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Sample records for mhd waves effects

  1. Study of MHD Effects on Surface Waves in Liquid Gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, W.; Ji, H.; Pace, D.; Rappaport, H.

    2001-10-01

    The liquid metal experiment (LMX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has been constructed to study magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects on the propagation of surface waves in liquid metals in an imposed horizontal magnetic field. The physics of liquid metal is of interest generally as a regime of small magnetic Reynolds number MHD and more specifically contributes basic knowledge to the applications of liquid lithium walls in a fusion reactor. Surface waves are driven by a wave driver controlled by a PC-based Labview system. A non-invasive diagnostic measures surface fluctuations at multiple locations accurately by reflecting an array of lasers off the surface and onto a screen recorded by an ICCD camera. The real part of the dispersion relation has been measured precisely and agrees well with a linear theory, revealing the role of surface oxidation. Experiments have also confirmed that a transverse magnetic field does not affect wave propagation, and have qualitatively observed MHD damping (a non-zero imaginary component of the dispersion relation) of waves propagating in a parallel magnetic field. Planned upgrades to LMX will enable quantitative measurement of this MHD damping rate as well as experiments on two-dimensional waves and nonlinear waves. Implications to the liquid metal wall concept in fusion reactors will be discussed.

  2. MHD Wave in Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, Robert

    2016-02-01

    The study of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves and oscillations in the solar atmosphere is one of the fastest developing fields in solar physics, and lies in the mainstream of using solar instrumentation data. This chapter first addresses the spatial frequency morphology of sources of sunspot oscillations and waves, including their localization, size, oscillation periods, and height localization with the mechanism of cutoff frequency that forms the observed emission variability. Then, it presents a review dynamic of sunspot wave processes, provides the information about the structure of wave fronts and their time variations, and investigates the oscillation frequency transformation depending on the wave energy. The chapter also addresses the initializing solar flares caused by trigger agents like magnetoacoustic waves, accelerated particle beams, and shocks. Special attention is paid to the relation between the flare reconnection periodic initialization and the dynamics of sunspot slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  3. MHD simple waves and the divergence wave

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G. M.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.

    2010-03-25

    In this paper we investigate magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simple divergence waves in MHD, for models in which nablacentre dotBnot =0. These models are related to the eight wave Riemann solvers in numerical MHD, in which the eighth wave is the divergence wave associated with nablacentre dotBnot =0. For simple wave solutions, all physical variables (the gas density, pressure, fluid velocity, entropy, and magnetic field induction in the MHD case) depend on a single phase function phi. We consider the form of the MHD equations used by both Powell et al. and Janhunen. It is shown that the Janhunen version of the equations possesses fully nonlinear, exact simple wave solutions for the divergence wave, but no physically meaningful simple divergence wave solution exists for the Powell et al. system. We suggest that the 1D simple, divergence wave solution for the Janhunen system, may be useful for the testing and validation of numerical MHD codes.

  4. Is the Alfven-wave propagation effect important for energy decay in homogeneous MHD turbulence?

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Murshed; Gray, Perry C.; Pontius, Duane H. Jr.; Matthaeus, William H.; Oughton, Sean

    1996-07-20

    We investigate the role of three-point decorrelation due to Alfven wave propagation in three-dimensional incompressible homogeneous MHD turbulence. By comparing numerical simulations with theoretical expectations, we have studied how this effect influences the decay of turbulent energy caused by both an external mean magnetic field and the fluctuating turbulent field. Decay is initially suppressed by a mean magnetic field, as expected, but the effect soon saturates. The decay rate does not scale with mean magnetic field for higher values. The disagreement with theoretical predictions can be accounted for by anisotropic spectral transfer. Thus, phenomenological models for energy decay that include decorrelation due to Alfvenic propagation are not substantiated. This work complements our detailed study of various models of energy decay in homogeneous MHD [Hossain et al., 1995].

  5. Resonant behaviour of MHD waves on magnetic flux tubes. III - Effect of equilibrium flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goossens, Marcel; Hollweg, Joseph V.; Sakurai, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    The Hollweg et al. (1990) analysis of MHD surface waves in a stationary equilibrium is extended. The conservation laws and jump conditions at Alfven and slow resonance points obtained by Sakurai et al. (1990) are generalized to include an equilibrium flow, and the assumption that the Eulerian perturbation of total pressure is constant is recovered as the special case of the conservation law for an equilibrium with straight magnetic field lines and flow along the magnetic field lines. It is shown that the conclusions formulated by Hollweg et al. are still valid for the straight cylindrical case. The effect of curvature is examined.

  6. Three-dimensional MHD modeling of flare-induced waves in coronal loops: thermal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provornikova, Elena; Ofman, Leon; Wang, Tongjiang

    EUV imaging and spectroscopic observations from several space missions (SOHO, TRACE, Hinode/EIS, SDO/AIA) have revealed the presence of MHD waves in solar coronal loops. Past analysis of SOHO/SUMER data suggested that slow magnetosonic waves in hot coronal loops are excited by flares at the loop`s footpoint. Recent Hinode/EIS observed propagating disturbances in active region loops were interpreted as flows as well as waves most likely generated by plasma outflows or jets. In order to understand dynamics of plasma in coronal loops due to flares or jets at the lower corona boundary, we perform full 3D MHD modeling of an active region and consider different mechanisms of wave excitation. We assume an initial equilibrium of the model active region with dipole magnetic field structure, gravitationally stratified density and temperature obtained from polytropic equation of state of the background coronal plasma. We extend previous isothermal studies by including full energy equation with empirical heating and radiative losses terms in the model. We study waves in both, short and long loops, and consider two excitation mechanisms in the model: impulsive plasma injection into the steady plasma upflow along the magnetic field lines, and impulsive heating at the footpoint of the loop. We show initiation and evolution of flows, excitation and damping of waves and flow-wave interaction in the loops. We compare our new results with previous models and observations.

  7. Alfven Wave Tomography for Cold MHD Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    I.Y. Dodin; N.J. Fisch

    2001-09-07

    Alfven waves propagation in slightly nonuniform cold plasmas is studied by means of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) nonlinear equations. The evolution of the MHD spectrum is shown to be governed by a matrix linear differential equation with constant coefficients determined by the spectrum of quasi-static plasma density perturbations. The Alfven waves are shown not to affect the plasma density inhomogeneities, as they scatter off of them. The application of the MHD spectrum evolution equation to the inverse scattering problem allows tomographic measurements of the plasma density profile by scanning the plasma volume with Alfven radiation.

  8. Effects of spatial transport and ambient wave intensity on the generation of MHD waves by interstellar pickup protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isenberg, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Intense MHD waves generated by the isotropization of interstellar pickup protons were predicted by Lee and Ip (1987) to appear in the solar wind whenever pickup proton fluxes were high enough. However, in reality these waves have proved surprisingly difficult to identify, even in the presence of observed pickup protons. We investigate the wave excitation by isotropization from an initially broad pitch-angle distribution instead of the narrow ring-beam assumed by Lee and Ip. The pitch angle of a newly-ionized proton is given by theta(sub o), the angle between the magnetic field (averaged over a pickup proton gyroradius) and the solar wind flow at the time of ionization. Then, a broadened distribution results from spatial transport of pickup protons prior to isotropization from regions upstream along the field containing different values of theta(sub o). The value of theta(sub o) will vary as a result of the ambient long-wavelength fluctuations in the solar wind. Thus, the range of initial pitch-angles is directly related to the amplitude of these fluctuations within a length-scale determined by the isotropization time. We show that a broad initial pitch-angle distribution can significantly modify the intensity and shape of the pickup-proton-generated wave spectrum, and we derive a criterion for the presence of observable pickup-proton generated waves given the intensity of the ambient long wavelength fluctuations.

  9. Linear and Nonlinear MHD Wave Processes in Plasmas. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tataronis, J. A.

    2004-06-01

    This program treats theoretically low frequency linear and nonlinear wave processes in magnetized plasmas. A primary objective has been to evaluate the effectiveness of MHD waves to heat plasma and drive current in toroidal configurations. The research covers the following topics: (1) the existence and properties of the MHD continua in plasma equilibria without spatial symmetry; (2) low frequency nonresonant current drive and nonlinear Alfven wave effects; and (3) nonlinear electron acceleration by rf and random plasma waves. Results have contributed to the fundamental knowledge base of MHD activity in symmetric and asymmetric toroidal plasmas. Among the accomplishments of this research effort, the following are highlighted: Identification of the MHD continuum mode singularities in toroidal geometry. Derivation of a third order ordinary differential equation that governs nonlinear current drive in the singular layers of the Alfvkn continuum modes in axisymmetric toroidal geometry. Bounded solutions of this ODE implies a net average current parallel to the toroidal equilibrium magnetic field. Discovery of a new unstable continuum of the linearized MHD equation in axially periodic circular plasma cylinders with shear and incompressibility. This continuum, which we named “accumulation continuum” and which is related to ballooning modes, arises as discrete unstable eigenfrequency accumulate on the imaginary frequency axis in the limit of large mode numbers. Development of techniques to control nonlinear electron acceleration through the action of multiple coherent and random plasmas waves. Two important elements of this program aye student participation and student training in plasma theory.

  10. MHD Waves in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter focuses on reviewing several observational aspects of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in the solar wind, in particular on Alfvén waves, Alfvénic turbulent spectrum, and their role in heating and accelerating the solar wind. It also reviews computational models that incorporate Alfvén waves as the driving source of the wind in the lower corona (coronal holes) and in the inner heliosphere, with emphasis on multi-dimensional models. Evidence for MHD waves in the solar wind is obtained from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations using Earth-based radio telescope observations of distant (galactic) radio sources. The solar wind electron density variability in the line of sight affects the received radio signal. The propagating fluctuations and their correlations are used to estimate the solar wind velocity and the wave amplitude in the parallel and the perpendicular directions in line of sight.

  11. MHD Wave Modes Resolved in Fine-Scale Chromospheric Magnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verth, G.; Jess, D. B.

    2016-02-01

    Due to its complex and dynamic fine-scale structure, the chromosphere is a particularly challenging region of the Sun's atmosphere to understand. It is now widely accepted that to model chromospheric dynamics, even on a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) scale, while also calculating spectral line emission, one must realistically include the effects of partial ionization and radiative transfer in a multi-fluid plasma under non-LTE conditions. Accurate quantification of MHD wave energetics must be founded on a precise identification of the actual wave mode being observed. This chapter focuses on MHD kink-mode identification, MHD sausage mode identification, and MHD torsional Alfvén wave identification. It then reviews progress in determining more accurate energy flux estimations of specific MHD wave modes observed in the chromosphere. The chapter finally examines how the discovery of these MHD wave modes has helped us advance the field of chromospheric magnetoseismology.

  12. Amplitudes of MHD Waves in Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Aimee Ann; Cally, Paul; Baldner, Charles; Kleint, Lucia; Tarbell, Theodore D.; De Pontieu, Bart; Scherrer, Philip H.; Rajaguru, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The conversion of p-modes into MHD waves by strong magnetic fields occurs mainly in the sub-photospheric layers. The photospheric signatures of MHD waves are weak due to low amplitudes at the beta=1 equipartion level where mode-conversion occurs. We report on small amplitude oscillations observed in the photosphere with Hinode SOT/SP in which we analyze time series for sunspots ARs 12186 (11.10.2014) and 12434 (17.10.2015). No significant magnetic field oscillations are recovered in the umbra or penumbra in the ME inversion. However, periodicities in the inclination angle are found at the umbral/penumbral boundary with 5 minute periods. Upward propagating waves are indicated in the intensity signals correlated between HMI and AIA at different heights. We compare SP results with the oscillations observed in HMI data. Simultaneous IRIS data shows transition region brightening above the umbral core.

  13. Nonlinear MHD Waves in a Prominence Foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.; Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T.; Schmieder, B.

    2015-11-01

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ˜ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5-11 minutes and wavelengths <2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating waves. The magnetic field was measured with the THEMIS instrument and was found to be 5-14 G. For the typical prominence density the corresponding fast magnetosonic speed is ˜20 km s-1, in qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure.

  14. Dispersion equation of gravito-MHD waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, Gordana

    2016-03-01

    We derive the dispersion equation for gravito-MHD waves in an isothermal, gravitationally stratified plasma with a horizontal inhomogeneous magnetic field. In the present model the sound and the Alfvén speeds are constant. It is known that in this model analytical solutions can be obtained for linearized perturbations. There are three modes propagating in the considered plasma: the fast, the slow and the Alfvén mode, all modified by gravity. In the extreme short wavelength limit, these waves propagate in a locally uniform plasma. The waves with larger wavelengths will be affected by the nonuniformity of the medium resulting from the action of gravitational force ρg. In the case without magnetic field these waves become gravito-acoustic waves.

  15. Dispersive waves in a seeded MHD generator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K. G.

    1972-01-01

    The equations giving the response of a slightly ionized plasma with monatomic components to sinusoidal perturbations have been formulated. Included in the model equations were the electron Hall effect, electron thermal diffusion, radiation, and electron-atom rate processes. Plasma conditions were limited to those where viscous effects, the induced magnetic field, ion slip, and atom-atom inelastic processes can be neglected. Presented are results of numerical calculations for MHD generators with a working fluid of potassium seeded argon.

  16. Propagation and damping of slow MHD waves in a flowing viscous coronal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nagendra; Kumar, Anil; Murawski, K.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the propagation of slow MHD waves in a flowing viscous solar coronal plasma. The compressive viscosity and steady flow along and opposite to the wave propagation are taken into account to study the damping of slow waves. We numerically solve the MHD equations by MacCormack method to examine the effect of steady flow on the damping of slow MHD waves in viscous solar coronal plasma. Amplitude of velocity perturbation and damping time of slow waves decrease with the increase in the value of Mach number. Flow causes a phase shift in the perturbed velocity amplitude and an increase in wave period. The damping of slow waves in flowing viscous plasma is stronger than the damping of waves in viscous plasma. Slow wave in backward flow damps earlier than the wave in forward flow.

  17. Analysis and gyrokinetic simulation of MHD Alfven wave interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, Kevin Derek

    effect of wave amplitude upon the validity of our analytic solution, exploring the nature of strong turbulence. In the kinetic limit where k⊥ rhoi ≳ 1 where incompressible MHD is no longer a valid description, we illustrate how the nonlinear evolution departs from our analytic expression. The analytic theory we develop provides a framework from which more sophisticated of weak and strong inertial-range turbulence theories may be developed. Characterization of the limits of this theory may provide guidance in the development of kinetic Alfven wave turbulence.

  18. Inductive-dynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling via MHD waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jiannan; Song, Paul; Vasyliūnas, Vytenis M.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate magnetosphere-ionosphere/thermosphere (M-IT) coupling via MHD waves by numerically solving time-dependent continuity, momentum, and energy equations for ions and neutrals, together with Maxwell's equations (Ampère's and Faraday's laws) and with photochemistry included. This inductive-dynamic approach we use is fundamentally different from those in previous magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) coupling models: all MHD wave modes are retained, and energy and momentum exchange between waves and plasma are incorporated into the governing equations, allowing a self-consistent examination of dynamic M-I coupling. Simulations, using an implicit numerical scheme, of the 1-D ionosphere/thermosphere system responding to an imposed convection velocity at the top boundary are presented to show how magnetosphere and ionosphere are coupled through Alfvén waves during the transient stage when the IT system changes from one quasi steady state to another. Wave reflection from the low-altitude ionosphere plays an essential role, causing overshoots and oscillations of ionospheric perturbations, and the dynamical Hall effect is an inherent aspect of the M-I coupling. The simulations demonstrate that the ionosphere/thermosphere responds to magnetospheric driving forces as a damped oscillator.

  19. MHD Effects on Surface Stability and Turbulence in Liquid Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Lauren; Ji, Hantau; Zweben, Stewart

    2000-10-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is a significant element in understanding many phenomena observed in space and laboratory plasmas. MHD models also appropriately describe behaviors of liquid metals. Currently, there are many interests in the utilization of liquid metal in fusion devices; therefore an understanding of MHD physics in liquid metals is imperative. A small experiment has been built to study the MHD effects on turbulence and surface waves in liquid metal. To fully examine the MHD properties, a reference case in hydrodynamics is established using water or Gallium without the presence of the magnetic field or electrical current. An external wave driver with varying frequency and amplitude excites surface waves on the liquid metal. The experimental case using Gallium is run with the presence of the magnetic field and/ or electric pulses. The magnetic field is induced using two magnetic field coils on either side of the liquid metal and the electrical current is induced using electrodes. The measured dispersion relations of the two cases are then compared to the theoretical predictions. Several diagnostics are used in concert to accurately measure the wave characteristics. The surface waves will be recorded visually through a camera and the amplitude and frequency of the waves will be measured using a laser and fiber-optic system. This successful experiment will significantly enhance knowledge of liquid metal wave behavior and therefore aid in the applications of MHD in fusion plasmas. This worked was conducted as part of the DOE-sponsored National Undergraduate Fellowship Program in Plasma Physics

  20. A Leaky Waveguide Model for MHD Wave Driven Winds from Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, driven by the large scale convective motions of the photosphere are suggested as a possible source of additional acceleration for the stellar wind. Most of the turbulent power in a coronal hole is carried by MHD waves with periods of a few hundred seconds or longer. This is evident from direct observations of turbulence in the solar photosphere, as well as in situ observations of turbulence in the solar wind. But waves with periods this long have wavelengths which are typically as large as the transverse scale of the coronal hole flux tube itself. For these waves boundary effects are important and the coronal hole must be treated as a waveguide. The propagation of MHD waves using this waveguide approach is discussed. The simple model presented demonstrates that coronal holes can act as waveguides for MHD waves. For typical solar parameters the waves are compressible and can generate a wave tensile force which tends to cancel at least part of the wave pressure force. This effect tends to decrease the efficiency of MHD wave acceleration.

  1. Two-fluid MHD Regime of Drift Wave Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shang-Chuan; Zhu, Ping; Xie, Jin-Lin; Liu, Wan-Dong

    2015-11-01

    Drift wave instabilities contribute to the formation of edge turbulence and zonal flows, and thus are believed to play essential roles in the anomalous transport processes in tokamaks. Whereas drift waves are generally assumed to be local and electrostatic, experiments have often found regimes where the spatial scales and the magnetic components of drift waves approach those of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes. In this work we study such a drift wave regime in a cylindrical magnetized plasma using a full two-fluid MHD model implemented in the NIMROD code. The linear dependency of growth rates on resistivity and the dispersion relation found in the NIMROD calculations qualitatively agree with theoretical analysis. As the azimuthal mode number increases, the drift modes become highly localized radially; however, unlike the conventional local approximation, the radial profile of the drift mode tends to shift toward the edge away from the center of the density gradient slope, suggesting the inhomogeneity of two-fluid effects. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China Grant 11275200 and National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China Grant 2014GB124002.

  2. Propagation and Dissipation of MHD Waves in Coronal Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, B. N.

    2006-11-01

    bholadwivedi@gmail.com In view of the landmark result on the solar wind outflow, starting between 5 Mm and 20 Mm above the photosphere in magnetic funnels, we investigate the propagation and dissipation of MHD waves in coronal holes. We underline the importance of Alfvén wave dissipation in the magnetic funnels through the viscous and resistive plasma. Our results show that Alfvén waves are one of the primary energy sources in the innermost part of coronal holes where the solar wind outflow starts. We also consider compressive viscosity and thermal conductivity to study the propagation and dissipation of long period slow longitudinal MHD waves in polar coronal holes. We discuss their likely role in the line profile narrowing, and in the energy budget for coronal holes and the solar wind. We compare the contribution of longitudinal MHD waves with high frequency Alfvén waves.

  3. Vorticity equation for MHD fast waves in geospace environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R.; Lui, A. T. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The MHD vorticity equation is modified in order to apply it to nonlinear MHD fast waves or shocks when their extent along the magnetic field is limited. Field-aligned current (FAC) generation is also discussed on the basis of this modified vorticity equation. When the wave normal is not aligned to the finite velocity convection and the source region is spatially limited, a longitudinal polarization causes a pair of plus and minus charges inside the compressional plane waves or shocks, generating a pair of FACs. This polarization is not related to the separation between the electrons and ions caused by their difference in mass, a separation which is inherent to compressional waves. The resultant double field-aligned current structure exists both with and without the contributions from curvature drift, which is questionable in terms of its contribution to vorticity change from the viewpoint of single-particle motion.

  4. Fundamental Studies On Development Of MHD (Magnetohydrodynamic) Generator Implement On Wave Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, M. F. M. A.; Apandi, Muhamad Al-Hakim Md; Sabri, M.; Shahril, K.

    2016-02-01

    As increasing of agricultural and industrial activities each year has led to an increasing in demand for energy. Possibility in the future, the country was not able to offer a lot of energy and power demand. This means that we need to focus on renewable energy to supply the demand for energy. Energy harvesting is among a method that can contribute on the renewable energy. MHD power generator is a new way to harvest the energy especially Ocean wave energy. An experimental investigation was conducted to explore performance of MHD generator. The effect of intensity of NaCl Solution (Sea Water), flow rate of NaCl solution, magnetic strength and magnet position to the current produce was analyzed. The result shows that each factor is give a significant effect to the current produce, because of that each factor need to consider on develop of MHD generator to harvest the wave energy as an alternative way to support the demand for energy.

  5. Doppler displacements in kink MHD waves in solar flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Marcel; Van Doorsselaere, Tom; Terradas, Jaume; Verth, Gary; Soler, Roberto

    Doppler displacements in kink MHD waves in solar flux tubes Presenting author: M. Goossens Co-authors: R. Soler, J. Terradas, T. Van Doorsselaere, G. Verth The standard interpretation of the transverse MHD waves observed in the solar atmosphere is that they are non-axisymmetric kink m=1) waves on magnetic flux tubes. This interpretation is based on the fact that axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric fluting waves do not displace the axis of the loop and the loop as a whole while kink waves indeed do so. A uniform transverse motion produces a Doppler displacement that is constant across the magnetic flux tube. A recent development is the observation of Doppler displacements that vary across the loop. The aim of the present contribution is to show that spatial variations of the Doppler displacements across the loop can be caused by kink waves. The motion associated with a kink wave is purely transverse only when the flux tube is uniform and sufficiently thin. Only in that case do the radial and azimuthal components of displacement have the same amplitude and is the azimuthal component a quarter of a period ahead of the radial component. This results in a unidirectional or transverse displacement. When the flux tube is non-uniform and has a non-zero radius the conditions for the generation of a purely transverse motion are not any longer met. In that case the motion in a kink wave is the sum of a transverse motion and a non-axisymmetric rotational motion that depends on the azimuthal angle. It can produce complicated variations of the Doppler displacement across the loop. I shall discuss the various cases of possible Doppler displacenents that can occur depending on the relative sizes of the amplitudes of the radial and azimuthal components of the displacement in the kink wave and on the orientation of the line of sight.

  6. MHD-waves in the geomagnetic tail: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonovich, Anatoliy; Mazur, Vitaliy; Kozlov, Daniil

    2015-03-01

    This article presents the review of experimental and theoretical studies on ultra-lowfrequency MHD oscillations of the geomagnetic tail. We consider the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetopause, oscillations with a discrete spectrum in the "magic frequencies"range, the ballooning instability of coupled Alfvén and slow magnetosonic waves, and "flapping" oscillations of the current sheet of the geomagnetic tail. Over the last decade, observations from THEMIS, CLUSTER and Double Star satellites have been of great importance for experimental studies. The use of several spacecraft allows us to study the structure of MHD oscillations with high spatial resolution. Due to this, we can make a detailed comparison between theoretical results and those obtained from multi-spacecraft studies. To make such comparisons in theoretical studies, in turn, we have to use the numerical models closest to the real magnetosphere.

  7. Eigen-Frequencies of MHD Wave Equations in the Presence of Longitudinal Stratification Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, Shahriar; Nasiri, Mojtaba; Dadashi, Neda; Safari, Hossein

    2015-04-01

    Coronal Loops oscillations and MHD waves propagating in solar corona and transition region has been observed by TRACE telescope in 1999. In this Study, the MHD mode oscillations of the coronal plasma are studied. The aim is to identify the effect of structuring such as density on the frequencies of oscillations. We modeled the coronal medium as a zero-plasma with longitudinally density stratification. Magnetic flux tube oscillations are categorized into sausage, kink and torsion modes. The MHD equations are reduced and the governing equation are solved numerically using Finite Element Method. Eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions are extracted. The torsional mode is analyzed. By changing the stratification parameter the antinodes move towards the footpoints and we also concluded that in the thin tube approximation, leakage modes are propagated.

  8. Is the magnetosphere a lens for MHD waves?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, K.; Sharma, A. S.; Valdivia, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    A viewpoint of the magnetosphere as a lens for MHD waves is presented. Using a simple model of the variation of the Alfven speed as proportional to the local magnetic value given by the Earth's dipole field and that due to the magnetopause currents represented by a current loop, it is found that the near-Earth magnetotail, in the range 8-16 R(sub E), is the focus of the magnetospheric lens. This location is found to be quite insensitive to a wide variation of parameters. By using simple diffraction theory analysis it is found that the focal region extends about 1 R(sub E) about the neutral sheet in the north-south plane and 0.2 - 0.5 R(sub E) along the Sun-Earth line. Compressive MHD waves carried by the solar wind or created by the interaction of the wind with the magnetopause can be amplified by a factor of about 100 in the focal region and this has potentially important implications to substorm activity.

  9. MHD waves and instabilities for gravitating, magnetized configurations in motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, Rony; Goedbloed, Hans J. P.

    Seismic probing of equilibrium configurations is of course well-known from geophysics, but has also been succesfully used to determine the internal structure of the Sun to an amazing accuracy. The results of helioseismology are quite impressive, although they only exploit an equilibrium structure where inward gravity is balanced by a pressure gradient in a 1D radial fashion. In principle, one can do the same for stationary, gravitating, magnetized plasma equilibria, as needed to perform MHD seismology in astrophysical jets or accretion disks. The introduction of (sheared) differential rotation does require the important switch from diagnosing static to stationary equilibrium configurations. The theory to describe all linear waves and instabilities in ideal MHD, given an exact stationary, gravitating, magnetized plasma equilibrium, in any dimensionality (1D, 2D, 3D) has been known since 1960, and is governed by the Frieman-Rotenberg equation. The full (mathematical) power of spectral theory governing physical eigenmode determination comes into play when using the Frieman-Rotenberg equation for moving equilibria, as applicable to astrophysical jets, accretion disks, but also solar flux ropes with stationary flow patterns. I will review exemplary seismic studies of flowing equilibrium configurations, covering solar to astrophysical configurations in motion. In that case, even essentially 1D configurations require quantification of the spectral web of eigenmodes, organizing the complex eigenfrequency plane.

  10. Kelvin-Helmholtz Unstable Magnetotail Flow Channels: Deceleration and Radiation of MHD Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkakin, H.; Mann, I. R.; Rankin, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) of magnetotail flow channels associated with burstybulk flows (BBFs) is investigated. MHD oscillations of the channel in both kink and sausage modes areinvestigated for KHI, and both the primary and secondary KHIs are found that drive MHD waves. Theseinstabilities are likely to be important for flow channel braking where the KHI removes energy from the flow.At flow speeds above the peak growth rate, the MHD modes excited by KHI develop from surface modesinto propagating modes leading to the radiation of MHD waves from the flow channel. The coupling ofBBF-driven shear flow instabilities to MHD waves presented here represents a new paradigm to explain BBFexcitation of tail flapping. Our model can also explain, for the first time, the generation mechanism for theobservations of waves propagating toward both flanks and emitted from BBF channels in the magnetotail.

  11. Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable magnetotail flow channels: Deceleration and radiation of MHD waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkakin, H.; Mann, I. R.; Rankin, R.

    2014-06-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) of magnetotail flow channels associated with bursty bulk flows (BBFs) is investigated. MHD oscillations of the channel in both kink and sausage modes are investigated for KHI, and both the primary and secondary KHIs are found that drive MHD waves. These instabilities are likely to be important for flow channel braking where the KHI removes energy from the flow. At flow speeds above the peak growth rate, the MHD modes excited by KHI develop from surface modes into propagating modes leading to the radiation of MHD waves from the flow channel. The coupling of BBF-driven shear flow instabilities to MHD waves presented here represents a new paradigm to explain BBF excitation of tail flapping. Our model can also explain, for the first time, the generation mechanism for the observations of waves propagating toward both flanks and emitted from BBF channels in the magnetotail.

  12. Large amplitude MHD waves upstream of the Jovian bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Smith, C. W.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of large amplitude magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) waves upstream of Jupiter's bow shock are analyzed. The waves are found to be right circularly polarized in the solar wind frame which suggests that they are propagating in the fast magnetosonic mode. A complete spectral and minimum variance eigenvalue analysis of the data was performed. The power spectrum of the magnetic fluctuations contains several peaks. The fluctuations at 2.3 mHz have a direction of minimum variance along the direction of the average magnetic field. The direction of minimum variance of these fluctuations lies at approximately 40 deg. to the magnetic field and is parallel to the radial direction. We argue that these fluctuations are waves excited by protons reflected off the Jovian bow shock. The inferred speed of the reflected protons is about two times the solar wind speed in the plasma rest frame. A linear instability analysis is presented which suggests an explanation for many of the observed features of the observations.

  13. Energetic particle effects on global MHD modes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of energetic particles on MHD type modes are studied by analytical theories and the nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code (NOVA-K). In particular we address the problems of (1) the stabilization of ideal MHD internal kink modes and the excitation of resonant fishbone'' internal modes and (2) the alpha particle destabilization of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) via transit resonances. Analytical theories are presented to help explain the NOVA-K results. For energetic trapped particles generated by neutral-beam injection (NBI) or ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH), a stability window for the n=1 internal kink mode in the hot particle beat space exists even in the absence of core ion finite Larmor radius effect (finite {omega}{sub *i}). On the other hand, the trapped alpha particles are found to resonantly excite instability of the n=1 internal mode and can lower the critical beta threshold. The circulating alpha particles can strongly destabilize TAE modes via inverse Landau damping associated with the spatial gradient of the alpha particle pressure. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  14. On the theory of MHD waves in a shear flow of a magnetized turbulent plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishonov, Todor M.; Maneva, Yana G.; Dimitrov, Zlatan D.; Hristov, Tihomir S.

    The set of equations for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in a shear flow is consecutively derived. This investigation is devoted on the wave heating of space plasmas. The proposed scenario involves the presence of a self-sustained turbulence and magnetic field. In the framework of Langevin--Burgers approach the influence of the turbulence is described by an additional external random force in the MHD system. Kinetic equation for the spectral density of the slow magnetosonic (Alfvénic) mode is derived in the short wavelength (WKB) approximation. The results show a pressing need for conduction of numerical Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with a random driver to take into account the influence of the long wavelength modes and to give a more precise analytical assessment of the short ones. Realistic MC calculations for the heating rate and shear stress tensor should give an answer to the perplexing problem for the missing viscosity in accretion disks and reveal why the quasars are the most powerful sources of light in the universe. It is supposed that the heating mechanism by alfvén waves absorption is common for many kinds of space plasmas from solar corona to active galactic nuclei and the solution of these longstanding puzzles deserves active interdisciplinary research. The work is illustrated by typical solutions of MHD equations and their spectral densities obtained by numerical calculations or by analytical solutions with the help of Heun functions. The amplification coefficient of slow magnetosonic wave in shear flow is analytically calculated. Pictorially speaking, if in WKB approximation we treat Alfvén waves as particles -- this amplification is effect of ``lasing of alfvons.''

  15. Computational Investigation of Extended-MHD Effects on Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jacob R.; Kruger, Scott E.

    2013-10-01

    We present studies with the extended-MHD NIMROD code of the tearing instability and edge-localized modes (ELMs). In our first study we use analytics and computations to examine tearing in a large-guide field with a nonzero pressure gradient where previous results show drift effects are stabilizing [Coppi, PoF (1964)]. Our work finds three new results: (1) At moderately large ion gyroradius the mode rotates at the electron drift velocity and there is no stabilization. (2) With collision-less drift reconnection, computations must also include electron gyroviscosity and advection. And (3) we derive a dispersion relation that exhibits diamagnetic stabilization and describes the transition between the electron-fluid-mediated regime of (1) and the semi-collisional regime [Drake and Lee, PoF (1977)]. Our second study investigates the transition from an ideal- to an extended-MHD model in an ELM unstable tokamak configuration. With the inclusion of a full generalized Ohm's law the growth rate is enhanced at intermediate wave-numbers and cut-off at large wave-numbers by diamagnetic effects consistent with analytics [Hastie et al., PoP (2003)]. Adding ion gyroviscosity to the model is stabilizing at large wave-numbers consistent with recent results [Xu et al., PoP (2013)]. Support provided by US DOE.

  16. Study of nonlinear MHD equations governing the wave propagation in twisted coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parhi, S.; DeBruyne, P.; Goossens, M.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    1995-01-01

    The solar corona, modelled by a low beta, resistive plasma slab, sustains MHD wave propagations due to shearing footpoint motions in the photosphere. By using a numerical algorithm the excitation and nonlinear development of MHD waves in twisted coronal loops are studied. The plasma responds to the footpoint motion by sausage waves if there is no twist. The twist in the magnetic field of the loop destroys initially developed sausage-like wave modes and they become kinks. The transition from sausage to kink modes is analyzed. The twist brings about mode degradation producing high harmonics and this generates more complex fine structures. This can be attributed to several local extrema in the perturbed velocity profiles. The Alfven wave produces remnants of the ideal 1/x singularity both for zero and non-zero twist and this pseudo-singularity becomes less pronounced for larger twist. The effect of nonlinearity is clearly observed by changing the amplitude of the driver by one order of magnitude. The magnetosonic waves also exhibit smoothed remnants of ideal logarithmic singularities when the frequency of the driver is correctly chosen. This pseudo-singularity for fast waves is absent when the coronal loop does not undergo any twist but becomes pronounced when twist is included. On the contrary, it is observed for slow waves even if there is no twist. Increasing the twist leads to a higher heating rate of the loop. The larger twist shifts somewhat uniformly distributed heating to layers inside the slab corresponding to peaks in the magnetic field strength.

  17. Study of Magnetorotational Instability and MHD Surface Waves in Liquid Gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, H.; Chen, F.; Kageyama, A.; Goodman, J.; Shoshan, E.; Rappaport, H.; Borg, M.; Halcrow, J.

    2002-11-01

    Two liquid gallium experiments have been constructed in PPPL to study basic MHD physics related to astrophysics and fusion sciences. The first experiment focuses on laboratory studies of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a rotating gallium disk or a short Couette flow geometry. The MRI has been proposed as a dominant mechanism for fast angular momentum transport in electrically-conducting accretion disks ranging from quasars and X-ray binaries to cataclysmic variables and perhaps even protoplanetary disks. Experiments using a prototype water disk has revealed importance of Ekman circulation, consistent with 2D hydrodynamic simulations. A revised design using multiple rings at each end of the flow are being implemented. The second experiment focuses on MHD surface waves in a large liquid gallium pool. It has been found that the damping rates of driven 1D surface waves propogating along a magnetic field are consistent with linear theory. The parametric excitation of 2D surface waves is being studied to elucidate effects of a horizonally imposed magnetic field on the dynamics of pattern formation. Detailed results will be presented for both experiments and implications to astrophysics and to the liquid metal wall concept in fusion reactors will be discussed. This work is supported by DoE.

  18. Stirring Coronal Spaghetti: Exploring Multiple Interactions Between MHD Waves and Density Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2016-05-01

    The solar corona has been revealed in the past few decades to be a highly dynamic nonequilibrium plasma environment. Both the loop-filled coronal base and the extended acceleration region of the solar wind appear to be strongly turbulent, and models that invoke the dissipation of incompressible Alfvenic fluctuations have had some success in explaining the heating. However, many of these models neglect the mounting evidence that density and pressure variations may play an important role in the mass and energy balance of this system. In this presentation I will briefly review observations of both compressible and incompressible MHD fluctuations in the corona and solar wind, and discuss future prospects with DKIST. I will also attempt to outline the many ways that these different fluctuation modes have been proposed to interact with one another -- usually with an eye on finding ways to enhance their dissipation and heating. One under-appreciated type of interaction is the fact that Alfven waves will undergo multiple reflections and refractions in a "background plasma" filled with localized density fluctuations. It is becoming increasingly clear that models must not only include the effects of longitudinal variability (e.g., magnetoacoustic waves and pulse-like jets) but also transverse "striations" that appear naturally in a structured magnetic field with small-scale footpoint variability. Future off-limb observations, such as those with DKIST's Cryo-NIRSP instrument, will be crucial for providing us with a detailed census of MHD waves and their mutual interactions in the corona.

  19. Nonlinear Alfvén waves in dissipative MHD plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jugao; Chen, Yinhua; Yu, M. Y.

    2016-03-01

    Nonlinear Alfvén wave trains in resistive and viscous magnetohydrodynamics plasmas are investigated. In weakly dissipative one-dimensional systems the inclusion of these effects leads to dissipative damping of Alfvén waves and heating of the plasma. It is found that plasma flow along the background magnetic field can reduce/increase the visco-resistive damping when the flow is along/against the Alfvén wave. In strongly dissipative systems, the front of the Alfvén wave train damps slower than the others, and it gradually forms a damping soliton. In two-dimensional systems, Alfvén wave phase mixing induced by inhomogeneity of the background plasma leads to enhancement of the dissipative damping and the corresponding plasma heating.

  20. Linear MHD Wave Propagation in Time-Dependent Flux Tube. II. Finite Plasma Beta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, A.; Erdélyi, R.

    2014-04-01

    The propagation of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves is an area that has been thoroughly studied for idealised static and steady state magnetised plasma systems applied to numerous solar structures. By applying the generalisation of a temporally varying background density to an open magnetic flux tube, mimicking the observed slow evolution of such waveguides in the solar atmosphere, further investigations into the propagation of both fast and slow MHD waves can take place. The assumption of a zero-beta plasma (no gas pressure) was applied in Williamson and Erdélyi ( Solar Phys. 2013, doi:10.1007/s11207-013-0366-9, Paper I) is now relaxed for further analysis here. Firstly, the introduction of a finite thermal pressure to the magnetic flux tube equilibrium modifies the existence of fast MHD waves which are directly comparable to their counterparts found in Paper I. Further, as a direct consequence of the non-zero kinetic plasma pressure, a slow MHD wave now exists, and is investigated. Analysis of the slow wave shows that, similar to the fast MHD wave, wave amplitude amplification takes place in time and height. The evolution of the wave amplitude is determined here analytically. We conclude that for a temporally slowly decreasing background density both propagating magnetosonic wave modes are amplified for over-dense magnetic flux tubes. This information can be very practical and useful for future solar magneto-seismology applications in the study of the amplitude and frequency properties of MHD waveguides, e.g. for diagnostic purposes, present in the solar atmosphere.

  1. On The Role of MHD Waves in Heating Localised Magnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdélyi, R.; Nelson, C. J.

    2016-04-01

    Satellite and ground-based observations from e.g. SOHO, TRACE, STEREO, Hinode, SDO and IRIS to DST/ROSA, IBIS, CoMP, STT/CRISP have provided a wealth of evidence of waves and oscillations present in a wide range of spatial scales of the magnetised solar atmosphere. Our understanding about localised solar structures has been considerably changed in light of these high spatial and time resolution observations. However, MHD waves not only enable us to perform sub-resolution magneto-seismology of magnetic waveguides but are also potential candidates to carry and damp the necessary non-thermal energy in these localised waveguides. First, we will briefly outline the basic recent developments in MHD wave theory focussing on linear waves. Next, we discuss the role of the most frequently studied wave classes, including the Alfven, and magneto-acoustic kink and sausage waves. The current theoretical (and often difficult) interpretations of the detected solar atmospheric wave and oscillatory phenomena within the framework of MHD will be shown. Last, the latest reported observational findings of potential MHD wave flux, in terms of localised plasma heating, in the solar atmosphere is discussed, bringing us closer to solve the coronal heating problem.

  2. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of MHD waves observed by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. T.; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, S.; Thompson, B. J.; Plunkett, S. P.; Zhao, X. P.; Dryer, M.

    2001-11-01

    We investigate the global large amplitude waves propagating across the solar disk as observed by the SOHO/Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT). These waves appear to be similar to those observed in Hα in the chromosphere and which are known as ``Moreton waves,'' associated with large solar flares [Moreton, 1960, 1964]. Uchida [1968] interpreted these Moreton waves as the propagation of a hydromagnetics disturbance in the corona with its wavefront intersecting the chromosphere to produce the Moreton wave as observed in movie sequences of Hα images. To search for an understanding of the physical characteristics of these newly observed EIT waves, we constructed a three-dimensional, time-dependent, numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. Measured global magnetic fields, obtained from the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) at Stanford University, are used as the initial magnetic field to investigate hydromagnetics wave propagation in a three-dimensional spherical geometry. Using magnetohydrodynamic wave theory together with simulation, we are able to identify these observed EIT waves as fast mode MHD waves dominated by the acoustic mode, called magnetosonic waves. The results to be presented include the following: (1) comparison of observed and simulated morphology projected on the disk and the distance-time curves on the solar disk; (2) three-dimensional evolution of the disturbed magnetic field lines at various viewing angles; (3) evolution of the plasma density profile at a specific location as a function of latitude; and (4) computed Friedrich's diagrams to identify the MHD wave characteristics.

  3. Realistic Modeling of SDO/AIA-discovered Coronal Fast MHD Wave Trains in Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, Leon; Liu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution EUV observations by space telescopes have provided plenty of evidence for coronal MHD waves in active regions. In particular, SDO/AIA discovered quasi-periodic, fast-mode propagating MHD wave trains (QFPs), which can propagate at speeds of ~1000 km/s perpendicular to the magnetic field. Such waves can provide information on the energy release of their associated flares and the magnetized plasma structure of the active regions. Before we can use these waves as tools for coronal seismology, 3D MHD modeling is required for disentangling observational ambiguities and improving the diagnostic accuracy. We present new results of observationally contained models of QFPs using our recently upgraded radiative, thermally conductive, visco-resistive 3D MHD code. The waves are excited by time-depended boundary conditions constrained by the spatial (localized) and quasi-periodic temporal evolution of a C-class flare typically associated with QFPs. We investigate the excitation, propagation, and damping of the waves for a range of key model parameters, such as the background temperature, density, magnetic field structure, and the location of the flaring site within the active region. We synthesize EUV intensities in multiple AIA channels and then obtain the model parameters that best reproduce the properties of observed QFPs. We discuss the implications of our model results for the seismological application of QFPs and for understanding the dynamics of their associated flares.

  4. Guided MHD waves as a coronal diagnostic tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    A description is provided of how fast magnetoacoustic waves are ducted along regions of low Alfven velocity (high density) in the corona, exhibiting a distinctive wave signature which may be used as a diagnostic probe of in situ coronal conditions (magnetic field strength, density inhomogeneity, etc.). Some observational knowledge of the start time of the impulsive wave source, possibly a flare, the start and end times of the generated wave event, and the frequency of the pulsations in that event permits a seismological deduction of the physical properties of the coronal medium in which the wave propagated. With good observations the theory offers a new means of probing the coronal atmosphere.

  5. MHD Turbulence and the FIP Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laming, Martin

    2010-11-01

    The First Ionization Potential (FIP) Effect is the by now well known abundance anomaly in the solar corona and slow speed solar wind, where elements with FIP less than about 10 eV (e.g. Fe, Mg, Si) are enhanced in abundance by a factor of about 3-4. High FIP elements (e.g. C, O, Ar) are essentially unchanged, while the highest FIP element, He, is depleted by a factor of about 0.5. A similar, though reduced abundance anomaly is found in the fast speed solar wind, and in coronal holes. These element fractionations are best explained by the action of the ponderomotive force in the solar chromosphere, arising as Alfvén waves reflect from the strong density gradients. Chromospheric ions, but not neutrals, are preferentially accelerated upwards. I will describe some recent developments, including the parametric generation of slow mode waves by the Alfvén wave driver, that now allows both the enhancement of Fe, Mg, S, etc, and the depletion of He to occur simultaneously.

  6. Linear MHD Wave Propagation in Time-Dependent Flux Tube. I. Zero Plasma-β

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, A.; Erdélyi, R.

    2014-03-01

    MHD waves and oscillations in sharply structured magnetic plasmas have been studied for static and steady systems in the thin tube approximation over many years. This work will generalize these studies by introducing a slowly varying background density in time, in order to determine the changes to the wave parameters introduced by this temporally varying equilibrium, i.e. to investigate the amplitude, frequency, and wavenumber for the kink and higher order propagating fast magnetohydrodynamic wave in the leading order approximation to the WKB approach in a zero- β plasma representing the upper solar atmosphere. To progress, the thin tube and over-dense loop approximations are used, restricting the results found here to the duration of a number of multiples of the characteristic density change timescale. Using such approximations it is shown that the amplitude of the kink wave is enhanced in a manner proportional to the square of the Alfvén speed, . The frequency of the wave solution tends to the driving frequency of the system as time progresses; however, the wavenumber approaches zero after a large multiple of the characteristic density change timescale, indicating an ever increasing wavelength. For the higher order fluting modes the changes in amplitude are dependent upon the wave mode; for the m=2 mode the wave is amplified to a constant level; however, for all m≥3 the fast MHD wave is damped within a relatively small multiple of the characteristic density change timescale. Understanding MHD wave behavior in time-dependent plasmas is an important step towards a more complete model of the solar atmosphere and has a key role to play in solar magneto-seismological applications.

  7. The Generation and Damping of Propagating MHD Kink Waves in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, R. J.; Verth, G.; Hillier, A.; Erdélyi, R.

    2014-03-01

    The source of the non-thermal energy required for the heating of the upper solar atmosphere to temperatures in excess of a million degrees and the acceleration of the solar wind to hundreds of kilometers per second is still unclear. One such mechanism for providing the required energy flux is incompressible torsional Alfvén and kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, which are magnetically dominated waves supported by the Sun's pervasive and complex magnetic field. In particular, propagating MHD kink waves have recently been observed to be ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere, but, until now, critical details of the transport of the kink wave energy throughout the Sun's atmosphere were lacking. Here, the ubiquity of the waves is exploited for statistical studies in the highly dynamic solar chromosphere. This large-scale investigation allows for the determination of the chromospheric kink wave velocity power spectra, a missing link necessary for determining the energy transport between the photosphere and corona. Crucially, the power spectra contain evidence for horizontal photospheric motions being an important mechanism for kink wave generation in the quiescent Sun. In addition, a comparison with measured coronal power spectra is provided for the first time, revealing frequency-dependent transmission profiles, suggesting that there is enhanced damping of kink waves in the lower corona.

  8. The generation and damping of propagating MHD kink waves in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R. J.; Verth, G.; Erdélyi, R.; Hillier, A. E-mail: g.verth@sheffield.ac.uk

    2014-03-20

    The source of the non-thermal energy required for the heating of the upper solar atmosphere to temperatures in excess of a million degrees and the acceleration of the solar wind to hundreds of kilometers per second is still unclear. One such mechanism for providing the required energy flux is incompressible torsional Alfvén and kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, which are magnetically dominated waves supported by the Sun's pervasive and complex magnetic field. In particular, propagating MHD kink waves have recently been observed to be ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere, but, until now, critical details of the transport of the kink wave energy throughout the Sun's atmosphere were lacking. Here, the ubiquity of the waves is exploited for statistical studies in the highly dynamic solar chromosphere. This large-scale investigation allows for the determination of the chromospheric kink wave velocity power spectra, a missing link necessary for determining the energy transport between the photosphere and corona. Crucially, the power spectra contain evidence for horizontal photospheric motions being an important mechanism for kink wave generation in the quiescent Sun. In addition, a comparison with measured coronal power spectra is provided for the first time, revealing frequency-dependent transmission profiles, suggesting that there is enhanced damping of kink waves in the lower corona.

  9. Numerical modelling of MHD waves in the solar chromosphere.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Mats; Bogdan, Thomas J

    2006-02-15

    Acoustic waves are generated by the convective motions in the solar convection zone. When propagating upwards into the chromosphere they reach the height where the sound speed equals the Alfvén speed and they undergo mode conversion, refraction and reflection. We use numerical simulations to study these processes in realistic configurations where the wavelength of the waves is similar to the length scales of the magnetic field. Even though this regime is outside the validity of previous analytic studies or studies using ray-tracing theory, we show that some of their basic results remain valid: the critical quantity for mode conversion is the angle between the magnetic field and the k-vector: the attack angle. At angles smaller than 30 degrees much of the acoustic, fast mode from the photosphere is transmitted as an acoustic, slow mode propagating along the field lines. At larger angles, most of the energy is refracted/reflected and returns as a fast mode creating an interference pattern between the upward and downward propagating waves. In three-dimensions, this interference between waves at small angles creates patterns with large horizontal phase speeds, especially close to magnetic field concentrations. When damping from shock dissipation and radiation is taken into account, the waves in the low-mid chromosphere have mostly the character of upward propagating acoustic waves and it is only close to the reflecting layer we get similar amplitudes for the upward propagating and refracted/reflected waves. The oscillatory power is suppressed in magnetic field concentrations and enhanced in ring-formed patterns around them. The complex interference patterns caused by mode-conversion, refraction and reflection, even with simple incident waves and in simple magnetic field geometries, make direct inversion of observables exceedingly difficult. In a dynamic chromosphere it is doubtful if the determination of mean quantities is even meaningful. PMID:16414886

  10. Large amplitude MHD waves upstream of the Jovian bow shock: Reinterpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Wong, H. K.; Vinas, A. F.; Smith, C. W.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of large amplitude magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves upstream of the Jovian bow shock were previously interpreted as arising from a resonant electromagnetic ion beam instability. That interpretation was based on the conclusion that the observed fluctuations were predominantly right elliptically polarized in the solar wind rest frame. Because it was noted that the fluctuations are, in fact, left elliptically polarized, a reanalysis of the observations was necessary. Several mechanisms for producing left hand polarized MHD waves in the observed frequency range were investigated. Instabilities excited by protons appear unlikely to account for the observations. A resonant instability excited by relativistic electrons escaping from the Jovian magnetosphere is a likely source of free energy consistent with the observations. Evidence for the existence of such a population of electrons was found in both the Low Energy Charged Particle experiments and Cosmic Ray experiments on Voyager 2.

  11. The modulational instability for the TDNLS equations for weakly nonlinear dispersive MHD waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.; Brio, M.; Zank, G. P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we study the modulational instability for the TDNLS equations derived by Hada (1993) and Brio, Hunter, and Johnson to describe the propagation of weakly nonlinear dispersive MHD waves in beta approximately 1 plasmas. We employ Whitham's averaged Lagrangian method to study the modulational instability. This complements studies of the modulational instability by Hada (1993) and Hollweg (1994), who did not use the averaged Lagrangian approach.

  12. Determining the Importance of Energy Transfer between Magnetospheric Regions via MHD Waves using Constellations of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattell, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    This grant was focused on research in two specific areas: (1) development of new techniques and software for assimilation, analysis and visualization of data from multiple satellites making in-situ measurements; and (2) determination of the role of MHD waves in energy transport during storms and substorms. Results were obtained in both areas and presented at national meetings and in publications. The talks and papers that were supported in part or fully by this grant are listed in this paper.

  13. Nonlinear Waves in Hall MHD: Analysis and Comparison to Known Linear Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, Jesse; Mahajan, Swadesh; Dorland, William

    2004-11-01

    Recently, a novel set of nonlinear waves were found to satisfy the Hall-Magnetohydrodynamic (HMHD) equations. The Mahajan-Krishan solution is a generalization of the classic Walén Nonlinear Alvén wave, of the form b=±αv. The implications of this mode are studied, including polarization and superposition. In particular, the gyrokinetic limit (k_⊥≫ k_\\|) is used in an attempt to match the MK wave to known Kinetic Alfvén waves and introduce FLR effects.

  14. Generation of sheet currents by high frequency fast MHD waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of fast magnetosonic waves of high frequency propagating into an axisymmetric equilibrium plasma is studied. By using the methods of weakly nonlinear geometrical optics, it is shown that the perturbation travels in the equatorial plane while satisfying a transport equation which enables us to predict the time and location of formation of shock waves. For plasmas of large magnetic Prandtl number, this would result into the creation of sheet currents which may give rise to magnetic reconnection and destruction of the original equilibrium.

  15. MHD waves and oscillations in the solar plasma. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Erdélyi, Robert

    2006-02-15

    The Sun's magnetic field is responsible for many spectacularly dynamic and intricate phenomena, such as the 11 year solar activity cycle, the hot and tenuous outer atmosphere called the solar corona, and the continuously expanding stream of solar particles known as the solar wind.Recently, there has been an enormous increase in our understanding of the role of solar magnetism in producing the observed complex atmosphere of the Sun. One such advance has occurred in the detection, by several different high-resolution space instruments on-board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer satellites, of magnetic waves and oscillations in the solar corona. The new subjects of solar atmospheric and coronal seismology are undergoing rapid development. The aim of this Scientific Discussion Meeting was to address the progress made through observational, theoretical and numerical studies of wave phenomena in the magnetic solar plasma. Major theoretical and observational advances were reported by a wide range of international scientists and pioneers in this field, followed by lively discussions and poster sessions on the many intriguing questions raised by the new results. Theoretical and observational aspects of magnetohydrodynamic waves and oscillations in general, and how these wave phenomena differ in various regions of the Sun, including sunspots, the transient lower atmosphere and the corona (in magnetic loops, plumes and prominences), were addressed through invited review papers and selected poster presentations. The results of these deliberations are collected together in this volume. PMID:16414880

  16. Global MHD modeling of resonant ULF waves: Simulations with and without a plasmasphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; Toffoletto, F. R.; Wiltberger, M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the plasmaspheric influence on the resonant mode coupling of magnetospheric ultralow frequency (ULF) waves using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. We present results from two different versions of the model, both driven by the same solar wind conditions: one version that contains a plasmasphere (the LFM coupled to the Rice Convection Model, where the Gallagher plasmasphere model is also included) and another that does not (the stand-alone LFM). We find that the inclusion of a cold, dense plasmasphere has a significant impact on the nature of the simulated ULF waves. For example, the inclusion of a plasmasphere leads to a deeper (more earthward) penetration of the compressional (azimuthal) electric field fluctuations, due to a shift in the location of the wave turning points. Consequently, the locations where the compressional electric field oscillations resonantly couple their energy into local toroidal mode field line resonances also shift earthward. We also find, in both simulations, that higher-frequency compressional (azimuthal) electric field oscillations penetrate deeper than lower frequency oscillations. In addition, the compressional wave mode structure in the simulations is consistent with a radial standing wave oscillation pattern, characteristic of a resonant waveguide. The incorporation of a plasmasphere into the LFM global MHD model represents an advance in the state of the art in regard to ULF wave modeling with such simulations. We offer a brief discussion of the implications for radiation belt modeling techniques that use the electric and magnetic field outputs from global MHD simulations to drive particle dynamics.

  17. MHD waves on solar magnetic flux tubes - Tutorial review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the highly simplified models that have been developed for solar magnetic flux tubes, which are intense photospheric-level fields confined by external gas pressure but able to vary rapidly with height, are presently discussed with emphasis on the torsional Alfven mode's propagation, reflection, and non-WKB properties. The 'sausage' and 'kink' modes described by the thin flux-tube approximation are noted. Attention is also given to the surface waves and resonance absorption of X-ray-emitting loops, as well as to the results of recent work on the resonant instabilities that occur in the presence of bulk flows.

  18. Ultralow frequency MHD waves in Jupiter's middle magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, Krishan K.; Kivelson, Margaret G.

    1989-01-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) magnetohydrodynamic pulsations (periods between 10 and 20 min) were observed on July 8-11, 1979 as Voyager 2 traveled through the middle magnetosphere of Jupiter between radial distances of 10 R(J) and 35 R(J). The particle and magnetic pressure perturbations associated with the waves were anticorrelated. The electron and ion perturbations on the dayside were in phase. The pressure perturbations occurred both within and outside of the plasma sheet. Perturbations in the transverse components of the magnetic field were associated with the compressional perturbations but the transverse power peaked within the plasma sheet of Jupiter and diminished rapidly outside of it.

  19. Linear MHD Wave Propagation in Time-Dependent Flux Tube. III. Leaky Waves in Zero-Beta Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, A.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we evaluate the time-dependent wave properties and the damping rate of propagating fast magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) waves when energy leakage into a magnetised atmosphere is considered. By considering a cold plasma, initial investigations into the evolution of MHD wave damping through this energy leakage will take place. The time-dependent governing equations have been derived previously in Williamson and Erdélyi (2014a, Solar Phys. 289, 899 - 909) and are now solved when the assumption of evanescent wave propagation in the outside of the waveguide is relaxed. The dispersion relation for leaky waves applicable to a straight magnetic field is determined in both an arbitrary tube and a thin-tube approximation. By analytically solving the dispersion relation in the thin-tube approximation, the explicit expressions for the temporal evolution of the dynamic frequency and wavenumber are determined. The damping rate is, then, obtained from the dispersion relation and is shown to decrease as the density ratio increases. By comparing the decrease in damping rate to the increase in damping for a stationary system, as shown, we aim to point out that energy leakage may not be as efficient a damping mechanism as previously thought.

  20. Effect of gasdynamic turbulence on the integral characteristics of conduction MHD generators

    SciTech Connect

    Vatazhin, A.B.; Levitan, Y.S.

    1986-04-01

    The authors analyze the effect of correlations on the integral characteristics of conduction MHD generators of different type. The paper studies a flow in the core of the channel of an MGD generator in the approximation of small magnetic Reynolds numbers. Two limiting situations characteristic for MHD setups are examined: a liquid-metal MHD channel and a conduction MHD generator operating on combustion products.

  1. Fast Wave Trains Associated with Solar Eruptions: Insights from 3D Thermodynamic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, C.; Liu, W.; Torok, T.; Linker, J.; Mikic, Z.; Ofman, L.

    2015-12-01

    EUV imaging observations during the SDO/AIA era have provided new insights into a variety of wave phenomena occurring in the low solar corona. One example is the observation of quasi-periodic, fast-propagating wave trains that are associated with solar eruptions, including flares and CMEs. While there has been considerable progress in understanding such waves from both an observational and theoretical perspective, it remains a challenge to pin down their physical origin. In this work, we detail our results from a case-study 3D thermodynamic MHD simulation of a coronal mass ejection where quasi-periodic wave trains are generated during the simulated eruption. We find a direct correlation between the onset of non-steady reconnection in the flare current sheet and the generation of quasi-periodic wave train signatures when patchy, collimated downflows interact with the flare arcade. Via forward modeling of SDO/AIA observables, we explore how the appearance of the wave trains is affected by line-of-sight integration and the multi-thermal nature of the coronal medium. We also examine how the wave trains themselves are channeled by natural waveguides formed in 3D by the non-uniform background magnetic field. While the physical association of the reconnection dynamics to the generation of quasi-periodic wave trains appears to be a compelling result, unanswered questions posed from recent observations as well as future prospects will be discussed.

  2. On the Properties of Slow MHD Sausage Waves within Small-scale Photospheric Magnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freij, N.; Dorotovič, I.; Morton, R. J.; Ruderman, M. S.; Karlovský, V.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of magnetoacoustic waves in magnetic structures in the solar atmosphere is well-documented. Applying the technique of solar magneto-seismology (SMS) allows us to infer the background properties of these structures. Here, we aim to identify properties of the observed magnetoacoustic waves and study the background properties of magnetic structures within the lower solar atmosphere. Using the Dutch Open Telescope and Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instruments, we captured two series of high-resolution intensity images with short cadences of two isolated magnetic pores. Combining wavelet analysis and empirical mode decomposition (EMD), we determined characteristic periods within the cross-sectional (i.e., area) and intensity time series. Then, by applying the theory of linear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), we identified the mode of these oscillations within the MHD framework. Several oscillations have been detected within these two magnetic pores. Their periods range from 3 to 20 minutes. Combining wavelet analysis and EMD enables us to confidently find the phase difference between the area and intensity oscillations. From these observed features, we concluded that the detected oscillations can be classified as slow sausage MHD waves. Furthermore, we determined several key properties of these oscillations such as the radial velocity perturbation, the magnetic field perturbation, and the vertical wavenumber using SMS. The estimated range of the related wavenumbers reveals that these oscillations are trapped within these magnetic structures. Our results suggest that the detected oscillations are standing harmonics, and this allows us to estimate the expansion factor of the waveguides by employing SMS. The calculated expansion factor ranges from 4 to 12.

  3. Wall surface leakage effects on MHD power generator performance

    SciTech Connect

    Pian, C.C.P.; Schmitt, E.W.

    1994-12-31

    Internal surface leakage effects on the MHD generator performance were studied using a combined experimental and analytical approach. A method to determine the wall resistances and slag layer conductivities from seed shut-off test data is introduced. These measured resistance values are then utilized in generator performance analyses. Calculated results were compared with measured data from MHD generator tests to verify the modeling approach. Finally, these calculated results were used to investigate the distribution of internal leakage currents as a function of generator size, generator operating conditions, and iron oxide injection rates. An advantage of this analysis methodology is the ability to differentiate between wall leakage and apparent leakage effects in the measured test data.

  4. Ultra-High-Resolution Observations of MHD Waves in Photospheric Magnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jess, D. B.; Verth, G.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter reviews the recent observations of waves and oscillations manifesting in fine-scale magnetic structures in the solar photosphere, which are often interpreted as the "building blocks' of the magnetic Sun. The authors found, through phase relationships between the various waveforms, that small-scale magnetic bright points (MBPs) in the photosphere demonstrated signatures of specific magnetoacoustic waves, in particular the sausage and kink modes. Modern magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the lower solar atmosphere clearly show how torsional motions can easily be induced in magnetic elements in the photosphere through the processes of vortical motions and/or buffeting by neighboring granules. The authors detected significant power associated with high-frequency horizontal motions, and suggested that these cases may be especially important in the creation of a turbulent environment that efficiently promotes Alfvén wave dissipation.

  5. Possible signatures of nonlinear MHD waves in the solar wind: UVCS observations and models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Romoli, M.; Davila, J. M.; Poletto, G.; Kohl, J.; Noci, G.

    1997-01-01

    Recent ultraviolet coronagraph spectrometer (UVCS) white light channel observations are discussed. These data indicated quasi-periodic variations in the polarized brightness in the polar coronal holes. The Fourier power spectrum analysis showed significant peaks at about six minutes and possible fluctuations on longer time scales. The observations are consistent with the predictions of the nonlinear solitary-like wave model. The purpose of a planned study on plume and inter-plume regions of coronal holes, motivated by the result of a 2.5 magnetohydrodynamic model (MHD), is explained.

  6. Symmetries of the TDNLS equations for weakly nonlinear dispersive MHD waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.; Brio, M.; Zank, G. P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we consider the symmetries and conservation laws for the TDNLS equations derived by Hada (1993) and Brio, Hunter and Johnson, to describe the propagation of weakly nonlinear dispersive MHD waves in beta approximately 1 plasmas. The equations describe the interaction of the Alfven and magnetoacoustic modes near the triple umbilic, where the fast magnetosonic, slow magnetosonic and Alfven speeds coincide and a(g)(exp 2) = V(A)(exp 2) where a(g) is the gas sound speed and V(A) is the Alfven speed. We discuss Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations, and similarity solutions for the equations.

  7. Numerical simulation of surface wave dynamics of liquid metal MHD flow on an inclined plane in a magnetic field with spatial variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Donghong

    Interest in utilizing liquid metal film flows to protect the plasma-facing solid structures places increasing demand on understanding the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of such flows in a magnetic field with spatial variation. The field gradient effect is studied by a two-dimensional (2D) model in Cartesian coordinates. The thin film flow down an inclined plane in spanwise (z-direction) magnetic field with constant streamwise gradient and applied current is analyzed. The solution to the equilibrium flow shows forcefully the M-shaped velocity profile and dependence of side layer thickness on Ha-1/2 whose definition is based on field gradient. The major part of the dissertation is the numerical simulation of free surface film flows and understanding the results. The VOF method is employed to track the free surface, and the CSF model is combined with VOF method to account for surface dynamics condition. The code is validated with respect to Navier-Stokes solver and MHD implementation by computations of ordinary wavy films, MHD flat films and a colleague proposed film flow. The comparisons are performed against respective experimental, theoretical or numerical solutions, and the results are well matched with them. It is found for the ordinary water falling films, at low frequency and high flowrate, the small forcing disturbance at inlet flowrate develops into big roll waves preceded by small capillary bow waves; at high frequency and low Re, it develops into nearly sinusoidal waves with small amplitude and without fore-running capillary waves. The MHD surface instability is investigated for two kinds of film flows in constant streamwise field gradient: one with spatial disturbance and without surface tension, the other with inlet forcing disturbance and with surface tension. At no surface tension condition, the finite amplitude disturbance is rapidly amplified and degrades to irregular shape. With surface tension to maintain smooth interface, finite amplitude regular waves

  8. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES AND CORONAL HEATING: UNIFYING EMPIRICAL AND MHD TURBULENCE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Igor V.; Van der Holst, Bart; Oran, Rona; Jin, Meng; Manchester, Ward B. IV; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Downs, Cooper; Roussev, Ilia I.; Evans, Rebekah M.

    2013-02-10

    We present a new global model of the solar corona, including the low corona, the transition region, and the top of the chromosphere. The realistic three-dimensional magnetic field is simulated using the data from the photospheric magnetic field measurements. The distinctive feature of the new model is incorporating MHD Alfven wave turbulence. We assume this turbulence and its nonlinear dissipation to be the only momentum and energy source for heating the coronal plasma and driving the solar wind. The difference between the turbulence dissipation efficiency in coronal holes and that in closed field regions is because the nonlinear cascade rate degrades in strongly anisotropic (imbalanced) turbulence in coronal holes (no inward propagating wave), thus resulting in colder coronal holes, from which the fast solar wind originates. The detailed presentation of the theoretical model is illustrated with the synthetic images for multi-wavelength EUV emission compared with the observations from SDO AIA and STEREO EUVI instruments for the Carrington rotation 2107.

  9. The energy flux of MHD wave modes excited by realistic photospheric drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedun, Viktor; Von Fay-Siebenburgen, Erdélyi Robert; Mumford, Stuart

    The mechanism(s) responsible for solar coronal heating are still an unresolved and challenging task. In the framework of 3D numerical modelling of MHD wave excitation and propagation in the strongly stratified solar atmosphere we analyse the mode coupling and estimate the wave energy partition which can be supplied to the upper layers of the solar atmosphere by locally decomposed slow, fast and Alfven modes. These waves are excited by a number of realistic photospheric drivers which are mimicking the random granular buffeting, the coherent global solar oscillations and swirly motion observed in e.g. magnetic bright points. Based on a self-similar approach, a realistic magnetic flux tubes configuration is constructed and implemented in the VALIIIC model of the solar atmosphere. A novel method for decomposing the velocity perturbations into parallel, perpendicular and azimuthal components in 3D geometry is developed using field lines to trace a volume of constant energy flux. This method is used to identify the excited wave modes propagating upwards from the photosphere and to compute the percentage energy contribution of each mode. We have found, that for all cases where torsional motion is present, the main contribution to the flux (60%) is by Alfven wave. In the case of the vertical driver it is found to mainly excite the fast- and slow-sausage modes and a horizontal driver primarily excites the slow kink mode.

  10. The properties of MHD waves and instabilities in solar plasmas with anisotropic temperature and thermal fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Dzhalilov, Namig

    As confirmed by observations, the temperature anisotropy relative to the magnetic field and the thermal fluxes are typical characteristics of the collisionless and magnetized plasma of the solar corona and solar wind. The properties of such plasma are described in terms of the anisotropic magnetohydrodynamics based on the kinetic equation under the 16-moment approximation. MHD waves and instabilities in the collisionless solar plasma have been analyzed under the aforementioned approximation taking into account the anisotropy of the plasma pressure along and across the magnetic field and the thermal flux along the field. It is established that the thermal flux results in the asymmetry of phase velocities of the compressible wave modes with respect to the outer magnetic field, in a strong interaction between the modes (particularly, between the retrograde modes propagating against the magnetic field), and in oscillatory in-stability of these modes. The thresholds of the mirror and fire-hose instabilities coincide with their kinetic expressions; the increments coincide qualitatively. At a certain propagation angle, the resonance interaction of three retrograde modes (fast sound, slow magnetosound, and slow sound ones) under the occurrence conditions of the classical aperiodic fire-hose instability gives rise to the oscillatory "fire-hose" instability of compressible modes, whose maximum increment may exceed the maximum increment of the classical fire-hose instability. A good agreement of the results obtained in terms of anisotropic MHD with the low-frequency limit of the kinetic description allows us to consider the applied approximation adequate for the description of large-scale dynamics of collisionless anisotropic solar plasma and to use it in the study of waves and instabilities in magnetic tubes and other magnetic features in the solar corona, magnetic reconnection, etc.

  11. Generalized reduced MHD equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, S.E.; Hegna, C.C.; Callen, J.D.

    1998-07-01

    A new derivation of reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations is presented. A multiple-time-scale expansion is employed. It has the advantage of clearly separating the three time scales of the problem associated with (1) MHD equilibrium, (2) fluctuations whose wave vector is aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field, and (3) those aligned parallel to the magnetic field. The derivation is carried out without relying on a large aspect ratio assumption; therefore this model can be applied to any general toroidal configuration. By accounting for the MHD equilibrium and constraints to eliminate the fast perpendicular waves, equations are derived to evolve scalar potential quantities on a time scale associated with the parallel wave vector (shear-alfven wave time scale), which is the time scale of interest for MHD instability studies. Careful attention is given in the derivation to satisfy energy conservation and to have manifestly divergence-free magnetic fields to all orders in the expansion parameter. Additionally, neoclassical closures and equilibrium shear flow effects are easily accounted for in this model. Equations for the inner resistive layer are derived which reproduce the linear ideal and resistive stability criterion of Glasser, Greene, and Johnson.

  12. Kinetic Effects of Energetic Particles on Resistive MHD Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, R.; Brennan, D. P.; Kim, C. C.

    2009-04-03

    We show that the kinetic effects of energetic particles can play a crucial role in the stability of the m/n=2/1 tearing mode in tokamaks (e.g., JET, JT-60U, and DIII-D), where the fraction of energetic particle {beta}{sub frac} is high. Using model equilibria based on DIII-D experimental reconstructions, the nonideal MHD linear stability of cases unstable to the 2/1 mode is investigated including a {delta}f particle-in-cell model for the energetic particles coupled to the nonlinear 3D resistive MHD code NIMROD[C. C. Kim et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 072507 (2008)]. It is observed that energetic particles have significant damping and stabilizing effects at experimentally relevant {beta}, {beta}{sub frac}, and S, and excite a real frequency of the 2/1 mode. Extrapolation of the results is discussed for implications to JET and ITER, where the effects are projected to be significant.

  13. MHD nature of ionospheric wave packets generated by the solar terminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afraimovich, E. L.; Edemsky, I. K.; Voeykov, S. V.; Yasukevich, Yu. V.; Zhivetiev, I. V.

    2010-02-01

    The morphology of medium-scale traveling wave packets is for the first time presented based on the total electron content (TEC), measured at the global network of GPS receivers (up to 1500 stations) during the long period (from 1998 to 2007) and at the GPS/GEONET dense Japan network (1220 stations) in 2008—2009. In the time domain, these packets are chains of narrowband TEC variations (trains) with a duration of about 1—2 h, a total duration of up to 6 h, and a variation period of 10—30 min. In the winter Northern Hemisphere, traveling wave packets are observed mostly 3 h after the passage of the morning solar terminator. In the equinox they appear after the passage of the solar terminator without a pronounced delay or advance. In summer traveling wave packets are registered 1.5—2 h before the appearance of the evening solar terminator at the observation point when the solar terminator passes in the magnetically conjugate region. The spatial structure of traveling wave packets is characterized by a high degree of anisotropy and coherence at a distance larger than ten wavelengths (the wavelength is 100—300 km). A high quality of the oscillatory system and synchronization with the appearance of the solar terminator at the observation point and in the magnetically conjugate region indicate that the generation of traveling wave packets by the solar terminator is of the MHD nature. Our results for the first time experimentally confirm the hypothesis that the solar terminator generates ion sound waves, proposed by Huba et al. [2000b].

  14. Magnetopause surface waves triggered by a rotating IMF with the global MHD SWMF/BAT-S-RUS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyas, T.; Spencer, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    The solar wind driving of magnetopause surface waves is only partly understood. In particular we do not have a picture of the magnetopause surface wave properties and behavior when a magnetic cloud event, which sometimes involves a rotating IMF, impinges on the magnetosphere. Here we investigate the effect of a twisting or rotational IMF under moderate solar wind velocity (about 500 km/s) upon the magnetosphere with the Global MHD BATS-R-US code. Synthetic solar wind data is constructed to simulate the most important features of a magnetic cloud event, but without including shock features. A sinusoidally varying By component accompanied by a cosinusoidally varying Bz component of the IMF is input into the model with magnitude 10-20 nT. The synthetic data is representative of the magnetic cloud event that occurred on October 3-7 2000. We use the results of the simulation to infer the modes, properties, and particularly the phase speed and wavelength of the surface wave structures.

  15. Stormtime Ionospheric Outflow Effects in Global Multi-Fluid MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sage, K.; Moore, T. E.; Eccles, V.; Merkin, V. G.; Welling, D. T.; Schunk, R. W.; Barakat, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present work detailing the effects of ionospheric outflow in the magnetosphere during the Sept 27- Oct 4, 2002 and Oct 22- Oct 29, 2002 GEM storms. The Multi-Fluid LFM global MHD code is driven by OMNI solar wind and IMF data and by outflow from the Generalized Polar Wind (GPW) model. The GPW input results in a realistic and dynamic, although not self-consistent, outflow of O+, H+, and He+ from the ionosphere. The validity of this outflow and its entry into the magnetosphere is tested through comparisons to Cluster and geosynchronous spacecraft observations. We show the access of these various populations to the magnetosphere, and we examine their effects on plasma sheet structure and storm time dynamics.

  16. Resonant behaviour of MHD waves on magnetic flux tubes. I - Connection formulae at the resonant surfaces. II - Absorption of sound waves by sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, Takashi; Goossens, Marcel; Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1991-01-01

    The present method of addressing the resonance problems that emerge in such MHD phenomena as the resonant absorption of waves at the Alfven resonance point avoids solving the fourth-order differential equation of dissipative MHD by recourse to connection formulae across the dissipation layer. In the second part of this investigation, the absorption of solar 5-min oscillations by sunspots is interpreted as the resonant absorption of sounds by a magnetic cylinder. The absorption coefficient is interpreted (1) analytically, under certain simplifying assumptions, and numerically, under more general conditions. The observed absorption coefficient magnitude is explained over suitable parameter ranges.

  17. The Foggy EUV Corona and Coronal Heating by MHD Waves from Explosive Reconnection Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Falconer, David A.

    2008-01-01

    In 0.5 arcsec/pixel TRACE coronal EUV images, the corona rooted in active regions that are at the limb and are not flaring is seen to consist of (1) a complex array of discrete loops and plumes embedded in (2) a diffuse ambient component that shows no fine structure and gradually fades with height. For each of two not-flaring active regions, found that the diffuse component is (1) approximately isothermal and hydrostatic and (2) emits well over half of the total EUV luminosity of the active-region corona. Here, from a TRACE Fe XII coronal image of another not-flaring active region, the large sunspot active region AR 10652 when it was at the west limb on 30 July 2004, we separate the diffuse component from the discrete loop component by spatial filtering, and find that the diffuse component has about 60% of the total luminosity. If under much higher spatial resolution than that of TRACE (e. g., the 0.1 arcsec/pixel resolution of the Hi-C sounding-rocket experiment proposed by J. W. Cirtain et al), most of the diffuse component remains diffuse rather being resolved into very narrow loops and plumes, this will raise the possibility that the EUV corona in active regions consists of two basically different but comparably luminous components: one being the set of discrete bright loops and plumes and the other being a truly diffuse component filling the space between the discrete loops and plumes. This dichotomy would imply that there are two different but comparably powerful coronal heating mechanisms operating in active regions, one for the distinct loops and plumes and another for the diffuse component. We present a scenario in which (1) each discrete bright loop or plume is a flux tube that was recently reconnected in a burst of reconnection, and (2) the diffuse component is heated by MHD waves that are generated by these reconnection events and by other fine-scale explosive reconnection events, most of which occur in and below the base of the corona where they are

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) nuclear weapons effects on submarine cable systems. Volume 1. Experiments and analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This report presents a study of the nuclear weapons magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects on submarine communications cables. The study consisted of the analysis and interpretation of currently available data on submarine cable systems TAT-4, TAT-6, and TAT-7. The primary result of the study is that decrease of the effective resistivity with frequency over the available experimental range, coupled with the model results, leads to quite small effective resistivities at the MHD characteristic frequencies, and hence small earth potential differences. Thus, it appears that submarine cable systems are less susceptible to an MHD threat than their land-based counter-parts.

  19. Characteristics of laminar MHD fluid hammer in pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z. Y.; Liu, Y. J.

    2016-01-01

    As gradually wide applications of MHD fluid, transportation as well as control with pumps and valves is unavoidable, which induces MHD fluid hammer. The paper attempts to combine MHD effect and fluid hammer effect and to investigate the characteristics of laminar MHD fluid hammer. A non-dimensional fluid hammer model, based on Navier-Stocks equations, coupling with Lorentz force is numerically solved in a reservoir-pipe-valve system with uniform external magnetic field. The MHD effect is represented by the interaction number which associates with the conductivity of the MHD fluid as well as the external magnetic field and can be interpreted as the ratio of Lorentz force to Joukowsky force. The transient numerical results of pressure head, average velocity, wall shear stress, velocity profiles and shear stress profiles are provided. The additional MHD effect hinders fluid motion, weakens wave front and homogenizes velocity profiles, contributing to obvious attenuation of oscillation, strengthened line packing and weakened Richardson annular effect. Studying the characteristics of MHD laminar fluid hammer theoretically supplements the gap of knowledge of rapid-transient MHD flow and technically provides beneficial information for MHD pipeline system designers to better devise MHD systems.

  20. Mitigation of magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP) effects from commerical electric power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R. ); Tesche, F.M. , Dallas, TX ); Vance, E.F. , Fort Worth, TX )

    1992-03-01

    A large nuclear detonation at altitudes of several hundred kilometers above the earth distorts the earth's magnetic field and produces a strong magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP). This can adversely affect electrical power systems. In this report, the effects of this nuclear environment on critical facilities connected to the commercial power system are considered. Methods of mitigating the MHD-EMP impacts are investigated, and recommended protection schemes are presented. Guidelines for testing facilities to determine the effects of MHD-EMP and to validate the mitigation methods also are discussed.

  1. Comparison of three artificial models of the MHD effect on the electrocardiogram

    PubMed Central

    Oster, Julien; Llinares, Raul; Payne, Stephen; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho; Schmidt, Ehud Jeruham; Clifford, Gari D.

    2013-01-01

    The Electrocardiogram (ECG) is often acquired during Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for both image acquisition synchronisation with heart activity and patient monitoring to alert for life-threatening events. Accurate ECG analysis is mandatory for cutting-edge applications, such as MRI guided interventions. Nevertheless, the majority of the clinical analysis of ECG acquired inside MRI is made difficult by the superposition of a voltage called the MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) effect. MHD is induced by the flow of electrically charged particles in the blood perpendicular to the static magnetic field, which creates a potential of the order of magnitude of the ECG and temporally coincident with the repolatisation period. In this study, a new MHD model is proposed which is an extension of several existing models and incorporates MRI-based blood flow measurements made across the aortic arch. The model is extended to several cardiac cycles to allow the simulation of a realistic ECG acquisition during MRI examination and the quality assessment of MHD suppression techniques. A comparison of two existing models is made with our new model and with an estimate of the MHD voltage observed during a real MRI scan. Results indicate a good agreement between our proposed model and the estimated MHD for most leads, although there are clearly some descrepencies with the observed signal which are likely to be due to remaining deficiencies in the model. However, the results demonstrate that our new model provides a closer approximation to observed MHD effects and a better depiction of the complexity of the MHD effect compared to the previously published models. The source code will be made freely available under and open source license to facilitate collaboration and allow more rapid development of more accurate models of the MHD effect. PMID:24761753

  2. A test of the Hall-MHD model: Application to low-frequency upstream waves at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlowski, D. S.; Russell, C. T.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Omidi, N.

    1994-01-01

    Early studies suggested that in the range of parameter space where the wave angular frequency is less than the proton gyrofrequency and the plasma beta, the ratio of the thermal to magnetic pressure, is less than 1 magnetohydrodynamics provides an adequate description of the propagating modes in a plasma. However, recently, Lacombe et al. (1992) have reported significant differences between basic wave characteristics of the specific propagation modes derived from linear Vlasov and Hall-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theories even when the waves are only weakly damped. In this paper we compare the magnetic polarization and normalization magnetic compression ratio of ultra low frequency (ULF) upstream waves at Venus with magnetic polarization and normalized magnetic compression ratio derived from both theories. We find that while the 'kinetic' approach gives magnetic polarization and normalized magnetic compression ratio consistent with the data in the analyzed range of beta (0.5 less than beta less than 5) for the fast magnetosonic mode, the same wave characteristics derived from the Hall-MHD model strongly depend on beta and are consistent with the data only at low beta for the fast mode and at high beta for the intermediate mode.

  3. A Numerical Study of Resistivity and Hall Effects for a Compressible MHD Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjogreen, B.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of resistive, Hall, and viscous terms on the flow structure compared with compressible ideal MHD is studied numerically for a one-fluid non-ideal MHD model. The goal of the present study is to shed some light on the emerging area of non-ideal MHD modeling and simulation. Numerical experiments are performed on a hypersonic blunt body flow with future application to plasma aerodynamics flow control in reentry vehicles. Numerical experiments are also performed on a magnetized time-developing mixing layer with possible application to magnetic/turbulence mixing.

  4. MHD Effects of a Ferritic Wall on Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Paul E.

    It has been recognized for some time that the very high fluence of fast (14.1MeV) neutrons produced by deuterium-tritium fusion will represent a major materials challenge for the development of next-generation fusion energy projects such as a fusion component test facility and demonstration fusion power reactor. The best-understood and most promising solutions presently available are a family of low-activation steels originally developed for use in fission reactors, but the ferromagnetic properties of these steels represent a danger to plasma confinement through enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and increased susceptibility to error fields. At present, experimental research into the effects of ferromagnetic materials on MHD stability in toroidal geometry has been confined to demonstrating that it is still possible to operate an advanced tokamak in the presence of ferromagnetic components. In order to better quantify the effects of ferromagnetic materials on tokamak plasma stability, a new ferritic wall has been installated in the High Beta Tokamak---Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device. The development, assembly, installation, and testing of this wall as a modular upgrade is described, and the effect of the wall on machine performance is characterized. Comparative studies of plasma dynamics with the ferritic wall close-fitting against similar plasmas with the ferritic wall retracted demonstrate substantial effects on plasma stability. Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) are applied, demonstrating a 50% increase in n = 1 plasma response amplitude when the ferritic wall is near the plasma. Susceptibility of plasmas to disruption events increases by a factor of 2 or more with the ferritic wall inserted, as disruptions are observed earlier with greater frequency. Growth rates of external kink instabilities are observed to be twice as large in the presence of a close-fitting ferritic wall. Initial studies are made of the influence of mode rotation frequency

  5. MHD Effect of Liquid Metal Film Flows as Plasma-Facing Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiujie; Xu, Zengyu; Pan, Chuanjie

    2008-12-01

    Stability of liquid metal film flow under gradient magnetic field is investigated. Three dimensional numerical simulations on magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) effect of free surface film flow were carried out, with emphasis on the film thickness variation and its surface stability. Three different MHD phenomena of film flow were observed in the experiment, namely, retardant, rivulet and flat film flow. From our experiment and numerical simulation it can be concluded that flat film flow is a good choice for plasma-facing components (PFCs)

  6. MHD Energy Bypass Scramjet Performance with Real Gas Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chul; Mehta, Unmeel B.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2000-01-01

    The theoretical performance of a scramjet propulsion system incorporating an magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) energy bypass scheme is calculated. The one-dimensional analysis developed earlier, in which the theoretical performance is calculated neglecting skin friction and using a sudden-freezing approximation for the nozzle flow, is modified to incorporate the method of Van Driest for turbulent skin friction and a finite-rate chemistry calculation in the nozzle. Unlike in the earlier design, in which four ramp compressions occurred in the pitch plane, in the present design the first two ramp compressions occur in the pitch plane and the next two compressions occur in the yaw plane. The results for the simplified design of a spaceliner show that (1) the present design produces higher specific impulses than the earlier design, (2) skin friction substantially reduces thrust and specific impulse, and (3) the specific impulse of the MHD-bypass system is still better than the non-MHD system and typical rocket over a narrow region of flight speeds and design parameters. Results suggest that the energy management with MHD principles offers the possibility of improving the performance of the scramjet. The technical issues needing further studies are identified.

  7. Coexistence of weak and strong wave turbulence in incompressible Hall MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyrand, Romain; Kiyani, Khurom; Galtier, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    We report a numerical investigation of 3D Hall Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with a strong mean magnetic field. By using a helicity decomposition and a cross-bicoherence analysis, we observe that the nonlinear 3-wave coupling is substantial among ion cyclotron and whistler waves. By studying in detail the degree of nonlinearity of these two populations we show that ion cyclotron and whistler turbulent fluctuations belong respectively to strong and weak wave turbulence. The non trivial blending of these two regime give rise to anomalous anisotropy and scaling properties. The separation of the weak random wave and strong coherent turbulence component can however be effectively done using simultaneous space and time Fourier transforms. Using this techniques we show that it is possible to recover some statistical prediction of weak turbulent theory.

  8. The Magnetic Coupling of Chromospheres and Winds From Late Type Evolved Stars: Role of MHD Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, Vladimir; Leake, James; Carpenter, Kenneth

    2015-08-01

    Stellar chromospheres and winds represent universal attributes of stars on the cool portion of H-R diagram. In this paper we derive observational constrains for the chromospheric heating and wind acceleration from cool evolved stars and examine the role of Alfven waves as a viable source of energy dissipation and momentum deposition. We use a 1.5D magnetohydrodynamic code with a generalized Ohm's law to study propagation of Alfven waves generated along a diverging magnetic field in a stellar photosphere at a single frequency. We demonstrate that due to inclusion of the effects of ion-neutral collisions in magnetized weakly ionized chromospheric plasma on resistivity and the appropriate grid resolution, the numerical resistivity becomes 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than the physical resistivity. The motions introduced by non-linear transverse Alfven waves can explain non-thermally broadened and non-Gaussian profiles of optically thin UV lines forming in the stellar chromosphere of α Tau and other late-type giant and supergiant stars. The calculated heating rates in the stellar chromosphere model due to resistive (Joule) dissipation of electric currents on Pedersen resistivity are consistent with observational constraints on the net radiative losses in UV lines and the continuum from α Tau. At the top of the chromosphere, Alfven waves experience significant reflection, producing downward propagating transverse waves that interact with upward propagating waves and produce velocity shear in the chromosphere. Our simulations also suggest that momentum deposition by non-linear Alfven waves becomes significant in the outer chromosphere within 1 stellar radius from the photosphere that initiates a slow and massive winds from red giants and supergiants.

  9. Infinitesimal structure of inverse pinch effect cylindrical MHD shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, Roy S; Stanescu, Dan; Tucker, Don H

    2008-01-01

    Nonstandard analysis is used to derive the relationships between the jump functions for density, pressure, velocity and magnetic field within a diverging cylindrical magnetohydrodynamic shock caused by the inverse pinch effect. The shock is assumed to have infinitesimal thickness. The obtained relationships allow explicit numerical constructions of the shock structure once the variation in one variable, here chosen to be the density, is specified. The shapes thus constructed offer additional insight into the physics of such shock waves from a perspective which would be extremely difficult to investigate experimentally.

  10. The energy associated with MHD waves generation in the solar wind plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    delaTorre, A.

    1995-01-01

    Gyrotropic symmetry is usually assumed in measurements of electron distribution functions in the heliosphere. This prevents the calculation of a net current perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. Previous theoretical results derived by one of the authors for a collisionless plasma with isotropic electrons in a strong magnetic field have shown that the excitation of MHD modes becomes possible when the external perpendicular current is non-zero. We consider then that any anisotropic electron population can be thought of as 'external', interacting with the remaining plasma through the self-consistent electromagnetic field. From this point of view any perpendicular current may be due to the anisotropic electrons, or to an external source like a stream, or to both. As perpendicular currents cannot be derived from the measured distribution functions, we resort to Ampere's law and experimental data of magnetic field fluctuations. The transfer of energy between MHD modes and external currents is then discussed.

  11. HYBRID AND HALL-MHD SIMULATIONS OF COLLISIONLESS RECONNECTION: EFFECTS OF PLASMA PRESSURE TENSOR

    SciTech Connect

    L. YIN; D. WINSKE; ET AL

    2001-05-01

    In this study we performed two-dimensional hybrid (particle ions, massless fluid electrons) and Hall-MHD simulations of collisionless reconnection in a thin current sheet. Both calculations include the full electron pressure tensor (instead of a localized resistivity) in the generalized Ohm's law to initiate reconnection, and in both an initial perturbation to the Harris equilibrium is applied. First, electron dynamics from the two calculations are compared, and we find overall agreement between the two calculations in both the reconnection rate and the global configuration. To address the issue of how kinetic treatment for the ions affects the reconnection dynamics, we compared the fluid-ion dynamics from the Hall-MHD calculation to the particle-ion dynamics obtained from the hybrid simulation. The comparison demonstrates that off-diagonal elements of the ion pressure tensor are important in correctly modeling the ion out-of-plane momentum transport from the X point. It is that these effects can be modeled efficiently using a particle Hall-MHD simulation method in which particle ions used in a predictor/corrector to implement the ion gyro-radius corrections. We also investigate the micro- macro-scale coupling in the magnetotail dynamics by using a new integrated approach in which particle Hall-MHD calculations are embedded inside a MHD simulation. Initial results of the simulation concerning current sheet thinning and reconnection dynamics are discussed.

  12. Numerical Simulation of MHD Effect in Liquid Metal Blankets with Flow Channel Insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Pan, H. C.

    2011-09-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic effect in liquid metal blankets with flow channel insert and pressure equalization slot for fusion liquid metal blanket is studied by numerical simulation based on two dimensional fully developed flow model. The code is verified by comparing analytical solution and numerical solution of Hunt Case II. The velocity field and MHD pressure drop varying with electric conductivity of the FCI is analyzed. The result shows that the average velocity in central area of the cross section decreases with the increase of the electric conductivity of FCI. While the average velocity in gap zone is reverse. Comparing with MHD duct flow without FCI, MHD pressure drop is reduced significantly when the FCI material is electrically insulating.

  13. Full wave effects on the lower hybrid wave spectrum and driven current profile in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraiwa, S.; Ko, J.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R.; Schmidt, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J.; Ma, Y.; Podpaly, Y.; Rice, J. E.; Wallace, G.; Wolfe, S. M.; C-Mod Group, Alcator; Scott, S.; Wilson, J. R.

    2011-08-15

    A numerical modeling of current profile modification by lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) using a fullwave/Fokker-Planck simulation code is presented. A MHD stable LHCD discharge on Alcator C-Mod was analyzed, and the current profile from full wave simulations was found to show better agreement with the experiment than a ray-tracing code. Comparison of full wave and ray-tracing simulation shows that, although ray-tracing can reproduce the stochastic wave spectrum broadening, the full wave calculation predicts even wider spectrum broadening, and the wave spectrum fills all of the kinematically allowed domain. This is the first demonstration of LHCD current profile modeling using a full wave simulation code in a multi-pass absorption regime, showing the clear impact of full wave effects on the LHCD driven current profile.

  14. MHD Stability Analysis Using an X-ray Wave Array Diagnostic on the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C.; Fonck, R.; Intrator, T.; Thorson, T.

    1998-11-01

    Tearing mode instabilities during plasma current ramp-up are important for extremely low aspect ratio devices. Fast current ramping, aided by the low internal inductance of low aspect ratio plasmas, induces skin currents. The resulting hollow current profile may produce double tearing modes, which allows for reconnection and current penetration. Another area of interest for MHD stability studies in the first phase of operation of the P EGASUS Experiment is the nature of the plasma stability boundary as the edge-q is lowered at extremely low aspect ratio. This boundary plays a major role in the accessibility to stable operation at very low toroidal field. P EGASUS will employ an X-ray diode (XRD) detector array to diagnose the internal plasma MHD structure. We are designing and installing a vertical 20 channel radially viewing pinhole array of XRD's for >= 50 eV photon measurement. Each channel will have a vertical resolution of 2 cm and an upper frequency limit of 100 kHz. The lithium drifted XRD's have a large surface area of 90 mm^2, thereby being quite sensitive and suited to a low temperature start-up plasma. The expected signal-to-noise ratio due to photon noise is < 0.1% for P EGASUS plasmas. * *Supported by U.S. DoE grant No. DE-FG02-96ER54375

  15. Slow-Mode MHD Wave Penetration into a Coronal Null Point due to the Mode Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Andrey N.; Uralov, Arkadiy M.

    2016-05-01

    Recent observations of magnetohydrodynamic oscillations and waves in solar active regions revealed their close link to quasi-periodic pulsations in flaring light curves. The nature of that link has not yet been understood in detail. In our analytical modelling we investigate propagation of slow magnetoacoustic waves in a solar active region, taking into account wave refraction and transmission of the slow magnetoacoustic mode into the fast one. The wave propagation is analysed in the geometrical acoustics approximation. Special attention is paid to the penetration of waves in the vicinity of a magnetic null point. The modelling has shown that the interaction of slow magnetoacoustic waves with the magnetic reconnection site is possible due to the mode transmission at the equipartition level where the sound speed is equal to the Alfvén speed. The efficiency of the transmission is also calculated.

  16. On the nature of propagating MHD waves in polar coronal hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Girjesh R.; Banerjee, Dipankar

    Waves play an important role in the heating of the solar corona and in the acceleration of the fast solar wind from polar Coronal Holes (pCHs). Recently using EIS/Hinode and SUMER/SOHO, we have reported the presence of accelerating waves in polar region (Gupta et al. 2010, ApJ, 718, 11). These waves appeared to be originating from a bright location on-disk, presumably the footprint of the coronal funnels. These waves were interpreted in terms of either propagating Alfven waves or fast magneto-acoustic waves. The new sets of observations are obtained from the EIS/Hinode 2'' slit and imaging data from AIA/SDO in various filters over plume and inter-plume regions as HOP175 programme. The combination of spectroscopic and imaging data will provide further details on mode identification and properties of these waves and will help in the energy calculations. In this presentation, preliminary results obtained from these observations in terms of different nature of propagating waves in plume and inter-plume regions and energy carried by these waves will be presented.

  17. Mitigation of magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP) effects from commerical electric power systems. Power Systems Technology Program

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.; Tesche, F.M.; Vance, E.F.

    1992-03-01

    A large nuclear detonation at altitudes of several hundred kilometers above the earth distorts the earth`s magnetic field and produces a strong magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP). This can adversely affect electrical power systems. In this report, the effects of this nuclear environment on critical facilities connected to the commercial power system are considered. Methods of mitigating the MHD-EMP impacts are investigated, and recommended protection schemes are presented. Guidelines for testing facilities to determine the effects of MHD-EMP and to validate the mitigation methods also are discussed.

  18. MHD wave generators with a screw flow-through channel for automated soldering of the printed-circuit assemblies of radioelectronic apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Gel'fgat, Y.M.; Simsons, Y.A.

    1985-04-01

    The basic characteristics of MHDW for soldering with a continuous wave of solder are presented. A similar presentation of characteristics describe soldering with two jets of solder. A diagram of an MHDW with a screw flow-through channel for creating a single continuous wave of solder is illustrated, and consists of a vat with the melted metal. The vat's bottom is constructed in the form of a circular cylinder placed in the hollow of a three-phase rotating-magnetic-field inductor. The main designs of MHD wave generators have proved to be very efficient for mass and large series production.

  19. Computation of the MHD modes with rotation and kinetic effects: AEGIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.-J.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Turnbull, A.; Waelbroeck, F.; van Dam, J. W.; Berk, H.

    2003-10-01

    A new linear MHD eigenvalue code called AEGIS (Adaptive EiGenfunction Independent Shooting) is being developed at the IFS. The benchmarking of AEGIS with GATO is underway and will be presented. Plasma rotation is being included, with the effect of rotation-enhanced plasma compressibility also taken into account. As a first step in including rotational effects, the ideal MHD model is being employed. Details of the numerical scheme will be described, along with preliminary numerical results. The plan to include kinetic compressiblity will be discussed. With this new code, rotational stabilization of resistive wall modes can be rigorously calculated for the first time. The algorithm also allows FLR effects to be included. Many helpful suggestions from A. Glasser are acknowledged.

  20. Survey of MHD plant applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, J. J.; Seikel, G. R.; Cutting, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Open-cycle MHD is one of the major R&D efforts in the Department of Energy's program to meet the national goal of reducing U.S. dependence on oil through increased utilization of coal. MHD offers an effective way to use coal to produce electric power at low cost in a highly efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. Open-cycle MHD plants are categorized by the MHD combustor oxidizer, its temperature and the method of preheat. The paper discusses MHD baseline plant design, open-cycle MHD plant in the Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), early commercial MHD plants, conceptual studies of the engineering test facility, retrofit (addition of an MHD topping cycle to an existing steam plant), and other potential applications and concepts. Emphasis is placed on a survey of both completed and ongoing studies to define both commercial and pilot plant design, cost, and performance.

  1. Excitation of MHD waves upstream of Jupiter by energetic sulfur or oxygen ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Wong, H. K.; Eviatar, A.

    1986-01-01

    Large fluxes of heavy ions have been reported upstream of Jupiter's bow shock as Voyager 1 approached the planet (Zwickl et al., 1981; Krimigis et al., 1985). Enhanced low-frequency magnetic wave activity was also observed during the particle events. The fluctuations are left-handed, elliptically polarized in the plasma frame. The spectrum of these fluctuations contains a peak close to the Doppler-shifted resonance frequency of a sulfur or oxygen beam with streaming energy of approximately 30 keV. These fluctuations are also present in the spectrum of the magnitude of the field. It is concluded that the observations result from an instability driven by an energetic beam of either sulfur or oxygen. The wave observations can be described by a heavy ion distribution with both a streaming anisotropy and a temperature anisotropy. This class of heavy ion streaming instabilities may also play a role in wave-particle interactions in the vicinity of comets.

  2. Laboratory Study of MHD Effects on Stability of Free-surface Liquid Metal Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burin, M. J.; Ji, H.; McMurtry, K.; Peterson, L.; Giannakis, D.; Rosner, R.; Fischer, P.

    2006-10-01

    The dynamics of free-surface MHD shear flows is potentially important to both astrophysics (e.g. in the mixing of dense plasma accreted upon neutron star surfaces) and fusion reactors (e.g. in liquid metal ‘first walls’). To date however few relevant experiments exist. In order to study the fundamental physics of such flows, a small-scale laboratory experiment is being built using a liquid gallium alloy flowing in an open- channel geometry. The flow dimensions are nominally 10cm wide, 1cm deep, and 70cm long under an imposed magnetic field up to 7kG, leading to maximum Hartman number of 2000 and maximum Reynolds number of 4x10^5. Two basic physics issues will ultimately be addressed: (1) How do MHD effects modify the stability of the free surface? For example, is the flow more stable (through the suppression of cross-field motions), or less stable (through the introduction of new boundary layers)? We also investigate whether internal shear layers and imposed electric currents can control the surface stability. (2) How do MHD effects modify free-surface convection driven by a vertical and/or horizontal temperature gradient? We discuss aspects of both of these issues, along with detailed descriptions of the experimental device. Pertinent theoretical stability analyses and initial hydrodynamic results are presented in companion posters. This work is supported by DoE under contract #DE-AC02-76-CH03073.

  3. The effect of line-tying on the radiative MHD stability of coronal plasmas with radial pressure profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, C.-H.

    1984-01-01

    The role of photospheric line-tying, i.e., solar coronal loop structures, was investigated in terms of the effect on radiative modes and the influence that different radial pressure profiles exert on the effects of line-tying on radiative MHD stability. Energy is assumed dissipated by heat conduction and radiation and zero- and first-order solutions are obtained for the radiative time scales. Line-tying is a magnetic tension in the zero-order MHD mode and produces stability. Heat conduction occurs along bent field lines in first-order MHD modes when plasmas cross the field lines. Irradiated cool-core loops can experience MHD instabilities in the cylinder center, while line-tying can stabilize the plasma in the surrounding hot medium. Line-tying also adds stability to magnetosonic and condensation modes.

  4. Some effects of MHD activity on impurity transport in the PBX tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Ida, K.; Fonck, R.J.; Hulse, R.A.; LeBlanc, B.

    1985-10-01

    The effects of MHD activity on intrinsic impurity transport are studied in ohmic discharges of the Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX) by measuring of the Z/sub eff/ profile from visible bremsstrahlung radiation and the spectral line intensities from ultraviolet spectroscopy. A diffusive/convective transport model, including an internal disruption model, is used to simulate the data. The Z/sub eff/ profile with no MHD activity is fitted with a strong inward convection, characterized by a peaking parameter c/sub v/ (= -a/sup 2/v/2rD) = 11 (3.5, +4.5). At the onset of MHD activity (a large m = 1 n = 1 oscillation followed by sawteeth), this strongly peaked profile is flattened and subsequently reaches a new quasi-equilibrium shape. This profile is characterized by reduced convection (c/sub v/ = 3.6 (-1.1, +1.6), D = 1.4 (-0.7, +5.6) x 10/sup 4/ cm/sup 2//s), in addition to the particle redistribution which accompanies the sawtooth internal disruptions. 10 figs.

  5. Mode properties of low-frequency waves: Kinetic theory versus Hall-MHD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss-Varban, D.; Omidi, N.; Quest, K. B.

    1994-01-01

    In fluid theory, the ordering of low-frequency modes in a homogeneous plasma is based on the phase velocity, since modes do not intersect each other in dispersion diagrams as a function of wavenumber or other parameters. In linear kinetic theory, modes cross each other. Thus a consistent and useful classification should be based on the physical properties of the modes instead. This paper attempts such a classification by documeting the dispersion and general mode properties of the low-frequency waves (omega much less than (OMEGA(sub ci) OMEGA(sub ce) (exp 1/2)), where OMEGA(sub ci), OMEGA(sub ce) are the cyclotron frequencies of the ions and electrons, respectively) in kinetic theory, and by comparing them to the results of two-fluid theory. Kinetic theory gives a seperate Alfven/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) wave with phase speed Omega/k approximately = v(sub A) cos theta for omega much less than OMEGA(sub ci), where v(sub A) is the Alfven velocity and theta the angle of propagation between wave vector k and background magnetic field B(sub o). For a given wavenumber, the magnetosonic mode is a double-valued solution with a singular point in theta, beta parameter space, where beta is the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure. It is shown that a branch cut starting at the singular point theta approximately 30 deg, beta approximately 3 and leading to larger beta gives a practical and consitent seperation of this double-valued magnetosonic solution. Selection of this branch cut results in a moderately damped fast/magnetos onic and a heavily damped slow/sound wave. A comprehensive review of the polarization, compressibility and other mode properties is given and shown to be consistent with the selected branch cut. At small wavenumbers, the kinetic mode properties typically start to deviate significantly from their fluid counterparts at beta approximately 0.5. At larger beta, there is no longer a consistent correspondence between the fluid and kinetic modes. Kinetic

  6. Small scale MHD wave processes in the solar atmosphere and solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1987-01-01

    Solar wind observations suggesting wave-particle interactions via ion-cyclotron resonances are reviewed. The required power at high frequencies is presumably supplied via a turbulent cascade. Tu's (1987) model, which considers a turbulent cascade explicitly, is outlined. In the solar atmosphere, resonance absorption is considered. The meanings of the cusp and Alfven resonances are discussed, and it is shown how energy gets pumped into small scales. It is shown that resonance absorption can heat the corona and spicules in a manner consistent with observations, if turbulence provides an eddy viscosity.

  7. Modeling of magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail using global MHD simulation with an effective resistivity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den, M.; Horiuchi, R.; Fujita, S.; Tanaka, T.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is considered to play an important role in space phenomena such as substorm in the Earth's magnetosphere. Tanaka and Fujita reproduced substorm evolution process by numerical simulation with the global MHD code [1]. In the MHD framework, the dissipation model is introduced for modeling of the kinetic effects. They found that the normalized reconnection viscosity, one of the dissipation model employed there, gave a large effect for the dipolarization, central phenomenon in the substorm development process, though that viscosity was assumed to be a constant parameter. It is well known that magnetic reconnection is controlled by microscopic kinetic mechanism. Frozen-in condition is broken due to particle kinetic effects and collisionless reconnection is triggered when current sheet is compressed as thin as ion kinetic scales under the influence of external driving flow [2, 3]. Horiuchi and his collaborators showed that reconnection electric field generated by microscopic physics evolves inside ion meandering scale so as to balance the flux inflow rate at the inflow boundary, which is controlled by macroscopic physics [2]. That is, effective resistivity generated through this process can be expressed by balance equation between micro and macro physics. In this paper, we perform substorm simulation by using the global MHD code developed by Tanaka [3] with this effective resistivity instead of the empirical resistivity model. We obtain the AE indices from simulation data, in which substorm onset can be seen clearly, and investigate the relationship between the substorm development and the effective resistivity model. [1] T. Tanaka, A, Nakamizo, A. Yoshikawa, S. Fujita, H. Shinagawa, H. Shimazu, T. Kikuchi, and K. K. Hashimoto, J. Geophys. Res. 115 (2010) A05220,doi:10.1029/2009JA014676. [2] W. Pei, R. Horiuchi, and T. Sato, Physics of Plasmas,Vol. 8 (2001), pp. 3251-3257. [3] A. Ishizawa, and R. Horiuchi, Phys. Rev. Lett., Vol. 95, 045003 (2005). [4

  8. Case Studies on MHD Wave Propagation by the Exos-D Electric Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jeong-Seon; Lee, Dong-Hun

    1997-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic wave phenomena have been investigated in the deep plasmasphere by the electric field measurements in the EXOS-D(Akebono) satellite. EXOS-D has highly eccentric orbits(the perigee: 274km, the apogee: 10,500km), which allows relatively long observational time interval near the apogee region compared to othe satellites which pass by the same region with less eccentric orbits. Case studies are peformed on one month data of October in 1989 where the apogee is located near the equator and the magnetic local time is about 9:00-12:00 a.m. in the dayside plasmasphere. The observational region ranges from L=2 to L=3 and the magnetic latitude is restricted to less than 30 degress. The power spectrum is examined for each 128 point series of 8-sec averaged data through a FFT, which covers f=0-62.3 mHz frequency bands. The results are well consistent with field line resonances(FLRs) and cavity modes in the plasmasphere.

  9. Effects of MHD instabilities on neutral beam current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Podestà, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gerhardt, S. P.; White, R. B.

    2015-04-17

    One of the primary tools foreseen for heating, current drive (CD) and q-profile control in future fusion reactors such as ITER and a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility is the neutral beam injection (NBI). However, fast ions from NBI may also provide the drive for energetic particle-driven instabilities (e.g. Alfvénic modes (AEs)), which in turn redistribute fast ions in both space and energy, thus hampering the control capabilities and overall efficiency of NB-driven current. Based on experiments on the NSTX tokamak (M. Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557), the effects of AEs and other low-frequency magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities on NB-CD efficiency are investigated. When looking at the new fast ion transport model, which accounts for particle transport in phase space as required for resonant AE perturbations, is utilized to obtain consistent simulations of NB-CD through the tokamak transport code TRANSP. It is found that instabilities do indeed reduce the NB-driven current density over most of the plasma radius by up to ~50%. Moreover, the details of the current profile evolution are sensitive to the specific model used to mimic the interaction between NB ions and instabilities. Finally, implications for fast ion transport modeling in integrated tokamak simulations are briefly discussed.

  10. Effects of MHD instabilities on neutral beam current drive

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Podestà, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gerhardt, S. P.; White, R. B.

    2015-04-17

    One of the primary tools foreseen for heating, current drive (CD) and q-profile control in future fusion reactors such as ITER and a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility is the neutral beam injection (NBI). However, fast ions from NBI may also provide the drive for energetic particle-driven instabilities (e.g. Alfvénic modes (AEs)), which in turn redistribute fast ions in both space and energy, thus hampering the control capabilities and overall efficiency of NB-driven current. Based on experiments on the NSTX tokamak (M. Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557), the effects of AEs and other low-frequency magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities on NB-CDmore » efficiency are investigated. When looking at the new fast ion transport model, which accounts for particle transport in phase space as required for resonant AE perturbations, is utilized to obtain consistent simulations of NB-CD through the tokamak transport code TRANSP. It is found that instabilities do indeed reduce the NB-driven current density over most of the plasma radius by up to ~50%. Moreover, the details of the current profile evolution are sensitive to the specific model used to mimic the interaction between NB ions and instabilities. Finally, implications for fast ion transport modeling in integrated tokamak simulations are briefly discussed.« less

  11. Studying effect of MHD on thin films of a micropolar fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Gamal M.

    2009-11-01

    This paper deals with the study of the effect of MHD on thin films of a micropolar fluid. These thin films are considered for three different geometries, namely: (i) flow down an inclined plane, (ii) flow on a moving belt and (iii) flow down a vertical cylinder. The transformed boundary layer governing equations of a micropolar fluid and the resulting system of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations are solved numerically by using shooting method. Numerical results were presented for velocity and micro-rotation profiles within the boundary layer for different parameters of the problem including micropolar fluid parameters, magnetic field parameter, etc., which are also discussed numerically and illustrated graphically.

  12. Integration of Extended MHD and Kinetic Effects in Global Magnetosphere Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaschewski, K.; Wang, L.; Maynard, K. R. M.; Raeder, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-12-01

    Computational models of Earth's geospace environment are an important tool to investigate the science of the coupled solar-wind -- magnetosphere -- ionosphere system, complementing satellite and ground observations with a global perspective. They are also crucial in understanding and predicting space weather, in particular under extreme conditions. Traditionally, global models have employed the one-fluid MHD approximation, which captures large-scale dynamics quite well. However, in Earth's nearly collisionless plasma environment it breaks down on small scales, where ion and electron dynamics and kinetic effects become important, and greatly change the reconnection dynamics. A number of approaches have recently been taken to advance global modeling, e.g., including multiple ion species, adding Hall physics in a Generalized Ohm's Law, embedding local PIC simulations into a larger fluid domain and also some work on simulating the entire system with hybrid or fully kinetic models, the latter however being to computationally expensive to be run at realistic parameters. We will present an alternate approach, ie., a multi-fluid moment model that is derived rigorously from the Vlasov-Maxwell system. The advantage is that the computational cost remains managable, as we are still solving fluid equations. While the evolution equation for each moment is exact, it depends on the next higher-order moment, so that truncating the hiearchy and closing the system to capture the essential kinetic physics is crucial. We implement 5-moment (density, momentum, scalar pressure) and 10-moment (includes pressure tensor) versions of the model, and use local approximations for the heat flux to close the system. We test these closures by local simulations where we can compare directly to PIC / hybrid codes, and employ them in global simulations using the next-generation OpenGGCM to contrast them to MHD / Hall-MHD results and compare with observations.

  13. Broadband Electron Precipitation in Global MHD Simulation and its Effect on the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Lotko, W.; Brambles, O. J.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    A broadband electron (BBE) precipitation model is implemented and analyzed in the MI coupling module of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry MHD simulation. Both number flux and energy flux of precipitating BBEs are regulated by MHD variables calculated near the low-altitude boundary of the LFM simulation. An empirical relation deduced from results of Keiling et al. (2003) is used to relate the AC Poynting flux to the energy flux precipitating BBEs in the simulation. We are investigating two different ways of regulating the number flux of BBE precipitation, one using an empirical relation between AC Poynting flux and number flux (Strangeway, unpublished) and another by constraining the intensity and cut-off energy of a fixed-pitch angle distribution of BBEs in terms of MHD simulation variables. The contributions to ionospheric conductance from BBE precipitation are evaluated using empirical relations derived by Robinson et al. (1987). The BBE-induced-conductance is added to the “standard” auroral contribution to conductance derived from monoenergetic and diffuse electron precipitation in the existing LFM precipitation model. The simulation is driven by ideal SW/IMF conditions with Vsw=400 km/s, Nsw=5/cc and Bz=-5 nT. The simulated time-average AC Poynting flux pattern resembles statistical patterns from Polar data (Keiling et al. 2003), and the simulated statistical pattern of BBE number flux resembles the statistical maps derived from DMSP data (Newell et al. 2009) on the nightside with a similar dawn-dusk asymmetry. The ionospheric Pedersen and Hall conductances are enhanced about 20% by the BBE precipitation. The number flux produced by BBEs is the same order of magnitude as that of monoenergetic and diffuse electrons. We thus expect BBE precipitation to have a moderate effect on the E-region ionosphere and a more significant influence on the density distribution of the F-region ionosphere.

  14. Investigation of Neutral Wind Effects on the Global Joule Heating Rate Using MHD and TI Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalafatoglu, E.; Kaymaz, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Precise calculation of global Joule heating rate is a long standing question in thermosphere-ionosphere coupling processes. The absence of the complete and direct, in-situ measurements of the parameters involved in the calculation of Joule heating such as the conductivity of the medium, small-scale variations of electric fields, and neutral winds at the ionospheric heights poses a great uncertainty in its determination. In this work, we study the effects of the neutral wind on the global Joule heating rate. Most of the time, owing to above mentioned difficulties the effects of the neutral wind have been neglected in the calculations. We investigate their effects using BATSRUS MHD model, TIEGCM and GITM. Using horizontal current density, Cowling conductivity, and Pedersen conductivities from the MHD model, we calculate the joule heating rate with and without the neutral wind contribution. We apply the procedure for March 2008 magnetospheric substorm events and quantify the differences to show the neutral wind contribution. We compare the results with those obtained using neutral wind velocities from TIEGCM and GITM models. This way while we compare and demonstrate the discrepancies between the models, we also provide an assessment for the integration of thermospheric and magnetospheric models.

  15. Analysis of Helicities and Hall and MHD Dynamo Effects in Two-Fluid Reversed-Field Pinch Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauppe, Joshua; Sovinec, Carl

    2015-11-01

    Relaxation in the RFP is studied numerically with extended-MHD modeling that includes the Hall term and ion gyroviscous stress. Previous results show significant coupling between magnetic relaxation and parallel flow evolution [King PoP 19, 055905]. Computations presented here display quasi-periodic relaxation events with current relaxation through MHD and Hall dynamo drives. The MHD dynamo always relaxes currents while the Hall dynamo may add or subtract from it, but the total dynamo drive is similar to single-fluid MHD computations. Changes in plasma momentum are due to viscous coupling to the wall and fluctuation-induced Maxwell stresses transport momentum radially inward when two-fluid effects are included. The magnetic helicity and hybrid helicity, a two-fluid extension of magnetic helicity that includes cross and kinetic helicity [Turner, 1986], are well-conserved relative to magnetic energy at each event. The cross helicity is well-conserved in single-fluid MHD but is significantly affected by both two-fluid effects and ion gyroviscosity. The plasma parallel current evolves towards the predicted flat profile; however, the plasma flow does not. Work supported through NSF grant PHY-0821899 and DOE grant DE-FG02-06ER54850.

  16. Effect of low frequency MHD instability on fast ion distribution in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, G.; Liu, D.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Podesta, M.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Bortolon, A.; White, R.; Darrow, D.; Fu, G. Y.; Wang, Z. R.; Kramer, G. J.; Liu, Y. Q.; Tritz, K.

    2015-11-01

    In NSTX spherical tokamak plasmas, the onset of low-frequency MHD modes cause a rapid ~ 25% reduction in the fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) signal. These, 5-20 kHz instabilities are commonly observed in the early phase of neutral beam heated plasmas that often have reversed magnetic shear in the plasma core. The collapse of the core fast ion density is measured by the vertical FIDA diagnostic. Although the profile flattens, changes in spectral shape are modest, suggesting that much of the distribution function is affected. Meanwhile, a modest increase of fast-ion losses is indicated by the measurements from neutron and fast-ion loss detectors. Moreover, this mode is always accompanied by Compressional Alfven Eigenmode (CAE). This suggests that low-f MHD instabilities can cause the redistribution of fast ions in both real and velocity space. Preliminary simulation results from the MARS-F code suggest that the low-f instability is a coupled infernal-peeling mode. The dependence of the mode's onset on the equilibrium parameters and its effect on the fast ion distribution will be computed, and compared with experimental measurements. Work supported by U.S. DOE DE-AC0209CH11466, DE-FG02-06ER54867, and DE-FG03-02ER54681.

  17. Extended MHD Simulations of Tearing Instabilities and the Dynamo Effect in the Reversed-Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaschewski, K.; Dearborn, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2009-11-01

    Observations on MST indicate the importance of the Hall current in sawtooth crashes and the dynamo effect in a RFP. We employ our Magnetic Reconnection Code (MRC) to perform fully 3D extended MHD simulations in the RFP, including the Hall current and electron pressure gradient in a generalized Ohm's law. The MRC is an MPI-parallelized finite-volume based simulation code that integrates the extended MHD equations. It supports arbitrary curvilinear coordinate mappings, allowing it to be adapted to cylindrical and toroidal geometries. In order to overcome restrictive time-step limits, it uses implicit time integration. We have benchmarked the code for linear tearing instabilities, and performed fully nonlinear simulations. Due to the presence of the Hall current, novel vortical flows are seen in the vicinity of rational surfaces, akin to those seen in recent sawtooth studies in tokamaks, when the peak of the current density separates from the stagnation point of the flow. We calculate the dynamo field by averaging, and compare simulations with observations.

  18. Ideal MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidberg, Jeffrey P.

    2014-06-01

    1. Introduction; 2. The ideal MHD model; 3. General properties of ideal MHD; 5. Equilibrium: one-dimensional configurations; 6. Equilibrium: two-dimensional configurations; 7. Equilibrium: three-dimensional configurations; 8. Stability: general considerations; 9. Alternate MHD models; 10. MHD stability comparison theorems; 11. Stability: one-dimensional configurations; 12. Stability: multi-dimensional configurations; Appendix A. Heuristic derivation of the kinetic equation; Appendix B. The Braginskii transport coefficients; Appendix C. Time derivatives in moving plasmas; Appendix D. The curvature vector; Appendix E. Overlap limit of the high b and Greene-Johnson stellarator models; Appendix F. General form for q(y); Appendix G. Natural boundary conditions; Appendix H. Upper and lower bounds on dQKIN.

  19. Thermal radiation and slip effects on MHD stagnation point flow of nanofluid over a stretching sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ul Haq, Rizwan; Nadeem, Sohail; Hayat Khan, Zafar; Sher Akbar, Noreen

    2015-01-01

    Present model is devoted for the stagnation point flow of nanofluid with magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) and thermal radiation effects passed over a stretching sheet. Moreover, we have considered the combined effects of velocity and thermal slip. Condition of zero normal flux of nanoparticles at the wall for the stretched flow phenomena is yet to be explored in the literature. Convinced partial differential equations of the model are transformed into the system of coupled nonlinear differential equations and then solved numerically. Graphical results are plotted for velocity, temperature and nanoparticle concentration for various values of emerging parameters. Variation of stream lines, skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt and Sherwood number are displayed along with the effective parameters. Final conclusion has been drawn on the basis of both numerical and graphs results.

  20. A pressure-based high resolution numerical method for resistive MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xisto, Carlos M.; Páscoa, José C.; Oliveira, Paulo J.

    2014-10-01

    In the paper we describe in detail a numerical method for the resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations involving viscous flow and report the results of application to a number of typical MHD test cases. The method is of the finite volume type but mixes aspects of pressure-correction and density based solvers; the algorithm arrangement is patterned on the well-known PISO algorithm, which is a pressure method, while the flux computation makes use of the AUSM-MHD scheme, which originates from density based methods. Five groups of test cases are addressed to verify and validate the method. We start with two resistive MHD cases, namely the Shercliff and Hunt flow problems, which are intended to validate the method for low-speed resistive MHD flows. The remaining three test cases, namely the cloud-shock interaction, the MHD rotor and the MHD blast wave, are standard 2D ideal MHD problems that serve to validate the method under high-speed flow and complex interaction of MHD shocks. Finally, we demonstrate the method with a more complex application problem, and discuss results of simulation for a quasi-bi-dimensional self-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster, for which we study the effect of cathode length upon the electromagnetic nozzle performance.

  1. A kinetic-MHD model for low frequency phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1991-07-01

    A hybrid kinetic-MHD model for describing low-frequency phenomena in high beta anisotropic plasmas that consist of two components: a low energy core component and an energetic component with low density. The kinetic-MHD model treats the low energy core component by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description, the energetic component by kinetic approach such as the gyrokinetic equation, and the coupling between the dynamics of these two components through plasma pressure in the momentum equation. The kinetic-MHD model optimizes both the physics contents and the theoretical efforts in studying low frequency MHD waves and transport phenomena in general magnetic field geometries, and can be easily modified to include the core plasma kinetic effects if necessary. It is applicable to any magnetized collisionless plasma system where the parallel electric field effects are negligibly small. In the linearized limit two coupled eigenmode equations for describing the coupling between the transverse Alfven type and the compressional Alfven type waves are derived. The eigenmode equations are identical to those derived from the full gyrokinetic equation in the low frequency limit and were previously analyzed both analytically nd numerically to obtain the eigenmode structure of the drift mirror instability which explains successfully the multi-satellite observation of antisymmetric field-aligned structure of the compressional magnetic field of Pc 5 waves in the magnetospheric ring current plasma. Finally, a quadratic form is derived to demonstrate the stability of the low-frequency transverse and compressional Alfven type instabilities in terms of the pressure anisotropy parameter {tau} and the magnetic field curvature-pressure gradient parameter. A procedure for determining the stability of a marginally stable MHD wave due to wave-particle resonances is also presented.

  2. Convective heat transfer and MHD effects on Casson nanofluid flow over a shrinking sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Rizwan; Nadeem, Sohail; Khan, Zafar; Okedayo, Toyin

    2014-12-01

    Current study examines the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow of a Casson nanofluid over an exponentially permeable shrinking sheet with convective boundary condition. Moreover, we have considered the suction/injection effects on the wall. By applying the appropriate transformations, system of non-linear partial differential equation along with the boundary conditions are transformed to couple non-linear ordinary differential equations. The resulting systems of non-linear ordinary differential equations are solved numerically using Runge-Kutta method. Numerical results for velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume concentration are presented through graphs for various values of dimensionless parameters. Effects of parameters for heat transfer at wall and nanoparticle volume concentration are also presented through graphs and tables. At the end, fluid flow behavior is examined through stream lines. Concluding remarks are provided for the whole analysis.

  3. The effect of conjugate heat transfer on MHD mixed convection about a vertical slender hollow cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Ahmet

    2011-04-01

    The problem of steady laminar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convection heat transfer about a vertical slender hollow cylinder is studied numerically, under the effect of wall conduction. A uniform magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the cylinder. The non-similar solutions using the Keller box method are obtained. The wall conduction parameter, the magnetic parameter and the Richardson number are the main parameters. For various values of these parameters the local skin friction and local heat transfer parameters are determined. The validity of the methodology is checked by comparing the results with those available in the open literature and a fairly good agreement is observed. Finally, it is determined that the local skin friction and the local heat transfer coefficients increase with an increase the magnetic parameter Mn and buoyancy parameter Ri and decrease with conjugate heat transfer parameter p.

  4. Convective boundary conditions effect on peristaltic flow of a MHD Jeffery nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothandapani, M.; Prakash, J.

    2016-03-01

    This work is aimed at describing the influences of MHD, chemical reaction, thermal radiation and heat source/sink parameter on peristaltic flow of Jeffery nanofluids in a tapered asymmetric channel along with slip and convective boundary conditions. The governing equations of a nanofluid are first formulated and then simplified under long-wavelength and low-Reynolds number approaches. The equation of nanoparticles temperature and concentration is coupled; hence, homotopy perturbation method has been used to obtain the solutions of temperature and concentration of nanoparticles. Analytical solutions for axial velocity, stream function and pressure gradient have also constructed. Effects of various influential flow parameters have been pointed out through with help of the graphs. Analysis indicates that the temperature of nanofluids decreases for a given increase in heat transfer Biot number and chemical reaction parameter, but it possesses converse behavior in respect of mass transfer Biot number and heat source/sink parameter.

  5. Implementation of Inductive Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling and its Effects on Global MHD Magnetospheric Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, S.; Lotko, W.; Zhang, B.; Brambles, O.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Lyon, J.; Merkin, V. G.

    2010-12-01

    In global modeling, magnetosphere-ionosphere (MI) coupling physically connects a global magnetospheric (GM) model and a global ionospheric-thermospheric (GIT) model. The field-aligned current from the GM model and the conductance distributions from the GIT model are used in a Poisson equation derived from the ionospheric Ohm's law combined with current continuity to determine the electrostatic potential in the ionosphere. In current GM models, this electrostatic potential is mapped to the inner boundary of the GM simulation to determine electrostatic boundary conditions on the electric field and MHD velocity there. Inductive effects and the finite Alfven transit time between the low-altitude GM boundary and the high-altitude GIT boundary (MI gap region) are neglected in this formulation of MI coupling. Using fields and currents derived from Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry GM simulations, and conductance distributions derived from its standalone empirical conductance model in the MI coupling Poisson equation, we have computed the fast Fourier transform of the electrostatic field at the low-altitude LFM simulation boundary as described above, and the FFT of the inductive electric field at the boundary under the assumption that μ 0 Σ P vA ≤ 1, where Σ P is the ionospheric Pedersen conductance and vA is the smallest value of the Alfven speed in the MI gap region. In this regime, the complete electric field at the low-altitude simulation boundary includes the usual mapped electrostatic field with an inductive addition for which the finite Alfven transit time and the diversion of field-aligned into polarization currents in the gap region are negligible (Lotko, 2004). By comparing the boundary-averaged spectra of the electrostatic and so-determined inductive fields, we confirm that the purely electrostatic formulation of MI coupling is valid when the MHD state varies on times scales exceeding about 200 s. For faster MHD time variations, the inductive electric field is shown to

  6. MHD Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, R F; Fasoli, A; Testa, D; Sharapov, S; Berk, H L; Breizman, B; Gondhalekar, A; Mantsinen, M

    2004-03-23

    Experiments are conducted on the JET tokamak to assess the diagnostic potential of MHD active and passive spectroscopy, for the plasma bulk and its suprathermal components, using Alfv{acute e}n Eigenmodes (AEs) excited by external antennas and by energetic particles. The measurements of AE frequencies and mode numbers give information on the bulk plasma. Improved equilibrium reconstruction, in particular in terms of radial profiles of density and safety factor, is possible from the comparison between the antenna driven spectrum and that calculated theoretically. Details of the time evolution of the non-monotonic safety factor profile in advanced scenarios can be reconstructed from the frequency of ICRH-driven energetic particle modes. The plasma effective mass can be inferred from the resonant frequency of externally driven AEs in discharges with similar equilibrium profiles. The stability thresholds and the nonlinear development of the instabilities can give clues on energy and spatial distribution of the fast particle population. The presence of unstable AEs provides lower limits in the energy of ICRH generated fast ion tails. Fast ion pressure gradients and their evolution can be inferred from the stability of AEs at different plasma radial positions. Finally, the details of the AE spectrum in the nonlinear stage can be used to obtain information about the fast particle velocity space diffusion.

  7. Accuracy of MHD simulations: Effects of simulation initialization in GUMICS-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakka, Antti; Pulkkinen, Tuija; Dimmock, Andrew; Osmane, Adnane; Palmroth, Minna; Honkonen, Ilja

    2016-04-01

    We conducted a study aimed at revealing how different global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation initialization methods affect the dynamics in different parts of the Earth's magnetosphere-ionosphere system. While such magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling codes have been used for more than two decades, their testing still requires significant work to identify the optimal numerical representation of the physical processes. We used the Grand Unified Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Simulation (GUMICS-4), the only European global MHD simulation being developed by the Finnish Meteorological Institute. GUMICS-4 was put to a test that included two stages: 1) a 10 day Omni data interval was simulated and the results were validated by comparing both the bow shock and the magnetopause spatial positions predicted by the simulation to actual measurements and 2) the validated 10 day simulation run was used as a reference in a comparison of five 3 + 12 hour (3 hour synthetic initialisation + 12 hour actual simulation) simulation runs. The 12 hour input was not only identical in each simulation case but it also represented a subset of the 10 day input thus enabling quantifying the effects of different synthetic initialisations on the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. The used synthetic initialisation data sets were created using stepwise, linear and sinusoidal functions. Switching the used input from the synthetic to real Omni data was immediate. The results show that the magnetosphere forms in each case within an hour after the switch to real data. However, local dissimilarities are found in the magnetospheric dynamics after formation depending on the used initialisation method. This is evident especially in the inner parts of the lobe.

  8. LIGKA: A linear gyrokinetic code for the description of background kinetic and fast particle effects on the MHD stability in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Lauber, Ph. Guenter, S.; Koenies, A.; Pinches, S.D.

    2007-09-10

    In a plasma with a population of super-thermal particles generated by heating or fusion processes, kinetic effects can lead to the additional destabilisation of MHD modes or even to additional energetic particle modes. In order to describe these modes, a new linear gyrokinetic MHD code has been developed and tested, LIGKA (linear gyrokinetic shear Alfven physics) [Ph. Lauber, Linear gyrokinetic description of fast particle effects on the MHD stability in tokamaks, Ph.D. Thesis, TU Muenchen, 2003; Ph. Lauber, S. Guenter, S.D. Pinches, Phys. Plasmas 12 (2005) 122501], based on a gyrokinetic model [H. Qin, Gyrokinetic theory and computational methods for electromagnetic perturbations in tokamaks, Ph.D. Thesis, Princeton University, 1998]. A finite Larmor radius expansion together with the construction of some fluid moments and specification to the shear Alfven regime results in a self-consistent, electromagnetic, non-perturbative model, that allows not only for growing or damped eigenvalues but also for a change in mode-structure of the magnetic perturbation due to the energetic particles and background kinetic effects. Compared to previous implementations [H. Qin, mentioned above], this model is coded in a more general and comprehensive way. LIGKA uses a Fourier decomposition in the poloidal coordinate and a finite element discretisation in the radial direction. Both analytical and numerical equilibria can be treated. Integration over the unperturbed particle orbits is performed with the drift-kinetic HAGIS code [S.D. Pinches, Ph.D. Thesis, The University of Nottingham, 1996; S.D. Pinches et al., CPC 111 (1998) 131] which accurately describes the particles' trajectories. This allows finite-banana-width effects to be implemented in a rigorous way since the linear formulation of the model allows the exchange of the unperturbed orbit integration and the discretisation of the perturbed potentials in the radial direction. Successful benchmarks for toroidal Alfven

  9. Effect of Trapped Energetic Ions on MHD Activity in Spherical Tori

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. White; Ya.I. Kolesnichenko; V.V. Lutsenko; V.S. Marchenko

    2002-05-30

    It is shown that the increase of beta (the ratio of plasma pressure to the magnetic field pressure) may change the character of the influence of trapped energetic ions on MHD stability in spherical tori. Namely, the energetic ions, which stabilize MHD modes (such as the ideal-kink mode, collisionless tearing mode, and semi-collisional tearing mode) at low beta, have a destabilizing influence at high beta unless the radial distribution of the energetic ions is very peaked.

  10. Spectrum of resistive MHD modes in cylindrical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, C.M.; Grimm, R.C.

    1983-07-01

    A numerical study of the normal modes of a compressible resistive MHD fluid in cylindrical geometry is presented. Resistivity resolves the shear Alfven and slow magnetosonic continua of ideal MHD into discrete spectra and gives rise to heavily damped modes whose frequencies lie on specific lines in the complex plane. Fast magnetosonic waves are less affected but are also damped. Overstable modes arise from the shear Alfven spectrum. The stabilizing effect of favorable average curvature is shown. Eigenfunctions illustrating the nature of typical normal modes are displayed.

  11. MHD simulations of Earth's bow shock: Interplanetary magnetic field orientation effects on shape and position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, J. F.; Cairns, Iver H.; Lyon, J. G.; Boshuizen, Christopher R.

    2004-04-01

    The location and geometry of Earth's bow shock vary considerably with the solar wind conditions. More specifically, Earth's bow shock is formed by the steepening of fast mode waves, whose speed vms depends upon the angle θbn between the local shock normal n and the magnetic field vector BIMF, as well as the Alfvén and sound speeds (vA and cS). Since vms is a minimum for θbn = 0° and low Alfvén Mach number MA, and maximum for θbn = 90° and high MA, this implies that as θIMF (the angle between BIMF and vsw) varies, the magnitude of vms should vary also across the shock, leading to changes in shape. This paper presents 3-D MHD simulation data which illustrate the changes in shock location and geometry in response to changes in θIMF and MA, for 1.4 ≤ MA ≤ 9.7 and 0° ≤ θIMF ≤ 90°. Specifically, for oblique IMF the shock's geometry is shown to become skewed in planes containing BIMF (e.g., the x - z plane). This is also emphasized in the terminator plane data, where the shock is best represented by ellipses, with centers translated along the z axis. For the θIMF = 90° simulations the shock is symmetric about the x axis in both the x - y and x - z planes. Simulations for field-aligned flow (θIMF = 0°) show a dimpling of the nose of the shock as MA → 1. The simulations also illustrate the general movement of the shock in response to changes in MA; high MA shocks are found closer to Earth than low MA shocks. 's [1991] magnetopause model is used in the simulations, and we discuss the limitations of this, as well as the expected results using a self-consistent model.

  12. MHD stability of ITER H-mode confinement with pedestal bootstrap current effects taken into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L. J.; Kotschenreuther, M. T.; Valanju, P.; Mahajan, S. M.; Hatch, D.; Liu, X.

    2015-11-01

    We have shown that the bootstrap current can have significant effects both on tokamak equilibrium and stability (Nucl. Fusion 53, 063009 (2013)). For ITER H-mode discharges pedestal density is low and consequently bootstrap current is large. We reconstruct numerically ITER equilibria with bootstrap current taken into account. Especially, we have considered a more realistic scenario in which density and temperature profiles can be different. The direct consequence of bootstrap current effects on equilibrium is the modification of local safety factor profile at pedestal. This results in a dramatic change of MHD mode behavior. The stability of ITER numerical equilibria is investigated with AEGIS code. Both low-n and peeling-ballooning modes are investigated. Note that pressure gradient at pedestal is steep. High resolution computation is needed. Since AEGIS code is an adaptive code, it can well handle this problem. Also, the analytical continuation technique based on the Cauchy-Riemann condition of dispersion relation is applied, so that the marginal stability conditions can be determined. Both numerical scheme and results will be presented. The effects of different density and temperature profiles on ITER H-mode discharges will be discussed. This research is supported by U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Science: Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER-54742.

  13. Effects of Magnetic Field on the Turbulent Wake of a Cylinder in MHD Channel Flow

    SciTech Connect

    John Rhoads; Edlundd, Eric; Ji, Hantao

    2013-04-01

    Results from a free-surface MHD flow experiment are presented detailing the modi cation of vortices in the wake of a circular cylinder with its axis parallel to the applied magnetic fi eld. Experiments were performed with a Reynolds number near Re ~ 104 as the interaction parameter, N = |j x B| / |ρ (υ • ∇), was increased through unity. By concurrently sampling the downstream fluid velocity at sixteen cross-stream locations in the wake, it was possible to extract an ensemble of azimuthal velocity profi les as a function of radius for vortices shed by the cylinder at varying strengths of magnetic field. Results indicate a signi cant change in vortex radius and rotation as N is increased. The lack of deviations from the vortex velocity pro file at high magnetic fi elds suggests the absence of small-scale turbulent features. By sampling the wake at three locations downstream in subsequent experiments, the decay of the vortices was examined and the effective viscosity was found to decrease as N-049±0.4. This reduction in effective viscosity is due to the modi cation of the small-scale eddies by the magnetic fi eld. The slope of the energy spectrum was observed to change from a k-1.8 power-law at low N to a k-3.5 power-law for N > 1. Together, these results suggest the flow smoothly transitioned to a quasi-two-dimensional state in the range 0 < N < 1.

  14. End region and current consolidation effects upon the performance of an MHD channel for the ETF conceptual design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. Y.; Smith, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that operating conditions which yielded a peak thermodynamic efficiency (41%) for an EFT-size MHD/steam power plant were previously (Wang et al., 1981; Staiger, 1981) identified by considering only the active region (the primary portion for power production) of an MHD channel. These previous efforts are extended here to include an investigation of the effects of the channel end regions on overall power generation. Considering these effects, the peak plant thermodynamic efficiency is found to be slightly lowered (40.7%); the channel operating point for peak efficiency is shifted to the supersonic mode (Mach number of approximately 1.1) rather than the previous subsonic operation (Mach number of approximately 0.9). Also discussed is the sensitivity of the channel performance to the B-field, diffuser recovery coefficient, channel load parameter, Mach number, and combustor pressure.

  15. MHD heat and mass transfer flow over a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with radiation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat Yasin, Mohd Hafizi; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2016-06-01

    The steady two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with radiation effects is investigated. The similarity transformation is introduced to transform the governing partial differential equations into a system of ordinary differential equations before being solved numerically using a shooting method. The results are obtained for the skin friction coefficient, the local Nusselt number and the local Sherwood number as well as the velocity, temperature and the concentration profiles for some values of the governing parameters, namely, suction/injection parameter S, stretching/shrinking parameter λ, magnetic parameter M, radiation parameter R, heat source/sink Q and chemical rate parameter K. For the shrinking case, there exist two solutions for a certain range of parameters, but the solution is unique for the stretching case. The stability analysis verified that the upper branch solution is linearly stable and physically reliable while the lower branch solution is not. For the reliable solution, the skin friction coefficient increases in the present of magnetic field. The heat transfer rate at the surface decreases in the present of radiation.

  16. Thermophysical effects of carbon nanotubes on MHD flow over a stretching surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ul Haq, Rizwan; Khan, Zafar Hayat; Khan, Waqar Ahmed

    2014-09-01

    This article is intended for investigating the effects of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and volume fraction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the flow and heat transfer in two lateral directions over a stretching sheet. For this purpose, three types of base fluids specifically water, ethylene glycol and engine oil with single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes are used in the analysis. The convective boundary condition in the presence of CNTs is presented first time and not been explored so far. The transformed nonlinear differential equations are solved by the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method with a shooting technique. The dimensionless velocity and shear stress are obtained in both directions. The dimensionless heat transfer is determined on the surface. Three different models of thermal conductivity are comparable for both CNTs and it is found that the Xue [1] model gives the best approach to guess the superb thermal conductivity in comparison with the Maxwell [2] and Hamilton and Crosser [3] models. And finally, another finding suggests the engine oil provides the highest skin friction and heat transfer rates.

  17. The Effects of Differential Rotation on the Magnetic Structure of the Solar Corona: MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lionello, Roberto; Riley, Pete; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2004-01-01

    Coronal holes are magnetically open regions from which the solar wind streams. Magnetic reconnection has been invoked to reconcile the apparently rigid rotation of coronal holes with the differential rotation of magnetic flux in the photosphere. This mechanism might also be relevant to the formation of the slow solar wind, the properties of which seem to indicate an origin from the opening of closed magnetic field lines. We have developed a global MHD model to study the effect of differential rotation on the coronal magnetic field. Starting from a magnetic flux distribution similar to that of Wang et al., which consists of a bipolar magnetic region added to a background dipole field, we applied differential rotation over a period of 5 solar rotations. The evolution of the magnetic field and of the boundaries of coronal holes are in substantial agreement with the findings of Wang et al.. We identified examples of interchange reconnection and other changes of topology of the magnetic field. Possible consequences for the origin of the slow solar wind are also discussed.

  18. The Effect of Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Energy Bypass on Specific Thrust for a Supersonic Turbojet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benyo, Theresa L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of a thermodynamic cycle analysis of a supersonic turbojet engine with a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy bypass system that explores a wide range of MHD enthalpy extraction parameters. Through the analysis described here, it is shown that applying a magnetic field to a flow path in the Mach 2.0 to 3.5 range can increase the specific thrust of the turbojet engine up to as much as 420 N/(kg/s) provided that the magnitude of the magnetic field is in the range of 1 to 5 Tesla. The MHD energy bypass can also increase the operating Mach number range for a supersonic turbojet engine into the hypersonic flight regime. In this case, the Mach number range is shown to be extended to Mach 7.0.

  19. Effects of stochastic field lines on the pressure driven MHD instabilities in the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohdachi, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kiyomasa; Sakakibara, Satoru; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Tsuchiya, Hayato; Ming, Tingfeng; Du, Xiaodi; LHD Expriment Group Team

    2014-10-01

    In the Large Helical Device (LHD), the plasma is surrounded by the so-called magnetic stochastic region, where the Kolmogorov length of the magnetic field lines is very short, from several tens of meters and to thousands meters. Finite pressure gradient are formed in this region and MHD instabilities localized in this region is observed since the edge region of the LHD is always unstable against the pressure driven mode. Therefore, the saturation level of the instabilities is the key issue in order to evaluate the risk of this kind of MHD instabilities. The saturation level depends on the pressure gradient and on the magnetic Reynolds number; there results are similar to the MHD mode in the closed magnetic surface region. The saturation level in the stochastic region is affected also by the stocasticity itself. Parameter dependence of the saturation level of the MHD activities in the region is discussed in detail. It is supported by NIFS budget code ULPP021, 028 and is also partially supported by the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture, Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research 26249144, by the JSPS-NRF-NSFC A3 Foresight Program NSFC: No. 11261140328.

  20. New wave effects in nonstationary plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Schmit, P. F.; Fisch, N. J.

    2013-05-15

    Through particle-in-cell simulations and analytics, a host of interesting and novel wave effects in nonstationary plasma are examined. In particular, Langmuir waves serve as a model system to explore wave dynamics in plasmas undergoing compression, expansion, and charge recombination. The entire wave life-cycle is explored, including wave excitation, adiabatic evolution and action conservation, nonadiabatic evolution and resonant wave-particle effects, collisional dissipation, and potential laboratory applications of the aforementioned phenomenology.

  1. Convective heat and mass transfer on MHD peristaltic flow of Williamson fluid with the effect of inclined magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veera Krishna, M.; Swarnalathamma, B. V.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we discussed the peristaltic MHD flow of an incompressible and electrically conducting Williamson fluid in a symmetric planar channel with heat and mass transfer under the effect of inclined magnetic field. Viscous dissipation and Joule heating are also taken into consideration. Mathematical model is presented by using the long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. The differential equations governing the flow are highly nonlinear and thus perturbation solution for small Weissenberg number (We < 1) is presented. Effects of the heat and mass transfer on the longitudinal velocity, temperature and concentration are studied in detail. Main observations are presented in the concluding section. The streamlines pattern is also given due attention.

  2. Soret and Dufour Effects on MHD Peristaltic Flow of Jeffrey Fluid in a Rotating System with Porous Medium.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Rafiq, Maimona; Ahmad, Bashir

    2016-01-01

    The objective of present paper is to examine the peristaltic flow of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Jeffrey fluid saturating porous space in a channel through rotating frame. Unlike the previous attempts, the flow formulation is based upon modified Darcy's law porous medium effect in Jeffrey fluid situation. In addition the impacts due to Soret and Dufour effects in the radiative peristaltic flow are accounted. Rosseland's approximation has been utilized for the thermal radiative heat flux. Lubrication approach is implemented for the simplification. Resulting problems are solved for the stream function, temperature and concentration. Graphical results are prepared and analyzed for different parameters of interest entering into the problems. PMID:26808387

  3. Soret and Dufour effects on MHD viscoelastic fluid flow through a vertical flat plate with constant suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Sheikh Imamul; Alam, Md. Mahmud

    2016-07-01

    An attempt is made to represent the numerical solution of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) viscoelastic fluid flow through an infinite vertical flat plate with constant suction in the presence of Soret and Dufour effects. The expressions of non-dimensional, coupled partial momentum, energy and concentration differential equations are obtained with the help of the usual non-dimensional variables. Implicit finite difference method is imposed to obtain the non-dimensional equations. Also the stability conditions and convergence criteria are analyzed. The effects of the various parameters entering into the problem on shear stress, Nusselt number, and Sherwood number are demonstrated graphically with physical interpretation.

  4. Viscous dissipation and thermal radiation effects on the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow and heat transfer over a stretching slender cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalteh, M.; Ghorbani, S.; Khademinejad, T.

    2016-05-01

    An axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow and heat transfer of a fluid over a slender cylinder are investigated numerically. The effects of viscous dissipation, thermal radiation, and surface transverse curvature are taken into account in the simulations. For this purpose, the governing partial differential equations are transformed to ordinary differential equations by using appropriate similarity transformations. The resultant ordinary differential equations along with appropriate boundary conditions are solved by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method combined with the shooting technique. The effects of various parameters on the velocity and temperature profiles, local skin friction coefficient, and Nusselt number are analyzed.

  5. Soret and Dufour Effects on MHD Peristaltic Flow of Jeffrey Fluid in a Rotating System with Porous Medium

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Rafiq, Maimona; Ahmad, Bashir

    2016-01-01

    The objective of present paper is to examine the peristaltic flow of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Jeffrey fluid saturating porous space in a channel through rotating frame. Unlike the previous attempts, the flow formulation is based upon modified Darcy's law porous medium effect in Jeffrey fluid situation. In addition the impacts due to Soret and Dufour effects in the radiative peristaltic flow are accounted. Rosseland’s approximation has been utilized for the thermal radiative heat flux. Lubrication approach is implemented for the simplification. Resulting problems are solved for the stream function, temperature and concentration. Graphical results are prepared and analyzed for different parameters of interest entering into the problems. PMID:26808387

  6. MHD turbulence in the solar wind: highlights on the effects of expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdini, Andrea; Grappin, Roland; Müller, Wolf Christian; Landi, Simone; Hellinger, Petr; Matteini, Lorenzo; Franci, Luca; Velli, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Properties of solar wind fluctuations are often interpreted as those of a homogenous turbulent plasma, at MHD or ion scales. However solar wind turbulence is not homogenous, being embedded in a spherically expanding flow of approximately constant speed. We briefly review some of the recent results on MHD turbulence obtained with the Expanding Box Model (EBM), which reveal the influence of expansion on the spectral anisotropy, the component anisotropy, and the z+/z- imbalance. We then focus on structure functions, computed in frames attached to the local or global mean field, and show that most of the observed features are well reproduced in our EBM simulations. We finally comment on the role of expansion in determining the injection scale of solar wind turbulence and its anisotropy.

  7. Substorm effects in MHD and test particle simulations of magnetotail dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    1998-12-31

    Recent magnetohydrodynamic simulations demonstrate that a global tail instability, initiated by localized breakdown of MHD, can cause plasmoid formation and ejection as well as dipolarization and the current diversion of the substorm current wedge. The connection between the reconnection process and the current wedge signatures is provided by earthward flow from the reconnection site. Its braking and diversion in the inner magnetosphere causes dipolarization and the magnetic field distortions of the current wedge. The authors demonstrate the characteristic properties of this process and the current systems involved. The strong localized electric field associated with the flow burst and the dipolarization is also the cause of particle acceleration and energetic particle injections. Test particle simulations of orbits in the MHD fields yield results that are quite consistent with observed injection signatures.

  8. MHD mixed convection flow of a power law nanofluid over a vertical stretching sheet with radiation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aini Mat, Nor Azian; Arifin, Norihan Md.; Nazar, Roslinda; Ismail, Fudziah; Bachok, Norfifah

    2013-09-01

    A similarity solution of the steady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convection boundary layer flow due to a stretching vertical heated sheet in a power law nanofluid with thermal radiation effect is theoretically studied. The governing system of partial differential equations is first transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the shooting method. The influence of pertinent parameters such as the nanoparticle volume fraction parameter, the magnetic parameter, the buoyancy or mixed convection parameter and the radiation parameter on the flow and heat transfer characteristics is discussed. Comparisons with published results are also presented.

  9. A Steady-state Picture of Solar Wind Acceleration and Charge State Composition Derived from a Global Wave-driven MHD Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oran, R.; Landi, E.; van der Holst, B.; Lepri, S. T.; Vásquez, A. M.; Nuevo, F. A.; Frazin, R.; Manchester, W.; Sokolov, I.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2015-06-01

    The higher charge states found in slow (<400 km s-1) solar wind streams compared to fast streams have supported the hypothesis that the slow wind originates in closed coronal loops and is released intermittently through reconnection. Here we examine whether a highly ionized slow wind can also form along steady and open magnetic field lines. We model the steady-state solar atmosphere using the Alfvén Wave Solar Model (AWSoM), a global MHD model driven by Alfvén waves, and apply an ionization code to calculate the charge state evolution along modeled open field lines. This constitutes the first charge state calculation covering all latitudes in a realistic magnetic field. The ratios {{O}+7}/{{O}+6} and {{C}+6}/{{C}+5} are compared to in situ Ulysses observations and are found to be higher in the slow wind, as observed; however, they are underpredicted in both wind types. The modeled ion fractions of S, Si, and Fe are used to calculate line-of-sight intensities, which are compared to Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) observations above a coronal hole. The agreement is partial and suggests that all ionization rates are underpredicted. Assuming the presence of suprathermal electrons improved the agreement with both EIS and Ulysses observations; importantly, the trend of higher ionization in the slow wind was maintained. The results suggest that there can be a sub-class of slow wind that is steady and highly ionized. Further analysis shows that it originates from coronal hole boundaries (CHBs), where the modeled electron density and temperature are higher than inside the hole, leading to faster ionization. This property of CHBs is global and observationally supported by EUV tomography.

  10. Reduced Extended MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, P. J.; Abdelhamid, H. M.; Grasso, D.; Hazeltine, R. D.; Lingam, M.; Tassi, E.

    2015-11-01

    Over the years various reduced fluid models have been obtained for modeling plasmas, with the goal of capturing important physics while maintaining computability. Such models have included the physics contained in various generalizations of Ohm's law, including Hall drift and electron inertia. In a recent publication it was shown that full 3D extended MHD is a Hamiltonian system by finding its noncanonical Poisson bracket. Subsequently, this bracket was shown to be derivable from that for Hall MHD by a series of remarkable transformations, which greatly simplifies the proof of the Jacobi identity and allows one to immediately obtain generalizations of the helicity and cross helicity. In this poster we use this structure to obtain exact reduced fluid models with the effects of full two-fluid theory. Results of numerical computations of collisionless reconnection using an exact reduced 4-field model will be presented and analytical comparisons of mode structure of previous reduced models will be made.

  11. Ion temperature effects on magnetotail Alfvén wave propagation and electron energization: ION TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON ALFVÉN WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Damiano, P. A.; Johnson, J. R.; Chaston, C. C.

    2015-07-01

    A new 2-D self-consistent hybrid gyrofluid-kinetic electron model in dipolar coordinates is presented and used to simulate dispersive-scale Alfvén wave pulse propagation from the equator to the ionosphere along an L = 10 magnetic field line. The model is an extension of the hybrid MHD-kinetic electron model that incorporates ion Larmor radius corrections via the kinetic fluid model of Cheng and Johnson (1999). It is found that consideration of a realistic ion to electron temperature ratio decreases the propagation time of the wave from the plasma sheet to the ionosphere by several seconds relative to a ρi=0 case (which also implies shorter timing for a substorm onset signal) and leads to significant dispersion of wave energy perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. Additionally, ion temperature effects reduce the parallel current and electron energization all along the field line for the same magnitude perpendicular electric field perturbation.

  12. Effects of the driving mechanism in MHD simulations of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linker, J. A.; van Hoven, G.; Schnack, D. D.

    Results of time-dependent MHD simulations of mass ejections in the solar coronal are presented. Previous authors have shown that results from simulations using a thermal driving mechanism are consistent with the observations only if an elaborate model of the initial corona is used. The first simulation effort, using a simple model of a plasmoid as the driving mechanism and a simple model of the initial corona, produces results that are also consistent with many observational features, suggesting that the nature of the driving mechanism plays an important role in determining the subsequent evolution of mass ejections. First simulations are based on the assumption that mass ejections are driven by magnetic forces.

  13. Effects of the driving mechanism in MHD simulations of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linker, J. A.; Van Hoven, G.; Schnack, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    Results of time-dependent MHD simulations of mass ejections in the solar coronal are presented. Previous authors have shown that results from simulations using a thermal driving mechanism are consistent with the observations only if an elaborate model of the initial corona is used. The first simulation effort, using a simple model of a plasmoid as the driving mechanism and a simple model of the initial corona, produces results that are also consistent with many observational features, suggesting that the nature of the driving mechanism plays an important role in determining the subsequent evolution of mass ejections. First simulations are based on the assumption that mass ejections are driven by magnetic forces.

  14. A theory for narrow-banded radio bursts at Uranus - MHD surface waves as an energy driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Curtis, S. A.; Desch, M. D.; Lepping, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    A possible scenario for the generation of the narrow-banded radio bursts detected at Uranus by the Voyager 2 planetary radio astronomy experiment is described. In order to account for the emission burstiness which occurs on time scales of hundreds of milliseconds, it is proposed that ULF magnetic surface turbulence generated at the frontside magnetopause propagates down the open/closed field line boundary and mode-converts to kinetic Alfven waves (KAW) deep within the polar cusp. The oscillating KAW potentials then drive a transient electron stream that creates the bursty radio emission. To substantiate these ideas, Voyager 2 magnetometer measurements of enhanced ULF magnetic activity at the frontside magnetopause are shown. It is demonstrated analytically that such magnetic turbulence should mode-convert deep in the cusp at a radial distance of 3 RU.

  15. 3D MHD Models of Active Region Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, Leon

    2004-01-01

    Present imaging and spectroscopic observations of active region loops allow to determine many physical parameters of the coronal loops, such as the density, temperature, velocity of flows in loops, and the magnetic field. However, due to projection effects many of these parameters remain ambiguous. Three dimensional imaging in EUV by the STEREO spacecraft will help to resolve the projection ambiguities, and the observations could be used to setup 3D MHD models of active region loops to study the dynamics and stability of active regions. Here the results of 3D MHD models of active region loops are presented, and the progress towards more realistic 3D MHD models of active regions. In particular the effects of impulsive events on the excitation of active region loop oscillations, and the generation, propagations and reflection of EIT waves are shown. It is shown how 3D MHD models together with 3D EUV observations can be used as a diagnostic tool for active region loop physical parameters, and to advance the science of the sources of solar coronal activity.

  16. Effects of Wave Nonlinearity on Wave Attenuation by Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. C.; Cox, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    The need to explore sustainable approaches to maintain coastal ecological systems has been widely recognized for decades and is increasingly important due to global climate change and patterns in coastal population growth. Submerged aquatic vegetation and emergent vegetation in estuaries and shorelines can provide ecosystem services, including wave-energy reduction and erosion control. Idealized models of wave-vegetation interaction often assume rigid, vertically uniform vegetation under the action of waves described by linear wave theory. A physical model experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of wave nonlinearity on the attenuation of random waves propagating through a stand of uniform, emergent vegetation in constant water depth. The experimental conditions spanned a relative water depth from near shallow to near deep water waves (0.45 < kh <1.49) and wave steepness from linear to nonlinear conditions (0.03 < ak < 0.18). The wave height to water depth ratios were in the range 0.12 < Hs/h < 0.34, and the Ursell parameter was in the range 2 < Ur < 68. Frictional losses from the side wall and friction were measured and removed from the wave attenuation in the vegetated cases to isolate the impact of vegetation. The normalized wave height attenuation decay for each case was fit to the decay equation of Dalrymple et al. (1984) to determine the damping factor, which was then used to calculate the bulk drag coefficients CD. This paper shows that the damping factor is dependent on the wave steepness ak across the range of relative water depths from shallow to deep water and that the damping factor can increase by a factor of two when the value of ak approximately doubles. In turn, this causes the drag coefficient CD to decrease on average by 23%. The drag coefficient can be modeled using the Keulegan-Carpenter number using the horizontal orbital wave velocity estimate from linear wave theory as the characteristic velocity scale. Alternatively, the Ursell

  17. SciDAC - Center for Simulation of Wave Interactions with MHD -- General Atomics Support of ORNL Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Abla, G

    2012-11-09

    The Center for Simulation of Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics (SWIM) project is dedicated to conduct research on integrated multi-physics simulations. The Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) is a framework that was created by the SWIM team. It provides an integration infrastructure for loosely coupled component-based simulations by facilitating services for code execution coordination, computational resource management, data management, and inter-component communication. The IPS framework features improving resource utilization, implementing application-level fault tolerance, and support of the concurrent multi-tasking execution model. The General Atomics (GA) team worked closely with other team members on this contract, and conducted research in the areas of computational code monitoring, meta-data management, interactive visualization, and user interfaces. The original website to monitor SWIM activity was developed in the beginning of the project. Due to the amended requirements, the software was redesigned and a revision of the website was deployed into production in April of 2010. Throughout the duration of this project, the SWIM Monitoring Portal (http://swim.gat.com:8080/) has been a critical production tool for supporting the project's physics goals.

  18. MHD Power Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Arthur; Rosa, Richard J.

    1975-01-01

    Explains the operation of the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator and advantages of the system over coal, oil or nuclear powered generators. Details the development of MHD generators in the United States and Soviet Union. (CP)

  19. Absence of Complete Finite-Larmor-Radius Stabilization in Extended MHD

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, P.; Schnack, D. D.; Ebrahimi, F.; Zweibel, E. G.; Suzuki, M.; Hegna, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2008-08-22

    The dominant finite-Larmour-radius (FLR) stabilization effects on interchange instability can be retained by taking into account the ion gyroviscosity or the generalized Ohm's law in an extended MHD model. However, recent simulations and theoretical calculations indicate that complete FLR stabilization of the interchange mode may not be attainable by ion gyroviscosity or the two-fluid effect alone in the framework of extended MHD. For a class of plasma equilibria in certain finite-{beta} or nonisentropic regimes, the critical wave number for complete FLR stabilization tends toward infinity.

  20. Absence of complete finite-Larmor-radius stabilization in extended MHD.

    PubMed

    Zhu, P; Schnack, D D; Ebrahimi, F; Zweibel, E G; Suzuki, M; Hegna, C C; Sovinec, C R

    2008-08-22

    The dominant finite-Larmour-radius (FLR) stabilization effects on interchange instability can be retained by taking into account the ion gyroviscosity or the generalized Ohm's law in an extended MHD model. However, recent simulations and theoretical calculations indicate that complete FLR stabilization of the interchange mode may not be attainable by ion gyroviscosity or the two-fluid effect alone in the framework of extended MHD. For a class of plasma equilibria in certain finite-beta or nonisentropic regimes, the critical wave number for complete FLR stabilization tends toward infinity. PMID:18764628

  1. Effects of Wall Shear Stress on Unsteady MHD Conjugate Flow in a Porous Medium with Ramped Wall Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arshad; Khan, Ilyas; Ali, Farhad; ulhaq, Sami; Shafie, Sharidan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of an arbitrary wall shear stress on unsteady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of a Newtonian fluid with conjugate effects of heat and mass transfer. The fluid is considered in a porous medium over a vertical plate with ramped temperature. The influence of thermal radiation in the energy equations is also considered. The coupled partial differential equations governing the flow are solved by using the Laplace transform technique. Exact solutions for velocity and temperature in case of both ramped and constant wall temperature as well as for concentration are obtained. It is found that velocity solutions are more general and can produce a huge number of exact solutions correlative to various fluid motions. Graphical results are provided for various embedded flow parameters and discussed in details. PMID:24621775

  2. Acoustic wave coupled magnetoelectric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, J. S.; Zhang, N.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetoelectric (ME) coupling by acoustic waveguide was developed. Longitudinal and transversal ME effects of larger than 44 and 6 (V cm-1 Oe-1) were obtained with the waveguide-coupled ME device, respectively. Several resonant points were observed in the range of frequency lower than 47 kHz. Analysis showed that the standing waves in the waveguide were responsible for those resonances. The frequency and size dependence of the ME effects were investigated. A resonant condition about the geometrical size of the waveguide was obtained. Theory and experiments showed the resonant frequencies were closely influenced by the diameter and length of the waveguide. A series of double-peak curves of longitudinal magnetoelectric response were obtained, and their significance was discussed initially.

  3. End region and current consolidation effects upon the performance of an MHD channel for the ETF conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.; Smith, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of MHD channel end regions on the overall power generation were considered. The peak plant thermodynamic efficiency was found to be slightly lower than for the active region (41%). The channel operating point for the peak efficiency was shifted to the supersonic mode (Mach No., M sub c approx. 1.1) rather than the previous subsonic operation (M sub c approx. 0.9). The sensitivity of the channel performance to the B-field, diffuser recovery coefficient, channel load parameter, Mach number, and combustor pressure is also discussed. In addition, methods for operating the channel in a constant-current mode are investigated. This mode is highly desirable from the standpoint of simplifying the current and voltage consolidation for the inverter system. This simplification could result in significant savings in the cost of the equipment. The initial results indicate that this simplification is possible, even under a strict Hall field constraint, with resonable plant thermodynamic efficiency (40.5%).

  4. MHD Field Line Resonances and Global Modes in Three-Dimensional Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    C.Z. Cheng

    2002-05-30

    By assuming a general isotropic pressure distribution P = P (y,a), where y and a are three-dimensional scalar functions labeling the field lines with B = -y x -a, we have derived a set of MHD eigenmode equations for both global MHD modes and field line resonances (FLR). Past MHD theories are restricted to isotropic pressures with P = P (y only). The present formulation also allows the plasma mass density to vary along the field line. The linearized ideal-MHD equations are cast into a set of global differential equations from which the field line resonance equations of the shear Alfvin waves and slow magnetosonic modes are naturally obtained for general three-dimensional magnetic field geometries with flux surfaces. Several new terms associated with the partial derivative of P with respect to alpha are obtained. In the FLR equations, a new term is found in the shear Alfvin FLR equation due to the geodesic curvature and the pressure gradient in the poloidal flux surface. The coupling between the shear Alfvin waves and the magnetosonic waves is through the combined effects of geodesic magnetic field curvature and plasma pressure as previously derived. The properties of the FLR eigenfunctions at the resonance field lines are investigated, and the behavior of the FLR wave solutions near the FLR surface are derived. Numerical solutions of the FLR equations for three-dimensional magnetospheric fields in equilibrium with high plasma pressure will be presented in a future publication.

  5. MHD waveguides in space plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, N. G.; Fedorov, E. N.; Pilipenko, V. A.

    2010-07-15

    The waveguide properties of two characteristic formations in the Earth's magnetotail-the plasma sheet and the current (neutral) sheet-are considered. The question of how the domains of existence of different types of MHD waveguide modes (fast and slow, body and surface) in the (k, {omega}) plane and their dispersion properties depend on the waveguide parameters is studied. Investigation of the dispersion relation in a number of particular (limiting) cases makes it possible to obtain a fairly complete qualitative pattern of all the branches of the dispersion curve. Accounting for the finite size of perturbations across the wave propagation direction reveals new additional effects such as a change in the critical waveguide frequencies, the excitation of longitudinal current at the boundaries of the sheets, and a change in the symmetry of the fundamental mode. Knowledge of the waveguide properties of the plasma and current sheets can explain the occurrence of preferred frequencies in the low-frequency fluctuation spectra in the magnetotail. In satellite observations, the type of waveguide mode can be determined from the spectral properties, as well as from the phase relationships between plasma oscillations and magnetic field oscillations that are presented in this paper.

  6. Broken Ergodicity in MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence may be represented by finite Fourier series, where the inherent periodic box serves as a surrogate for a bounded astrophysical plasma. Independent Fourier coefficients form a canonical ensemble described by a Gaussian probability density function containing a Hermitian covariance matrix with positive eigenvalues. The eigenvalues at lowest wave number can be very small, resulting in a large-scale coherent structure: a turbulent dynamo. This is seen in computations and a theoretical explanation in terms of 'broken ergodicity' contains Taylor s theory of force-free states. An important problem for future work is the case of real, i.e., dissipative flows. In real flows, broken ergodicity and coherent structure are still expected to occur in MHD turbulence at the largest scale, as suggested by low resolution simulations. One challenge is to incorporate coherent structure at the largest scale into the theory of turbulent fluctuations at smaller scales.

  7. Structure of convective surface deposits and effect on MHD steam-plant design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T. R.; Chow, L. S. H.; Smyk, E. B.

    Experimental and analytical investigations are being made of the seed-ash deposits that will form on convective-heat-transfer surfaces in the MHD steam-bottoming plant. The results show that, although fouling of the steam and air heaters will be severe, the fouling problems can be solved by proper specification of tube bank arrangements, gas velocities, soot-blower placement, and soot-blowing schedule, which will vary depending on the gas temperature. At gas temperatures below the seed melting point, weak, non-adherent deposits are formed and can be easily controlled by conventional soot blowers. At gas temperatures well above the seed melting point, it appears practical to operate steam and air heaters without soot blowing, because the deposit thickness will be limited by the formation of a freely flowing, molten surface. The intermediate-temperature range (1300 to 16000K) is the most troublesome because the deposits can become very strong and adherent. This section of the steam heaters must be designed to limit heat fluxes and must be operated with frequent soot blowing.

  8. Gravitational Waves in Effective Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmet, Xavier; Kuntz, Iberê; Mohapatra, Sonali

    2016-08-01

    In this short paper we investigate quantum gravitational effects on Einstein's equations using Effective Field Theory techniques. We consider the leading order quantum gravitational correction to the wave equation. Besides the usual massless mode, we find a pair of modes with complex masses. These massive particles have a width and could thus lead to a damping of gravitational waves if excited in violent astrophysical processes producing gravitational waves such as e.g. black hole mergers. We discuss the consequences for gravitational wave events such as GW 150914 recently observed by the Advanced LIGO collaboration.

  9. MHD Oscillations in the Earth's Magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonovich, A. S.; Mazur, V. A.; Kozlov, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    In studies of hydromagnetic oscillations of the Earth's magnetosphere, it is often considered as a giant resonator for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. A shear flow instability on the magnetopause has long been regarded as a possible source of MHD oscillations in the Earth's magnetosphere. A most interesting phenomenon investigated for the past two decades are ultra-low-frequency oscillations with a discrete spectrum. Such oscillations are recorded usually in the midnight-morning sector of the magnetosphere at 60° to 80° latitudes. Another type of MHD oscillations typical of the magnetotail is the coupled Alfvén and slow magnetosonic waves on stretched magnetic field lines passing through the current sheet. Each of these modes can propagate along paths that almost coincide with the magnetic field lines. The recently discovered kink-like oscillations are oscillations of the current sheet itself, similar to a piece of fabric fluttering in the wind. In this regard they are called flapping modes.

  10. Effects of stress waves on cells

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, H L; Da Silva, L B; Visuri, S R

    1998-03-02

    Laser induced stress waves are being used in a variety of medical applications, including drug delivery and targeted tissue disruption. Stress waves can also be an undesirable side effect in laser procedures such as ophthalmology and angioplasty. Thus, a study of the effects of stress waves on a cellular level is useful. Thermoelastic stress waves were produced using a Q-switched frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (@.=532nm) with a pulse duration of 4 ns. The laser radiation was delivered to an absorbing media. A thermoelastic stress wave was produced in the absorbing media and propagated into plated cells. The energy per pulse delivered to a sample and the spot size were varied. Stress waves were quantified. We assayed for cell viability and damage using two methods. The laser parameters within which cells maintain viability were investigated and thresholds for cell damage were defined. A comparison of cell damage thresholds for different cell lines was made.

  11. Tunnel effect wave energy detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Waltman, Steven B. (Inventor); Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for measuring gravitational and inertial forces, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy acting on an object or fluid in space provide an electric tunneling current through a gap between an electrode and that object or fluid in space and vary that gap with any selected one of such forces, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy acting on that object or fluid. These methods and apparatus sense a corresponding variation in an electric property of that gap and determine the latter force, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy in response to that corresponding variation, and thereby sense or measure such parameters as acceleration, position, particle mass, velocity, magnetic field strength, presence or direction, or wave or radiant energy intensity, presence or direction.

  12. Performance of Scramjet Engine with MHD Energy Bypass System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminaga, Susumu; Tomioka, Sadatake; Yamasaki, Hiroyuki

    Flow behavior and thrust performance of MHD energy bypass scramjet engine was examined numerically. MHD generator was placed at the isolator to enhance the flow compression. Kinetic energy was converted to electrical energy in the MHD generator. Extracted electrical energy was consumed at the MHD accelerator placed at the downstream of the combustor. When MHD energy bypass system was used, the flow was decelerated and compressed in the MHD generator. Effect of velocity and Mach number on wall friction was analyzed and decrease of friction force was pointed out. Also, high pressure in the combustor resulted in increase of pressure contribution to net thrust. Despite of positive effects, decelerating Lorentz force in the MHD generator was comparably large and no significant difference in net thrust performance is observed.

  13. Relativistic electron scattering by magnetosonic waves: Effects of discrete wave emission and high wave amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Artemyev, A. V.; Mourenas, D.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we study relativistic electron scattering by fast magnetosonic waves. We compare results of test particle simulations and the quasi-linear theory for different spectra of waves to investigate how a fine structure of the wave emission can influence electron resonant scattering. We show that for a realistically wide distribution of wave normal angles θ (i.e., when the dispersion δθ≥0.5{sup °}), relativistic electron scattering is similar for a wide wave spectrum and for a spectrum consisting in well-separated ion cyclotron harmonics. Comparisons of test particle simulations with quasi-linear theory show that for δθ>0.5{sup °}, the quasi-linear approximation describes resonant scattering correctly for a large enough plasma frequency. For a very narrow θ distribution (when δθ∼0.05{sup °}), however, the effect of a fine structure in the wave spectrum becomes important. In this case, quasi-linear theory clearly fails in describing accurately electron scattering by fast magnetosonic waves. We also study the effect of high wave amplitudes on relativistic electron scattering. For typical conditions in the earth's radiation belts, the quasi-linear approximation cannot accurately describe electron scattering for waves with averaged amplitudes >300 pT. We discuss various applications of the obtained results for modeling electron dynamics in the radiation belts and in the Earth's magnetotail.

  14. Variance anisotropy in compressible 3-D MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oughton, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Wan, Minping; Parashar, Tulasi

    2016-06-01

    We employ spectral method numerical simulations to examine the dynamical development of anisotropy of the variance, or polarization, of the magnetic and velocity field in compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Both variance anisotropy and spectral anisotropy emerge under influence of a large-scale mean magnetic field B0; these are distinct effects, although sometimes related. Here we examine the appearance of variance parallel to B0, when starting from a highly anisotropic state. The discussion is based on a turbulence theoretic approach rather than a wave perspective. We find that parallel variance emerges over several characteristic nonlinear times, often attaining a quasi-steady level that depends on plasma beta. Consistency with solar wind observations seems to occur when the initial state is dominated by quasi-two-dimensional fluctuations.

  15. Hall effects on the Walén relation in rotational discontinuities and Alfvén waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, B. H.; Lee, L. C.

    2000-08-01

    For Alfvénic fluctuations in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) the perturbed transverse velocity Vt and magnetic field Bt can be related by the Walén relation, Vt = ±Bt/(μ0ρ)1/2 ≡;±VAt, where ρ is the plasma density, VAt is the transverse Alfvén velocity, and the plus (minus) sign is for antiparallel (parallel) propagation. However, observations of Vt and Bt for Alfvén waves and rotational discontinuities in the solar wind and at the magnetopause showed an obvious deviation from the relation. In this paper, modifications of the Walén relation for linear and nonlinear Alfvén waves and rotational discontinuities (RDs) are examined in the Hall-MHD formulation. Let Vit (≈ Vt) be the transverse ion velocity and Vet be the transverse electron velocity. It is found that Vit = ±Bt(z)/(μ0ρ1)1/2 = ±(ρ(z)/ρ1)1/2 VAt(z) and Vet = ±(ρ1/μ0)1/2Bt(z)/ρ(z) = ±(ρ1/ρ(z))1/2 VAt(z)for RDs in Hall-MHD, where ρ1 is the upstream plasma density. The ion and electron Walén ratios are defined as Ai = Vit/VAt and Ae = Vet/VAt, respectively. It is found in Hall-MHD that ?, AiAe = 1 and Ai < 1 (Ai > 1) for Alfvén waves and RDs with right-hand (left-hand) polarization. The Hall dispersive effect may modify the ion Walén ratio by ΔAi≈±0.14 for the magnetopause RDs and by ΔAi≈±0.07 for the interplanetary RDs.

  16. Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, R. J.; Pollina, R. J.

    1991-04-01

    The objective of this task is to study the corrosion and arc erosion of MHD materials in a cooperative effort with, and to support, the MHD topping cycle program. Materials tested in the Avco Research Laboratory/Textron facility, or materials which have significant MHD importance, will be analyzed to document their physical deterioration. Conclusions shall be drawn about their wear mechanisms and lifetime in the MHD environment with respect to the following issues; sulfur corrosion, electrochemical corrosion, and arc erosion. The impact of any materials or slag conditions on the level of power output and on the level of leakage current in the MHD channel will also be noted, where appropriate. Two phenomena that can effect the analysis of slag leakage current have been investigated and found significant. These are: (1) transverse current along the slag layer in the insulator walls of an MHD duct, and (2) electrode surface voltage drops. Both tend to reduce the value inferred for average plasma conductivity and increase the value inferred for axial leakage current. These two effects in combination are potentially capable of explaining the high leakage inferred. Corrosion on the water side of metal MHD duct wall elements has been examined in CDIF and Mark 7 generators. It appears to be controllable by adjusting the pH of the water and/or by controlling the dissolved oxygen content.

  17. Nonlinear Talbot effect of rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiqi; Belić, Milivoj R.; Zheng, Huaibin; Chen, Haixia; Li, Changbiao; Song, Jianping; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2014-03-01

    Akhmediev and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers are rogue wave solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). Talbot effect (TE) is an image recurrence phenomenon in the diffraction of light waves. We report the nonlinear TE of rogue waves in a cubic medium. It is different from the linear TE, in that the wave propagates in a NL medium and is an eigenmode of NLSE. Periodic rogue waves impinging on a NL medium exhibit recurrent behavior, but only at the TE length and at the half-TE length with a π-phase shift; the fractional TE is absent. The NL TE is the result of the NL interference of the lobes of rogue wave breathers. This interaction is related to the transverse period and intensity of breathers, in that the bigger the period and the higher the intensity, the shorter the TE length.

  18. End region and current consolidation effects upon the performance of an MHD channel for the ETF conceptual design. [Engineering Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.; Smith, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that operating conditions which yielded a peak thermodynamic efficiency (41%) for an EFT-size MHD/steam power plant were previously (Wang et al., 1981; Staiger, 1981) identified by considering only the active region (the primary portion for power production) of an MHD channel. These previous efforts are extended here to include an investigation of the effects of the channel end regions on overall power generation. Considering these effects, the peak plant thermodynamic efficiency is found to be slightly lowered (40.7%); the channel operating point for peak efficiency is shifted to the supersonic mode (Mach number of approximately 1.1) rather than the previous subsonic operation (Mach number of approximately 0.9). Also discussed is the sensitivity of the channel performance to the B-field, diffuser recovery coefficient, channel load parameter, Mach number, and combustor pressure.

  19. MHD memes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewar, R. L.; Mills, R.; Hole, M. J.

    2009-05-01

    The celebration of Allan Kaufman's 80th birthday was an occasion to reflect on a career that has stimulated the mutual exchange of ideas (or memes in the terminology of Richard Dawkins) between many researchers. This paper will revisit a meme Allan encountered in his early career in magnetohydrodynamics, the continuation of a magnetohydrodynamic mode through a singularity, and will also mention other problems where Allan's work has had a powerful cross-fertilizing effect in plasma physics and other areas of physics and mathematics. To resolve the continuation problem we regularize the Newcomb equation, solve it in terms of Legendre functions of imaginary argument, and define the small weak solutions of the Newcomb equation as generalized functions in the manner of Lighthill, i.e. via a limiting sequence of analytic functions that connect smoothly across the singularity.

  20. Combined Effect of Hall and Ion-Slip Currents on Unsteady MHD Couette Flows in a Rotating System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Basant K.; Apere, Clement A.

    2010-10-01

    The unsteady MHD Couette flows of a viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid between two parallel plates in a rotating system are studied taking hall and ion-slip currents into consideration. The relevant equations are solved analytically using the Laplace transform techniques. A unified closed form analytical expressions for the velocity and the skin friction for the cases; when the magnetic lines of force are fixed relative to the fluid or to the moving plate are derived. The solution obtained shows that the inclusion of Hall and ion-slip currents gives some interesting results. It is found that the influence of the Hall and ion slip parameters have a reducing effect on the magnitude of the secondary velocity especially when the magnetic lines of force are fixed relative to the moving plate. It is also interesting to note that the presence of Hall and ion-slip currents led to an increase in the time it took both the primary and the secondary velocities to achieve their steady state values. On the other hand, the resultant skin friction on the moving plate decreases with an increase in both the Hall and ion-slip parameters when the magnetic field is fixed relative to the fluid, while the opposite behaviour is noticed the magnetic field is fixed relative to the moving plate.

  1. Variation of effective roll number on MHD Rayleigh-Benard convection confined in a small-aspect ratio box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaka, Yuji; Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Vogt, Tobias; Eckert, Sven

    2015-11-01

    MHD Rayleigh-Benard convection was studied experimentally using a box filled with liquid metal with five in aspect ratio and square horizontal cross section. Applying horizontal magnetic field organizes the convection motion into quasi-two dimensional rolls arranged parallel to the magnetic field. The number of rolls has tendency, decreases with increasing Rayleigh number Ra and increases with increasing Chandrasekhar number Q. To fit the box with relatively smaller aspect ratio, the convection rolls take regime transition accompanying variation of the roll number against variations of Ra and Q. We explored convection regimes in a ranges, 2 ×103 < Q <104 and 5 ×103 < Ra < 3 ×105 using ultrasonic velocity profiling that can capture time variations of instantaneous velocity profile. In a range Ra / Q ~ 10 , we found periodic flow reversals in which five rolls periodically change the direction of their circulation with gradual skew of rolls. We performed POD analysis on the spatio-temporal velocity distribution obtained by UVP and indicated that that the periodic flow reversals consist of periodic emergence of 4-rolls mode in dominant 5-rolls mode. POD analysis also provided evaluation of effective number of rolls as a more objective approach.

  2. Observations of wave effects on inlet circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orescanin, Mara; Raubenheimer, Britt; Elgar, Steve

    2014-07-01

    Observations of water levels, winds, waves, and currents in Katama Bay, Edgartown Channel, and Katama Inlet on Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts are used to test the hypothesis that wave forcing is important to circulation in inlet channels of two-inlet systems and to water levels in the bay between the inlets. Katama Bay is connected to the Atlantic Ocean via Katama Inlet and to Vineyard Sound via Edgartown Channel. A numerical model based on the momentum and continuity equations that uses measured bathymetry and is driven with observed water levels in the ocean and sound, ocean waves, and local winds predicts the currents observed in Katama Inlet more accurately when wave forcing is included than when waves are ignored. During Hurricanes Irene and Sandy, when incident (12-m water depth) significant wave heights were greater than 5 m, breaking-wave cross-shore (along-inlet-channel) radiation stress gradients enhanced flows from the ocean into the bay during flood tides, and reduced (almost to zero during Irene) flows out of the bay during ebb tides. Model simulations without the effects of waves predict net discharge from the sound to the ocean both during Hurricane Irene and over a 1-month period with a range of conditions. In contrast, simulations that include wave forcing predict net discharge from the ocean to the sound, consistent with the observations.

  3. Effect of Energetic-Ion-Driven MHD Instabilities on Energetic-Ion-Transport in Compact Helical System and Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, M.; Ogawa, K.; Toi, K.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Shimizu, A.; Spong, Donald A; Okumura, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes 1) representative results on excitation of energetic-particle mode (EPM) and toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmode (TAE) and consequent beam-ion losses in CHS, and 2) recent results on beam-ion transport and/or losses while EPMs are destabilized in LHD. Bursting EPMs and TAEs are often excited by co-injected beam ions in the high-beam ion pressure environment and give a significant effect on co-going beam ions in both experiments. It seems that in CHS, resonant beam ions are lost within a relatively short-time scale once they are anomalously transported due to energetic-ion driven MHD modes, whereas unlike CHS, redistribution of beam ions due to energetic-ion driven MHD modes is seen in LHD, suggesting that not all anomalously transported beam ions escape from the plasma.

  4. Space-based laser-driven MHD generator: Feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. H.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of a laser-driven MHD generator, as a candidate receiver for a space-based laser power transmission system, was investigated. On the basis of reasonable parameters obtained in the literature, a model of the laser-driven MHD generator was developed with the assumptions of a steady, turbulent, two-dimensional flow. These assumptions were based on the continuous and steady generation of plasmas by the exposure of the continuous wave laser beam thus inducing a steady back pressure that enables the medium to flow steadily. The model considered here took the turbulent nature of plasmas into account in the two-dimensional geometry of the generator. For these conditions with the plasma parameters defining the thermal conductivity, viscosity, electrical conductivity for the plasma flow, a generator efficiency of 53.3% was calculated. If turbulent effects and nonequilibrium ionization are taken into account, the efficiency is 43.2%. The study shows that the laser-driven MHD system has potential as a laser power receiver for space applications because of its high energy conversion efficiency, high energy density and relatively simple mechanism as compared to other energy conversion cycles.

  5. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics – Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-01-01

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle’s Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas. PMID:27160346

  6. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics – Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-05-01

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle’s Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas.

  7. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics - Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-01-01

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle's Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas. PMID:27160346

  8. New wave effects in nonstationary plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, Paul

    2012-10-01

    In plasma undergoing compression, embedded waves can have very unusual and possibly useful properties. For example, part of the mechanical energy of compressing plasma can be transferred controllably to hot electrons by seeding the plasma with plasma waves. Under compression, wherein wave action is conserved, the wave energy grows as its frequency and wavenumber change adiabatically, until, suddenly, the wave damps, resulting in switch-like production not only of heat [1], but also voltage and current [2]. These bursts can be controlled precisely in time by prescribing the compression script. Several classic problems in wave physics, including the bump-on-tail instability, exhibit new effects under compression [3]. In addition, the waves undergoing compression or expansion affect fundamental properties of plasma, such as the plasma compressibility; moreover, and rather remarkably, nonlinear waves, such as BGK modes, affect the plasma compressibility differently [4]. Wave-particle interactions mediated by plasma compression also can enhance the performance of plasma-based particle accelerators. To describe numerically all these effects, novel particle-in-cell simulations were developed. These findings point towards potentially beneficial applications, including in inertial confinement fusion and high energy density plasma physics, where extreme compression is exercised on dense plasma, which could be seeded with waves. [4pt] [1] P. F. Schmit, I. Y. Dodin, and N. J. Fisch, PRL 105, 175003 (2010).[0pt] [2] P. F. Schmit and N. J. Fisch, PRL 108, 215003 (2012).[0pt] [3] P. F. Schmit et al., J. Plasma Phys. 77, 629 (2011).[0pt] [4] P. F. Schmit, I. Y. Dodin, and N. J. Fisch, Phys. Plasmas 18, 042103 (2011).[0pt] [5] P. F. Schmit and N. J. Fisch, Phys. Plasmas 18, 102102 (2011).

  9. MHD Turbulence and Magnetic Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V

    2014-01-01

    investigation, by greatly extending the statistical theory of ideal MHD turbulence. The mathematical details of broken ergodicity, in fact, give a quantitative explanation of how coherent structure, dynamic alignment and force-free states appear in turbulent magnetofluids. The relevance of these ideal results to real MHD turbulence occurs because broken ergodicity is most manifest in the ideal case at the largest length scales and it is in these largest scales that a real magnetofluid has the least dissipation, i.e., most closely approaches the behavior of an ideal magnetofluid. Furthermore, the effects grow stronger when cross and magnetic helicities grow large with respect to energy, and this is exactly what occurs with time in a real magnetofluid, where it is called selective decay. The relevance of these results found in ideal MHD turbulence theory to the real world is that they provide at least a qualitative explanation of why confined turbulent magnetofluids, such as the liquid iron that fills the Earth's outer core, produce stationary, large-scale magnetic fields, i.e., the geomagnetic field. These results should also apply to other planets as well as to plasma confinement devices on Earth and in space, and the effects should be manifest if Reynolds numbers are high enough and there is enough time for stationarity to occur, at least approximately. In the presentation, details will be given for both theoretical and numerical results, and references will be provided.

  10. Antiferromagnetic Spin Wave Field-Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ran; Daniels, Matthew W; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-01-01

    In a collinear antiferromagnet with easy-axis anisotropy, symmetry dictates that the spin wave modes must be doubly degenerate. Theses two modes, distinguished by their opposite polarization and available only in antiferromagnets, give rise to a novel degree of freedom to encode and process information. We show that the spin wave polarization can be manipulated by an electric field induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and magnetic anisotropy. We propose a prototype spin wave field-effect transistor which realizes a gate-tunable magnonic analog of the Faraday effect, and demonstrate its application in THz signal modulation. Our findings open up the exciting possibility of digital data processing utilizing antiferromagnetic spin waves and enable the direct projection of optical computing concepts onto the mesoscopic scale. PMID:27048928

  11. Antiferromagnetic Spin Wave Field-Effect Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ran; Daniels, Matthew W.; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-04-01

    In a collinear antiferromagnet with easy-axis anisotropy, symmetry dictates that the spin wave modes must be doubly degenerate. Theses two modes, distinguished by their opposite polarization and available only in antiferromagnets, give rise to a novel degree of freedom to encode and process information. We show that the spin wave polarization can be manipulated by an electric field induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and magnetic anisotropy. We propose a prototype spin wave field-effect transistor which realizes a gate-tunable magnonic analog of the Faraday effect, and demonstrate its application in THz signal modulation. Our findings open up the exciting possibility of digital data processing utilizing antiferromagnetic spin waves and enable the direct projection of optical computing concepts onto the mesoscopic scale.

  12. Antiferromagnetic Spin Wave Field-Effect Transistor

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ran; Daniels, Matthew W.; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-01-01

    In a collinear antiferromagnet with easy-axis anisotropy, symmetry dictates that the spin wave modes must be doubly degenerate. Theses two modes, distinguished by their opposite polarization and available only in antiferromagnets, give rise to a novel degree of freedom to encode and process information. We show that the spin wave polarization can be manipulated by an electric field induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and magnetic anisotropy. We propose a prototype spin wave field-effect transistor which realizes a gate-tunable magnonic analog of the Faraday effect, and demonstrate its application in THz signal modulation. Our findings open up the exciting possibility of digital data processing utilizing antiferromagnetic spin waves and enable the direct projection of optical computing concepts onto the mesoscopic scale. PMID:27048928

  13. Antiferromagnetic Spin Wave Field-Effect Transistor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cheng, Ran; Daniels, Matthew W.; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-04-06

    In a collinear antiferromagnet with easy-axis anisotropy, symmetry dictates that the spin wave modes must be doubly degenerate. Theses two modes, distinguished by their opposite polarization and available only in antiferromagnets, give rise to a novel degree of freedom to encode and process information. We show that the spin wave polarization can be manipulated by an electric field induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and magnetic anisotropy. We propose a prototype spin wave field effect transistor which realizes a gate-tunable magnonic analog of the Faraday effect, and demonstrate its application in THz signal modulation. In conclusion, our findings open up the exciting possibilitymore » of digital data processing utilizing antiferromagnetic spin waves and enable the direct projection of optical computing concepts onto the mesoscopic scale.« less

  14. MHD shocks in coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this research program is the study of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks and nonlinear simple waves produced as a result of the interaction of ejected lower coronal plasma with the ambient corona. The types of shocks and nonlinear simple waves produced for representative coronal conditions and disturbance velocities were determined. The wave system and the interactions between the ejecta and ambient corona were studied using both analytic theory and numerical solutions of the time-dependent, nonlinear MHD equations. Observations from the SMM coronagraph/polarimeter provided both guidance and motivation and are used extensively in evaluating the results. As a natural consequence of the comparisons with the data, the simulations assisted in better understanding the physical interactions in coronal mass ejections (CME's).

  15. MHD waves detected by ice at distances > 28 x 10/sup 6/ km from Comet Halley: Cometary or solar wind origin

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurutani, B.T.; Brinca, A.L.; Smith, E.J.; Thorne, R.M.; Scarf, F.L.; Gosling, J.T.; Ipavich, F.M.

    1986-01-01

    Spectral analyses of the high resolution magnetic field data are employed to determine if there is evidence of cometary heavy ion pickup when ICE was closest to Halley, approx.28 x 10/sup 6/ km. No evidence is found for the presence of heavy ion cyclotron waves. However, from this search, two new wave modes are discovered in the solar wind: electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves and drift mirror mode waves. Both modes have scales of 10 to 60 s (1 to 6 T/sub p/) in the spacecraft frame. The possibility of wave generation by cometary hydrogen pickup is explored. Theoretical arguments and further experimental evidence indicates that cometary origin is improbable. The most likely source is plasma instabilities associated with solar wind stream-stream interactions. VLF electrostatic emissions are found to occur in field minima or at gradients of the drift mirror structures. Possible generation mechanisms of drift mirror mode waves, cyclotron waves and electrostatic waves are discussed.

  16. Calculating Rotating Hydrodynamic and Magnetohydrodynamic Waves to Understand Magnetic Effects on Dynamical Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xing

    2016-09-01

    To understand magnetic effects on dynamical tides, we study the rotating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow driven by harmonic forcing. The linear responses are analytically derived in a periodic box under the local WKB approximation. Both the kinetic and Ohmic dissipations at the resonant frequencies are calculated, and the various parameters are investigated. Although magnetic pressure may be negligible compared to thermal pressure, the magnetic field can be important for the first-order perturbation, e.g., dynamical tides. It is found that the magnetic field splits the resonant frequency, namely the rotating hydrodynamic flow has only one resonant frequency, but the rotating MHD flow has two, one positive and the other negative. In the weak field regime the dissipations are asymmetric around the two resonant frequencies and this asymmetry is more striking with a weaker magnetic field. It is also found that both the kinetic and Ohmic dissipations at the resonant frequencies are inversely proportional to the Ekman number and the square of the wavenumber. The dissipation at the resonant frequency on small scales is almost equal to the dissipation at the non-resonant frequencies, namely the resonance takes its effect on the dissipation at intermediate length scales. Moreover, the waves with phase propagation that is perpendicular to the magnetic field are much more damped. It is also interesting to find that the frequency-averaged dissipation is constant. This result suggests that in compact objects, magnetic effects on tidal dissipation should be considered.

  17. Modeling the effect of wave-vegetation interaction on wave setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rooijen, A. A.; McCall, R. T.; van Thiel de Vries, J. S. M.; van Dongeren, A. R.; Reniers, A. J. H. M.; Roelvink, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    Aquatic vegetation in the coastal zone attenuates wave energy and reduces the risk of coastal hazards, e.g., flooding. Besides the attenuation of sea-swell waves, vegetation may also affect infragravity-band (IG) waves and wave setup. To date, knowledge on the effect of vegetation on IG waves and wave setup is lacking, while they are potentially important parameters for coastal risk assessment. In this study, the storm impact model XBeach is extended with formulations for attenuation of sea-swell and IG waves, and wave setup effects in two modes: the sea-swell wave phase-resolving (nonhydrostatic) and the phase-averaged (surfbeat) mode. In surfbeat mode, a wave shape model is implemented to capture the effect of nonlinear wave-vegetation interaction processes on wave setup. Both modeling modes are verified using data from two flume experiments with mimic vegetation and show good skill in computing the sea-swell and IG wave transformation, and wave setup. In surfbeat mode, the wave setup prediction greatly improves when using the wave shape model, while in nonhydrostatic mode (nonlinear) intrawave effects are directly accounted for. Subsequently, the model is used for a range of coastal geomorphological configurations by varying bed slope and vegetation extent. The results indicate that the effect of wave-vegetation interaction on wave setup may be relevant for a range of typical coastal geomorphological configurations (e.g., relatively steep to gentle slope coasts fronted by vegetation).

  18. Flow development and analysis of MHD generators and seawater thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.D. ); Roy, G.D. )

    1992-03-01

    In this paper, the flow characteristics inside magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma generators and seawater thrusters are analyzed and are compared using a three-dimensional computer model that solves the governing partial differential equations for fluid flow and electrical fields. Calculations have been performed for a Faraday plasma generator and for a continuous electrode seawater thruster. The results of the calculations show that the effects caused by the interaction of the MHD forces with the fluid flow are strongly manifested in the case of the MHD generator as compared to the flow development in the MHD thruster. The existence of velocity overshoots over the sidewalls confirm previously published results for MHD generators with strong MHD interaction. For MHD thrusters, the velocity profile is found to be slightly flatter over the sidewall as compared to that over the electrode wall. As a result, distinct enhancement of the skin friction exists over the sidewalls of MHD generators in comparison to that of MHD thrusters. Plots of velocity profiles and skin friction distributions are presented to illustrate and compare the flow development in MHD generators and thrusters.

  19. Power facility with a built-in multipolar MHD generator

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalev, K.L.; Markina, T.A.

    1995-05-01

    The scheme of a power facility with a built-in multipolar MHD generator is discussed. In most papers devoted to airborne high-power MHD generators (self-contained or built into the nozzle of the propulsion unit), MHD channels are discussed that are based on a two-pole scheme. The processes of energy conversion in these MHD generators are usually accompanied by disturbances of flow in the entire channel volume, which, in many cases, is undesirable for the operation of power facilities. Depending on the number of pairs of poles, the proposed facility makes it possible to accomplish MHD conversion both in the nozzle peripheral zone and in the central part of the flow. An analysis of the methods and results of calculations of volume MHD effects for finite Hall parameters {beta} and MHD-interaction s, as well as of the output characteristics of multipolar MHD generators equipped with electrode modules of different types are given. A comparison of the theoretical and experimental data is made. A scheme involving an advanced propulsion unit fired with cryogenic fuel H{sub 2}+O{sub 2} and a built-in multipolar MHD generator is considered. The problems of using built-in multipolar MHD generators in propulsion units utilizing other fuel pairs are discussed.

  20. Thermophysical effects of water driven copper nanoparticles on MHD axisymmetric permeable shrinking sheet: Dual-nature study.

    PubMed

    Ul Haq, Rizwan; Rajotia, D; Noor, N F M

    2016-03-01

    The present study is dedicated to analyze the dual-nature solutions of the axisymmetric flow of a magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) nanofluid over a permeable shrinking sheet. In those phenomena where the fluid flow is due to the shrinking surface, some reverse behaviors of the flow arise because of vorticity effects. Despite of heat transfer analysis, the main purpose of the present study is to attain the solutions of the complex nature problem that appear in reverse flow phenomena. Thermophysical properties of both base fluid (water) and nanoparticles (copper) are also taken into account. By means of similarity transformation, partial differential equations are converted into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations and then solved via the Runge-Kutta method. These results are divided separately into two cases: the first one is the unidirectional shrinking along the surface (m = 1) and the other one is for axisymmetric shrinking phenomena (m = 2) . To enhance the thermal conductivity of base fluid, nanoparticle volume fractions (0≤φ ≤ 0.2)) are incorporated within the base fluid. The numerical investigation explores the condition of existence, non-existence and the duality of similarity solution depends upon the range of suction parameter (S) and Hartmann number (M). The reduced skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are plotted to analyze the fluid flow and heat transfer at the surface of the shrinking sheet. Streamlines and isotherms are also plotted against the engineering control parameters to analyze the flow behavior and heat transfer within the whole domain. Throughout this analysis it is found that both nanoparticle volume fraction and Hartmann number are increasing functions of both skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number. PMID:27006069

  1. Global MHD simulations of plasmaspheric plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, J.; Ouellette, J.; Merkin, V. G.

    2015-12-01

    The plasmasphere represents a separate population from the rest of themagnetosphere, generally high density but cold. When the solar windturns strongly southward this plasma is convected toward the daysidemagnetopause and affects the interaction of the solar wind with themagnetosphere. We have used multi-fluid simulations using the LFMglobal MHD code to model this interaction. The plasmasphere isinitialized as a cold (~1eV) hydrogen plasma in a quiet northward IMFstate with a density distribution appropriate for K_p = 1. Thecorotation potential from the ionosphere spins up the plasmasphereinto rough corotation. After a initialization period of hours, asouthward IMF is introduced and the enhanced convection initiates asurge of plasmaspheric density to the dayside. We discuss two aspectsof this interaction, the effects on dayside reconnection and on theKelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). We find that the mass loading ofmagnetospheric flux tubes slows local reconnection rates, though notas much as predicted by Borovsky et al. [2013]. We findthat the total reconnection rate is reduced, although not as much aswould be predicted by just the sub-solar reconnection rate. The KHIis somewhat reduced by the plasmaspheric loading of density in the lowlatitude boundary layer. It has been suggested that the presence ofthe plasmasphere may lead to enhanced ULF wave power in the interiorof the magnetosphere from the KHI waves. We find only a minimal effect during northward IMF. For southward IMF, the situation is complicated by the interaction of KHI with non-steady reconnection.

  2. Material effects in photoconductive frozen wave generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oconnell, Robert M.; Thaxter, J. B.; Bell, Richard E.

    1991-04-01

    Linear photoconductive gallium arsenide (GaAs) fast closing switches for microwave applications, such as frozen wave pulse generation, are analyzed and compared to experimental measurements. Material effects in photo-conductive frozen wave generators fabricated in semiconductor-based microstrip transmission line are studied from three perspectives; frozen wave propagation in the line; the spacing between the switches in a frozen wave generator and their maximum number; and the switching behavior of the gap-switch itself, which is modeled as a lumped-element, modified Ebers-Moll equivalent circuit. The experimental transient behavior of hybrid gap-switches fabricated on semi-insulating GaAs with ohmic and non-ohmic contacts is compared with predicted performance. Picosecond laser pulses, doubled to 527 micron wavelength are used to excite linear photoconductivity in 75 micron gap switches mounted in a test fixture of 50 ohm microstrip lines on alumina.

  3. Radiation and chemical reaction effects on MHD flow along a moving vertical porous plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana Reddy, G. V.; Bhaskar Reddy, N.; Gorla, R. S. R.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the effects of magnetohydrodynamic force and buoyancy on convective heat and mass transfer flow past a moving vertical porous plate in the presence of thermal radiation and chemical reaction. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to a system of self-similar equations using the similarity transformations. The resultant equations are then solved numerically using the fourth order Runge-Kutta method along with the shooting technique. The results are obtained for the velocity, temperature, concentration, skin-friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number. The effects of various parameters on flow variables are illustrated graphically, and the physical aspects of the problem are discussed.

  4. INCORPORATING AMBIPOLAR AND OHMIC DIFFUSION IN THE AMR MHD CODE RAMSES

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, J.; Mulet-Marquis, C.; Chabrier, G.; Teyssier, R.

    2012-08-01

    We have implemented non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) effects in the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES, namely, ambipolar diffusion and Ohmic dissipation, as additional source terms in the ideal MHD equations. We describe in details how we have discretized these terms using the adaptive Cartesian mesh, and how the time step is diminished with respect to the ideal case, in order to perform a stable time integration. We have performed a large suite of test runs, featuring the Barenblatt diffusion test, the Ohmic diffusion test, the C-shock test, and the Alfven wave test. For the latter, we have performed a careful truncation error analysis to estimate the magnitude of the numerical diffusion induced by our Godunov scheme, allowing us to estimate the spatial resolution that is required to address non-ideal MHD effects reliably. We show that our scheme is second-order accurate, and is therefore ideally suited to study non-ideal MHD effects in the context of star formation and molecular cloud dynamics.

  5. Hall Effects And Rotation Effects On MHD Flow Past An Exponentially Accelerated Vertical Plate With Combined Heat And Mass Transfer Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamizhsudar, M.; Pandurangan, J.; Muthucumaraswamy, R.

    2015-08-01

    A theoretical solution of flow past an exponentially accelerated vertical plate in the presence of Hall current and MHD relative to a rotating fluid with uniform temperature and mass diffusion is presented. The dimensionless equations are solved using the Laplace method. The axial and transverse velocity, temperature and concentration fields are studied for different parameters such as the Hall parameter (m), Hartmann number (M), Rotation parameter (Ω), Schmidt number, Prandtl number, thermal Grashof number (Gr) and mass Grashof number (Gc). It has been observed that the temperature of the plate decreases with increasing values of the Prandtl number and the concentration near the plate increases with decreasing values of Schmidt number. It is also observed that both axial and transverse velocities increase with decreasing values of the magnetic field parameter or rotation parameter, but the trend gets reversed with respect to the Hall parameter. The effects of parameters m, M, Ω, Gr and Gc on the axial and transverse velocity profiles are shown graphically.

  6. Flow Shear Effects in the Onset Physics of Resistive MHD Instabilities in Tokamaks. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Dylan P.

    2013-04-24

    The progress in this research centers around the computational analysis of flow shear effects in the onset of a 3/2 mode driven by a 1/1 mode in DIII-D equilibria. The initial idea was to try and calculate, via nonlinear simulations with NIMROD, the effects of rotation shear on driven 3/2 and 2/1 seed island physics, in experimentally relevant DIIID equilibria. The simulations indicated that very small seed islands were directly driven, as shielding between the sawtooth and the surfaces is significant at the high Lundquist numbers of the experiment. Instead, long after the initial crash the difference in linear stability of the 3/2, which remained prevalent despite the flattening of the core profiles from the sawtooth, contributed to a difference in the eventual seed island evolution. Essentially the seed islands grew or decayed long after the sawtooth crash, and not directly from it. Effectively the dominant 1/1 mode was found to be dragging the coupled modes surrounding it at a high rate through the plasma at their surfaces. The 1/1 mode is locked to the local frame of the plasma in the core, where the flow rate is greatest. The resonant perturbations at the surrounding surfaces propagate in the 'high slip regime' in the language of Fitzpatrick. Peaked flux averaged jxb forces (see Figs. 1 and 2) agree with localized flow modifications at the surfaces in analogy with Ebrahimi, PRL 2007. We track the mode into nonlinear saturation and have found oscillatory states in the evolution. During a visit (11/09) to Tulsa by R.J. LaHaye (GA), it became clear that similar oscillatory states are observed in DIII-D for these types of discharges.

  7. Effects of MHD on Cu-water nanofluid flow and heat transfer by means of CVFEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami, M.; Gorji Bandpy, M.; Ellahi, R.; Hassan, Mohsan; Soleimani, Soheil

    2014-01-01

    In this study magnetohydrodynamic effect on natural convection heat transfer of Cu-water nanofluid in an enclosure with hot elliptic cylinder is investigated. The governing equations of fluid motion and heat transfer in their vorticity stream function form are used to simulate the nanofluid flow and heat transfer. Control Volume based Finite Element Method (CVFEM) is applied to solve these equations. The effective thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluid are calculated using the Maxwell-Garnetts (MG) and Brinkman models, respectively. The calculations are performed for different governing parameters such as the Hartmann number, Rayleigh number, nanoparticle volume fraction and inclined angle of inner cylinder. Also a correlation of average Nusselt number corresponding to active parameters is presented. The results indicate that Nusselt number is an increasing function of nanoparticle volume fraction, Rayleigh numbers and inclination angle while it is a decreasing function of Hartmann number. Also it can be found that increasing Rayleigh number leads to decrease heat transfer enhancement while opposite trend is observed with augment of Hartmann number.

  8. Solar Wind Interaction Effects on Mars Crustal Field Measurements Inferred from MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, Janet G.; Ma, Yingjuan; Brain, David; Lillis, Rob

    2014-05-01

    Analyses of MGS mapping orbit measurements of the planetary magnetic fields of Mars used best practices to minimize the contributions of induced magnetic fields and other features associated with the solar wind interaction. In particular, these concentrated on nightside sampling over long periods of time so as to average out external contributions and perturbations, and eliminated apparently disturbed times in the interplanetary medium. However solar wind interaction-related features at the mapping orbit altitude of 400km may not average out because of non-symmetrical distortions produced by reconnection and dawn-dusk differences associated with the average Parker Spiral external field. The potential issues especially affect the weaker large scale components whose influences are best measured where the solar wind effects are most influential. This includes the important axial dipole field that may be either crustal, a fossil of a previously active dynamo, or evidence of a weak presently active dynamo. We use BATS-R-US models of the Mars-solar wind interaction to investigate these effects and to demonstrate that we still may not know the low order components of the Martian magnetic field very well.

  9. Radial energy transport by magnetospheric ULF waves: Effects of magnetic curvature and plasma pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouznetsov, Igor; Lotko, William

    1995-01-01

    The 'radial' transport of energy by internal ULF waves, stimulated by dayside magnetospheric boundary oscillations, is analyzed in the framework of one-fluid magnetohydrodynamics. (the term radial is used here to denote the direction orthogonal to geomagnetic flux surfaces.) The model for the inhomogeneous magnetospheric plasma and background magnetic field is axisymmetric and includes radial and parallel variations in the magnetic field, magnetic curvature, plasma density, and low but finite plasma pressure. The radial mode structure of the coupled fast and intermediate MHD waves is determined by numerical solution of the inhomogeneous wave equation; the parallel mode structure is characterized by a Wentzel-Kramer-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. Ionospheric dissipation is modeled by allowing the parallel wave number to be complex. For boudnary oscillations with frequencies in the range from 10 to 48 mHz, and using a dipole model for the background magnetic field, the combined effects of magnetic curvature and finite plasma pressure are shown to (1) enhance the amplitude of field line resonances by as much as a factor of 2 relative to values obtained in a cold plasma or box-model approximation for the dayside magnetosphere; (2) increase the energy flux delivered to a given resonance by a factor of 2-4; and (3) broaden the spectral width of the resonance by a factor of 2-3. The effects are attributed to the existence of an 'Alfven buoyancy oscillation,' which approaches the usual shear mode Alfven wave at resonance, but unlike the shear Alfven mode, it is dispersive at short perpendicular wavelengths. The form of dispersion is analogous to that of an internal atmospheric gravity wave, with the magnetic tension of the curved background field providing the restoring force and allowing radial propagation of the mode. For nominal dayside parameters, the propagation band of the Alfven buoyancy wave occurs between the location of its (field line) resonance and that of the

  10. MHD Mixed Convective Peristaltic Motion of Nanofluid with Joule Heating and Thermophoresis Effects

    PubMed Central

    Shehzad, Sabir Ali; Abbasi, Fahad Munir; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaadi, Fuad

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of present investigation is to introduce the novel aspect of thermophoresis in the mixed convective peristaltic transport of viscous nanofluid. Viscous dissipation and Joule heating are also taken into account. Problem is modeled using the lubrication approach. Resulting system of equations is solved numerically. Effects of sundry parameters on the velocity, temperature, concentration of nanoparticles and heat and mass transfer rates at the wall are studied through graphs. It is noted that the concentration of nanoparticles near the boundaries is enhanced for larger thermophoresis parameter. However reverse situation is observed for an increase in the value of Brownian motion parameter. Further, the mass transfer rate at the wall significantly decreases when Brownian motion parameter is assigned higher values. PMID:25391147

  11. Effects of prescribed heat flux and transpiration on MHD axisymmetric flow impinging on stretching cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabood, Fazle; Lorenzini, Giulio; Pochai, Napporat; Ibrahim, Sheikh Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    A numerical treatment for axisymmetric flow and heat transfer due to a stretching cylinder under the influence of a uniform magnetic field and prescribed surface heat flux is presented. Numerical results are obtained for dimensionless velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number for several values of the suction/injection, magnetic and curvature parameters as well as the Prandtl number. The present study reveals that the controlling parameters have strong effects on the physical quantities of interest. It is seen that the magnetic field enhances the dimensionless temperature inside the thermal boundary layer, whereas it reduces the dimensionless velocity inside the hydrodynamic boundary layer. Heat transfer rate reduces, while the skin friction coefficient increases with magnetic field.

  12. Soret and dufour effects on MHD mixed convection heat and mass transfer in a micropolar fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasacharya, Darbhasayanam; Upendar, Mendu

    2013-12-01

    This paper analyzes the flow, heat and mass transfer characteristics of the mixed convection on a vertical plate in a micropolar fluid in the presence of Soret and Dufour effects. A uniform magnetic field of magnitude is applied normal to the plate. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are transformed into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations and then solved numerically using the Keller-box method. The numerical results are compared and found to be in good agreement with previously published results as special cases of the present investigation. The rate of heat and mass transfer at the plate are presented graphically for various values of coupling number, magnetic parameter, Prandtl number, Schmidt number, Dufour and Soret numbers. In addition, the skin-friction coefficient, the wall couple stress are shown in a tabular form.

  13. On 2-D Boussinesq equations for MHD convection with stratification effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Dongfen; Gui, Guilong

    2016-08-01

    This paper is concerned with the two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics-Boussinesq system with the temperature-dependent viscosity, thermal diffusivity and electrical conductivity. The first progress on this topic was made independently by Chae and Hou-Li [8,26] where the Boussinesq system with partial constant viscosity is obtained. Recently, Wang-Zhang [45] considered the temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal diffusivity, and Li-Xu [16] generalized the Wang-Zhang's result to the inviscid case with temperature-dependent thermal diffusivity. In this paper, we include the stratification and magnetic effects and consider the full system, in the framework of low regularity. We prove that, without any smallness assumption on the initial data, the full system is globally well-posed. Moreover, by applying the uniformly bounded generalized Oseen operator, time decay estimate of the solution is obtained.

  14. MHD mixed convective peristaltic motion of nanofluid with Joule heating and thermophoresis effects.

    PubMed

    Shehzad, Sabir Ali; Abbasi, Fahad Munir; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaadi, Fuad

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of present investigation is to introduce the novel aspect of thermophoresis in the mixed convective peristaltic transport of viscous nanofluid. Viscous dissipation and Joule heating are also taken into account. Problem is modeled using the lubrication approach. Resulting system of equations is solved numerically. Effects of sundry parameters on the velocity, temperature, concentration of nanoparticles and heat and mass transfer rates at the wall are studied through graphs. It is noted that the concentration of nanoparticles near the boundaries is enhanced for larger thermophoresis parameter. However reverse situation is observed for an increase in the value of Brownian motion parameter. Further, the mass transfer rate at the wall significantly decreases when Brownian motion parameter is assigned higher values. PMID:25391147

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in Dynamic Plasmas with Solar Applications: Effect of Thermal Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghafri, Khalil

    2013-08-01

    In the present thesis we examine the effect of the cooling background coronal plasma on damping coronal oscillations. The background plasma is assumed to be cooling because of thermal conduction. Moreover, the cooling of the background temperature is assumed to have an exponential profile with characteristic cooling times typical for solar coronal loops. We have investigated the propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves in a homogeneous magnetised plasma embedded in a hot coronal loop. The background plasma is assumed to be cooling due to thermal conduction in a weakly stratified atmosphere. The influence of cooling of the background plasma on the properties of magneto-acoustic waves is examined. The background temperature is found to decrease exponentially with time by solving the background plasma equations. On the other hand, we have considered the influence of a cooling background plasma on the longitudinal standing (slow) magneto-acoustic waves generated in a loop of hot corona. The cooling of the background plasma is dominated by a physically unspecified thermodynamic source. A dominance of the cooling in the absence of any dissipative mechanisms is found to amplify the oscillation amplitude. Thermal conduction, which is presumed to be a weak, is only present in the perturbations, causing a damping for the hot-loop oscillations. The previous study is expanded on investigating the effect of strong thermal conduction on the hot coronal oscillations. The competition between the cooling of plasma and the damping of oscillations can be captured from the behaviour of MHD waves. The hot-loop oscillations undergo strong damping due to thermal conduction, although the cooling coronal plasma exerts resistive role on the damping method by decreasing the rate of decaying for cool coronal oscillations. Contrary to cool loops, the amplitude of very hot loops that undergoes a high amount of cooling experiences faster damping than others. However, the damping of the standing

  16. Effects of chemical reaction on MHD mixed convection stagnation point flow toward a vertical plate in a porous medium with radiation and heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hari, Niranjan; Sivasankaran, S.; Bhuvaneswari, M.; Siri, Zailan

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to analyze the effects of chemical reaction on MHD mixed convection with the stagnation point flow towards a vertical plate embedded in a porous medium with radiation and internal heat generation. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed into a set of ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations. Then they are solved by shooting technique with Runge-Kutta fourth order iteration. The obtained numerical results are illustrated graphically and the heat and mass transfer rates are given in tabular form. The velocity and temperature profiles overshoot near the plate on increasing the chemical reaction parameter, Richardson number and magnetic field parameter.

  17. Effects of thermophoresis and heat generation/absorption on MHD flow due to an oscillatory stretching sheet with chemically reactive species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh, Mariam; Abbas, Zaheer

    2015-12-01

    The effects of chemical reaction and heat generation/absorption on MHD flow over an oscillatory stretching surface in a viscous fluid have been studied in the presence of thermophoresis. The porous plate is oscillated back and forth in its own plane and suction/injection is also taking into account. The similarity solution of the developed non-linear governing partial differential equations is constructed in the form of series using homotopy analysis method. The convergence of the obtained series solutions is discussed in the whole domain (0 ≤ η ≤ ∞) . A parametric study of the all governing parameters is accomplished and the physical results are shown graphically.

  18. Identification of standing MHD modes in MHD simulations of planetary magnetospheres. Application to Mercury.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griton, Léa; Pantellini, Filippo; Moncuquet, Michel

    2016-04-01

    We present 3D simulations of the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury's magnetosphere using the magnetohydrodynamic code AMRVAC. A procedure for the identification of standing MHD modes has been applied to these simulations showing that large scale standing slow mode structures may exist in Mercury's magnetosheath. The identification is mostly based on relatively simple approximate analytical solutions to the old problem of determining the family of all standing linear plane MHD waves in a flowing plasma. The question of the identification of standing slow mode structures using in situ measurements such as the future BepiColombo MMO mission to Mercury will be discussed as well.

  19. EMAPS: An Efficient Multiscale Approach to Plasma Systems with Non-MHD Scale Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Omelchenko, Yuri A; Karimabadi, Homa

    2014-10-14

    Using Discrete-Event Simulation (DES) as a novel paradigm for time integration of large-scale physics-driven systems, we have achieved significant breakthroughs in simulations of multi-dimensional magnetized plasmas where ion kinetic and finite Larmor radius (FLR) and Hall effects play a crucial role. For these purposes we apply a unique asynchronous simulation tool: a parallel, electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code, HYPERS (Hybrid Particle Event-Resolved Simulator), which treats plasma electrons as a charge neutralizing fluid and solves a self-consistent set of non-radiative Maxwell, electron fluid equations and ion particle equations on a structured computational grid. HYPERS enables adaptive local time steps for particles, fluid elements and electromagnetic fields. This ensures robustness (stability) and efficiency (speed) of highly dynamic and nonlinear simulations of compact plasma systems such spheromaks, FRCs, ion beams and edge plasmas. HYPERS is a unique asynchronous code that has been designed to serve as a test bed for developing multi-physics applications not only for laboratory plasma devices but generally across a number of plasma physics fields, including astrophysics, space physics and electronic devices. We have made significant improvements to the HYPERS core: (1) implemented a new asynchronous magnetic field integration scheme that preserves local divB=0 to within round-off errors; (2) Improved staggered-grid discretizations of electric and magnetic fields. These modifications have significantly enhanced the accuracy and robustness of 3D simulations. We have conducted first-ever end-to-end 3D simulations of merging spheromak plasmas. The preliminary results show: (1) tilt-driven relaxation of a freely expanding spheromak to an m=1 Taylor helix configuration and (2) possibility of formation of a tilt-stable field-reversed configuration via merging and magnetic reconnection of two double-sided spheromaks with opposite helicities.

  20. Modeling ionospheric electron precipitation due to wave particle scattering in the magnetosphere and the feedback effect on the magnetospheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Jordanova, V.; Ridley, A. J.; Albert, J.; Horne, R. B.; Jeffery, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Electron precipitation down to the atmosphere caused by wave-particle scattering in the magnetosphere contribute significantly to the enhancement of auroral ionospheric conductivity. Global MHD models that are incapable of capturing kinetic physics in the inner magnetosphere usually adopt MHD parameters to specify the precipitation flux to estimate auroral conductivity, hence losing self-consistency in the global circulation of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. In this study we improve the coupling structure in global models by connecting the physics-based (wave-particle scattering) electron precipitation with the ionospheric electrodynamics and investigate the feedback effect on the magnetospheric dynamics. We use BATS-R-US coupled with a kinetic ring current model RAM-SCB that solves pitch angle dependent particle distributions to study the global circulation dynamics during the Jan 25-26, 2013 storm event. Following tail injections, we found enhanced precipitation number and energy fluxes of tens of keV electrons being scattered into loss cone due to interactions with enhanced chorus and hiss waves in the magnetosphere. This results in a more profound auroral conductance and larger electric field imposing on the plasma transport in the magnetosphere. We also compared our results with previous methods in specifying the auroral conductance, such as empirical relation used in Ridley et al. (2004). It is found that our physics-based method develops a larger convection electric field in the near-Earth region and therefore leads to a more intense ring current.

  1. A theory of MHD instability of an inhomogeneous plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonovich, Anatoly S.

    2011-06-01

    A problem of the stability of an inhomogeneous axisymmetric plasma jet in a parallel magnetic field is solved. The jet boundary becomes, under certain conditions, unstable relative to magnetosonic oscillations (Kelvin-Helmholtz instability) in the presence of a shear flow at the jet boundary. Because of its internal inhomogeneity the plasma jet has resonance surfaces, where conversion takes place between various modes of plasma magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations. Propagating in inhomogeneous plasma, fast magnetosonic waves drive the Alfven and slow magnetosonic (SMS) oscillations, tightly localized across the magnetic shells, on the resonance surfaces. MHD oscillation energy is absorbed in the neighbourhood of these resonance surfaces. The resonance surfaces disappear for the eigenmodes of SMS waves propagating in the jet waveguide. The stability of the plasma MHD flow is determined by competition between the mechanisms of shear flow instability on the boundary and wave energy dissipation because of resonant MHD-mode coupling. The problem is solved analytically, in the Wentzel, Kramers, Brillouin (WKB) approximation, for the plasma jet with a boundary in the form of a tangential discontinuity over the radial coordinate. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability develops if plasma flow velocity in the jet exceeds the maximum Alfven speed at the boundary. The stability of the plasma jet with a smooth boundary layer is investigated numerically for the basic modes of MHD oscillations, to which the WKB approximation is inapplicable. A new 'unstable mode of MHD oscillations has been discovered which, unlike the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, exists for any, however weak, plasma flow velocities.

  2. Dipole Alignment in Rotating MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.; Fu, Terry; Morin, Lee

    2012-01-01

    We present numerical results from long-term CPU and GPU simulations of rotating, homogeneous, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, and discuss their connection to the spherically bounded case. We compare our numerical results with a statistical theory of geodynamo action that has evolved from the absolute equilibrium ensemble theory of ideal MHD turbulence, which is based on the ideal MHD invariants are energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity. However, for rotating MHD turbulence, the cross helicity is no longer an exact invariant, although rms cross helicity becomes quasistationary during an ideal MHD simulation. This and the anisotropy imposed by rotation suggests an ansatz in which an effective, nonzero value of cross helicity is assigned to axisymmetric modes and zero cross helicity to non-axisymmetric modes. This hybrid statistics predicts a large-scale quasistationary magnetic field due to broken ergodicity , as well as dipole vector alignment with the rotation axis, both of which are observed numerically. We find that only a relatively small value of effective cross helicity leads to the prediction of a dipole moment vector that is closely aligned (less than 10 degrees) with the rotation axis. We also discuss the effect of initial conditions, dissipation and grid size on the numerical simulations and statistical theory.

  3. Pulse Detonation Rocket MHD Power Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A pulse detonation research engine (MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) Model PDRE (Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine) G-2) has been developed for the purpose of examining integrated propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic power generation applications. The engine is based on a rectangular cross-section tube coupled to a converging-diverging nozzle, which is in turn attached to a segmented Faraday channel. As part of the shakedown testing activity, the pressure wave was interrogated along the length of the engine while running on hydrogen/oxygen propellants. Rapid transition to detonation wave propagation was insured through the use of a short Schelkin spiral near the head of the engine. The measured detonation wave velocities were in excess of 2500 m/s in agreement with the theoretical C-J velocity. The engine was first tested in a straight tube configuration without a nozzle, and the time resolved thrust was measured simultaneously with the head-end pressure. Similar measurements were made with the converging-diverging nozzle attached. The time correlation of the thrust and head-end pressure data was found to be excellent. The major purpose of the converging-diverging nozzle was to configure the engine for driving an MHD generator for the direct production of electrical power. Additional tests were therefore necessary in which seed (cesium-hydroxide dissolved in methanol) was directly injected into the engine as a spray. The exhaust plume was then interrogated with a microwave interferometer in an attempt to characterize the plasma conditions, and emission spectroscopy measurements were also acquired. Data reduction efforts indicate that the plasma exhaust is very highly ionized, although there is some uncertainty at this time as to the relative abundance of negative OH ions. The emission spectroscopy data provided some indication of the species in the exhaust as well as a measurement of temperature. A 24-electrode-pair segmented Faraday channel and 0.6 Tesla permanent

  4. Environmental Effects for Gravitational-wave Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barausse, Enrico; Cardoso, Vitor; Pani, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    The upcoming detection of gravitational waves by terrestrial interferometers will usher in the era of gravitational-wave astronomy. This will be particularly true when space-based detectors will come of age and measure the mass and spin of massive black holes with exquisite precision and up to very high redshifts, thus allowing for better understanding of the symbiotic evolution of black holes with galaxies, and for high-precision tests of General Relativity in strong-field, highly dynamical regimes. Such ambitious goals require that astrophysical environmental pollution of gravitational-wave signals be constrained to negligible levels, so that neither detection nor estimation of the source parameters are significantly affected. Here, we consider the main sources for space-based detectors - the inspiral, merger and ringdown of massive black-hole binaries and extreme mass-ratio inspirals - and account for various effects on their gravitational waveforms, including electromagnetic fields, cosmological evolution, accretion disks, dark matter, “firewalls” and possible deviations from General Relativity. We discover that the black-hole quasinormal modes are sharply different in the presence of matter, but the ringdown signal observed by interferometers is typically unaffected. The effect of accretion disks and dark matter depends critically on their geometry and density profile, but is negligible for most sources, except for few special extreme mass-ratio inspirals. Electromagnetic fields and cosmological effects are always negligible. We finally explore the implications of our findings for proposed tests of General Relativity with gravitational waves, and conclude that environmental effects will not prevent the development of precision gravitational-wave astronomy.

  5. Solar-wind/magnetospheric dynamos: MHD-scale collective entry of the solar wind energy, momentum and mass into the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Yan; Lysak, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    A quasi open MHD (Magnetohydrodynamic) scale anomalous transport controlled boundary layer model is proposed, where the MHD collective behavior of magnetofluids (direct dynamo effect, anomalous viscous interaction and anomalous diffusion of the mass and the magnetic field) plays the main role in the conversion of the Solar Wind (SW) kinetic and magnetic energy into electromagnetic energy in the Magnetosphere (MSp). The so called direct and indirect dynamo effects are based on inductive and purely dissipative energy conversion, respectively. The self organization ability of vector fields in turbulent magnetofluids implies an inductive response of the plasma, which leads to the direct dynamo effect. The direct dynamo effect describes the direct formation of localized field aligned currents and the transverse Alfven waves and provides a source for MHD scale anomalous diffusivity and viscosity. The SW/MSp coupling depends on the dynamo efficiency.

  6. Geometric effects on stress wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K L; Trim, M W; Horstemeyer, M F; Lee, N; Williams, L N; Liao, J; Rhee, H; Prabhu, R

    2014-02-01

    The present study, through finite element simulations, shows the geometric effects of a bioinspired solid on pressure and impulse mitigation for an elastic, plastic, and viscoelastic material. Because of the bioinspired geometries, stress wave mitigation became apparent in a nonintuitive manner such that potential real-world applications in human protective gear designs are realizable. In nature, there are several toroidal designs that are employed for mitigating stress waves; examples include the hyoid bone on the back of a woodpecker's jaw that extends around the skull to its nose and a ram's horn. This study evaluates four different geometries with the same length and same initial cross-sectional diameter at the impact location in three-dimensional finite element analyses. The geometries in increasing complexity were the following: (1) a round cylinder, (2) a round cylinder that was tapered to a point, (3) a round cylinder that was spiraled in a two dimensional plane, and (4) a round cylinder that was tapered and spiraled in a two-dimensional plane. The results show that the tapered spiral geometry mitigated the greatest amount of pressure and impulse (approximately 98% mitigation) when compared to the cylinder regardless of material type (elastic, plastic, and viscoelastic) and regardless of input pressure signature. The specimen taper effectively mitigated the stress wave as a result of uniaxial deformational processes and an induced shear that arose from its geometry. Due to the decreasing cross-sectional area arising from the taper, the local uniaxial and shear stresses increased along the specimen length. The spiral induced even greater shear stresses that help mitigate the stress wave and also induced transverse displacements at the tip such that minimal wave reflections occurred. This phenomenon arose although only longitudinal waves were introduced as the initial boundary condition (BC). In nature, when shearing occurs within or between materials

  7. The Effects of Wave Escape on Fast Magnetosonic Wave Turbulence in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2012-01-01

    One of the leading models for electron acceleration in solar flares is stochastic acceleration by weakly turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ("fast waves"). In this model, large-scale flows triggered by magnetic reconnection excite large-wavelength fast waves, and fast-wave energy then cascades from large wavelengths to small wavelengths. Electron acceleration by large-wavelength fast-waves is weak, and so the model relies on the small-wavelength waves produced by the turbulent cascade. In order for the model to work, the energy cascade time for large-wavelength fast waves must be shorter than the time required for the waves to propagate out of the solar-flare acceleration region. To investigate the effects of wave escape, we solve the wave kinetic equation for fast waves in weak turbulence theory, supplemented with a homogeneous wave-loss term.We find that the amplitude of large-wavelength fast waves must exceed a minimum threshold in order for a significant fraction of the wave energy to cascade to small wavelengths before the waves leave the acceleration region.We evaluate this threshold as a function of the dominant wavelength of the fast waves that are initially excited by reconnection outflows.

  8. THE EFFECTS OF WAVE ESCAPE ON FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVE TURBULENCE IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard E-mail: benjamin.chandran@unh.edu E-mail: devore@nrl.navy.mil

    2012-09-20

    One of the leading models for electron acceleration in solar flares is stochastic acceleration by weakly turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ({sup f}ast waves{sup )}. In this model, large-scale flows triggered by magnetic reconnection excite large-wavelength fast waves, and fast-wave energy then cascades from large wavelengths to small wavelengths. Electron acceleration by large-wavelength fast waves is weak, and so the model relies on the small-wavelength waves produced by the turbulent cascade. In order for the model to work, the energy cascade time for large-wavelength fast waves must be shorter than the time required for the waves to propagate out of the solar-flare acceleration region. To investigate the effects of wave escape, we solve the wave kinetic equation for fast waves in weak turbulence theory, supplemented with a homogeneous wave-loss term. We find that the amplitude of large-wavelength fast waves must exceed a minimum threshold in order for a significant fraction of the wave energy to cascade to small wavelengths before the waves leave the acceleration region. We evaluate this threshold as a function of the dominant wavelength of the fast waves that are initially excited by reconnection outflows.

  9. Observations of dust acoustic waves driven at high frequencies: Finite dust temperature effects and wave interference

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Edward Jr.; Fisher, Ross; Merlino, Robert L.

    2007-12-15

    An experiment has been performed to study the behavior of dust acoustic waves driven at high frequencies (f>100 Hz), extending the range of previous work. In this study, two previously unreported phenomena are observed--interference effects between naturally excited dust acoustic waves and driven dust acoustic waves, and the observation of finite dust temperature effects on the dispersion relation.

  10. High-Accuracy, Implicit Solution of the Extended-MHD Equations using High-Continuity Finite Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardin, Stephen C.

    2004-11-01

    It has been recognized for some time that it is necessary to go beyond the simple ``resistive MHD'' description of the plasma in order to get the correct quantitative results for the growth and saturation of global dissipative modes in a fusion device. The inclusion of a more complete ``generalized Ohms law'' and the off-diagonal terms in the ion pressure tensor introduce Whistler waves, Kinetic Alfven waves, and gyro-viscous waves, all of which are dispersive and require special numerical treatment. We have developed a new numerical approach to solving these Extended-MHD equations using a compact representation that is specifically designed to yield efficient high-order-of-accuracy, implicit solutions of a general formulation of the compressible Extended-MHD equations. The representation is based on a triangular finite element with fifth order accuracy that is constructed to have continuous derivatives across element boundaries, allowing its use with systems of equations containing complex spatial derivative operators of up to 4th order. The final set of equations are solved using the parallel sparse direct solver, SuperLU, which makes linear solutions exceptionally efficient, since only a one-time LU decomposition is required. The magnetic and velocity fields are decomposed without loss of generality in in a potential, stream function form. Subsets of the full set of 6 equations describing unreduced compressible extended MHD yield (1) the two variable reduced MHD equations, and (2) the 4-field Fitzpatrick-Porcelli equations. Applications are presented in straight and toroidal geometry showing the accuracy and efficiency of the method in computing highly anisotropic heat conduction, toroidal equilibrium, and the effect of ``two-fluid'' effects on resistive instabilities.

  11. BENCHMARKING FAST-TO-ALFVEN MODE CONVERSION IN A COLD MHD PLASMA. II. HOW TO GET ALFVEN WAVES THROUGH THE SOLAR TRANSITION REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Shelley C.; Cally, Paul S. E-mail: paul.cally@monash.edu

    2012-05-20

    Alfven waves may be difficult to excite at the photosphere due to low-ionization fraction and suffer near-total reflection at the transition region (TR). Yet they are ubiquitous in the corona and heliosphere. To overcome these difficulties, we show that they may instead be generated high in the chromosphere by conversion from reflecting fast magnetohydrodynamic waves, and that Alfvenic TR reflection is greatly reduced if the fast reflection point is within a few scale heights of the TR. The influence of mode conversion on the phase of the reflected fast wave is also explored. This phase can potentially be misinterpreted as a travel speed perturbation with implications for the practical seismic probing of active regions.

  12. MHD Generating system

    DOEpatents

    Petrick, Michael; Pierson, Edward S.; Schreiner, Felix

    1980-01-01

    According to the present invention, coal combustion gas is the primary working fluid and copper or a copper alloy is the electrodynamic fluid in the MHD generator, thereby eliminating the heat exchangers between the combustor and the liquid-metal MHD working fluids, allowing the use of a conventional coalfired steam bottoming plant, and making the plant simpler, more efficient and cheaper. In operation, the gas and liquid are combined in a mixer and the resulting two-phase mixture enters the MHD generator. The MHD generator acts as a turbine and electric generator in one unit wherein the gas expands, drives the liquid across the magnetic field and thus generates electrical power. The gas and liquid are separated, and the available energy in the gas is recovered before the gas is exhausted to the atmosphere. Where the combustion gas contains sulfur, oxygen is bubbled through a side loop to remove sulfur therefrom as a concentrated stream of sulfur dioxide. The combustor is operated substoichiometrically to control the oxide level in the copper.

  13. Disk MHD generator study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Retallick, F. D.

    1980-01-01

    Directly-fired, separately-fired, and oxygen-augmented MHD power plants incorporating a disk geometry for the MHD generator were studied. The base parameters defined for four near-optimum-performance MHD steam power systems of various types are presented. The finally selected systems consisted of (1) two directly fired cases, one at 1920 K (2996F) preheat and the other at 1650 K (2500 F) preheat, (2) a separately-fired case where the air is preheated to the same level as the higher temperature directly-fired cases, and (3) an oxygen augmented case with the same generator inlet temperature of 2839 (4650F) as the high temperature directly-fired and separately-fired cases. Supersonic Mach numbers at the generator inlet, gas inlet swirl, and constant Hall field operation were specified based on disk generator optimization. System pressures were based on optimization of MHD net power. Supercritical reheat stream plants were used in all cases. Open and closed cycle component costs are summarized and compared.

  14. Kinetic effects on global Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical investigation is carried out on the effects of the kinetic particle response on global type shear-Alfven waves in tokamaks. Two kinds of wave-particle interactions have been identified: (1) resonant interaction between energetic circulating particles and high frequency Alfven waves, (2) nonresonant interaction between trapped particles and low frequency modes. The author focuses on gap modes which are discrete modes whose real frequency lies in gas of the Alfven continuum induced by geometrical effects. A new gap mode, the Ellipticity Induced Alfven Eigenmode (EAE), is induced by the ellipticity of the plasma cross section that couples the m and m + 2 poloidal harmonics. This mode is of the general class as the Toroidicity Induced Alfven Eigenmode (TAE). In configurations with finite ellipticity, the EAE (n; m, m + 2) has a global structure centered about the q = (m + 1)/n surface. In the presence of an energetic ion species any Alfven wave can be destabilized via transit resonance with circulating particles. A sufficient stability criterion is derived for energetic particle-Alfven mode. To include the stabilizing effects of the electron and ion Landau damping a general treatment using a newly derived drift kinetic description of each species is carried out. The analysis has been restricted to Alfven gap modes. Low frequency modes have been investigated using the new drift kinetic model. Focusing on the internal kink mode, the main kinetic contributions arises from trapped particles which process in the toroidal direction. The trapped bulk ions can destabilize the high frequency branch of the internal kink. The numerical solution of the dispersion relation shows that a sharp threshold in [beta][sub p] exists for the instability to grow and that stabilizing effects come from the trapped electron response.

  15. Laser-powered MHD generators for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion systems of the pulsed laser-supported detonation (LSD) wave, plasma MHD, and liquid-metal MHD (LMMHD) types are assessed for their potential as space-based laser-to-electrical power converters. These systems offer several advantages as energy converters relative to the present chemical, nuclear, and solar devices, including high conversion efficiency, simple design, high-temperature operation, high power density, and high reliability. Of these systems, the Brayton cycle liquid-metal MHD system appears to be the most attractive. The LMMHD technology base is well established for terrestrial applications, particularly with regard to the generator, mixer, and other system components. However, further research is required to extend this technology base to space applications and to establish the technology required to couple the laser energy into the system most efficiently. Continued research on each of the three system types is recommended.

  16. THE EFFECT OF A TWISTED MAGNETIC FIELD ON THE PERIOD RATIO P{sub 1}/P{sub 2} OF NONAXISYMMETRIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Karami, K.; Bahari, K. E-mail: K.Bahari@razi.ac.ir

    2012-10-01

    We consider nonaxisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in a zero-beta cylindrical compressible thin magnetic flux tube modeled as a twisted core surrounded by a magnetically twisted annulus, with both embedded in a straight ambient external field. The dispersion relation is derived and solved analytically and numerically to obtain the frequencies of the nonaxisymmetric MHD waves. The main result is that the twisted magnetic annulus does affect the period ratio P{sub 1}/P{sub 2} of the kink modes. For the kink modes, the magnetic twist in the annulus region can achieve deviations from P{sub 1}/P{sub 2} = 2 of the same order of magnitude as in the observations. Furthermore, the effect of the internal twist on the fluting modes is investigated.

  17. Symmetry, Statistics and Structure in MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2007-01-01

    Here, we examine homogeneous MHD turbulence in terms of truncated Fourier series. The ideal MHD equations and the associated statistical theory of absolute equilibrium ensembles are symmetric under P, C and T. However, the presence of invariant helicities, which are pseudoscalars under P and C, dynamically breaks this symmetry. This occurs because the surface of constant energy in phase space has disjoint parts, called components: while ensemble averages are taken over all components, a dynamical phase trajectory is confined to only one component. As the Birkhoff-Khinchin theorem tells us, ideal MHD turbulence is thus non-ergodic. This non-ergodicity manifests itself in low-wave number Fourier modes that have large mean values (while absolute ensemble theory predicts mean values of zero). Therefore, we have coherent structure in ideal MHD turbulence. The level of non-ergodicity and amount of energy contained in the associated coherent structure depends on the values of the helicities, as well as on the presence, or not, of a mean magnetic field and/or overall rotation. In addition to the well known cross and magnetic helicities, we also present a new invariant, which we call the parallel helicity, since it occurs when mean field and rotation axis are aligned. The question of applicability of these results to real (i.e., dissipative) MHD turbulence is also examined. Several long-time numerical simulations on a 64(exp 3) grid are given as examples. It is seen that coherent structure begins to form before decay dominates over nonlinearity. The connection of these results with inverse spectral cascades, selective decay, and magnetic dynamos is also discussed.

  18. Relativistic MHD simulations of stellar core collapse and magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, José A.; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; Gabler, Michael; Müller, Ewald; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2011-02-01

    We present results from simulations of magneto-rotational stellar core collapse along with Alfvén oscillations in magnetars. These simulations are performed with the CoCoA/CoCoNuT code, which is able to handle ideal MHD flows in dynamical spacetimes in general relativity. Our core collapse simulations highlight the importance of genuine magnetic effects, like the magneto-rotational instability, for the dynamics of the flow. For the modelling of magnetars we use the anelastic approximation to general relativistic MHD, which allows for an effective suppression of fluid modes and an accurate description of Alfvén waves. We further compute Alfvén oscillation frequencies along individual magnetic field lines with a semi-analytic approach. Our work confirms previous results based on perturbative approaches regarding the existence of two families of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), with harmonics at integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. Additional material is presented in the accompanying contribution by Gabler et al (2010b) in these proceedings.

  19. Effects of simulated heat waves on ApoE-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunling; Zhang, Shuyu; Tian, Ying; Wang, Baojian; Shen, Shuanghe

    2014-02-01

    The effects of simulated heat waves on body weight, body temperature, and biomarkers of cardiac function in ApoE-/- mice were investigated. Heat waves were simulated in a meteorological environment simulation chamber according to data from a heat wave that occurred in July 2001 in Nanjing, China. Eighteen ApoE-/- mice were divided into control group, heat wave group, and heat wave BH4 group. Mice in the heat wave and BH4 groups were exposed to simulated heat waves in the simulation chamber. Mice in BH4 group were treated with gastric lavage with BH4 2 h prior to heat wave exposure. Results showed that the heat waves did not significantly affect body weight or ET-1 levels. However, mice in the heat wave group had significantly higher rectal temperature and NO level and lower SOD activity compared with mice in the control group (p < 0.01), indicating that heat wave had negative effects on cardiac function in ApoE-/- mice. Gastric lavage with BH4 prior to heat wave exposure significantly reduced heat wave-induced increases in rectal temperature and decreases in SOD activity. Additionally, pretreatment with BH4 further increased NO level in plasma. Collectively, these beneficial effects demonstrate that BH4 may potentially mitigate the risk of coronary heart disease in mice under heat wave exposure. These results may be useful when studying the effects of heat waves on humans. PMID:24477215

  20. Effective p -wave interaction and topological superfluids in s -wave quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Zheng, Zhen; Pu, Han; Zou, Xubo; Guo, Guangcan

    2016-03-01

    p -wave interaction in cold atoms may give rise to exotic topological superfluids. However, the realization of p -wave interaction in a cold atom system is experimentally challenging. Here we propose a simple scheme to synthesize effective p -wave interaction in conventional s -wave interacting quantum gases. The key idea is to load atoms into a spin-dependent optical lattice potential. Using two concrete examples involving spin-1/2 fermions, we show how the original system can be mapped into a model describing spinless fermions with nearest-neighbor p -wave interaction, whose ground state can be a topological superfluid that supports Majorana fermions under proper conditions. Our proposal has the advantage that it does not require spin-orbit coupling or loading atoms onto higher orbitals, which is the key in earlier proposals to synthesize effective p -wave interaction in s -wave quantum gases, and may provide a completely new route for realizing p -wave topological superfluids.

  1. Joule heating effects on MHD mixed convection of a Jeffrey fluid over a stretching sheet with power law heat flux: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, D. Harish; Narayana, P. V. Satya

    2016-08-01

    An analysis has been carried out to study the Joule heating effect on MHD heat transfer of an incompressible Jeffrey fluid due to a stretching porous sheet with power law heat flux and heat source. A constant magnetic field is applied normal to the stretching surface. The basic governing equations are reduced into the coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using similarity transformations. The resulting equations are then solved numerically by shooting method with fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme. The effects of various physical parameters entering into the problem on dimensionless velocity and temperature distribution are discussed through graphs and tables. The results reveal that the momentum and thermal boundary layer thickness are significantly influenced by Deborah number (β), ratio of relaxation and retardation times parameter (λ), heat generation parameter (β*), Eckert number (Ec) and magnetic field parameter (M). A comparison with the previously published works shows excellent agreement.

  2. Conjugate Effects of Heat and Mass Transfer on MHD Free Convection Flow over an Inclined Plate Embedded in a Porous Medium

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Farhad; Khan, Ilyas; Samiulhaq; Shafie, Sharidan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present an exact analysis of combined effects of radiation and chemical reaction on the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) free convection flow of an electrically conducting incompressible viscous fluid over an inclined plate embedded in a porous medium. The impulsively started plate with variable temperature and mass diffusion is considered. The dimensionless momentum equation coupled with the energy and mass diffusion equations are analytically solved using the Laplace transform method. Expressions for velocity, temperature and concentration fields are obtained. They satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions and can be reduced, as special cases, to some known solutions from the literature. Expressions for skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are also obtained. Finally, the effects of pertinent parameters on velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are graphically displayed whereas the variations in skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are shown through tables. PMID:23840321

  3. A three-dimensional MHD simulation analysis of the origin of the slow solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washimi, H.; Zank, G. P.; Hu, Q.; Nakamizo, A.; Tanaka, T.; Kojima, M.; Kubo, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a 3D MHD simulation model for the study of the solar-wind acceleration mechanism and for reproducing a realistic configuration of solar wind plasma by using observed photospheric magnetic field at each Carrington rotation cycle. Using an unstructured mesh coordinate system on spherical surface with fine spacing in radial direction, we aim to reproduce a wide range of solar-wind plasma configuration from the photosphere to 1AU. We have incorporated external source terms into the momentum and energy equations in our MHD simulation. The energy source term consists of two volumetric heating functions: one is a new term, as a new development from our original model (Nakamizo et al. JGR 114, A07109, 2009), for the heating in a very narrow region around the transition region. The other one is an additional heating source which probably comes from some nonlinear wave phenomena which are effective over a radial distance of an order of the solar radius in the corona. The Spitzer-type thermal conduction term is also taken into account. The momentum source term is given in a form similar to that of the nonlinear wave heating function noted above. Using this MHD simulation system, we will study the origin of the slow solar wind from nearby regions of some isolated active regions during CR1900-CR1913 in some details.

  4. Proceedings of the workshop on nonlinear MHD and extended MHD

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    Nonlinear MHD simulations have proven their value in interpreting experimental results over the years. As magnetic fusion experiments reach higher performance regimes, more sophisticated experimental diagnostics coupled with ever expanding computer capabilities have increased both the need for and the feasibility of nonlinear global simulations using models more realistic than regular ideal and resistive MHD. Such extended-MHD nonlinear simulations have already begun to produce useful results. These studies are expected to lead to ever more comprehensive simulation models in the future and to play a vital role in fully understanding fusion plasmas. Topics include the following: (1) current state of nonlinear MHD and extended-MHD simulations; (2) comparisons to experimental data; (3) discussions between experimentalists and theorists; (4) /equations for extended-MHD models, kinetic-based closures; and (5) paths toward more comprehensive simulation models, etc. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  5. Collisionless Reconnection with Weak Slow Shocks Under Anisotropic MHD Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, K.; Hoshino, M.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection accompanied by a pair of slow-mode shock waves, known as Petschek's theory, has been widely studied as an efficient mechanism to convert magnetically stored energy to thermal and/or kinetic energy in plasmas. Satellite observations in the Earth's magnetotail, on the other hand, report that the detection of slow shocks is rare compared with the theory. As an important step to bridge the gap between the observational fact and the Petschek-type reconnection, we performed one- and two- dimensional collisionless magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of magnetic reconnection paying special attention to the effect of temperature anisotropy. In high-beta plasmas such as a plasma sheet in the magnetotail, it is expected that even weak temperature anisotropy can greatly modify the dynamics. We demonstrate that the slow shocks do exist in the reconnection layer even under the anisotropic temperature. The resultant shocks, however, are weaker than those in isotropic MHD in terms of plasma compression. In addition, the amount of magnetic energy released across the shock is extremely small, that is, the shock is no longer switch-off type. In spite of the weakness of the shocks, the reconnection rates measured by the inflow velocities are kept at the same level as the isotropic cases. Once the slow shock forms, the downstream plasma is heated in highly anisotropic manner, and the firehose-sense anisotropy affects the wave structure in the system. In particular, it is remarkable that the sequential order of propagation of slow shocks and rotational discontinuities reverses depending upon the magnitude of a superposed guide field. Our result is consistent with the rareness of the slow shock detection in the magnetotail, and implies that shocks do not necessarily play an important role. Furthermore, a variety of wave structure of a reconnection layer shown here will help interpretation of observational data in collisionless reconnection.

  6. Simulating solar MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüssler, M.

    1999-05-01

    Two aspects of solar MHD are discussed in relation to the work of the MHD simulation group at KIS. Photospheric magneto-convection, the nonlinear interaction of magnetic field and convection in a strongly stratified, radiating fluid, is a key process of general astrophysical relevance. Comprehensive numerical simulations including radiative transfer have significantly improved our understanding of the processes and have become an important tool for the interpretation of observational data. Examples of field intensification in the solar photosphere ('convective collapse') are shown. The second line of research is concerned with the dynamics of flux tubes in the convection zone, which has far-reaching implications for our understanding of the solar dynamo. Simulations indicate that the field strength in the region where the flux is stored before erupting to form sunspot groups is of the order of 105 G, an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates based on equipartition with the kinetic energy of convective flows.

  7. Very low frequency and ELF effects in the upper ionosphere caused by large-scale acoustic waves in the lower ionosphere observed from AUREOL-3 satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galperin, Y. I.; Gladyshev, V. A.; Jorjio, N. V.; Kovrazhkin, R. A.; Lissakov, Y. V.; Maslov, V. D.; Nikolaenko, L. M.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Molchanov, O. A.; Mogilevsky, M. M.

    The active MASSA experiment studied the effects generated in the upper atmosphere and in the magnetosphere by a large-scale acoustic wave from a chemical explosion reaching ionospheric altitudes. The AUREOL-3 satellite crossed the corresponding magnetic force tubes by the time of the development of the electromagnetic processes expected in the lower ionosphere E-region above the explosion. Measurements reveal electromagnetic effects in the ionospheric and magnetospheric plasmas. Effects include nearly electrostatic ELF and VLF noises in the magnetic force tube based on the E-layer ionosphere above the explosion. Their area expands with a velocity of 0.6 km/sec, i.e., as of an acoustic wave in the lower ionosphere. An intense MHD wave is detected at L = 1.31, equatorwards from the explosion L-shell (L = 1.5).

  8. Evaluation of the Effects of Ketoconazole and Voriconazole on the Pharmacokinetics of Oxcarbazepine and Its Main Metabolite MHD in Rats by UPLC-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinxin; Gu, Ermin; Wang, Shuanghu; Zheng, Xiang; Chen, Mengchun; Wang, Li; Hu, Guoxin; Cai, Jian-ping; Zhou, Hongyu

    2016-03-01

    Oxcarbazepine (OXC), a second-generation antiepileptic drug, undergoes rapid reduction with formation of the active metabolite 10,11-dihydro-10-hydroxy-carbazepine (MHD) in vivo. In this study, a method for simultaneous determination of OXC and MHD in rat plasma using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS-MS) was developed and validated. Under given chromatographic conditions, OXC, MHD and internal standard diazepam were separated well and quantified by electrospray positive ionization mass spectrometry in the multiple reaction monitoring transitions mode. The method validation demonstrated good linearity over the range of 10-2,000 ng/mL for OXC and 5-1,000 ng/mL for MHD. The lower limit of quantification was 5 ng/mL for OXC and 2.5 ng/mL for MHD, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the evaluation of the pharmacokinetics of OXC and MHD in rats, with or without pretreatment by ketoconazole (KET) and voriconazole (VOR). Statistics indicated that KET and VOR significantly affected the disposition of OXC and MHD in vivo, whereas VOR predominantly interfered with the disposition of MHD. This method is suitable for pharmacokinetic study in small animals. PMID:26499119

  9. Coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on traveling bacterial waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Bouwer, Edward J.; Hilpert, Markus

    2014-08-01

    Traveling bacterial waves are capable of improving contaminant remediation in the subsurface. It is fairly well understood how bacterial chemotaxis and growth separately affect the formation and propagation of such waves. However, their interaction is not well understood. We therefore perform a modeling study to investigate the coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on bacterial migration, and examine their effects on contaminant remediation. We study the waves by using different initial electron acceptor concentrations for different bacteria and substrate systems. Three types of traveling waves can occur: a chemotactic wave due to the biased movement of chemotactic bacteria resulting from metabolism-generated substrate concentration gradients; a growth/decay/motility wave due to a dynamic equilibrium between bacterial growth, decay and random motility; and an integrated wave due to the interaction between bacterial chemotaxis and growth. Chemotaxis hardly enhances the bacterial propagation if it is too weak to form a chemotactic wave or its wave speed is less than half of the growth/decay/motility wave speed. However, chemotaxis significantly accelerates bacterial propagation once its wave speed exceeds the growth/decay/motility wave speed. When convection occurs, it speeds up the growth/decay/motility wave but slows down or even eliminates the chemotactic wave due to the dispersion. Bacterial survival proves particularly important for bacterial propagation. Therefore we develop a conceptual model to estimate the speed of growth/decay/motility waves.

  10. Coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on traveling bacterial waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Z.; Hilpert, M.; Bouwer, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Traveling bacterial waves are capable of improving contaminant remediation in the subsurface. It is fairly well understood how bacterial chemotaxis and growth separately affect the formation and propagation of such waves. However, their interaction is not well understood. We therefore perform a modeling study to investigate the coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on bacterial migration, and examine their effects on contaminant remediation. We study the waves by using different initial electron acceptor concentrations for different bacteria and substrate systems. Three types of traveling waves can occur: a chemotactic wave due to the biased movement of chemotactic bacteria resulting from metabolism-generated substrate concentration gradients; a growth/decay/motility wave due to a dynamic equilibrium between bacterial growth, decay and random motility; and an integrated wave due to the interaction between bacterial chemotaxis and growth. Chemotaxis hardly enhances the bacterial propagation if it is too weak to form a chemotactic wave or its wave speed is less than half of the growth/decay/motility wave speed. However, chemotaxis significantly accelerates bacterial propagation once its wave speed exceeds the growth/decay/motility wave speed. When convection occurs, it speeds up the growth/decay/motility wave but slows down or even eliminates the chemotactic wave due to the dispersion. Bacterial survival proves particularly important for bacterial propagation. Therefore we develop a conceptual model to estimate the speed of growth/decay/motility waves.

  11. Kinetic analysis of MHD ballooning modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.; Cheng, C.Z.; Chance, M.S.

    1984-10-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the stability properties of the appropriate kinetically generalized form of MHD ballooning modes together with the usual trapped-particle drift modes is presented. The calculations are fully electromagnetic and include the complete dynamics associated with compressional ion acoustic waves. Trapped-particle effects along with all forms of collisionless dissipation are taken into account without approximations. The influence of collisions is estimated with a model Krook operator. Results from the application of this analysis to realistic tokamak operating conditions indicate that unstable short-wavelength modes with significant growth rates can extend from ..beta.. = 0 to value above the upper ideal-MHD-critical-beta associated with the so-called second stability regime. Since the strength of the relevant modes appears to vary gradually with ..beta.., these results support a soft beta limit picture involving a continuous (rather than abrupt or hard) modification of anomalous transport already present in low-..beta..-tokamaks. However, at higher beta the increasing dominance of the electromagnetic component of the perturbations indicated by these calculations could also imply significantly different transport scaling properties.

  12. Mirror force induced wave dispersion in Alfvén waves

    SciTech Connect

    Damiano, P. A.; Johnson, J. R.

    2013-06-15

    Recent hybrid MHD-kinetic electron simulations of global scale standing shear Alfvén waves along the Earth's closed dipolar magnetic field lines show that the upward parallel current region within these waves saturates and broadens perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field and that this broadening increases with the electron temperature. Using resistive MHD simulations, with a parallel Ohm's law derived from the linear Knight relation (which expresses the current-voltage relationship along an auroral field line), we explore the nature of this broadening in the context of the increased perpendicular Poynting flux resulting from the increased parallel electric field associated with mirror force effects. This increased Poynting flux facilitates wave energy dispersion across field lines which in-turn allows for electron acceleration to carry the field aligned current on adjacent field lines. This mirror force driven dispersion can dominate over that associated with electron inertial effects for global scale waves.

  13. MHD Turbulence through the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veltri, P.

    Velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in a wide range of space and time scales have been directly detected in the interplanetary medium In the solar corona the presence of MHD turbulence is naturally generated by the mechanical and magnetic energy input from the photosphere and it could be related to coronal heating as well as to energy release events like micro and nanoflares A certain amount of fluctuations from the solar corona arrives in the solar wind mainly as Alfvénic turbulence i e strongly correlated velocity and magnetic field fluctuations with a very low level of compressible density magnetic field intensity temperature fluctuations The whole system formed by the solar corona and the solar wind represents a sort of wind tunnel extremely useful to study the MHD turbulence properties The presence of magnetic turbulence in the heliosphere is identified as the source of charged particle collisionless diffusion which according the values of parameters like the energy level on magnetic fluctuations or the turbulence correlation length can display both a normal gaussian random walk and an anomalous subdiffusive or super diffusive behavior The former case is obtained in a situation of global stochasticity high level of fluctuation energy while the latter in a situation of weak chaos low level of fluctuation energy The talk will discuss turbulence generation at photospheric level its propagation and its interaction with heliospheric structures and its effects on anomalous transport processes of charged

  14. Effect of cavitation on spherical blast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.

    1984-09-01

    For spherical blast waves propagating through a self-gravitating gas with an energy input Eα = E0tβ, where Eα is the energy released up to time t, E0 is a functional constant, and β is a constant, kinetic, internal heat, and gravitational potential energies have been computed. Taking the parameter A2, which characterises the gravitational field, equal to 2, variations of the percentages of these energies for β = 0, 1/2, 4/3, and 3 with shock strength have been presented. For β = 3, the effect of cavitation on the percentages of kinetic energy and internal heat energies has been explored.

  15. About MHD heating of plasmaspheric and ionospheric plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, V. A.; Buechner, J.; Kirchner, T.

    In recent years, the possibility has been considered to provide supplementary MHD heating to a Tokamak plasma on the basis of an approach involving resonant mode conversion of a magnetosonic wave into a kinetic Alfven wave. The present paper has the objective to study Alfven resonance heating under magnetospheric conditions. The conducted investigation takes into account the damping of an Alfven wave in the ionosphere, a phenomenon, which has not been considered in some previous studies. The employed model is not restricted to the consideration of an approximation of the plasma density by a linear profile, and arbitrary, smooth characteristics are contemplated. The employed model of the magnetosphere corresponds to the model described by Southwood (1974). The rate of energy dissipation at the point of Alfven resonance is calculated, and Joule heating of the ionosphere caused by dissipation of resonant Alfven waves is estimated. MHD waves of sufficient intensity can induce anomalous heating of plasmaspheric particles near the point of resonance.

  16. Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD-spectroscopic observations of resistive wall mode stability in DIII-D plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, F. Hanson, J. M.; Navratil, G. A.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2015-02-15

    Experiments conducted at DIII-D investigate the role of drift kinetic damping and fast neutral beam injection (NBI)-ions in the approach to the no-wall β{sub N} limit. Modelling results show that the drift kinetic effects are significant and necessary to reproduce the measured plasma response at the ideal no-wall limit. Fast neutral-beam ions and rotation play important roles and are crucial to quantitatively match the experiment. In this paper, we report on the model validation of a series of plasmas with increasing β{sub N}, where the plasma stability is probed by active magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) spectroscopy. The response of the plasma to an externally applied field is used to probe the stable side of the resistive wall mode and obtain an indication of the proximity of the equilibrium to an instability limit. We describe the comparison between the measured plasma response and that calculated by means of the drift kinetic MARS-K code [Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], which includes the toroidal rotation, the electron and ion drift-kinetic resonances, and the presence of fast particles for the modelled plasmas. The inclusion of kinetic effects allows the code to reproduce the experimental results within ∼13% for both the amplitude and phase of the plasma response, which is a significant improvement with respect to the undamped MHD-only model. The presence of fast NBI-generated ions is necessary to obtain the low response at the highest β{sub N} levels (∼90% of the ideal no-wall limit). The toroidal rotation has an impact on the results, and a sensitivity study shows that a large variation in the predicted response is caused by the details of the rotation profiles at high β{sub N}.

  17. Wave and Wind Effects on Inlet Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raubenheimer, B.; Wargula, A.; Orescanin, M. M.; Hopkins, J.; Elgar, S.

    2014-12-01

    Observations and numerical simulations of the water circulation and morphological change in two separate, well-mixed inlets will be compared with each other. Tides, winds, waves, and currents were measured from May 1 to 28, 2012 in and near New River Inlet, NC. Offshore significant wave heights were 0 to 3 m, and wind speeds ranged from 0 to 16 m/s. The long, narrow inlet is about 1000 m wide where it opens onto the ebb shoal, narrows to 100 m wide about 1000 m inland, and connects to the Intracoastal Waterway (which connects to additional ocean inlets about 12 and 36 km north and south, respectively) about 3000 m inland. Tides in the inlet are progressive and inlet flows are in phase with water depths. Measurements also were collected during the summers of 2011-2014, including during Hurricanes Irene and Sandy (offshore significant wave heights > 5 m and winds > 15 m/s), in Katama Bay, MA, which connects to Vineyard Sound via Edgartown Channel and to the Atlantic Ocean via Katama Inlet. During this period, Katama Inlet migrated east about 1000 m, narrowed from 400 to 100 m wide, changed depth from 7 to 2 m, and lengthened from 200 to 1000 m. Tidal flows in Katama Inlet are forced by sea level gradients resulting from the 3-hr phase lag between tides in Vineyard Sound and the Atlantic Ocean. Analyses of the momentum balances suggest that waves drive flows into the mouths of the inlets during storms. The timing of the storms relative to ebb and flood, and wind effects, may affect the discharge and sediment transport through the inlet. Winds and waves also drive alongshore flows on the ebb shoals. Lateral flows at bends in New River Inlet, which may be important to the along-inlet transfer of momentum and to mixing, are affected by winds. The importance of connections to additional inlets in multi-inlet systems will be discussed. Funded by ONR, ASD(R&E), NSF, Sea Grant, and NDSEG.

  18. Broken Ergodicity in MHD Turbulence in a Spherical Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.; wang, Yifan

    2011-01-01

    Broken ergodicity (BE) occurs in Fourier method numerical simulations of ideal, homogeneous, incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Although naive statistical theory predicts that Fourier coefficients of fluid velocity and magnetic field are zero-mean random variables, numerical simulations clearly show that low-wave-number coefficients have non-zero mean values that can be very large compared to the associated standard deviation. In other words, large-scale coherent structure (i.e., broken ergodicity) in homogeneous MHD turbulence can spontaneously grow out of random initial conditions. Eigenanalysis of the modal covariance matrices in the probability density functions of ideal statistical theory leads to a theoretical explanation of observed BE in homogeneous MHD turbulence. Since dissipation is minimal at the largest scales, BE is also relevant for resistive magnetofluids, as evidenced in numerical simulations. Here, we move beyond model magnetofluids confined by periodic boxes to examine BE in rotating magnetofluids in spherical domains using spherical harmonic expansions along with suitable boundary conditions. We present theoretical results for 3-D and 2-D spherical models and also present computational results from dynamical simulations of 2-D MHD turbulence on a rotating spherical surface. MHD turbulence on a 2-D sphere is affected by Coriolus forces, while MHD turbulence on a 2-D plane is not, so that 2-D spherical models are a useful (and simpler) intermediate stage on the path to understanding the much more complex 3-D spherical case.

  19. Treatment of MHD turbulence with non-equipartition and anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ye; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2005-11-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) turbulence theory, often employed satisfactorily in astrophysical applications, has often focused on parameter ranges that imply nearly equal values of kinetic and magnetic energies and length scales. However, MHD flow may have disparity magnetic Prandtl number, dissimilar kinetic and magnetic Reynolds number, different kinetic and magnetic outer length scales, and strong anisotropy. Here we discuss a phenomenology for such ``non-equipartitioned'' MHD flow. We suggest two conditions for a MHD flow to transition to strong turbulent flow, extensions of (i) Taylor's constant flux in an inertial range, and (ii) Kolmogorov's scale separation between the large and small scale boundaries of an inertial range. For this analysis, the detailed information on turbulence structure is not needed. These two conditions for MHD transition are expected to provide consistent predictions and should be applicable to anisotropic MHD flows, after the length scales are replaced by their corresponding perpendicular components. Second, we point out that the dynamics and anisotropy of MHD fluctuations is controlled by the relative strength between the straining effects between eddies of similar size and the sweeping action by the large-eddies, or propagation effect of the large-scale magnetic fields, on the small scales, and analysis of this balance in principle also requires consideration of non-equipartition effects.

  20. MHD Ballooning Instability in the Plasma Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    C.Z. Cheng; S. Zaharia

    2003-10-20

    Based on the ideal-MHD model the stability of ballooning modes is investigated by employing realistic 3D magnetospheric equilibria, in particular for the substorm growth phase. Previous MHD ballooning stability calculations making use of approximations on the plasma compressibility can give rise to erroneous conclusions. Our results show that without making approximations on the plasma compressibility the MHD ballooning modes are unstable for the entire plasma sheet where beta (sub)eq is greater than or equal to 1, and the most unstable modes are located in the strong cross-tail current sheet region in the near-Earth plasma sheet, which maps to the initial brightening location of the breakup arc in the ionosphere. However, the MHD beq threshold is too low in comparison with observations by AMPTE/CCE at X = -(8 - 9)R(sub)E, which show that a low-frequency instability is excited only when beq increases over 50. The difficulty is mitigated by considering the kinetic effects of ion gyrorad ii and trapped electron dynamics, which can greatly increase the stabilizing effects of field line tension and thus enhance the beta(sub)eq threshold [Cheng and Lui, 1998]. The consequence is to reduce the equatorial region of the unstable ballooning modes to the strong cross-tail current sheet region where the free energy associated with the plasma pressure gradient and magnetic field curvature is maximum.

  1. Stratification effects on nonlinear elastic surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, D. F.

    1988-01-01

    On a homogeneous elastic half-space, linear surface waves are nondispersive. In each direction, waves having any profile travel without distortion. Nonlinearity causes intermodulation between the various wavelengths so that the signal distorts. Even when nonlinearity is small, sinusoidal profiles do not remain approximately sinusoidal. The absence of dispersion means that profiles suffer cumulative distortion, until the surface slope and strain become locally unbounded. Although this behaviour is typical of many signals, there are some signals for which intermodulation is constructive. These signals can travel coherently over large distances. For seismological applications, it is important to study the effects due to stratification. Dependence of the material constants on depth modifies the nonlinear evolution equations previously derived for homogeneous media. It has a smaller effect on higher frequencies than on lower frequencies. An approximate theory for short wavelength (high frequency) signals is introduced. Calculations show that when nonlinearity is no more important than dispersion, initially sinusoidal profiles propagate with surface slope remaining finite. When dispersion is small compared to nonlinearity, certain sharp peaked profiles can travel large distances while suffering little distortion.

  2. Non-Adiabatic MHD Modes in Periodic Magnetic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nagendra; Kumar, Anil

    High-resolution satellite observations reveal that many solar features such as penumbra and plume regions possess the structures with alternating properties. So we study the joint effect of periodic alternation of magnetic slabs and thermal mechanisms on the propagation of MHD waves. We consider a perfectly conducting fluid permeated by a magnetic field having the peri-odicity along x-axis and constant direction along z-axis. We suppose that the medium consists of alternating slabs of strong and weak homogeneous magnetic field with a sharp discontinuity at the boundary. The inclusion of non-adiabatic effects modifies the energy equation in which the thermal mechanisms (radiation, heating and thermal conduction) are added. The gravi-tational effects are negligible because wavelengths are assumed to be much smaller than the gravitational scale height. The dispersion relations for the surface and body modes are derived and analyzed in the limiting cases of thin and thick slabs. The dispersion curves depend upon the Bloch's wavenumber due to the periodicity in magnetic field. We have examined the be-havior of dispersion curves for different values of slab width ratio and Bloch's wavenumber as a function of dimensionless wavelength. It is shown that the width of structures influences the propagation speed of waves. Our results might be useful in understanding the wave propagation in plume regions, photosphere and spaghetti structures in solar wind.

  3. The blast wave mitigation effects of a magnetogasdynamic decelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, Roy S; Lundgren, Ronald G; Tucker, Don H

    2009-01-01

    This work computes shock wave jump functions for viscous blast waves propagating in a magnetogasdynamic decelerator. The decelerator is assumed to be a one-dimensional channel with sides that are perfect conductors. An electric field applied on the walls of the channel produces a magnetogasdynamic pump, which decelerates the flow field induced by a blast wave. The blast wave jump functions computed here are compared to magnetogasdynamic results for steady supersonic channel flow to quantify potential blast mitigation effects. Theoretical shock wave jump functions are also presented for inviscid blast waves propagating in a one-dimensional channel with an electromagnetic field.

  4. MHD turbulence model for global simulations of the solar wind and SEP acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Igor V.; Roussev, Ilia I.

    2008-08-25

    The aim of the present work is to unify the various transport equations for turbulent waves that are used in different areas of space physics. We mostly focus on the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, in particular the Alfvenic turbulence.

  5. Fully implicit adaptive mesh refinement MHD algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Bobby

    2005-10-01

    In the macroscopic simulation of plasmas, the numerical modeler is faced with the challenge of dealing with multiple time and length scales. The former results in stiffness due to the presence of very fast waves. The latter requires one to resolve the localized features that the system develops. Traditional approaches based on explicit time integration techniques and fixed meshes are not suitable for this challenge, as such approaches prevent the modeler from using realistic plasma parameters to keep the computation feasible. We propose here a novel approach, based on implicit methods and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). Our emphasis is on both accuracy and scalability with the number of degrees of freedom. To our knowledge, a scalable, fully implicit AMR algorithm has not been accomplished before for MHD. As a proof-of-principle, we focus on the reduced resistive MHD model as a basic MHD model paradigm, which is truly multiscale. The approach taken here is to adapt mature physics-based technologyootnotetextL. Chac'on et al., J. Comput. Phys. 178 (1), 15- 36 (2002) to AMR grids, and employ AMR-aware multilevel techniques (such as fast adaptive composite --FAC-- algorithms) for scalability. We will demonstrate that the concept is indeed feasible, featuring optimal scalability under grid refinement. Results of fully-implicit, dynamically-adaptive AMR simulations will be presented on a variety of problems.

  6. MHD aspects of fire-hose type instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Hau, L.

    2003-12-01

    In a homogeneous anisotropic plasma the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Alfvén wave may become unstable for p∥ > pperpendicular to + B2/μ 0. Recently a new type of fire-hose instability is found by Hellinger and Matsumoto [2000] that has maximum growth rate occurring for oblique propagation and may grow faster than the Alfvén mode. This new mode is compressional and may be more efficient at destroying pressure anisotropy than the standard fire hose. In this study we examines the fire-hose type (p∥ > pperpendicular to ) instabilities based on the linear and nonlinear double-polytropic MHD theory. It is shown that there exist two types of MHD fire-hose instabilities associated with the intermediate and slow modes, respectively, and with suitable choice of polytropic exponents the linear instability criteria become the same as those based on the Vlasov theory in the hydromagnetic limit. Moreover, the properties of the nonlinear MHD fire-hose instabilities are found to have great similarities with those obtained from the kinetic theory and hybrid simulation. In particular, the classical fire-hose instability evolves toward the linear fire-hose stability threshold while the nonlinear marginal stability associated with the new fire hose is well below the condition of β ∥ - β perpendicular to = 2 but complies with less stringent linear stability threshold for MHD slow-mode wave.

  7. Effect of Resolution on Propagating Detonation Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2014-07-10

    Simulations of the cylinder test are used to illustrate the effect of mesh resolution on a propagating detonation wave. For this study we use the xRage code with the SURF burn model for PBX 9501. The adaptive mesh capability of xRage is used to vary the resolution of the reaction zone. We focus on two key properties: the detonation speed and the cylinder wall velocity. The latter is related to the release isentrope behind the detonation wave. As the reaction zone is refined (2 to 15 cells for cell size of 62 to 8μm), both the detonation speed and final wall velocity change by a small amount; less than 1 per cent. The detonation speed decreases with coarser resolution. Even when the reaction zone is grossly under-resolved (cell size twice the reaction-zone width of the burn model) the wall velocity is within a per cent and the detonation speed is low by only 2 per cent.

  8. Output from MHD Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahakis, Nektarios

    2010-03-01

    Outflows emanating from the environment of stellar or galactic objects are a widespread phenomenon in astrophysics. Their morphology ranges from nearly spherically symmetric winds to highly collimated jets. In some cases, e.g., in jets associated with young stellar objects, the bulk outflow speeds are nonrelativistic, while in others, e.g., in jets associated with active galactic nuclei or gamma-ray bursts, it can even be highly relativistic. The main driving mechanism of collimated outflows is likely related to magnetic fields. These fields are able to tap the rotational energy of the compact object or disk, accelerate, and collimate matter ejecta. To zeroth order these outflows can be described by the highly intractable theory of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Even in systems where the assumptions of zero resistivity (ideal MHD), steady state, axisymmetry, one fluid description, and polytropic equation of state are applicable, the problem remains difficult. In this case the problem reduces to only two equations, corresponding to the two components of the momentum equation along the flow and in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field (transfield direction). The latter equation is the most difficult to solve, but also the most important. It answers the question on the degree of the collimation, but also crucially affects the solution of the first, the acceleration efficiency and the bulk velocity of the flow. The first and second parts of this chapter refer to nonrelativistic and relativistic flows, respectively. These Parts can be read independently. In each one, the governing equations are presented and discussed, focusing on the case of flows that are magnetically dominated near the central source. The general characteristics of the solutions in relation to the acceleration and collimation mechanisms are analyzed. As specific examples of exact solutions of the full system of the MHD equations that satisfy all the analyzed general characteristics, self

  9. Numerical modeling of the effects of wave energy converter characteristics on nearshore wave conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chang, G.; Ruehl, K.; Jones, C. A.; Roberts, J.; Chartrand, C.

    2015-12-24

    Modeled nearshore wave propagation was investigated downstream of simulated wave energy converters (WECs) to evaluate overall near- and far-field effects of WEC arrays. Model sensitivity to WEC characteristics and WEC array deployment scenarios was evaluated using a modified version of an industry standard wave model, Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), which allows the incorporation of device-specific WEC characteristics to specify obstacle transmission. The sensitivity study illustrated that WEC device type and subsequently its size directly resulted in wave height variations in the lee of the WEC array. Wave heights decreased up to 30% between modeled scenarios with and without WECs formore » large arrays (100 devices) of relatively sizable devices (26 m in diameter) with peak power generation near to the modeled incident wave height. Other WEC types resulted in less than 15% differences in modeled wave height with and without WECs, with lesser influence for WECs less than 10 m in diameter. Wave directions and periods were largely insensitive to changes in parameters. Furthermore, additional model parameterization and analysis are required to fully explore the model sensitivity of peak wave period and mean wave direction to the varying of the parameters.« less

  10. Numerical modeling of the effects of wave energy converter characteristics on nearshore wave conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, G.; Ruehl, K.; Jones, C. A.; Roberts, J.; Chartrand, C.

    2015-12-24

    Modeled nearshore wave propagation was investigated downstream of simulated wave energy converters (WECs) to evaluate overall near- and far-field effects of WEC arrays. Model sensitivity to WEC characteristics and WEC array deployment scenarios was evaluated using a modified version of an industry standard wave model, Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), which allows the incorporation of device-specific WEC characteristics to specify obstacle transmission. The sensitivity study illustrated that WEC device type and subsequently its size directly resulted in wave height variations in the lee of the WEC array. Wave heights decreased up to 30% between modeled scenarios with and without WECs for large arrays (100 devices) of relatively sizable devices (26 m in diameter) with peak power generation near to the modeled incident wave height. Other WEC types resulted in less than 15% differences in modeled wave height with and without WECs, with lesser influence for WECs less than 10 m in diameter. Wave directions and periods were largely insensitive to changes in parameters. Furthermore, additional model parameterization and analysis are required to fully explore the model sensitivity of peak wave period and mean wave direction to the varying of the parameters.

  11. Strong curvature effects in Neumann wave problems

    SciTech Connect

    Willatzen, M.; Pors, A.; Gravesen, J.

    2012-08-15

    Waveguide phenomena play a major role in basic sciences and engineering. The Helmholtz equation is the governing equation for the electric field in electromagnetic wave propagation and the acoustic pressure in the study of pressure dynamics. The Schroedinger equation simplifies to the Helmholtz equation for a quantum-mechanical particle confined by infinite barriers relevant in semiconductor physics. With this in mind and the interest to tailor waveguides towards a desired spectrum and modal pattern structure in classical structures and nanostructures, it becomes increasingly important to understand the influence of curvature effects in waveguides. In this work, we demonstrate analytically strong curvature effects for the eigenvalue spectrum of the Helmholtz equation with Neumann boundary conditions in cases where the waveguide cross section is a circular sector. It is found that the linear-in-curvature contribution originates from parity symmetry breaking of eigenstates in circular-sector tori and hence vanishes in a torus with a complete circular cross section. The same strong curvature effect is not present in waveguides subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions where curvature contributions contribute to second-order in the curvature only. We demonstrate this finding by considering wave propagation in a circular-sector torus corresponding to Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions, respectively. Results for relative eigenfrequency shifts and modes are determined and compared with three-dimensional finite element method results. Good agreement is found between the present analytical method using a combination of differential geometry with perturbation theory and finite element results for a large range of curvature ratios.

  12. Strong curvature effects in Neumann wave problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willatzen, M.; Pors, A.; Gravesen, J.

    2012-08-01

    Waveguide phenomena play a major role in basic sciences and engineering. The Helmholtz equation is the governing equation for the electric field in electromagnetic wave propagation and the acoustic pressure in the study of pressure dynamics. The Schrödinger equation simplifies to the Helmholtz equation for a quantum-mechanical particle confined by infinite barriers relevant in semiconductor physics. With this in mind and the interest to tailor waveguides towards a desired spectrum and modal pattern structure in classical structures and nanostructures, it becomes increasingly important to understand the influence of curvature effects in waveguides. In this work, we demonstrate analytically strong curvature effects for the eigenvalue spectrum of the Helmholtz equation with Neumann boundary conditions in cases where the waveguide cross section is a circular sector. It is found that the linear-in-curvature contribution originates from parity symmetry breaking of eigenstates in circular-sector tori and hence vanishes in a torus with a complete circular cross section. The same strong curvature effect is not present in waveguides subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions where curvature contributions contribute to second-order in the curvature only. We demonstrate this finding by considering wave propagation in a circular-sector torus corresponding to Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions, respectively. Results for relative eigenfrequency shifts and modes are determined and compared with three-dimensional finite element method results. Good agreement is found between the present analytical method using a combination of differential geometry with perturbation theory and finite element results for a large range of curvature ratios.

  13. Acoustic power absorption and enhancement generated by slow and fast MHD waves. Evidence of solar cycle velocity/intensity amplitude changes consistent with the mode conversion theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoniello, R.; Finsterle, W.; García, R. A.; Salabert, D.; Jiménez, A.; Elsworth, Y.; Schunker, H.

    2010-06-01

    We used long duration, high quality, unresolved (Sun-as-a star) observations collected by the ground based network BiSON and by the instruments GOLF and VIRGO on board the ESA/NASA SOHO satellite to search for solar-cycle-related changes in mode characteristics in velocity and continuum intensity for the frequency range between 2.5 mHz <ν< 6.8 mHz. Over the ascending phase of solar cycle 23 we found a suppression in the p-mode amplitudes both in the velocity and intensity data between 2.5 mHz <ν< 4.5 mHz with a maximum suppression for frequencies in the range between 2.5 mHz <ν< 3.5 mHz. The size of the amplitude suppression is 13 ± 2 per cent for the velocity and 9 ± 2 per cent for the intensity observations. Over the range of 4.5 mHz <ν< 5.5 mHz the findings hint within the errors to a null change both in the velocity and intensity amplitudes. At still higher frequencies, in the so called High-frequency Interference Peaks (HIPs) between 5.8 mHz <ν< 6.8 mHz, we found an enhancement in the velocity amplitudes with the maximum 36 ± 7 per cent occurring for 6.3 mHz <ν< 6.8 mHz. However, in intensity observations we found a rather smaller enhancement of about 5 ± 2 per cent in the same interval. There is evidence that the frequency dependence of solar-cycle velocity amplitude changes is consistent with the theory behind the mode conversion of acoustic waves in a non-vertical magnetic field, but there are some problems with the intensity data, which may be due to the height in the solar atmosphere at which the VIRGO data are taken.

  14. Theory of Alfven wave heating in general toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tataronis, J.A.; Salat, A.

    1981-09-01

    A general treatment of Alfven wave heating based on the linearized equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is given. The conclusion of this study is that the geometry of the plasma equilium could play an important role on the effectiveness of this heating mechanism, and for certain geometries the fundamental equations may not possess solutions which satisfy prescribed boundary conditions.

  15. Spin effect on parametric interactions of waves in magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shahid, M.; Melrose, D. B.; Jamil, M.; Murtaza, G.

    2012-11-15

    The parametric decay instability of upper hybrid wave into low-frequency electromagnetic Shear Alfven wave and Ordinary mode radiation (O-mode) has been investigated in an electron-ion plasma immersed in the uniform external magnetic field. Incorporating quantum effect due to electron spin, the fluid model has been used to investigate the linear and nonlinear response of the plasma species for three-wave coupling in a magnetoplasma. It is shown that the spin of electrons has considerable effect on the parametric decay of upper hybrid wave into Ordinary mode radiation (O-mode) and Shear Alfven wave even in classical regime.

  16. Rayleigh wave effects in an elastic half-space.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of Rayleigh wave effects in a homogeneous isotropic linearly elastic half-space subject to an impulsive uniform disk pressure loading. An approximate formula is obtained for the Rayleigh wave effects. It is shown that the Rayleigh waves near the center of loading arise from the portion of the dilatational and shear waves moving toward the axis, after they originate at the edge of the load disk. A study is made of the vertical displacement due to Rayleigh waves at points on the axis near the surface of the elastic half-space.

  17. Commercialization of MHD power technology

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, D.J.; Jensen, A.D.; Probert, P.B.

    1984-08-01

    This paper presents an approach to the commercialization of Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) technology from the perspective of an equipment manufacturer. It discusses and recommends actions to be taken in solving technical problems and mitigating risk for the first commercial MHD power plant.

  18. High-magnetic-field MHD-generator program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Eustis, R. H.; Mitchner, M.; Self, S. A.; Koester, J. K.; Kruger, C. H.

    1981-07-01

    Progress in an experimental and theoretical program designed to investigate MHD channel phenomena which are important at high magnetic fields is described. The areas of research include nonuniformity effects, boundary layers, Hall field breakdown, the effects of electrode configuration and current concentrations, and studies of steady-state combustion disk and linear channels in an existing 6 Tesla magnet of small dimensions. In the study of the effects of nonuniformities, experiments were performed to test a multi-channel, fiber optics diagnostic system that yields time-resolved temperature profiles in an MHD chanel. For the study of magneto-acoustic fluctuation phenomena, a one dimensional model was developed to describe the performance of a non-ideal MHD generator with a generalized electrical configuration. A two dimensional MHD computer code was developed which predicts the dependence on electrode and insulator dimensions of the onset of interelectrode Hall field breakdown, as initiated either by breakdown in the insulator or in the plasma.

  19. The effect of microscale random Alfven waves on the propagation of large-scale Alfven waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namikawa, T.; Hamabata, H.

    1983-04-01

    The ponderomotive force generated by random Alfven waves in a collisionless plasma is evaluated taking into account mean magnetic and velocity shear and is expressed as a series involving spatial derivatives of mean magnetic and velocity fields whose coefficients are associated with the helicity spectrum function of random velocity field. The effect of microscale random Alfven waves through ponderomotive and mean electromotive forces generated by them on the propagation of large-scale Alfven waves is also investigated.

  20. Toroidal Theory of MHD Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Goedbloed, J.P.

    2004-03-15

    We continue with the adventures of the Alfven wave and its two magnetosonic companions as they travel in the curved space of magnetic surfaces and field lines (Sec. 2), find themselves trapped in singularities of an unprecedented richness (Sec. 3), decide to get themselves better maps of the landscape to do the required twisting while some of their youthful energy is leaking away (Sec. 4), cause trouble at the edge of a powerful empire (Sec. 5), and finally see the light in a distant future (Sec. 6). Needed on the trip are the evolution equations of both ideal and resistive MHD 'derived' in reference [1], the solutions to the toroidal equilibrium equations discussed in reference [2], the general background on spectral theory of inhomogeneous plasmas presented in reference [3], which is extended in the two directions of toroidal geometry and resistivity in this lecture [4]. This leads to such intricate dynamics that numerical techniques are virtually the only way to proceed. This aspect is further elaborated in reference [5] on numerical techniques.

  1. Exploración del modelo coronal MHD de Uchida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francile, C.; Castro, J. I.; Flores, M.

    We present an analysis of the MHD model of an isothermal solar corona with radially symmetrical magnetic field and gravity. The solution in the approximation "WKB" was presented by Uchida (1968). The model is ex- plored for different coronal conditions and heights of initial perturbation to study the propagation of coronal waves and reproduce the observed char- acteristics of phenomena such as Moreton waves. Finally we discuss the obtained results. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  2. Simulating solar MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüssler, M.

    1999-05-01

    Two aspects of solar MHD are discussed in relation to the work of the MHD simulation group at KIS. Photospheric magneto-convection, the nonlinear interaction of magnetic field and convection in a strongly stratified, radiating fluid, is a key process of general astrophysical relevance. Comprehensive numerical simulations including radiative transfer have significantly improved our understanding of the processes and have become an important tool for the interpretation of observational data. Examples of field intensification in the solar photosphere ('convective collapse') are shown. The second line of research is concerned with the dynamics of flux tubes in the convection zone, which has far-reaching implications for our understanding of the solar dynamo. Simulations indicate that the field strength in the region where the flux is stored before erupting to form sunspot groups is of the order of 105 G, an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates based on equipartition with the kinetic energy of convective flows.Key words. Solar physics · astrophysics and astronomy (photosphere and chromosphere; stellar interiors and dynamo theory; numerical simulation studies).

  3. Cometary MHD and chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegmann, R.; Schmidt, H. U.; Huebner, W. F.; Boice, D. C.

    1987-01-01

    An MHD and chemical comet-coma model was developed, applying the computer program of Huebner (1985) for the detailed chemical evolution of a spherically expanding coma and the program of Schmidt and Wegman (1982) and Wegman (1987) for the MHD flow of plasma and magnetic field in a comet to the Giotto-mission data on the ion abundances measured by the HIS ion mass spectrometer. The physics and chemistry of the coma are modeled in great detail, including photoprocesses, gas-phase chemical kinetics, energy balance with a separate electron temperature, multifluid hydrodynamics with a transition to free molecular flow, fast-streaming atomic and molecular hydrogen, counter and cross streaming of the ionized species relative to the neutral species in the coma-solar wind interaction region with momentum exchange by elastic collisions, mass-loading through ion pick-up, and Lorentz forces of the advected magnetic field. The results, both inside and outside of the contact surface, are discussed and compared with the relevant HIS ion mass spectra.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modelling of solar active phenomena via numerical methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1988-01-01

    Numerical ideal MHD models for the study of solar active phenomena are summarized. Particular attention is given to the following physical phenomena: (1) local heating of a coronal loop in an isothermal and stratified atmosphere, and (2) the coronal dynamic responses due to magnetic field movement. The results suggest that local heating of a magnetic loop will lead to the enhancement of the density of the neighboring loops through MHD wave compression. It is noted that field lines can be pinched off and may form a self-contained magnetized plasma blob that may move outward into interplanetary space.

  5. Effects of the Gulf Stream on ocean waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holthuijsen, L. H.; Tolman, H. L.

    1991-01-01

    In the present study a third-generation numerical wave model is used to study effects of a straight Gulf Stream ring on ocean waves in swell and storm conditions. The model accounts for all relevant processes of propagation, generation, and dissipation of the waves (including current effects) without imposing a priori restraints on the spectral development of the waves. The dominating mechanism affecting the waves appears to be current-induced refraction even though the short-crestedness of the incoming waves tends to mask its effects (also in swell conditions). Depending on wind and wave conditions, refraction may trap locally generated waves in the straight Gulf Stream or it may reflect wave energy back to the open ocean. In the Gulf Stream ring, refraction induces a considerable variation in significant wave height and short-crestedness, but it hardly affects the mean wave direction. In storm conditions the processes of generation and dissipation are considerably enhanced in countercurrent situations and reduced following-current situations.

  6. Electron scattering and nonlinear trapping by oblique whistler waves: The critical wave intensity for nonlinear effects

    SciTech Connect

    Artemyev, A. V. Vasiliev, A. A.; Mourenas, D.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we consider high-energy electron scattering and nonlinear trapping by oblique whistler waves via the Landau resonance. We use recent spacecraft observations in the radiation belts to construct the whistler wave model. The main purpose of the paper is to provide an estimate of the critical wave amplitude for which the nonlinear wave-particle resonant interaction becomes more important than particle scattering. To this aim, we derive an analytical expression describing the particle scattering by large amplitude whistler waves and compare the corresponding effect with the nonlinear particle acceleration due to trapping. The latter is much more rare but the corresponding change of energy is substantially larger than energy jumps due to scattering. We show that for reasonable wave amplitudes ∼10–100 mV/m of strong whistlers, the nonlinear effects are more important than the linear and nonlinear scattering for electrons with energies ∼10–50 keV. We test the dependencies of the critical wave amplitude on system parameters (background plasma density, wave frequency, etc.). We discuss the role of obtained results for the theoretical description of the nonlinear wave amplification in radiation belts.

  7. Revisit of Alfvén ballooning modes in isotropic, ideal MHD plasmas: Effect of diamagnetic condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, John Z. G.; Hirose, Akira

    2014-04-01

    Alfvén ballooning modes provide an important mechanism to explain explosive phenomena in regions where field lines transit from dipole-like to taillike shapes. However, commonly used analytical results were unable to recover Alfvén modes in uniform plasmas and basic ballooning mode in inhomogeneous plasmas. We rigidly revisited previous work on isotropic, ideal magnetospheric plasmas and found where the problems occurred. This paper shows accurate expressions of the ballooning modes. Under the dimagnetic condition (an infinite ky), the modes have two groups depending on the relations of the three equilibrium parameters: plasma β, pressure gradient kp, and magnetic curvature kc (magnetic gradient kB is no more than a tenth of kc and thus neglected in magnetotail plasma). If the constraint is relaxed (a finite ky), the dispersion relation includes the following: (1) the fast compressional Alfvén branch; (2) two groups of ballooning instabilities: Group 1 appears when kp is independent of β, and Group 2 emerges when kc is independent of β; and (3) in Group 1, a critical β exists above which the wave mode becomes unstable, while the perpendicular wave number (k⊥) affects the instability by modulating the critical β values; by contrast, in Group 2, there is no critical β, and the wave keeps its original stable or unstable mode, while k⊥ has a critical value above which the wave mode becomes unstable.

  8. Analytical investigation of critical MHD phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Development and analysis of schemes for suppression of the startup overvoltage transient in the AEDC High Performance Demonstration Experiment (HPDE), analysis of performance enhancement due to electrode voltage drop reduction by use of pyrolytic graphites in the HPDE, prediction of optimal loading schemes for the HPDE, prediction of PHDE performance with a diagonal electrical connection, and predictions of the likelihood and effects of axial current leakage between adjacent electrodes in the HPDE are reviewed. Simulations of tests at the AEDC/HPDE with STD Research Corporation multidimensional and time dependent computer codes provided additional validation for the computer codes and shed light on physical mechanisms which govern performance and durability of MHD power generators. The magnetoaerothermal effect was predicted by STD Research Corporation to have a significant effect on the HPDE/MHD generator performance at high interaction.

  9. Biological Effects of Shock Waves on Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanadhas, Divya Prakash; Janardhanraj, S.; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; Gopalan, Jagadeesh

    Shock waves have been successfully used for disintegrating kidney stones[1], noninvasive angiogenic approach[2] and for the treatment of osteoporosis[3]. Recently shock waves have been used to treat different medical conditions including intestinal anastomosis[4], wound healing[5], Kienböck's disease[6] and articular cartilage defects[7].

  10. Heat Waves in the United States: Mortality Risk during Heat Waves and Effect Modification by Heat Wave Characteristics in 43 U.S. Communities

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, G. Brooke; Bell, Michelle L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Devastating health effects from recent heat waves, and projected increases in frequency, duration, and severity of heat waves from climate change, highlight the importance of understanding health consequences of heat waves. Objectives We analyzed mortality risk for heat waves in 43 U.S. cities (1987–2005) and investigated how effects relate to heat waves’ intensity, duration, or timing in season. Methods Heat waves were defined as ≥ 2 days with temperature ≥ 95th percentile for the community for 1 May through 30 September. Heat waves were characterized by their intensity, duration, and timing in season. Within each community, we estimated mortality risk during each heat wave compared with non-heat wave days, controlling for potential confounders. We combined individual heat wave effect estimates using Bayesian hierarchical modeling to generate overall effects at the community, regional, and national levels. We estimated how heat wave mortality effects were modified by heat wave characteristics (intensity, duration, timing in season). Results Nationally, mortality increased 3.74% [95% posterior interval (PI), 2.29–5.22%] during heat waves compared with non-heat wave days. Heat wave mortality risk increased 2.49% for every 1°F increase in heat wave intensity and 0.38% for every 1-day increase in heat wave duration. Mortality increased 5.04% (95% PI, 3.06–7.06%) during the first heat wave of the summer versus 2.65% (95% PI, 1.14–4.18%) during later heat waves, compared with non-heat wave days. Heat wave mortality impacts and effect modification by heat wave characteristics were more pronounced in the Northeast and Midwest compared with the South. Conclusions We found higher mortality risk from heat waves that were more intense or longer, or those occurring earlier in summer. These findings have implications for decision makers and researchers estimating health effects from climate change. PMID:21084239

  11. Magnetospheric filter effect for Pc 3 Alfven mode waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, X.; Comfort, R. H.; Gallagher, D. L.; Green, J. L.; Musielak, Z. E.; Moore, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    We present a ray-tracing study of the propagation of Pc 3 Alfven mode waves originating at the dayside magnetopause. This study reveals interesting features of magnetospheric filter effect for these waves. Pc 3 Alfven mode waves cannot penetrate to low Earth altitudes unless the wave frequency is below approximately 30 mHz. Configurations of the dispersion curves and the refractive index show that the gyroresonance and pseudo-cutoff introduced by the heavy ion O(+) block the waves. When the O(+) concentration is removed from the plasma composition, the barriers caused by the O(+) no longer exist, and waves with much higher frequencies than 30 mHz can penetrate to low altitudes. The result that the 30 mHz or lower frequency Alfven waves can be guided to low altitudes agrees with ground-based power spectrum observation at high altitudes.

  12. Magnetospheric filter effect for Pc 3 Alfven mode waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, X.; Comfort, R. H.; Gallagher, D. L.; Green, J. L.; Musielak, Z. E.; Moore, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    We present a ray-tracing study of the propagation of Pc 3 Alfven mode waves originating at the dayside magnetopause. This study reveals interesting features of a magnetospheric filter effect for these waves. Pc 3 Alfven mode waves cannot penetrate to low Earth altitudes unless the wave frequency is below approximately 30 mHz. Configurations of the dispersion curves and the refractive index show that the gyroresonance and pseudo-cutoff introduced by the heavy ion O(+) block the waves. When the O(+) concentration is removed from the plasma composition, the barriers caused by the O(+) no longer exist, and waves with much higher frequencies than 30 mHz can penetrate to low altitudes. The result that the 30 mHz or lower frequency Alfven waves can be guided to low altitudes agrees with ground-based power spectrum observations at high latitudes.

  13. MHD Energy Bypass Scramjet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.; Bogdanoff, David W.; Park, Chul; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Revolutionary rather than evolutionary changes in propulsion systems are most likely to decrease cost of space transportation and to provide a global range capability. Hypersonic air-breathing propulsion is a revolutionary propulsion system. The performance of scramjet engines can be improved by the AJAX energy management concept. A magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD) generator controls the flow and extracts flow energy in the engine inlet and a MHD accelerator downstream of the combustor accelerates the nozzle flow. A progress report toward developing the MHD technology is presented herein. Recent theoretical efforts are reviewed and ongoing experimental efforts are discussed. The latter efforts also include an ongoing collaboration between NASA, the US Air Force Research Laboratory, US industry, and Russian scientific organizations. Two of the critical technologies, the ionization of the air and the MHD accelerator, are briefly discussed. Examples of limiting the combustor entrance Mach number to a low supersonic value with a MHD energy bypass scheme are presented, demonstrating an improvement in scramjet performance. The results for a simplified design of an aerospace plane show that the specific impulse of the MHD-bypass system is better than the non-MHD system and typical rocket over a narrow region of flight speeds and design parameters. Equilibrium ionization and non-equilibrium ionization are discussed. The thermodynamic condition of air at the entrance of the engine inlet determines the method of ionization. The required external power for non-equilibrium ionization is computed. There have been many experiments in which electrical power generation has successfully been achieved by magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) means. However, relatively few experiments have been made to date for the reverse case of achieving gas acceleration by the MHD means. An experiment in a shock tunnel is described in which MHD acceleration is investigated experimentally. MHD has several

  14. Production of MHD fluid

    DOEpatents

    Lacey, James J.; Kurtzrock, Roy C.; Bienstock, Daniel

    1976-08-24

    A hot gaseous fluid of low ash content, suitable for use in open-cycle MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) power generation, is produced by means of a three-stage process comprising (1) partial combustion of a fossil fuel to produce a hot gaseous product comprising CO.sub.2 CO, and H.sub.2 O, (2) reformation of the gaseous product from stage (1) by means of a fluidized char bed, whereby CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O are converted to CO and H.sub.2, and (3) combustion of CO and H.sub.2 from stage (2) to produce a low ash-content fluid (flue gas) comprising CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O and having a temperature of about 4000.degree. to 5000.degree.F.

  15. MHD channel performance for potential early commercial MHD power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swallom, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    The commercial viability of full and part load early commercial MHD power plants is examined. The load conditions comprise a mass flow of 472 kg/sec in the channel, Rosebud coal, 34% by volume oxygen in the oxidizer preheated to 922 K, and a one percent by mass seeding with K. The full load condition is discussed in terms of a combined cycle plant with optimized electrical output by the MHD channel. Various electrical load parameters, pressure ratios, and magnetic field profiles are considered for a baseload MHD generator, with a finding that a decelerating flow rate yields slightly higher electrical output than a constant flow rate. Nominal and part load conditions are explored, with a reduced gas mass flow rate and an enriched oxygen content. An enthalpy extraction of 24.6% and an isentropic efficiency of 74.2% is predicted for nominal operation of a 526 MWe MHD generator, with higher efficiencies for part load operation.

  16. Measurements of sideband mode-coupling effects and linear MHD growth rates associated with the ponderomotive force

    SciTech Connect

    Meassick, S.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the interactions of rf waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) with flute interchange modes are presented. Interactions between the applied l = +1 rf wave and an m = {minus}1 flute mode give rise to sidebands above and below the rf frequency with mode numbers of l = 0 and l = +2 respectively. The contribution of the sideband terms to perturbed energy are shown to cancel 40% of the direct ponderomotive contribution for w/w{sub ci} = 1.25. This is less then the 90% predicted by self-consistent theories of the ponderomotive force for an applied l = +1 rf wave above the ion cyclotron frequency with a large separation between the plasma and the vacuum vessel. Measurements of the linear growth and decay rate of the flute instability in the presence of rf are presented. These measurements allow a determination of the net stabilizing force on the plasma. The measured growth rate is in good agreement with that calculated by considering only the curvature driven instability and the ponderomotive force.

  17. Efficient Low Dissipative High Order Schemes for Multiscale MHD Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjoegreen, Bjoern; Yee, Helen C.

    2002-11-01

    Accurate numerical simulations of complex multiscale compressible viscous flows, especially high speed turbulence combustion and acoustics, demand high order schemes with adaptive numerical dissipation controls. Standard high resolution shock-capturing methods are too dissipative to capture the small scales and/or long-time wave propagations without extreme grid refinements and small time steps. An integrated approach for the control of numerical dissipation in high order schemes for the compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations has been developed and verified by the authors and collaborators. These schemes are suitable for the problems in question. Basically, the scheme consists of sixth-order or higher non-dissipative spatial difference operators as the base scheme. To control the amount of numerical dissipation, multiresolution wavelets are used as sensors to adaptively limit the amount and to aid the selection and/or blending of the appropriate types of numerical dissipation to be used. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) waves play a key role in drag reduction in highly maneuverable high speed combat aircraft, in space weather forecasting, and in the understanding of the dynamics of the evolution of our solar system and the main sequence stars. Although there exist a few well-studied second and third-order high-resolution shock-capturing schemes for the MHD in the literature, these schemes are too diffusive and not practical for turbulence/combustion MHD flows. On the other hand, extension of higher than third-order high-resolution schemes to the MHD system of equations is not straightforward. Unlike the hydrodynamic equations, the inviscid MHD system is non-strictly hyperbolic with non-convex fluxes. The wave structures and shock types are different from their hydrodynamic counterparts. Many of the non-traditional hydrodynamic shocks are not fully understood. Consequently, reliable and highly accurate numerical schemes for multiscale MHD equations pose a great

  18. Nonlinear Alfvén wave dynamics at a 2D magnetic null point: ponderomotive force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurgood, J. O.; McLaughlin, J. A.

    2013-07-01

    Context. In the linear, β = 0 MHD regime, the transient properties of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in the vicinity of 2D null points are well known. The waves are decoupled and accumulate at predictable parts of the magnetic topology: fast waves accumulate at the null point; whereas Alfvén waves cannot cross the separatricies. However, in nonlinear MHD mode conversion can occur at regions of inhomogeneous Alfvén speed, suggesting that the decoupled nature of waves may not extend to the nonlinear regime. Aims: We investigate the behaviour of low-amplitude Alfvén waves about a 2D magnetic null point in nonlinear, β = 0 MHD. Methods: We numerically simulate the introduction of low-amplitude Alfvén waves into the vicinity of a magnetic null point using the nonlinear LARE2D code. Results: Unlike in the linear regime, we find that the Alfvén wave sustains cospatial daughter disturbances, manifest in the transverse and longitudinal fluid velocity, owing to the action of nonlinear magnetic pressure gradients (viz. the ponderomotive force). These disturbances are dependent on the Alfvén wave and do not interact with the medium to excite magnetoacoustic waves, although the transverse daughter becomes focused at the null point. Additionally, an independently propagating fast magnetoacoustic wave is generated during the early stages, which transports some of the initial Alfvén wave energy towards the null point. Subsequently, despite undergoing dispersion and phase-mixing due to gradients in the Alfvén-speed profile (∇cA ≠ 0) there is no further nonlinear generation of fast waves. Conclusions: We find that Alfvén waves at 2D cold null points behave largely as in the linear regime, however they sustain transverse and longitudinal disturbances - effects absent in the linear regime - due to nonlinear magnetic pressure gradients.

  19. Dynamo action in dissipative, forced, rotating MHD turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is an inherent feature of large-scale, energetic astrophysical and geophysical magnetofluids. In general, these are rotating and are energized through buoyancy and shear, while viscosity and resistivity provide a means of dissipation of kinetic and magnetic energy. Studies of unforced, rotating, ideal (i.e., non-dissipative) MHD turbulence have produced interesting results, but it is important to determine how these results are affected by dissipation and forcing. Here, we extend our previous work and examine dissipative, forced, and rotating MHD turbulence. Incompressibility is assumed, and finite Fourier series represent turbulent velocity and magnetic field on a 643 grid. Forcing occurs at an intermediate wave number by a method that keeps total energy relatively constant and allows for injection of kinetic and magnetic helicity. We find that 3-D energy spectra are asymmetric when forcing is present. We also find that dynamo action occurs when forcing has either kinetic or magnetic helicity, with magnetic helicity injection being more important. In forced, dissipative MHD turbulence, the dynamo manifests itself as a large-scale coherent structure that is similar to that seen in the ideal case. These results imply that MHD turbulence, per se, may play a fundamental role in the creation and maintenance of large-scale (i.e., dipolar) stellar and planetary magnetic fields.

  20. Multiphysics/Multiscale Coupling of Microturbulence and MHD Equiliria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. W.; Startsev, E. A.; Hudson, S. R.; Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S.

    2015-11-01

    We propose to investigate the multiphysics and multiscale coupling between a time-dependent gyrokinetic ``microscopic'' code for studying gyroradius-scale turbulence, associated with global ion-acoustic and shear-Alfven waves, and a ``macroscopic'' code for computing large-scale global equilibria based on the time-independent MHD equations, in order to identify a family of self-consistent global MHD equilibria that can minimize the electrostatic potentials responsible for turbulent transport by passing global parameters between the two codes. The codes involved are 1) the electromagnetic version of the GTS code for studying microturbulence, and 2) the SPEC code for calculating three-dimensional MHD equilibria with or without chaotic fields. This concept is based on a newly found correlation between the gyrokinetic evolution and the MHD equilibrium when the electrostatic potential vanishes. The proposed work involves the scales ranging from the electron skin depth to the machine size, and includes the physics of both gyrokinetics and MHD. This work is supported by US DoE # DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  1. MHD Simulation Heliospheric Magnetic Fields and Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. Aaron

    2005-01-01

    This talk will present a summary of our results on simulations of heliospheric structure and dynamics. We use a three-dimensional MHD code in spherical coordinates to produce a solar wind containing a rotating, tilted heliospheric current sheet, fast-slow stream and microstream shear layers, waves, 2-D turbulence, and pressure balanced structures that are input to the inner (superAlfvenic) boundary. The evolution of various combinations of these has led to a deeper understanding of sector structure, magnetic holes, fluctuation anisotropies, and general turbulent evolution. We show how the sectors are likely to be connected, how spiral fields can arise, and how field line diffusion can be caused by waves with transverse structure and microstream shears.

  2. Scale-Dependent Alignment of Velocity and Magnetic Fluctuations in Anisotropic MHD Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Bigot, B.; Ponty, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The tendency of alignment between velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in MHD turbulence has been a subject of great interest theoretically [Grappin et al. 1983, Matthaeus et al. 1983, Pouquet et al. 1988] as well as observationally over many years. There has been recent theoretical interest in the effect of scale-dependent alignment of velocity and magnetic fluctuations in 3D anisotropic MHD turbulence with a large-scale magnetic field [Boldyrev 2005, 2006]. This theory predicts that the angle θ between the velocity and magnetic fluctuation vectors has a scaling of θ ∝ λ1/4, where λ is the spatial scale of the fluctuations. There have also been simulations on 3D forced MHD turbulence that supports this prediction [Mason et al. 2006, 2007]. In this paper, we demonstrate that the feature of scale-dependent alignment and the scaling of θ ∝ λ1/4 also occurs in 2D within a range of time interval and spatial scales, despite the fact that Boldyrev’s phenomenological theory appears to rely on physical mechanisms operative in fully 3D turbulence in the presence of a strong external field. High-resolution pseudo-spectral simulations and scaling analysis, based on pseudo-Alfven waves in 2D, will be presented. These findings suggests that the phenomenon of scale-dependent alignment may be a more universal feature of MHD turbulence than has been thought recently, independent of dimensionality, whether the turbulence is balanced or imbalanced. Implications for solar wind turbulence observations will be discussed. This work is supported by DOE and NASA.

  3. Absorption effects in diffusing wave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento-Gomez, Erick; Morales-Cruzado, Beatriz; Castillo, Rolando

    2014-07-20

    The effect of absorption in diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) was studied using an absorption-dependent diffusive equation for describing the light propagation within a turbid liquid where dielectric microspheres have been embedded. Here, we propose an expression for the time-averaged light intensity autocorrelation function that correctly describes the time fluctuations for the scattered light, in the regime where the diffusion approximation accurately describes the light propagation. This correction was suspected previously, but it was not formally derived from a light diffusive equation. As in the case of no absorption, we obtained that time fluctuations of the scattered light can be related to the mean square displacement of the embedded particles. However, if a correction for absorption is not taken into account, the colloidal dynamics can be misinterpreted. Experimental results show that this new formulation correctly describes the time fluctuations of scattered light. This new procedure extends the applicability of DWS, and it opens the possibility of doing microrheology with this optical method in systems where absorption cannot be avoided. PMID:25090203

  4. Acceleration of the Fast Solar Wind by Solitary Waves in Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, Leon

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to develop a new model for the acceleration of the fast solar wind by nonlinear. time-dependent multidimensional MHD simulations of waves in solar coronal holes. Preliminary computational studies indicate that nonlinear waves are generated in coronal holes by torsional Alfv\\'{e}n waves. These waves in addition to thermal conduction may contribute considerably to the accelerate the solar wind. Specific goals of this proposal are to investigate the generation of nonlinear solitary-like waves and their effect on solar wind acceleration by numerical 2.5D MHD simulation of coronal holes with a broad range of plasma and wave parameters; to study the effect of random disturbances at the base of a solar coronal hole on the fast solar wind acceleration with a more advanced 2.5D MHD model and to compare the results with the available observations; to extend the study to a full 3D MHD simulation of fast solar wind acceleration with a more realistic model of a coronal hole and solar boundary conditions. The ultimate goal of the three year study is to model the, fast solar wind in a coronal hole, based on realistic boundary conditions in a coronal hole near the Sun, and the coronal hole structure (i.e., density, temperature. and magnetic field geometry,) that will become available from the recently launched SOHO spacecraft.

  5. Acceleration of the Fast Solar Wind by Solitary Waves in Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, Leon

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to develop a new model for the acceleration of the fast solar wind by nonlinear, time-dependent multidimensional MHD simulations of waves in solar coronal holes. Preliminary computational studies indicate that solitary-like waves are generated in coronal holes nonlinearly by torsional Alfven waves. These waves in addition to thermal conduction may contribute considerably to the accelerate the solar wind. Specific goals of this proposal are to investigate the generation of nonlinear solitary-like waves and their effect on solar wind acceleration by numerical 2.5D MHD simulation of coronal holes with a broad range of plasma and wave parameters; to study the effect of random disturbances at the base of a solar coronal hole on the fast solar wind acceleration with a more advanced 2.5D MHD model and to compare the results with the available observations; to extend the study to a full 3D MHD simulation of fast solar wind acceleration with a more realistic model of a coronal hole and solar boundary conditions. The ultimate goal of the three year study is to model the fast solar wind in a coronal hole, based on realistic boundary conditions in a coronal hole near the Sun, and the coronal hole structure (i.e., density, temperature, and magnetic field geometry) that will become available from the recently launched SOHO spacecraft.

  6. Experimental Observation of Negative Effective Gravity in Water Waves

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xinhua; Yang, Jiong; Zi, Jian; Chan, C. T.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The gravity of Earth is responsible for the formation of water waves and usually difficult to change. Although negative effective gravity was recently predicted theoretically in water waves, it has not yet been observed in experiments and remains a mathematical curiosity which is difficult to understand. Here we experimentally demonstrate that close to the resonant frequency of purposely-designed resonating units, negative effective gravity can occur for water waves passing through an array of resonators composing of bottom-mounted split tubes, resulting in the prohibition of water wave propagation. It is found that when negative gravity occurs, the averaged displacement of water surface in a unit cell of the array has a phase difference of π to that along the boundary of the unit cell, consistent with theoretical predictions. Our results provide a mechanism to block water waves and may find applications in wave energy conversion and coastal protection. PMID:23715132

  7. Effects of latitudinally heterogeneous buoyancy flux conditions at the inner core boundary of an MHD dynamo in a rotating spherical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Youhei; Takehiro, Shin-ichi; Nishizawa, Seiya; Hayashi, Yoshi-Yuki

    2013-10-01

    Numerical experiments on an MHD dynamo in a rotating spherical shell are performed in order to examine effects of latitudinally heterogeneous buoyancy flux conditions at the inner core boundary on the establishment of dynamo solutions. The Ekman number, the Prandtl number, and the ratio of the inner to outer radii are fixed as 10-3, 1, and 0.35, respectively. The magnetic Prandtl number is varied from 1 to 10, and the modified Rayleigh number is increased from 100 to 500. The electrically-conducting inner sphere is allowed to rotate rigidly around the rotation axis of the outer sphere at a different angular velocity. It is found that self-sustained dynamo solutions are obtained in the presence of a strong buoyancy flux around the equatorial regions or a homogeneous buoyancy flux, whereas a magnetic field does not develop spontaneously in all cases when a strong buoyancy flux is present around the polar regions. This difference in the development of the magnetic fields is considered to be affected by the different distributions of the mean zonal flow. In the case of the strong polar buoyancy flux, the direction of the mean zonal flow around the inner core is reversed due to the thermal wind balance and strong shear layer produced there. This shear may prevent the coherent growth of vortex columns and the magnetic field.

  8. MHD theory of field line resonance in the magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chang, T.C.; Lin, C.A.; Tsai, W.H.

    1992-01-01

    The linearized ideal MHD equations are cast into a set of global differential equations from which the field line resonance equations of the shear Alfven waves and slow magnetosonic waves are naturally obtained for finite pressure plasmas in general magnetic field geometries with flux surfaces. The coupling between the shear Alfven waves and the magnetosonic waves is through the geodesic magnetic field curvature. For axisymmetric magnetospheric equilibria, there is no coupling between the shear Alfven waves and slow magnetosonic waves because the geodesic magnetic field curvature vanishes. The asymptotic singular solutions of the MHD equations near the field line resonant surface are derived. Numerical solutions of the field line resonance equations are performed for the dipole magnetic field, and it is found that the shear Alfven wave field line resonant frequency is proportional to L{sup {minus}4}{rho}{sup {minus}1/2}. The slow magnetosonic wave resonant frequency is much smaller than the Shear Alfven wave resonant frequency and is roughly proportional to P/{rho}L{sup 2}, where L is the equatorial L-shell distance, P is the plasma pressure, and {rho} is the plasma mass density. The results help to understand the continuous spectra observed by AMPTE/CCE.

  9. MHD properties of magnetosheath flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, G. L.; Crooker, N. U.; Erickson, G. M.; Sonnerup, B. U. Ö.; Maynard, N. C.; Schoendorf, J. A.; Siebert, K. D.; Weimer, D. R.; White, W. W.; Wilson, G. R.

    2002-04-01

    We discuss four aspects of magnetosheath flow that require MHD for their calculation and understanding. We illustrate these aspects with computations using a numerical MHD code that simulates the global magnetosphere and its magnetosheath. The four inherently MHD aspects of magnetosheath flow that we consider are the depletion layer, the magnetospheric sash, MHD flow deflections, and the magnetosheath's slow-mode expansion into the magnetotail. We introduce new details of these aspects or illustrate known details in a new way, including the dependence of the depletion layer on interplanetary magnetic filed clock angle; agreement between the locations of the antiparallel regions of Luhmann et al. (J. Geophys. Res. 89 (1984) 1739) and the magnetospheric sash, and deflections corresponding separately to a stagnation line and magnetic reconnection.

  10. MHD technology in aluminum casting

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinichenko, I.

    1984-08-01

    The use of MHD technology in aluminum casting is discussed. Associates of the Latvian Academy of Sciences Institute of Physics developed magnetohydrodynamic units for the Siberian plant. A MHD unit made it possible to free five persons from heavy work at the plant. Labor productivity doubled in this section. With the aid of the magnetic field, the alloy silumin is obtained in only three hours. Specialists of the Irkutsk affiliate of the All-Union Scientific Research and Design Institute of the Aluminum, Magnesium and Electrode Industry are convinced that MHD technology has a bright future. However, this will necessitate the development of new MHD technology for different types of casting facilities, with their specific features taken into account.

  11. Kinetic effects on Alfven wave nonlinearity. II - The modified nonlinear wave equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, Steven R.

    1990-01-01

    A previously developed Vlasov theory is used here to study the role of resonant particle and other kinetic effects on Alfven wave nonlinearity. A hybrid fluid-Vlasov equation approach is used to obtain a modified version of the derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The differences between a scalar model for the plasma pressure and a tensor model are discussed. The susceptibilty of the modified nonlinear wave equation to modulational instability is studied. The modulational instability normally associated with the derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation will, under most circumstances, be restricted to left circularly polarized waves. The nonlocal term in the modified nonlinear wave equation engenders a new modulational instability that is independent of beta and the sense of circular polarization. This new instability may explain the occurrence of wave packet steepening for all values of the plasma beta in the vicinity of the earth's bow shock.

  12. Some wave-particle effects on large-scale Alfven wave propagation and damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siregar, E.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    Phase mixing can reduce greatly the torsional Alfven wave's dissipation length for propagation in complex magnetic field-line geometries. This phase mixing causes significant energy transfers from large to small scales where a conversion from ordered wave energy into a particle kinetic form occurs. This conversion during its initial stages is an entropy conserving process well described by Vlasov theory, Nonlinear stages of wave-particle resonance, particle trapping, and collisional resistivity are often invoked as processes eventually responsible for converting ordered wave motions into random thermal motion. Strictly speaking, this entropy producing phase cannot be described within Vlasov theory, and the large-scale effects of these microscopic events resides at the difficult frontier between generalized fluid and kinetic theories. We attempt to describe certain aspects of such resonances within the framework of fluid theory focusing on torsional Alfven wave energy transport and deposition within flux tubes.

  13. Mathematical modelling in MHD technology

    SciTech Connect

    Scheindlin, A.E.; Medin, S.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The technological scheme and the general parameters of the commercial scale pilot MHD power plant are described. The characteristics of the flow train components and the electrical equipment are discussed. The basic ideas of the mathematical modelling of the processes and the devices operation in MHD systems are considered. The application of different description levels in computer simulation is analyzed and the examples of typical solutions are presented.

  14. The cutoff frequency for fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic waves in an isothermal atmosphere with a uniform horizontal magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, B. A.; Musielak, Z. E.

    1993-01-01

    This study analytically examines conditions for reflection of MHD fast-mode waves propagating upward in an isothermal atmosphere. A new method of transforming the linearized wave equation into Klein-Gordon form is utilized to calculate a local cutoff (critical) frequency for these waves. This critical frequency determines the height in the atmosphere at which reflection dominates and above which wave propagation is effectively cut off. Comparison of our results to those previously obtained shows that earlier calculations of the critical frequency for MHD fast mode waves were done incorrectly. The results may be helpful in explaining the short-period end of the spectrum of the solar global p-mode oscillations. They may also be important in studies of wave propagation and wave trapping in highly magnetized stellar atmospheres.

  15. Wave-current interaction: Effect on the wave field in a semi-enclosed basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetazzo, A.; Carniel, S.; Sclavo, M.; Bergamasco, A.

    2013-10-01

    The effect on waves of the Wave-Current Interaction (WCI) process in the semi-enclosed Gulf of Venice (northern region of the Adriatic Sea) was investigated using the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system. COAWST relies on the ocean model ROMS (Regional Ocean Modeling System), the wave model SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore), and the CSTMS (Community Sediment Transport Modeling System) routines. The two-way data transfer between circulation and wave models was synchronous via MCT (Model Coupling Toolkit), with ROMS providing: current field, free surface elevation, and bathymetry to SWAN. For coupling, the 3-D current profiles were averaged using a formulation which integrated the near-surface velocity over a depth controlled by the spectral mean wavenumber. COAWST system was implemented on a parent grid (with horizontal resolution of 2.0 km) covering the whole Adriatic Sea with one-way nesting to a child grid resolving the northern area (Gulf of Venice) at a resolution of 0.5 km. The meteorological forcings provided by the operational meteorological model COSMO-I7 (a mesoscale model developed in the framework of the COSMO Consortium) were used to drive the modeling system in the period bracketing September 2010-August 2011. The adopted winds and the simulated waves were compared with observations at the CNR-ISMAR Acqua Alta oceanographic tower, located off the Venice littoral. Wave heights and sea surface winds were also compared with satellite-derived data. The analysis of WCI was performed on the child grid over the winter season (January-March 2011) with particular focus on the waves generated by prevailing and dominant winds blowing on the Adriatic Sea: Bora and Sirocco. Due to the variable wind direction with respect to the ocean current direction different effects on WCI were depicted, showing that within the northern Adriatic Sea the ocean-wave interactions are strongly dependent on the wind forcing direction. Further

  16. MHD aspects of fire-hose type instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B. J.; Hau, L. N.

    2003-12-01

    In a homogeneous anisotropic plasma the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shear Alfvén wave may become unstable for p∥ > p⊥ + B2/μo. Recently, a new type of fire-hose instability was found by Hellinger and Matsumoto [2000] that has maximum growth rate occurring for oblique propagation and may grow faster than the Alfvén mode. This new mode is compressional and may be more efficient at destroying pressure anisotropy than the standard fire hose. This paper examines the fire-hose type (p∥ > p⊥) instabilities based on the linear and nonlinear double-polytropic MHD theory. It is shown that there exist two types of MHD fire-hose instabilities, and with suitable choice of polytropic exponents the linear instability criteria become the same as those based on the Vlasov theory in the hydromagnetic limit. Moreover, the properties of the nonlinear MHD fire-hose instabilities are found to have great similarities with those obtained from the kinetic theory and hybrid simulations. In particular, the classical fire-hose instability evolves toward the linear fire-hose stability threshold, while the nonlinear marginal stability associated with the new fire hose is well below the condition of β∥ - β⊥ = 2 but complies with less stringent linear stability threshold for compressible Alfvén waves.

  17. Interpreting observations of molecular outflow sources: the MHD shock code mhd_vode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, D. R.; Pineau des Forêts, G.

    2015-06-01

    The planar MHD shock code mhd_vode has been developed in order to simulate both continuous (C) type shock waves and jump (J) type shock waves in the interstellar medium. The physical and chemical state of the gas in steady-state may also be computed and used as input to a shock wave model. The code is written principally in FORTRAN 90, although some routines remain in FORTRAN 77. The documented program and its input data are described and provided as supplementary material, and the results of exemplary test runs are presented. Our intention is to enable the interested user to run the code for any sensible parameter set and to comprehend the results. With applications to molecular outflow sources in mind, we have computed, and are making available as supplementary material, integrated atomic and molecular line intensities for grids of C- and J-type models; these computations are summarized in the Appendices. Appendix tables, a copy of the current version of the code, and of the two model grids are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/578/A63

  18. Geometric Effects on the Amplification of First Mode Instability Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Lindsay C.; Candler, Graham V.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of geometric changes on the amplification of first mode instability waves in an external supersonic boundary layer were investigated using numerical techniques. Boundary layer stability was analyzed at Mach 6 conditions similar to freestream conditions obtained in quiet ground test facilities so that results obtained in this study may be applied to future test article design to measure first mode instability waves. The DAKOTA optimization software package was used to optimize an axisymmetric geometry to maximize the amplification of the waves at first mode frequencies as computed by the 2D STABL hypersonic boundary layer stability analysis tool. First, geometric parameters such as nose radius, cone half angle, vehicle length, and surface curvature were examined separately to determine the individual effects on the first mode amplification. Finally, all geometric parameters were allowed to vary to produce a shape optimized to maximize the amplification of first mode instability waves while minimizing the amplification of second mode instability waves. Since first mode waves are known to be most unstable in the form of oblique wave, the geometries were optimized using a broad range of wave frequencies as well as a wide range of oblique wave angles to determine the geometry that most amplifies the first mode waves. Since first mode waves are seen most often in flows with low Mach numbers at the edge of the boundary layer, the edge Mach number for each geometry was recorded to determine any relationship between edge Mach number and the stability of first mode waves. Results indicate that an axisymmetric cone with a sharp nose and a slight flare at the aft end under the Mach 6 freestream conditions used here will lower the Mach number at the edge of the boundary layer to less than 4, and the corresponding stability analysis showed maximum first mode N factors of 3.

  19. Controlling Voigt waves by the Pockels effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Tom G.

    2015-01-01

    Voigt wave propagation was investigated in a homogenized composite material (HCM) arising from a porous electro-optic host material infiltrated by a fluid of refractive index na. The constitutive parameters of the HCM were estimated using the extended Bruggeman homogenization formalism. Numerical studies revealed that the directions which support Voigt wave propagation in the HCM could be substantially controlled by means of an applied dc electric field. Furthermore, the extent to which this control could be achieved was found to be sensitive to the porosity of the host material, the shapes, sizes, and orientations of the pores, as well as the refractive index na. These findings may be particularly significant for potential technological applications of Voigt waves such as in optical sensing.

  20. Implicit Predictor-Corrector finite difference scheme for the ideal MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, T.; Yu, H.; Lai, S.

    2012-12-01

    A innovative simulation code for ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is developed. We present a multiple-dimensional MHD code based on high-order implicit predictor-corrector finite difference scheme (high-order IPCFD scheme). High-order IPCFD scheme adopts high-order predictor-corrector scheme for the time integration and high-order central difference method as the spatial derivative solver. We use Elimination-of-the-Runoff-Errors (ERE) technology to avoid the numerical oscillations and numerical instability in the simulation results. In one-dimensional MHD problem, our simulation results show good agreement with the Brio & Wu MHD shock tube problem. The divergent B constraint remains fully satisfied, that is the divergent B equals to zero throughout the simulation. When solving the two-dimensional (2D) linear wave in MHD plasma, we clearly obtain the group-velocity Friedrichs diagrams of the MHD waves. Here we demonstrate 2D simulation results of rotor problem, Orszag-Tang vortex system, vortex type K-H instability, and kink type K-H instability by using our IPCFD MHD code and discuss the advantage of our simulation code.

  1. Statistical Theory of the Ideal MHD Geodynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, J. V.

    2012-01-01

    A statistical theory of geodynamo action is developed, using a mathematical model of the geodynamo as a rotating outer core containing an ideal (i.e., no dissipation), incompressible, turbulent, convecting magnetofluid. On the concentric inner and outer spherical bounding surfaces the normal components of the velocity, magnetic field, vorticity and electric current are zero, as is the temperature fluctuation. This allows the use of a set of Galerkin expansion functions that are common to both velocity and magnetic field, as well as vorticity, current and the temperature fluctuation. The resulting dynamical system, based on the Boussinesq form of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, represents MHD turbulence in a spherical domain. These basic equations (minus the temperature equation) and boundary conditions have been used previously in numerical simulations of forced, decaying MHD turbulence inside a sphere [1,2]. Here, the ideal case is studied through statistical analysis and leads to a prediction that an ideal coherent structure will be found in the form of a large-scale quasistationary magnetic field that results from broken ergodicity, an effect that has been previously studied both analytically and numerically for homogeneous MHD turbulence [3,4]. The axial dipole component becomes prominent when there is a relatively large magnetic helicity (proportional to the global correlation of magnetic vector potential and magnetic field) and a stationary, nonzero cross helicity (proportional to the global correlation of velocity and magnetic field). The expected angle of the dipole moment vector with respect to the rotation axis is found to decrease to a minimum as the average cross helicity increases for a fixed value of magnetic helicity and then to increase again when average cross helicity approaches its maximum possible value. Only a relatively small value of cross helicity is needed to produce a dipole moment vector that is aligned at approx.10deg with the

  2. Effects of D region ionization on radio wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of anomalous D region ionization upon radio wave propagation are described for the main types of disturbances: sudden ionospheric disturbances, relativistic electron events, magnetic storms, auroral disturbances, polar cap events, and stratospheric warmings. Examples of radio wave characteristics for such conditions are given for the frequencies between the extremely low (3-3000 Hz) and high (3-30 MHz) frequency domains. Statistics on the disturbance effects and radio wave data are given in order to contribute towards the evaluation of possibilities for predicting the radio effects.

  3. Dynamo theory and liquid metal MHD experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lielausis, O.

    1994-06-01

    High values of magnetic Reynolds number Rm are characteristic not only to astrophysics, but also to other interesting objects, including liquid metal (LM) flows. LM experiments have been performed illustrating important predictions of the dynamo theory, for example, about the existence and features of the alpha effect. Consideration of so called 'laminar' dynamos provides a theoretical base for direct experimental realization and examination of the dynamo process. First step results, gathered a subcritical conditions, confirm the statement that self-excitation in LM experiments can be achieved practically today. In such devices as LM (sodium) cooled fast breeders Rm can reach values of up to 50 and specific MHD phenomena have been observed in operating fast reactors. Cautions against crisis like processes have been expressed. It is important for the dynamo theory to understand what kind of perturbed motion is able to coexist with the generated magnetic field. Fundamentally new ideas here are issuing from the theory of 2D MHD turbulence. LM MHD served for the first direct proves, confirming, that the predicted surprising features of 2D turbulence can be observed in reality. It is worth incorporating these already not new ideas in the dynamo theory. In such a way a field for new solutions could be established.

  4. The Statistical Mechanics of Ideal MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2003-01-01

    Turbulence is a universal, nonlinear phenomenon found in all energetic fluid and plasma motion. In particular. understanding magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and incorporating its effects in the computation and prediction of the flow of ionized gases in space, for example, are great challenges that must be met if such computations and predictions are to be meaningful. Although a general solution to the "problem of turbulence" does not exist in closed form, numerical integrations allow us to explore the phase space of solutions for both ideal and dissipative flows. For homogeneous, incompressible turbulence, Fourier methods are appropriate, and phase space is defined by the Fourier coefficients of the physical fields. In the case of ideal MHD flows, a fairly robust statistical mechanics has been developed, in which the symmetry and ergodic properties of phase space is understood. A discussion of these properties will illuminate our principal discovery: Coherent structure and randomness co-exist in ideal MHD turbulence. For dissipative flows, as opposed to ideal flows, progress beyond the dimensional analysis of Kolmogorov has been difficult. Here, some possible future directions that draw on the ideal results will also be discussed. Our conclusion will be that while ideal turbulence is now well understood, real turbulence still presents great challenges.

  5. Effect of four-wave mixing on copropagating spatial solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Nadeem A.; Sammut, Rowland A.; Tran, Hai-Tan

    1996-07-01

    It is known that in the absence of four-wave mixing, spatial solitons of two frequencies can copropagate stably in a Kerr-law nonlinear medium. We investigate the effect of including four-wave mixing. We show that when phase-matching conditions are satisfied, Stokes and anti-Stokes waves can be generated to produce a new steady-state solution consisting of four copropagating beams. On the other hand, if weak signal beams are injected along with the pump beams, then four-wave mixing can be used to amplify those side beams. When phase-matching conditions are not satisfied, the Stokes and anti-Stokes waves simply propagate as linear modes in the effective waveguides induced by the pump solitons.

  6. Global and Kinetic MHD Simulation by the Gpic-MHD Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroshi, Naitou; Yusuke, Yamada; Kenji, Kajiwara; Wei-li, Lee; Shinji, Tokuda; Masatoshi, Yagi

    2011-10-01

    In order to implement large-scale and high-beta tokamak simulation, a new algorithm of the electromagnetic gyrokinetic PIC (particle-in-cell) code was proposed and installed on the Gpic-MHD code [Gyrokinetic PIC code for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation]. In the new algorithm, the vorticity equation and the generalized Ohm's law along the magnetic field are derived from the basic equations of the gyrokinetic Vlasov, Poisson, and Ampere system and are used to describe the spatio-temporal evolution of the field quantities of the electrostatic potential varphi and the longitudinal component of the vector potential Az. The basic algorithm is equivalent to solving the reduced-MHD-type equations with kinetic corrections, in which MHD physics related to Alfven modes are well described. The estimation of perturbed electron pressure from particle dynamics is dominant, while the effects of other moments are negligible. Another advantage of the algorithm is that the longitudinal induced electric field, ETz = -∂Az/∂t, is explicitly estimated by the generalized Ohm's law and used in the equations of motion. Furthermore, the particle velocities along the magnetic field are used (vz-formulation) instead of generalized momentums (pz-formulation), hence there is no problem of ‘cancellation', which would otherwise appear when Az is estimated from the Ampere's law in the pz-formulation. The successful simulation of the collisionless internal kink mode by the new Gpic-MHD with realistic values of the large-scale and high-beta tokamaks revealed the usefulness of the new algorithm.

  7. Preliminary Analysis of Liquid Metal MHD Pressure Drop in the Blanket for the FDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-yan; Wu, Yi-can; He, Xiao-xong

    2002-10-01

    Preliminary analysis and calculation of liquid metal Li17Pb83 magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop in the blanket for the FDS have been presented to evaluate the significance of MHD effects on the thermal-hydraulic design of the blanket. To decrease the liquid metal MHD pressure drop, Al2O3 is applied as an electronically insulated coating onto the inner surface of the ducts. The requirement for the insulated coating to reduce the additional leakage pressure drop caused by coating imperfections has been analyzed. Finally, the total liquid metal MHD pressure drop and magnetic pump power in the FDS blanket have been given.

  8. Global MHD Simulations of Accretion Disks in Cataclysmic Variables. I. The Importance of Spiral Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Wenhua; Stone, James M.; Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2016-06-01

    We present results from the first global 3D MHD simulations of accretion disks in cataclysmic variable (CV) systems in order to investigate the relative importance of angular momentum transport via turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) compared with that driven by spiral shock waves. Remarkably, we find that even with vigorous MRI turbulence, spiral shocks are an important component of the overall angular momentum budget, at least when temperatures in the disk are high (so that Mach numbers are low). In order to understand the excitation, propagation, and damping of spiral density waves in our simulations more carefully, we perform a series of 2D global hydrodynamical simulations with various equation of states, both with and without mass inflow via the Lagrangian point (L1). Compared with previous similar studies, we find the following new results. (1) The linear wave dispersion relation fits the pitch angles of spiral density waves very well. (2) We demonstrate explicitly that mass accretion is driven by the deposition of negative angular momentum carried by the waves when they dissipate in shocks. (3) Using Reynolds stress scaled by gas pressure to represent the effective angular momentum transport rate {α }{eff} is not accurate when mass accretion is driven by non-axisymmetric shocks. (4) Using the mass accretion rate measured in our simulations to directly measure α defined in standard thin-disk theory, we find 0.02≲ {α }{eff}≲ 0.05 for CV disks, consistent with observed values in quiescent states of dwarf novae. In this regime, the disk may be too cool and neutral for the MRI to operate and spiral shocks are a possible accretion mechanism. However, we caution that our simulations use unrealistically low Mach numbers in this regime and, therefore, future models with more realistic thermodynamics and non-ideal MHD are warranted.

  9. Pulse detonation MHD power

    SciTech Connect

    Litchford, R.J.; Thompson, B.R.; Lineberry, J.T.

    1998-07-01

    A series of laboratory scale experiments were conducted to investigate the basic engineering performance characteristics of a pulse detonation driven magnetohydrodynamic electric power generator. In these experiments, stoichiometric oxy-acetylene mixtures seeded with a cesium-hydroxide/ methanol spray were detonated at atmospheric pressure in a 1 m long tube having an inside diameter of 2.54 cm. Experiments with a plasma diagnostic channel attached to the end of the tube confirmed the attainment of detonation conditions (p{sub 2}/p{sub 1} {approximately} 34 and D {approximately} 2400 m/s) and enabled the measurement of current density ({approximately} 2 A/cm{sup 2}) and electrical conductivity ({approximately} 6 mho/m) behind the detonation wave front. In a second set of experiments, a 30 cm long continuous electrode Faraday channel having a height of 2.54 cm and a width of 2.0 cm was attached to the end of the tube using an area transition duct. The Faraday channel was placed inside a permanent magnet assembly having a nominal magnetic induction of 0.6 Tesla, and the electrodes were connected to an active loading circuit in order to characterize power extraction dependence on load impedance while also simulating higher effective magnetic induction. In these single-shot experiments, the near-electrode potential drop was found to consume approximately 60% of the effective u x B induced potential. For B = 0.6 Tesla, the authors obtained a peak open circuit voltage of V{sub O}C = Bh {approximately} 10 volts implying an effective burned gas velocity relative to the tube of {approximately} 660 m/s which may be compared with the theoretical equilibrium value for the idealized case (1100 m/s). The experiments indicated peak power extraction at a load impedance between 5 and 10 Ohms. The measured peak electrical energy density ranged from 10 to 10{sup 3} J/m{sup 3} when the effective magnetic induction was varied from 0.6 to 4.2 Tesla. These results

  10. MHD results from a collisionless fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, J. J.

    2002-11-01

    A non-conventional closure ansatz for collisionless MHD has been proposed in Ref.[1]. The truncation of the set of fluid moment equations is suggested by a comparison between the standard non-relativistic set and the non-relativistic limit of the relativistic set derived in Ref.[2]. The resulting model is a closed system of evolution equations in conservation form for the particle, momentum and energy densities, and the energy flux, allowing for pressure anisotropy and parallel heat flux. The static equilibrium condition is the same as in the Chew-Goldberger-Low theory, supplemented by the condition that the parallel energy flux be constant along the magnetic field. We study the linear perturbations about such static equilibria to derive the MHD wave dispersion relations in a homogeneous background and the perturbed potential energy associated with a stability energy principle. [1] J.J. Ramos, 2002 International Sherwood Theory Meeting, Rochester, NY, paper 1D25. [2] R.D. Hazeltine and S.M. Mahajan, Ap. J. 567, 1262 (2002).

  11. Circularly polarized waves in a plasma with vacuum polarization effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, J.; Stenflo, L.; Brodin, G.; Marklund, M.; Shukla, P. K.

    2007-06-15

    The theory for large amplitude circularly polarized waves propagating along an external magnetic field is extended in order to also include vacuum polarization effects. A general dispersion relation, which unites previous results, is derived.

  12. Scintillation effects on radio wave propagation through solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. M.; Sue, M. K.; Bedrossian, A.; Sniffin, R. W.

    2002-01-01

    When RF waves pass through the solar corona and solar wind regions close to the Sun, strong scintillation effects appear at their amplitude, frequency and phase, especially in the regions very close to the Sun (less than 4 solar radius).

  13. Added effect of heat wave on mortality in Seoul, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Won Kyung; Lee, Hye Ah; Lim, Youn Hee; Park, Hyesook

    2016-05-01

    A heat wave could increase mortality owing to high temperature. However, little is known about the added (duration) effect of heat wave from the prolonged period of high temperature on mortality and different effect sizes depending on the definition of heat waves and models. A distributed lag non-linear model with a quasi-Poisson distribution was used to evaluate the added effect of heat wave on mortality after adjusting for long-term and intra-seasonal trends and apparent temperature. We evaluated the cumulative relative risk of the added wave effect on mortality on lag days 0-30. The models were constructed using nine definitions of heat wave and two relationships (cubic spline and linear threshold model) between temperature and mortality to leave out the high temperature effect. Further, we performed sensitivity analysis to evaluate the changes in the effect of heat wave on mortality according to the different degrees of freedom for time trend and cubic spline of temperature. We found that heat wave had the added effect from the prolonged period of high temperature on mortality and it was considerable in the aspect of cumulative risk because of the lagged influence. When heat wave was defined with a threshold of 98th percentile temperature and ≥2, 3, and 4 consecutive days, mortality increased by 14.8 % (7.5-22.6, 95 % confidence interval (CI)), 18.1 % (10.8-26.0, 95 % CI), 18.1 % (10.7-25.9, 95 % CI), respectively, in cubic spline model. When it came to the definitions of 90th and 95th percentile, the risk increase in mortality declined to 3.7-5.8 % and 8.6-11.3 %, respectively. This effect was robust to the flexibility of the model for temperature and time trend, while the definitions of a heat wave were critical in estimating its relationship with mortality. This finding could help deepen our understanding and quantifying of the relationship between heat wave and mortality and select an appropriate definition of heat wave and temperature model in the future

  14. Added effect of heat wave on mortality in Seoul, Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Kyung; Lee, Hye Ah; Lim, Youn Hee; Park, Hyesook

    2016-05-01

    A heat wave could increase mortality owing to high temperature. However, little is known about the added (duration) effect of heat wave from the prolonged period of high temperature on mortality and different effect sizes depending on the definition of heat waves and models. A distributed lag non-linear model with a quasi-Poisson distribution was used to evaluate the added effect of heat wave on mortality after adjusting for long-term and intra-seasonal trends and apparent temperature. We evaluated the cumulative relative risk of the added wave effect on mortality on lag days 0-30. The models were constructed using nine definitions of heat wave and two relationships (cubic spline and linear threshold model) between temperature and mortality to leave out the high temperature effect. Further, we performed sensitivity analysis to evaluate the changes in the effect of heat wave on mortality according to the different degrees of freedom for time trend and cubic spline of temperature. We found that heat wave had the added effect from the prolonged period of high temperature on mortality and it was considerable in the aspect of cumulative risk because of the lagged influence. When heat wave was defined with a threshold of 98th percentile temperature and ≥2, 3, and 4 consecutive days, mortality increased by 14.8 % (7.5-22.6, 95 % confidence interval (CI)), 18.1 % (10.8-26.0, 95 % CI), 18.1 % (10.7-25.9, 95 % CI), respectively, in cubic spline model. When it came to the definitions of 90th and 95th percentile, the risk increase in mortality declined to 3.7-5.8 % and 8.6-11.3 %, respectively. This effect was robust to the flexibility of the model for temperature and time trend, while the definitions of a heat wave were critical in estimating its relationship with mortality. This finding could help deepen our understanding and quantifying of the relationship between heat wave and mortality and select an appropriate definition of heat wave and temperature model in the future

  15. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) Project represents the culmination of the proof-of-concept (POC) development stage in the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to advance MHD technology to early commercial development stage utility power applications. The project is a joint effort, combining the skills of three topping cycle component developers: TRW, Avco/TDS, and Westinghouse. TRW, the prime contractor and system integrator, is responsible for the 50 thermal megawatt (50 MW{sub t}) slagging coal combustion subsystem. Avco/TDS is responsible for the MHD channel subsystem (nozzle, channel, diffuser, and power conditioning circuits), and Westinghouse is responsible for the current consolidation subsystem. The ITC Project will advance the state-of-the-art in MHD power systems with the design, construction, and integrated testing of 50 MW{sub t} power train components which are prototypical of the equipment that will be used in an early commercial scale MHD utility retrofit. Long duration testing of the integrated power train at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana will be performed, so that by the early 1990's, an engineering data base on the reliability, availability, maintainability and performance of the system will be available to allow scaleup of the prototypical designs to the next development level. This Sixteenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period May 1, 1991 to July 31, 1991.

  16. The effect of a brief northward turning in IMF Bz on solar wind-magnetosphere coupling in a global MHD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Kevin H.; Lopez, Ramon E.; Bruntz, Robert

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we examine the response of the magnetosphere-ionopshere (M-I) system to a transient northward excursion in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global MHD simulation. The simulated IMF transitions hold from a steady southward IMF to a steady northward IMF before suddenly transitioning back to southward IMF after 20 min. Once the IMF returns southward, the M-I system is in a state of reduced energy dissipation for approximately an hour as it reconfigures back into a standard southward IMF configuration. We find that the northward IMF excursion affects both the viscous and reconnection interactions with the solar wind. The flow of plasma in the magnetosphere is significantly disrupted by the reconnection cycle under northward IMF. This reduce the transfer of mechanical energy from the solar wind due to the viscous interaction, and the magnetosphere-ionosphere system is in a mixed topological configuration containing elements produced by both of southward IMF reconnection and the Dungey cycle, as well as northward IMF reconnection and the presence of reverse cell convection at high latitudes. The effects of the transient northward IMF must be completely cleared out before the system can return to an optimal state of energy transfer characteristic of steady southward IMF. As a result, a simple 20 min excursion of northward IMF can put the magnetosphere-ionosphere system into a reduced state of coupling to the solar wind for some time following the return to steady southward IMF; for LFM we saw a reduced state lasting an hour

  17. Realistic Modeling of Multi-Scale MHD Dynamics of the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitiashvili, Irina; Mansour, Nagi N.; Wray, Alan; Couvidat, Sebastian; Yoon, Seokkwan; Kosovichev, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Realistic 3D radiative MHD simulations open new perspectives for understanding the turbulent dynamics of the solar surface, its coupling to the atmosphere, and the physical mechanisms of generation and transport of non-thermal energy. Traditionally, plasma eruptions and wave phenomena in the solar atmosphere are modeled by prescribing artificial driving mechanisms using magnetic or gas pressure forces that might arise from magnetic field emergence or reconnection instabilities. In contrast, our 'ab initio' simulations provide a realistic description of solar dynamics naturally driven by solar energy flow. By simulating the upper convection zone and the solar atmosphere, we can investigate in detail the physical processes of turbulent magnetoconvection, generation and amplification of magnetic fields, excitation of MHD waves, and plasma eruptions. We present recent simulation results of the multi-scale dynamics of quiet-Sun regions, and energetic effects in the atmosphere and compare with observations. For the comparisons we calculate synthetic spectro-polarimetric data to model observational data of SDO, Hinode, and New Solar Telescope.

  18. Investigation of physico-chemical processes in hypervelocity MHD-gas acceleration wind tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Alfyorov, V.I.; Dmitriev, L.M.; Yegorov, B.V.; Markachev, Yu.E.

    1995-12-31

    The calculation results for nonequilibrium physicochemical processes in the circuit of the hypersonic MHD-gas acceleration wind tunnel are presented. The flow in the primary nozzle is shown to be in thermodynamic equilibrium at To=3400 K, Po=(2{approximately}3)x10{sup 5} Pa, M=2 used in the plenum chamber. Variations in the static pressure due to oxidation reaction of Na, K are pointed out. The channels of energy transfer from the electric field to different degrees of freedom of an accelerated gas with Na, K seeds are considered. The calculation procedure for gas dynamic and kinetic processes in the MHD-channel using measured parameters is suggested. The calculated results are compared with the data obtained in a thermodynamic gas equilibrium assumption. The flow in the secondary nozzle is calculated under the same assumptions and the gas parameters at its exit are evaluated. Particular attention is given to the influence of seeds on flows over bodies. It is shown that the seeds exert a very small influence on the flow behind a normal shock wave. The seeds behind an oblique shock wave accelerate deactivation of vibrations of N{sub 2}, but this effect is insignificant.

  19. The effect of spall on Lg waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yong-Feng; Chen, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Hai-Ming

    2005-05-01

    The generation mechanism of Lg wave from underground nuclear explosion is still not clear at present. The general viewpoint is that the S wave generated by the near-source scattering of explosion-generated Rg appears to be the primary contributor to the low-frequency Lg (0.2 2.0 Hz) from nuclear explosions. The viewpoint is supported by the analysis of regional data from several Yucca Flats, NTS explosions by Patton and Taylor (1995), who further indicated that the prominent low-frequency spectral null in Lg is due to Rg from a compensated linear vector dipole (CLVD) source. In the paper, the data from Kazakstan Test Sites are investigated by a spectral ratio method. We have found that the spectral ratio of Lg waves is characterized by a spectral scalloping and a pronounced null, and the spectral null does not shift with spall dwell times, showing a strong dependence on shot depth and a very good agreement with those expected from Rg due to a CLVD source.

  20. Effect of parallel refraction on magnetospheric upper hybrid waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, J.; Kennel, C. F.

    1984-01-01

    Large amplitude (not less than 10 mV/m) electrostatic plasma waves near the upper hybrid (UH) frequency have been observed from 0 to 50 deg magnetic latitude (MLAT) during satellite plasma-pause crossings. A three-dimensional numerical ray-tracing calculation, based on an electron distribution measured during a GEOS 1 dayside intense upper-hybrid wave event, suggests how UH waves might achieve such large amplitudes away from the geomagnetic equator. Refractive effects largely control the wave amplification and, in particular, the unavoidable refraction due to parallel geomagnetic field gradients restricts growth to levels below those observed. However, a cold electron density gradient parallel to the field can lead to upper hybrid wave growth that can account for the observed emission levels.

  1. Bathymetric Effects on a Tropical Cyclone Wave Field at Landfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C. W.; Walsh, E. J.; Vandemark, D.; Krabill, W. B.; Garcia, A. W.; Houston, S. H.; Powell, M. D.; Black, P. G.; Marks, F. D.; Gerlach, John C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    On 26 August 1998, the NASA Scanning Radar Altimeter (SRA) flew aboard one of the WP-3D hurricane research aircraft to document the sea surface directional wave spectrum in the region between Charleston, SC and Cape Hatteras, NC, as Bonnie, a large Category 3 hurricane, was making landfall near Wilmington, NC. Two days earlier, the SRA had documented the wave field spatial variation in open water when Hurricane Bonnie was 400 km east of Abaco Island, Bahamas. Bonnie was similar in size during the two flights, but the maximum speed in the NOAA Hurricane Research Division surface wind analysis was 15% lower prior to landfall (39 m/s) than it had been in the open ocean (46 m/s). This was compensated for by its faster movement prior to landfall (9.5 m/s) than when it was encountered in the open ocean (5 m/s). The slower movement matched the group velocity of waves of 65 m length, so waves at the peak of the spectrum outdistanced the storm as soon as they were generated. The higher translation speed prior to landfall matched the group velocity of waves of 230 m length, significantly increasing the effective fetch and duration of waves near the peak of the spectrum which propagated in the direction of the storm track. The open ocean wave height variation indicated that Hurricane Bonnie would have produced waves of 11 m significant wave height on the shore northeast of Wilmington had it not been for the continental shelf. The bathymetry distributed the steepening and breaking process across the shelf so that the wavelength and wave height were reduced gradually as the shore was approached. The wave height 5 km from shore was about 4 m.

  2. Biological effects of laser-induced stress waves

    SciTech Connect

    Doukas, A.; Lee, S.; McAuliffe, D.

    1995-12-31

    Laser-induced stress waves can be generated by one of the following mechanisms: Optical breakdown, ablation or rapid heating of an absorbing medium. These three modes of laser interaction with matter allow the investigation of cellular and tissue responses to stress waves with different characteristics and under different conditions. The most widely studied phenomena are those of the collateral damage seen in photodisruption in the eye and in 193 run ablation of cornea and skin. On the other hand, the therapeutic application of laser-induced stress waves has been limited to the disruption of noncellular material such as renal stones, atheromatous plaque and vitreous strands. The effects of stress waves to cells and tissues can be quite disparate. Stress waves can fracture tissue, damage cells, and increase the permeability of the plasma membrane. The viability of cell cultures exposed to stress waves increases with the peak stress and the number of pulses applied. The rise time of the stress wave also influences the degree of cell injury. In fact, cell viability, as measured by thymidine incorporation, correlates better with the stress gradient than peak stress. Recent studies have also established that stress waves induce a transient increase of the permeability of the plasma membrane in vitro. In addition, if the stress gradient is below the damage threshhold, the cells remain viable. Thus, stress waves can be useful as a means of drug delivery, increasing the intracellular drug concentration and allowing the use of drugs which are impermeable to the cell membrane. The present studies show that it is important to create controllable stress waves. The wavelength tunability and the micropulse structure of the free electron laser is ideal for generating stress waves with independently adjustable parameters, such as rise time, duration and peak stress.

  3. The effect of random Alfven waves on the propagation of hydromagnetic waves in a finite-beta plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamabata, Hiromitsu; Namikawa, Tomikazu

    1990-01-01

    Using first-order smoothing theory, Fourier analysis and perturbation methods, the evolution equation of the wave spectrum as well as the nonlinear forces generated by random Alfven waves in a finite-beta plasma with phenomenological Landau-damping effects are obtained. The effect of microscale random Alfven waves on the propagation of large-scale hydromagnetic waves is also investigated by solving the mean-field equations. It is shown that parallel-propagating random Alfven waves are modulationally stable and that obliquely propagating random Alfven waves can be modulationally unstable when the energy of random waves is converted to slow magnetoacoustic waves that can be Landau-damped, providing a dissipation mechanism for the Alfven waves.

  4. Soret and Dufour effects on MHD slip flow with thermal radiation over a porous rotating infinite disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjali Devi, S. P.; Uma Devi, R.

    2011-04-01

    In this investigation, thermal radiation effect over an electrically conducting, Newtonian fluid in a steady laminar magnetohydrodynamic convective flow over a porous rotating infinite disk with the consideration of heat and mass transfer in the presence of Soret and Dufour diffusion effects is investigated. The partial differential equations governing the problem under consideration are transformed by a similarity transformation into a system of ordinary differential equations which are solved numerically using fourth order Runge-Kutta based shooting method. The effects of the magnetic interaction parameter, slip flow parameter, Soret number, Dufour number, Schmidt number, radiation parameter, Prandtl number and suction parameter on the fluid velocity, temperature and concentration distributions in the regime are depicted graphically and are analyzed in detail. The corresponding skin-friction coefficients, the Nusselt number and the Sherwood number are also calculated and displayed in tables showing the effects of various parameters on them.

  5. Surface Sediment Effects on Teleseismic P Wave Ground Displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Nolet, G.; Dahlen, F. A.

    2001-12-01

    Large scatter in short-period body-wave amplitude measurements over short distances have been widely observed. "Station corrections" are essential when amplitude data are applied to determine event magnitude, and, occasionally, to explore deeper subsurface structures. In this paper, we investigated the effects of surface sediments on teleseismic P wave displacement amplitude assuming layered crust structures. Local scattering effects are ignored since we are interested in the teleseismic waves with dominant frequency well below 1 Hz. Generally, displacements are amplified as seismic waves propagate into a low-impedance sediment layer. As the wavefield interacts with a surface sediment layer, P wave reverberations de-amplify the ground displacement recorded by seismic sensors at the surface. The de-amplification effect is dependent on the period of the seismic wave. Numerical calculations show when the period of the seismic wave is much longer than P wave 2-way travel time in the surface sediment layer, it doesn't "feel" the existance of the sediment layer, which leaves amplitudes intact except for about a factor of 2 amplification effect caused by the free-surface. At shorter period, the amplification effect is approximately linearly-dependent on the period of seismic waves. When the period of seismic wave is short and within a couple of times of the P wave 2-way travel time in the sediment, the amplification effects varies greatly over a small range of seismic wave period. It indicates that surface displacement amplitude of high-frequency P wave could vary laterally up to an order of magnitude where P wave velocity in the surface weathering layer is low (less than few hundred meters per second) and lateral variations of the relative impedance are extremely large. A 7-layer 2x2 degree global crust model, {Crust2.0} (Laske et al) is used to estimate frequency-dependent station corrections in the continents and the stable period range of teleseismic P waves for

  6. The effect of nonlinear traveling waves on rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui-Correa, Juan Carlos

    2013-08-01

    The effect of the housing stiffness on nonlinear traveling waves is presented in this work. It was found that the housing controls the synchronization of nonlinear elements and it allows nonlinear waves to travel through the structure. This phenomenon was observed in a gearbox with a soft housing, and the phenomenon was reproduced with a lump-mass dynamic model. The model included a pair of gears, the rolling bearings and the housing. The model considered all the nonlinear effects. Numerical and experimental results were analyzed with a time-frequency method using the Morlet wavelet function. A compound effect was observed when the nonlinear waves travel between the gears and the bearings: the waves increased the dynamic load amplitude and add another periodic load.

  7. MHD stability of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chance, M.S. Sun, Y.C.; Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.E.; Okabayashi, M.

    1992-08-01

    This paper will give an overview of the some of the methods which are used to simulate the ideal MHD properties of tokamak plasmas. A great deal of the research in this field is necessarily numerical and the substantial progress made during the past several years has roughly paralleled the continuing availability of more advanced supercomputers. These have become essential to accurately model the complex configurations necessary for achieving MHD stable reactor grade conditions. Appropriate tokamak MHD equilibria will be described. Then the stability properties is discussed in some detail, emphasizing the difficulties of obtaining stable high {beta} discharges in plasmas in which the current is mainly ohmically driven and thus demonstrating the need for tailoring the current and pressure profiles of the plasma away from the ohmic state. The outline of this paper will roughly follow the physics development to attain the second region of stability in the PBX-M device at The Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory.

  8. The discrete Alfvén wave spectrum induced by the Hall current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Atsushi; Hirose, Akira; Mahajan, Swadesh; Ohsaki, Shuichi

    2004-11-01

    It is shown that the discrete Alfvén wave induced by the Hall current [S. Ohsaki and S. M. Mahajan, Phys. Plasmas 11, 898 (2004)] is equivalent to the kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW). The Hall magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dispersion relation can be fully recovered from the electromagnetic kinetic dispersion relation provided the ion temperature is negligible and the magnetosonic perturbation is retained. Effects of a finite ion temperature on the Hall MHD have been identified in the first order of ion FLR parameter and β_i. As expected, the MHD mode equation becomes anisotropic because of the double adiabaticity in ion dynamics even when the ion temperature is isotropic.

  9. Observational Tests of Recent MHD Turbulence Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sanjoy

    2001-06-01

    This grant seeks to analyze the Heliospheric Missions data to test current theories on the angular dependence (with respect to mean magnetic field direction) of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the solar wind. Solar wind turbulence may be composed of two or more dynamically independent components. Such components include magnetic pressure-balanced structures, velocity shears, quasi-2D turbulence, and slab (Alfven) waves. We use a method, developed during the first two years of this grant, for extracting the individual reduced spectra of up to three separate turbulence components from a single spacecraft time series. The method has been used on ISEE-3 data, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, Ulysses, and Voyager data samples. The correlation of fluctuations as a function of angle between flow direction and magnetic-field direction is the focus of study during the third year.

  10. Observational Tests of Recent MHD Turbulence Perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Sanjoy; Guhathakurta, M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This grant seeks to analyze the Heliospheric Missions data to test current theories on the angular dependence (with respect to mean magnetic field direction) of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the solar wind. Solar wind turbulence may be composed of two or more dynamically independent components. Such components include magnetic pressure-balanced structures, velocity shears, quasi-2D turbulence, and slab (Alfven) waves. We use a method, developed during the first two years of this grant, for extracting the individual reduced spectra of up to three separate turbulence components from a single spacecraft time series. The method has been used on ISEE-3 data, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, Ulysses, and Voyager data samples. The correlation of fluctuations as a function of angle between flow direction and magnetic-field direction is the focus of study during the third year.

  11. Alpha-Driven MHD and MHD-Induced Alpha Loss in TFTR DT Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zuoyang

    1996-11-01

    Theoretical calculation and numerical simulation indicate that there can be interesting interactions between alpha particles and MHD activity which can adversely affect the performance of a tokamak reactor (e.g., ITER). These interactions include alpha-driven MHD, like the toroidicity-induced-Alfven-eigenmode (TAE) and MHD induced alpha particle losses or redistribution. Both phenomena have been observed in recent TFTR DT experiments. Weak alpha-driven TAE activity was observed in a NBI-heated DT experiment characterized by high q0 ( >= 2) and low core magnetic shear. The TAE mode appears at ~30-100 ms after the neutral beam turning off approximately as predicted by theory. The mode has an amplitude measured by magnetic coils at the edge tildeB_p ~1 mG, frequency ~150-190 kHz and toroidal mode number ~2-3. It lasts only ~ 30-70 ms and has been seen only in DT discharges with fusion power level about 1.5-2.0 MW. Numerical calculation using NOVA-K code shows that this type of plasma has a big TAE gap. The calculated TAE frequency and mode number are close to the observation. (2) KBM-induced alpha particle loss^1. In some high-β, high fusion power DT experiments, enhanced alpha particle losses were observed to be correlated to the high frequency MHD modes with f ~100-200 kHz (the TAE frequency would be two-times higher) and n ~5-10. These modes are localized around the peak plasma pressure gradient and have ballooning characteristics. Alpha loss increases by 30-100% during the modes. Particle orbit simulations show the added loss results from wave-particle resonance. Linear instability analysis indicates that the plasma is unstable to the kinetic MHD ballooning modes (KBM) driven primarily by strong local pressure gradients. ----------------- ^1Z. Chang, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76 (1996) 1071. In collaberation with R. Nazikian, G.-Y. Fu, S. Batha, R. Budny, L. Chen, D. Darrow, E. Fredrickson, R. Majeski, D. Mansfield, K. McGuire, G. Rewoldt, G. Taylor, R. White, K

  12. Immersed boundary method for the MHD flows of liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriadis, D. G. E.; Kassinos, S. C.; Votyakov, E. V.

    2009-02-01

    Wall-bounded magnetohydrodynamic (MHD hereafter) flows are of great theoretical and practical interest. Even for laminar cases, MHD simulations are associated with very high computational cost due to the resolution requirements for the Hartmann and side layers developing in the presence of solid obstacles. In the presence of turbulence, these difficulties are further compounded. Thus, MHD simulations in complex geometries are currently a challenge. The immersed boundary (IB hereafter) method is a reliable numerical tool for efficient hydrodynamic field simulations in arbitrarily geometries, but it has not yet been extended for MHD simulations. The present study forms the first attempt to apply the IB methodology for the computation of both the hydrodynamic and MHD fields. A consistent numerical methodology is presented that is appropriate for efficient 3D MHD simulations in geometrically complicated domains using cartesian flow solvers. For that purpose, a projection scheme for the electric current density is presented, based on an electric potential correction algorithm. A suitable forcing scheme for electric density currents in the vicinity of non-conducting immersed surfaces is also proposed. The proposed methodology has been first extensively tested for Hartmann layers in fully-developed and developing channel and duct flows at Hartmann numbers Ha=500-2000. In order to demonstrate the potential of the method, the three-dimensional MHD flow around a circular cylinder at Reynolds number Re=200 is also presented. The effects of grid resolution and variable arrangement on the simulation accuracy and consistency were examined. When compared with existing numerical or analytic solutions, excellent agreement was found for all the cases considered. The proposed projection and forcing schemes for current densities were found capable of satisfying the charge conservation law in the presence of immersed non-conducting boundaries. Finally, we show how the proposed

  13. Problems in nonlinear resistive MHD

    SciTech Connect

    Turnbull, A.D.; Strait, E.J.; La Haye, R.J.; Chu, M.S.; Miller, R.L.

    1998-12-31

    Two experimentally relevant problems can relatively easily be tackled by nonlinear MHD codes. Both problems require plasma rotation in addition to the nonlinear mode coupling and full geometry already incorporated into the codes, but no additional physics seems to be crucial. These problems discussed here are: (1) nonlinear coupling and interaction of multiple MHD modes near the B limit and (2) nonlinear coupling of the m/n = 1/1 sawtooth mode with higher n gongs and development of seed islands outside q = 1.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) channel corner seal

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.

    1980-01-01

    A corner seal for an MHD duct includes a compressible portion which contacts the duct walls and an insulating portion which contacts the electrodes, sidewall bars and insulators. The compressible portion may be a pneumatic or hydraulic gasket or an open-cell foam rubber. The insulating portion is segmented into a plurality of pieces of the same thickness as the electrodes, insulators and sidewall bars and aligned therewith, the pieces aligned with the insulator being of a different size from the pieces aligned with the electrodes and sidewall bars to create a stepped configuration along the corners of the MHD channel.

  15. Energy structure of MHD flow coupling with outer resistance circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z. Y.; Liu, Y. J.; Chen, Y. Q.; Peng, Z. L.

    2015-08-01

    Energy structure of MHD flow coupling with outer resistance circuit is studied to illuminate qualitatively and quantitatively the energy relation of this basic MHD flow system with energy input and output. Energy structure are analytically derived based on the Navier-Stocks equations for two-dimensional fully-developed flow and generalized Ohm's Law. The influences of applied magnetic field, Hall parameter and conductivity on energy structure are discussed based on the analytical results. Associated energies in MHD flow are deduced and validated by energy conservation. These results reveal that energy structure consists of two sub structures: electrical energy structure and internal energy structure. Energy structure and its sub structures provide an integrated theoretical energy path of the MHD system. Applied magnetic field and conductivity decrease the input energy, dissipation by fluid viscosity and internal energy but increase the ratio of electrical energy to input energy, while Hall parameter has the opposite effects. These are caused by their different effects on Bulk velocity, velocity profiles, voltage and current in outer circuit. Understanding energy structure helps MHD application designers to actively adjust the allocation of different parts of energy so that it is more reasonable and desirable.

  16. Quantum effects on compressional Alfven waves in compensated semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, M. R.

    2015-03-15

    Amplitude modulation of a compressional Alfven wave in compensated electron-hole semiconductor plasmas is considered in the quantum magnetohydrodynamic regime in this paper. The important ingredients of this study are the inclusion of the particle degeneracy pressure, exchange-correlation potential, and the quantum diffraction effects via the Bohm potential in the momentum balance equations of the charge carriers. A modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived for the evolution of the slowly varying amplitude of the compressional Alfven wave by employing the standard reductive perturbation technique. Typical values of the parameters for GaAs, GaSb, and GaN semiconductors are considered in analyzing the linear and nonlinear dispersions of the compressional Alfven wave. Detailed analysis of the modulation instability in the long-wavelength regime is presented. For typical parameter ranges of the semiconductor plasmas and at the long-wavelength regime, it is found that the wave is modulationally unstable above a certain critical wavenumber. Effects of the exchange-correlation potential and the Bohm potential in the wave dynamics are also studied. It is found that the effect of the Bohm potential may be neglected in comparison with the effect of the exchange-correlation potential in the linear and nonlinear dispersions of the compressional Alfven wave.

  17. Effects of Emic Waves on the Outer Electron Radiation Belt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, R. B.; Kersten, T.; Glauert, S.; Meredith, N. P.; Fraser, B. J.; Grew, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last few years there has been substantial progress to incorporate wave-particle interactions into global simulation models of the radiation belts. Models of plasmaspheric hiss and whistler mode chorus make a huge impact on the variability of the relativistic electron flux. Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves also cause electron loss from the radiation belts but their effectiveness has not been fully quantified. Here we present the results of simulations using a new chorus diffusion matrix and demonstrate that in principle the outer electron radiation belt can be formed by wave acceleration from a soft electron spectrum. We also describe a new model for EMIC waves. Wave data derived from the fluxgate magnetometer on CRRES was used to define the power spectrum as a function of geomagnetic activity, L* and magnetic local time for Hydrogen and Helium band waves. We show that wave power depends on activity as measured by AE and Kp. Using an assumed ion composition, and previously defined plasma density models the PADIE code was used to calculate bounce and drift averaged diffusion rates for EMIC waves and incorporated into the BAS Radiation Belt Model together with whistler mode chorus, plasmaspheric hiss and radial diffusion. Thus the model can be driven by a time sequence of Kp with appropriate boundary conditions. By simulating a 100 day period in 1990 we show that the model can produce electron flux up to energies of several MeV. When EMIC waves are included they cause a significant reduction in the electron flux for energies greater than 2 MeV but only for pitch angles lower than about 60 degrees. The simulations show that the distribution of electrons left behind in space looks like a pancake distribution at MeV energies. We show that EMIC waves cannot remove electrons at all pitch angles even at 30 MeV and are therefore unlikely to set an upper energy limit to the outer radiation belt.

  18. Resonance absorption of compressible magnetohydrodynamic waves at thin 'surfaces'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.; Yang, G.

    1988-01-01

    The behavior of plasma and fields in the transition layer supporting MHD surface waves is analyzed, assuming that the total pressure fluctuations, delta-P(tot), can be taken to be nearly constant across this thin transition layer, with a value nearly the same as would be obtained if the MHD wave were supported by a truly discontinuous surface. Regarding therefore delta-P(tot) as known, the plasma and field equations in the transition layer were cast into a form in which delta-P(tot) appeared as a driving term. Among the two resonances that appear (the cusp resonance and the Alfven resonance) special attention is given to the Alfven resonance, which affects the velocity and magnetic field components normal to the background magnetic field. The effects of three types of viscosity on the Alfven resonance are considered, and it is shown that energy is pumped out of the surface wave into thin layers surrounding the resonant field lines.

  19. An assessment of full-wave effects on the propagation and absorption of lower hybrid waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John

    2008-11-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons. Consequently these waves are well-suited to driving current in the plasma periphery where the electron temperature is lower, making LH current drive (LHCD) a promising technique for off--axis (r/a˜0.60) current profile control in reactor grade plasmas. Established modeling techniques use WKB expansions with non-Maxwellian self-consistent distributions. Higher order WKB expansions have shown some effects on the parallel wavenumber evolution and consequently on the damping due to diffraction [1]. A massively parallel version of the TORIC full-wave electromagnetic field solver valid in the LH range of frequencies has been developed [2] and applied to scenarios at the density and magnetic field characteristic of devices such as Alcator C-Mod and ITER [B0 5 T, ne 1x10^20 m-3]. We find that retaining full wave effects due to diffraction and focusing has a strong effect on the location of wave absorption. Diffraction occurs at caustic surfaces and in resonance cones resulting in a large upshift of the parallel wavenumber and localized power deposition. For some values of density and magnetic field when the waves are fully accessible to the center of the plasma, the full wave description predicts all power being damped at larger radii (r/a ˜ 0.7) in contrast to ray tracing which shows more central power absorption. By incorporating a Fokker-Planck code for self-consistent treatment of the electron distribution and using an synthetic hard X-ray diagnostic we compare the code predictions by both full wave and ray tracing methods with recent Alcator C-Mod experiments. We will compare full-wave and ray tracing for low and high single pass damping regimes. [0pt] [1] G. Pereverzev, Nucl. Fusion 32 1091 (1991). [0pt] [2] J. C. Wright, E. J. Valeo, C. K. Phillips and P. T. Bonoli, Comm. in Comput. Physics 4 545 (2008).

  20. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Near-shore Wave Fields: Model Generation Validation and Evaluation - Kaneohe Bay HI.

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    The numerical model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) , was used to simulate wave conditions in Kaneohe Bay, HI in order to determine the effects of wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices on the propagation of waves into shore. A nested SWAN model was validated then used to evaluate a range of initial wave conditions: significant wave heights (H s ) , peak periods (T p ) , and mean wave directions ( MWD) . Differences between wave height s in the presence and absence of WEC device s were assessed at locations in shore of the WEC array. The maximum decrease in wave height due to the WEC s was predicted to be approximately 6% at 5 m and 10 m water depths. Th is occurred for model initiation parameters of H s = 3 m (for 5 m water depth) or 4 m (10 m water depth) , T p = 10 s, and MWD = 330deg . Subsequently, bottom orbital velocities were found to decrease by about 6%.

  1. Winds From Luminous Late-Type Stars. 1; The Effects of Nonlinear Alfven Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Airapetian, V. S.; Ofman, L.; Robinson, R. D.; Carpenter, K.; Davila, J.

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling of winds from luminous late-type stars using a 2.5-dimensional, nonlinear MHD computer code. We assume that the wind is generated within an initially hydrostatic atmosphere and is driven by torsional Alfven waves generated at the stellar surface. Two cases of atmospheric topology are considered: case I has longitudinally uniform density distribution and isotropic radial magnetic field over the stellar surface, and case II has an isotropic, radial magnetic field with a transverse density gradient, which we refer to as an "atmospheric hole." We use the same set of boundary conditions for both models. The calculations are designed to model a cool luminous star, for which we assume an initial hydrostatic pressure scale height of 0.072 Stellar Radius, an Alfven wave speed of 92 km/s at the surface, and a wave period of 76 days, which roughly corresponds with the convective turnover time. For case I the calculations produce a wind with terminal velocity of about 22 km/s and a mass loss rate comparable to the expected value of 10(exp -6) Solar Mass/yr. For case II we predict a two-component wind: a fast (25 km/s) and relatively dense wind outside of the atmospheric hole and a slow (1.5 km/s), rarefied wind inside of the hole.

  2. MHD forced convective laminar boundary layer flow from a convectively heated moving vertical plate with radiation and transpiration effect.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Jashim; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, A I Md

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional steady forced convective flow of a Newtonian fluid past a convectively heated permeable vertically moving plate in the presence of a variable magnetic field and radiation effect has been investigated numerically. The plate moves either in assisting or opposing direction to the free stream. The plate and free stream velocities are considered to be proportional to x(m) whilst the magnetic field and mass transfer velocity are taken to be proportional to x((m-1)/2) where x is the distance along the plate from the leading edge of the plate. Instead of using existing similarity transformations, we use a linear group of transformations to transform the governing equations into similarity equations with relevant boundary conditions. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are presented to show the effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as on the friction factor, rate of heat and mass transfer. It is found that the rate of heat transfer elevates with the mass transfer velocity, convective heat transfer, Prandtl number, velocity ratio and the magnetic field parameters. It is also found that the rate of mass transfer enhances with the mass transfer velocity, velocity ratio, power law index and the Schmidt number, whilst it suppresses with the magnetic field parameter. Our results are compared with the results existing in the open literature. The comparisons are satisfactory. PMID:23741295

  3. MHD Forced Convective Laminar Boundary Layer Flow from a Convectively Heated Moving Vertical Plate with Radiation and Transpiration Effect

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Jashim; Khan, Waqar A.; Ismail, A. I. Md.

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional steady forced convective flow of a Newtonian fluid past a convectively heated permeable vertically moving plate in the presence of a variable magnetic field and radiation effect has been investigated numerically. The plate moves either in assisting or opposing direction to the free stream. The plate and free stream velocities are considered to be proportional to whilst the magnetic field and mass transfer velocity are taken to be proportional to where is the distance along the plate from the leading edge of the plate. Instead of using existing similarity transformations, we use a linear group of transformations to transform the governing equations into similarity equations with relevant boundary conditions. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are presented to show the effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as on the friction factor, rate of heat and mass transfer. It is found that the rate of heat transfer elevates with the mass transfer velocity, convective heat transfer, Prandtl number, velocity ratio and the magnetic field parameters. It is also found that the rate of mass transfer enhances with the mass transfer velocity, velocity ratio, power law index and the Schmidt number, whilst it suppresses with the magnetic field parameter. Our results are compared with the results existing in the open literature. The comparisons are satisfactory. PMID:23741295

  4. Turning water into rock: The inverted waves effect.

    PubMed

    Häkkinen, Jukka; Gröhn, Lauri

    2016-01-01

    Humans perceive shape in two-dimensional shaded images, and turning such an image upside down can result in inversion of the relief of this image. Previous research indicates that this inversion is caused by assumptions related to overhead illumination, global convexity and viewpoint above the surface. In our article, we describe the inverted waves effect, in which turning an image of waves upside down changes its relief and also its perceived material properties. PMID:27482371

  5. Effect of Extra Dimensions on Gravitational Waves from Cosmic Strings

    SciTech Connect

    O'Callaghan, Eimear; Chadburn, Sarah; Geshnizjani, Ghazal; Gregory, Ruth; Zavala, Ivonne

    2010-08-20

    We show how the motion of cosmic superstrings in extra dimensions can modify the gravitational wave signal from cusps. Additional dimensions both round off cusps, as well as reducing the probability of their formation, and thus give a significant dimension dependent damping of the gravitational waves. We look at the implication of this effect for LIGO and LISA, as well as commenting on more general frequency bands.

  6. Turning water into rock: The inverted waves effect

    PubMed Central

    Gröhn, Lauri

    2016-01-01

    Humans perceive shape in two-dimensional shaded images, and turning such an image upside down can result in inversion of the relief of this image. Previous research indicates that this inversion is caused by assumptions related to overhead illumination, global convexity and viewpoint above the surface. In our article, we describe the inverted waves effect, in which turning an image of waves upside down changes its relief and also its perceived material properties. PMID:27482371

  7. Effect of extra dimensions on gravitational waves from cosmic strings.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Eimear; Chadburn, Sarah; Geshnizjani, Ghazal; Gregory, Ruth; Zavala, Ivonne

    2010-08-20

    We show how the motion of cosmic superstrings in extra dimensions can modify the gravitational wave signal from cusps. Additional dimensions both round off cusps, as well as reducing the probability of their formation, and thus give a significant dimension dependent damping of the gravitational waves. We look at the implication of this effect for LIGO and LISA, as well as commenting on more general frequency bands. PMID:20868089

  8. Sensitivity of Josephson-effect millimeter-wave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohta, H.; Feldman, M. J.; Parrish, P. T.; Chiao, R. Y.

    1974-01-01

    The noise temperature and the minimum detectable temperature of a Josephson junction in video detection of microwave and millimeter-wave radiation has been calculated. We use the well-known method based on a Fokker-Planck equation. The noise temperature can be very close to ambient temperature. Because its predetection bandwidth is very wide, a Josephson-effect radio telescope receiver can have a minimum detectable temperature better than that of a traveling-wave maser.

  9. Simultaneous effects of partial slip and thermal-diffusion and diffusion-thermo on steady MHD convective flow due to a rotating disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, M. M.; Hayat, T.; Erfani, E.; Mohimanian Pour, S. A.; Hendi, Awatif A.

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of present research is to derive analytical expressions for the solution of steady MHD convective and slip flow due to a rotating disk. Viscous dissipation and Ohmic heating are taken into account. The nonlinear partial differential equations for MHD laminar flow of the homogeneous fluid are reduced to a system of five coupled ordinary differential equations by using similarity transformation. The derived solution is expressed in series of exponentially-decaying functions using homotopy analysis method (HAM). The convergence of the obtained series solutions is examined. Finally some figures are sketched to show the accuracy of the applied method and assessment of various slip parameter γ, magnetic field parameter M, Eckert Ec, Schmidt Sc and Soret Sr numbers on the profiles of the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration distributions. Validity of the obtained results are verified by the numerical results.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Turbulent MHD Flows Using an Iterative PNS Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, Hiromasa; Tannehill, John C.; Mehta, Unmeel B.

    2003-01-01

    A new parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) algorithm has been developed to efficiently compute magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows in the low magnetic Reynolds number regime. In this regime, the electrical conductivity is low and the induced magnetic field is negligible compared to the applied magnetic field. The MHD effects are modeled by introducing source terms into the PNS equation which can then be solved in a very efficient manner. To account for upstream (elliptic) effects, the flowfields are computed using multiple streamwise sweeps with an iterated PNS algorithm. Turbulence has been included by modifying the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model to account for MHD effects. The new algorithm has been used to compute both laminar and turbulent, supersonic, MHD flows over flat plates and supersonic viscous flows in a rectangular MHD accelerator. The present results are in excellent agreement with previous complete Navier-Stokes calculations.

  11. Numerical analysis for MHD peristaltic transport of Carreau-Yasuda fluid in a curved channel with Hall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, F. M.; Hayat, T.; Alsaedi, A.

    2015-05-01

    Impact of applied magnetic field on the peristaltic transport of Carreau-Yasuda fluid in a curved conduit is analyzed in this article. Hall effects are also taken into consideration. Lubrication approach is utilized in problem formulation. Resulting nonlinear system is solved numerically. Results for axial velocity, pressure gradient, pressure rise per wavelength and stream function are obtained and studied graphically. Results revealed that for small values of curvature parameter the fluid velocity is not symmetric about the centerline. Also increase in the value of Hall parameter balances the magnetic influence of applied magnetic field by some extent. Further, the Carreau-Yasuda fluid possesses large size of trapped bolus when compared with the Newtonian fluid.

  12. Thermal radiation effects on MHD flow of a micropolar fluid over a stretching surface with variable thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Mostafa A. A.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of variable thermal conductivity and radiation on the flow and heat transfer of an electrically conducting micropolar fluid over a continuously stretching surface with varying temperature in the presence of a magnetic field are considered. The surface temperature is assumed to vary as a power-law temperature. The governing conservation equations of mass, momentum, angular momentum and energy are converted into a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations by means of similarity transformation. The resulting system of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations is solved numerically. The numerical results show that the thermal boundary thickness increases as the thermal conductivity parameter S increases, while it decreases as the radiation parameter F increases. Also, it was found that the Nusselt number increases as F increases and decreases as S increases.

  13. MHD Stagnation-Point Flow and Heat Transfer with Effects of Viscous Dissipation, Joule Heating and Partial Velocity Slip

    PubMed Central

    Mat Yasin, Mohd Hafizi; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    The steady two-dimensional stagnation-point flow and heat transfer past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with effects of viscous dissipation, Joule heating and partial velocity slip in the presence of a magnetic field is investigated. The partial differential equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using a similarity transformation, before being solved numerically by shooting technique. Results indicate that the skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number increase as magnetic parameter increases. It is found that for the stretching sheet the solution is unique while for the shrinking sheet there exist nonunique solutions (dual solutions) in certain range of parameters. The stability analysis shows that the upper branch solution is stable while the lower branch solution is unstable. PMID:26647651

  14. MHD Stagnation-Point Flow and Heat Transfer with Effects of Viscous Dissipation, Joule Heating and Partial Velocity Slip.

    PubMed

    Yasin, Mohd Hafizi Mat; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    The steady two-dimensional stagnation-point flow and heat transfer past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with effects of viscous dissipation, Joule heating and partial velocity slip in the presence of a magnetic field is investigated. The partial differential equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using a similarity transformation, before being solved numerically by shooting technique. Results indicate that the skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number increase as magnetic parameter increases. It is found that for the stretching sheet the solution is unique while for the shrinking sheet there exist nonunique solutions (dual solutions) in certain range of parameters. The stability analysis shows that the upper branch solution is stable while the lower branch solution is unstable. PMID:26647651

  15. MHD of Aircraft Re-entry: Limits and Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Seller, G.; Capitelli, M.; Longo, S.; Armenise, I.; Bruno, D.

    2005-05-16

    In the present work, starting from classical MHD scheme, based on Maxwell equations, Euler fluid dynamic equations and generalised Ohm law, a critical study of fluid dynamics, electromagnetism, chemical and physical behaviour of plasma is carried out, and then a aircraft re-entry MHD numerical scheme is implemented. This scheme is used for MHD calculations in different conditions, in the range of low magnetic force and intermediate electrical conductivity. Initial imposed magnetic fields are uniform, but also some cases with coil generated magnetic fields are considered. Calculations of magnetic field and induced currents are extended also inside the blunt body. Results show interesting physical and electromagnetic effects. Comparison with other methods shows possible development in keeping into account other physical and chemical effects.

  16. Wave-particle interactions in the radiation belts: effect of wave spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliadis, Dimitris; Tornquist, Mattias; Koepke, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Particle acceleration in Earth's radiation belts is often explain in terms of radial diffusion theory. Some of the most important contributions to diffusive transport are stochastic as well as resonant interactions with low-frequency (Alfven/magnetosonic) waves. While spectra of such waves are traditionally assumed to be broadband and spectrally white, a number of recent studies [Rae et al., 2012; Ozeke et al., 2012] indicate that the spectra of ground geomagnetic pulsations are significantly more complex. We examine power-law spectra in particle simulations in a realistic magnetospheric field configuration and report on their effect on the transport and energization of the pre-storm electron population.

  17. Travelling wave effects in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonflotow, A.

    1983-01-01

    Several aspects of travelling waves in Large Space Structures(LSS) are discussed. The dynamic similarity among LSS's, electric power systems, microwave circuits and communications network is noted. The existence of time lag between actuation and response is illuminated with the aid of simple examples, and their prediction is demonstrated. To prevent echoes, communications lines have matched terminations; this idea is applied to the design of dampers of one dimensional structures. Periodic structures act as mechanical band pass filters. Implications of this behavior are examined on a simple example. It is noted that the implication is twofold; continuum models of periodic lattice structures may err considerably; on the other hand, it is possible to design favorable transmission (and resonance) characteristics into the structure.

  18. Effect of thermal radiation on MHD flow of blood and heat transfer in a permeable capillary in stretching motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, J. C.; Sinha, A.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, a theoretical analysis is presented for magnetohydrodynamic flow of blood in a capillary, its lumen being porous and wall permeable. The unsteadiness in the flow and temperature fields is caused by the time-dependence of the stretching velocity and the surface temperature. Thermal radiation, velocity slip and thermal slip conditions are taken into account. In order to study the flow field as well as the temperature field, the problem is formulated as a boundary value problem consisting of a system of nonlinear coupled partial differential equations. The problem is analysed by using similarity transformation and boundary layer approximation. Solution of the problem is achieved by developing a suitable numerical method and using high speed computers. Computational results for the variation in velocity, temperature, skin-friction co-efficient and Nusselt number are presented in graphical/tabular form. Effects of different parameters are adequately discussed. Since the study takes care of thermal radiation in blood flow, the results reported here are likely to have an important bearing on the therapeutic procedure of hyperthermia, particularly in understanding/regulating blood flow and heat transfer in capillaries.

  19. Ramp temperature and Dufour effects on transient MHD natural convection flow past an infinite vertical plate in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marneni, Narahari; Tippa, Sowmya; Pendyala, Rajashekhar

    2015-12-01

    Analytical investigation of the unsteady natural convection flow along an infinite vertical plate embedded in a porous medium subjected to a ramped temperature boundary condition has been performed in the presence of magnetic field, thermal radiation, heat generation or absorption, chemical reaction and Dufour effect. The governing equations for momentum, energy and concentration have been solved using the Laplace transform technique. The closed-form exact solutions for the velocity, temperature and concentration fields as well as the skin-friction, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are obtained without any restrictions. The influence of pertinent parameters on the fluid velocity, temperature, skin-friction and Nusselt number have been discussed in detailed through graphs. The natural convection due to ramped wall temperature (RWT) has also been compared with that of the constant wall temperature (CWT). It is observed that the fluid velocity and temperature profiles are greater in case of CWT than the case of RWT. Also it is noticed that the flow accelerates with increasing values of heat source parameter, permeability parameter and Dufour number while the flow retardation is observed with increasing values of radiation parameter, magnetic field parameter and Schmidt number.

  20. Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, R.J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Pollina, R.J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Avco-Everett Research Lab., Everett, MA )

    1991-10-01

    The objective of this task is to study the corrosion and arc erosion of MHD materials in a cooperative effort with, and to support, the MHD topping cycle program. Materials tested in the Avco Research Laboratory/Textron facility, or materials which have significant MHD importance, will be analyzed to document their physical deterioration. Conclusions shall be drawn about their wear mechanisms and lifetime in the MHD environment with respect to the following issues; sulfur corrosion, electrochemical corrosion, and arc erosion. The impact of any materials or slag conditions on the level of power output and on the level of leakage current in the MHD channel will also be noted, where appropriate.

  1. Open cycle gas fired MHD power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, S.A. ); Negrini, F. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the main objectives for the present development of gas fired MHD power generation are considered. The state of the world-wide natural gas consumption and its utilization for electricity production is analyzed. The experimental efforts in gas-fired MHD studies are briefly described. The essential features of the two major world gas-fired MHD project - the Ryazan MHDES-580 (U-500) power plant and the Italian 230 MWt retrofit are presented. New suggestions for improving the efficiency of MHD systems and the theoretical and experimental aspects of MHD development are discussed.

  2. MHD integrated topping cycle project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the project is to design and construct prototypical hardware for an integrated MHD topping cycle, and conduct long duration proof-of-concept tests of integrated system at the US DOE Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. The results of the long duration tests will augment the existing engineering design data base on MHD power train reliability, availability, maintainability, and performance, and will serve as a basis for scaling up the topping cycle design to the next level of development, an early commercial scale power plant retrofit. The components of the MHD power train to be designed, fabricated, and tested include: A slagging coal combustor with a rated capacity of 50 MW thermal input, capable of operation with an Eastern (Illinois no. 6) or Western (Montana Rosebud) coal, a segmented supersonic nozzle, a supersonic MHD channel capable of generating at least 1.5 MW of electrical power, a segmented supersonic diffuser section to interface the channel with existing facility quench and exhaust systems, a complete set of current control circuits for local diagonal current control along the channel, and a set of current consolidation circuits to interface the channel with the existing facility inverter.

  3. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the project is to design and construct prototypical hardware for an integrated MHD topping cycle, and conduct long duration proof-of-concept tests of integrated system at the US DOE Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. The results of the long duration tests will augment the existing engineering design data base on MHD power train reliability, availability, maintainability, and performance, and will serve as a basis for scaling up the topping cycle design to the next level of development, an early commercial scale power plant retrofit. The components of the MHD power train to be designed, fabricated, and tested include: A slagging coal combustor with a rated capacity of 50 MW thermal input, capable of operation with an Eastern (Illinois {number sign}6) or Western (Montana Rosebud) coal, a segmented supersonic nozzle, a supersonic MHD channel capable of generating at least 1.5 MW of electrical power, a segmented supersonic diffuser section to interface the channel with existing facility quench and exhaust systems, a complete set of current control circuits for local diagonal current control along the channel, and a set of current consolidation circuits to interface the channel with the existing facility inverter.

  4. Effects of climate change on wave height at the coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, J.

    2003-04-01

    To make progress towards the ultimate objective of predicting coastal vulnerability to climate change, we need to predict the probability of extreme values of sea level and wave height, and their likely variation with changing climate. There is evidence of changes in sea level and wave height on various time-scales. For example, the North Atlantic Oscillation appears to be responsible for increasing wave height in the North Atlantic over recent decades. The impact of changes in wave height in the North Atlantic at the coastline in the North Sea, the Hebrides/Malin Shelf and the English Channel will be quite different. Three different, and contrasting areas are examined The effect of changing sea levels, due to global warming and changes in tides and surge height and frequency, is combined with increases in offshore wave height. Coastal wave modelling, using the WAM and SWAN wave models, provides a useful tool for examining the possible impacts of climate change at the coast. This study is part of a Tyndall Centre project which is examining the vulnerability of the UK coast to changing wave climate and sea level. These changes are likely to be especially important in low-lying areas with coastal wetlands such as the north Norfolk coast, which has been selected as a detailed case study area. In this area there are offshore shallow banks and extensive inter-tidal areas. There are transitions from upper marsh to freshwater grazing marshes, sand dunes, shingle beaches, mudflats and sandflats. Many internationally important and varied habitats are threatened by rising sea levels and changes in storminess due to potential climate change effects. Likely changes in overtopping of coastal embankments, inundation of intertidal areas, sediment transport and coastal erosion are examined. Changes in low water level may be important as well as high water. The second area of study is Christchurch Bay in the English Channel. The English Channel is exposed to swell from the North

  5. Seismic Waves in Finely Layered VTI Media: Poroelasticity, Thomsen Parameters, and Fluid Effects on Shear Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2004-02-24

    Layered earth models are well justified by experience, and provide a simple means of studying fairly general behavior of the elastic and poroelastic characteristics of seismic waves in the earth. Thomsen's anisotropy parameters for weak elastic and poroelastic anisotropy are now commonly used in exploration, and can be conveniently expressed in terms of the layer averages of Backus. Since our main interest is usually in the fluids underground, it would be helpful to have a set of general equations relating the Thomsen parameters as directly as possible to the fluid properties. This end can be achieved in a rather straightforward fashion for these layered earth models, and the present paper develops and then discusses these relations. Furthermore, it is found that, although there are five effective shear moduli for any layered VTI medium, one and only one effective shear modulus for the layered system contains all the dependence of pore fluids on the elastic or poroelastic constants that can be observed in vertically polarized shear waves in VTI media. The effects of the pore fluids on this effective shear modulus can be substantial - an increase of shear wave speed on the order of 10% is shown to be possible when circumstances are favorable -when the medium behaves in an undrained fashion, and the shear modulus fluctuations are large (resulting in strong anisotropy). These effects are expected to be seen at higher frequencies such as sonic and ultrasonic waves for well-logging or laboratory experiments, or at seismic wave frequencies for low permeability regions of reservoirs, prior to hydrofracing. Results presented are strictly for velocity analysis.

  6. Feasibility study of a nonequilibrium MHD accelerator concept for hypersonic propulsion ground testing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ying-Ming; Simmons, G.A.; Nelson, G.L.

    1995-12-31

    A National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) funded research study to evaluate the feasibility of using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) body force accelerators to produce true air simulation for hypersonic propulsion ground testing is discussed in this paper. Testing over the airbreathing portion of a transatmospheric vehicle (TAV) hypersonic flight regime will require high quality air simulation for actual flight conditions behind a bow shock wave (forebody, pre-inlet region) for flight velocities up to Mach 16 and perhaps beyond. Material limits and chemical dissociation at high temperature limit the simulated flight Mach numbers in conventional facilities to less than Mach 12 for continuous and semi-continuous testing and less than Mach 7 for applications requiring true air chemistry. By adding kinetic energy directly to the flow, MHD accelerators avoid the high temperatures and pressures required in the reservoir region of conventional expansion facilities, allowing MHD to produce true flight conditions in flight regimes impossible with conventional facilities. The present study is intended to resolve some of the critical technical issues related to the operation of MHD at high pressure. Funding has been provided only for the first phase of a three to four year feasibility study that would culminate in the demonstration of MHD acceleration under conditions required to produce true flight conditions behind a bow shock wave to flight Mach numbers of 16 or greater. MHD critical issues and a program plan to resolve these are discussed.

  7. Lamb wave propagation in vibrating structures for effective health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xubin; Soh, Chee Kiong; Avvari, Panduranga Vittal

    2015-03-01

    Lamb wave based Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) has received much attention during the past decades for its broad coverage and high sensitivity to damage. Lamb waves can be used to locate and quantify damage in static structures successfully. Nonetheless, structures are usually subjected to various external vibrations or oscillations. Not many studies are reported in the literature concerning the damage detecting ability of Lamb wave in oscillating structures which turns out to be a pivotal issue in the practical application of the SHM technique. For this reason in this study, the propagating capability of Lamb waves in a vibrating thin aluminum plate is examined experimentally. Two circular shaped piezoelectric wafer active transducers are surface-bonded on the aluminum plate where one acted as an actuator and another as a sensor. An arbitrary waveform generator is connected to the actuator for the generation of a windowed tone burst on the aluminum plate. An oscilloscope is connected to the sensor for receiving the traveled waves. An external shaker is used to generate out-of-plane external vibration on the plate structure. Time of flight (TOF) is a crucial parameter in most Lamb wave based SHM studies, which measures wave traveling time from the actuator to sensor. In the present study the influence of the external vibrations on the TOF is investigated. Experiments are performed under different boundary conditions of the plate, such as free-free and fixed by gluing. The effects of external vibrations in the frequency range between 10 Hz to 1000 Hz are analyzed. Comparisons are carried out between the resulting Lamb wave signals from the vibrating plate for different boundary conditions. Experimental results show that the external vibrations in relatively low frequency range do not change the TOF during the application of Lamb wave based SHM.

  8. Development of a MHD code satisfying solenoidal magnetic field condition and its application to Mercury's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, M.; Seki, K.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2007-12-01

    The MHD simulation is one of the powerful methods to understand global structure of the magnetosphere. However, in the Mercury's magnetosphere, kinetic effects of plasma might not be negligible because of its small scale. Statistical trajectory tracing of test particles is an important scheme to investigate the kinetic effects of particles. Previous studies by Delcourt et al. [2003; 2005] used analytical models of electric and magnetic fields that are obtained by rescaling the Earth's magnetosphere and calculated the motion of planetary sodium ions. While this approach is efficient to see the dynamics of heavy ions, resultant properties largely depend on the field models. In order to verify the particle dynamics in the more realistic global configuration of the Mercury's magnetosphere, a self-consistent electric and magnetic field configuration such as that obtained from MHD simulations is required. For studies of the kinetic effects, it is important that the resultant magnetic field (B) satisfies solenoidal condition, i.e., divB=0, to avoid artificial acceleration/deceleration. Aiming at global simulation of the Mercury's magnetosphere, we developed a MHD simulation code that automatically satisfies solenoidal condition for B. To implement the condition, we used vector potential (A) instead of magnetic field itself in the MHD equations. The usage of A automatically guaranteed divB=div(rotA)=0. For an accurate simulation of high Reynolds number magnetofluid, we adopted R-CIP algorithm [Yabe et al., 1991; Xiao et al., 1996] to solve the advection term in the simulation code. The non-advection terms are solved by 4th order Runge-Kutta method or 3rd order Adams-Moulton predictor-corrector method. The code assessment by comparison with previous simulations with TVD algorithm or analytical solutions shows reasonably good ability of energy and mass conservation, and description of MHD discontinuities. A remarkable feature of the new code with A is the precise description

  9. Effects of abnormal excitation on the dynamics of spiral waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min-Yi, Deng; Xue-Liang, Zhang; Jing-Yu, Dai

    2016-01-01

    The effect of physiological and pathological abnormal excitation of a myocyte on the spiral waves is investigated based on the cellular automaton model. When the excitability of the medium is high enough, the physiological abnormal excitation causes the spiral wave to meander irregularly and slowly. When the excitability of the medium is low enough, the physiological abnormal excitation leads to a new stable spiral wave. On the other hand, the pathological abnormal excitation destroys the spiral wave and results in the spatiotemporal chaos, which agrees with the clinical conclusion that the early after depolarization is the pro-arrhythmic mechanism of some anti-arrhythmic drugs. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are analyzed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11365003 and 11165004).

  10. Amplification of spin waves by the spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón-Hernández, E.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.

    2012-04-01

    We observe amplification of spin-wave packets propagating along a film of single-crystal yttrium iron garnet (YIG) subject to a transverse temperature gradient. The spin waves are excited and detected with standard techniques used to study volume or surface magnetostatic waves in the 1-2 GHz frequency range. Amplification gains larger than 20 are observed in a YIG film heated by a current of 20 mA in a Pt layer in a simple YIG/Pt bilayer. The amplification is attributed to the action of a spin-transfer thermal torque acting on the magnetization that opposes the relaxation and which is created by spin currents generated through the spin Seebeck effect. The experimental data are interpreted with a spin-wave model.

  11. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic waves in a steady zonal circulation for a shallow fluid shell on the surface of a rotating sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, Y. Q.

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers two-dimensional nonlinear MHD waves of large horizontal spatial scales for a thin magnetofluid layer on the surface of a rotating sphere. The 'shallow fluid' hydrodynamic equations are generalized to include the effects of magnetic fields, and it is shown that the resulting MHD equations can be reduced to a single scalar equation for a stream function involving several free functions. For special choices of these free functions, two kinds of finite-amplitude MHD waves are obtained, propagating in the azimuthal direction relative to the uniformly rotating background atmosphere in the presence of a background zonal magnetic field and a steady differential zonal flow. These two kinds of MHD waves are fundamentally due to the joint effects of the uniform rotation of the background atmosphere and background magnetic field; the first is an inertial wave of the Rossby (1939) and Haurwitz (1940) type, modified by the presence of the background zonal magnetic field, while the second is a magnetic Alfven-like wave which is modified by the uniform rotation of the background atmosphere.

  12. Toward A Self Consistent MHD Model of Chromospheres and Winds From Late Type Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, V. S.; Leake, J. E.; Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first magnetohydrodynamic model of the stellar chromospheric heating and acceleration of the outer atmospheres of cool evolved stars, using α Tau as a case study. We used a 1.5D MHD code with a generalized Ohm's law that accounts for the effects of partial ionization in the stellar atmosphere to study Alfvén wave dissipation and wave reflection. We have demonstrated that due to inclusion of the effects of ion-neutral collisions in magnetized weakly ionized chromospheric plasma on resistivity and the appropriate grid resolution, the numerical resistivity becomes 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than the physical resistivity. The motions introduced by non-linear transverse Alfvé waves can explain non-thermally broadened and non-Gaussian profiles of optically thin UV lines forming in the stellar chromosphere of α Tau and other late-type giant and supergiant stars. The calculated heating rates in the stellar chromosphere due to resistive (Joule) dissipation of electric currents, induced by upward propagating non-linear Alfvé waves, are consistent with observational constraints on the net radiative losses in UV lines and the continuum from α Tau. At the top of the chromosphere, Alfvé waves experience significant reflection, producing downward propagating transverse waves that interact with upward propagating waves and produce velocity shear in the chromosphere. Our simulations also suggest that momentum deposition by non-linear Alfvé waves becomes significant in the outer chromosphere at 1 stellar radius from the photosphere. The calculated terminal velocity and the mass loss rate are consistent with the observationally derived wind properties in α Tau.

  13. Hall MHD Simulations of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Y.; Combi, M. R.; Rubin, M.; Hansen, K. C.; Toth, G.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2012-12-01

    Comets have highly eccentric orbits and a wide range of gas production rates and thus they are ideal subjects to study the interaction between the solar wind and nonmagnetized bodies. Hansen et al. (2007, Space Sci. Rev. 128, 133) used a fluid-based MHD model and a semi-kinetic hybrid particle model to study the plasma environment of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (CG), the Rosetta mission target comet, at different heliocentric distances. They showed that for such a weak comet at a large heliocentric distance, the length scales of the cometosheath and the bow shock are comparable to or smaller than the ion gyroradius, which violates the underlying assumption for a valid fluid description of the plasma. As a result, the classical ideal MHD model is not able to always give physical results, while the hybrid model, which accounts for the kinetic effects of ions with both cometary and solar wind origin, is more reliable. However, hybrid models are computationally expensive and the results can be noisy. A compromise approach is Hall MHD [Toth et al., 2008], which includes the Hall term in the MHD equations and allows for the decoupling of the ion and electron fluids. We use a single ion species Hall MHD model to simulate the plasma environment of comet 67P/CG and compare the results with the two models mentioned above. We find that the Hall effect is capable of reproducing some features of the hybrid model and thus extends the applicability of MHD. In addition, this study helps to identify the conditions and regions in the cometary plasma where the Hall effect is not negligible. This work is supported by NSF Planetary Astronomy grant AST0707283 and JPL subcontract 1266313 under NASA grant NMO710889.

  14. Allee effect promotes diversity in traveling waves of colonization

    PubMed Central

    Roques, Lionel; Garnier, Jimmy; Hamel, François; Klein, Etienne K.

    2012-01-01

    Most mathematical studies on expanding populations have focused on the rate of range expansion of a population. However, the genetic consequences of population expansion remain an understudied body of theory. Describing an expanding population as a traveling wave solution derived from a classical reaction-diffusion model, we analyze the spatio-temporal evolution of its genetic structure. We show that the presence of an Allee effect (i.e., a lower per capita growth rate at low densities) drastically modifies genetic diversity, both in the colonization front and behind it. With an Allee effect (i.e., pushed colonization waves), all of the genetic diversity of a population is conserved in the colonization front. In the absence of an Allee effect (i.e., pulled waves), only the furthest forward members of the initial population persist in the colonization front, indicating a strong erosion of the diversity in this population. These results counteract commonly held notions that the Allee effect generally has adverse consequences. Our study contributes new knowledge to the surfing phenomenon in continuous models without random genetic drift. It also provides insight into the dynamics of traveling wave solutions and leads to a new interpretation of the mathematical notions of pulled and pushed waves. PMID:22611189

  15. Perturbed Stability Analysis of External Ideal MHD Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, K. J.; Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Garstka, G. D.; Turnbull, A. D.; Garofalo, A. M.; Cowley, S. C.

    2002-11-01

    Traditionally, numerical parameter scans are performed to study the effects of equilibrium shaping and profiles on long wavelength ideal MHD instabilities. Previously, we introduced a new perturbative technique to more efficiently explore these dependencies: changes in delta-W due to small equilibrium variations are found using a perturbation of the energy principle rather than with an eigenvalue-solver instability code. With this approach, the stability properties of similar equilibria can be efficiently explored without generating complete numerical results for every set of parameters (which is time-intensive for accurate representations of several configurations). Here, we apply this approach to toroidal geometry using GATO (an ideal MHD stability code) and experimental equilibria. In particular, we explore ideal MHD stability of external kink modes in the spherical tokamak Pegasus and resistive wall modes in DIII-D.

  16. Resonance absorption of magnetohydrodynamic surface waves Physical discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown how the phenomenon of MHD surface wave resonance absorption can be described in simple terms, both physically and mathematically, by applying the 'thin flux tube equations' to the finite-thickness transition layer which supports the surface wave. The thin flux tubes support incompressible slow-mode waves that are driven by fluctuations in the total pressure which exist due to the presence of the surface wave. It is shown that the equations for the slow-mode waves can be reduced to a simple equation, equivalent to a driven harmonic oscillator. Certain field lines within the transition layer are equivalent to a harmonic oscillator driven at resonance, and neighboring field lines are effectively driven at resonance as long as a given condition is satisfied. Thus, a layer which secularly extracts energy from the surface wave develops. The analysis indicates that nonlinear effects may destroy the resonance which is crucial to the whole effect.

  17. Parametric instabilities of parallel propagating incoherent Alfven waves in a finite ion beta plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nariyuki, Y.; Hada, T.; Tsubouchi, K.

    2007-12-15

    Large amplitude, low-frequency Alfven waves constitute one of the most essential elements of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the fast solar wind. Due to small collisionless dissipation rates, the waves can propagate long distances and efficiently convey such macroscopic quantities as momentum, energy, and helicity. Since loading of such quantities is completed when the waves damp away, it is important to examine how the waves can dissipate in the solar wind. Among various possible dissipation processes of the Alfven waves, parametric instabilities have been believed to be important. In this paper, we numerically discuss the parametric instabilities of coherent/incoherent Alfven waves in a finite ion beta plasma using a one-dimensional hybrid (superparticle ions plus an electron massless fluid) simulation, in order to explain local production of sunward propagating Alfven waves, as suggested by Helios/Ulysses observation results. Parameter studies clarify the dependence of parametric instabilities of coherent/incoherent Alfven waves on the ion and electron beta ratio. Parametric instabilities of coherent Alfven waves in a finite ion beta plasma are vastly different from those in the cold ions (i.e., MHD and/or Hall-MHD systems), even if the collisionless damping of the Alfven waves are neglected. Further, ''nonlinearly driven'' modulational instability is important for the dissipation of incoherent Alfven waves in a finite ion beta plasma regardless of their polarization, since the ion kinetic effects let both the right-hand and left-hand polarized waves become unstable to the modulational instability. The present results suggest that, although the antisunward propagating dispersive Alfven waves are efficiently dissipated through the parametric instabilities in a finite ion beta plasma, these instabilities hardly produce the sunward propagating waves.

  18. Meissner effect without superconductivity from a chiral d -density wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotetes, P.; Varelogiannis, G.

    2008-12-01

    We demonstrate that the formation of a chiral d -density wave state generates a topological Meissner effect (TME) in the absence of any kind of superconductivity. The TME is identical to the usual superconducting Meissner effect, but it appears only for magnetic fields perpendicular to the plane while it is absent for in-plane fields. The observed enhanced diamagnetic signals in the nonsuperconducting pseudogap regime of the cuprates may find an alternative interpretation in terms of the TME, originating from a chiral d -density wave pseudogap.

  19. Backtracking search algorithm for effective and efficient surface wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xianhai; Zhang, Xueqiang; Zhao, Sutao; Li, Lei

    2015-03-01

    Surface wave dispersion analysis is widely used in geophysics to infer near-surface shear (S)-wave velocity profiles for a wide variety of applications. However, inversion of surface wave data is challenging for most local-search methods due to its high nonlinearity and to its multimodality. In this work, we proposed and implemented a new Rayleigh wave dispersion curve inversion scheme based on backtracking search algorithm (BSA), a novel and powerful evolutionary algorithm (EA). Development of BSA is motivated by studies that attempt to develop an algorithm that possesses desirable features for different optimization problems which include the ability to reach a problem's global minimum more quickly and successfully with a small number of control parameters and low computational cost, as well as robustness and ease of application to different problem models. The proposed inverse procedure is applied to nonlinear inversion of fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave dispersion curves for near-surface S-wave velocity profiles. To evaluate calculation efficiency and effectiveness of BSA, four noise-free and four noisy synthetic data sets are firstly inverted. Then, the performance of BSA is compared with that of genetic algorithms (GA) by two noise-free synthetic data sets. Finally, a real-world example from a waste disposal site in NE Italy is inverted to examine the applicability and robustness of the proposed approach on real surface wave data. Furthermore, the performance of BSA is compared against that of GA by real data to further evaluate scores of BSA. Results from both synthetic and actual data demonstrate that BSA applied to nonlinear inversion of surface wave data should be considered good not only in terms of the accuracy but also in terms of the convergence speed. The great advantages of BSA are that the algorithm is simple, robust and easy to implement. Also there are fewer control parameters to tune.

  20. Stability of a two-volume MRxMHD model in slab geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuen, Li Huey; Hole, Matthew; Dewar, Robert; Dennis, Graham

    2015-11-01

    Ideal MHD models are inadequate to describe various physical attributes of toroidal plasmas with no continuous symmetry, such as magnetic islands and stochastic regions. A new MHD formulation, MRxMHD, uses only a finite number of ideal-MHD flux surface interfaces, with relaxed plasma regions in between, thus allowing a stepped-pressure profile, magnetic islands, and stochastic regions. In toroidally asymmetric plasma, the existence of interfaces in MRxMHD is contingent on the field pitch, or rotational transform, of flux surfaces being irrational; a KAM argument shows that some good equilibrium flux surfaces continue to exist for small perturbations to an integrable system (foliated by flux surfaces), provided that the rotational transforms on both sides of each interface are sufficiently irrational. Building upon the MRxMHD stability model by Hole, we study the effects of irrationality of the rotational transform at interfaces in MRxMHD on plasma stability. Investigating the plasma stability of a two-volume MRxMHD periodic-slab, we find that the 2D system stability conditions are dependent on the interface and resonance layer magnetic field pitch at minimised energy states. While tearing instabilities exist at low order rational resonances, investigating instability of high-order rationals requires study of pressure-driven instabilities.

  1. MHD simulation of RF current drive in MST

    SciTech Connect

    Hendries, E. R.; Anderson, J. K.; Forest, C. B.; Reusch, J. A.; Seltzman, A. H.; Sovinec, C. R.; Diem, S.; Harvey, R. W.

    2014-02-12

    Auxiliary heating and current drive using RF waves such as the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) promises to advance the performance of the reversed field pinch (RFP). In previous computational work [1], a hypothetical edge-localized current drive is shown to suppress the tearing activity which governs the macroscopic transport properties of the RFP. The ideal conditions for tearing stabilization include a reduced toroidal induction, and precise width and radial position of the Gaussian-shaped external current drive. In support of the EBW experiment on the Madison Symmetric Torus, an integrated modeling scheme now incorporates ray tracing and Fokker-Plank predictions of auxiliary current into single fluid MHD. Simulations at low Lundquist number (S ∼ 10{sup 4}) generally agree with the previous work; significantly more burdensome simulations at MST-like Lundquist number (S ∼ 3×10{sup 6}) show unexpected results. The effect on nonlinearly saturated current profile by a particular RF-driven external force decreases in magnitude and widens considerably as the Lundquist number increases toward experimental values. Simulations reproduce the periodic current profile relaxation events observed in experiment (sawteeth) in the absence of current profile control. Reduction of the tearing mode amplitudes is still observable; however, reduction is limited to periods between the large bursts of magnetic activity at each sawtooth. The sawtoothing pattern persists with up to 10 MW of externally applied RF power. Periods with prolonged low tearing amplitude are predicted with a combination of external current drive and a reduced toroidal loop voltage, consistent with previous conclusions. Finally, the resistivity profile is observed to have a strong effect on the optimal externally driven current profile for mode stabilization.

  2. Magnetorotational Instability of Dissipative MHD Flows

    SciTech Connect

    HERRON, ISOM H

    2010-07-10

    Executive summary Two important general problems of interest in plasma physics that may be addressed successfully by Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are: (1) Find magnetic field configurations capable of confining a plasma in equilibrium. (2) Study the stability properties of each such an equilibrium. It is often found that the length scale of many instabilities and waves that are able to grow or propagate in a system, are comparable with plasma size, such as in magnetically confined thermonuclear plasmas or in astrophysical accretion disks. Thus MHD is able to provide a good description of such large-scale disturbances. The Magnetorotational instability (MRI) is one particular instance of a potential instability. The project involved theoretical work on fundamental aspects of plasma physics. Researchers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) began to perform a series of liquid metal Couette flow experiments between rotating cylinders. Their purpose was to produce MRI, which they had predicted theoretically 2002, but was only observed in the laboratory since this project began. The personnel on the project consisted of three persons: (1) The PI, who was partially supported on the budget during each of four summers 2005-2008. (2) Two graduate research assistants, who worked consecutively on the project throughout the years 2005-2009. As a result, the first student, Fritzner Soliman, obtained an M.S. degree in 2006; the second student, Pablo Suarez obtained the Ph.D. degree in 2009. The work was in collaboration with scientists in Princeton, periodic trips were made by the PI as part of the project. There were 4 peer-reviewed publications and one book produced.

  3. Effects of Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Arrays on Wave, Current, and Sediment Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruehl, K.; Roberts, J. D.; Jones, C.; Magalen, J.; James, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The characterization of the physical environment and commensurate alteration of that environment due to Wave Energy Conversion (WEC) devices, or arrays of devices, must be understood to make informed device-performance predictions, specifications of hydrodynamic loads, and environmental evaluations of eco-system responses (e.g., changes to circulation patterns, sediment dynamics, and water quality). Hydrodynamic and sediment issues associated with performance of wave-energy devices will primarily be nearshore where WEC infrastructure (e.g., anchors, piles) are exposed to large forces from the surface-wave action and currents. Wave-energy devices will be subject to additional corrosion, fouling, and wear of moving parts caused by suspended sediments in the water column. The alteration of the circulation and sediment transport patterns may also alter local ecosystems through changes in benthic habitat, circulation patterns, or other environmental parameters. Sandia National Laboratories is developing tools and performing studies to quantitatively characterize the environments where WEC devices may be installed and to assess potential affects to hydrodynamics and local sediment transport. The primary tools are wave, hydrodynamic, and sediment transport models. To ensure confidence in the resulting evaluation of system-wide effects, the models are appropriately constrained and validated with measured data where available. An extension of the US EPA's EFDC code, SNL-EFDC, provides a suitable platform for modeling the necessary hydrodynamics;it has been modified to directly incorporate output from a SWAN wave model of the region. Model development and results are presented. In this work, a model is exercised for Monterey Bay, near Santa Cruz where a WEC array could be deployed. Santa Cruz is located on the northern coast of Monterey Bay, in Central California, USA. This site was selected for preliminary research due to the readily available historical hydrodynamic data

  4. The RFP dynamo: MHD to kinetic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarff, J. S.; Almagri, A. F.; den Hartog, D. J.; McCollam, K. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Sauppe, J. P.; Sovinec, C. R.; Terry, P. W.; Triana, J. C.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Parke, E.

    2015-11-01

    The hallmark of magnetic relaxation in an RFP plasma is profile flattening of J0 .B0 /B2 effected by a dynamo-like emf in Ohm's law. This is well-studied in single-fluid MHD, but recent MST results and extended MHD modeling show that both and the Hall emf, - /ene , are important, revealing decoupled electron and ion motion. Since dynamo is current-related, the electron fluid emf, , captures both effects. In MST, the electron flow is dominantly Ve , 1 ~E1 ×B0 /B2 , implying ~ / B . This and the Hall emf are measured in MST for comparison in Ohm's law. A finite-pressure response is also possible, e.g., ``diamagnetic dynamo'', ∇ . /ene , associated with diamagnetic drift, and ``kinetic dynamo'' associated with collisionless streaming of electrons in a stochastic magnetic field. Correlation measurements and using FIR interferometry and Thomson scattering reveal these as small but finite in MST. A kinetic emf might be expected for any high-beta plasma with inhomogeneous pressure. Support by DOE/NSF.

  5. Simulations of a Detonation Wave in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Lord; Karagozian, Ann; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2010-11-01

    Numerical simulations of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) effects on detonation wave structures are performed, with applications to flow control and MHD power extraction in Pulse Detonation Engines (PDE) and their design variations. In contrast to prior studies of MHD interactions in PDEs,ootnotetextCambier, et al., AIAA-2008-4688 the effects of the finite relaxation length scale for ionization on the stability of the detonation wave are examined. Depending on the coupling parameters, the magnetic field can quench the detonation and effectively act as a barrier to its propagation. Conversely, an applied transient magnetic field can exert a force on a pre-ionized gas and accelerate it. The dynamics are subject to non-linear effects; a propagating transverse magnetic field will initially exert a small force if the gas has a low conductivity and the magnetic Reynolds number (Rem) is low. Nevertheless, the gas accelerated by the "piston" action of the field can pre-heat the ambient gas and increase its conductivity. As the wave progresses, Rem increases and the magnetic field becomes increasingly effective. The dynamics of this process are examined in detail with a high-order shock-capturing method and full kinetics of combustion and ionization. The complex chemical kinetics calculations are ported onto a GPU using the CUDA language, and computational performance is compared with standard CPU-based computations.

  6. The Biermann catastrophe of numerical MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziani, C.; Tzeferacos, P.; Lee, D.; Lamb, D. Q.; Weide, K.; Fatenejad, M.; Miller, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Biermann Battery effect is frequently invoked in cosmic magnetogenesis and studied in High-Energy Density laboratory physics experiments. Unfortunately, direct implementation of the Biermann effect in MHD codes is known to produce unphysical magnetic fields at shocks whose value does not converge with resolution. We show that this convergence breakdown is due to naive discretization, which fails to account for the fact that discretized irrotational vector fields have spurious solenoidal components that grow without bound near a discontinuity. We show that careful consideration of the kinetics of ion viscous shocks leads to a formulation of the Biermann effect that gives rise to a convergent algorithm. We note a novel physical effect a resistive magnetic precursor in which Biermann-generated field in the shock “leaks” resistively upstream. The effect appears to be potentially observable in experiments at laser facilities.

  7. Test particle simulation study of whistler wave packets observed near Comet Giacobini-Zinner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaya, N.; Matsumoto, H.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1989-01-01

    Nonlinear interactions of water group ions with large-amplitude whistler wave packets detected at the leading edge of steepened magnetosonic waves observed near Comet Giacobini-Zinner (GZ) are studied using test particle simulations of water-ion interactions with a model wave based on GZ data. Some of the water ions are found to be decelerated in the steepened portion of the magnetosonic wave to the resonance velocity with the whistler wave packets. Through resonance and related nonlinear interaction with the large-amplitude whistler waves, the water ions become trapped by the packet. An energy balance calculation demonstrates that the trapped ions lose their kinetic energy during the trapped motion in the packet. Thus, the nonlinear trapping motion in the wave structure leads to effective energy transfer from the water group ions to the whistler wave packets in the leading edge of the steepened MHD waves.

  8. MHD-stable plasma confinement in an axisymmetric mirror system

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.V.

    1988-02-01

    If the magnetic field of a nonparaxial mirror system is chosen appropriately, it is possible to maintain a sharp plasma boundary in an open axisymmetric confinement system in a manner which is stable against flute modes (both global and small-scale). Stability prevails in the ideal MHD approximation without finite-ion-Larmor radius effects.

  9. Modified NASA-Lewis chemical equilibrium code for MHD applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacks, R. A.; Geyer, H. K.; Grammel, S. J.; Doss, E. D.

    1979-01-01

    A substantially modified version of the NASA-Lewis Chemical Equilibrium Code was recently developed. The modifications were designed to extend the power and convenience of the Code as a tool for performing combustor analysis for MHD systems studies. The effect of the programming details is described from a user point of view.

  10. Experimental investigation of the magnetohydrodynamic parachute effect in a hypersonic air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomichev, V. P.; Yadrenkin, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    New data on experimental implementation of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) parachute configuration in an air flow with Mach number M = 6 about a flat plate are considered. It is shown that MHD interaction near a flat plate may transform an attached oblique shock wave into a normal detached one, which considerably extends the area of body-incoming flow interaction. This effect can be employed in optimizing return space vehicle deceleration conditions in the upper atmosphere.

  11. Electromagnetic wave propagation in rain and polarization effects

    PubMed Central

    OKAMURA, Sogo; OGUCHI, Tomohiro

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes our study on microwave and millimeter-wave propagation in rain with special emphasis on the effects of polarization. Starting from a recount of our past findings, we will discuss developments with these and how they are connected with subsequent research. PMID:20551593

  12. Effects of Radial Electric Fields on ICRF Waves

    SciTech Connect

    C.K. Phillips; J.C. Hosea; M. Ono; J.R. Wilson

    2001-06-18

    Equilibrium considerations infer that large localized radial electric fields are associated with internal transport barrier structures in tokamaks and other toroidal magnetic confinement configurations. In this paper, the effects of an equilibrium electric field on fast magnetosonic wave propagation are considered in the context of a cold plasma model.

  13. MHD Contractors' Review Meeting: Abstracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The objectives of the Integrated Topping Cycle project are to design, construct, and deliver all prototypical hardware necessary to conduct long duration integrated MHD topping cycle proof-of-concept tests at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana. The results of the long duration tests will augment the existing engineering data base on MHD power train reliability, maintainability, durability, and performance, and will serve as a basis for scaling up to the early commercial scale power plant retrofit. The components of the MHD power train to be designed, fabricated, and tested include the following three systems: (1) a slagging coal combustion subsystem with a rated capacity of 50 MW thermal input, capable of operation with eastern (Illinois) or western (Montana Rosebud) coal; (2) a channel subsystem consisting of a segmented supersonic nozzle, channel (with current controls), and diffuser, capable of power output of 1.5 MW(sub e); and (3) a current consolidation subsystem to interface the channel with the existing facility inverter.

  14. Wave packet dynamics under effect of a pulsed electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, A. R. C. B.; de Moura, F. A. B. F.; Dias, W. S.

    2016-06-01

    We studied the dynamics of an electron in a crystalline one-dimensional model under effect of a time-dependent Gaussian field. The time evolution of an initially Gaussian wave packet it was obtained through the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Our analysis consists of computing the electronic centroid as well as the mean square displacement. We observe that the electrical pulse is able to promote a special kind of displacement along the chain. We demonstrated a direct relation between the group velocity of the wave packet and the applied electrical pulses. We compare those numerical calculations with a semi-classical approach.

  15. An array effect of wave energy farm buoys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kweon, Hyuck-Min; Lee, Jung-Lyul

    2012-12-01

    An ocean buoy energy farm is considered for Green energy generation and delivery to small towns along the Korean coast. The present studypresents that the floating buoy-type energy farm appears to be sufficiently feasible fortrapping more energy compared to afixed cylinder duck array. It is also seen from the numerical resultsthat the resonated waves between spaced buoys are further trapped by floating buoy motion.Our numerical study is analyzed by a plane-wave approximation, in which evanescent mode effects are included in a modified mild-slope equation based on the scattering characteristics for a single buoy.

  16. Extended MHD Stabiliy Calculations of Spheromak Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, E. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2013-10-01

    Linear extended MHD calculations of spheromak equilibria in a cylindrical flux conserver are performed using the NIMROD code (Sovinec et al., JCP 195, 2004). A series of Grad-Sharfranov equilibria are generated with β ranging from 0 . 4 % to 4 . 2 % , corresponding to peak electron temperatures ranging 50 to 300 eV. These equilibria use a λ profile representative of SSPX shot 14590, which measured a peak electron temperature of 325 eV (McLean et al., POP 13, 2006). Resistive MHD calculations find that the β = 0 . 4 % case is unstable to resonant resistive interchange modes with γτA <= 2 . 3 % . These modes transition to ideal interchange as the equilibrium pressure is increased. Growth rates as large as γτA = 20 % are calculated for the 4 . 2 % β case. Calculations including ion-gyroviscosity show a minimal reduction of growth rate. Effects from including the Hall and Electron pressure terms in Ohm's Law and the cross-field diamagnetic heat flux are investigated. Results of related nonlinear simulations are also presented. Work Supported by US DOE.

  17. Shocked Magnetotail: ARTEMIS Observations and MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2015-04-01

    Interplanetary shocks can cause magnetospheric disturbances on various scales including kinetic and MHD processes. In this paper we study a shock event using ARTEMIS in situ observations and OpenGGCM MHD simulations, which shows how significant effect of interplanetary shocks could be on the magnetotail. The two ARTEMIS spacecraft were located near the tail current sheet and lobe center at (-60, 1, -5Re_GSM) when the shock arrived and recorded an abrupt tail compression leading to significant enhancements in the plasma density, temperature, magnetic field strength, and cross-tail current density, as well as to tailward flows and current sheet crossings. About 10 min later, the spacecraft entered the sheath solar wind unexpectedly. Two hypotheses are considered: either the tail was cut off by the high solar wind ram pressure (~25-30 nPa), or the compressed tail was pushed aside by the appreciable dawnward solar wind flow imposed by the shock. OpenGGMC simulation results confirmed the second hypothesis and revealed that during this 10 min interval, the lobe center moved dawnward by ~12 Re and the tail width in Y was reduced from ~40 to 26 Re, which eventually exposed ARTEMIS to the sheath solar wind. Comparisons of plasma and magnetic parameters between ARTEMIS in situ observations and simulations showed a satisfied consistence.

  18. TAE modes and MHD activity in TFTR DT plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.; Batha, S.; Bell, M.

    1995-03-01

    The high power deuterium and tritium experiments on TFTR have produced fusion a parameters similar to those expected on ITER. The achieved {beta}{sub {alpha}}/{beta} and the R{triangledown}{beta}{sub {alpha}} in TFRR D-T shots are 1/2 to 1/3 those predicted in the ITER EDA. Studies of the initial TFTR D-T plasmas find no evidence that the presence of the fast fusion {alpha} population has affected the stability of MHD, with the possible exception of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE`s). The initial TFTR DT plasmas had MHD activity similar to that commonly seen in deuterium plasmas. Operation of TFTR at plasma currents of 2.0--2.5 MA has greatly reduced the deleterious effects of MHD commonly observed at lower currents. Even at these higher currents, the performance of TFTR is limited by {beta}-limit disruptions. The effects of MHD on D-T fusion {alpha}`s was similar to effects observed on other fusion products in D only plasmas.

  19. Spectral Effects on Fast Wave Core Heating and Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    C.K. Phillips, R.E. Bell, L.A. Berry, P.T. Bonoli, R.W. Harvey, J.C. Hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, P.M. Ryan, G. Taylor, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, H. Yuh, and the NSTX Team

    2009-05-11

    Recent results obtained with high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) on NSTX strongly support the hypothesis that the onset of perpendicular fast wave propagation right at or very near the launcher is a primary cause for a reduction in core heating efficiency at long wavelengths that is also observed in ICRF heating experiments in numerous tokamaks. A dramatic increase in core heating efficiency was first achieved in NSTX L-mode helium majority plasmas when the onset for perpendicular wave propagation was moved away from the antenna and nearby vessel structures. Efficient core heating in deuterium majority L mode and H mode discharges, in which the edge density is typically higher than in comparable helium majority plasmas, was then accomplished by reducing the edge density in front of the launcher with lithium conditioning and avoiding operational points prone to instabilities. These results indicate that careful tailoring of the edge density profiles in ITER should be considered to limit rf power losses to the antenna and plasma facing materials. Finally, in plasmas with reduced rf power losses in the edge regions, the first direct measurements of high harmonic fast wave current drive were obtained with the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. The location and radial dependence of HHFW CD measured by MSE are in reasonable agreement with predictions from both full wave and ray tracing simulations.

  20. Projection effects in coronal dimmings and associated EUV wave event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissauer, Karin; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid; Vanninathan, Kamalam; Magdalenic, Jasmina

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the high-speed (v > 1000 km s‑1) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with an X1.2 flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) from NOAA active region 11283. This EUV wave features peculiar on-disk signatures, in particular we observe an intermittent "disappearance" of the front for 120 s in SDO/AIA 171, 193, 211 Å data, whereas the 335 Å filter, sensitive to hotter plasmas (T˜ 2.5 MK), shows a continuous evolution of the wave front. We exploit the multi-point quadrature position of SDO and STEREO-A, to make a thorough analysis of the EUV wave evolution, with respect to its kinematics and amplitude evolution. We identify on-disk coronal dimming regions in SDO/AIA, reminiscent of core dimmings, that have no corresponding on-disk dimming signatures in STEREO-A/EUVI. Reconstructing the SDO line-of-sight (LOS) direction in STEREO-A clearly shows that the observed SDO on-disk dimming areas are not the footprints of the erupting fluxrope but result from decreased emission from the expanding CME body integrated along the LOS. In this context, we conclude that the intermittent disappearance of the EUV wave in the AIA 171, 193, 211 Å filters, which are channels sensitive to plasma with temperatures below ˜ 2 MK is also caused by such LOS integration effects. These observations clearly demonstrate that single-view image data provide us with limited insight to correctly interpret coronal features.

  1. Effects of low-dose extracorporeal shock waves on microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaled, Walaa; Goertz, Ole; Lauer, Henrik; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Hauser, Jörg

    2012-11-01

    The extended wounds of burn patients remain a challenge due to wound infection and following septicemia. The aim of this study was to analyze microcirculation, angiogenesis and leukocyte endothelium interaction after burn injury with and without extracorporeal shock wave application (ESWA). A novel shockwave system was developed based on a commercially available device for orthopedics (Dornier Aries®) that was equipped with a newly developed applicator. This system is based on the electromagnetic shock wave emitter (EMSE) technology and was introduced to accomplish a localized treatment for wound healing. The system includes a novel field of focus for new applications, with high precision and ease of use. In the animal study, full-thickness burns were inflicted on to the ears of hairless mice (n=51). Intravital fluorescent microscopy was used to assess microcirculatory parameters, angiogenesis and leukocyte behavior. ESWA was performed on day 1, 3 and 7. Values were obtained immediately after burn, as well as at days 1, 3, 7, and 12 post burn. All shockwave treated groups showed an accelerated angiogenesis with a less non-perfused area and an improved blood flow after burn injury compared to the placebo control group. After three treatments, the shock waves increased the number of rolling leukocytes significantly compared to the non-treated animals. Shock waves seem to have a positive effect on several parameters of wound healing after burn injury. However, further investigations are necessary to detect positive influence of shock waves on microcirculation after burn injuries.

  2. Newtonian CAFE: a new ideal MHD code to study the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J. J.; Guzmán, F.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we present a new independent code designed to solve the equations of classical ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in three dimensions, submitted to a constant gravitational field. The purpose of the code centers on the analysis of solar phenomena within the photosphere-corona region. In special the code is capable to simulate the propagation of impulsively generated linear and non-linear MHD waves in the non-isothermal solar atmosphere. We present 1D and 2D standard tests to demonstrate the quality of the numerical results obtained with our code. As 3D tests we present the propagation of MHD-gravity waves and vortices in the solar atmosphere. The code is based on high-resolution shock-capturing methods, uses the HLLE flux formula combined with Minmod, MC and WENO5 reconstructors. The divergence free magnetic field constraint is controlled using the Flux Constrained Transport method.

  3. Pressure driven currents near magnetic islands in 3D MHD equilibria: Effects of pressure variation within flux surfaces and of symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiman, Allan H.

    2016-07-01

    In toroidal, magnetically confined plasmas, the heat and particle transport is strongly anisotropic, with transport along the field lines sufficiently strong relative to cross-field transport that the equilibrium pressure can generally be regarded as constant on the flux surfaces in much of the plasma. The regions near small magnetic islands, and those near the X-lines of larger islands, are exceptions, having a significant variation of the pressure within the flux surfaces. It is shown here that the variation of the equilibrium pressure within the flux surfaces in those regions has significant consequences for the pressure driven currents. It is further shown that the consequences are strongly affected by the symmetry of the magnetic field if the field is invariant under combined reflection in the poloidal and toroidal angles. (This symmetry property is called "stellarator symmetry.") In non-stellarator-symmetric equilibria, the pressure-driven currents have logarithmic singularities at the X-lines. In stellarator-symmetric MHD equilibria, the singular components of the pressure-driven currents vanish. These equilibria are to be contrasted with equilibria having B ṡ∇p =0 , where the singular components of the pressure-driven currents vanish regardless of the symmetry. They are also to be contrasted with 3D MHD equilibrium solutions that are constrained to have simply nested flux surfaces, where the pressure-driven current goes like 1 /x near rational surfaces, where x is the distance from the rational surface, except in the case of quasi-symmetric flux surfaces. For the purpose of calculating the pressure-driven currents near magnetic islands, we work with a closed subset of the MHD equilibrium equations that involves only perpendicular force balance, and is decoupled from parallel force balance. It is not correct to use the parallel component of the conventional MHD force balance equation, B ṡ∇p =0 , near magnetic islands. Small but nonzero values of B

  4. Rapporteur report: MHD electric power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seikel, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    Five US papers from the Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on MHD Electrical Power Generation at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are summarized. Results of the initial parametric phase of the US effort on the study of potential early commercial MHD plants are reported and aspects of the smaller commercial prototype plant termed the Engineering Test Facility are discussed. The alternative of using a disk geometry generator rather than a linear generator in baseload MHD plants is examined. Closed-cycle as well as open-cycle MHD plants are considered.

  5. The effect of source's shape for seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.; Mikada, H.; Goto, T.; Takekawa, J.; Onishi, K.; Kasahara, J.; Kuroda, T.

    2009-12-01

    In conventional simulation of seismic wave propagation, the source which generates signals is usually given by a point force or by a particle velocity at a point. In practice, seismic wave is generated by signal generators with finite volume and width. Since seismic lines span a distance up to hundreds meter to several kilometers, many people conducted seismic survey and data processing with the assumption that the size of signal generator is negligible compared with survey scale. However, there are no studies that tells how the size of baseplate influences generated seismic waves. Such estimations, therefore, are meaningful to consider the scale of generator. In this sense, current seismic processing might require a theoretical background about the seismic source for further detailed analysis. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of seismic source’s shape to resultant wave properties, and then estimate how effective the consideration about the scale of signal generator is for analyzing the seismic data. To evaluate source’s scale effect, we performed finite element analysis with the 3D model including the baseplate of source and the heterogeneous ground medium. We adopted a finite element method (FEM) and chose the code named “MD Nastran” (MSC Software Ver.2008) to calculate seismic wave propagation. To verify the reliability of calculation, we compared the result of FEM and that of finite-difference method (FDM) with wave propagating simulation of isotropic and homogeneous model with a point source. The amplitude and phase of those two were nearly equal each other. We considered the calculation of FEM is accurate enough and can be performed in the following calculations. As the first step, we developed a simple point source model and a baseplate model. The point source model contains only the ground represented by an elastic medium. The force generating the signal is given at the nodal point of the surface in this case. On the other

  6. Nonequilibrium, large-amplitude MHD fluctuations in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. Aaron; Wiltberger, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    Compressible MHD simulations in one dimension with three-dimensional vectors are used to investigate a number of processes relevant to problems in interplanetary physics. The simulations indicate that a large-amplitude nonequilibrium (e.g., linearly polarized) Alfvenic wave, which always starts with small relative fluctuations in the magnitude B of the magnetic field, typically evolves to flatten the magnetic profile in most regions. Under a wide variety of conditions B and the density rho become anticorrelated on average. If the mean magnetic field is allowed to decrease in time, the point where the transverse magnetic fluctuation amplitude delta B(sub T) is greater than the mean field B(sub 0) is not special, and large values of delta B(sub T)/B(sub 0) do not cause the compressive thermal energy to increase remarkably or the wave energy to dissipate at an unusually high rate. Nor does the 'backscatter' of the waves that occurs when the sound speed is less than the Alfven speed result, in itself, in substantial energy dissipation, but rather primarily in a phase change between the magnetic and velocity fields. For isolated wave packets the backscatter does not occur for any of the parameters examined; an initial radiation of acoustic waves away from the packet establishes a stable traveling structure. Thus these simulations, although greatly idealized compared to reality, suggest a picture in which the interplanetary fluctuations should have small deltaB and increasingly quasi-pressure balanced compressive fluctuations, as observed, and in which the dissipation and 'saturation' at delta B(sub T)/B(sub 0) approximately = 1 required by some theories of wave acceleration of the solar wind do not occur. The simulations also provide simple ways to understand the processes of nonlinear steepening and backscattering of Alfven waves and demonstrate the existence of previously unreported types of quasi-steady MHD states.

  7. Temperature effects in ultrasonic Lamb wave structural health monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Salamone, Salvatore

    2008-07-01

    There is a need to better understand the effect of temperature changes on the response of ultrasonic guided-wave pitch-catch systems used for structural health monitoring. A model is proposed to account for all relevant temperature-dependent parameters of a pitch-catch system on an isotropic plate, including the actuator-plate and plate-sensor interactions through shear-lag behavior, the piezoelectric and dielectric permittivity properties of the transducers, and the Lamb wave dispersion properties of the substrate plate. The model is used to predict the S(0) and A(0) response spectra in aluminum plates for the temperature range of -40-+60 degrees C, which accounts for normal aircraft operations. The transducers examined are monolithic PZT-5A [PZT denotes Pb(Zr-Ti)O3] patches and flexible macrofiber composite type P1 patches. The study shows substantial changes in Lamb wave amplitude response caused solely by temperature excursions. It is also shown that, for the transducers considered, the response amplitude changes follow two opposite trends below and above ambient temperature (20 degrees C), respectively. These results can provide a basis for the compensation of temperature effects in guided-wave damage detection systems. PMID:18646963

  8. Effects of beach morphology and waves on onshore larval transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimura, A.; Reniers, A.; Paris, C. B.; Shanks, A.; MacMahan, J.; Morgan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Larvae of intertidal species grow offshore, and migrate back to the shore when they are ready to settle on their adult substrates. In order to reach the habitat, they must cross the surf zone, which is characterized as a semi-permeable barrier. This is accomplished through physical forcing (i.e., waves and current) as well as their own behavior. Two possible scenarios of onshore larval transport are proposed: Negatively buoyant larvae stay in the bottom boundary layer because of turbulence-dependent sinking behavior, and are carried toward the shore by streaming of the bottom boundary layer; positively buoyant larvae move to the shore during onshore wind events, and sink to the bottom once they encounter high turbulence (i.e., surf zone edge), where they are carried by the bottom current toward the shore (Fujimura et al. 2014). Our biophysical Lagrangian particle tracking model helps to explain how beach morphology and wave conditions affect larval distribution patterns and abundance. Model results and field observations show that larval abundance in the surf zone is higher at mildly sloped, rip-channeled beaches than at steep pocket beaches. Beach attributes are broken up to examine which and how beach configuration factors affect larval abundance. Modeling with alongshore uniform beaches with variable slopes reveal that larval populations in the surf zone are negatively correlated with beach steepness. Alongshore variability enhances onshore larval transport because of increased cross-shore water exchange by rip currents. Wave groups produce transient rip currents and enhance cross-shore exchange. Effects of other wave components, such as wave height and breaking wave rollers are also considered.

  9. SURFACE ALFVEN WAVES IN SOLAR FLUX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, M.; Andries, J.; Soler, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Arregui, I.; Terradas, J.

    2012-07-10

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. Alfven waves and magneto-sonic waves are particular classes of MHD waves. These wave modes are clearly different and have pure properties in uniform plasmas of infinite extent only. Due to plasma non-uniformity, MHD waves have mixed properties and cannot be classified as pure Alfven or magneto-sonic waves. However, vorticity is a quantity unequivocally related to Alfven waves as compression is for magneto-sonic waves. Here, we investigate MHD waves superimposed on a one-dimensional non-uniform straight cylinder with constant magnetic field. For a piecewise constant density profile, we find that the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves have the same properties as surface Alfven waves at a true discontinuity in density. Contrary to the classic Alfven waves in a uniform plasma of infinite extent, vorticity is zero everywhere except at the cylinder boundary. If the discontinuity in density is replaced with a continuous variation of density, vorticity is spread out over the whole interval with non-uniform density. The fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves do not need compression to exist unlike the radial overtones. In thin magnetic cylinders, the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves with phase velocities between the internal and the external Alfven velocities can be considered as surface Alfven waves. On the contrary, the radial overtones can be related to fast-like magneto-sonic modes.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic waves with relativistic electrons and positrons in degenerate spin-1/2 astrophysical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Maroof, R.; Ali, S.; Mushtaq, A.; Qamar, A.

    2015-11-15

    Linear properties of high and low frequency waves are studied in an electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) dense plasma with spin and relativity effects. In a low frequency regime, the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, namely, the magnetoacoustic and Alfven waves are presented in a magnetized plasma, in which the inertial ions are taken as spinless and non-degenerate, whereas the electrons and positrons are treated quantum mechanically due to their smaller mass. Quantum corrections associated with the spin magnetization and density correlations for electrons and positrons are re-considered and a generalized dispersion relation for the low frequency MHD waves is derived to account for relativistic degeneracy effects. On the basis of angles of propagation, the dispersion relations of different modes are discussed analytically in a degenerate relativistic plasma. Numerical results reveal that electron and positron relativistic degeneracy effects significantly modify the dispersive properties of MHD waves. Our present analysis should be useful for understanding the collective interactions in dense astrophysical compact objects, like, the white dwarfs and in atmosphere of neutron stars.

  11. An assessment of full wave effects on the propagation and absorption of lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J. C.; Bonoli, P. T.; Schmidt, A. E.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Harvey, R. W.; Brambilla, M. A.

    2009-07-15

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves ({omega}{sub ci}<<{omega}<<{omega}{sub ce}, where {omega}{sub i,e}{identical_to}Z{sub i,e}eB/m{sub i,e}c) have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons and consequently are well-suited to driving current. Established modeling techniques use Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) expansions with self-consistent non-Maxwellian distributions. Higher order WKB expansions have shown some effects on the parallel wave number evolution and consequently on the damping due to diffraction [G. Pereverzev, Nucl. Fusion 32, 1091 (1991)]. A massively parallel version of the TORIC full wave electromagnetic field solver valid in the LH range of frequencies has been developed [J. C. Wright et al., Comm. Comp. Phys. 4, 545 (2008)] and coupled to an electron Fokker-Planck solver CQL3D[R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, in Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting, Montreal, 1992 (IAEA Institute of Physics Publishing, Vienna, 1993), USDOC/NTIS Document No. DE93002962, pp. 489-526] in order to self-consistently evolve nonthermal electron distributions characteristic of LH current drive (LHCD) experiments in devices such as Alcator C-Mod and ITER (B{sub 0}{approx_equal}5 T, n{sub e0}{approx_equal}1x10{sup 20} m{sup -3}). These simulations represent the first ever self-consistent simulations of LHCD utilizing both a full wave and Fokker-Planck calculation in toroidal geometry.

  12. Quasi-modes as dissipative MHD eigenmodes : results for 1-dimensional equilibrium states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirry, W. J.; Goossens, M.

    1996-05-01

    Quasi-modes which are important for understanding the MHD wave behavior of solar and astrophysical magnetic plasmas are computed as eigenmodes of the linear dissipative MHD equations. This eigenmode computation is carried out with a simple numerical scheme which is based on analytical solutions to the dissipative MHD equations in the quasi-singular resonance layer. Non-uniformity in magnetic field and plasma density gives rise to a continuous spectrum of resonant frequencies. Global discrete eigenmodes with characteristic frequencies lying within the range of the continuous spectrum may couple to localised resonant Alfven waves. In ideal MHD these modes are not eigenmodes of the Hermitian ideal MHD operator, but are found as a temporal dominant global exponentially decaying response to an initial perturbation. In dissipative MHD they are really eigenmodes with damping becoming independent of the dissipation mechanism in the limit of vanishing dissipation. An analytical solution of these global modes is found in the dissipative layer around the resonant Alfvenic position. Using the analytical solution to cross the quasi-singular resonance layer the required numerical effort of the eigenvalue scheme is limited to the integration of the ideal MHD equations in regions away from any singularity. The presented scheme allows for a straightforward parametric study. The method is checked with known ideal quasi-mode frequencies found for a 1-D box model for the Earth's magnetosphere (Zhu & Kivelson 1988). The agreement is excellent. The dependence of the oscillation frequency on the wavenumbers for a 1-D slab model for coronal loops found by Ofman, Davila, & Steinolfson (1995) is also easily recovered.

  13. Performance and flow characteristics of MHD seawater thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.D.

    1990-01-01

    The main goal of the research is to investigate the effects of strong magnetic fields on the electrical and flow fields inside MHD thrusters. The results of this study is important in the assessment of the feasibility of MHD seawater propulsion for the Navy. To accomplish this goal a three-dimensional fluid flow computer model has been developed and applied to study the concept of MHD seawater propulsion. The effects of strong magnetic fields on the current and electric fields inside the MHD thruster and their interaction with the flow fields, particularly those in the boundary layers, have been investigated. The results of the three-dimensional computations indicate that the velocity profiles are flatter over the sidewalls of the thruster walls in comparison to the velocity profiles over the electrode walls. These nonuniformities in the flow fields give rise to nonuniform distribution of the skin friction along the walls of the thrusters, where higher values are predicted over the sidewalls relative to those over the electrode walls. Also, a parametric study has been performed using the three-dimensional MHD flow model to analyze the performance of continuous electrode seawater thrusters under different operating parameters. The effects of these parameters on the fluid flow characteristics, and on the thruster efficiency have been investigated. Those parameters include the magnetic field (10--20 T), thruster diameter, surface roughness, flow velocity, and the electric load factor. The results show also that the thruster performance improves with the strength of the magnetic field and thruster diameter, and the efficiency decreases with the flow velocity and surface roughness.

  14. Observations of the parametric decay instability of nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Spangler, S.R.; Leckband, J.A.; Cairns, I.H.

    1997-03-01

    One of the most important nonlinear processes for Alfven and fast magnetosonic waves is the decay instability, in which a forward propagating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave is converted into a forward propagating ion acoustic wave and a backward propagating MHD wave. Despite an extensive theoretical literature and numerous computer simulations of the process, there is minimal experimental or observational evidence for its existence. In this paper we report an extensive search for evidence of the decay instability in the MHD wave field upstream of the Earth`s bow shock. Twenty intervals of spacecraft magnetometer and density data with durations between 21 and 168 min were examined. The observational signature of the decay instability sought was a quasi-monochromatic feature in the density power spectrum, attributable to the daughter ion acoustic wave, at a frequency higher than the main wave features in the magnetic power spectra. Such a feature was in fact observed for the interval in which the theoretically predicted instability growth rate was highest, as well as in a second interval for which the instability was permitted with a slower growth rate. However, the data set also contains three long intervals of data in which the {open_quotes}decay line{close_quotes} signature is not seen, although theoretically permitted. The decay line is also absent in four shorter intervals in which the plasma {beta} is less than unity, and the instability accordingly facilitated. Possible reasons for the absence of the instability in these intervals are discussed, such as a finite bandwidth for the parent wave field and plasma kinetic effects. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Observations of the parametric decay instability of nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Steven R.; Leckband, James A.; Cairns, Iver H.

    1997-03-01

    One of the most important nonlinear processes for Alfvén and fast magnetosonic waves is the decay instability, in which a forward propagating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave is converted into a forward propagating ion acoustic wave and a backward propagating MHD wave. Despite an extensive theoretical literature and numerous computer simulations of the process, there is minimal experimental or observational evidence for its existence. In this paper we report an extensive search for evidence of the decay instability in the MHD wave field upstream of the Earth's bow shock. Twenty intervals of spacecraft magnetometer and density data with durations between 21 and 168 min were examined. The observational signature of the decay instability sought was a quasi-monochromatic feature in the density power spectrum, attributable to the daughter ion acoustic wave, at a frequency higher than the main wave features in the magnetic power spectra. Such a feature was in fact observed for the interval in which the theoretically predicted instability growth rate was highest, as well as in a second interval for which the instability was permitted with a slower growth rate. However, the data set also contains three long intervals of data in which the "decay line'' signature is not seen, although theoretically permitted. The decay line is also absent in four shorter intervals in which the plasma β is less than unity, and the instability accordingly facilitated. Possible reasons for the absence of the instability in these intervals are discussed, such as a finite bandwidth for the parent wave field and plasma kinetic effects.

  16. Modulational instability of finite-amplitude, circularly polarized Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derby, N. F., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The simple theory of the decay instability of Alfven waves is strictly applicable only to a small-amplitude parent wave in a low-beta plasma, but, if the parent wave is circularly polarized, it is possible to analyze the situation without either of these restrictions. Results show that a large-amplitude circularly polarized wave is unstable with respect to decay into three waves, one longitudinal and one transverse wave propagating parallel to the parent wave and one transverse wave propagating antiparallel. The transverse decay products appear at frequencies which are the sum and difference of the frequencies of the parent wave and the longitudinal wave. The decay products are not familiar MHD modes except in the limit of small beta and small amplitude of the parent wave, in which case the decay products are a forward-propagating sound wave and a backward-propagating circularly polarized wave. In this limit the other transverse wave disappears. The effect of finite beta is to reduce the linear growth rate of the instability from the value suggested by the simple theory. Possible applications of these results to the theory of the solar wind are briefly touched upon.

  17. A simple unsplit Godunov method for multidimensional MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, James M.; Gardiner, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    We describe a numerical algorithm based on Godunov methods for integrating the equations of compressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in multidimensions. It combines a simple, dimensionally-unsplit integration method with the constrained transport (CT) discretization of the induction equation to enforce the divergence-free constraint. We present the results of a series of fully three-dimensional tests which indicate the method is second-order accurate for smooth solutions in all MHD wave families, and captures shocks, contact and rotational discontinuities well. However, it is also more diffusive than other more complex unsplit integrators combined with CT. Thus, the primary advantage of the method is its simplicity. It does not require a characteristic tracing step to construct interface values for the Riemann solver, it is straightforward to extend with additional physics, and it is suitable for use with nested and adaptive meshes. The method is implemented as one of two dimensionally unsplit MHD integrators in the Athena code, which is freely available for download from the web.

  18. Gravity wave and microphysical effects on bow echo development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selin, Rebecca Denise Adams

    . Microphysical sensitivity tests further elucidate the importance of the horizontal distribution of the microphysical heating profile. The tests used variations in the graupel parameter to evaluate its effect on bowing development and related forecasting parameters. Idealized and case study simulations showed that simulations using a larger, heavier, more "hail-like'' graupel parameter with faster fallspeeds have decreased evaporation and melting rates concentrated closer behind the convective line, compared to simulations with a smaller, slower-falling, more "graupel-like'' graupel parameter. This resulted in increased precipitation efficiency but a smaller stratiform region, weaker cold pool, weaker downdrafts and surface wind gusts, rear-to-front flow that remained elevated until close behind the convective line, and delayed bowing development in the "hail-like'' simulations. Output from the case study sensitivity tests were compared to data from the Oklahoma Mesonet, which showed "hail-like'' microphysical variations can cause significant variations in simulated forecasting parameters, including a 90 minute delay in onset of bowing, 150% weaker surface wind gusts, and a 600% increase in storm-total precipitation. Results from this work emphasize the importance of microphysical heating and cooling profiles in development of bow echoes, be it through the generation of multiple gravity waves and their feedback to the convection, or through direct modification of convective features such as the rear-inflow circulation and the cold pool strength. The pressure surge gravity wave generated by low-level cooling prior to bowing, and associated destabilization of the environment immediately in advance of the system, improves understanding of the cause of convective intensification as the system bows. However, the strong connection shown between bow echo development and microphysical processes, and the highly diverse nature of microphysical parameterizations, presents a challenge to

  19. Three-dimensional analysis of MHD generators and diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Vanka, S P; Ahluwalia, R K; Doss, E D

    1982-03-01

    The three-dimensional flow and heat transfer phenomena in MHD channels and diffusers are analyzed by solving the governing partial differential equations for flow and electrical fields. The equation set consists of the mass continuity equation, the three momentum equations, the equations for enthalpy, turbulence kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, and the Maxwell equations. This set of coupled equations is solved by the use of a finite-difference calculation procedure. The turbulence is represented by a two-equation model of turbulence in which partial differential equations are solved for the turbulence kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. Calculations have been performed for Faraday and diagonally-connected channels. Specifically, the AEDC (Faraday) and the UTSI (diagonal) channels have been analyzed, and the results are compared with experimental data. The agreement is fairly good for all the measured quantities. The effects of channel loading on the three-dimensional flow characteristics of Faraday and diagonally-connected generators have been also analyzed. A simple argument is presented to show qualitatively the role of MHD body forces in generating axial vorticity and hence secondary flows in the cross-stream. Calculations have also been made to study the flow evolution in MHD diffusers. The calculations show that the velocity overshoots and secondary flows decay along the diffusers length. Plots of velocity, skin friction and pressure recovery are presented to illustrate the flow development in MHD diffusers.

  20. MHD effects and heat transfer for the UCM fluid along with Joule heating and thermal radiation using Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, S.; Hussain, S.; Sagheer, M.

    2016-08-01

    Present study examines the numerical analysis of MHD flow of Maxwell fluid with thermal radiation and Joule heating by considering the recently developed Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model which explains the time relaxation characteristics for the heat flux. The objective is to analyze the governing parameters such as viscoelastic fluid parameter, Magnetic parameter, Eckert and Prandtl number's impact on the velocity and temperature profiles through graphs and tables. Suitable similarity transformations have been used to reduce the formulated PDEs into a system of coupled non-linear ODEs. Shooting technique has been invoked for finding the numerical solutions of the dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles. Additionally, the MATLAB built-in routine bvp4c has also been used to verify and strengthen the results obtained by shooting method. From some special cases of the present work, a comparison with the previously published results has been presented.

  1. The Effects of Thermal Radiation on an Unsteady MHD Axisymmetric Stagnation-Point Flow over a Shrinking Sheet in Presence of Temperature Dependent Thermal Conductivity with Navier Slip

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Sabyasachi; Haroun, Nageeb A. H.; Sibanda, Precious

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) axisymmetric stagnation-point flow of an unsteady and electrically conducting incompressible viscous fluid in with temperature dependent thermal conductivity, thermal radiation and Navier slip is investigated. The flow is due to a shrinking surface that is shrunk axisymmetrically in its own plane with a linear velocity. The magnetic field is imposed normally to the sheet. The model equations that describe this fluid flow are solved by using the spectral relaxation method. Here, heat transfer processes are discussed for two different types of wall heating; (a) a prescribed surface temperature and (b) a prescribed surface heat flux. We discuss and evaluate how the various parameters affect the fluid flow, heat transfer and the temperature field with the aid of different graphical presentations and tabulated results. PMID:26414006

  2. Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: Evaluation of SNL-SWAN and Sensitivity Studies in Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Magalen, Jason; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    A modified version of an indust ry standard wave modeling tool was evaluated, optimized, and utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters a nd wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deployment scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that wave direction and WEC device type we r e most sensitive to the variation in the model parameters examined in this study . Generally, the changes in wave height we re the primary alteration caused by the presence of a WEC array. Specifically, W EC device type and subsequently their size directly re sult ed in wave height variations; however, it is important to utilize ongoing laboratory studies and future field tests to determine the most appropriate power matrix values for a particular WEC device and configuration in order to improve modeling results .

  3. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: A Modeling Sensitivity Study in Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Grace Chang; Jason Magalen; Craig Jones

    2014-08-01

    A n indust ry standard wave modeling tool was utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters and wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deploym ent scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that b oth wave height and near - bottom orbital velocity we re subject to the largest pote ntial variations, each decreas ed in sensitivity as transmission coefficient increase d , as number and spacing of WEC devices decrease d , and as the deployment location move d offshore. Wave direction wa s affected consistently for all parameters and wave perio d was not affected (or negligibly affected) by varying model parameters or WEC configuration .

  4. Investigating Free-surface, MHD Instabilities in Liquid Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumfiel, Geoff; Ji, Hantao; Zweben, Stewart

    1999-11-01

    The addition of the Lorentz force (j × B) to MHD fluids, such as liquid metals, could introduce new instabilities to free-surface motions. An experiment is under development at PPPL that will contribute to the understanding of these instabilities. This experiment is designed to explore how instabilities form and propagate on the surface of liquid metals. Metals with low melting points and reasonable conductive properties (such as Ga) are melted in an eight inch, square Pyrex container. The container is placed in a large magnetic field (up to 5 kG) and a perpendicular current is set up in the metal. Waves are generated using a simple wave driving apparatus. A one dimensional, diode camera is used to monitor wave propagation perpendicular to the B-field. Initial results will be presented and discussed. This experiment will provide information that could eventually be used to better control free-surface motions in liquid Li walls in fusion reactors.

  5. Surfing effect in the interaction of electromagnetic and gravitational waves: Limits on the speed of gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Polnarev, A. G.; Baskaran, D.

    2008-06-15

    In the current work we investigate the propagation of electromagnetic waves in the field of gravitational waves. Starting with the simple case of an electromagnetic wave traveling in the field of a plane monochromatic gravitational wave, we introduce the concept of the surfing effect and analyze its physical consequences. We then generalize these results to an arbitrary gravitational wave field. We show that, due to the transverse nature of gravitational waves, the surfing effect leads to significant observable consequences only if the velocity of gravitational waves deviates from the speed of light. This fact can help to place an upper limit on the deviation of gravitational wave velocity from the speed of light. The microarcsecond resolution promised by the upcoming precision interferometry experiments allow one to place stringent upper limits on {epsilon}=(v{sub gw}-c)/c as a function of the energy density parameter for gravitational waves {omega}{sub gw}. For {omega}{sub gw}{approx_equal}10{sup -10} this limit amounts to {epsilon} < or approx. 2{center_dot}10{sup -2}.

  6. ANALYTIC APPROXIMATE SEISMOLOGY OF PROPAGATING MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, M.; Soler, R.; Arregui, I.

    2012-12-01

    Observations show that propagating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. The technique of MHD seismology uses the wave observations combined with MHD wave theory to indirectly infer physical parameters of the solar atmospheric plasma and magnetic field. Here, we present an analytical seismological inversion scheme for propagating MHD waves. This scheme uses the observational information on wavelengths and damping lengths in a consistent manner, along with observed values of periods or phase velocities, and is based on approximate asymptotic expressions for the theoretical values of wavelengths and damping lengths. The applicability of the inversion scheme is discussed and an example is given.

  7. Eulerian simulations of collisional effects on electrostatic plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco; Perrone, Denise; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2013-09-01

    The problem of collisions in a plasma is a wide subject with a huge historical literature. In fact, the description of realistic plasmas is a tough problem to attack, both from the theoretical and the numerical point of view. In this paper, a Eulerian time-splitting algorithm for the study of the propagation of electrostatic waves in collisional plasmas is presented. Collisions are modeled through one-dimensional operators of the Fokker-Planck type, both in linear and nonlinear forms. The accuracy of the numerical code is discussed by comparing the numerical results to the analytical predictions obtained in some limit cases when trying to evaluate the effects of collisions in the phenomenon of wave plasma echo and collisional dissipation of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal waves. Particular attention is devoted to the study of the nonlinear Dougherty collisional operator, recently used to describe the collisional dissipation of electron plasma waves in a pure electron plasma column [M. W. Anderson and T. M. O'Neil, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112110 (2007)]. Finally, for the study of collisional plasmas, a recipe to set the simulation parameters in order to prevent the filamentation problem can be provided, by exploiting the property of velocity diffusion operators to smooth out small velocity scales.

  8. Spectral effects on fast wave core heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Cynthia; Bell, R. E.; Berry, Lee; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Ryan, Philip Michael; Wilgen, John B

    2009-01-01

    Recent results obtained with high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) on NSTX strongly support the hypothesis that the onset of perpendicular fast wave propagation right at or very near the launcher is a primary cause for a reduction in core heating efficiency at long wavelengths that is also observed in ICRF heating experiments in numerous tokamaks. A dramatic increase in core heating efficiency was first achieved in NSTX L-mode helium majority plasmas when the onset for perpendicular wave propagation was moved away from the antenna and nearby vessel structures. Efficient core heating in deuterium majority L-mode and H-mode discharges, in which the edge density is typically higher than in comparable helium majority plasmas, was then accomplished by reducing the edge density in front of the launcher with lithium conditioning and avoiding operational points prone to instabilities. These results indicate that careful tailoring of the edge density profiles in ITER should be considered to limit radio frequency (rf) power losses to the antenna and plasma facing materials. Finally, in plasmas with reduced rf power losses in the edge regions, the first direct measurements of HHFW CD were obtained with the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. The location and radial dependence of HHFW CD measured by MSE are in reasonable agreement with predictions from both full wave and ray tracing simulations.

  9. Eulerian simulations of collisional effects on electrostatic plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco; Perrone, Denise; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2013-09-15

    The problem of collisions in a plasma is a wide subject with a huge historical literature. In fact, the description of realistic plasmas is a tough problem to attack, both from the theoretical and the numerical point of view. In this paper, a Eulerian time-splitting algorithm for the study of the propagation of electrostatic waves in collisional plasmas is presented. Collisions are modeled through one-dimensional operators of the Fokker-Planck type, both in linear and nonlinear forms. The accuracy of the numerical code is discussed by comparing the numerical results to the analytical predictions obtained in some limit cases when trying to evaluate the effects of collisions in the phenomenon of wave plasma echo and collisional dissipation of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal waves. Particular attention is devoted to the study of the nonlinear Dougherty collisional operator, recently used to describe the collisional dissipation of electron plasma waves in a pure electron plasma column [M. W. Anderson and T. M. O'Neil, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112110 (2007)]. Finally, for the study of collisional plasmas, a recipe to set the simulation parameters in order to prevent the filamentation problem can be provided, by exploiting the property of velocity diffusion operators to smooth out small velocity scales.

  10. Magnetic field effects on gravitational waves from binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Matthew; Hirschmann, Eric; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven; Motl, Patrick; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos; Tohline, Joel

    2008-04-01

    Observational evidence indicates that a fair number of neutron star binaries and neutron star-black hole binaries have a sizable magnetic field which can be responsible for powering pulsars and colimating jets. Magnetic field effects additionally can have a strong influence on the dynamics of the fluid by redistributing angular momentum through different mechanisms (magnetic winding and braking, magneto-rotational instabilities) depending on the strength of the magnetic field and the typical time scales involved in the process. These processes can affect the multipolar structure of the source and consequently the produced gravitational wave. We present results of neutron star binary mergers both with and without magnetic field and discuss the magnetic effects on the gravitational waves, fluid structure, and merger timescale.

  11. The effect of lipid monolayers on Faraday waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Stephen; Bookman, Lake; Shearer, Michael; Daniels, Karen

    2011-11-01

    Surface tension is known to affect the critical driving acceleration for Faraday waves and their spatial wavenumber at onset. We perform experiments in the subharmonic regime, on water whose free surface is contaminated with up to one monolayer of fluorescent NBD-PC lipid. A circular container of water is vibrated vertically at single frequencies ranging from 15 Hz to 70 Hz, and we measure the acceleration and wavenumber at the onset of Faraday waves. We observe that the critical acceleration is larger than predicted by recent models, if the effect of the contaminant is assumed to simply lower the surface tension. Critical wavenumbers are largely unaffected. We examine whether a non-uniform lipid distribution is responsible for these effects. This work is funded by NSF Grant # DMS-0968258.

  12. Second-order wave effects on TLP tendon tension responses

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, H.; Mercier, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a general procedure for analyzing the second-order wave effects on the tendon tension responses of a TLP. The approach solves both first- and second-order equation of motions for a TLP system in frequency domain. Viscous effects are included in the form of statistically linearized damping coefficients. An efficient algorithm has been devised for reducing the burden of second-order wave diffraction analysis, which selects the interacting frequency pairs according to springing frequency of interest to minimize the cost of computing quadratic transfer functions (QTFs) and allow accurate interpolation of QTFs. Moment statistics of the tension process are computed through an eigenvalue analysis. The developed method is applied to analyze the tendon tension responses of a TLP design in water depth of 3,000 ft.

  13. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This eighteenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period November 1, 1991 to January 31, 1992. The precombustor is fully assembled. Manufacturing of all slagging stage components has been completed. All cooling panels were welded in place and the panel/shell gap was filled with RTV. Final combustor assembly is in progress. The low pressure cooling subsystem (LPCS) was delivered to the CDIF. Second stage brazing issues were resolved. The construction of the two anode power cabinets was completed.

  14. Ceramic component for MHD electrode

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.; Bates, Junior L.

    1981-01-01

    A ceramic component which exhibits electrical conductivity down to near room temperatures has the formula: Hf.sub.x In.sub.y A.sub.z O.sub.2 where x=0.1 to 0.4, y=0.3 to 0.6, z=0.1 to 0.4 and A is a lanthanide rare earth or yttrium. The component is suitable for use in the fabrication of MHD electrodes or as the current leadout portion of a composite electrode with other ceramic components.

  15. Ceramic components for MHD electrode

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, D.D.

    A ceramic component which exhibits electrical conductivity down to near room temperatures has the formula: Hf/sub x/In/sub y/A/sub z/O/sub 2/ where x = 0.1 to 0.4, y = 0.3 to 0.6, z = 0.1 to 0.4 and A is a lanthanide rare earth or yttrium. The component is suitable for use in the fabrication of MHD electrodes or as the current leadout portion of a composite electrode with other ceramic components.

  16. Towards Integrated Pulse Detonation Propulsion and MHD Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Thompson, Bryan R.; Lineberry, John T.

    1999-01-01

    with PDEs for integrated aerospace propulsion and MHD power. An effort is made to estimate the energy requirements for direct detonation initiation of potential fuel/oxidizer mixtures and to determine the electrical power requirements. This requirement is evaluated in terms of the possibility for MHD power generation using the combustion detonation wave. Small scale laboratory experiments were conducted using stoichiometric mixtures of acetylene and oxygen with an atomized spray of cesium hydroxide dissolved in alcohol as an ionization seed in the active MHD region. Time resolved thrust and MHD power generation measurements were performed. These results show that PDEs yield higher I(sub sp) levels than a comparable rocket engine and that MHD power generation is viable candidate for achieving self-excited engine operation.

  17. Numerical simulation of the operation of a MHD generator in transient regimes in MHD power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Bityurin, V.A.; Ivanov, P.P.; Koryagina, G.M.; Lyubimov, G.A.; Medin, S.A.; Morozov, G.N.; Prokop, A.S.

    1982-09-01

    Transient regimes of a MHD generator operating in combination with equipment in a MHD power station are analzyed with the help of a numerical model. The MHD generator, whose flow-through part consists of a nozzle, a channel, and a diffuser, is regulated by changing the flow rate and the load. Three types of MHD channels are studied: Faraday supersonic and subsonic, and diagonal supersonic. Their characteristics are presented and the efficiency of the MHD power station under nonrated regimes is determined. It is established that a MHD generator and the MHD power station as a whole admit quite efficient and deep regulation of the change in the flow rate of the working body.

  18. Multipath Effects on Phase Measurements with Continuous Terahertz Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, A. H.; Albarracin, M. G.; Thomas, D. H.; von der Weid, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    We evaluate the effect of multipath waves on terahertz phase measurements due to multiple reflections between the transmitter antenna and the sample. We show that the phase shift introduced by the sample will be biased by a value which depends on the sample position in the terahertz path. We show how to remove the bias and use the technique in the measurement of the index of refraction of Mylar at 194.4 GHz.

  19. Effect of Radio Frequency Waves on Plasma Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, S.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of Radio Frequency waves on low frequency plasma instabilities and turbulence is studied. It is shown that the ponderomotive force can stabilize or destabilize instabilities depending on the power deposition profile and no RF induced flow generation hypothesis is required. Its possible consequence on space and fusion plasma will be discussed. Collaborations with George Vahala from William & Mary, Julio Martinell from UNAM and Atsushi Fukuyama from Kyoto University are acknowledged.

  20. Workshop on Feedback Stabilization of MHD Stabilities

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, K.; Kugel, H.; La Haye, R.; Mauel, M.; Nevins, W.; Prager, S.

    1996-12-31

    The feedback stabilization of MHD instabilities is an area of research that is critical for improving the performance and economic attractiveness of magnetic confinement devices. A Workshop dedicated to feedback stabilization of MHD instabilities was held from December 11-13, 1996 at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton NJ, USA. The resulting presentations, conclusions, and recommendations are summarized.

  1. MHD (Magnetohydrodynamics) Program Plan, FY 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-05-01

    The essential elements of the current program, which is a continuation of the program outlined in the FY 1988 MHD Program Plan, are to: develop technical and environmental data for the integrated MHD topping cycle system through long-term (1000 hours) proof of concept (POC) testing; develop technical and environmental data for the integrated MHD bottoming cycle subsystem through long-term (4000 hours) POC testing; design and construct a seed regeneration system capable of independent operation, using spent seed materials from the MHD process; prepare a conceptual design for an MHD retrofit plant; and continue system studies and supporting research necessary for system testing. Results of the topping cycle POC tests at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF), coupled with the bottoming cycle POC test results obtained at the Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF), and the seed regeneration POC effort will provide the critical engineering data base for the private sector's final decision on proceeding with the design, construction, and operation of an MHD retrofit. The development schedule, decision points, and resource requirements are discussed. As part of the MHD program, international activities of several nations are monitored and evaluated through contact with the international MHD scientific and technical community.

  2. Edge plasma responses to energetic-particle-driven MHD instability in Heliotron J

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Yamamoto, S.; Nagasaki, K.; Mizuuchi, T.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Hashimoto, K.; Shi, N.; Zang, L.; Kasajima, K.; Kenmochi, N.; Ohtani, Y.; Nagae, Y.; Mukai, K.; Lee, H. Y.; Matsuura, H.; Takeuchi, M.; Konoshima, S.; Sano, F.

    2016-01-01

    Two different responses to an energetic-particle-driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability, modulation of the turbulence amplitude associated with the MHD instability and dynamical changes in the radial electric field (Er) synchronized with bursting MHD activities, are found around the edge plasma in neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasmas of the Heliotron J device using multiple Langmuir probes. The nonlinear phase relationship between the MHD activity and broadband fluctuation is found from bicoherence and envelope analysis applied to the probe signals. The structural changes of the Er profile appear in perfect synchronization with the periodic MHD activities, and radial transport of fast ions are observed around the last closed flux surface as a radial delay of the ion saturation current signals. Moreover, distortion of the MHD mode structure is clarified in each cycle of the MHD activities using beam emission spectroscopy diagnostics, suggesting that the fast ion distribution in real and/or velocity spaces is distorted in the core plasma, which can modify the radial electric field structure through a redistribution process of the fast ions. These observations suggest that such effects as a nonlinear coupling with turbulence and/or the modification of radial electric field profiles are important and should be incorporated into the study of energetic particle driven instabilities in burning plasma physics.

  3. Measurements of Prompt and MHD-Induced Fast Ion Loss from National Spherical Torus Experiment Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. Darrow; S.S. Medley; A.L. Roquemore; W.W. Heidbrink; A. Alekseyev; F.E. Cecil; J. Egedal; V.Ya. Goloborod'ko; N.N. Gorelenkov; M. Isobe; S. Kaye; M. Miah; F. Paoletti; M.H. Redi; S.N. Reznik; A. Rosenberg; R. White; D. Wyatt; V.A. Yavorskij

    2002-10-15

    A range of effects may make fast ion confinement in spherical tokamaks worse than in conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. Data from neutron detectors, a neutral particle analyzer, and a fast ion loss diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) indicate that neutral beam ion confinement is consistent with classical expectations in quiescent plasmas, within the {approx}25% errors of measurement. However, fast ion confinement in NSTX is frequently affected by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity, and the effect of MHD can be quite strong.

  4. Effects of chemical reaction on MHD free convection and mass transfer flow of a micropolar fluid with oscillatory plate velocity and constant heat source in a rotating frame of reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakr, A. A.

    2011-02-01

    This paper concerns with studying the steady and unsteady MHD micropolar flow and mass transfers flow with constant heat source in a rotating frame of reference in the presence chemical reaction of the first-order, taking an oscillatory plate velocity and a constant suction velocity at the plate. The plate velocity is assumed to oscillate in time with a constant frequency; it is thus assumed that the solutions of the boundary layer are the same oscillatory type. The governing dimensionless equations are solved analytically after using small perturbation approximation. The effects of the various flow parameters and thermophysical properties on the velocity and temperature fields across the boundary layer are investigated. Numerical results of velocity profiles of micropolar fluids are compared with the corresponding flow problems for a Newtonian fluid. The results show that there exists completely oscillating behavior in the velocity distribution.

  5. The effect of aerosols on northern hemisphere wintertime stationary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewinschal, Anna; Ekman, Annica M. L.

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol particles have a considerable impact on the energy budget of the atmosphere because of their ability to scatter and absorb incoming solar radiation. Since the beginning of the industrialisation a large increase has been seen mainly in the concentrations of sulphate and black carbon as a result of combustion of fossil fuel and biomass burning. Aerosol particles have a relatively short residence time in the atmosphere why the aerosol concentration shows a large variation spatially as well as in time where high concentrations are found close to emission sources. This leads to a highly varying radiative forcing pattern which modifies temperature gradients which in turn can alter the pressure distribution and lead to changes in the circulation in the atmosphere. In this study, the effect on the wintertime planetary scale waves on the northern hemisphere is specifically considered together with the regional climate impact due to changes in the stationary waves. To investigate the effect of aerosols on the circulation a global general circulation model based on the ECMWF operational forecast model is used (EC-Earth). The aerosol description in EC-Earth consists of prescribed monthly mean mass concentration fields of five different types of aerosols: sulphate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust and sea salt. Only the direct radiative effect is considered and the different aerosol types are treated as external mixtures. Changes in the stationary wave pattern are determined by comparing model simulations using present-day and pre-industrial concentrations of aerosol particles. Since the planetary scale waves largely influence the storm tracks and are an important part of the meridional heat transport, changes in the wave pattern may have substantial impact on the climate globally and locally. By looking at changes in the model simulations globally it can be found that the aerosol radiative forcing has the potential to change the stationary wave pattern. Furthermore

  6. MHD Instability and Turbulence in the Tachocline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werne, Joe; Wagner, William J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The focus of this project was to study the physical processes that govern tachocline dynamics and structure. Specific features explored included stratification, shear, waves, and toroidal and poloidal background fields. In order to address recent theoretical work on anisotropic mixing and dynamics in the tachocline, we were particularly interested in such anisotropic mixing for the specific tachocline processes studied. Transition to turbulence often shapes the largest-scale features that appear spontaneously in a flow during the development of turbulence. The resulting large-scale straining field can control the subsequent dynamics; therefore, anticipation of the large-scale straining field that results for individual realizations of the transition to turbulence can be important for subsequent dynamics, flow morphology, and transport characteristics. As a result, we paid particular attention to the development of turbulence in the stratified and sheared environment of the tachocline. This is complicated by the fact that the linearly stability of sheared MHD flows is non-self-adjoint, implying that normal asymptotic linear stability theory may not be relevant.

  7. Optimization of a surface wave elastography method through diffraction and guided waves effects characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinspan, G. A.; Aguiar, S.; Benech, N.

    2016-04-01

    Soft biological tissue elasticity is a parameter whose reliable measure is relevant to many applications in fields as diverse as medicine and the agrifood industry. The ultrasonic elastography methods are often unviable to be applied to provide such solutions. In this way, the surface wave elastography (SWE) appears as a viable alternative, due its low cost, easy to use, non-invasive-destructive character as well as its ability to provide in vivo estimates. Previous studies have described a good correlation between the overall behavior of ultrasonic elastography and SWE, although the latter overestimates the elasticity values compared to the first. It has been suggested that this is due to the influence of certain physical effects related to the exclusive use of low frequency waves, as well as by characteristics of the experimental setup and/or medium. In this work we confirm the influence of such effects and discuss different strategies to make independent the estimations thereof. This allows achieving a good agreement between the ultrasonic reference method and SWE. Thus, SWE becomes a reliable method to estimate soft biological tissue elasticity.

  8. Multimegawatt NEP with vapor core reactor MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Blair; Knight, Travis; Anghaie, Samim

    2002-01-01

    Efforts at the Innovative Nuclear Space Power and Propulsion Institute have assessed the feasibility of combining gaseous or vapor core reactors with magnetohydrodynamic power generators to provide extremely high quality, high density, and low specific mass electrical power for space applications. Innovative shielding strategies are employed to maintain an effective but relatively low mass shield, which is the most dominating part of multi-megawatt space power systems. The fission driven magnetohydrodynamic generator produces tens of kilowatt DC power at specific mass of less than 0.5 kg/kW for the total power system. The MHD output with minor conditioning is coupled to magnetoplasmadynamic thruster to achieve an overall NEP system specific mass of less than 1.0 kg/kW for power levels above 20 MWe. Few other concepts would allow comparable ensuing payload savings and flexible mission abort options for manned flights to Mars for example. .

  9. Two Contemporary Problems in Magnetized Plasmas: The ion-ion hybrid resonator and MHD stability in a snowflake divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, William Anthony

    The first part of the dissertation investigates the effects of multiple-ions on the propagation of shear Alfven waves. It is shown that the presence of a second ion-species allows for the formation of an ion-ion hybrid resonator in the presence of a magnetic well. A full-wave description is shown to explain the measured eigenfrequencies and spatial form of the resonator modes identified in experiments in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. However, it is determined that neither electron collisions or radial convection of the mode due to coupling to either the compressional or ion-Bernstein wave can explain the observed dissipation. Ray tracing studies for shear Alfven waves are performed in various magnetic geometries of contemporary interest. In a tokamak, it is found that the hybrid resonator can exist in the cold-plasma regime, but that ion-temperature effects combined with curvature effects cause the wave reflection point to shift towards the cyclotron frequency of the heavier ion. A one-dimensional WKB model is applied to a tokamak geometry for conditions corresponding to a burning fusion plasma to characterize the resonator. Instability due to fusion-born alpha particles is assessed. An approximate form of the global eigenmode is considered. It is identified that magnetic field shear combined with large ion temperature can cause coupling to an ion-Bernstein wave, which can limit the instability. Finally, the radiation pattern of shear Alfven waves generated by a burst of charged particles in the presence of two-ion species is considered. The spectral content and spatial patterns of the radiated waves are determined. The second part of the dissertation considers the MHD stability of the plasma near a divertor in a tokamak. Two types of modes are considered: a ballooning mode and an axisymmetric, quasi-flute mode. Instability thresholds are derived for both modes and numerically evaluated for parameters relevant to recent experiments. This is done to

  10. Adding Drift Kinetics to a Global MHD Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, J.; Merkin, V. G.; Zhang, B.; Ouellette, J.

    2015-12-01

    Global MHD models have generally been successful in describing thebehavior of the magnetosphere at large and meso-scales. An exceptionis the inner magnetosphere where energy dependent particle drifts areessential in the dynamics and evolution of the ring current. Even inthe tail particle drifts are a significant perturbation on the MHDbehavior of the plasma. The most common drift addition to MHD has beeninclusion of the Hall term in Faraday's Law. There have been attemptsin the space physics context to include gradient and curvature driftswithin a single fluid MHD picture. These have not been terriblysuccessful because the use of a single, Maxwellian distribution doesnot capture the energy dependent nature of the drifts. The advent ofmulti-fluid MHD codes leads to a reconsideration of this problem. TheVlasov equation can be used to define individual ``species'' whichcover a specific energy range. Each fluid can then be treated ashaving a separate evolution. We take the approach of the RiceConvection Model (RCM) that each energy channel can be described by adistribution that is essentially isotropic in the guiding centerpicture. In the local picture, this gives rise to drifts that can bedescribed in terms of the energy dependent inertial and diamagneticdrifts. By extending the MHD equations with these drifts we can get asystem which reduces to the RCM approach in the slow-flow innermagnetosphere but is not restricted to cases where the flow speed issmall. The restriction is that the equations can be expanded in theratio of the Larmor radius to the gradient scale lengths. At scalesapproaching di, the assumption of gyrotropic (or isotropic)distributions break down. In addition to the drifts, the formalism canalso be used to include finite Larmor radius effects on the pressuretensor (gyro-viscosity). We present some initial calculations with this method.

  11. Benchmark Modeling of the Near-Field and Far-Field Wave Effects of Wave Energy Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E; Haller, Merrick C; Ozkan-Haller, H Tuba

    2013-01-26

    This project is an industry-led partnership between Columbia Power Technologies and Oregon State University that will perform benchmark laboratory experiments and numerical modeling of the near-field and far-field impacts of wave scattering from an array of wave energy devices. These benchmark experimental observations will help to fill a gaping hole in our present knowledge of the near-field effects of multiple, floating wave energy converters and are a critical requirement for estimating the potential far-field environmental effects of wave energy arrays. The experiments will be performed at the Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (Oregon State University) and will utilize an array of newly developed Buoys' that are realistic, lab-scale floating power converters. The array of Buoys will be subjected to realistic, directional wave forcing (1:33 scale) that will approximate the expected conditions (waves and water depths) to be found off the Central Oregon Coast. Experimental observations will include comprehensive in-situ wave and current measurements as well as a suite of novel optical measurements. These new optical capabilities will include imaging of the 3D wave scattering using a binocular stereo camera system, as well as 3D device motion tracking using a newly acquired LED system. These observing systems will capture the 3D motion history of individual Buoys as well as resolve the 3D scattered wave field; thus resolving the constructive and destructive wave interference patterns produced by the array at high resolution. These data combined with the device motion tracking will provide necessary information for array design in order to balance array performance with the mitigation of far-field impacts. As a benchmark data set, these data will be an important resource for testing of models for wave/buoy interactions, buoy performance, and far-field effects on wave and current patterns due to the presence of arrays. Under the proposed project we will initiate high

  12. Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.D. ); Sikes, W.C. )

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

  13. Cusp geometry in MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, George; Crooker, Nancy; Siebert, Keith; Maynard, Nelson; Weimer, Daniel; White, Willard

    2005-01-01

    The MHD simulations described here show that the latitude of the high-altitude cusp decreases as the IMF swings from North to South, that there is a pronounced dawn dusk asymmetry at high-altitude associated with a dawn dusk component of the IMF, and that at the same time there is also a pronounced dawn dusk asymmetry at low-altitude. The simulations generate a feature that represents what has been called the cleft. It appears as a tail (when the IMF has a By component) attached to the cusp, extending either toward the dawn flank or the dusk flank depending on the dawn dusk orientation of the IMF. This one-sided cleft connects the cusp to the magnetospheric sash. We compare cusp geometry predicted by MHD simulations against published observations based on Hawkeye and DMSP data. Regarding the high-altitude predictions, the comparisons are not definitive, mainly because the observations are incomplete or mutually inconsistent. Regarding the low-altitude prediction of a strong dawn dusk asymmetry, the observations are unambiguous and are in good qualitative agreement with the prediction.

  14. Effect of strong coupling on dust acoustic waves and instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. Kalman, G.

    1998-10-01

    The presence of charged dust in a plasma can lead to very low frequency dust acoustic waves and instabilities. In certain laboratory plasmas the dust is strongly coupled, as characterized by the condition {Gamma}{sub d}=Q{sub d}{sup 2} exp({minus}d/{lambda}{sub D})/dT{sub d}{ge}1, where Q{sub d} is the dust charge, {ital d} is the intergrain spacing, T{sub d} is the dust thermal energy, and {lambda}{sub D} is the plasma screening length. When the dust is strongly coupled, the spatial correlation of the grains can affect the dispersion relation of these waves. We review our recent work [1] on the dispersion properties of dust acoustic waves in the strongly coupled (liquid) phase in a dusty plasma, including also the effects of dust-neutral collisions. We then discuss a preliminary analysis of the effect of strong dust coupling on an ion dust two-stream instability in a collisional dusty plasma. Applications to laboratory dusty plasmas are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Effect of strong coupling on dust acoustic waves and instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M.; Kalman, G.

    1998-10-21

    The presence of charged dust in a plasma can lead to very low frequency dust acoustic waves and instabilities. In certain laboratory plasmas the dust is strongly coupled, as characterized by the condition {gamma}{sub d}=Q{sub d}{sup 2} exp(-d/{lambda}{sub D})/dT{sub d}{>=}1, where Q{sub d} is the dust charge, d is the intergrain spacing, T{sub d} is the dust thermal energy, and {lambda}{sub D} is the plasma screening length. When the dust is strongly coupled, the spatial correlation of the grains can affect the dispersion relation of these waves. We review our recent work [1] on the dispersion properties of dust acoustic waves in the strongly coupled (liquid) phase in a dusty plasma, including also the effects of dust-neutral collisions. We then discuss a preliminary analysis of the effect of strong dust coupling on an ion dust two-stream instability in a collisional dusty plasma. Applications to laboratory dusty plasmas are discussed.

  16. Divergence Free High Order Filter Methods for the Compressible MHD Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yea, H. C.; Sjoegreen, Bjoern

    2003-01-01

    The generalization of a class of low-dissipative high order filter finite difference methods for long time wave propagation of shock/turbulence/combustion compressible viscous gas dynamic flows to compressible MHD equations for structured curvilinear grids has been achieved. The new scheme is shown to provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of the divergence of the magnetic field numerical error. Standard diver- gence cleaning is not required by the present filter approach. For certain MHD test cases, divergence free preservation of the magnetic fields has been achieved.

  17. High Order Filter Methods for the Non-ideal Compressible MHD Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, Bjoern

    2003-01-01

    The generalization of a class of low-dissipative high order filter finite difference methods for long time wave propagation of shock/turbulence/combustion compressible viscous gas dynamic flows to compressible MHD equations for structured curvilinear grids has been achieved. The new scheme is shown to provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of the divergence of the magnetic field numerical error. Standard divergence cleaning is not required by the present filter approach. For certain non-ideal MHD test cases, divergence free preservation of the magnetic fields has been achieved.

  18. Preliminary measurements of thermal effects in the dust acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jeremiah

    2009-11-01

    A complex (dusty) plasma (CDP) is a four-component system composed of ions, electrons, neutral particles and charged microparticles. The presence of the microparticles gives rise to new plasma phenomena, including collective modes such as the dust acoustic wave. Recent measurements of the dispersion relationship of this wave mode [E. Thomas, Jr., et. al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 123701 (2007), J.D. Williams, et. al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 043704 (2008)] have shown that, over a range of neutral gas pressures, it is necessary to include thermal effects to accurately fit the measured dispersion relations. In this work, initial measurements of the dispersion relation in a new dusty plasma experiment, the Wittenberg University DUsty Plasma Experiment (WUDUPE), will be presented. In particular, the dependence of the kinetic dust temperature on the neutral gas pressure will be presented.

  19. Detecting inertial effects with airborne matter-wave interferometry.

    PubMed

    Geiger, R; Ménoret, V; Stern, G; Zahzam, N; Cheinet, P; Battelier, B; Villing, A; Moron, F; Lours, M; Bidel, Y; Bresson, A; Landragin, A; Bouyer, P

    2011-01-01

    Inertial sensors relying on atom interferometry offer a breakthrough advance in a variety of applications, such as inertial navigation, gravimetry or ground- and space-based tests of fundamental physics. These instruments require a quiet environment to reach their performance and using them outside the laboratory remains a challenge. Here we report the first operation of an airborne matter-wave accelerometer set up aboard a 0g plane and operating during the standard gravity (1g) and microgravity (0g) phases of the flight. At 1g, the sensor can detect inertial effects more than 300 times weaker than the typical acceleration fluctuations of the aircraft. We describe the improvement of the interferometer sensitivity in 0g, which reaches 2 x 10-4 ms-2 / √Hz with our current setup. We finally discuss the extension of our method to airborne and spaceborne tests of the Universality of free fall with matter waves. PMID:21934658

  20. Radiative transfer effects on reflected shock waves. II - Absorbing gas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, F. Y.; Olfe, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    Radiative cooling effects behind a reflected shock wave are calculated for an absorbing-emitting gas by means of an expansion procedure in the small density ratio across the shock front. For a gray gas shock layer with an optical thickness of order unity or less the absorption integral is simplified by use of the local temperature approximation, whereas for larger optical thicknesses a Rosseland diffusion type of solution is matched with the local temperature approximation solution. The calculations show that the shock wave will attenuate at first and then accelerate to a constant velocity. Under appropriate conditions the gas enthalpy near the wall may increase at intermediate times before ultimately decreasing to zero. A two-band absorption model yields end-wall radiant-heat fluxes which agree well with available shock-tube measurements.

  1. Detecting inertial effects with airborne matter-wave interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, R.; Ménoret, V.; Stern, G.; Zahzam, N.; Cheinet, P.; Battelier, B.; Villing, A.; Moron, F.; Lours, M.; Bidel, Y.; Bresson, A.; Landragin, A.; Bouyer, P.

    2011-01-01

    Inertial sensors relying on atom interferometry offer a breakthrough advance in a variety of applications, such as inertial navigation, gravimetry or ground- and space-based tests of fundamental physics. These instruments require a quiet environment to reach their performance and using them outside the laboratory remains a challenge. Here we report the first operation of an airborne matter-wave accelerometer set up aboard a 0g plane and operating during the standard gravity (1g) and microgravity (0g) phases of the flight. At 1g, the sensor can detect inertial effects more than 300 times weaker than the typical acceleration fluctuations of the aircraft. We describe the improvement of the interferometer sensitivity in 0g, which reaches 2 x 10-4 ms-2 / √Hz with our current setup. We finally discuss the extension of our method to airborne and spaceborne tests of the Universality of free fall with matter waves. PMID:21934658

  2. Electromagnetic Effects on Wave Propagation in an Isotropic Micropolar Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, S.; Mukhopadhyay, B.

    2015-11-01

    The generalized theory of thermoelasticity is applied to study the propagation of plane harmonic waves in an infinitely long, isotropic, micropolar plate in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. The present analysis also includes the thermal relaxation time, electric displacement current, and the coupling of heat transfer and microrotation of the material. To determine the effect of the presence of thermal as well as magnetic fields on the phase velocity, two potential functions are used, and more general dispersive relations are obtained for symmetric and antisymmetric modes. The results for the cases of coupled thermoelasticity, magnetoelasticity, micropolar thermoelasticity, and classical micropolar elasticity as special cases are derived. The changes in the phase velocity and attenuation coefficient with the wave number are shown graphically.

  3. Test particle simulation study of whistler wave packets observed near comet Giacobini-Zinner

    SciTech Connect

    Kaya, N. ); Matsumoto, H.; Tsurutani, B.T. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena )

    1989-01-01

    In order to study nonlinear interactions of water group ions with large amplitude whistler wave packets detected at the leading edge of steepened magnetosonic waves observed near comet Giacobini-Zinner, the authors carried out test particle simulations of water ion interactions with a model wave based on the G-Z data. As the model wave, they adopted a linearly polarized magnetosonic (MS) wave as the trailing portion of the wave, and circularly polarized whistler waves in the leading edge of the wave. Both the MS and whistler waves are a priori assumed to have large amplitudes. They found that some of the water ions are decelerated in the steepened portion of the magnetosonic wave to the resonance velocity with the whistler wave packets. Through resonance and related nonlinear interaction with the large amplitude whistler waves, the water ions become trapped by the whistler wave packet. An energy balance calculation demonstrates that the trapped ions do lose their kinetic energy during the trapped motion in the whistler wave packet. It is thus demonstrated that the nonlinear trapping motion in the wave structure leads to the effective energy transfer from the water group ions to the whistler wave packets in the leading edge of the steepened MHD waves.

  4. Atomic physics effects on dissipative toroidal drift wave stability

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, M.A.; Hahm, T.S.

    1992-02-01

    The effects of atomic physics processes such as ionization, charge exchange, and radiation on the linear stability of dissipative drift waves are investigated in toroidal geometry both numerically and analytically. For typical TFTR and TEXT edge parameters, overall linear stability is determined by the competition between the destabilizing influence of ionization and the stabilizing effect due to the electron temperature gradient. An analytical expression for the linear marginal stability condition, {eta}{sub e}{sup crit}, is derived. The instability is most likely to occur at the extreme edge of tokamaks with a significant ionization source and a steep electron density gradient.

  5. Seismic wave propagation effects in the upper volcanic edifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Montesinos, Beatriz; Bean, Chris; Lokmer, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    A seismogram contains information about the seismic source and the wave path. Understanding the path effect is important for both source inversions and geophysical imagery. In the case of volcanoes, the correct interpretation of the signals helps us to determine their internal state. For instance, long-period events are commonly associated to magma movements in resonant conduits. We present an application of the adjoint methodology proposed in Tromp et al. [2004] to study the seismic wave propagation effects in the upper volcanic edifice. We do this by calculating sensitivity kernels, that is, investigating the sensitivity of different parts of a seismogram to different parts of the velocity model. In particular, we examine the influence of near-surface low-velocity volcanic structure to the recorded signals. We use the SPECFEM 2D software, a two-dimensional elastic wave propagation code based on the spectral-element method, to simulate examples for Mount Etna, Italy. We calculate synthetic seismograms in 2D heterogeneous models with topography, for the sources with different dominant frequency and locations. Then, we calculate the adjoint wavefield by time-reversing the calculated seismograms and "playing" them back into the medium as simultaneous seismic sources at the original receiver positions. In the last step, by combining the forward and adjoint wavefields, we calculate the traveltime sensitivity kernels of Mount Etna. In order to be able to capture a complex wave travel path, we examine the sensitivity of different parts of a seismic wavefield, that is, different time-window on a seimogram to different parts of the structural models. Preliminary results show the importance of the velocity structure at the near surface on the recorded traces. This means that we cannot ignore the heterogeneity of the upper volcanic edifice at the time of the interpretation of the recorded signals.

  6. The effect of heat waves on dairy cow mortality.

    PubMed

    Vitali, A; Felici, A; Esposito, S; Bernabucci, U; Bertocchi, L; Maresca, C; Nardone, A; Lacetera, N

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the mortality of dairy cows during heat waves. Mortality data (46,610 cases) referred to dairy cows older than 24mo that died on a farm from all causes from May 1 to September 30 during a 6-yr period (2002-2007). Weather data were obtained from 12 weather stations located in different areas of Italy. Heat waves were defined for each weather station as a period of at least 3 consecutive days, from May 1 to September 30 (2002-2007), when the daily maximum temperature exceeded the 90th percentile of the reference distribution (1971-2000). Summer days were classified as days in heat wave (HW) or not in heat wave (nHW). Days in HW were numbered to evaluate the relationship between mortality and length of the wave. Finally, the first 3 nHW days after the end of a heat wave were also considered to account for potential prolonged effects. The mortality risk was evaluated using a case-crossover design. A conditional logistic regression model was used to calculate odds ratio and 95% confidence interval for mortality recorded in HW compared with that recorded in nHW days pooled and stratified by duration of exposure, age of cows, and month of occurrence. Dairy cows mortality was greater during HW compared with nHW days. Furthermore, compared with nHW days, the risk of mortality continued to be higher during the 3 d after the end of HW. Mortality increased with the length of the HW. Considering deaths stratified by age, cows up to 28mo were not affected by HW, whereas all the other age categories of older cows (29-60, 61-96, and >96mo) showed a greater mortality when exposed to HW. The risk of death during HW was higher in early summer months. In particular, the highest risk of mortality was observed during June HW. Present results strongly support the implementation of adaptation strategies which may limit heat stress-related impairment of animal welfare and economic losses in dairy cow farm during HW. PMID:25958287

  7. Dynamical effects of vegetation on the 2003 summer heat waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stéfanon, M.

    2012-04-01

    Dynamical effects of vegetation on the 2003 summer heat waves Marc Stéfanon(1), Philippe Drobinski(1), Fabio D'Andrea(1), Nathalie de Noblet(2) (1) IPSL/LMD, France; (2) IPSL/LSCE, France The land surface model (LSM) in regional climate models (RCMs) plays a key role in energy and water exchanges between land and atmosphere. The vegetation can affect these exchanges through physical, biophysical and bio-geophysical mechanisms. It participates to evapo-transpiration process which determines the partitioning of net radiation between sensible and latent heat flux, through water evaporation from soil throughout the entire root system. For seasonal timescale leaf cover change induced leaf-area index (LAI) and albedo changes, impacting the Earth's radiative balance. In addition, atmospheric chemistry and carbon concentration has a direct effect on plant stomatal structure, the main exchange interface with the atmosphere. Therefore the surface energy balance is intimately linked to the carbon cycle and vegetation conditions and an accurate representation of the Earth's surface is required to improve the performance of RCMs. It is even more crucial for extreme events as heat waves and droughts which display highly nonlinear behaviour. If triggering of heat waves is determined by the large scale, local coupled processes over land can amplify or inhibit heat trough several feedback mechanism. One set of two simulation has been conducted with WRF, using different LSMs. They aim to study drought and vegetation effect on the dynamical and hydrological processes controlling the occurrence and life cycle of heat waves In the MORCE plateform, the dynamical global vegetation model (DGVM) ORCHIDEE is implemented in the atmospheric module WRF. ORCHIDEE is based on three different modules. The first module, called SECHIBA, describes the fast processes such as exchanges of energy and water between the atmosphere and the biosphere, and the soil water budget. The phenology and carbon

  8. Joint distribution of successive wave steepness parameters. [Water wave modeling and effects on offshore oil platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Myrhaug, D. . Dept. of Marine Hydrodynamics); Rue, H. . Division of Industrial Mathematics)

    1993-08-01

    In this paper, a joint distribution of wave steepness parameters for two successive waves is presented. The wave steepness parameters considered herein are the crest front steepness and the total wave steepness. The joint distribution of wave steepness parameters for two successive waves is represented by a two-dimensional Weibull distribution with the parameters [alpha]=0.84 and [beta]=1.40. The application of the results is illustrated by an example. Overall these results seem to be physically sound, although they are valid for the particular sea state chosen. The present approach has some basis in measured wave data, but comparison with data on the joint distribution of steepness parameters for two successive waves are needed before any conclusion can be drawn on the ability of this approach to describe measured wave data. Such a data base should be established from carefully designed field measurements in order to have the possibility to measure nonlinear properties of the waves. However, at present this joint distribution of steepness parameters for two successive waves should represent a useful tool for engineering applications.

  9. Dressed four-wave mixing second-order Talbot effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haixia; Zhang, Xun; Zhu, Dayu; Yang, Chang; Jiang, Tao; Zheng, Huaibin; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2014-10-01

    We theoretically demonstrate second-order Talbot effect (SOTE) based on entangled photon pairs. The photon pairs are generated from the spontaneous parametric four-wave mixing (SPFWM) process in a cold atomic medium and can be taken as the imaging light in order to realize coincidence recording. A strong standing wave is used to create the electromagnetically induced grating in the entangled photon pairs channels. By changing the frequency detuning of the standing wave or the other optical fields participating in the process, we can manipulate the contrast of the second-order Talbot image. We use the second-order correlation function and the dressed-state picture to explain the SOTE occurring in the SPFWM process. Moreover, we demonstrate the scheme for SOTE based on the spatially correlated twin beams generated from the SPFWM process with injection. This scheme provides a convenient detection proposal for the SOTE at the cost of the image contrast. Compared to the previous self-imaging schemes, the present schemes have the characteristic of controllable image contrast and of nonlocal imaging, and thus, they might broaden their applications in imaging techniques and find applications in quantum lithography.

  10. Effects of low frequency waves and spiky electric fields in the magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattell, C.; Bennett, T.; Sigsbee, K.; Streed, T.; Mozer, F. S.; Roth, I.; Tsuruda, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Okada, T.; Kokubun, S.

    1996-01-01

    Intense low frequency waves and large amplitude spiky electric fields are commonly observed in the active magnetotail. These fields are of dynamic significance for substorms because the amplitude of the waves is large enough to provide the dissipation necessary for reconnection. The waves modify the trajectories of ions in the magnetotail, resulting in enhanced energization and pitch angle scattering in comparison with the trajectories obtained without waves. The spikes may represent the nonlinear evolution of the waves. Observations are presented of low frequency waves and spiky electric fields measured in the plasma sheet. The relationship between the waves and the spikes is compared to wave evolution theories. The Lundquist number is evaluated for the magnetotail based on the wave observations and previously published studies of the current sheet scale sizes. The effects of the waves on the ion trajectories are discussed using the results from a particle tracing code.

  11. Non-linear interactions of plasma waves in the context of solar particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallegos-Cruz, A.; Perez-Peraza, J.

    2001-08-01

    Stochastic particle acceleration in plasmas by means of MHD turbulence in-volves a wide range of alternatives according to, the specific wave mode, the frequency regime of the turbulence, the kind of particles to be accelerated, the assumed plasma model and so on. At present most of the alternatives have been studied with relatively deepness, though some features are not yet com-pletely understood. One of them is the delimitation of the real importance of non-lineal effects of turbulence waves in the process of particle acceleration. In this work we analyse such effects taking into account the temporal evolution of the turbulence. For illustration we exemplify our analysis with the fast MHD mode. Our results show that in some specific stages of the turbulence evolu-tion, non-linear interactions have important effects in the process of particle acceleration.

  12. Analysis of MHD Pressure Drop in Liquid LiPb Flow in Chinese ITER DFLL-TBM with Insulating Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongli; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Hongyan

    2008-08-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop in the Chinese Dual Functional Liquid Lithium-lead Test Blanket Module (DFLL-TBM) proposed for ITER is discussed in this paper. Electrical insulation between the coolant channel surfaces and the liquid metal is required to reduce the MHD pressure drop to a manageable level. Insulation can be provided by a thin insulating coating, such as Al2O3, which can also serve as a tritium barrier layer, at the channel surfaces in contact with LiPb. The coating's effectiveness for reducing the MHD pressure drop is analysed through three-dimensional numerical simulation. A MHD-based commercial computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software FLUENT is used to simulate the LiPb flow. The effect on the MHD pressure drop due to cracks or faults in the coating layer is also considered. The insulating performance requirement for the coating material in DFLL-TBM design is proposed according to the analysis.

  13. Total energy cascade and residual energy in MHD turbulence: homogeneous versus expanding (solar wind) turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grappin, Roland; Müller, Wolf-Christian; Verdini, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Standard phenomenologies of MHD turbulence generally neglect deviations from kinetic-magnetic energies equipartition. However, solar wind turbulence commonly shows a magnetic excess (or positive residual energy) in the inertial range, with a definite power-law. We report here direct MHD simulation results showing a magnetic excess, both in homogeneous and expanding turbulence, with the latter taking into account the radial flow (expanding box model or EBM). We show that the results on magnetic excess, both scaling laws and amplitude, can be interpreted as resulting from the competition between the nonlinear stretching of the magnetic field by the velocity field and the relaxation to equipartition by the linear propagation of Alfvén waves. We generalize in this way earlier results on homogeneous MHD turbulence.

  14. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    As part of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) project, TRW was given the responsibility to organize, charter and co-chair, with the Department of Energy (DOE), an MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee (TTIRC). The Charter of the TTIRC, which was approved by the DOE in June 1988 and distributed to the committee members, is included as part of this Summary. As stated in the Charter, the purpose of this committee is to: (1) review all Proof-of-Concept (POC) projects and schedules in the national MHD program; to assess their compatibility with each other and the first commercial MHD retrofit plant; (2) establish and implement technology transfer formats for users of this technology; (3) identify interfaces, issues, and funding structures directly impacting the success of the commercial retrofit; (4) investigate and identify the manner in which, and by whom, the above should be resolved; and (5) investigate and assess other participation (foreign and domestic) in the US MHD Program. The DOE fiscal year 1989 MHD Program Plan Schedule is included at the end of this Summary. The MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee's activities to date have focused primarily on the technology transfer'' aspects of its charter. It has provided a forum for the dissemination of technical and programmatic information among workers in the field of MHD and to the potential end users, the utilities, by holding semi-annual meetings. The committee publishes this semi-annual report, which presents in Sections 2 through 11 capsule summaries of technical progress for all DOE Proof-of-Concept MHD contracts and major test facilities.

  15. MHD Instabilities at the Heliopause

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, B.; Florinski, V.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Zank, G. P.

    2006-09-26

    The heliopause (HP) is the outer edge of the heliosphere which separates the tenuous and hot heliosheath plasma on one side and the relatively dense and cool magnetized interstellar plasma on the other side. As a surface of tangential discontinuity, the HP is subjected to both Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities. The coupling between plasma ions and neutral atoms through the process of charge exchange provides an ''effective gravity'' at the HP, while a shear flow exists across it. We derive analytically the linearized dispersion relation for waves propagating along the surface of this discontinuity, which represents a combined RT/KH analysis. We investigate both the purely hydrodynamic, as well as magnetohydrodynamic, cases, and find that interstellar and heliospheric magnetic fields can help stabilize the HP for RT and KH-type instabilities.

  16. Cross-polarized wave generation by effective cubic nonlinear optical interaction.

    PubMed

    Petrov, G I; Albert, O; Etchepare, J; Saltiel, S M

    2001-03-15

    A new cubic nonlinear optical effect in which a linearly polarized wave propagating in a single quadratic medium is converted into a wave that is cross polarized to the input wave is observed in BBO crystal. The effect is explained by cascading of two different second-order processes: second-harmonic generation and difference frequency mixing. PMID:18040322

  17. Application of Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and Recent Research Trend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Nobuhiro

    As the applications of Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion, research and development for high-efficiency and low emission electric power generation system, MHD accelerations and/or MHD thrusters, and flow control around hypersonic and re-entry vehicles are introduced. For closed cycle MHD power generation, high-efficiency MHD single system is the most hopeful system and space power system using mixed inert gas (MIG) working medium is proposed. For open cycle MHD, high-efficiency coal fired MHD system with CO2 recovery has been proposed. As inverse process of MHD power generation, MHD accelerators/thrusters are expected as the next generation propulsion system. Heat flux reduction to protect re-entry vehicles is expected by an MHD process for safety return from space missions.

  18. Energy storage and dissipation in the magnetotail during substorms 2. MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.; Winglee, R. M.

    1993-05-01

    The effects of temporal and spatial variations in the plasma resistivity on the evolution of the magnetosphere during substorms are examined with numerical solutions of the two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The global MHD simulations self-consistently consider the interaction of the solar wind with the dayside magnetosphere as well as the evolution of the tail region. These solutions are used to study how various solar wind states generate conditions in the tail, such as pressure gradients and cross-tail currents, that have the potential of leading to a substorm. Although the MHD formalism does provide information on the large-scale evolution, the essential mechanism for substorm development may involve microscopic or particle processes not present in an MHD approach. As a result, this MHD study is carried out in association with particle simulations (Winglee and Steinolfson, this issue). Since one connection between the MHD and particle approaches is through the resistivity, the effects of various resistivity distributions on the global MHD configuration are examined. The resistivity distributions considered here are (1) a temporally constant and spatially uniform resistivity, (2) a resistivity proportional to the square of the local current density, and (3) a resistivity proportional to the square of the local magnetic field strength. The latter distribution is suggested by the above particle simulations and represents effects produced by the increased magnetization of particles and the differential motion between electrons and ions. For all three cases a plasmoid is formed and ejected tailward. However, when the resistivity depends on the field strength, considerably more energy is stored in the tail prior to plasmoid formation, and plasmoid formation is delayed relative to the results for the other two resistivity distributions. Furthermore, when the plasmoid is eventually ejected, it moves down the tail with a higher speed. The MHD results

  19. Local structures of homogeneous Hall MHD turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, H.; Araki, K.

    2011-12-01

    Local structures of decaying homogeneous and isotropic Hall MHD turbulence are studied by means of direct numerical simulations. Regions of strong vorticity and strong current density in Hall MHD turbulence are compared to those of single-fluid MHD turbulence. An analysis by the use of a low-pass filter reveals that the introduction of the Hall term can modify not only small-scale structures of the current density but also structures of the vorticity field, especially at the scales smaller than the ion skin depth.

  20. SSX MHD plasma wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael R.; Schaffner, David A.

    2015-06-01

    A new turbulent plasma source at the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) facility is described. The MHD wind tunnel configuration employs a magnetized plasma gun to inject high-beta plasma into a large, well-instrumented, vacuum drift region. This provides unique laboratory conditions approaching that in the solar wind: there is no applied background magnetic field in the drift region and has no net axial magnetic flux; the plasma flow speed is on the order of the local sound speed (M ~ 1), so flow energy density is comparable to thermal energy density; and the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure is of order unity (plasma β ~ 1) so thermal energy density is also comparable to magnetic energy density. Results presented here and referenced within demonstrate the new capabilities and show how the new platform is proving useful for fundamental plasma turbulence studies.