α2 domains of UBA demonstrate ancient lineages but novel lineages are also identified at both domains in this work. We also find examples of recombination between UBA and the non-classical locus, ULA. Evidence for strong diversifying selection was found at a discrete suite of S. trutta UBA amino acid sites. The pattern was found to contrast with that found in re-analysed UBA data from an artificially stocked S. trutta population. PMID:23667568

  5. Analysis of endogenous peptides bound by soluble MHC class I molecules: a novel approach for identifying tumor-specific antigens.

    PubMed

    Barnea, Eilon; Beer, Ilan; Patoka, Renana; Ziv, Tamar; Kessler, Ofra; Tzehoval, Esther; Eisenbach, Lea; Zavazava, Nicholas; Admon, Arie

    2002-01-01

    The Human MHC Project aims at comprehensive cataloging of peptides presented within the context of different human leukocyte antigens (HLA) expressed by cells of various tissue origins, both in health and in disease. Of major interest are peptides presented on cancer cells, which include peptides derived from tumor antigens that are of interest for immunotherapy. Here, HLA-restricted tumor-specific antigens were identified by transfecting human breast, ovarian and prostate tumor cell lines with truncated genes of HLA-A2 and HLA-B7. Soluble HLA secreted by these cell lines were purified by affinity chromatography and analyzed by nano-capillary electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Typically, a large peptide pool was recovered and sequenced including peptides derived from MAGE-B2 and mucin and other new tumor-derived antigens that may serve as potential candidates for immunotherapy. PMID:11782012

  6. Class I T-cell epitope prediction: improvements using a combination of proteasome cleavage, TAP affinity, and MHC binding.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Flower, Darren R

    2006-05-01

    Cleavage by the proteasome is responsible for generating the C terminus of T-cell epitopes. Modeling the process of proteasome cleavage as part of a multi-step algorithm for T-cell epitope prediction will reduce the number of non-binders and increase the overall accuracy of the predictive algorithm. Quantitative matrix-based models for prediction of the proteasome cleavage sites in a protein were developed using a training set of 489 naturally processed T-cell epitopes (nonamer peptides) associated with HLA-A and HLA-B molecules. The models were validated using an external test set of 227 T-cell epitopes. The performance of the models was good, identifying 76% of the C-termini correctly. The best model of proteasome cleavage was incorporated as the first step in a three-step algorithm for T-cell epitope prediction, where subsequent steps predicted TAP affinity and MHC binding using previously derived models. PMID:16524630

  7. Transport and intracellular distribution of MHC class II molecules and associated invariant chain in normal and antigen-processing mutant cell lines.

    PubMed

    Riberdy, J M; Avva, R R; Geuze, H J; Cresswell, P

    1994-06-01

    We have compared the intracellular transport and subcellular distribution of MHC class II-invariant chain complexes in a wild-type HLA-DR3 homozygous cell line and a mutant cell line, T2.DR3. The latter has a defect in antigen processing and accumulates HLA-DR3 molecules associated with an invariant chain-derived peptide (CLIP) rather than the normal complement of peptides derived from endocytosed proteins. We find that in the wild-type cells, CLIP is transiently associated with HLA-DR3 molecules, suggesting that the peptide is a normal class II-associated intermediate generated during proteolysis of the invariant chain. In the mutant cell line proteolysis of the invariant chain is less efficient, and HLA-DR3/CLIP complexes are generated much more slowly. Examination of the mutant cell line by immunoelectronmicroscopy shows that class II-invariant chain complexes accumulate intracellularly in large acidic vesicles which contain lysosomal markers, including beta-hexosaminidase, cathepsin D, and the lysosomal membrane protein CD63. The markers in these vesicles are identical to those seen in the class II-containing vesicles (MIICs) seen in the wild-type cells but the morphology is drastically different. The vesicles in the mutant cells are endocytic, as measured by the internalization of BSA-gold conjugates. The implication of these findings for antigen processing in general and the nature of the mutation in particular are discussed. PMID:8207055

  8. HLA-DRB1*11 and variants of the MHC class II locus are strong risk factors for systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ombrello, Michael J; Remmers, Elaine F; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Grom, Alexei; Foell, Dirk; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Martini, Alberto; Gattorno, Marco; Özen, Seza; Prahalad, Sampath; Zeft, Andrew S; Bohnsack, John F; Mellins, Elizabeth D; Ilowite, Norman T; Russo, Ricardo; Len, Claudio; Hilario, Maria Odete E; Oliveira, Sheila; Yeung, Rae S M; Rosenberg, Alan; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Anton, Jordi; Schwarz, Tobias; Hinks, Anne; Bilginer, Yelda; Park, Jane; Cobb, Joanna; Satorius, Colleen L; Han, Buhm; Baskin, Elizabeth; Signa, Sara; Duerr, Richard H; Achkar, J P; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Kottyan, Leah C; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen W; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Docampo, Elisa; Estivill, Xavier; Gül, Ahmet; de Bakker, Paul I W; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Langefeld, Carl D; Thompson, Susan; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Thomson, Wendy; Kastner, Daniel L; Woo, Patricia

    2015-12-29

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is an often severe, potentially life-threatening childhood inflammatory disease, the pathophysiology of which is poorly understood. To determine whether genetic variation within the MHC locus on chromosome 6 influences sJIA susceptibility, we performed an association study of 982 children with sJIA and 8,010 healthy control subjects from nine countries. Using meta-analysis of directly observed and imputed SNP genotypes and imputed classic HLA types, we identified the MHC locus as a bona fide susceptibility locus with effects on sJIA risk that transcended geographically defined strata. The strongest sJIA-associated SNP, rs151043342 [P = 2.8 × 10(-17), odds ratio (OR) 2.6 (2.1, 3.3)], was part of a cluster of 482 sJIA-associated SNPs that spanned a 400-kb region and included the class II HLA region. Conditional analysis controlling for the effect of rs151043342 found that rs12722051 independently influenced sJIA risk [P = 1.0 × 10(-5), OR 0.7 (0.6, 0.8)]. Meta-analysis of imputed classic HLA-type associations in six study populations of Western European ancestry revealed that HLA-DRB1*11 and its defining amino acid residue, glutamate 58, were strongly associated with sJIA [P = 2.7 × 10(-16), OR 2.3 (1.9, 2.8)], as was the HLA-DRB1*11-HLA-DQA1*05-HLA-DQB1*03 haplotype [6.4 × 10(-17), OR 2.3 (1.9, 2.9)]. By examining the MHC locus in the largest collection of sJIA patients assembled to date, this study solidifies the relationship between the class II HLA region and sJIA, implicating adaptive immune molecules in the pathogenesis of sJIA. PMID:26598658

  9. HLA-DRB1*11 and variants of the MHC class II locus are strong risk factors for systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ombrello, Michael J.; Remmers, Elaine F.; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Grom, Alexei; Foell, Dirk; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Martini, Alberto; Gattorno, Marco; Özen, Seza; Prahalad, Sampath; Zeft, Andrew S.; Bohnsack, John F.; Mellins, Elizabeth D.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Russo, Ricardo; Len, Claudio; Hilario, Maria Odete E.; Oliveira, Sheila; Yeung, Rae S. M.; Rosenberg, Alan; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Anton, Jordi; Schwarz, Tobias; Hinks, Anne; Bilginer, Yelda; Park, Jane; Cobb, Joanna; Satorius, Colleen L.; Han, Buhm; Baskin, Elizabeth; Signa, Sara; Duerr, Richard H.; Achkar, J. P.; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kottyan, Leah C.; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen W.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Docampo, Elisa; Estivill, Xavier; Gül, Ahmet; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Langefeld, Carl D.; Thompson, Susan; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Thomson, Wendy; Kastner, Daniel L.; Woo, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is an often severe, potentially life-threatening childhood inflammatory disease, the pathophysiology of which is poorly understood. To determine whether genetic variation within the MHC locus on chromosome 6 influences sJIA susceptibility, we performed an association study of 982 children with sJIA and 8,010 healthy control subjects from nine countries. Using meta-analysis of directly observed and imputed SNP genotypes and imputed classic HLA types, we identified the MHC locus as a bona fide susceptibility locus with effects on sJIA risk that transcended geographically defined strata. The strongest sJIA-associated SNP, rs151043342 [P = 2.8 × 10−17, odds ratio (OR) 2.6 (2.1, 3.3)], was part of a cluster of 482 sJIA-associated SNPs that spanned a 400-kb region and included the class II HLA region. Conditional analysis controlling for the effect of rs151043342 found that rs12722051 independently influenced sJIA risk [P = 1.0 × 10−5, OR 0.7 (0.6, 0.8)]. Meta-analysis of imputed classic HLA-type associations in six study populations of Western European ancestry revealed that HLA-DRB1*11 and its defining amino acid residue, glutamate 58, were strongly associated with sJIA [P = 2.7 × 10−16, OR 2.3 (1.9, 2.8)], as was the HLA-DRB1*11—HLA-DQA1*05—HLA-DQB1*03 haplotype [6.4 × 10−17, OR 2.3 (1.9, 2.9)]. By examining the MHC locus in the largest collection of sJIA patients assembled to date, this study solidifies the relationship between the class II HLA region and sJIA, implicating adaptive immune molecules in the pathogenesis of sJIA. PMID:26598658

  10. Understanding MHC Class I Presentation of Viral Antigens by Human Dendritic Cells as a Basis for Rational Design of Therapeutic Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    van Montfoort, Nadine; van der Aa, Evelyn; Woltman, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective viral clearance requires the induction of virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Since dendritic cells (DC) have a central role in initiating and shaping virus-specific CTL responses, it is important to understand how DC initiate virus-specific CTL responses. Some viruses can directly infect DC, which theoretically allow direct presentation of viral antigens to CTL, but many viruses target other cells than DC and thus the host depends on the cross-presentation of viral antigens by DC to activate virus-specific CTL. Research in mouse models has highly enhanced our understanding of the mechanisms underlying cross-presentation and the dendritic cells (DC) subsets involved, however, these results cannot be readily translated toward the role of human DC in MHC class I-antigen presentation of human viruses. Here, we summarize the insights gained in the past 20 years on MHC class I presentation of viral antigen by human DC and add to the current debate on the capacities of different human DC subsets herein. Furthermore, possible sources of viral antigens and essential DC characteristics for effective induction of virus-specific CTL are evaluated. We conclude that cross-presentation is not only an efficient mechanism exploited by DC to initiate immunity to viruses that do not infect DC but also to viruses that do infect DC, because cross-presentation has many conceptual advantages and bypasses direct immune modulatory effects of the virus on its infected target cells. Since knowledge on the mechanism of viral antigen presentation and the preferred DC subsets is crucial for rational vaccine design, the obtained insights are very instrumental for the development of effective anti-viral immunotherapy. PMID:24795724

  11. MHC class II derived recombinant T cell receptor ligands protect DBA/1LacJ mice from collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Huan, Jianya; Kaler, Laurie J; Mooney, Jeffery L; Subramanian, Sandhya; Hopke, Corwyn; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Rosloniec, Edward F; Burrows, Gregory G; Offner, Halina

    2008-01-15

    We previously demonstrated the therapeutic effects of MHC class II derived recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTL), single-chain two domain complexes of the alpha1 and beta1 domains of MHC class II molecules genetically linked with an immunodominant peptide, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In the current study, we produced a monomeric murine I-Aq-derived RTL construct covalently linked with bovine collagen type II peptide (bCII257-270) suitable for use in DBA/1LacJ mice that develop collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an animal model of human rheumatoid arthritis, after immunization with bCII protein in CFA. In this study, we demonstrate that the I-Aq-derived RTLs reduced the incidence of the disease, suppressed the clinical and histological signs of CIA and induced long-term modulation of T cells specific for arthritogenic Ags. Our results showed that the I-Aq/bCII257-270 molecule could systemically reduce proinflammatory IL-17 and IFN-gamma production and significantly increase anti-inflammatory IL-10, IL-13, and FoxP3 gene expression in splenocytes. Moreover, I-Aq/bCII257-270 molecule could also selectively inhibit IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-23 expression in local joint tissue. This is the first report demonstrating effective prevention of joint inflammation and clinical signs of CIA with an I-Aq-derived RTL, thus supporting the possible clinical use of this approach for treating rheumatoid arthritis in humans. PMID:18178865

  12. MHC Class II Derived Recombinant T Cell Receptor Ligands Protect DBA/1LacJ Mice from Collagen-Induced Arthritis1

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Jianya; Kaler, Laurie J.; Mooney, Jeffery L.; Subramanian, Sandhya; Hopke, Corwyn; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Rosloniec, Edward F.; Burrows, Gregory G.; Offner, Halina

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the therapeutic effects of MHC class II derived recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTL), single-chain two domain complexes of the α1 and β1 domains of MHC class II molecules genetically linked with an immunodominant peptide, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In the current study, we produced a monomeric murine I-Aq-derived RTL construct covalently linked with bovine collagen type II peptide (bCII257–270) suitable for use in DBA/1LacJ mice that develop collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an animal model of human rheumatoid arthritis, after immunization with bCII protein in CFA. In this study, we demonstrate that the I-Aq-derived RTLs reduced the incidence of the disease, suppressed the clinical and histological signs of CIA and induced long-term modulation of T cells specific for arthritogenic Ags. Our results showed that the I-Aq/bCII257–270 molecule could systemically reduce proinflammatory IL-17 and IFN-γ production and significantly increase anti-inflammatory IL-10, IL-13, and FoxP3 gene expression in splenocytes. Moreover, I-Aq/bCII257–270 molecule could also selectively inhibit IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-23 expression in local joint tissue. This is the first report demonstrating effective prevention of joint inflammation and clinical signs of CIA with an I-Aq-derived RTL, thus supporting the possible clinical use of this approach for treating rheumatoid arthritis in humans. PMID:18178865

  13. A novel strategy for the identification of antigens that are recognised by bovine MHC class I restricted cytotoxic T cells in a protozoan infection using reverse vaccinology

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Simon P; Honda, Yoshikazu; Pellé, Roger; Mwangi, Duncan M; Glew, E Jane; de Villiers, Etienne P; Shah, Trushar; Bishop, Richard; van der Bruggen, Pierre; Nene, Vishvanath; Taracha, Evans LN

    2007-01-01

    Background Immunity against the bovine protozoan parasite Theileria parva has previously been shown to be mediated through lysis of parasite-infected cells by MHC class I restricted CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. It is hypothesized that identification of CTL target schizont antigens will aid the development of a sub-unit vaccine. We exploited the availability of the complete genome sequence data and bioinformatics tools to identify genes encoding secreted or membrane anchored proteins that may be processed and presented by the MHC class I molecules of infected cells to CTL. Results Of the 986 predicted open reading frames (ORFs) encoded by chromosome 1 of the T. parva genome, 55 were selected based on the presence of a signal peptide and/or a transmembrane helix domain. Thirty six selected ORFs were successfully cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector, transiently transfected into immortalized bovine skin fibroblasts and screened in vitro using T. parva-specific CTL. Recognition of gene products by CTL was assessed using an IFN-γ ELISpot assay. A 525 base pair ORF encoding a 174 amino acid protein, designated Tp2, was identified by T. parva-specific CTL from 4 animals. These CTL recognized and lysed Tp2 transfected skin fibroblasts and recognized 4 distinct epitopes. Significantly, Tp2 specific CD8+ T cell responses were observed during the protective immune response against sporozoite challenge. Conclusion The identification of an antigen containing multiple CTL epitopes and its apparent immunodominance during a protective anti-parasite response makes Tp2 an attractive candidate for evaluation of its vaccine potential. PMID:17291333

  14. MHC class II restricted innate-like double negative T cells contribute to optimal primary and secondary immunity to Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Mou, Zhirong; Liu, Dong; Okwor, Ifeoma; Jia, Ping; Orihara, Kanami; Uzonna, Jude Ezeh

    2014-09-01

    Although it is generally believed that CD4(+) T cells play important roles in anti-Leishmania immunity, some studies suggest that they may be dispensable, and that MHC II-restricted CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) (double negative, DN) T cells may be more important in regulating primary anti-Leishmania immunity. In addition, while there are reports of increased numbers of DN T cells in Leishmania-infected patients, dogs and mice, concrete evidence implicating these cells in secondary anti-Leishmania immunity has not yet been documented. Here, we report that DN T cells extensively proliferate and produce effector cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF and IL-17) and granzyme B (GrzB) in the draining lymph nodes and spleens of mice following primary and secondary L. major infections. DN T cells from healed mice display functional characteristics of protective anti-Leishmania memory-like cells: rapid and extensive proliferation and effector cytokines production following L. major challenge in vitro and in vivo. DN T cells express predominantly (> 95%) alpha-beta T cell receptor (αβ TCR), are Leishmania-specific, restricted mostly by MHC class II molecules and display transcriptional profile of innate-like genes. Using in vivo depletion and adoptive transfer studies, we show that DN T cells contribute to optimal primary and secondary anti-Leishmania immunity in mice. These results directly identify DN T cells as important players in effective and protective primary and secondary anti-L. major immunity in experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:25233487

  15. FcR blocking activity in serum of actively enhanced rat renal allograft recipients due to IgG anti-class II MHC alloantibody.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, H E; Bolton, E M; Gracie, J A; Cocker, J E; Sandilands, G P; Bradley, J A

    1990-01-01

    In some rat strain combinations, pre-operative donor-specific blood transfusion produces long-term renal allograft survival, although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. This study has examined whether Fc receptor (FcR)-blocking activity could be detected in the serum of unmodified PVG strain recipients bearing a rejecting renal allograft and in recipients bearing an actively enhanced graft following pre-operative blood transfusion. Serum harvested on Day 5 from actively enhanced PVG recipients of DA rat renal allografts was shown to specifically inhibit erythrocyte-antibody (EA) rosette formation with donor strain, but not third-party, splenocytes, while the levels of EA rosette inhibition (EAI) in Day 5 serum from rejecting rats remained markedly lower. This FcR-blocking activity was present in enhanced serum fractions, prepared by discontinuous density gradient centrifugation, which corresponded to the 7 S peak. Purified IgG prepared from enhanced serum was also found to inhibit EA rosette formation with donor splenocytes, and absorption of the IgG preparations with donor strain erythrocytes failed to abrogate EA rosette inhibition. Further experiments, in which absorbed IgG from enhanced animals was tested for FcR blocking activity against splenocytes of defined major histocompatability complex (MHC) subregion specificities, established that FcR-blocking activity was mediated by IgG alloantibodies directed against donor MHC class II antigens. Whether the presence of such antibodies early after transplantation contributes to the beneficial effect of blood transfusion on graft survival remains to be determined. PMID:2312162

  16. Structural basis of diverse peptide accommodation by the rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule Mamu-B*17: insights into immune protection from simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Gao, Feng; Liu, Jun; Qi, Jianxun; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A; Gao, George F

    2011-12-15

    The MHC class I molecule Mamu-B*17 has been associated with elite control of SIV infection in rhesus macaques, akin to the protective effects described for HLA-B*57 in HIV-infected individuals. In this study, we determined the crystal structures of Mamu-B*17 in complex with eight different peptides corresponding to immunodominant SIV(mac)239-derived CD8(+) T cell epitopes: HW8 (HLEVQGYW), GW10 (GSHLEVQGYW), MW9 (MHPAQTSQW), QW9 (QTSQWDDPW), FW9 (FQWMGYELW), MF8 (MRHVLEPF), IW9 (IRYPKTFGW), and IW11 (IRYPKTFGWLW). The structures reveal that not only P2, but also P1 and P3, can be used as N-terminal anchor residues by Mamu-B*17-restricted peptides. Moreover, the N-terminal anchor residues exhibit a broad chemical specificity, encompassing basic (H and R), bulky polar aliphatic (Q), and small (T) residues. In contrast, Mamu-B*17 exhibits a very narrow preference for aromatic residues (W and F) at the C terminus, similar to that displayed by HLA-B*57. Flexibility within the whole peptide-binding groove contributes to the accommodation of these diverse peptides, which adopt distinct conformations. Furthermore, the unusually large pocket D enables compensation from other peptide residues if P3 is occupied by an amino acid with a small side chain. In addition, residues located at likely TCR contact regions present highly flexible conformations, which may impact TCR repertoire profiles. These findings provide novel insights into the structural basis of diverse peptide accommodation by Mamu-B*17 and highlight unique atomic features that might contribute to the protective effect of this MHC I molecule in SIV-infected rhesus macaques. PMID:22084443

  17. Methylation status and transcriptional expression of the MHC class I loci in human trophoblast cells from term placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Guillaudeux, T.; Rodriguez, A.M.; Girr, M.

    1995-04-01

    Of the various molecular regulatory mechanisms that may be used by human trophoblast cells to down-regulate expression of HLA class I genes, we chose to investigate the methylation of DNA, generally associated with inhibition of transcription. We analyzed the methylation status of different HLA class I loci in villous and extravillous cytotrophoblast cells and in vitro-differentiated syncytiotrophoblast, purified from human term placenta, as well as in the human trophoblast-derived JAR and JEG-3 cell lines. We then compared methylation status and transcriptional activity. An inverse relationship was established between JAR and JEG-3: HLA-A, -B, and -G are methylated and repressed in JAR, whereas in JEG-3, HLA-A is methylated and repressed but HLA-B and -G are partially methylated and transcribed. HLA-E is unmethylated and transcribed in both cell lines. Apart from HLA-E, which is always unmethylated and transcribed, no such relationship exists for the other class I loci in trophoblast cells. Whereas nonclassical HLA-G and classical HLA-A and -B class I genes are undermethylated in both cytotrophoblast and syncytiotrophoblast, they are clearly transcribed in the former but minimally transcribed in the latter subpopulation. Thus, the down-regulation of class I gene expression in the in vitro-differentiated synctiotrophoblast is unlikely to be caused by DNA methylation. Furthermore, there is no detectable expression of any class I molecule at the cell surface of either trophoblast cell subpopulation, suggesting a negative control on translation and/or on the secretory pathway to the plasma membrane. 50 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Interaction Analysis between HLA-DRB1 Shared Epitope Alleles and MHC Class II Transactivator CIITA Gene with Regard to Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ronninger, Marcus; Seddighzadeh, Maria; Eike, Morten Christoph; Plant, Darren; Daha, Nina A.; Skinningsrud, Beate; Worthington, Jane; Kvien, Tore K.; Toes, Rene E. M.; Lie, Benedicte A.; Alfredsson, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    HLA-DRB1 shared epitope (SE) alleles are the strongest genetic determinants for autoantibody positive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). One of the key regulators in expression of HLA class II receptors is MHC class II transactivator (CIITA). A variant of the CIITA gene has been found to associate with inflammatory diseases. We wanted to explore whether the risk variant rs3087456 in the CIITA gene interacts with the HLA-DRB1 SE alleles regarding the risk of developing RA. We tested this hypothesis in a case-control study with 11767 individuals from four European Caucasian populations (6649 RA cases and 5118 controls). We found no significant additive interaction for risk alleles among Swedish Caucasians with RA (n = 3869, attributable proportion due to interaction (AP) = 0.2, 95%CI: −0.2–0.5) or when stratifying for anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) presence (ACPA positive disease: n = 2945, AP = 0.3, 95%CI: −0.05–0.6, ACPA negative: n = 2268, AP = −0.2, 95%CI: −1.0–0.6). We further found no significant interaction between the main subgroups of SE alleles (DRB1*01, DRB1*04 or DRB1*10) and CIITA. Similar analysis of three independent RA cohorts from British, Dutch and Norwegian populations also indicated an absence of significant interaction between genetic variants in CIITA and SE alleles with regard to RA risk. Our data suggest that risk from the CIITA locus is independent of the major risk for RA from HLA-DRB1 SE alleles, given that no significant interaction between rs3087456 and SE alleles was observed. Since a biological link between products of these genes is evident, the genetic contribution from CIITA and class II antigens in the autoimmune process may involve additional unidentified factors. PMID:22461888

  19. Class I MHC molecules on hematopoietic cells can support intrathymic positive selection of T cell receptor transgenic T cells

    PubMed Central

    Zerrahn, Jens; Volkmann, Ariane; Coles, Mark C.; Held, Werner; Lemonnier, Francois A.; Raulet, David H.

    1999-01-01

    The identity of cells that mediate positive selection of CD8+ T cells was investigated in two T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic systems. Irradiated β2-microglobulin mutant mice or mice with mutations in both the Kb and Db genes were repopulated with fetal liver cells from class I+ TCR transgenic mice. In the case of the 2C TCR, mature transgene-expressing CD8+ T cells appeared in the thymuses of the chimeras and in larger numbers in the peripheral lymphoid organs. These CD8+ T cells were functional, exhibited a naive, resting phenotype, and were mostly thymus-dependent. Their development depended on donor cell class I expression. These results establish that thymic hematopoietic cells can direct positive selection of CD8+ T cells expressing a conventional TCR. In contrast, no significant development of HY (male antigen)–TCR+ CD8+ T cells was observed in class I+ into class I-deficient chimeras. These data suggest that successful positive selection directed by hematopoietic cells depends on specific properties of the TCR or its thymic ligands. The possibility that hematopoietic cell-induced, positive selection occurs only with TCRs that exhibit relatively high avidity interactions with selecting ligands in the thymus is discussed. PMID:10500200

  20. Purification of a novel MHC class I element binding activity from thymus nuclear extracts reveals that thymic RBP-Jkappa/CBF1 binds to NF-kappaB-like elements.

    PubMed

    Shirakata, Y; Shuman, J D; Coligan, J E

    1996-06-15

    We purified a DNA binding protein that recognizes a portion of the MHC class I regulatory element region 1/NF-kappaB binding site whose expression correlates with the expression of a MHC class I transgene in the thymus. The N-terminal amino acid sequence and the molecular size matched the RBP-Jkappa protein, also known as the EBV C-promoter binding factor, CBF1. Anti-peptide sera reactive with RBP-Jkappa/CBF1 also reacted with this protein in gel mobility shift assays. Although RBP-Jkappa/CBF1 is ubiquitously expressed, binding to the MHC class Ia NF-kappaB site was limited to the thymus. Comparison of the DNA binding specificities of RBP-Jkappa/CBF1 in thymic and splenic nuclear extracts revealed strong binding from both extracts to an IFN-beta kappaB site containing the RBP-Jkappa/CBF1 consensus sequence (CGTGGGAA). In contrast, only the thymic nuclear extract showed strong DNA binding activity with probes containing the NF-kappaB recognition sequences present in the MHC class Ia, IL-2Ralpha, and granulocyte-macrophage CSF promoters. Thus, RBP-Jkappa/CBF1 in thymic extracts demonstrates a clearly distinguishable DNA binding specificity that correlates with tissue-specific expression of a class I transgene. This, coupled with the fact that our previous study showed enhanced expression of the transgene in CD4+CD8+ thymocytes, suggests that RBP-Jkappa/CBF1 may play a role in the development of the immune system. PMID:8648111

  1. Complement opsonization of HIV-1 results in a different intracellular processing pattern and enhanced MHC class I presentation by dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Tjomsland, Veronica; Ellegård, Rada; Burgener, Adam; Mogk, Kenzie; Che, Karlhans F; Westmacott, Garrett; Hinkula, Jorma; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Larsson, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Induction of optimal HIV-1-specific T-cell responses, which can contribute to controlling viral infection in vivo, depends on antigen processing and presentation processes occurring in DCs. Opsonization can influence the routing of antigen processing and pathways used for presentation. We studied antigen proteolysis and the role of endocytic receptors in MHC class I (MHCI) and II (MHCII) presentation of antigens derived from HIV-1 in human monocyte-derived immature DCs (IDCs) and mature DCs, comparing free and complement opsonized HIV-1 particles. Opsonization of virions promoted MHCI presentation by DCs, indicating that complement opsonization routes more virions toward the MHCI presentation pathway. Blockade of macrophage mannose receptor (MMR) and β7-integrin enhanced MHCI and MHCII presentation by IDCs and mature DCs, whereas the block of complement receptor 3 decreased MHCI and MHCII presentation. In addition, we found that IDC and MDC proteolytic activities were modulated by HIV-1 exposure; complement-opsonized HIV-1 induced an increased proteasome activity in IDCs. Taken together, these findings indicate that endocytic receptors such as MMR, complement receptor 3, and β7-integrin can promote or disfavor antigen presentation probably by routing HIV-1 into different endosomal compartments with distinct efficiencies for degradation of viral antigens and MHCI and MHCII presentation, and that HIV-1 affects the antigen-processing machinery. PMID:23526630

  2. Down-regulation of poison ivy/oak-induced contact sensitivity by treatment with a class II MHC binding peptide:hapten conjugate.

    PubMed

    Gelber, C; Gemmell, L; McAteer, D; Homola, M; Swain, P; Liu, A; Wilson, K J; Gefter, M

    1997-03-01

    Immune regulation of contact sensitivity to the poison ivy/oak catechol was studied at the level of class II MHC-restricted T cell recognition of hapten:peptide conjugates. In this study we have shown that 1) T cells from C3H/HeN (H-2k) mice, immunized with a synthetic I-Ak binding peptide coupled to 3-pentadecyl-catechol (PDC; a representative catechol in urushiol), recognized peptides derived from syngeneic cells linked to the same catechol; 2) T cells from draining lymph nodes of C3H/HeN mice skin-painted with PDC proliferated in response to a peptide carrier:PDC conjugate only when it was linked at the 7th, but not the 4th or the 10th, position on the peptide carrier; and 3) tolerization studies confirmed down-regulation of PDC-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity following treatment with a single I-Ak binding peptide carrying PDC covalently bound to a lysine residue at the middle (7th) TCR contact position. Tolerization with peptide:PDC conjugate resulted in abrogation of hapten-specific T cell proliferative responses that correlated with diminished IL-2 secretion. On the basis of these data we propose that it may be sufficient to couple the hapten at a single, well-chosen position on a carrier peptide to target a relevant population of T cells involved in contact sensitivity. PMID:9036993

  3. Structure of an α-Helical Peptide and Lipopeptide Bound to the Nonclassical Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Molecule CD1d.

    PubMed

    Girardi, Enrico; Wang, Jing; Zajonc, Dirk M

    2016-05-13

    Mouse CD1d is a nonclassical MHC molecule able to present lipids and glycolipids to a specialized subset of T cells known as natural killer T cells. The antigens presented by CD1d have been shown to cover a broad range of chemical structures and to follow precise rules determining the potency of the antigen in the context of T cell activation. Together with lipids, initial reports suggested that CD1d can also bind and present hydrophobic peptides with (F/W)XX(I/L/M)XXW. However, the exact location of peptide binding and the molecular basis for the required motif are currently unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of the first peptide identified to bind CD1d, p99, and show that it binds in the antigen-binding groove of CD1d in a manner compatible with its presentation to T cell receptors. Interestingly, the peptide adopts an α-helical conformation, which orients the motif residues toward its deep binding groove, therefore explaining the molecular requirements for peptide binding. Moreover, we demonstrate that a lipopeptide version of the same peptide is able to bind CD1d in a similar conformation, identifying another class of molecules binding this antigen-presenting molecule. PMID:27006394

  4. MHC class II transactivator represses human IL-4 gene transcription by interruption of promoter binding with CBP/p300, STAT6 and NFAT1 via histone hypoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaorong; Jiang, Yang; Lu, Liming; Ding, Qing; Jiao, Zhijun; Zhou, Yun; Xin, Lijun; Chou, Kuang-Yen

    2007-01-01

    In addition to its property of enhancing major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II expression, the class II transactivator (CIITA) was recently demonstrated to be involved in T helper type 1/type 2 (Th1/Th2) differentiation by regulating interleukin-4 (IL-4) gene transcription. There was however, controversy regarding whether CIITA promotes or suppresses IL-4 expression in the experiments with transgenic mice. To clarify the discrepancy by using simpler experimental systems, human Jurkat T cells that express IL-4 but not interferon-γ, even if stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin, were used for CIITA transfection. Significant suppression of IL-4 gene expression was demonstrated. Simultaneously, histones H3 and H4 in the IL-4 promoter were hypoacetylated. The suppression could be totally reversed by the histone deacetylatase inhibitor trichostatin A. Furthermore, the IL-4 expression was determined in primarily established human Th1/Th2 cells to which CIITA small interference RNA (siRNA) had been introduced. A substantially increased level of IL-4 was recorded in the CIITA siRNA-transfected Th1 cells, which was in parallel with significantly enhanced acetylation in histone H3 of the IL-4 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that CIITA abrogated the binding of coactivator CBP/p300 and transcription factors STAT6/NFAT1 to IL-4 promoter in the CIITA-transfected cells. In conclusion, CIITA was active in the repression of transcription activation of human IL-4 gene in both the T-cell line and the primary human CD4 T cells by preventing transcription factors from binding to IL-4 promoter through histone hypoacetylation. Our data confirm a potential significant role of CIITA in controlling Th1/Th2 differentiation via modulation of IL-4 gene activation. PMID:17645498

  5. Immunization with Live and Dead Chlamydia muridarum Induces Different Levels of Protective Immunity in a Murine Genital Tract Model: Correlation with MHC Class II Peptide Presentation and Multifunctional Th1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong; Karunakaran, Karuna P.; Kelly, Isabelle; Shen, Caixia; Jiang, Xiaozhou; Foster, Leonard J.; Brunham, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Mice that were intranasally vaccinated with live or dead Chlamydia muridarum with or without CpG-containing oligodeoxynucleotide 1862 elicited widely disparate levels of protective immunity to genital tract challenge. We found that the frequency of multifunctional T cells coexpressing IFN-γ and TNF-α with or without IL-2 induced by live C. muridarum most accurately correlated with the pattern of protection against C. muridarum genital tract infection, suggesting that IFN-γ+–producing CD4+ T cells that highly coexpress TNF-α may be the optimal effector cells for protective immunity. We also used an immunoproteomic approach to analyze MHC class II-bound peptides eluted from dendritic cells (DCs) that were pulsed with live or dead C. muridarum elementary bodies (EBs). We found that DCs pulsed with live EBs presented 45 MHC class II C. muridarum peptides mapping to 13 proteins. In contrast, DCs pulsed with dead EBs presented only six MHC class II C. muridarum peptides mapping to three proteins. Only two epitopes were shared in common between the live and dead EB-pulsed groups. This study provides insights into the role of Ag presentation and cytokine secretion patterns of CD4+ T effector cells that correlate with protective immunity elicited by live and dead C. muridarum. These insights should prove useful for improving vaccine design for Chlamydia trachomatis. PMID:21296978

  6. Deficient Peptide Loading and MHC Class II Endosomal Sorting in a Human Genetic Immunodeficiency Disease: the Chediak-Higashi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Faigle, Wolfgang; Raposo, Graça; Tenza, Daniele; Pinet, Valérie; Vogt, Anne B.; Kropshofer, Harald; Fischer, Alain; de Saint-Basile, Geneviève; Amigorena, Sebastian

    1998-01-01

    The Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a human recessive autosomal disease caused by mutations in a single gene encoding a protein of unknown function, called lysosomal-trafficking regulator. All cells in CHS patients bear enlarged lysosomes. In addition, T- and natural killer cell cytotoxicity is defective in these patients, causing severe immunodeficiencies. We have analyzed major histocompatibility complex class II functions and intracellular transport in Epstein Barr Virus–transformed B cells from CHS patients. Peptide loading onto major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and antigen presentation are strongly delayed these cells. A detailed electron microscopy analysis of endocytic compartments revealed that only lysosomal multilaminar compartments are enlarged (reaching 1–2 μm), whereas late multivesicular endosomes have normal size and morphology. In contrast to giant multilaminar compartments that bear most of the usual lysosomal markers in these cells (HLA-DR, HLA-DM, Lamp-1, CD63, etc.), multivesicular late endosomes displayed reduced levels of all these molecules, suggesting a defect in transport from the trans-Golgi network and/or early endosomes into late multivesicular endosomes. Further insight into a possible mechanism of this transport defect came from immunolocalizing the lysosomal trafficking regulator protein, as antibodies directed to a peptide from its COOH terminal domain decorated punctated structures partially aligned along microtubules. These results suggest that the product of the Lyst gene is required for sorting endosomal resident proteins into late multivesicular endosomes by a mechanism involving microtubules. PMID:9606205

  7. Co-evolution of the MHC class I and KIR gene families in rhesus macaques: ancestry and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Natasja G; Blokhuis, Jeroen H; Otting, Nel; Doxiadis, Gaby G M; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2015-01-01

    Researchers dealing with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and killer immunoglobulin receptor (KIR) multi-gene families in humans are often wary of the complex and seemingly different situation that is encountered regarding these gene families in Old World monkeys. For the sake of comparison, the well-defined and thoroughly studied situation in humans has been taken as a reference. In macaques, both the major histocompatibility complex class I and KIR gene families are plastic entities that have experienced various rounds of expansion, contraction, and subsequent recombination processes. As a consequence, haplotypes in macaques display substantial diversity with regard to gene copy number variation. Additionally, for both multi-gene families, differential levels of polymorphism (allelic variation), and expression are observed as well. A comparative genetic approach has allowed us to answer questions related to ancestry, to shed light on unique adaptations of the species’ immune system, and to provide insights into the genetic events and selective pressures that have shaped the range of these gene families. PMID:26284481

  8. Revisiting MHC genes in spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Breban, Maxime; Costantino, Félicie; André, Claudine; Chiocchia, Gilles; Garchon, Henri-Jean

    2015-06-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) refers to a variety of inflammatory rheumatic disorders with strong heritability. Shared genetic predisposition, as shown by familial aggregation, is largely attributable to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, which was estimated to account for approximately half of the whole disease heritability. The first predisposing allele identified more than 40 years ago is HLA-B27, which is a major gene predisposing to all forms of SpA. However, despite intensive research, its pathogenesis remains uncertain. Other MHC alleles belonging to the class I and class II regions have been identified to exert additional effect. Candidate-gene approaches and genome-wide studies have recently allowed identification of several new loci residing outside of the MHC region that are involved in the predisposition to SpA. Interestingly, some of those new genes, such as ERAP1, ERAP2, and NPEPPS, code for aminopeptidases that are involved in MHC class I presentation and were shown to interact with HLA-B27. PMID:25903667

  9. Genomic organization of the crested ibis MHC provides new insight into ancestral avian MHC structure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Cheng; Lan, Hong; Sun, Li; Deng, Yan-Li; Tang, Ke-Yi; Wan, Qiu-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays an important role in immune response. Avian MHCs are not well characterized, only reporting highly compact Galliformes MHCs and extensively fragmented zebra finch MHC. We report the first genomic structure of an endangered Pelecaniformes (crested ibis) MHC containing 54 genes in three regions spanning ~500 kb. In contrast to the loose BG (26 loci within 265 kb) and Class I (11 within 150) genomic structures, the Core Region is condensed (17 within 85). Furthermore, this Region exhibits a COL11A2 gene, followed by four tandem MHC class II αβ dyads retaining two suites of anciently duplicated “αβ” lineages. Thus, the crested ibis MHC structure is entirely different from the known avian MHC architectures but similar to that of mammalian MHCs, suggesting that the fundamental structure of ancestral avian class II MHCs should be “COL11A2-IIαβ1-IIαβ2.” The gene structures, residue characteristics, and expression levels of the five class I genes reveal inter-locus functional divergence. However, phylogenetic analysis indicates that these five genes generate a well-supported intra-species clade, showing evidence for recent duplications. Our analyses suggest dramatic structural variation among avian MHC lineages, help elucidate avian MHC evolution, and provide a foundation for future conservation studies. PMID:25608659

  10. The peptide motif of the single dominantly expressed class I molecule of the chicken MHC can explain the response to a molecular defined vaccine of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV).

    PubMed

    Butter, Colin; Staines, Karen; van Hateren, Andrew; Davison, T Fred; Kaufman, Jim

    2013-08-01

    In contrast to typical mammals, the chicken MHC (the BF-BL region of the B locus) has strong genetic associations with resistance and susceptibility to infectious pathogens as well as responses to vaccines. We have shown that the chicken MHC encodes a single dominantly expressed class I molecule whose peptide-binding motifs can determine resistance to viral pathogens, such as Rous sarcoma virus and Marek's disease virus. In this report, we examine the response to a molecular defined vaccine, fp-IBD1, which consists of a fowlpox virus vector carrying the VP2 gene of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) fused with β-galactosidase. We vaccinated parental lines and two backcross families with fp-IBD1, challenged with the virulent IBDV strain F52/70, and measured damage to the bursa. We found that the MHC haplotype B15 from line 15I confers no protection, whereas B2 from line 61 and B12 from line C determine protection, although another locus from line 61 was also important. Using our peptide motifs, we found that many more peptides from VP2 were predicted to bind to the dominantly expressed class I molecule BF2*1201 than BF2*1501. Moreover, most of the peptides predicted to bind BF2*1201 did in fact bind, while none bound BF2*1501. Using peptide vaccination, we identified one B12 peptide that conferred protection to challenge, as assessed by bursal damage and viremia. Thus, we show the strong genetic association of the chicken MHC to a T cell vaccine can be explained by peptide presentation by the single dominantly expressed class I molecule. PMID:23644721

  11. Neuronal MHC Class I Molecules are Involved in Excitatory Synaptic Transmission at the Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Synapses of Marmoset Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingyue; Schlumbohm, Christina; Mätz-Rensing, Kerstin; Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara; Flügge, Gabriele; Zhang, Weiqi; Walter, Lutz; Fuchs, Eberhard

    2010-01-01

    Several recent studies suggested a role for neuronal major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) molecules in certain forms of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of rodents. Here, we report for the first time on the expression pattern and functional properties of MHCI molecules in the hippocampus of a nonhuman primate, the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus). We detected a presynaptic, mossy fiber-specific localization of MHCI proteins within the marmoset hippocampus. MHCI molecules were present in the large, VGlut1-positive, mossy fiber terminals, which provide input to CA3 pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, whole-cell recordings of CA3 pyramidal neurons in acute hippocampal slices of the common marmoset demonstrated that application of antibodies which specifically block MHCI proteins caused a significant decrease in the frequency, and a transient increase in the amplitude, of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in CA3 pyramidal neurons. These findings add to previous studies on neuronal MHCI molecules by describing their expression and localization in the primate hippocampus and by implicating them in plasticity-related processes at the mossy fiber–CA3 synapses. In addition, our results suggest significant interspecies differences in the localization of neuronal MHCI molecules in the hippocampus of mice and marmosets, as well as in their potential function in these species. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10571-010-9510-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20232136

  12. Constitutive induction of intestinal Tc17 cells in the absence of hematopoietic cell-specific MHC class II expression.

    PubMed

    Rubino, Stephen J; Geddes, Kaoru; Magalhaes, Joao G; Streutker, Catherine; Philpott, Dana J; Girardin, Stephen E

    2013-11-01

    The enteric pathogen Citrobacter rodentium induces a mucosal IL-17 response in CD4(+) T helper (Th17) cells that is dependent on the Nod-like receptors Nod1 and Nod2. Here, we sought to determine whether this early Th17 response required antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) for full induction. At early phases of C. rodentium infection, we observed that the intestinal mucosal Th17 response was fully blunted in irradiated mice reconstituted with MHCII-deficient (MHCII(-/-) →WT) hematopoietic cells. Surprisingly, we also observed a substantial increase in the relative frequency of IL-17(+) CD8(+) CD4(-) TCR-β(+) cells (Tc17 cells) and FOXP3(+) CD8(+) CD4(-) TCR-β(+) cells in the lamina propria and intraepithelial lymphocyte compartment of MHCII(-/-) →WT mice compared with that in WT→WT counterparts. Moreover, MHCII(-/-) →WT mice displayed increased susceptibility, increased bacterial translocation to deeper organs, and more severe colonic histopathology after infection with C. rodentium. Finally, a similar phenotype was observed in mice deficient for CIITA, a transcriptional regulator of MHCII expression. Together, these results indicate that MHCII is required to mount early mucosal Th17 responses to an enteric pathogen, and that MHCII regulates the induction of atypical CD8(+) T-cell subsets, such as Tc17 cells and FOXP3(+) CD8(+) cells, in vivo. PMID:23881368

  13. Multiple sclerosis: a role for astroglia in active demyelination suggested by class II MHC expression and ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Lee, S C; Moore, G R; Golenwsky, G; Raine, C S

    1990-03-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tissue was studied by immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy from three cases of multiple sclerosis (MS) in which evidence of ongoing myelin breakdown could be documented. The study focussed upon the role of glial cells in the pathogenesis of demyelination. In acute MS, demyelination involved the vesicular dissolution of myelin from intact axons and a paucity of fibrillary astrogliosis. Foamy macrophages, many of them probably derived from transformed and recently proliferated microglia, contained recognizable myelin debris and lipid droplets and were abundant throughout the lesions. These cells formed the major phagocytic population and stained positively for class II major histocompatibility complex antigens (HLA-DR; Ia). In acute MS lesions, rounded astrocytes were encountered which possessed membrane-bound compartments enclosing phagocytosed fragments of myelin basic protein-positive debris. Despite the superficial resemblance of these cells to foamy macrophages, the presence of intermediate filaments, glycogen granules and diffuse glial fibrillary acidic protein positivity supported an astroglial identity. Astrocyte processes were involved in myelin removal and invested recently demyelinated axons. Hypertrophic fibrous astrocytes were common in chronic active lesions, were capable of myelin degradation and on occasion, contained myelin debris attached to clathrin-coated pits. These astrocytes were sometimes Ia+. Oligodendrocytes were depleted from the center of active lesions but were numerous at the lesion margin, suggesting survival and proliferation. They stained positively for myelin-associated glycoprotein, a marker for immature oligodendrocytes. However, they were invariably Ia-. The findings confirm and further support a role for the astrocyte as both an antigen presenting cell and a phagocyte in the CNS during MS. PMID:2307980

  14. A family of nonclassical class I MHC genes contributes to ultrasensitive chemodetection by mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Ishii, Tomohiro; Chamero, Pablo; Hendrix, Philipp; Oboti, Livio; Schmid, Andreas; Kircher, Sarah; Pyrski, Martina; Akiyoshi, Sachiko; Khan, Mona; Vaes, Evelien; Zufall, Frank; Mombaerts, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO) has a pivotal role in chemical communication. The vomeronasal sensory neuroepithelium consists of distinct populations of vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs). A subset of VSNs, with cell bodies in the basal part of the basal layer, coexpress Vmn2r G-protein-coupled receptor genes with H2-Mv genes, a family of nine nonclassical class I major histocompatibility complex genes. The in vivo, physiological roles of the H2-Mv gene family remain mysterious more than a decade after the discovery of combinatorial H2-Mv gene expression in VSNs. Here, we have taken a genetic approach and have deleted the 530 kb cluster of H2-Mv genes in the mouse germline by chromosome engineering. Homozygous mutant mice (ΔH2Mv mice) are viable and fertile. There are no major anatomical defects in their VNO and accessory olfactory bulb (AOB). Their VSNs can be stimulated with chemostimuli (peptides and proteins) to the same maximum responses as VSNs of wild-type mice, but require much higher concentrations. This physiological phenotype is displayed at the single-cell level and is cell autonomous: single V2rf2-expressing VSNs, which normally coexpress H2-Mv genes, display a decreased sensitivity to a peptide ligand in ΔH2Mv mice, whereas single V2r1b-expressing VSNs, which do not coexpress H2-Mv genes, show normal sensitivity to a peptide ligand in ΔH2Mv mice. Consistent with the greatly decreased VSN sensitivity, ΔH2Mv mice display pronounced deficits in aggressive and sexual behaviors. Thus, H2-Mv genes are not absolutely essential for the generation of physiological responses, but are required for ultrasensitive chemodetection by a subset of VSNs. PMID:24719092

  15. Acidosis increases MHC class II-restricted presentation of a protein endowed with a pH-dependent heparan sulfate-binding ability.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Delphine; Savatier, Alexandra; Upert, Grégory; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Léonetti, Michel

    2015-04-15

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are ubiquitously expressed molecules that participate in numerous biological processes. We previously showed that HSPGs expressed on the surface of APCs can serve as receptors for a hybrid protein containing an HS ligand and an Ag, which leads to more efficient stimulation of Th cells. To investigate whether such behavior is shared by proteins with inherent HS-binding ability, we looked for proteins endowed with this characteristic. We found that diphtheria toxin and its nontoxic mutant, called CRM197, can interact with HS. However, we observed that their binding ability is higher at pH 6 than at pH 7.4. Therefore, as extracellular acidosis occurs during infection by various micro-organisms, we assessed whether HS-binding capacity affects MHC class II-restricted presentation at different pHs. We first observed that pH decrease allows CRM197 binding to HSPG-expressing cells, including APCs. Then, we showed that this interaction enhances Ag uptake and presentation to Th cells. Lastly, we observed that pH decrease does not affect processing and presentation abilities of the APCs. Our findings show that acidic pH causes an HSPG-mediated uptake and an enhancement of T cell stimulation of Ags with the inherent ability to bind HSPGs pH-dependently. Furthermore, they suggest that proteins from micro-organisms with this binding characteristic might be supported more efficiently by the adaptive immune system when acidosis is triggered during infection. PMID:25754736

  16. Protection against H1N1 influenza challenge by a DNA vaccine expressing H3/H1 subtype hemagglutinin combined with MHC class II-restricted epitopes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Multiple subtypes of avian influenza viruses have crossed the species barrier to infect humans and have the potential to cause a pandemic. Therefore, new influenza vaccines to prevent the co-existence of multiple subtypes within a host and cross-species transmission of influenza are urgently needed. Methods Here we report a multi-epitope DNA vaccine targeted towards multiple subtypes of the influenza virus. The protective hemagglutinin (HA) antigens from H5/H7/H9 subtypes were screened for MHC II class-restricted epitopes overlapping with predicted B cell epitopes. We then constructed a DNA plasmid vaccine, pV-H3-EHA-H1, based on HA antigens from human influenza H3/H1 subtypes combined with the H5/H7/H9 subtype Th/B epitope box. Results Epitope-specific IFN-γ ELISpot responses were significantly higher in the multi-epitope DNA group than in other vaccine and control groups (P < 0.05). The multi-epitope group significantly enhanced Th2 cell responses as determined by cytokine assays. The survival rate of mice given the multi-epitope vaccine was the highest among the vaccine groups, but it was not significantly different compared to those given single antigen expressing pV-H1HA1 vaccine and dual antigen expressing pV-H3-H1 vaccine (P > 0.05). No measurable virus titers were detected in the lungs of the multi-epitope immunized group. The unique multi-epitope DNA vaccine enhanced virus-specific antibody and cellular immunity as well as conferred complete protection against lethal challenge with A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1) influenza strain in mice. Conclusions This approach may be a promising strategy for developing a universal influenza vaccine to prevent multiple subtypes of influenza virus and to induce long-term protective immune against cross-species transmission. PMID:21134292

  17. MHC Class I-Related Neonatal Fc Receptor for IgG Is Functionally Expressed in Monocytes, Intestinal Macrophages, and Dendritic Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoping; Meng, Gang; Dickinson, Bonny L.; Li, Xiaotong; Mizoguchi, Emiko; Miao, Lili; Wang, Yuansheng; Robert, Caroline; Wu, Benyan; Smith, Phillip D.; Lencer, Wayne I.; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) for IgG, an MHC class I-related molecule, functions to transport IgG across polarized epithelial cells and protect IgG from degradation. However, little is known about whether FcRn is functionally expressed in immune cells. We show here that FcRn mRNA was identifiable in human monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. FcRn heavy chain was detectable as a 45-kDa protein in monocytic U937 and THP-1 cells and in purified human intestinal macrophages, peripheral blood monocytes, and dendritic cells by Western blot analysis. FcRn colocalized in vivo with macrosialin (CD68) and Ncl-Macro, two macrophage markers, in the lamina propria of human small intestine. The heavy chain of FcRn was associated with the β2-microglobulin (β2m) light chain in U937 and THP-1 cells. FcRn bound human IgG at pH 6.0, but not at pH 7.5. This binding could be inhibited by human IgG Fc, but not Fab. FcRn could be detected on the cell surface of activated, but not resting, THP-1 cells. Furthermore, FcRn was uniformly present intracellularly in all blood monocytes and intestinal macrophages. FcRn was detectable on the cell surface of a significant fraction of monocytes at lower levels and on a small subset of tissue macrophages that expressed high levels of FcRn on the cell surface. These data show that FcRn is functionally expressed and its cellular distribution is regulated in monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, suggesting that it may confer novel IgG binding functions upon these cell types relative to typical FcγRs: FcγRI, FcγRII, and FcγRIII. PMID:11207281

  18. Effect of genetic variation in the MHC Class II DRB region on resistance and susceptibility to Johne's disease in endangered Indian Jamunapari goats.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Singh, S V; Singh, M K; Saxena, V K; Horin, P; Singh, A V; Sohal, J S

    2012-08-01

    The pathogenesis of Johne's disease (JD), caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), is complex and has not been completely understood yet. In the present study, we analysed the polymorphism in the exon-2 of the caprine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II DRB region and its association with resistance or susceptibility to JD. A total of 203 Jamunapari goats, which is an Indian endangered breed highly susceptible to JD, kept at a single farm were studied. On the basis of clinical signs, microscopic examination, faecal culture, ELISA and diagnostic PCR, 60 and 143 goats were classified as resistant and susceptible to JD, respectively. PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) with two enzymes, PstI and TaqI, was used to assess variation in the DRB gene(s) in all 203 goats studied. Two di-allelic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), here referred as 'P' and 'T', were tested. In each of them, three genotypes were found in the group analysed. The minimum allele frequencies (MAFs) were 0.233 and 0.486 for the P and T SNPs, respectively. Statistically significant associations between alleles, individual genotypes and composed genotypes of both SNPs were found. The frequency of p and t alleles, of individual pp and tt and of composed pptt genotypes were significantly higher (P(corr) < 0.001) in the 'resistant' group as compared to the 'susceptible' group, while the P and T alleles were associated with susceptibility (P(corr) < 0.001). In heterozygous genotypes, susceptibility was dominant over resistance. The effects of both SNP on resistance and susceptibility were comparable and composed heterozygous genotypes showed intermediate levels of susceptibility in terms of the odds ratio and P-values calculated. PMID:22321606

  19. UL16-binding proteins, novel MHC class I-related proteins, bind to NKG2D and activate multiple signaling pathways in primary NK cells.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Claire L; Chalupny, N Jan; Schooley, Kenneth; VandenBos, Tim; Kubin, Marek; Cosman, David

    2002-01-15

    The UL16-binding proteins (ULBPs) are a novel family of MHC class I-related molecules that were identified as targets of the human CMV glycoprotein, UL16. We have previously shown that ULBP expression renders a relatively resistant target cell sensitive to NK cytotoxicity, presumably by engaging NKG2D, an activating receptor expressed by NK and other immune effector cells. In this study we show that NKG2D is the ULBP counterstructure on primary NK cells and that its expression is up-regulated by IL-15 stimulation. Soluble forms of ULBPs induce marked protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and activation of the Janus kinase 2, STAT5, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)/Akt signal transduction pathways. ULBP-induced activation of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase and ULBP-induced IFN-gamma production are blocked by inhibitors of PI 3-kinase, consistent with the known binding of PI 3-kinase to DAP10, the membrane-bound signal-transducing subunit of the NKG2D receptor. While all three ULBPs activate the same signaling pathways, ULBP3 was found to bind weakly and to induce the weakest signal. In summary, we have shown that NKG2D is the ULBP counterstructure on primary NK cells and for the first time have identified signaling pathways that are activated by NKG2D ligands. These results increase our understanding of the mechanisms by which NKG2D activates immune effector cells and may have implications for immune surveillance against pathogens and tumors. PMID:11777960

  20. Autoantibodies against MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A are associated with increased risk of concomitant autoimmune diseases in celiac patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Overexpression of autologous proteins can lead to the formation of autoantibodies and autoimmune diseases. MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A (MICA) is highly expressed in the enterocytes of patients with celiac disease, which arises in response to gluten. The aim of this study was to investigate anti-MICA antibody formation in patients with celiac disease and its association with other autoimmune processes. Methods We tested serum samples from 383 patients with celiac disease, obtained before they took up a gluten-free diet, 428 patients with diverse autoimmune diseases, and 200 controls for anti-MICA antibodies. All samples were also tested for anti-endomysium and anti-transglutaminase antibodies. Results Antibodies against MICA were detected in samples from 41.7% of patients with celiac disease but in only 3.5% of those from controls (P <0.0001) and 8.2% from patients with autoimmune disease (P <0.0001). These antibodies disappeared after the instauration of a gluten-free diet. Anti-MICA antibodies were significantly prevalent in younger patients (P <0.01). Fifty-eight patients with celiac disease (15.1%) presented a concomitant autoimmune disease. Anti-MICA-positive patients had a higher risk of autoimmune disease than MICA antibody-negative patients (P <0.0001; odds ratio = 6.11). The risk was even higher when we also controlled for age (odds ratio = 11.69). Finally, we found that the associated risk of developing additional autoimmune diseases was 16 and 10 times as high in pediatric patients and adults with anti-MICA, respectively, as in those without. Conclusions The development of anti-MICA antibodies could be related to a gluten-containing diet, and seems to be involved in the development of autoimmune diseases in patients with celiac disease, especially younger ones. PMID:24565339

  1. [MHC tetramers: tracking specific immunity].

    PubMed

    Kosor, Ela; Gagro, Alenka; Drazenović, Vladimir; Kuzman, Ilija; Jeren, Tatjana; Rakusić, Snjezana; Rabatić, Sabina; Markotić, Alemka; Gotovac, Katja; Sabioncello, Ante; Cecuk, Esma; Kerhin-Brkljacić, Vesna; Gjenero-Margan, Ira; Kaić, Bernard; Mlinarić-Galinović, Gordana; Kastelan, Andrija; Dekaris, Dragan

    2003-01-01

    In an adaptive immune response, antigen is recognized by two distinct sets of highly variable receptor molecules: (1) immunoglobulins, that serve as antigen receptors on B cells and (2) the antigen-specific receptors on T cells. T cells play important role in the control of infection and in the development of protective immunity. These cells can also mediate anti-tumor effects and, in case of autoimmune syndromes, contribute to the development and pathology of disease. The specificity of T cells is determined by T cell receptors (TCR). Understanding of the success of immune responses requires the direct measurement of antigen-specific T lymphocytes. Cell with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules are able to present antigens to antigen-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. MHC class I molecules present small peptides (epitopes) processed from intracellular antigens such as viruses and intracellular bacteria. MHC class I molecules in humans are designated as human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and divided into HLA-A, -B and -C. CD8+ T cells recognize MHC class I molecules and after activation produce proteins that destroy infected cells. MHC class II molecules receive their peptides mainly from extracellular and soluble antigens and present them to the CD4+ T helper cells. A recently described technique that can be used in flow cytometry enables us to quantify ex vivo antigen-specific T cells by binding of soluble tetramer MHC-peptide complexes attached to fluorochrome. Quantitative analyses of antigen-specific T cell populations provide important information on the natural course of immune responses. The interaction of T cell receptors on T lymphocytes with tetrameric MHC-peptide complexes mimics the situation on the cell surface, and allows for reliable binding. Tetramers consist of four biotinylated HLA-peptide epitope complexes bound to streptavidin conjugated with fluorescent dye. Tetramer technology has sensitivity of detection as little

  2. Comparative Genome Analyses Reveal Distinct Structure in the Saltwater Crocodile MHC

    PubMed Central

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Deakin, Janine; Godinez, Ricardo M.; Shan, Xueyan; Peterson, Daniel G.; Marthey, Sylvain; Lyons, Eric; McCarthy, Fiona M.; Isberg, Sally R.; Higgins, Damien P.; Chong, Amanda Y.; John, John St; Glenn, Travis C.; Ray, David A.; Gongora, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a dynamic genome region with an essential role in the adaptive immunity of vertebrates, especially antigen presentation. The MHC is generally divided into subregions (classes I, II and III) containing genes of similar function across species, but with different gene number and organisation. Crocodylia (crocodilians) are widely distributed and represent an evolutionary distinct group among higher vertebrates, but the genomic organisation of MHC within this lineage has been largely unexplored. Here, we studied the MHC region of the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) and compared it with that of other taxa. We characterised genomic clusters encompassing MHC class I and class II genes in the saltwater crocodile based on sequencing of bacterial artificial chromosomes. Six gene clusters spanning ∼452 kb were identified to contain nine MHC class I genes, six MHC class II genes, three TAP genes, and a TRIM gene. These MHC class I and class II genes were in separate scaffold regions and were greater in length (2–6 times longer) than their counterparts in well-studied fowl B loci, suggesting that the compaction of avian MHC occurred after the crocodilian-avian split. Comparative analyses between the saltwater crocodile MHC and that from the alligator and gharial showed large syntenic areas (>80% identity) with similar gene order. Comparisons with other vertebrates showed that the saltwater crocodile had MHC class I genes located along with TAP, consistent with birds studied. Linkage between MHC class I and TRIM39 observed in the saltwater crocodile resembled MHC in eutherians compared, but absent in avian MHC, suggesting that the saltwater crocodile MHC appears to have gene organisation intermediate between these two lineages. These observations suggest that the structure of the saltwater crocodile MHC, and other crocodilians, can help determine the MHC that was present in the ancestors of archosaurs. PMID:25503521

  3. Comparative genome analyses reveal distinct structure in the saltwater crocodile MHC.

    PubMed

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Deakin, Janine; Godinez, Ricardo M; Shan, Xueyan; Peterson, Daniel G; Marthey, Sylvain; Lyons, Eric; McCarthy, Fiona M; Isberg, Sally R; Higgins, Damien P; Chong, Amanda Y; John, John St; Glenn, Travis C; Ray, David A; Gongora, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a dynamic genome region with an essential role in the adaptive immunity of vertebrates, especially antigen presentation. The MHC is generally divided into subregions (classes I, II and III) containing genes of similar function across species, but with different gene number and organisation. Crocodylia (crocodilians) are widely distributed and represent an evolutionary distinct group among higher vertebrates, but the genomic organisation of MHC within this lineage has been largely unexplored. Here, we studied the MHC region of the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) and compared it with that of other taxa. We characterised genomic clusters encompassing MHC class I and class II genes in the saltwater crocodile based on sequencing of bacterial artificial chromosomes. Six gene clusters spanning ∼452 kb were identified to contain nine MHC class I genes, six MHC class II genes, three TAP genes, and a TRIM gene. These MHC class I and class II genes were in separate scaffold regions and were greater in length (2-6 times longer) than their counterparts in well-studied fowl B loci, suggesting that the compaction of avian MHC occurred after the crocodilian-avian split. Comparative analyses between the saltwater crocodile MHC and that from the alligator and gharial showed large syntenic areas (>80% identity) with similar gene order. Comparisons with other vertebrates showed that the saltwater crocodile had MHC class I genes located along with TAP, consistent with birds studied. Linkage between MHC class I and TRIM39 observed in the saltwater crocodile resembled MHC in eutherians compared, but absent in avian MHC, suggesting that the saltwater crocodile MHC appears to have gene organisation intermediate between these two lineages. These observations suggest that the structure of the saltwater crocodile MHC, and other crocodilians, can help determine the MHC that was present in the ancestors of archosaurs. PMID:25503521

  4. Characterization of MHC class II B polymorphism in multiple populations of wild gorillas using non-invasive samples and next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hans, Jörg B; Haubner, Anne; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Bergl, Richard A; Fünfstück, Tillmann; Gray, Maryke; Morgan, David B; Robbins, Martha M; Sanz, Crickette; Vigilant, Linda

    2015-11-01

    Genes encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are crucial for the recognition and presentation of antigens to the immune system. In contrast to their closest relatives, chimpanzees and humans, much less is known about variation in gorillas at these loci. This study explored the exon 2 variation of -DPB1, -DQB1, and -DRB genes in 46 gorillas from four populations while simultaneously evaluating the feasibility of using fecal samples for high-throughput MHC genotyping. By applying strict similarity- and frequency-based analysis, we found, despite our modest sample size, a total of 18 alleles that have not been described previously, thereby illustrating the potential for efficient and highly accurate MHC genotyping from non-invasive DNA samples. We emphasize the importance of controlling for multiple potential sources of error when applying this massively parallel short-read sequencing technology to PCR products generated from low concentration DNA extracts. We observed pronounced differences in MHC variation between species, subspecies and populations that are consistent with both the ancient and recent demographic histories experienced by gorillas. PMID:26283172

  5. The opossum MHC genomic region revisited.

    PubMed

    Krasnec, Katina V; Sharp, Alana R; Williams, Tracey L; Miller, Robert D

    2015-04-01

    The gray short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica is one of the few marsupial species for which a high quality whole genome sequence is available and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region has been annotated. Previous analyses revealed only a single locus within the opossum MHC region, designated Modo-UA1, with the features expected for encoding a functionally classical class I α-chain. Nine other class I genes found within the MHC are highly divergent and have features usually associated with non-classical roles. The original annotation, however, was based on an early version of the opossum genome assembly. More recent analyses of allelic variation in individual opossums revealed too many Modo-UA1 sequences per individual to be accounted for by a single MHC class I locus found in the genome assembly. A reanalysis of a later generation assembly, MonDom5, revealed the presence of two additional loci, now designated Modo-UA3 and UA4, in a region that was expanded and more complete than in the earlier assembly. Modo-UA1, UA3, and UA4 are all transcribed, although Modo-UA4 transcripts are rarer. Modo-UA4 is also relatively non-polymorphic. Evidence presented support the accuracy of the later assembly and the existence of three related class I genes in the opossum, making opossums more typical of mammals and most tetrapods by having multiple apparent classical MHC class I loci. PMID:25737310

  6. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Processing of the NY-ESO-1 Antigen Is Regulated by Rpn10 and Rpn13 Proteins and Immunoproteasomes following Non-lysine Ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Golnik, Richard; Lehmann, Andrea; Kloetzel, Peter-Michael; Ebstein, Frédéric

    2016-04-15

    The supply of MHC class I-restricted peptides is primarily ensured by the degradation of intracellular proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Depending on the target and the enzymes involved, ubiquitination is a process that may dramatically vary in terms of linkages, length, and attachment sites. Here we identified the unique lysine residue at position 124 of the NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigen as the acceptor site for the formation of canonical Lys-48-linkages. Interestingly, a lysine-less form of NY-ESO-1 was as efficient as its wild-type counterpart in supplying the HLA-A*0201-restricted NY-ESO-1157-165 antigenic peptide. In fact, we show that the regulation of NY-ESO-1 processing by the ubiquitin receptors Rpn10 and Rpn13 as a well as by the standard and immunoproteasome is governed by non-canonical ubiquitination on non-lysine sites. In summary, our data underscore the significance of atypical ubiquitination in the modulation of MHC class I antigen processing. PMID:26903513

  7. Immunization with a Peptide Containing MHC Class I and II Epitopes Derived from the Tumor Antigen SIM2 Induces an Effective CD4 and CD8 T-Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Kissick, Haydn T.; Sanda, Martin G.; Dunn, Laura K.; Arredouani, Mohamed S.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we sought to determine whether peptide vaccines designed harbor both class I as well as class II restricted antigenic motifs could concurrently induce CD4 and CD8 T cell activation against autologous tumor antigens. Based on our prior genome-wide interrogation of human prostate cancer tissues to identify genes over-expressed in cancer and absent in the periphery, we targeted SIM2 as a prototype autologous tumor antigen for these studies. Using humanized transgenic mice we found that the 9aa HLA-A*0201 epitope, SIM2237–245, was effective at inducing an antigen specific response against SIM2-expressing prostate cancer cell line, PC3. Immunization with a multi-epitope peptide harboring both MHC-I and MHC-II restricted epitopes induced an IFN-γ response in CD8 T cells to the HLA-A*0201-restricted SIM2237–245 epitope, and an IL-2 response by CD4 T cells to the SIM2240–254 epitope. This peptide was also effective at inducing CD8+ T-cells that responded specifically to SIM2-expressing tumor cells. Collectively, the data presented in this study suggest that a single peptide containing multiple SIM2 epitopes can be used to induce both a CD4 and CD8 T cell response, providing a peptide-based vaccine formulation for potential use in immunotherapy of various cancers. PMID:24690990

  8. Immunization with a peptide containing MHC class I and II epitopes derived from the tumor antigen SIM2 induces an effective CD4 and CD8 T-cell response.

    PubMed

    Kissick, Haydn T; Sanda, Martin G; Dunn, Laura K; Arredouani, Mohamed S

    2014-01-01

    Here, we sought to determine whether peptide vaccines designed harbor both class I as well as class II restricted antigenic motifs could concurrently induce CD4 and CD8 T cell activation against autologous tumor antigens. Based on our prior genome-wide interrogation of human prostate cancer tissues to identify genes over-expressed in cancer and absent in the periphery, we targeted SIM2 as a prototype autologous tumor antigen for these studies. Using humanized transgenic mice we found that the 9aa HLA-A*0201 epitope, SIM2(237-245), was effective at inducing an antigen specific response against SIM2-expressing prostate cancer cell line, PC3. Immunization with a multi-epitope peptide harboring both MHC-I and MHC-II restricted epitopes induced an IFN-γ response in CD8 T cells to the HLA-A*0201-restricted SIM2(237-245) epitope, and an IL-2 response by CD4 T cells to the SIM2(240-254) epitope. This peptide was also effective at inducing CD8+ T-cells that responded specifically to SIM2-expressing tumor cells. Collectively, the data presented in this study suggest that a single peptide containing multiple SIM2 epitopes can be used to induce both a CD4 and CD8 T cell response, providing a peptide-based vaccine formulation for potential use in immunotherapy of various cancers. PMID:24690990

  9. Toward the quantitative prediction of T-cell epitopes: coMFA and coMSIA studies of peptides with affinity for the class I MHC molecule HLA-A*0201.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, I A; Flower, D R

    2001-10-25

    A set of 102 peptides with affinity for the class I MHC HLA-A0201 molecule was subjected to three-dimensional quantitative structure-affinity relationship (3D QSAR) studies using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA). A test set of 50 peptides was used to determine the predictive value of the models. The CoMFA models gave q(2) and r(2)pred below 0.5. The best CoMSIA model has q(2) = 0.542 and r(2)pred = 0.679, and includes hydrophobic, steric, and H-bond donor fields. The hydrophobic interactions play a dominant role in peptide-MHC molecule binding. CoMSIA coefficient contour maps were used to analyze the structural features of the peptides accounting for the affinity in terms of the three positively contributing physicochemical properties: local hydrophobicity, steric bulk and hydrogen-bond-donor ability. PMID:11606121

  10. Unusual evolutionary conservation and further species-specific adaptations of a large family of Nonclassical MHC class Ib genes across different degrees of genome ploidy in the amphibian subfamily Xenopodinae

    PubMed Central

    Edholm, Eva-Stina; Goyos, Ana; Taran, Joseph; De Jesús Andino, Francisco; Ohta, Yuko; Robert, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Nonclassical MHC class Ib (class Ib) genes are a family of highly diverse and rapidly evolving genes wherein gene numbers, organization and expression markedly differ even among closely related species rendering class Ib phylogeny difficult to establish. Whereas among mammals there are few unambiguous class Ib gene orthologs, different amphibian species belonging to the anuran subfamily Xenopodinae exhibit an unusually high degree of conservation among multiple class Ib gene lineages. Comparative genomic analysis of class Ib gene loci of two divergent (~65 million years) Xenopodinae subfamily members X. laevis (allotetraploid) and X. tropicalis (diploid) shows that both species possess a large cluster of class Ib genes denoted as Xenopus/Silurana nonclassical (XNC/SNC). Our study reveals two distinct phylogenetic patterns among these genes: some gene lineages display a high degree of flexibility, as demonstrated by species-specific expansion and contractions, whereas other class Ib gene lineages have been maintained as monogenic subfamilies with very few changes in their nucleotide sequence across divergent species. In this second category, we further investigated the XNC/SNC10 gene lineage that in X. laevis is required for the development of a distinct semi-invariant T cell population. We report compelling evidence of the remarkable high degree of conservation of this gene lineage that is present in all 12 species of the Xenopodinae examined, including species with different degrees of ploidy ranging from 2, 4, 8 to 12N. This suggests that the critical role of XNC10 during early T cell development is conserved in amphibians. PMID:24771209

  11. DNA Vaccines Encoding Antigen Targeted to MHC Class II Induce Influenza-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses, Enabling Faster Resolution of Influenza Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Laura; Kinnear, Ekaterina; McDonald, Jacqueline U.; Grodeland, Gunnveig; Bogen, Bjarne; Stubsrud, Elisabeth; Lindeberg, Mona M.; Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik; Tregoning, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines are effective but imperfect, failing to cover against emerging strains of virus and requiring seasonal administration to protect against new strains. A key step to improving influenza vaccines is to improve our understanding of vaccine-induced protection. While it is clear that antibodies play a protective role, vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells can improve protection. To further explore the role of CD8+ T cells, we used a DNA vaccine that encodes antigen dimerized to an immune cell targeting module. Immunizing CB6F1 mice with the DNA vaccine in a heterologous prime-boost regime with the seasonal protein vaccine improved the resolution of influenza disease compared with protein alone. This improved disease resolution was dependent on CD8+ T cells. However, DNA vaccine regimes that induced CD8+ T cells alone were not protective and did not boost the protection provided by protein. The MHC-targeting module used was an anti-I-Ed single chain antibody specific to the BALB/c strain of mice. To test the role of MHC targeting, we compared the response between BALB/c, C57BL/6 mice, and an F1 cross of the two strains (CB6F1). BALB/c mice were protected, C57BL/6 were not, and the F1 had an intermediate phenotype; showing that the targeting of antigen is important in the response. Based on these findings, and in agreement with other studies using different vaccines, we conclude that, in addition to antibody, inducing a protective CD8 response is important in future influenza vaccines. PMID:27602032

  12. DNA Vaccines Encoding Antigen Targeted to MHC Class II Induce Influenza-Specific CD8(+) T Cell Responses, Enabling Faster Resolution of Influenza Disease.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Laura; Kinnear, Ekaterina; McDonald, Jacqueline U; Grodeland, Gunnveig; Bogen, Bjarne; Stubsrud, Elisabeth; Lindeberg, Mona M; Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik; Tregoning, John S

    2016-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines are effective but imperfect, failing to cover against emerging strains of virus and requiring seasonal administration to protect against new strains. A key step to improving influenza vaccines is to improve our understanding of vaccine-induced protection. While it is clear that antibodies play a protective role, vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells can improve protection. To further explore the role of CD8(+) T cells, we used a DNA vaccine that encodes antigen dimerized to an immune cell targeting module. Immunizing CB6F1 mice with the DNA vaccine in a heterologous prime-boost regime with the seasonal protein vaccine improved the resolution of influenza disease compared with protein alone. This improved disease resolution was dependent on CD8(+) T cells. However, DNA vaccine regimes that induced CD8(+) T cells alone were not protective and did not boost the protection provided by protein. The MHC-targeting module used was an anti-I-E(d) single chain antibody specific to the BALB/c strain of mice. To test the role of MHC targeting, we compared the response between BALB/c, C57BL/6 mice, and an F1 cross of the two strains (CB6F1). BALB/c mice were protected, C57BL/6 were not, and the F1 had an intermediate phenotype; showing that the targeting of antigen is important in the response. Based on these findings, and in agreement with other studies using different vaccines, we conclude that, in addition to antibody, inducing a protective CD8 response is important in future influenza vaccines. PMID:27602032

  13. Genetic Diversity and mRNA Expression of Porcine MHC Class I Chain-Related 2 (SLA-MIC2) Gene and Development of a High-Resolution Typing Method

    PubMed Central

    Dinka, Hunduma; Nguyen, DinhTruong; Choi, Hojun; Cho, Hyesun; Choi, Minkyeung; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Park, Jin-Ki; Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Park, Chankyu

    2015-01-01

    The genetic structure and function of MHC class I chain-related (MIC) genes in the pig genome have not been well characterized, and show discordance in available data. Therefore, we have experimentally characterized the exon-intron structure and functional copy expression pattern of the pig MIC gene, SLA-MIC2. We have also studied the genetic diversity of SLA-MIC2 from seven different breeds using a high-resolution genomic sequence-based typing (GSBT) method. Our results showed that the SLA-MIC2 gene has a similar molecular organization as the human and cattle orthologs, and is expressed in only a few tissues including the small intestine, lung, and heart. A total of fifteen SLA-MIC2 alleles were identified from typing 145 animals, ten of which were previously unreported. Our analysis showed that the previously reported and tentatively named SLA-MIC2*05, 07, and 01 alleles occurred most frequently. The observed heterozygosity varied from 0.26 to 0.73 among breeds. The number of alleles of the SLA-MIC2 gene in pigs is somewhat lower compared to the number of alleles of the porcine MHC class I and II genes; however, the level of heterozygosity was similar. Our results indicate the comprehensiveness of using genomic DNA-based typing for the systemic study of the SLA-MIC2 gene. The method developed for this study, as well as the detailed information that was obtained, could serve as fundamental tools for understanding the influence of the SLA-MIC2 gene on porcine immune responses. PMID:26305091

  14. Autophagy proteins in antigen processing for presentation on MHC molecules.

    PubMed

    Münz, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Autophagy describes catabolic pathways that deliver cytoplasmic constituents for lysosomal degradation. Since major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules sample protein degradation products and present them to T cells for adaptive immunity, it is maybe not too surprising that autophagy contributes to this protein antigen processing for MHC presentation. However, the recently recognized breath of pathways, by which autophagy contributes to MHC antigen processing, is exciting. Macroautophagy does not only seem to deliver intracellular but facilitates also extracellular antigen processing by lysosomal hydrolysis for MHC class II presentation. Moreover, even MHC class I molecules that usually display proteasomal products are regulated by macroautophagy, probably using a pool of these molecules outside the endoplasmic reticulum, where MHC class I molecules are loaded with peptide during canonical MHC class I antigen processing. This review aims to summarize these recent developments and point out gaps of knowledge, which should be filled by further investigation, in order to harness the different antigen-processing pathways via autophagy for vaccine improvement. PMID:27319339

  15. Two-domain MHC class II molecules form stable complexes with myelin basic protein 69-89 peptide that detect and inhibit rat encephalitogenic T cells and treat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Burrows, G G; Bebo, B F; Adlard, K L; Vandenbark, A A; Offner, H

    1998-12-01

    We designed and expressed in bacteria a single-chain two-domain MHC class II molecule capable of binding and forming stable complexes with antigenic peptide. The prototype "beta1alpha1" molecule included the beta1 domain of the rat RT1.B class II molecule covalently linked to the amino terminus of the alpha1 domain. In association with the encephalitogenic myelin basic protein (MBP) 69-89 peptide recognized by Lewis rat T cells, the beta1alpha1/MBP-69-89 complex specifically labeled and inhibited activation of MBP-69-89 reactive T cells in an IL-2-reversible manner. Moreover, this complex both suppressed and treated clinical signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and inhibited delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions and lymphocyte proliferation in an Ag-specific manner. These data indicate that the beta1alpha1/MBP-69-89 complex functions as a simplified natural TCR ligand with potent inhibitory activity that does not require additional signaling from the beta2 and alpha2 domains. This new class of small soluble polypeptide may provide a template for designing human homologues useful in detecting and regulating potentially autopathogenic T cells. PMID:9834080

  16. The Crystal Structure of CD8alpha,Beta in Complex With YTS156.7.7 Fab And Interaction With Other CD8 Antibodies Define the Binding Mode of CD8alpha,Beta to MHC Class I

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, D.A.; Issafras, H.; Landais, E.; Teyton, L.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-27

    The CD8{alpha}{beta} heterodimer interacts with class I pMHC on antigen-presenting cells as a co-receptor for TCR-mediated activation of cytotoxic T cells. To characterize this immunologically important interaction, we used monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific to either CD8{alpha} or CD8{beta} to probe the mechanism of CD8{alpha}{beta} binding to pMHCI. The YTS156.7 mAb inhibits this interaction and blocks T cell activation. To elucidate the molecular basis for this inhibition, the crystal structure of the CD8{alpha}{beta} immunoglobulin-like ectodomains were determined in complex with mAb YTS156.7 Fab at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution. The YTS156.7 epitope on CD8{beta} was identified and implies that residues in the CDR1 and CDR2-equivalent loops of CD8{beta} are occluded upon binding to class I pMHC. To further characterize the pMHCI/CD8{alpha}{beta} interaction, binding of class I tetramers to CD8{alpha}{beta} on the surface of T cells was assessed in the presence of anti-CD8 mAbs. In contrast to YTS156.7, mAb YTS105.18, which is specific for CD8{alpha}, does not inhibit binding of CD8{alpha}{beta} to class I tetramers, indicating the YTS105.18 epitope is not occluded in the pMHCI/CD8{alpha}{beta} complex. Together, these data indicate a model for the pMHCI/CD8{alpha}{beta} interaction similar to that observed for CD8{alpha}{alpha} in the CD8{alpha}{alpha}/pMHCI complex, but in which CD8{alpha} occupies the lower orientation (membrane proximal to the antigen presenting cell), and CD8{beta} occupies the upper position (membrane distal). The implication of this molecular assembly for the function of CD8{alpha}{beta} in T cell activation is discussed.

  17. A Lipid Based Antigen Delivery System Efficiently Facilitates MHC Class-I Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells to Stimulate CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maji, Mithun; Mazumder, Saumyabrata; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Sabur, Abdus; Shadab, Md.; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    The most effective strategy for protection against intracellular infections such as Leishmania is vaccination with live parasites. Use of recombinant proteins avoids the risks associated with live vaccines. However, due to low immunogenicity, they fail to trigger T cell responses particularly of CD8+ cells requisite for persistent immunity. Previously we showed the importance of protein entrapment in cationic liposomes and MPL as adjuvant for elicitation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses for long-term protection. In this study we investigated the role of cationic liposomes on maturation and antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). We observed that cationic liposomes were taken up very efficiently by DCs and transported to different cellular sites. DCs activated with liposomal rgp63 led to efficient presentation of antigen to specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, lymphoid CD8+ T cells from liposomal rgp63 immunized mice demonstrated better proliferative ability when co-cultured ex vivo with stimulated DCs. Addition of MPL to vaccine enhanced the antigen presentation by DCs and induced more efficient antigen specific CD8+ T cell responses when compared to free and liposomal antigen. These liposomal formulations presented to CD8+ T cells through TAP-dependent MHC-I pathway offer new possibilities for a safe subunit vaccine. PMID:27251373

  18. A Lipid Based Antigen Delivery System Efficiently Facilitates MHC Class-I Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells to Stimulate CD8(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Maji, Mithun; Mazumder, Saumyabrata; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Sabur, Abdus; Shadab, Md; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    The most effective strategy for protection against intracellular infections such as Leishmania is vaccination with live parasites. Use of recombinant proteins avoids the risks associated with live vaccines. However, due to low immunogenicity, they fail to trigger T cell responses particularly of CD8(+) cells requisite for persistent immunity. Previously we showed the importance of protein entrapment in cationic liposomes and MPL as adjuvant for elicitation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses for long-term protection. In this study we investigated the role of cationic liposomes on maturation and antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). We observed that cationic liposomes were taken up very efficiently by DCs and transported to different cellular sites. DCs activated with liposomal rgp63 led to efficient presentation of antigen to specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, lymphoid CD8(+) T cells from liposomal rgp63 immunized mice demonstrated better proliferative ability when co-cultured ex vivo with stimulated DCs. Addition of MPL to vaccine enhanced the antigen presentation by DCs and induced more efficient antigen specific CD8(+) T cell responses when compared to free and liposomal antigen. These liposomal formulations presented to CD8(+) T cells through TAP-dependent MHC-I pathway offer new possibilities for a safe subunit vaccine. PMID:27251373

  19. A Lipid Based Antigen Delivery System Efficiently Facilitates MHC Class-I Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells to Stimulate CD8+ T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Mithun; Mazumder, Saumyabrata; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Sabur, Abdus; Shadab, Md.; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-06-01

    The most effective strategy for protection against intracellular infections such as Leishmania is vaccination with live parasites. Use of recombinant proteins avoids the risks associated with live vaccines. However, due to low immunogenicity, they fail to trigger T cell responses particularly of CD8+ cells requisite for persistent immunity. Previously we showed the importance of protein entrapment in cationic liposomes and MPL as adjuvant for elicitation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses for long-term protection. In this study we investigated the role of cationic liposomes on maturation and antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). We observed that cationic liposomes were taken up very efficiently by DCs and transported to different cellular sites. DCs activated with liposomal rgp63 led to efficient presentation of antigen to specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, lymphoid CD8+ T cells from liposomal rgp63 immunized mice demonstrated better proliferative ability when co-cultured ex vivo with stimulated DCs. Addition of MPL to vaccine enhanced the antigen presentation by DCs and induced more efficient antigen specific CD8+ T cell responses when compared to free and liposomal antigen. These liposomal formulations presented to CD8+ T cells through TAP-dependent MHC-I pathway offer new possibilities for a safe subunit vaccine.

  20. Structural Basis of the CD8[alpha beta]/MHC Class I Interaction: Focused Recognition Orients CD8[beta] to a T Cell Proximal Position[superscript 1,2

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Rui; Natarajan, Kannan; Margulies, David H.

    2009-09-18

    In the immune system, B cells, dendritic cells, NK cells, and T lymphocytes all respond to signals received via ligand binding to receptors and coreceptors. Although the specificity of T cell recognition is determined by the interaction of T cell receptors with MHC/peptide complexes, the development of T cells in the thymus and their sensitivity to Ag are also dependent on coreceptor molecules CD8 (for MHC class I (MHCI)) and CD4 (for MHCII). The CD8{alpha}{beta} heterodimer is a potent coreceptor for T cell activation, but efforts to understand its function fully have been hampered by ignorance of the structural details of its interactions with MHCI. In this study we describe the structure of CD8{alpha}{beta} in complex with the murine MHCI molecule H-2D{sup d} at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. The focus of the CD8{alpha}{beta} interaction is the acidic loop (residues 222-228) of the {alpha}3 domain of H-2D{sup d}. The {beta} subunit occupies a T cell membrane proximal position, defining the relative positions of the CD8{alpha} and CD8{beta} subunits. Unlike the CD8{alpha}{alpha} homodimer, CD8{alpha}{beta} does not contact the MHCI {alpha}{sub 2}- or {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin domains. Movements of the CD8{alpha} CDR2 and CD8{beta} CDR1 and CDR2 loops as well as the flexibility of the H-2D{sup d} CD loop facilitate the monovalent interaction. The structure resolves inconclusive data on the topology of the CD8{alpha}{beta}/MHCI interaction, indicates that CD8{beta} is crucial in orienting the CD8{alpha}{beta} heterodimer, provides a framework for understanding the mechanistic role of CD8{alpha}{beta} in lymphoid cell signaling, and offers a tangible context for design of structurally altered coreceptors for tumor and viral immunotherapy.

  1. Cheetah paradigm revisited: MHC diversity in the world's largest free-ranging population.

    PubMed

    Castro-Prieto, Aines; Wachter, Bettina; Sommer, Simone

    2011-04-01

    For more than two decades, the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has been considered a paradigm of disease vulnerability associated with low genetic diversity, particularly at the immune genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Cheetahs have been used as a classic example in numerous conservation genetics textbooks as well as in many related scientific publications. However, earlier studies used methods with low resolution to quantify MHC diversity and/or small sample sizes. Furthermore, high disease susceptibility was reported only for captive cheetahs, whereas free-ranging cheetahs show no signs of infectious diseases and a good general health status. We examined whether the diversity at MHC class I and class II-DRB loci in 149 Namibian cheetahs was higher than previously reported using single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, cloning, and sequencing. MHC genes were examined at the genomic and transcriptomic levels. We detected ten MHC class I and four class II-DRB alleles, of which nine MHC class I and all class II-DRB alleles were expressed. Phylogenetic analyses and individual genotypes suggested that the alleles belong to four MHC class I and three class II-DRB putative loci. Evidence of positive selection was detected in both MHC loci. Our study indicated that the low number of MHC class I alleles previously observed in cheetahs was due to a smaller sample size examined. On the other hand, the low number of MHC class II-DRB alleles previously observed in cheetahs was further confirmed. Compared with other mammalian species including felids, cheetahs showed low levels of MHC diversity, but this does not seem to influence the immunocompetence of free-ranging cheetahs in Namibia and contradicts the previous conclusion that the cheetah is a paradigm species of disease vulnerability. PMID:21183613

  2. MHC-Dependent Desensitization of Intrinsic Anti-Self Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Jubala, Cristan M.; Lamerato-Kozicki, Angela R.; Borakove, Michelle; Lang, Julie; Gardner, Lori A.; Coffey, David; Helm, Karen M.; Schaack, Jerome; Baier, Monika; Cutter, Gary R.; Bellgrau, Donald; Modiano, Jaime F.

    2008-01-01

    The survival of naïve T cells is compromised in the absence of molecules encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) while antigen-experienced T cells survive. We hypothesized that survival pressures in an in vivo, MHC-deficient environment would permit enrichment of less frequent antigen-experienced autoreactive cells at the expense of the majority of antigen naïve T cells. To test this hypothesis, we generated MHC class I and class II-deficient mice in NOD and C57Bl/6 (B6) backgrounds, and examined the capacity of adoptively transferred autoimmune-prone NOD T cells, or non-autoimmune prone naïve B6 T cells, respectively, to reject transplanted wild type pancreatic islets or transplantable tumors in the MHC-deficient mice. In the MHC-deficient environment, CD4 T cells acquired self-hostile properties (islet rejection and tumor invasion) that were independent from their genetic propensity for autoreactivity, while CD8 T cells required appropriate prior exposure to antigen in order to survive and function (reject tumor) in this environment; however, disengagement of Tob1, a negative regulator of proliferation, led to a reverse phenotype with regard to persistence of CD4 and CD8 T cells in the MHC-deficient environment. Our data suggest that self-peptide/MHC interactions have dual roles to facilitate survival and restrain autoreactivity, thus acting as integral components of an intrinsic network of negative regulation that maintains tolerance. PMID:18523772

  3. Identifiying human MHC supertypes using bioinformatic methods.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Guan, Pingping; Flower, Darren R

    2004-04-01

    Classification of MHC molecules into supertypes in terms of peptide-binding specificities is an important issue, with direct implications for the development of epitope-based vaccines with wide population coverage. In view of extremely high MHC polymorphism (948 class I and 633 class II HLA alleles) the experimental solution of this task is presently impossible. In this study, we describe a bioinformatics strategy for classifying MHC molecules into supertypes using information drawn solely from three-dimensional protein structure. Two chemometric techniques-hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis-were used independently on a set of 783 HLA class I molecules to identify supertypes based on structural similarities and molecular interaction fields calculated for the peptide binding site. Eight supertypes were defined: A2, A3, A24, B7, B27, B44, C1, and C4. The two techniques gave 77% consensus, i.e., 605 HLA class I alleles were classified in the same supertype by both methods. The proposed strategy allowed "supertype fingerprints" to be identified. Thus, the A2 supertype fingerprint is Tyr(9)/Phe(9), Arg(97), and His(114) or Tyr(116); the A3-Tyr(9)/Phe(9)/Ser(9), Ile(97)/Met(97) and Glu(114) or Asp(116); the A24-Ser(9) and Met(97); the B7-Asn(63) and Leu(81); the B27-Glu(63) and Leu(81); for B44-Ala(81); the C1-Ser(77); and the C4-Asn(77). PMID:15034046

  4. Evolution of nonclassical MHC-dependent invariant T cells

    PubMed Central

    Edholm, Eva-Stina; Grayfer, Leon; Robert, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    TCR-mediated specific recognition of antigenic peptides in the context of classical MHC molecules is a cornerstone of adaptive immunity of jawed vertebrate. Ancillary to these interactions, the T cell repertoire also includes unconventional T cells that recognize endogenous and/or exogenous antigens in a classical MHC-unrestricted manner. Among these, the mammalian nonclassical MHC class I-restricted invariant T cell (iT) subsets, such as iNKT and MAIT cells, are now believed to be integral to immune response initiation as well as in orchestrating subsequent adaptive immunity. Until recently the evolutionary origins of these cells were unknown. Here we review our current understanding of a nonclassical MHC class I-restricted iT cell population in the amphibian Xenopus laevis. Parallels with the mammalian iNKT and MAIT cells underline the crucial biological roles of these evolutionarily ancient immune subsets. PMID:25117267

  5. MHCcluster, a method for functional clustering of MHC molecules.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Martin; Lundegaard, Claus; Buus, Søren; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten

    2013-09-01

    The identification of peptides binding to major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) is a critical step in the understanding of T cell immune responses. The human MHC genomic region (HLA) is extremely polymorphic comprising several thousand alleles, many encoding a distinct molecule. The potentially unique specificities remain experimentally uncharacterized for the vast majority of HLA molecules. Likewise, for nonhuman species, only a minor fraction of the known MHC molecules have been characterized. Here, we describe a tool, MHCcluster, to functionally cluster MHC molecules based on their predicted binding specificity. The method has a flexible web interface that allows the user to include any MHC of interest in the analysis. The output consists of a static heat map and graphical tree-based visualizations of the functional relationship between MHC variants and a dynamic TreeViewer interface where both the functional relationship and the individual binding specificities of MHC molecules are visualized. We demonstrate that conventional sequence-based clustering will fail to identify the functional relationship between molecules, when applied to MHC system, and only through the use of the predicted binding specificity can a correct clustering be found. Clustering of prevalent HLA-A and HLA-B alleles using MHCcluster confirms the presence of 12 major specificity groups (supertypes) some however with highly divergent specificities. Importantly, some HLA molecules are shown not to fit any supertype classification. Also, we use MHCcluster to show that chimpanzee MHC class I molecules have a reduced functional diversity compared to that of HLA class I molecules. MHCcluster is available at www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/MHCcluster-2.0. PMID:23775223

  6. Interaction of TAPBPR, a tapasin homolog, with MHC-I molecules promotes peptide editing

    PubMed Central

    Morozov, Giora I.; Zhao, Huaying; Mage, Michael G.; Boyd, Lisa F.; Jiang, Jiansheng; Dolan, Michael A.; Venna, Ramesh; Norcross, Michael A.; McMurtrey, Curtis P.; Hildebrand, William; Schuck, Peter; Natarajan, Kannan; Margulies, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide loading of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules is central to antigen presentation, self-tolerance, and CD8+ T-cell activation. TAP binding protein, related (TAPBPR), a widely expressed tapasin homolog, is not part of the classical MHC-I peptide-loading complex (PLC). Using recombinant MHC-I molecules, we show that TAPBPR binds HLA-A*02:01 and several other MHC-I molecules that are either peptide-free or loaded with low-affinity peptides. Fluorescence polarization experiments establish that TAPBPR augments peptide binding by MHC-I. The TAPBPR/MHC-I interaction is reversed by specific peptides, related to their affinity. Mutational and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies confirm the structural similarities of TAPBPR with tapasin. These results support a role of TAPBPR in stabilizing peptide-receptive conformation(s) of MHC-I, permitting peptide editing. PMID:26869717

  7. Interaction of TAPBPR, a tapasin homolog, with MHC-I molecules promotes peptide editing.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Giora I; Zhao, Huaying; Mage, Michael G; Boyd, Lisa F; Jiang, Jiansheng; Dolan, Michael A; Venna, Ramesh; Norcross, Michael A; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Hildebrand, William; Schuck, Peter; Natarajan, Kannan; Margulies, David H

    2016-02-23

    Peptide loading of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules is central to antigen presentation, self-tolerance, and CD8(+) T-cell activation. TAP binding protein, related (TAPBPR), a widely expressed tapasin homolog, is not part of the classical MHC-I peptide-loading complex (PLC). Using recombinant MHC-I molecules, we show that TAPBPR binds HLA-A*02:01 and several other MHC-I molecules that are either peptide-free or loaded with low-affinity peptides. Fluorescence polarization experiments establish that TAPBPR augments peptide binding by MHC-I. The TAPBPR/MHC-I interaction is reversed by specific peptides, related to their affinity. Mutational and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies confirm the structural similarities of TAPBPR with tapasin. These results support a role of TAPBPR in stabilizing peptide-receptive conformation(s) of MHC-I, permitting peptide editing. PMID:26869717

  8. The Length Distribution of Class I-Restricted T Cell Epitopes Is Determined by Both Peptide Supply and MHC Allele-Specific Binding Preference.

    PubMed

    Trolle, Thomas; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Sidney, John; Bardet, Wilfried; Osborn, Sean C; Kaever, Thomas; Sette, Alessandro; Hildebrand, William H; Nielsen, Morten; Peters, Bjoern

    2016-02-15

    HLA class I-binding predictions are widely used to identify candidate peptide targets of human CD8(+) T cell responses. Many such approaches focus exclusively on a limited range of peptide lengths, typically 9 aa and sometimes 9-10 aa, despite multiple examples of dominant epitopes of other lengths. In this study, we examined whether epitope predictions can be improved by incorporating the natural length distribution of HLA class I ligands. We found that, although different HLA alleles have diverse length-binding preferences, the length profiles of ligands that are naturally presented by these alleles are much more homogeneous. We hypothesized that this is due to a defined length profile of peptides available for HLA binding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Based on this, we created a model of HLA allele-specific ligand length profiles and demonstrate how this model, in combination with HLA-binding predictions, greatly improves comprehensive identification of CD8(+) T cell epitopes. PMID:26783342

  9. Human B lymphoblastoid cells contain distinct patterns of cathepsin activity in endocytic compartments and regulate MHC class II transport in a cathepsin S-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Lautwein, Alfred; Kraus, Marianne; Reich, Michael; Burster, Timo; Brandenburg, J; Overkleeft, Herman S; Schwarz, Gerold; Kammer, Winfried; Weber, Ekkehard; Kalbacher, Hubert; Nordheim, Alfred; Driessen, Christoph

    2004-05-01

    Endocytic proteolysis represents a major functional component of the major histocompatibility complex class II antigen-presentation machinery. Although transport and assembly of class II molecules in the endocytic compartment are well characterized, we lack information about the pattern of endocytic protease activity along this pathway. Here, we used chemical tools that visualize endocytic proteases in an activity-dependent manner in combination with subcellular fractionation to dissect the subcellular distribution of the major cathepsins (Cat) CatS, CatB, CatH, CatD, CatC, and CatZ as well as the asparagine-specific endoprotease (AEP) in human B-lymphoblastoid cells (BLC). Endocytic proteases were distributed in two distinct patterns: CatB and CatZ were most prominent in early and late endosomes but absent from lysosomes, and CatH, CatS, CatD, CatC, and AEP distributed between late endosomes and lysosomes, suggesting that CatB and CatZ might be involved in the initial proteolytic attack on a given antigen. The entire spectrum of protease activity colocalized with human leukocyte antigen-DM and the C-terminal and N-terminal processing of invariant chain (Ii) in late endosomes. CatS was active in all endocytic compartments. Surprisingly and in contrast with results from dendritic cells, inhibition of CatS activity by leucine-homophenylalanine-vinylsulfone-phenol prevented N-terminal processing of Ii but did not alter the subcellular trafficking or surface delivery of class II complexes, as deferred from pulse-chase analysis in combination with subcellular fractionation and biotinylation of cell-surface protein. Thus, BLC contain distinct activity patterns of proteases in endocytic compartments and regulate the intracellular transport and surface-delivery of class II in a CatS-independent manner. PMID:14966190

  10. Activation of the JAK/STAT-1 Signaling Pathway by IFN-γ Can Down-Regulate Functional Expression of the MHC Class I-Related Neonatal Fc Receptor for IgG1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xindong; Ye, Lilin; Bai, Yu; Mojidi, Habi; Simister, Neil E.; Zhu, Xiaoping

    2009-01-01

    Expression of many MHC genes is enhanced at the transcriptional or posttranscriptional level following exposure to the cytokine IFN-γ. However, in this study we found that IFN-γ down-regulated the constitutive expression of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), an MHC class I-related molecule that functions to transport maternal IgG and protect IgG and albumin from degradation. Epithelial cell, macrophage-like THP-1 cell, and freshly isolated human PBMC exposure to IFN-γ resulted in a significant decrease of FcRn expression as assessed by real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting. The down-regulation of FcRn was not caused by apoptosis or the instability of FcRn mRNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and gel mobility shift assays showed that STAT-1 bound to an IFN-γ activation site in the human FcRn promoter region. Luciferase expression from an FcRn promoter-luciferase reporter gene construct was not altered in JAK1- and STAT-1-deficient cells following exposure to IFN-γ, whereas expression of JAK1 or STAT-1 protein restored the IFN-γ inhibitory effect on luciferase activity. The repressive effect of IFN-γ on the FcRn promoter was selectively reversed or blocked by mutations of the core nucleotides in the IFN-γ activation site sequence and by over-expression of the STAT-1 inhibitor PIAS1 or the dominant negative phospho-STAT-1 mutations at Tyr-701 and/or Ser-727 residues. Furthermore, STAT-1 might down-regulate FcRn transcription through sequestering the transcriptional coactivator CREB binding protein/p300. Functionally, IFN-γ stimulation dampened bidirectional transport of IgG across a polarized Calu-3 lung epithelial monolayer. Taken together, our results indicate that the JAK/STAT-1 signaling pathway was necessary and sufficient to mediate the down-regulation of FcRn gene expression by IFN-γ. PMID:18566411

  11. Sequencing and comparative analysis of the gorilla MHC genomic sequence.

    PubMed

    Wilming, Laurens G; Hart, Elizabeth A; Coggill, Penny C; Horton, Roger; Gilbert, James G R; Clee, Chris; Jones, Matt; Lloyd, Christine; Palmer, Sophie; Sims, Sarah; Whitehead, Siobhan; Wiley, David; Beck, Stephan; Harrow, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes play a critical role in vertebrate immune response and because the MHC is linked to a significant number of auto-immune and other diseases it is of great medical interest. Here we describe the clone-based sequencing and subsequent annotation of the MHC region of the gorilla genome. Because the MHC is subject to extensive variation, both structural and sequence-wise, it is not readily amenable to study in whole genome shotgun sequence such as the recently published gorilla genome. The variation of the MHC also makes it of evolutionary interest and therefore we analyse the sequence in the context of human and chimpanzee. In our comparisons with human and re-annotated chimpanzee MHC sequence we find that gorilla has a trimodular RCCX cluster, versus the reference human bimodular cluster, and additional copies of Class I (pseudo)genes between Gogo-K and Gogo-A (the orthologues of HLA-K and -A). We also find that Gogo-H (and Patr-H) is coding versus the HLA-H pseudogene and, conversely, there is a Gogo-DQB2 pseudogene versus the HLA-DQB2 coding gene. Our analysis, which is freely available through the VEGA genome browser, provides the research community with a comprehensive dataset for comparative and evolutionary research of the MHC. PMID:23589541

  12. Cloning and modeling of CD8 beta in the amphibian ambystoma Mexicanum. Evolutionary conserved structures for interactions with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules.

    PubMed

    Fellah, Julien S; Tuffèry, Pierre; Etchebest, Catherine; Guillet, Françoise; Bleux, Christian; Charlemagne, Jacques

    2002-04-17

    Mammalian and avian T-cells exhibit a large number of well characterized surface molecules associated with their maturation degree. Very little is known in comparison with T-cell differentiation in ectothermic vertebrates. This is mainly due to the lack of probes to identify T-cell subsets. We cloned and sequenced the first ectothermic CD8 beta DNA complementary to RNA from an amphibian species, the Mexican axolotl. The CD8 beta chain was 30-36% identical with its avian and mammalian homologues. The extracellular V-like domain contained the two typically conserved cysteines and was followed by a J-like sequence containing the canonical Phe-Gly-X-Gly stretch. The connecting peptide was much longer than in other species and contained potential O-glycosylation sites. The axolotl CD8 beta and major histocompatibility complex class I molecules were modeled using human HLA-A2/CD8 alphaalpha complex as template. The backbone conformation of axolotl CD8 beta matched well with the CD8 alpha-2 subunit of the human complex but significant structural differences were located in the CDR1, CDR2 and DE loops. Both axolotl and human class I showed large negative surface potential. The interacting area of the human CD8 alpha chain and of the corresponding region of axolotl CD8 beta had positive electrostatic potential compatible with complexation with the corresponding class I molecules. The presence of a CD8 beta homologue in an amphibian species implies that it was already present in the Devonian ancestor of amphibians and mammals, i.e. more than 400 million years ago. PMID:12034498

  13. CD40 promotes MHC class II expression on adipose tissue macrophages and regulates adipose tissue CD4+ T cells with obesity.

    PubMed

    Morris, David L; Oatmen, Kelsie E; Mergian, Taleen A; Cho, Kae Won; DelProposto, Jennifer L; Singer, Kanakadurga; Evans-Molina, Carmella; O'Rourke, Robert W; Lumeng, Carey N

    2016-06-01

    Obesity activates both innate and adaptive immune responses in adipose tissue, but the mechanisms critical for regulating these responses remain unknown. CD40/CD40L signaling provides bidirectional costimulatory signals between antigen-presenting cells and CD4(+) T cells, and CD40L expression is increased in obese humans. Therefore, we examined the contribution of CD40 to the progression of obesity-induced inflammation in mice. CD40 was highly expressed on adipose tissue macrophages in mice, and CD40/CD40L signaling promoted the expression of antigen-presenting cell markers in adipose tissue macrophages. When fed a high fat diet, Cd40-deficient mice had reduced accumulation of conventional CD4(+) T cells (Tconv: CD3(+)CD4(+)Foxp3(-)) in visceral fat compared with wild-type mice. By contrast, the number of regulatory CD4(+) T cells (Treg: CD3(+)CD4(+)Foxp3(+)) in lean and obese fat was similar between wild-type and knockout mice. Adipose tissue macrophage content and inflammatory gene expression in fat did not differ between obese wild-type and knockout mice; however, major histocompatibility complex class II and CD86 expression on adipose tissue macrophages was reduced in visceral fat from knockout mice. Similar results were observed in chimeric mice with hematopoietic Cd40-deficiency. Nonetheless, neither whole body nor hematopoietic disruption of CD40 ameliorated obesity-induced insulin resistance in mice. In human adipose tissue, CD40 expression was positively correlated with CD80 and CD86 expression in obese patients with type 2 diabetes. These findings indicate that CD40 signaling in adipose tissue macrophages regulates major histocompatibility complex class II and CD86 expression to control the expansion of CD4(+) T cells; however, this is largely dispensable for the development of obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance in mice. PMID:26658005

  14. A novel TaqI polymorphism in the coding region of the ovine TNXB gene in the MHC class III region: morphostructural and physiological influences.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, Oyeyemi O; Adefenwa, Mufliat A; Agaviezor, Brilliant O; Ikeobi, Christian O N; Wheto, Matthew; Okpeku, Moses; Amusan, Samuel A; Yakubu, Abdulmojeed; De Donato, Marcos; Peters, Sunday O; Imumorin, Ikhide G

    2014-02-01

    The tenascin-XB (TNXB) gene has antiadhesive effects, functions in matrix maturation in connective tissues, and localizes to the major histocompatibility complex class III region. We hypothesized that it may influence adaptive physiological response through an effect on blood vessel function. We identified a novel g.1324 A→G polymorphism at a TaqI recognition site in a 454 bp fragment of ovine TNXB and genotyped it in 150 Nigerian sheep using PCR-RFLP. The missense mutation changes glutamic acid (GAA) to glycine (GGA). Among SNP genotypes, significant differences (P < 0.05) were observed in body weight and fore cannon bone length. Interaction effects of breed, SNP genotype, and geographic location had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on chest girth. The SNP genotype was significantly (P < 0.05) associated with physiological traits of pulse rate and skin temperature. The observed effect of this novel polymorphism may be mediated through its role in connective tissue biology, requiring further association and functional studies. PMID:23877191

  15. Additive method for the prediction of protein-peptide binding affinity. Application to the MHC class I molecule HLA-A*0201.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Blythe, Martin J; Flower, Darren R

    2002-01-01

    A method has been developed for prediction of binding affinities between proteins and peptides. We exemplify the method through its application to binding predictions of peptides with affinity to major histocompatibility complex class I molecule HLA-A*0201. The method is named "additive" because it is based on the assumption that the binding affinity of a peptide could be presented as a sum of the contributions of the amino acids at each position and the interactions between them. The amino acid contributions and the contributions of the interactions between adjacent side chains and every second side chain were derived using a partial least squares (PLS) statistical methodology using a training set of 420 experimental IC50 values. The predictive power of the method was assessed using rigorous cross-validation and using an independent test set of 89 peptides. The mean value of the residuals between the experimental and predicted pIC50 values was 0.508 for this test set. The additive method was implemented in a program for rapid T-cell epitope search. It is universal and can be applied to any peptide-protein interaction where binding data is known. PMID:12645903

  16. MHC Class I Chain-Related Gene A Polymorphisms and Linkage Disequilibrium with HLA-B and HLA-C Alleles in Ocular Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Ayo, Christiane Maria; Camargo, Ana Vitória da Silveira; Frederico, Fábio Batista; Siqueira, Rubens Camargo; Previato, Mariana; Murata, Fernando Henrique Antunes; Silveira-Carvalho, Aparecida Perpétuo; Barbosa, Amanda Pires; Brandão de Mattos, Cinara de Cássia; de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether polymorphisms of the MICA (major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A) gene are associated with eye lesions due to Toxoplasma gondii infection in a group of immunocompetent patients from southeastern Brazil. The study enrolled 297 patients with serological diagnosis of toxoplasmosis. Participants were classified into two distinct groups after conducting fundoscopic exams according to the presence (n = 148) or absence (n = 149) of ocular scars/lesions due to toxoplasmosis. The group of patients with scars/lesions was further subdivided into two groups according to the type of the ocular manifestation observed: primary (n = 120) or recurrent (n = 28). Genotyping of the MICA and HLA alleles was performed by the polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific oligonucleotide technique (PCR-SSO; One Lambda®) and the MICA-129 polymorphism (rs1051792) was identified by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR-RFLP). Significant associations involving MICA polymorphisms were not found. Although the MICA*002~HLA-B*35 haplotype was associated with increased risk of developing ocular toxoplasmosis (P-value = 0.04; OR = 2.20; 95% CI = 1.05–4.60), and the MICA*008~HLA-C*07 haplotype was associated with protection against the development of manifestations of ocular toxoplasmosis (P-value = 0.009; OR: 0.44; 95% CI: 0.22–0.76), these associations were not statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. MICA polymorphisms do not appear to influence the development of ocular lesions in patients diagnosed with toxoplasmosis in this study population. PMID:26672749

  17. Boosting the MHC Class II-Restricted Tumor Antigen Presentation to CD4+ T Helper Cells: A Critical Issue for Triggering Protective Immunity and Re-Orienting the Tumor Microenvironment Toward an Anti-Tumor State

    PubMed Central

    Accolla, Roberto S.; Lombardo, Letizia; Abdallah, Rawan; Raval, Goutham; Forlani, Greta; Tosi, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Although the existence of an immune response against tumor cells is well documented, the fact that tumors take off in cancer patients indicates that neoplastic cells can circumvent this response. Over the years many investigators have described strategies to rescue the anti-tumor immune response with the aim of creating specific and long-lasting protection against the disease. When exported to human clinical settings, these strategies have revealed in most cases a very limited, if any, positive outcome. We believe that the failure is mostly due to the inadequate triggering of the CD4+ T helper (TH) cell arm of the adaptive immunity, as TH cells are necessary to trigger all the immune effector mechanisms required to eliminate tumor cells. In this review, we focus on novel strategies that by stimulating MHC class II-restricted activation of TH cells generate a specific and persistent adaptive immunity against the tumor. This point is of critical importance for both preventive and therapeutic anti-tumor vaccination protocols, because adaptive immunity with its capacity to produce specific, long-lasting protection and memory responses is indeed the final goal of vaccination. We will discuss data from our as well as other laboratories which strongly suggest that triggering a specific and persistent anti-tumor CD4+ TH cell response stably modify not only the tumor microenvironment but also tumor-dependent extratumor microenvironments by eliminating and/or reducing the blood-derived tumor infiltrating cells that may have a pro-tumor growth function such as regulatory CD4+/CD25+ T cells and myeloid-derived-suppressor cells. Within this frame, therefore, we believe that the establishment of a pro-tumor environment is not the cause but simply the consequence of the tumor strategy to primarily counteract components of the adaptive cellular immunity, particularly TH lymphocytes. PMID:24600588

  18. Establishment of the reversible peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) class I Histamer technology: tool for visualization and selection of functionally active antigen-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Sabine; Kaireit, Till; Figueiredo, Constança; Hiller, Oliver; Maecker-Kolhoff, Britta; Geyeregger, Renè; Immenschuh, Stephan; Blasczyk, Rainer; Eiz-Vesper, Britta

    2012-09-01

    Multimers of soluble peptide-major histocompatibilty complex (pMHC) molecules are used in both basic and clinical immunology. They allow the specific visualization and isolation of antigen-specific T cells from ex vivo samples. Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells sorted by pMHC multimers is an effective strategy for treatment of patients with malignancies or infectious diseases after transplantation. We developed a new reversible pMHC multimer called 'Histamer' to enable the specific detection and isolation of antiviral T cells from peripheral blood. HLA-A*02:01/CMVpp65 (495-503) Histamer (A02/CMV Histamer) was generated by coupling 6xHis-tagged pMHC molecules onto cobalt-based magnetic beads. The specificity of the Histamer was evaluated by flow cytometry. Sorting of antiviral CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) was performed by magnetic cell separation, followed by the monomerization of the Histamer after addition of the competitor L-histidine. Sorted T cells were analyzed for phenotype and function. The reversible pMHC Histamer proved to be highly specific and sensitive. CMV-specific T cells of up to 99.6% purity were isolated using the Histamer technology. Rapid and complete disassembly of the T-cell surface-bound A02/CMV Histamer followed by the subsequent dissociation of the pMHC monomers from CD8(+) CTL receptors was achieved using 100 mM L-histidine. The function of CMV-specific T cells enriched by Histamer staining did not differ from CTLs induced by standard T-cell assays. This reversible T-cell staining procedure preserves the functionality of antigen-specific T cells and can be adapted to good manufacturing practice conditions. The pMHC Histamer technology offers full flexibility and fulfills all requirements to generate clinical-grade T lymphocytes. PMID:22740564

  19. Cytokines Induce Faster Membrane Diffusion of MHC Class I and the Ly49A Receptor in a Subpopulation of Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bagawath-Singh, Sunitha; Staaf, Elina; Stoppelenburg, Arie Jan; Spielmann, Thiemo; Kambayashi, Taku; Widengren, Jerker; Johansson, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Cytokines have the potential to drastically augment immune cell activity. Apart from altering the expression of a multitude of proteins, cytokines also affect immune cell dynamics. However, how cytokines affect the molecular dynamics within the cell membrane of immune cells has not been addressed previously. Molecular movement is a vital component of all biological processes, and the rate of motion is, thus, an inherent determining factor for the pace of such processes. Natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes, which belong to the innate immune system. By fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we investigated the influence of cytokine stimulation on the membrane density and molecular dynamics of the inhibitory receptor Ly49A and its ligand, the major histocompatibility complex class I allele H-2Dd, in freshly isolated murine NK cells. H-2Dd was densely expressed and diffused slowly in resting NK cells. Ly49A was expressed at a lower density and diffused faster. The diffusion rate in resting cells was not altered by disrupting the actin cytoskeleton. A short-term stimulation with interleukin-2 or interferon-α + β did not change the surface density of moving H-2Dd or Ly49A, despite a slight upregulation at the cellular level of H-2Dd by interferon-α + β, and of Ly49A by IL-2. However, the molecular diffusion rates of both H-2Dd and Ly49A increased significantly. A multivariate analysis revealed that the increased diffusion was especially marked in a subpopulation of NK cells, where the diffusion rate was increased around fourfold compared to resting NK cells. After IL-2 stimulation, this subpopulation of NK cells also displayed lower density of Ly49A and higher brightness per entity, indicating that Ly49A may homo-cluster to a larger extent in these cells. A faster diffusion of inhibitory receptors could enable a faster accumulation of these molecules at the immune synapse with a target cell, eventually leading to a more efficient NK cell

  20. Evolution of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes in the brown bear

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins constitute an essential component of the vertebrate immune response, and are coded by the most polymorphic of the vertebrate genes. Here, we investigated sequence variation and evolution of MHC class I and class II DRB, DQA and DQB genes in the brown bear Ursus arctos to characterise the level of polymorphism, estimate the strength of positive selection acting on them, and assess the extent of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism in Ursidae. Results We found 37 MHC class I, 16 MHC class II DRB, four DQB and two DQA alleles. We confirmed the expression of several loci: three MHC class I, two DRB, two DQB and one DQA. MHC class I also contained two clusters of non-expressed sequences. MHC class I and DRB allele frequencies differed between northern and southern populations of the Scandinavian brown bear. The rate of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN) exceeded the rate of synonymous substitutions (dS) at putative antigen binding sites of DRB and DQB loci and, marginally significantly, at MHC class I loci. Models of codon evolution supported positive selection at DRB and MHC class I loci. Both MHC class I and MHC class II sequences showed orthology to gene clusters found in the giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Conclusions Historical positive selection has acted on MHC class I, class II DRB and DQB, but not on the DQA locus. The signal of historical positive selection on the DRB locus was particularly strong, which may be a general feature of caniforms. The presence of MHC class I pseudogenes may indicate faster gene turnover in this class through the birth-and-death process. South–north population structure at MHC loci probably reflects origin of the populations from separate glacial refugia. PMID:23031405

  1. Cytokine therapy reverses NK cell anergy in MHC-deficient tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ardolino, Michele; Azimi, Camillia S.; Iannello, Alexandre; Trevino, Troy N.; Horan, Lucas; Zhang, Lily; Deng, Weiwen; Ring, Aaron M.; Fischer, Suzanne; Garcia, K. Christopher; Raulet, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Various cytokines have been evaluated as potential anticancer drugs; however, most cytokine trials have shown relatively low efficacy. Here, we found that treatments with IL-12 and IL-18 or with a mutant form of IL-2 (the “superkine” called H9) provided substantial therapeutic benefit for mice specifically bearing MHC class I–deficient tumors, but these treatments were ineffective for mice with matched MHC class I+ tumors. Cytokine efficacy was linked to the reversal of the anergic state of NK cells that specifically occurred in MHC class I–deficient tumors, but not MHC class I+ tumors. NK cell anergy was accompanied by impaired early signal transduction and was locally imparted by the presence of MHC class I–deficient tumor cells, even when such cells were a minor population in a tumor mixture. These results demonstrate that MHC class I–deficient tumor cells can escape from the immune response by functionally inactivating NK cells, and suggest cytokine-based immunotherapy as a potential strategy for MHC class I–deficient tumors. These results suggest that such cytokine therapies would be optimized by stratification of patients. Moreover, our results suggest that such treatments may be highly beneficial in the context of therapies to enhance NK cell functions in cancer patients. PMID:25329698

  2. The arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 regulates CIITA-dependent MHC II transcription.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhiwen; Kong, Xiaocen; Xia, Jun; Wu, Xiaoyan; Li, He; Xu, Huihui; Fang, Mingming; Xu, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC II) dependent antigen presentation serves as a key step in mammalian adaptive immunity and host defense. In antigen presenting cells (e.g., macrophages), MHC II transcription can be activated by interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and mediated by class II transactivator (CIITA). The underlying epigenetic mechanism, however, is not completely understood. Here we report that following IFN-γ stimulation, symmetrically dimethylated histone H3 arginine 2 (H3R2Me2s) accumulated on the MHC II promoter along with CIITA. IFN-γ augmented expression, nuclear translocation, and promoter binding of the protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 in macrophages. Over-expression of PRMT5 potentiated IFN-γ induced activation of MHC II transcription in an enzyme activity-dependent manner. In contrast, PRMT5 silencing or inhibition of PRMT5 activity by methylthioadenosine (MTA) suppressed MHC II transactivation by IFN-γ. CIITA interacted with and recruited PRMT5 to the MHC II promoter and mediated the synergy between PRMT5 and ASH2/WDR5 to activate MHC II transcription. PRMT5 expression was down-regulated in senescent and H2O2-treated macrophages rendering ineffectual induction of MHC II transcription by IFN-γ. Taken together, our data reveal a pathophysiologically relevant role for PRMT5 in MHC II transactivation in macrophages. PMID:26972221

  3. MHC2MIL: a novel multiple instance learning based method for MHC-II peptide binding prediction by considering peptide flanking region and residue positions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Computational prediction of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) binding peptides can assist researchers in understanding the mechanism of immune systems and developing peptide based vaccines. Although many computational methods have been proposed, the performance of these methods are far from satisfactory. The difficulty of MHC-II peptide binding prediction comes mainly from the large length variation of binding peptides. Methods We develop a novel multiple instance learning based method called MHC2MIL, in order to predict MHC-II binding peptides. We deem each peptide in MHC2MIL as a bag, and some substrings of the peptide as the instances in the bag. Unlike previous multiple instance learning based methods that consider only instances of fixed length 9 (9 amino acids), MHC2MIL is able to deal with instances of both lengths of 9 and 11 (11 amino acids), simultaneously. As such, MHC2MIL incorporates important information in the peptide flanking region. For measuring the distances between different instances, furthermore, MHC2MIL explicitly highlights the amino acids in some important positions. Results Experimental results on a benchmark dataset have shown that, the performance of MHC2MIL is significantly improved by considering the instances of both 9 and 11 amino acids, as well as by emphasizing amino acids at key positions in the instance. The results are consistent with those reported in the literature on MHC-II peptide binding. In addition to five important positions (1, 4, 6, 7 and 9) for HLA(human leukocyte antigen, the name of MHC in Humans) DR peptide binding, we also find that position 2 may play some roles in the binding process. By using 5-fold cross validation on the benchmark dataset, MHC2MIL outperforms two state-of-the-art methods of MHC2SK and NN-align with being statistically significant, on 12 HLA DP and DQ molecules. In addition, it achieves comparable performance with MHC2SK and NN-align on 14 HLA DR molecules. MHC2MIL

  4. ZXDC, a novel zinc finger protein that binds CIITA and activates MHC gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kandari, Wafa; Jambunathan, Srikarthika; Navalgund, Vandana; Koneni, Rupa; Freer, Margot; Parimi, Neeta; Mudhasani, Rajini; Fontes, Joseph D.

    2006-01-01

    The class II trans-activator (CIITA) is recognized as the master regulator of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II gene transcription and contributes to the transcription of MHC class I genes. To better understand the function of CIITA, we performed yeast two-hybrid with the C-terminal 807 amino acids of CIITA, and cloned a novel human cDNA named zinc finger, X-linked, duplicated family member C (ZXDC). The 858 amino acid ZXDC protein contains 10 zinc fingers and a transcriptional activation domain, and was found to interact with the region of CIITA containing leucine-rich repeats. Over-expression of ZXDC in human cell lines resulted in super-activation of MHC class I and class II promoters by CIITA. Conversely, silencing of ZXDC expression reduced the ability of CIITA to activate transcription of MHC class II genes. Given the specific interaction between the ZXDC and CIITA proteins, as well as the effect of ZXDC on MHC gene transcription, it appears that ZXDC is an important regulator of both MHC class I and class II transcription. PMID:16600381

  5. Genetic diversity and differentiation of the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) population in western Sichuan, China, based on the second exon of the major histocompatibility complex class II DQB (MhcMamu-DQB1) alleles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstracts Background Rhesus macaques living in western Sichuan, China, have been separated into several isolated populations due to habitat fragmentation. Previous studies based on the neutral or nearly neutral markers (mitochondrial DNA or microsatellites) showed high levels of genetic diversity and moderate genetic differentiation in the Sichuan rhesus macaques. Variation at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) loci is widely accepted as being maintained by balancing selection, even with a low level of neutral variability in some species. However, in small and isolated or bottlenecked populations, balancing selection may be overwhelmed by genetic drift. To estimate microevolutionary forces acting on the isolated rhesus macaque populations, we examined genetic variation at Mhc-DQB1 loci in 119 wild rhesus macaques from five geographically isolated populations in western Sichuan, China, and compared the levels of MHC variation and differentiation among populations with that previously observed at neutral microsatellite markers. Results 23 Mamu-DQB1 alleles were identified in 119 rhesus macaques in western Sichuan, China. These macaques exhibited relatively high levels of genetic diversity at Mamu-DQB1. The Hanyuan population presented the highest genetic variation, whereas the Heishui population was the lowest. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and pairwise FST values showed moderate genetic differentiation occurring among the five populations at the Mhc-DQB1 locus. Non-synonymous substitutions occurred at a higher frequency than synonymous substitutions in the peptide binding region. Levels of MHC variation within rhesus macaque populations are concordant with microsatellite variation. On the phylogenetic tree for the rhesus and crab-eating macaques, extensive allele or allelic lineage sharing is observed betweenthe two species. Conclusions Phylogenetic analyses confirm the apparent trans-species model of evolution of the Mhc-DQB1 genes in these

  6. MHC gene copy number variation in Tasmanian devils: implications for the spread of a contagious cancer

    PubMed Central

    Siddle, Hannah V.; Marzec, Jolanta; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Jones, Menna; Belov, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Tasmanian devils face extinction owing to the emergence of a contagious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is a clonal cancer spread owing to a lack of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) barriers in Tasmanian devil populations. We present a comprehensive screen of MHC diversity in devils and identify