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Sample records for mhl uwe wilhelm

  1. Media Health Literacy (MHL): Development and Measurement of the Concept among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin-Zamir, Diane; Lemish, Dafna; Gofin, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    Increasing media use among adolescents and its significant influence on health behavior warrants in-depth understanding of their response to media content. This study developed the concept and tested a model of Media Health Literacy (MHL), examined its association with personal/socio-demographic determinants and reported sources of health…

  2. Johann Christoph Sturm and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (German Title: Johann Christoph Sturm und Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratchovil, Stefan

    Johann Christian Sturm and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz were two well-known scholars of their time, who showed mutual attention and esteem. The history of their relation is described, based on the mutual mentions in letters and publications.

  3. Historical Connections: Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz: The Universal Genius.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimer, Wilbert; Reimer, Luetta

    1994-01-01

    Contains biographical facts, contributions, quotations, and anecdotes about mathematician Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. Presents an activity in which students discover patterns in the sums of the reciprocals of the triangular numbers. Contains reproducible student worksheet. (MKR)

  4. Wilhelm Weinberg's early contribution to segregation analysis.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alan; Seneta, Eugene

    2013-09-01

    Wilhelm Weinberg (1862-1937) is a largely forgotten pioneer of human and medical genetics. His name is linked with that of the English mathematician G. H. Hardy in the Hardy-Weinberg law, pervasive in textbooks on population genetics since it expresses stability over generations of zygote frequencies AA, Aa, aa under random mating. One of Weinberg's signal contributions, in an article whose centenary we celebrate, was to verify that Mendel's segregation law still held in the setting of human heredity, contrary to the then-prevailing view of William Bateson (1861-1926), the leading Mendelian geneticist of the time. Specifically, Weinberg verified that the proportion of recessive offspring genotypes aa in human parental crossings Aa × Aa (that is, the segregation ratio for such a setting) was indeed p=1/4. We focus in a nontechnical way on his procedure, called the simple sib method, and on the heated controversy with Felix Bernstein (1878-1956) in the 1920s and 1930s over work stimulated by Weinberg's article. PMID:24018765

  5. The Meaning of Disfigurement in Wilhelm Hauff's "Dwarf Nose."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blamires, David

    2002-01-01

    Notes that Wilhelm Hauff's fairy tale "Dwarf Nose" tells of a boy who is turned into a squirrel for seven years, then regains human form as a dwarf with a long nose before finally achieving normal adult proportions. Discusses how the story includes details that suggest a sexual interpretation. (SG)

  6. Wilhelm von Humboldt's Idea of "Bildung" and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Elsina

    The importance of Wilhelm von Humboldt's work in educational philosophy is little known outside of Germany and even there he is more often criticized than praised. This is unfortunate because his contributions to education and other areas had an important impact on other philosophers of his period and are well worth considering today. In his main…

  7. Sources of Wilhelm Johannsen's genotype theory.

    PubMed

    Roll-Hansen, Nils

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the historical background and early formation of Wilhelm Johannsen's distinction between genotype and phenotype. It is argued that contrary to a widely accepted interpretation (For instance, W. Provine, 1971. The Origins of Theoretical Population Genetics. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press; Mayr, 1973; F. B. Churchill, 1974. Journal of the History of Biology 7: 5-30; E. Mayr, 1982. The Growth of Biological Thought, Cambridge: Harvard University Press; J. Sapp, 2003. Genesis. The Evolution of Biology. New York: Oxford University Press) his concepts referred primarily to properties of individual organisms and not to statistical averages. Johannsen's concept of genotype was derived from the idea of species in the tradition of biological systematics from Linnaeus to de Vries: An individual belonged to a group - species, subspecies, elementary species - by representing a certain underlying type (S. Müller-Wille and V. Orel, 2007. Annals of Science 64: 171-215). Johannsen sharpened this idea theoretically in the light of recent biological discoveries, not least those of cytology. He tested and confirmed it experimentally combining the methods of biometry, as developed by Francis Galton, with the individual selection method and pedigree analysis, as developed for instance by Louis Vilmorin. The term "genotype" was introduced in W. Johannsen's 1909 (Elemente der Exakten Erblichkeitslehre. Jena: Gustav Fischer) treatise, but the idea of a stable underlying biological "type" distinct from observable properties was the core idea of his classical bean selection experiment published 6 years earlier (W. Johannsen, 1903. Ueber Erblichkeit in Populationen und reinen Linien. Eine Beitrag zur Beleuchtung schwebender Selektionsfragen, Jena: Gustav Fischer, pp. 58-59). The individual ontological foundation of population analysis was a self-evident presupposition in Johannsen's studies of heredity in populations from their start in the early 1890s till his

  8. Waldemar Wilhelm: father of oral and maxillofacial surgery in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Castro-Núñez, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    Waldemar Wilhelm (1913-1994) was honored by the Asociación Colombiana de Cirugía Oral y Maxilofacial (Colombian Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery) as the Father of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Colombia. Born in Karlsruhe, Germany, Wilhelm graduated as a dentist from Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in 1936. He emigrated shortly thereafter to Colombia, receiving his dental license there in 1943. He completed his oral and maxillofacial surgery training at Nordwestdeutsche Kieferklinic, under the tutelage of Prof. Dr. Dr. Karl Schuchardt in Hamburg. In 1950, he settled in Bogotá, where he joined the Universidad Nacional School of Dentistry, opened Colombia's first oral and maxillofacial surgery department at Hospital San José, and trained the first maxillofacial surgeons in Colombia in 1958. PMID:22372189

  9. UWE-3, in-orbit performance and lessons learned of a modular and flexible satellite bus for future pico-satellite formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, S.; Bangert, P.; Dombrovski, S.; Schilling, K.

    2015-12-01

    Formations of small satellites offer promising perspectives due to improved temporal and spatial coverage and resolution at reasonable costs. The UWE-program addresses in-orbit demonstrations of key technologies to enable formations of cooperating distributed spacecraft at pico-satellite level. In this context, the CubeSat UWE-3 addresses experiments for evaluation of real-time attitude determination and control. UWE-3 introduces also a modular and flexible pico-satellite bus as a robust and extensible base for future missions. Technical objective was a very low power consumption of the COTS-based system, nevertheless providing a robust performance of this miniature satellite by advanced microprocessor redundancy and fault detection, identification and recovery software. This contribution addresses the UWE-3 design and mission results with emphasis on the operational experiences of the attitude determination and control system.

  10. Wilhelm Ludwig and his contributions to population genetics.

    PubMed

    Antonovics, J

    1990-03-01

    This article reviews the life and work of the German biologist Wilhelm Ludwig (1901-1959), whose contributions to population genetics have been largely ignored. Ludwig's work was a rich tapestry of population biology, spanning investigations into population growth, biological asymmetries, sex ratio, and paternity analysis. He was ahead of his time in explicitly combining the theory of population ecology and population genetics. His classic paper on annidation showed the possibility of population differentiation in the face of gene flow, and his early studies demonstrated the importance of selection in evolutionary change. Much of his work spanned the period of the Second World War in Germany, and interesting questions remain about his life during this turbulent period. PMID:21232329

  11. Wilhelm Tempel and his 10.8-cm Steinheil Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Simone; Gasperini, Antonella; Galli, Daniele; Palla, Francesco; Brenni, Paolo; Giatti, Anna

    2010-03-01

    The German astronomer Ernst Wilhelm Leberecht Tempel (1821-1889) owed most of his successes to a 10.8-cm Steinheil refractor, which he bought in 1858. A lithographer, without an academic foundation, but with a strong passion for astronomy, Tempel had sharp eyesight and a talent for drawing, and he discovered with his telescope many celestial objects, including asteroids, comets (most notably, 9 P/Tempel 1) and the Merope Nebula in the Pleiades. Tempel carried his telescope with him throughout his moves in France and Italy. The telescope is now conserved in Florence, at the Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, where Tempel was astronomer from 1875 until the end of his life. Using unpublished material from the Arcetri Historical Archive, as well as documents from other archives and published material, we trace the history of the telescope and its use during and after Tempel's life, and describe its recent rediscovery and status.

  12. Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel (1784-1846) and the Russian Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichsanova, Vera N.

    In the first half of the 19th century the foundations of stellar astronomy were established thanks to the German astronomer, geodeticist and mathematician Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel. Internationally estimed and in close relationship with scientists in many countries, especially in Russia, Bessel (although not yet 30 years old) in 1814 became a foreign member of the Petersburg Academy of Sciences. Wilhelm Struve, director of the Dorpat observatory, was in close contact with him. Together they discussed problems of observational procedures and the use of instruments. In 1817 Struve bought the same Reichenbach meridian circle as Bessel used in Königsberg. Both ordered their refractors from the famous Fraunhofer workshop in Munich. %(9-inch for Dorpat). Bessel was also involved in the high precision Russian geodetic survey which started in 1816 and which succeeded in connecting the Russian and western European triangulation networks. Struve tried to measure parallaxes using the bright star Vega (α Lyrae); his results were published in 1837. Also in 1837 Bessel, using his Fraunhofer heliometer and the star 61 Cygni, found a result close to modern values, later acknowledged with the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society. In 1834 Struve was named director of the new Russian observatory in Pulkovo, St. Petersburg. Struve discussed the plans with Bessel and both acquired a Repsold meridian circle. The next aim, begun in the 1840s -- after the first determination of stellar distances -- was the distribution of stars in space (in the Milky Way). For this, catalogues with not only accurate stellar positions but also brightnesses were necessary. Thanks to Bessel's thorough reformation of measuring and reduction methods, making possible high accuracy telescopic observations, Struve was able to produce important results in stellar astronomy.

  13. Wilhelm Weinberg’s Early Contribution to Segregation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Alan; Seneta, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Wilhelm Weinberg (1862–1937) is a largely forgotten pioneer of human and medical genetics. His name is linked with that of the English mathematician G. H. Hardy in the Hardy–Weinberg law, pervasive in textbooks on population genetics since it expresses stability over generations of zygote frequencies AA, Aa, aa under random mating. One of Weinberg’s signal contributions, in an article whose centenary we celebrate, was to verify that Mendel’s segregation law still held in the setting of human heredity, contrary to the then-prevailing view of William Bateson (1861–1926), the leading Mendelian geneticist of the time. Specifically, Weinberg verified that the proportion of recessive offspring genotypes aa in human parental crossings Aa × Aa (that is, the segregation ratio for such a setting) was indeed p=14. We focus in a nontechnical way on his procedure, called the simple sib method, and on the heated controversy with Felix Bernstein (1878–1956) in the 1920s and 1930s over work stimulated by Weinberg’s article. PMID:24018765

  14. Wilhelm Troll (1897 - 1978): idealistic morphology, physics, and phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Rieppel, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Idealistic morphology as articulated by the botanist Wilhelm Troll, the main target of the critique voiced by the early phylogeneticists, was firmly embedded in its contemporary scientific, cultural, and political context. Troll appealed to theoretical developments in contemporary physics in support of his research program. He understood burgeoning quantum mechanics not only to threaten the unity of physics, but also the validity of the principle of causality. Troll used this insight in support of his claim of a dualism in biology, relegating the causal-analytical approach to physiology, while rejuvenating the Goethean paradigm in comparative morphology. This embedded idealistic morphology in the völkisch tradition that characterized German culture during the Weimar Republic and its aftermath. In contrast, the contemporary phylogeneticists anchored their research program in the rise of logical positivism and in Darwin's principle of natural selection. This, in turn, brought phylogenetic systematists of the late 1930s and early 1940s into the orbit of national-socialist racial theory and eugenics. In conclusion, the early debate between idealistic morphologists and phylogenetic systematists was not only ideologically tainted, but also implied a philosophical impasse that is best characterized as a conflict between the Goethean and Newtonian paradigm of natural science. PMID:22696827

  15. [Measuring the positive dimensions among health care workers: a contribution to the Italian validation of the UWES--Utrecht Work Engagement Scale].

    PubMed

    Pisanti, R; Paplomatas, A; Bertini, M

    2008-01-01

    Engagement is defined as a positive, fulfilling, work-related state of mind that is characterized by vigor, dedication, and absorption. The main purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES). Data from a sample of health care workers (N=948) were used to test four propositions concerning dimensionality, internal consistency and construct validity. The UWES Italian version and the Multidimensional Organizational Health Questionnaire (MOHQ) were administered to the subjects (a subsample of 225 health care workers also completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory). The factorial structure has been examined through a series of Explorative Factor Analysis (AFE) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). As in the original version, we found a three factor solution. Internal consistency indexes were satisfactory. In addition, the correlations between UWES, MOHQ and MBI revealed a good construct validity. It is concluded that the Italian Version of the UWES has acceptable psychometric properties and that the instrument can be used in studies on positive organizational behavior. PMID:18700486

  16. Kaiser Wilhelm syndrome: obstetric trauma or placental insult in a historical case mimicking Erb's palsy.

    PubMed

    Jain, Venu; Sebire, Neil J; Talbert, David G

    2005-01-01

    Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany (1859) developed a weak and noticeably short left arm during childhood, commonly attributed to nerve damage caused by the use of excessive force during his difficult breech delivery, Erb's palsy. However, Wilhelm's mother had a severe fall when about four months pregnant and the child was reported to be very thin at birth, suggesting intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Wilhelm blamed the British doctor for his deformity, and formed an enmity, which ultimately led to the 1914-1918 world war. We propose an alternative theory, considering the possibility of placental damage and consequential flow redistribution caused by the fall. In severe IUGR, the Doppler pulsatility index (PI) of the brachial arteries differs, that of the right arm being lower than the left. We used a computer model of the fetoplacental unit and reduced its functional placental area until such resistance asymmetry was produced. This would occur in extreme hypoxia when flow in the aortic isthmus is reversed, bringing right ventricular blood of lower oxygen content to the left subclavian artery. The reduced PI in the right arm is a normal vasodilatory hypoxic response, but the apparently normal PI in the left arm results from decreased demand due to metabolic failure. We suggest that the nerve damage affecting the Kaiser's left arm was due to placental insufficiency during pregnancy, and not mechanical brachial plexus injury during delivery. We further suggest that such a mechanism be called Kaiser Wilhelm syndrome to distinguish it from Erb's palsy originating from obstetric trauma. PMID:15893138

  17. Wilhelm von Humboldt and the "Orient": On Edward W. Said's Remarks on Humboldt's Orientalist Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messling, Markus

    2008-01-01

    From an epistemological perspective, Wilhelm von Humboldt's studies on the Oriental and East Asian languages and writing systems (Egyptian hieroglyphs, Sanskrit, Chinese, Polynesian) raise the question of his position in the Orientalist discourse of his time. Said [Said, E.W., 1978. "Orientalism. Western Conceptions of the Orient, fourth ed."…

  18. Perfecting the Individual: Wilhelm von Humboldt's Concept of Anthropology, "Bildung" and Mimesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulf, Christoph

    2003-01-01

    In the works of Wilhelm von Humboldt education took on a new quality, focusing firmly on the importance of the individual. "Bildung" was to become the principal task with a view to preparing the individual for the requirements of future life. In this article, the author investigates two aspects relating to the "Bildung" of the individual. First,…

  19. Professor Bernhard Pollack (1865-1928) of Friedrich Wilhelm University, Berlin: neurohistologist, ophthalmologist, pianist.

    PubMed

    Triarhou, Lazaros C

    2012-01-01

    This article highlights the life and work of Bernhard Pollack (1865-1928), a pioneer neurohistologist, ophthalmologist, and world-class pianist. In 1897, Pollack published the first standard manual on staining methods for the nervous system. Born into a Prussian-Jewish family, he received his piano education from the composer Moritz Moszkowski and his pathology education from Carl Weigert. Pollack worked in the Institutes of Wilhelm Waldeyer (anatomy), Emanuel Mendel (neuropsychiatry), the later Nobel laureate Robert Koch (infectious diseases), and the Eye Policlinic of Paul Silex (ophthalmology), becoming a Professor of Ophthalmology at Berlin's Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität in 1919. The study also chronicles the founding by Pollack of the Berlin Doctors' Orchestra in 1911. PMID:22572721

  20. Tribute to an Astronomer: The Work of Max Ernst on Wilhelm Tempel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazé, Yaël

    2016-05-01

    In 1964-1974, the German artist Max Ernst created, with the help of two friends, a series of works (books, movie, and paintings) related to the astronomer Wilhelm Tempel. Mixing actual texts by Tempel and artistic features, this series pays homage to the astronomer by recalling his life and discoveries. Moreover, the core of the project, the book Maximiliana or the Illegal Practice of Astronomy, actually depicts the way science works, making this work of art a most original tribute to a scientist.

  1. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1909: Wilhelm Ostwald

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, Josh

    2002-02-01

    This, the third of a series of thirteen articles on Nobel Laureates in chemical dynamics, features the work of Wilhelm Ostwald, who won the Nobel Prize in 1909 for his work on catalysis, equilibria, and reaction rates. The first two articles in this series discussed two of Ostwald's students--Jacobus van't Hoff (Nobel 1901) and Svante Arrhenius (Nobel 1903). Ostwald's own studies of catalysis were guided by the work of those two former students. Ostwald's name remains associated with the catalytic process used to manufacture nitric acid from ammonia.

  2. The Nazi symbiosis: politics and human genetics at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute.

    PubMed

    Berez, Thomas M; Weiss, Sheila Faith

    2004-12-01

    The case of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics (KWIA), from its inception in Weimar Republic Germany to its apogee under the rule of the Third Reich, is an example of how politics and human heredity can function as mutually beneficial resources. Whether it was a result of the Nazi bureaucrats' desire to legitimize their racial policy through science, or the KWIA personnel's desire to secure more funding for their research, the symbiotic relationship that developed between human genetics and Nazi politics could help explain why many scientists in the Third Reich undertook research projects that wholly transgressed the boundaries of morally acceptable science. PMID:15571767

  3. The timing of Late Pleistocene glaciation at Mount Wilhelm, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Stephanie; Barrows, Timothy; Hope, Geoff; Pillans, Brad; Fifield, Keith

    2016-04-01

    The highlands of New Guinea were the most extensively glaciated area in the Asian tropical region during the Late Pleistocene. Evidence for glaciation is widespread on most of the mountain peaks above ~3500 m. Glacial landforms include both valley and ice cap forms, but the timing of glaciation remains constrained to only a few local areas. This paper focuses on Mount Wilhelm, which is situated in the central southern region of Papua New Guinea at 5.78°S and is the highest peak (4510 m a.s.l.) We focus on a south easterly valley (Pindaunde Valley) emanating from the peak, where large moraines indicate the maximum ice extent of a valley glacier ~5 km long. Within this extensive moraine complex, recessional moraines document the retreat of the glacier towards the summit region. In order to determine the timing of deglaciation, we collected samples for surface exposure dating using 36Cl and 10Be from diorite boulders positioned on moraine crests. The ages indicate that maximum ice extent was attained during the last glacial maximum (LGM) and that ice remained near its maximum extent until after 15 ka but persisted at higher elevations almost until the Holocene. These results are similar to those described from Mt Giluwe to the northwest of Mount Wilhelm, where an ice cap reached its maximum extent at the LGM and remained there for around 3-4,000 years. This indicates that full glacial conditions were only brief in this region of the tropics.

  4. Replication and Pedagogy in the History of Psychology V: The Metronome and Wilhelm Wundt's Search for the Components of Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayala, Christopher; Borawski, Steven; Miller, Jonathon

    2008-01-01

    Wilhelm Wundt (1832-1920) believed that consciousness was represented by the interconnection of psychical processes comprised of temporal elements and compounds. To explore these processes, Wundt used a metronome to measure the amount of information that passed into consciousness across time. The current project replicated some of his procedures,…

  5. X-ray K-edge analysis of drain lines in Wilhelm Hall, Ames Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, T.; Whitmore, C. |

    1999-01-05

    From August 12--27, 1998 X-ray K-edge measurements were made on drain lines in seven rooms in Wilhelm Hall, Ames Laboratory. The purpose of these measurements was to determine the extent of thorium (and other heavy metal) contamination inside these pipes. The K-edge method is a noninvasive inspection technique that can provide accurate quantification of heavy metal contamination interior to an object. Of the seven drain lines inspected, one was found to have no significant contamination, three showed significant thorium deposits, two showed mercury contamination, and one line was found to contain mercury, thorium and uranium. The K-edge measurements were found to be consistent with readings from hand-held survey meters, and provided much greater detail on the location and amount of heavy metal contamination.

  6. The holist tradition in twentieth century genetics. Wilhelm Johannsen's genotype concept

    PubMed Central

    Roll-Hansen, Nils

    2014-01-01

    The terms ‘genotype’, ‘phenotype’ and ‘gene’ originally had a different meaning from that in the Modern Synthesis. These terms were coined in the first decade of the twentieth century by the Danish plant physiologist Wilhelm Johannsen. His bean selection experiment and his theoretical analysis of the difference between genotype and phenotype were important inputs to the formation of genetics as a well-defined special discipline. This paper shows how Johannsen's holistic genotype theory provided a platform for criticism of narrowly genocentric versions of the chromosome theory of heredity that came to dominate genetics in the middle decades of the twentieth century. Johannsen came to recognize the epoch-making importance of the work done by the Drosophila group, but he continued to insist on the incompleteness of the chromosome theory. Genes of the kind that they mapped on the chromosomes could only give a partial explanation of biological heredity and evolution. PMID:24882823

  7. Genetics as a modernization program: biological research at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institutes and the political economy of the Nazi State.

    PubMed

    Gausemeier, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    During the Third Reich, the biological institutes of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society (KWG, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gesellschaft) underwent a substantial reorganization and modernization. This paper discusses the development of projects in the fields of biochemical genetics, virus research, radiation genetics, and plant genetics that were initiated in those years. These cases exemplify, on the one hand, the political conditions for biological research in the Nazi state. They highlight how leading scientists advanced their projects by building close ties with politicians and science-funding organizations and companies. On the other hand, the study examines how the contents of research were shaped by, and how they contributed to, the aims and needs of the political economy of the Nazi system. This paper therefore aims not only to highlight basic aspects of scientific development under Nazism, but also to provide general insights into the structure of the Third Reich and the dynamics of its war economy. PMID:20957826

  8. PREFACE: The 395th Wilhelm and Else Heraeus Seminar: `Time-dependent phenomena in Quantum Mechanics'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleber, Manfred; Kramer, Tobias

    2008-03-01

    The 395th Wilhelm and Else Heraeus Seminar: `Time-dependent phenomena in Quantum Mechanics' took place at the Heinrich Fabri Institute in Blaubeuren, Germany, 12-16 September 2007. The conference covered a wide range of topics connected with time-dependent phenomena in quantum mechanical systems. The 20 invited talks and 15 short talks with posters at the workshop covered the historical debate between Schrödinger, Dirac and Pauli about the role of time in Quantum Mechanics (the debate was carried out sometimes in footnotes) up to the almost direct observation of electron dynamics on the attosecond time-scale. Semiclassical methods, time-delay, monodromy, variational principles and quasi-resonances are just some of the themes which are discussed in more detail in the papers. Time-dependent methods also shed new light on energy-dependent systems, where the detour of studying the time-evolution of a quantum states allows one to solve previously intractable problems. Additional information is available at the conference webpage http://www.quantumdynamics.de The organizer would like to thank all speakers, contributors, session chairs and referees for their efforts in making the conference a success. We also gratefully acknowledge the generous financial support from the Wilhelm and Else Heraeus Foundation for the conference and the production of this special volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Manfred Kleber Physik Department T30, Technische Universität München, 85747 Garching, Germany mkleber@ph.tum.de Tobias Kramer Institut I: Theoretische Physik, Universität Regensburg, 93040 Regensburg, Germany tobias.kramer@physik.uni-regensburg.de Guest Editors Conference photograph Front row (from left): W Schleich, E J Heller, J B Delos, H Friedrich, K Richter, M Kleber, P Kramer, M Man'ko, A del Campo, V Man'ko, M Efremov, A Ruiz, M O Scully Middle row: A Zamora, R Aganoglu, T Kramer, J

  9. Wilhelm von Hboldt and James Parkinson. An appraisal of observation and creativity.

    PubMed

    Lakke, J P

    1996-10-01

    Wilhelm von Humboldt (1767-1835) was an educational reformer, a statesman serving Frederick William III, King of Prussia and a philologist, who influenced the contemporary linguist Chomsky. Moreover von Humbolt was a prolific writer, he kept up a substantial correspondence with family and a circle of acquaintances. His letters also contain references to his physical fitness. In the year of James Parkinson's death, 1824, von Humboldt mentioned difficulties with writing for the first time. From his correspondence during the last 11 years of his life we can reconstruct a classic development of the shaking palsy based on clever self-observations. Von Humboldt supplemented James Parkinson's description with micrographia, and dysdiadochokinesia. In addition, he observed, that turning over in bed was impeded, that after 9 years of misery his tremor subsided, and that writing was possible using Latin print lettering instead of his usual gothic handwriting, von Humboldt died on the 8th April 1835 of pneumonia, a complication of his illness; he kept his full intellectual and artistic capacities until the end. PMID:18591044

  10. Discovering environmental cancer: Wilhelm Hueper, post-World War II epidemiology, and the vanishing clinician's eye.

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, C

    1997-01-01

    Today, our understanding of and approach to the exogenous causes of cancer are dominated by epidemiological practices that came into widespread use after World War II. This paper examines the forces, considerations, and controversies that shaped postwar risk factor epidemiology in the United States. It is argued that, for all of the new capabilities it brought, this risk factor epidemiology has left us with less of a clinical eye for unrecognized cancer hazards, especially from limited and localized exposures in the work-place. The focus here is on Wilhelm Hueper, author of the first textbook on occupational cancer (1942). Hueper became the foremost spokesman for earlier identification practices centering on occupational exposures. The new epidemiological methods and associated institutions that arose in the 1940s and 1950s bore an unsettled relation to earlier claims and methods that some, Hueper among them, interpreted as a challenge. Hueper's critique of the new epidemiology identified some of its limitations and potentially debilitating consequences that remain with us today. Images p1825-a p1827-a p1829-a PMID:9366640

  11. Johann Wilhelm Hittorf and the material culture of nineteenth-century gas discharge research.

    PubMed

    Müller, Falk

    2011-06-01

    In the second half of the nineteenth century, gas discharge research was transformed from a playful and fragmented field into a new branch of physical science and technology. From the 1850s onwards, several technical innovations-powerful high-voltage supplies, the enhancement of glass-blowing skills, or the introduction of mercury air-pumps- allowed for a major extension of experimental practices and expansion of the phenomenological field. Gas discharge tubes served as containers in which resources from various disciplinary contexts could be brought together; along with the experimental apparatus built around them the tubes developed into increasingly complex interfaces mediating between the human senses and the micro-world. The focus of the following paper will be on the physicist and chemist Johann Wilhelm Hittorf (1824-1914), his educational background and his attempts to understand gaseous conduction as a process of interaction between electrical energy and matter. Hittorf started a long-term project in gas discharge research in the early 1860s. In his research he tried to combine a morphological exploration of gas discharge phenomena-aiming at the experimental production of a coherent phenomenological manifold--with the definition and precise measurements of physical properties. PMID:21879606

  12. From Wilhelm von Humboldt to Hitler-are prominent people more prone to have Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Horowski; Horowski; Calne; Calne

    2000-10-01

    We describe Parkinsonism in prominent people, where Wilhelm von Humboldt and Adolf Hitler provide just two spectacular, opposing examples. In both of them, there is little if any evidence that the disease did influence their life ambitions, methods of achieving them or cognitive function in general. Thus, Hitler's Parkinsonism should remain a 'footnote' to history, and historians should acknowledge that in his last years, his trembling, his curbed posture, his slow walking, mask-like face and low voice did not indicate remorse, fear or depression as a consequence of his crimes, but were mere expressions of his disease which, until the end, had no impact on his intellectual skills and methods. The apparently higher incidence of Parkinsonism in prominent people may be just due to their higher visibility, or a consequence of disease-related personality traits (e.g. ambition, perfectionism, rigidity) which may contribute to becoming, e.g., a prominent authoritarian person. Perhaps even some early behaviour pattern (such as repressed emotions or acting in public-which could even increase the risk of some infection) contributes to a greater vulnerability for developing Parkinsonism. Further studying other prominent cases might lead us to better understanding of risk factors and the expression of early Parkinsonism. PMID:10900395

  13. Carl Wilhelm Scheele, the discoverer of oxygen, and a very productive chemist.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2014-12-01

    Carl Wilhelm Scheele (1742-1786) has an important place in the history of the discovery of respiratory gases because he was undoubtedly the first person to prepare oxygen and describe some of its properties. Despite this, his contributions have often been overshadowed by those of Joseph Priestley and Antoine Lavoisier, who also played critical roles in preparing the gas and understanding its nature. Sadly, Scheele was slow to publish his discovery and therefore Priestley is rightly recognized as the first person to report the preparation of oxygen. This being said, the thinking of both Scheele and Priestley was dominated by the phlogiston theory, and it was left to Lavoisier to elucidate the true nature of oxygen. In addition to his work on oxygen, Scheele was enormously productive in other areas of chemistry. Arguably he discovered seven new elements and many other compounds. However, he kept a low profile during his life as a pharmacist, and he did not have strong links with contemporary prestigious institutions such as the Royal Society in England or the French Académie des Sciences. He was elected to the Royal Swedish Academy of Science but only attended one meeting. Partly as a result, he remains a somewhat nebulous figure despite the critical contribution he made to the history of respiratory gases and his extensive researches in other areas of chemistry. His death at the age of 43 may have been hastened by his habit of tasting the chemicals that he worked on. PMID:25281638

  14. [Friedrich Wilhelm von Halem and his contributions to the inauguration of the thalasso-therapy in Prussia in the 18th century. A medico-historical survey].

    PubMed

    Rummler, S

    2004-06-01

    This article is dedicated in remembrance of Friedrich Wilhelm von Halem, a former student of the University Frankfurt-on-Oder (Viadrina) in later eighteenth-century Germany. Friedrich Wilhelm von Halem from Aurich, was the first physician in the period of the German Enlightenment, who had introduced the thalasso-therapy as a part of a new health-conception. His pioneering achievement led to the foundation of the first health resort on the german coast of the North-Sea in Norderney (East Frisian Islands), May 1797. PMID:15236096

  15. Neuroscience in its context. Neuroscience and psychology in the work of Wilhelm Wundt.

    PubMed

    Ziche, P

    1999-01-01

    Wilhelm Wundt (1832-1920), the first to establish an Institute devoted exclusively to psychological research in Germany, started his career as a (neuro)physiologist. He gradually turned into a psychologist in the 1860's and 1870's, at a time when neuroscience had to deal with the problem of giving an adequate physiological interpretation of the data accumulated by neuroanatomy. Neither the functional interpretation of brain morphology, nor the options provided by the reflex model seemed acceptable to Wundt. In his Physiological Psychology, first published in 1874, Wundt adds another aspect to this discussion by showing that psychology may help, and indeed is required, to clarify some of the most controversial problems in brain research. He thus became a key figure in neuroscience's struggle to locate itself within the various research traditions. The following theses will be argued for: 1. Wundt's turn to psychology resulted from his view that the methodological basis of physiological brain research of the time was unsatisfactory. 2. Psychology, in its attempt to solve these problems, implied a new conception of an interaction between experimental and theoretical brain research. 3. Wundt tried to demonstrate the necessity of psychological considerations for experimental brain research. These points are discussed with reference to Wundt's treatment of the localization of functions in the brain. According to Wundt, psychology can show, by analyzing the complex structure of intellect and will, that mental phenomena can be realized in the brain only in the form of complex interations of the elements of the brain. The results of the psychological considerations imply that a strict localizations cannot be correct; but they are also turned against the conception of a complete functional equivalence of the various parts of the cortext. For Wundt, a reconstruction of brain processes cannot start with neurones, but only with patterns of a functional organization of brain

  16. Wilhelm Winkler (1842-1910) - a Thuringian private astronomer and maecenas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, Wilfried; Dorschner, Johann; Schielicke, Reinhardt E.

    Wilhelm Winkler was born in 1842 in Eisenberg, Thuringia, as the son of a lawyer. After attending the trading high school in Gera, Winkler worked as a merchant in Eisenberg, following in the footsteps of his grandfather. In 1875 he gave up this trade and devoted his time entirely to astronomy. Advised by Carl Bruhns, director of the Leipzig University Observatory, he established an observatory on his estate in Gohlis near Leipzig. From 1878 Winkler regularly observed sunspots; other fields of his observational interests were comets, occultations of stars by the Moon, and Jupiter's satellites. In 1887 he went to Jena, where he contacted Ernst Abbe, who was the head of the Jena observatory, too. For some years, Winkler's instruments were used in the new observatory erected by Abbe, which replaced the old Ducal Observatory of the Goethe era. Winkler donated the precision pendulum clock and some other instruments to this observatory. He also offered his observational assistance whenever it was wanted. In 1893 Winkler built up his own observatory in Jena and published annual reports on his work in the Vierteljahrsschrift of the Astronomische Gesellschaft. His observational results mainly appeared in the journal Astronomische Nachrichten. In 1902 he was awarded an honorary doctor's degree by the Philosophical Faculty of Jena University. However, at that time his physical constitution began gradually to fade. He lost his left eye due to a sarcoma, and finally he died at the age of 68. In his will, he left 100 000 Mark in form of securities to Jena University (Winkler Foundation). The University Observatory got his 4.5 m dome, the transport of which from his residence to the final site was also paid for by him, several instruments, and a lot of books. In 1936 Winkler's dome was closed by the University. The observatory was transferred from the University to the Zeiss works in exchange for the observatory in the Jena Forst. Zeiss sponsored the reconstruction of the old dome

  17. Comparison Between Monteiro DA Rocha and Wilhelm Olbers' Methods for the Determination of the Orbits of Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Fernando B.; Fernandes, João

    2006-08-01

    In 1797, under von Zach sponsoring, Wilhelm Olbers published his work on the determination of the parabolic orbits of the comets - "Abhandlung tiber die leichteste und bequemste Methode, die Bahn eines Cometen aus einigen Beobachtungen zu berechnen von Wilhelm Olbers". Over the next century, this method would become the main tool to determine comets' parabolic orbits. Two years later, in 1799, an article of Monteiro da Rocha entitled "Determinação das Orbitas dos Cometas" is published in Memórias da Academia Real das Ciências de Lisboa. This study publishes a method to solve the problem of the determination of comets' orbits very similar with the one proposed by Olbers. In the current article we intend to provide some information about the method of Monteiro da Rocha, which in fact was formerly formulated circa 16-17 years in advance to Olbers method, and to present the results of the quantitative side-by-side comparison of methods.

  18. "A talented young man" - The short life of Friedrich Wilhelm Tönnies, 1796-1817; (German Title: "Ein talentvoller junger Mann" - Das kurze Leben des Friedrich Wilhelm Tönnies, 1796-1817)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwemin, Friedhelm

    Friedrich Wilhelm Tönnies' name is hardly found in the major histories of astronomy. This is not surprising since he died before the age of twenty-one. Nevertheless, and perhaps because he knew at heart that not much time was granted to him, he left an astonishingly prolific oeuvre which indicates his rich talents. His contemporaries also testify that this son af a wealthy textile merchant had a great talent. But it is idle to speculate whether he would have become a second Bessel, or just an inconspicuous high school teacher in some remote Prussian province. He experienced a decisive career advancement by the Berlin astronomer J.E. Bode, obtained his Ph.D. already at the age of nineteen, published, among other things, about the large solar eclipse of November 19, 1816, and corresponded with several professional astronomers, before he succumbed to a pulmonary disease.

  19. Wilhelm Reich's self-censorship after his arrest as an enemy alien: the chilling effect of an illegal imprisonment.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Philip W

    2014-04-01

    After discussing Wilhelm Reich's place in psychoanalysis, the article explores his arrest as an 'enemy alien' in December 1941. Reich's emotional responses to his imprisonment (which was illegal and which lasted nearly a month) are explored. A number of scholars have suggested that many European radical psychoanalysts refrained from sharing their former political ideas once they emigrated to the United States. Following a brief discussion of this pattern of 'silencing,' it is argued that Reich's withholding certain documents from publication was due to a self-imposed censorship, motivated in part by the fear of further governmental interference with his life and work. This fear, however, did not extend to his discussion of his newly developed theory of orgone energy. PMID:24628260

  20. [Wilhelm Troll (1897-1978). The tradition of idealistic morphology in the German botanical sciences of the 20th century].

    PubMed

    Meister, Kay

    2005-01-01

    During the first half of the 19th century, idealistic morphology developed into an influential research program in the German biosciences. This program was based on the concept of an ideal connection existing between various living beings. The growth of Darwinian thought and its new paradigm of historical explanation supplanted the idealistic morphology. Yet in the first half of the 20th century the principles of idealistic morphology experienced a powerful revival. Wilhelm Troll (1897-1978) was one of the most significant figures in this renaissance. Guided by the ideas of J.W. von Goethe, Troll established a research program rejecting causal, functional, and phylogenetic explanations as well as the idea of evolutionary adaptation. Instead, he attempted to create a 'pure' morphology based on the descriptions of various plant species. Governed by some explicitly metaphysical presumptions, Troll based his theory on the description of the organismal Gestalt. In consequence, his theory was actually a return to the proper idealistic morphology as it was known in the early 19th century. It lead German botanical morphology to a period of methodological and epistemological return. PMID:16602487

  1. A variation on forced migration: Wilhelm Peters (Prussia via Britain to Turkey) and Muzafer Sherif (Turkey to the United States).

    PubMed

    Russell, Gül

    2016-01-01

    In 1933 the Turkish Republic formally offered university positions to 30 German-speaking academics who were dismissed with the coming to power of the National Socialist Government. That initial number went up to 56 with the inclusion of the technical assistants. By 1948 the estimated total had increased to 199. Given renewable five-year contracts with salaries substantially higher than their Turkish counterparts, the foreign émigrés were to implement the westernization program of higher education. The ten year-old secular Turkish Republic's extensive social reforms had encompassed the adoption of the Latin alphabet, and equal rights for women, removing gender bias in hiring. Such a high concentration of émigré academics in one institution, "the highest anywhere in the world," provides a unique opportunity to study a subject which has been neglected. In this article two cases in psychology will be examined: Wilhelm Peters (1880-1963), who came, via Britain, to Istanbul in 1936 from the University of Jena in Germany, and Muzafer Sherif (1906-1988) who went to the United States from Ankara University in 1945. The purpose of the comparative analysis is to identify the features that are specific to the German experience, and those that are shared and underlie translocation in science within the multifaceted complexity of the process of forced migration. PMID:27388256

  2. Treating epiphora in adults with the Wilhelm plastic nasolacrimal stent: mid-term results of a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Ciampi, Juan J; Lanciego, Carlos; Navarro, Sofia; Cuena, Rafael; Velasco, Javier; Perea, Miguel; García-García, Lorenzo

    2011-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate, in a prospective, single-center study, the effectiveness of the Wilhelm-type stent used in interventional radiology for the management of epiphora. Patients (n = 104; mean age 64 [range 25–88]; 33 male and 71 female) with severe epiphora had the stents inserted (135 stents in 115 eyes) to treat obstruction of the nasolacrimal system. The etiology of the obstruction was idiopathic in 83 cases, chronic dacryocystitis in 31, cases and postsurgical status in 1 case. The overall technical success rate of stent placement was near 94%. Resolution of epiphora was complete in 105 cases and partial in 3 cases. During a mean 13-month follow-up (range 1 week to 28 months), the median duration of primary patency was 11 months, and the percentage of patency at 6 months was 60.8%, at 1 year was 39.6%, and at 2 years was 25%. Stents malfunctioned in 54 cases, and all were easily withdrawn except in 1 case. Of these 27 cases, patency recovered spontaneously in 9 and by way of a second stent in 18. Secondary patency was 50%. Factors presdisposing to lower primary patency are inflammatory etiology and location of the obstruction. The benefit of stent deployment is clear with respect to the resolution of epiphora in candidate patients for percutaneous treatment. Technical and/or design improvements would be welcomed. PMID:20390276

  3. Treating Epiphora in Adults With the Wilhelm Plastic Nasolacrimal Stent: Mid-Term Results of a Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ciampi, Juan J. Lanciego, Carlos; Navarro, Sofia; Cuena, Rafael; Velasco, Javier; Perea, Miguel; Garcia-Garcia, Lorenzo

    2011-02-15

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate, in a prospective, single-center study, the effectiveness of the Wilhelm-type stent used in interventional radiology for the management of epiphora. Patients (n = 104; mean age 64 [range 25-88]; 33 male and 71 female) with severe epiphora had the stents inserted (135 stents in 115 eyes) to treat obstruction of the nasolacrimal system. The etiology of the obstruction was idiopathic in 83 cases, chronic dacryocystitis in 31, cases and postsurgical status in 1 case. The overall technical success rate of stent placement was near 94%. Resolution of epiphora was complete in 105 cases and partial in 3 cases. During a mean 13-month follow-up (range 1 week to 28 months), the median duration of primary patency was 11 months, and the percentage of patency at 6 months was 60.8%, at 1 year was 39.6%, and at 2 years was 25%. Stents malfunctioned in 54 cases, and all were easily withdrawn except in 1 case. Of these 27 cases, patency recovered spontaneously in 9 and by way of a second stent in 18. Secondary patency was 50%. Factors presdisposing to lower primary patency are inflammatory etiology and location of the obstruction. The benefit of stent deployment is clear with respect to the resolution of epiphora in candidate patients for percutaneous treatment. Technical and/or design improvements would be welcomed.

  4. The many lives of experiments: Wilhelm Johannsen, selection, hybridization, and the complex relations of genes and characters.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Robert

    2016-04-01

    In addition to his experiments on selection in pure lines, Wilhelm Johannsen (1857-1927) performed less well-known hybridisation experiments with beans. This article describes these experiments and discusses Johannsen's motivations and interpretations, in the context of developments in early genetics. I will show that Johannsen first presented the hybridisation experiments as an additional control for his selection experiments. The latter were dedicated to investigating heredity with respect to debates concerning the significance of natural selection of continuous variation for evolution. In the course of the establishment of a Mendelian research program after 1900, the study of heredity gained increasing independence from questions of evolution, and focused more on the modes and mechanisms of heredity. Further to their role as control experiments, Johannsen also saw his hybridisation experiments as contributing to the Mendelian program, by extending the scope of the principles of Mendelian inheritance to quantitative characters. Towards the end of the first decade of genetics, Johannsen revisited his experiments to illustrate the many-many relationship between genes and characters, at a time when that relationship appeared increasingly complex, and the unit-character concept, accordingly, became inadequate. For the philosophy of science, the example shows that experiments can have multiple roles in a research programme, and can be interpreted in the light of questions other than those that motivated the experiments in the first place. PMID:26699626

  5. The Wilhelm Wundt Center and the first graduate program for the history and philosophy of psychology in Brazil: A brief report.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Saulo de Freitas; Caropreso, Fátima Siqueira; Simanke, Richard Theisen; Castañon, Gustavo Arja

    2013-08-01

    The expansion of Brazilian universities since 2009 has promoted a general growth and incentive of scientific activities throughout the country, not only in the so-called hard sciences, but also in the human sciences. In this brief report, we announce the creation of two new institutional spaces dedicated to the history and philosophy of psychology at the Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF) in Brazil: the Wilhelm Wundt Center for the History and Philosophy of Psychology (NUHFIP) and the Graduate Program in History and Philosophy of Psychology. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:23977953

  6. On the bifurcation of blood vessels--Wilhelm Roux's doctoral thesis (Jena 1878)--a seminal work for biophysical modelling in developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Kurz, H; Sandau, K; Christ, B

    1997-02-01

    Wilhelm Roux's doctoral thesis described the relationship between the angle and diameter of bifurcating blood vessels. We have re-read this work in the light of biophysics and developmental biology and found two remarkable aspects hidden among a multitude of observations, rules and exceptions to these rules. First, the author identified the major determinants involved in vascular development; genetics, cybernetics, and mechanics; moreover, he knew that he could not deal with the genetic and regulatory aspects, and could hardly treat the mechanical part adequately. Second, he was deeply convinced that the laws of physics determine the design of organisms, and that a necessity for optimality was inherent in development. We combined the analysis of diameter relationships with the requirement for optimality in a stochastic biophysical model, and concluded that a constant wall-stress condition could define a minimum wall-tissue optimum during arterial development. Hence, almost 120 years after Wilhelm Roux's pioneering work, our model indicates one possible way in which physical laws have determined the evolution of regulatory and structural properties in vessel wall development. PMID:9059737

  7. [The history of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society during the Third Reich. Interim reports of the president's commission of the Max Planck Society].

    PubMed

    Weber, M M

    2002-11-01

    In 1997 the Max Planck Society set up a presidential commission to do research on the historical development of its precursor organization, the Kaiser Wilhelm Society (KWG), during the Third Reich. This paper presents some of the important results given in the interim reports of this commission that are relevant to psychiatry. It focuses on brain research, anthropology, psychiatric genetics, and the role of the well-known biochemist Adolf Butenandt. In general, the interim reports reflect the numerous links between the biomedical research of the KWG and the institutions of the National Socialist (Nazi) state. However, they do not yet allow a final historical assessment as to the complex situation of this field of research during National Socialism. PMID:12430055

  8. [The alphabet of nature and the alphabet of culture in the eighteenth century. botany, diplomatics, and ethno-linguistics according to Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner : Botany, Diplomatics, and ethno-linguistics according to Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner].

    PubMed

    Gierl, Martin

    2010-01-01

    In the middle of the eighteenth century, Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner attempted to realize the old idea of deciphering the alphabet of the world, which Francis Bacon had raised as a general postulate of science. This article describes these attempts and their interrelations. Linné used the model of the alphabet to classify plants according to the characters of this fruiting body. Gatterer, one of the leading German historians during the Enlightenment, adopted the botanical method of classification by genus and species to classify the history of scripts. He used the forms of the alphabetic characters to measure the age of manuscripts and to map the process of history as a genealogy of culture. Gatterer collaborated closely with Büttner, the first Göttingen professor of natural history. Büttner constructed a general alphabet of languages which connected the phonetics of language with the historically known alphabets. Early on, diplomatics and ethnography combined the natural order of natural history and the cultural order of the alphabet with the attempt to register development and to document development by the evolution of forms. Based on the shared model of the alphabet and on the common necessity to classify their empirical material, natural history and the description of culture were related attempts in the middle of the eighteenth century to comprehend the alphabetically organized nature and a naturally ordered culture. PMID:20665241

  9. [The search for "od." Karl Ludwig Freiheer von Reichenbach (1788-1869) and Karl Wilhelm Mayrhofer (1806-1853), two joined against Justus von Liebig].

    PubMed

    Habacher, M

    1980-05-01

    The author describes the controversy between Justus von Liebig on one side and Reichenbach and Mayrhofer on the other side. It is a controversy about problems of science and medicine which are characteristic for the late 18th and the first half of the 19th century, when Mesmerism and similar ideas of occultic and comparative phenomenona were discussed and often refused as being "not scientific". Justus von Liebig and Karl Ludwig Freiherr von Reichenbach were both chemists, both interested in scientific progress and working in this field. They were friends in the years 1830 to 1848. But later on this friendship ended when Reichenbach--who in the mean time moved to Vienna--became more and more interested in phenomenons seen by sensitive persons concerning effects of light. Although Reichenbach himself was not able to recognize the phenomenons he was sure that other persons had this ability. He had the impression that there is a special force floating through the universe, and this force he called "od". Liebig, who was not able to follow this theory and rejected it has speculation, turned against Reichenbach in 1852-3. So the controversy began and their old friendship came to an end. Reichenbach's theory of the "od", characteristic for the time of the romanticism and leading back to Mesmerism was accepted and supported by the Austrian physician Dr. Karl Wilhelm Mayrhofer who had aroused his interest by describing similar phenomenos some of this patients had. The letters of both men, the chemist and the doctor, which are well preserved (Technical Museum of Vienna) and discussed here, give a good impression of Reichenbach's ideas concerning his theory of the "od" and his philosophical ideas. As Reichenbach tried to find a philosophy corresponding to his theory and as he meant to have found this in the philosophy of Friedrich Eduard Beneke his remarks in those letters give a good information about Beneke's discussion of Reichenbach's theory. Mayrhofer, on the other hand

  10. Wien, Wilhelm (1864-1928)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Born in Gaffken, East Prussia (now Poland), Nobel prizewinner (1911), became professor of physics at Munich and discovered Wien's law, for the distribution of light in the spectrum of a black-body. Discovered the proton in an early mass-spectrometer experiment (confirmed by Rutherford)....

  11. Neuropathological research at the "Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Psychiatrie" (German Institute for Psychiatric Research) in Munich (Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institute). Scientific utilization of children's organs from the "Kinderfachabteilungen" (Children's Special Departments) at Bavarian State Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Steger, Florian

    2006-09-01

    During National Socialism, the politically motivated interest in psychiatric genetic research lead to the founding of research departments specialized in pathological-anatomical brain research, the two Kaiser Wilhelm-Institutes (KWI) in Berlin and Munich. The latter was indirectly provided with brain material by Bavarian State Hospitals, to three of which "Kinderfachabteilungen" (Special Pediatric Units) were affiliated. As children became victims of the systematically conducted child "euthanasia" in these Special Pediatric Units, this paper will address the question whether and to which extent the organs from victims of child "euthanasia" were used for (neuro-) pathological research at the KWI in Munich. By means of case studies and medical histories (with focus on the situation in Kaufbeuren-Irsee), I will argue that pediatric departments on a regular base delivered slide preparations, that the child "euthanasia" conduced in these departments systematically contributed to neuropathological research and that slide preparations from victims of child "euthanasia" were used in scientific publications after 1945. PMID:16887759

  12. ["... that progress in anatomy is most likely to occur when its problems include the study of growth and function, as well as of structure". about the anatomy and physiology of Ernst Heinrich Weber (794-1878 and Wilhelm His (1831-1904) his successor in the department of anatomy at the University of Leipzig].

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Reinhard

    2005-11-01

    The Leipzig anatomist and physiologist Ernst Heinrich Weber had introduced physiological thinking in anatomy and exact methods of mathematical physics to the study of the functioning of the body making him the founder of a physically orientated physiology. But he would not have been that excellent physiologist without being a nonetheless distinguished anatomist since he solved his physiological problems usually following function in close relation to structure. Together with his brother Wilhelm Eduard Weber (1804-1891), who later was to become a famous physicist, in their theory of waves he laid the basis for an exact analysis of the movements of fluids in elastic tubes und was the first to apply the basic laws of hydrodynamics to the circulation of the blood. In collaboration with his youngest brother Eduard Friedrich Wilhelm Weber (1806-1871), who worked as a prosector at his institute and together with Wilhelm Weber had studied the mechanics of the walking apparatus, he demonstrated the inhibiting effect of the vagus nerve on the action of the heart. Ernst Heinrich Weber's approach to consider an organ as a whole not neglecting the study of its function set him apart from most of his contemporaries and has characterized the work of the Leipzig anatomists and physiologists since his time. Among those was Wilhelm His from Basle who succeeded him in the chair of anatomy in 1872. On the basis of a systematic analysis of human embryos by means of serial sections and plastic reconstruction His completely reformed the field of embryology and was the first to present a comprehensive treatise on human embryology. The making of modern human embryology was, above all, his achievement. He did not confine himself to mere description but wanted to gain deeper insight into the causal events by developmental-mechanical conceptions. With his detection of the neuroblasts and that they give rise to an axon and later to dendrites His provided the developmental foundations for the

  13. The Alphabet of Nature and the Alphabet of Culture in the Eighteenth Century. Botany, Diplomatics, and Ethno-Linguistics according to Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In the middle of the eighteenth century, Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner attempted to realize the old idea of deciphering the alphabet of the world, which Francis Bacon had raised as a general postulate of science. This article describes these attempts and their interrelations. Linné used the model of the alphabet to classify plants according to the characters of this fruiting body. Gatterer, one of the leading German historians during the Enlightenment, adopted the botanical method of classification by genus and species to classify the history of scripts. He used the forms of the alphabetic characters to measure the age of manuscripts and to map the process of history as a genealogy of culture. Gatterer collaborated closely with Büttner, the first Göttingen professor of natural history. Büttner constructed a general alphabet of languages which connected the phonetics of language with the historically known alphabets. Early on, diplomatics and ethnography combined the natural order of natural history and the cultural order of the alphabet with the attempt to register development and to document development by the evolution of forms. Based on the shared model of the alphabet and on the common necessity to classify their empirical material, natural history and the description of culture were related attempts in the middle of the eighteenth century to comprehend the alphabetically organized nature and a naturally ordered culture. PMID:20665241

  14. [The work of Carl Wilhelm Scheele].

    PubMed

    Cassebaum, H

    1986-12-01

    On the occasion of C. W. Scheele's 200th anniversary of death corrections and complements to some of his important investigations and theories including discussions of priorities, are given to elucidate his works and to avoid misunderstanding (element term; tartaric, oxalic and benzoic acid; pyrolusit; earths/spar/Bologneese luminous stone/barite; Scheele/Bergman/Lavoisier; fire theory/discovery of oxygen; graphite/Wolfram; Scheele/Wenzel). PMID:3554272

  15. Bessel, Friedrich Wilhelm (1784-1846)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Astronomer, geodesist, mathematician, born in Minden, Westphalia, Germany. At the age of 26, became director of Frederick William III of Prussia's new Konigsberg Observatory, where he remained for the rest of his life. Published (1838) the first recognizedly accurate stellar parallax (of 61 Cygni), the earliest accurate method for measuring stellar distances (10 light years for 61 Cygni) (but see...

  16. Olbers, Heinrich Wilhelm (1758-1840)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Doctor, astronomer, born in Arbergen, Germany, enthusiast for astronomy. He discovered several comets. In 1800 he joined the team of 24 `celestial police', organized by FRANZ VON ZACH, who were to patrol a share of the zodiac looking for the planet missing (according to BODE's law) between Mars and Jupiter. On New Year's Day 1801 PIAZZI discovered Ceres, and, in March 1802, Olbers discovered Pall...

  17. Argelander, Friedrich Wilhelm August (1799-1875)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Astronomer, born in Memel, East Prussia. Director of the Bonn Observatory, where he organized a survey of the position of all 324 198 stars of the northern hemisphere above the ninth magnitude, published as the star charts and catalogs of the Bonner Durchmusterung (BD). His assistant, Eduard Schönfeld (1828-91), made the extension (BDE) into the southern sky. It is staggering to think about this ...

  18. Schickard [Schickhardt], Wilhelm (1592-1635)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Born in Herrenberg, Württemberg, Germany, became professor of astronomy in Tübingen. He corresponded with KEPLER, was one of the first to teach Kepler's discoveries, and, on the basis of his experience in making maps and other devices, proposed to Kepler the development of an analog computer to calculate planetary positions. He invented the first calculating machine, a `hand planetarium' (like an...

  19. Hermann Wilhelm Abich im Kaukasus: Zum zweihundertsten Geburtstag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibold, Ilse; Seibold, Eugen

    2006-11-01

    Hermann Abich was born in 1806 in Berlin and died in 1886 in Graz. He grew up in a wealthy family which had friendly relations with famous scientists like Alexander von Humboldt, Leopold von Buch or Carl Ritter. After his studies in Heidelberg and Berlin he turned to extended fieldwork at the volcanoes of Italy. In 1833 1834 he published excellent petrological/chemical results and got soon a good scientific reputation. Thus he was nominated as Professor for Geology and Mineralogy of the prestigious Russian University in Dorpat (now Tartu, Esthonia) in 1842. In 1844 he was sent to Armenia by the Russian authorities. For the next three decades his fieldwork with about 190 publications was concentrated on the Great and Lesser Caucasus. This was a period of Russian expansion to the South with long-lasting regional fights. But he enjoyed the support of powerful governors. He was an indefatigable and enthusiastic explorer and a precise observer and designer. His interests covered many fields: morphology, glaciology, structural geology, volcanology with Thermal Springs, mineral resources from hydrocarbons, coal, salt to ores, stratigraphy and paleontology as a base for geological maps. But he also gave advice for practical problems, and he was active in meteorology, botany and archaeology. Alltogether he became “the Father of Caucasus Geology”. The following sketch stresses only on three aspects of his activities. He was one of the first pioneers in hydrocarbon exploration, especially around the anticlines with the mud volcanoes near Baku. In many respects, however, his fundamental ideas were erronous. He explained the structure of the Great Caucasus by the traditional theories of Leopold von Buch and Elie de Beaumont. The Caucasus anticline “was elevated by forces acting from beneath”. Following them he tried to discover regularities in the strike of mountain chains. Similarily he treated volcanism like Alexander von Humboldt and Leopold von Buch with their two groups of phenomena: voluminous, mostly basaltic “elevation craters” versus isolated, mostly trachytic and relatively small cones of “true volcanoes”. In spite of the isolation of the Caucasus region he had cultivated continuously contacts with leading geologists in Europe and was honoured by many institutions. He left Russia in 1876 for Vienna planning to write there the final monograph volumes about his investigations but he died before he could complete them.

  20. Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel - the astronomer as a poet; (German Title: Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel - der Astronom als Poet)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fürst, Dietmar

    This contribution illuminates a hitherto unknown side of the famous astronomer Bessel: his delight in occasionally writing poetry. These poems were thought to be of private use only, in particular as rhymed answers to his intimate correspondent Heinrich Christian Schumacher.

  1. Comment on Underwater Explosion (UWE) Analysis of the ROKS Cheonan Incident by S.G. Kim and Y. Kitterman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwang Sup

    2013-03-01

    The analysis of the seismic and infrasound data recorded at the time of the Cheonan incident led Kim and Gitterman (this journal, published on line August 2012) to conclude that a non-contact underwater explosion had sunk the ship. They also concluded that one of the mines deployed by the South Korean Navy many years ago in the area and then abandoned sank the ship. Their mine theory that is based on the explosive charge weights they calculated by means of two methods using the bubble period determined by their analysis, however, appears to be invalid. Although the incident had occurred in a shallow sea with a depth of less than 50m, the authors used the methods that are applicable only to free-field underwater explosions. The consideration of the influence on the bubble period of the nearby sea surface and bottom and the nearby ship's hull would double the calculated weights. In addition, the authors ignored several evidences that support the torpedo theory. One of them is aluminum-containing white powder found in large quantities at certain substrates in the retrieved Cheonan. However, the conclusion of the official investigation group that the torpedo was made in North Korea is based on a circumstantial evidence and is yet to be proven with other more direct evidences.

  2. Philosophical Anthropology and Educational Change: Wilhelm Von Humbolt and the Prussian Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Carla R.

    1973-01-01

    After the defeat by Napoleon, Prussia endeavored to rebuild its war torn country by instituting sweeping social and educational reforms. This effort marked one of the few instances in which philosophical anthropology formed the explicit basis of a successful program of social change. (Author/KM)

  3. [Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen and the discovery of X-rays].

    PubMed

    Tubiana, M

    1996-01-01

    W.C. Röntgen reported the discovery of X-rays in December 1895 after seven weeks of assiduous work during which he had studied the properties of this new type of radiation able to go through screens of notable thickness. He named them X-rays to underline the fact that their nature was unknown. The news of this discovery immediately aroused an immense interest in the public and also initiated intense research in several directions. Physicians and physicists began as early as January 1896 to use X-rays on patients to investigate the skeleton and subsequently the lung and other organs. This was the birth or radiology. Rapidly they observed skin erythema, which led to the idea of using X-rays against a variety of lesions. In June 1896 the first patient was treated by radiotherapy. J.J. Thomson (Cambridge, U.K.) showed that X-rays were able to ionize gaz and the study of this phenomenon led to the discovery of electrons in 1897. In order to understand the emission of X-rays, H. Becquerel (Paris) investigated the role of the phosphorescence of the glass of the tube and while doing so discovered radioactivity in March 1896. X-rays and radioactivity were at the origin of the scientific revolution at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th centuries. Research on radioactive materials demonstrated the existence of atoms which had been till then only a convenient hypothesis for explaining chemical reactions, but whose reality was considered as dubious by most physicists. Moreover, interaction of particles emitted by radionuclides and atoms enabled first the study of the structure of the atom and subsequently its nucleus. Matter, elements which were thought to be immutable were found to be transmutable, and eventually to disintegrate. The origin of the energy transferred to the radiation which was emitted appeared as a mystery and in order to explain it the physicist had to accept that matter could convert energy. In 1903 Einstein established the equivalence between matter and energy. Matter, energy, electricity, light which were formerly considered as continuous quantities were found to be discrete: there are particles of matter (elementary particles), energy (quanta, Planck 1905), electricity (electron), light (photons). Radioactive decay, particle interactions imposed a probabilistic physics which progressively replaced classic deterministic physics. Radioactivity can be used as a clock to measure time in the universe. Datations were made for fossils, art masterpieces and also for the earth, the solar system and universe. X-rays diffraction proved to be a powerful tool for studying crystals and molecules, in particular protein, and in 1953 enabled to demonstrate the DNA double helix. Hence X-rays and radioactivity originated a revolution in physics and science and in the vision of nature. The imperceptible and yet so powerful rays demonstrated the deficiencies of our senses. Mathematical entities and instrumentation must complement our sensations. The huge increment in our knowledge is accompanied by a divorce between the scientist and the layman who now often has great difficulties understanding new concepts not only in physics but also in biology. PMID:8696882

  4. [The medical arrangements of the Westphalian Wilhelms-University in Münster (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Weber, F W

    1977-12-01

    The buildings of the clinics and institutions of the medical faculty in Münster which were planned in 1914 and completed in 1925 were enlarged considerably with numerous new buildings in the 1950's because of increasing specialisation in medicine. The university eye clinic built in 1925 was enlarged in 1970 by the addition of a bed wing and in 1975 by the new construction of the out patients department. In 1969 the foundation stone for the new central clinic with the four bed towers was laid. The eye clinic will not move into the new central clinic, because the old part of the present eye clinic was also completely renovated, besides the construction of both the additions. This description is complemented by conclusive data on the number and bed-use of the single clinics and on the cost of the new wing and the number of students. PMID:342807

  5. Wilhelm August Gottlieb Manniske, MD (1769-1835): microscope use during removal of buried corneal body in 1792.

    PubMed

    Muirhead, J Fraser

    2013-02-01

    In 1792, a priest in Germany consulted a young doctor about a buried corneal foreign body hidden in a small, hard mass that partly covered the pupil. During removal of the foreign body, the doctor inspected the corneal incision with a microscope to confirm the suspected presence of the foreign body. This may be the first use of a microscope in eye surgery. PMID:23411892

  6. Deep mantle mineralogy and novel materials synthesis using multianvil high-pressure technology (Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetsuo, Irifune

    2016-04-01

    Phase relations in mantle and slab materials have been studied using Kawai-type multianvil apparatus (KMA) under pressure and temperature conditions of the mantle transition region and the uppermost lower mantle of the Earth. The associated density and sound velocity changes of these materials have also been determined using the KMA technology combined with synchrotron in situ X-ray and ultrasonic interferometry measurements. The results show that the mantle transition region is made of a pyrolitic composition, while the presence of a harzburgite-rich layer is suggested in the lower parts of this region. Use of sintered diamond anvils for KMA has allowed expansion of these measurements toward deeper region of the lower mantle. Our preliminary results of such measurements indicate that at least upper part of the lower mantle is made of the pyrolitic composition contrary to a recent study based on Brillouin scattering measurements in diamond anvil cell, which concluded a more Si-rich lower mantle. On the other hand, we have been applying KMA technology to synthesis of novel functional materials utilizing its capability of producing very high static pressures and homogeneous temperatures in relatively large sample volumes. These include ultrahard nano-polycrystalline diamond (NPD) directly converted from graphite, which is now being used for applications to abrasive and cutting tools as well as for some scientific applications such as anvils for some high-pressure devices. Another example of such a novel material is hard and tough nano-polycrystalline stishovite (NPS), which is also potentially important for some industrial applications. Moreover, we recently succeeded in making highly transparent nano-polycrystalline garnet (NPG), which is ideal for the measurements of sound velocities by various methods, such as Brillouin scattering and GHz ultrasonic interferometry. Thus, the KMA technology opens the door to the synthesis of transparent nano-polycrystalline ceramics, in addition to its use for the studies in deep Earth mineralogy.

  7. Struve family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Struve, Friedrich Georg Wilhelm (1793-1864); Struve, Otto Wilhelm (1819-1905), son of Friedrich; Struve, Karl Hermann (1854-1920), elder son of Otto Wilhelm, brother of Gustav; Struve, Gustav Wilhelm Ludwig (1858-1920), younger son of Otto Wilhelm, brother of Karl; Struve, Otto (1897-1963) [Otto Struve II], son of Gustav....

  8. Reply to "Comment on 'Cosmic-ray-driven reaction and greenhouse effect of halogenated molecules: Culprits for atmospheric ozone depletion and global climate change' by Rolf Müller and Jens-Uwe Grooß"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Q.-B.

    2014-04-01

    In their Comment, Müller and Grooß continuously use problematic "observed data" and misleading arguments to make a case against our CRE mechanism of the ozone hole and CFC-warming mechanism of global climate change. They make the groundless assertion that the CRE theory cannot be considered as an independent process for ozone loss in the polar stratosphere. Their claim that the impact of the CRE mechanism on polar chlorine activation and ozone loss in the stratosphere would be limited does not agree with the observed data over the past decades. They also make many contradictory and fact-distorting arguments that "There is no polar ozone loss in darkness, there is no apparent 11-year periodicity in polar total ozone measurements, the age of air in the polar lower stratosphere is much older than 1-2 years, and the reported detection of a pronounced recovery (by about 20-25%) in Antarctic total ozone measurements by the year 2010 is in error." These assertions ignore and contradict a great deal of robust observed data from both laboratory and field measurements reported in the literature including their own publications. Their new argument for the photodissociation of CFCs on PSCs also contradicts their previous extraordinary efforts including the use of fabricated "ACE-FTS satellite data" to argue for no physical/chemical loss of CFCs in the winter lower polar stratosphere. Finally, they do not provide any scientific evidence to support their criticism for the no physical basis of the CFC-warming theory and its conclusions. In summary, their misleading arguments and false "data" do not change the convincing conclusion reached by robust observations in my recent paper that both the CRE mechanism and the CFC-warming mechanism not only provide new fundamental understandings of the O3 hole and global climate change but have superior predictive capabilities, compared with the conventional models.

  9. Do Web-based Mental Health Literacy Interventions Improve the Mental Health Literacy of Adult Consumers? Results From a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Antoniades, Josefine

    2016-01-01

    Background Low levels of mental health literacy (MHL) have been identified as an important contributor to the mental health treatment gap. Interventions to improve MHL have used traditional media (eg, community talks, print media) and new platforms (eg, the Internet). Evaluations of interventions using conventional media show improvements in MHL improve community recognition of mental illness as well as knowledge, attitude, and intended behaviors toward people having mental illness. However, the potential of new media, such as the Internet, to enhance MHL has yet to be systematically evaluated. Objective Study aims were twofold: (1) To systematically appraise the efficacy of Web-based interventions in improving MHL. (2) To establish if increases in MHL translated into improvement in individual health seeking and health outcomes as well as reductions in stigma toward people with mental illness. Methods We conducted a systematic search and appraisal of all original research published between 2000 and 2015 that evaluated Web-based interventions to improve MHL. The PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines were used to report findings. Results Fourteen studies were included: 10 randomized controlled trials and 4 quasi-experimental studies. Seven studies were conducted in Australia. A variety of Web-based interventions were identified ranging from linear, static websites to highly interactive interventions such as social media games. Some Web-based interventions were specifically designed for people living with mental illness whereas others were applicable to the general population. Interventions were more likely to be successful if they included “active ingredients” such as a structured program, were tailored to specific populations, delivered evidenced-based content, and promoted interactivity and experiential learning. Conclusions Web-based interventions targeting MHL are more likely to be successful if they include

  10. The Mental Health Literacy Scale (MHLS): A new scale-based measure of mental health literacy.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Matt; Casey, Leanne

    2015-09-30

    Although Mental Health Literacy (MHL) has been a topic of substantial interest, measurement of this concept using a scale-based measure has been limited, including a lack of psychometric and methodologically robust scale-based measures of MHL. This study developed a new scale-based measure of MHL, the Mental Health Literacy Scale (MHLS), which assesses all attributes of MHL. Construction of the MHLS was done over three key stages, including measure development, pilot testing and assessment of psychometrics and methodological quality. The resulting measure is a 35 item, univariate scale that is easily administered and scored. Results showed significant differences in scores between mental health professionals and a community sample, as well as individuals with greater experience with mental health, and a significant positive relationship with help-seeking intentions. The MHLS also demonstrated good internal and test-retest reliability. Evaluation of the methodological quality of the MHLS indicated that it has substantial methodological advantages in comparison to existing scale-based measures of MHL. The MHLS can be used in assessing individual and population level differences in MHL and in determining the impact of programmes designed to improve MHL. PMID:26228163

  11. [From anamnesis to the art of interpretation, or: What is a "genuine" psychoanalyst? Wolfgang Warda, Ludwig Binswanger, Wilhelm Strohmayer and the origins of psychoanalysis in Thuringia].

    PubMed

    May, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Warda and Strohmayer from Thuringia were among the first German physicians who developed an interest in Freuds theory and therapeutic method around 1900. Their contributions reflect the influence of Otto Binswanger, professor of psychiatry in Jena, a representative of the "psychological direction" in psychiatry which in the beginning was relatively receptive to Freud. The paper discusses their rapprochement to, and detachment from, the Freudian school, including also the work of a third young physician: Ludwig Binswanger, Otto's nephew, who was active in Jena at the same time. It points to certain factors contributing to the increasing rejection Freud met in academic circles which have been underrated to date: (1) the transformation of psychoanalysis into an art of interpretation; (2) the introduction of transference. Both factors which were elaborated by Freud as essentials of his theoretical and practical approach around 1900 and published in 1904/05, undermined the claim of academic medicine to objectivity. The paper describes how psychoanalysis officially abandoned the scientific standards of contemporary medicine at the Weimar congress in 1911, at the same time as Warda and Strohmayer left the Freudian group. PMID:27281983

  12. German-American Cultural Interaction in the Jacksonian Era: Six Unpublished Letters by Francis Lieber and John Pickering to Wilhelm von Humboldt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller-Vollmer, Kurt

    1998-01-01

    Letters by German-American writer and political scientist Francis Lieber and American lawyer and linguist John Pickering to Wilhem von Humboldt in Berlin, published here for the first time, give insight into the cultural interaction between Germany and the United States during the Jacksonian era, and may open new perspectives for German-American…

  13. The impact of compulsory helmet legislation on cyclist head injuries in New South Wales, Australia: a response.

    PubMed

    Walter, Scott R; Olivier, Jake; Churches, Tim; Grzebieta, Raphael

    2013-03-01

    This article responds to criticisms made in a rejoinder (Accident Analysis and Prevention 2012, 45: 107-109) questioning the validity of a study on the impact of mandatory helmet legislation (MHL) for cyclists in New South Wales, Australia. We systematically address the criticisms through clarification of our methods, extension of the original analysis and discussion of new evidence on the population-level effects of MHL. Extensions of our analysis confirm the original conclusions that MHL had a beneficial effect on head injury rates over and above background trends and changes in cycling participation. The ongoing debate around MHL draws attention away from important ways in which both safety and participation can be improved through investment in well-connected cycling infrastructure, fostering consideration between road users, and adequate legal protection for vulnerable road users. These are the essential elements for providing a cycling environment that encourages participation, with all its health, economic and environmental benefits, while maximising safety. PMID:23339779

  14. Improvement of Flow Quality in NAL Chofu Mach 10 Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacey, John; Inoue, Yasutoshi; Higashida, Akio; Inoue, Manabu; Ishizaka, Kouichi; Korte, John J.

    2002-01-01

    As a result of CFD analysis and remachining of the nozzle, the flow quality of the Mach 10 Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at NAL Chofu, Japan was improved. The subsequent test results validated the CFD analytical predictions by NASA and MHL.

  15. Mental health literacy: a cross-cultural approach to knowledge and beliefs about depression, schizophrenia and generalized anxiety disorder

    PubMed Central

    Altweck, Laura; Marshall, Tara C.; Ferenczi, Nelli; Lefringhausen, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Many families worldwide have at least one member with a behavioral or mental disorder, and yet the majority of the public fails to correctly recognize symptoms of mental illness. Previous research has found that Mental Health Literacy (MHL)—the knowledge and positive beliefs about mental disorders—tends to be higher in European and North American cultures, compared to Asian and African cultures. Nonetheless quantitative research examining the variables that explain this cultural difference remains limited. The purpose of our study was fourfold: (a) to validate measures of MHL cross-culturally, (b) to examine the MHL model quantitatively, (c) to investigate cultural differences in the MHL model, and (d) to examine collectivism as a predictor of MHL. We validated measures of MHL in European American and Indian samples. The results lend strong quantitative support to the MHL model. Recognition of symptoms of mental illness was a central variable: greater recognition predicted greater endorsement of social causes of mental illness and endorsement of professional help-seeking as well as lesser endorsement of lay help-seeking. The MHL model also showed an overwhelming cultural difference; namely, lay help-seeking beliefs played a central role in the Indian sample, and a negligible role in the European American sample. Further, collectivism was positively associated with causal beliefs of mental illness in the European American sample, and with lay help-seeking beliefs in the Indian sample. These findings demonstrate the importance of understanding cultural differences in beliefs about mental illness, particularly in relation to help-seeking beliefs. PMID:26441699

  16. Mental health literacy: a cross-cultural approach to knowledge and beliefs about depression, schizophrenia and generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Altweck, Laura; Marshall, Tara C; Ferenczi, Nelli; Lefringhausen, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Many families worldwide have at least one member with a behavioral or mental disorder, and yet the majority of the public fails to correctly recognize symptoms of mental illness. Previous research has found that Mental Health Literacy (MHL)-the knowledge and positive beliefs about mental disorders-tends to be higher in European and North American cultures, compared to Asian and African cultures. Nonetheless quantitative research examining the variables that explain this cultural difference remains limited. The purpose of our study was fourfold: (a) to validate measures of MHL cross-culturally, (b) to examine the MHL model quantitatively, (c) to investigate cultural differences in the MHL model, and (d) to examine collectivism as a predictor of MHL. We validated measures of MHL in European American and Indian samples. The results lend strong quantitative support to the MHL model. Recognition of symptoms of mental illness was a central variable: greater recognition predicted greater endorsement of social causes of mental illness and endorsement of professional help-seeking as well as lesser endorsement of lay help-seeking. The MHL model also showed an overwhelming cultural difference; namely, lay help-seeking beliefs played a central role in the Indian sample, and a negligible role in the European American sample. Further, collectivism was positively associated with causal beliefs of mental illness in the European American sample, and with lay help-seeking beliefs in the Indian sample. These findings demonstrate the importance of understanding cultural differences in beliefs about mental illness, particularly in relation to help-seeking beliefs. PMID:26441699

  17. Inhibitory Effects of Medium Molecular Weight Heparinyl Amino Acid Derivatives on Ischemic Paw Edema in Mice.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Seiichi; Toda, Takao; Nakamura, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the radical-scavenging effects of heparin (HE), medium molecular weight heparinyl phenylalanine (MHF), and medium molecular weight heparinyl leucine (MHL) using ischemic paw edema in mice. We also examined the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) of mice that were administered these compounds as an index of their side-effects. HE had a preventative effect and significant reduced ischemic paw edema. However, its effect was not dose-dependent and the dose-response curve was bell-shaped. The effective dose of HE also exhibited a prolonged APTT. Pretreatment using MHF and MHL were effective against ischemic paw edema without a prolonged APTT. Remarkably, the action of MHF was not only preventively, but also therapeutically active. These results suggest that MHF and MHL are superior to HE as safe radical scavengers in vivo. PMID:27381605

  18. Hypoxia imaging predicts success of hypoxia-induced cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine gene therapy in a murine lung tumor model.

    PubMed

    Lee, B-F; Lee, C-H; Chiu, N-T; Hsia, C-C; Shen, L-H; Shiau, A-L

    2012-04-01

    Tc-99m-HL91 is a hypoxia imaging biomarker. The aim of this study was to investigate the value of Tc-99m-HL91 imaging for hypoxia-induced cytosine deaminase (CD)/5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) gene therapy in a murine lung tumor model. C57BL/6 mice were implanted with Lewis lung carcinoma cells transduced with the hypoxia-inducible promoter-driven CD gene (LL2/CD) or luciferase gene (LL2/Luc) serving as the control. When tumor volumes reached 100 mm(3), pretreatment images were acquired after injection of Tc-99m-HL91. The mice were divided into low and high hypoxic groups based on the tumor-to-non-tumor ratio of Tc-99m-HL91. They were injected daily with 5-FC (500 mg kg(-1)) or the vehicle for 1 week. When tumor volumes reached 1000 mm(3), autoradiography and histological examinations were performed. Treatment with 5-FC delayed tumor growth and enhanced the survival of mice bearing high hypoxic LL2/CD tumors. The therapeutic effect of hypoxia-induced CD/5-FC gene therapy was more pronounced in high hypoxic tumors than in low hypoxic tumors. This study provides the first evidence that Tc-99m-HL91 can serve as an imaging biomarker for predicting the treatment responses of hypoxia-regulated CD/5-FC gene therapy in animal tumor models. Our results suggest that hypoxia imaging using Tc-99m-HL91 has the predictive value for the success of hypoxia-directed treatment regimens. PMID:22281757

  19. Assessment of mental health literacy using a multifaceted measure among a Chinese rural population

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yu; Liu, Zi-wei; Hu, Mi; Liu, Xi-guang; Liu, Hui-ming; Yang, Joyce P; Zhou, Liang; Xiao, Shui-yuan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The present study aims to assess mental health literacy (MHL) using a standardised multifaceted 20-item instrument called Mental Health Knowledge Questionnaire (MHKQ) developed by the Chinese Ministry of Health, among a rural Chinese population. Setting Four villages in Liuyang county of Hunan province, China. Participants This was a cross-sectional study. A multistage cluster-sampling method was adopted, leading to a final sampling frame of 2377 residents aged 18–60 years from four villages of Liuyang county. Included in the study were residents aged 18–60 years living in their village for at least half a year; excluded were those not living in the areas during the research period, those with difficulty in communication due to serious physical or mental illness and those who were cognitively impaired or actively psychotic. Finally, 2052 participants completed the survey. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcome was correct response rate of the MHKQ; secondary outcome measures were association between sociodemographics and MHL, and association between MHL and health outcomes. Results Correct response rates for the 20 MHKQ items ranged from 19% to 94%, with a mean rate of 58%. Younger age (r=−0.02, p<0.01), higher education (r: 1.38–2.69, p<0.01) and higher income (r=0.41, p<0.01), were independently associated with higher MHL. MHL was independently associated with self-rated general health (r=2.31, p<0.01), depression (r=−0.09, p<0.01) and anxiety (r=−0.07, p<0.05). Conclusions MHL in the rural areas of Liuyang is lower than that reported in urban areas of China. There is much room for improvement with regard to MHL promotion in rural areas of China. Younger age, higher education and higher income are the three robust factors related to higher MHL, so cohort-specific educational intervention efforts may be indicated. PMID:26438139

  20. Congenital Heart Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart defects. Important Notice The Congenital Heart Information Network website is temporarily out of service. Please join ... and Uwe Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright © ...

  1. Teachers' Perceptions about Minimal Hearing Loss: A Role for Educational Audiologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richburg, Cynthia McCormick; Goldberg, Lynette R.

    2005-01-01

    A 25-item survey was administered to 45 teachers to identify what they knew about Minimal Hearing Loss (MHL) and to verify or refute five possible misperceptions reported earlier by Goldberg and McCormick Richburg (2004). Results support the importance of an educational audiologist on the service delivery team to help teachers understand the…

  2. Long term bicycle related head injury trends for New South Wales, Australia following mandatory helmet legislation.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Jake; Walter, Scott R; Grzebieta, Raphael H

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1991 enactment of mandatory helmet legislation (MHL) for cyclists in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, there has been extensive debate as to its effect on head injury rates at a population level. Many previous studies have focused on the impact of MHL around the time of enactment, while little has been done to examine the ongoing effects. We aimed to extend prior work by investigating long-term trends in cyclist head and arm injuries over the period 1991-2010. The counts of cyclists hospitalised with head or arm injuries were jointly modelled with log-linear regression. The simultaneous modelling of related injury mechanisms avoids the need for actual exposure data and accounts for the effects of changes in the cycling environment, cycling behaviour and general safety improvements. Models were run separately with population counts, bicycle imports, the average weekday counts of cyclists in Sydney CBD and cycling estimates from survey data as proxy exposures. Overall, arm injuries were higher than head injuries throughout the study period, consistent with previous post-MHL observations. The trends in the two injury groups also significantly diverged, such that the gap between rates increased with time. The results suggest that the initial observed benefit of MHL has been maintained over the ensuing decades. There is a notable additional safety benefit after 2006 that is associated with an increase in cycling infrastructure spending. This implies that the effect of MHL is ongoing and progress in cycling safety in NSW has and will continue to benefit from focusing on broader issues such as increasing cycling infrastructure. PMID:23026203

  3. Factors affecting paddy soil arsenic concentration in Bangladesh: prediction and uncertainty of geostatistical risk mapping.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zia U; Panaullah, Golam M; DeGloria, Stephen D; Duxbury, John M

    2011-12-15

    Knowledge of the spatial correlation of soil arsenic (As) concentrations with environmental variables is needed to assess the nature and extent of the risk of As contamination from irrigation water in Bangladesh. We analyzed 263 paired groundwater and paddy soil samples covering highland (HL) and medium highland-1 (MHL-1) land types for geostatistical mapping of soil As and delineation of As contaminated areas in Tala Upazilla, Satkhira district. We also collected 74 non-rice soil samples to assess the baseline concentration of soil As for this area. The mean soil As concentrations (mg/kg) for different land types under rice and non-rice crops were: rice-MHL-1 (21.2)>rice-HL (14.1)>non-rice-MHL-1 (11.9)>non-rice-HL (7.2). Multiple regression analyses showed that irrigation water As, Fe, land elevation and years of tubewell operation are the important factors affecting the concentrations of As in HL paddy soils. Only years of tubewell operation affected As concentration in the MHL-1 paddy soils. Quantitatively similar increases in soil As above the estimated baseline-As concentration were observed for rice soils on HL and MHL-1 after 6-8 years of groundwater irrigation, implying strong retention of As added in irrigation water in both land types. Application of single geostatistical methods with secondary variables such as regression kriging (RK) and ordinary co-kriging (OCK) gave little improvement in prediction of soil As over ordinary kriging (OK). Comparing single prediction methods, kriging within strata (KWS), the combination of RK for HL and OCK for MHL-1, gave more accurate soil As predictions and showed the lowest misclassification of declaring a location "contaminated" with respect to 14.8 mg As/kg, the highest value obtained for the baseline soil As concentration. Prediction of soil As buildup over time indicated that 75% or the soils cropped to rice would contain at least 30 mg/L As by the year 2020. PMID:22055452

  4. The Question of Teaching Vocabulary: Which Words? In What Ways?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of vocabulary for comprehension, Wilhelm asks two key questions: "which words do I teach and how should I teach them?" Through years of trial and error, Wilhelm has adopted these principles to answer "which words": teach "important" words students will see and use again; words necessary to conceptual understanding; words…

  5. Teaching Literacy for Love and Wisdom: Being the Book and Being the Change. Language and Literacy Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.; Novak, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    This powerful book lays out an inspiring new vision for the teaching of English, building on themes central to Wilhelm's influential "You Gotta BE The Book." With this new work, Wilhelm and Novak challenge business as usual in the language arts. They call for nothing short of a revolution in our understanding of the aims and methods of the English…

  6. Considering Hermeneutics and Education: Hermes, Teachers, and Intellectualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyles, Deron Robert

    Teacher roles in contemporary American schools should be more closely aligned to hermeneutics as the study of meaning (interpretation/understanding). A marriage between Platonic notions of interpretation and the quest for meaning with the interpretive theories of Friedrich Schleiermacher, Wilhelm von Humboldt, Wilhelm Dilthey, and Hans-Georg…

  7. Our Compulsory Goals: Effective Teaching and Meaningful Learning through Powerful Cultural Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Wilhelm asks, "But are new literacies just fun?" Then he immediately answers, "Absolutely not--if we as teachers provide the right context and conditions of their use." Offering research-based advice on incorporating technology to increase motivation and deepen learning, Wilhelm boils it down to this bottom line: it's engaged, substantive,…

  8. Radiative properties of ceramic metal-halide high intensity discharge lamps containing additives in argon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressault, Yann; Teulet, Philippe; Zissis, Georges

    2016-07-01

    The lighting represents a consumption of about 19% of the world electricity production. We are thus searching new effective and environment-friendlier light sources. The ceramic metal-halide high intensity lamps (C-MHL) are one of the options for illuminating very high area. The new C-MHL lamps contain additives species that reduce mercury inside and lead to a richer spectrum in specific spectral intervals, a better colour temperature or colour rendering index. This work is particularly focused on the power radiated by these lamps, estimated using the net emission coefficient, and depending on several additives (calcium, sodium, tungsten, dysprosium, and thallium or strontium iodides). The results show the strong influence of the additives on the power radiated despite of their small quantity in the mixtures and the increase of visible radiation portion in presence of dysprosium.

  9. Mesenchymal Hamartoma of the Liver in an Infant With Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome: A Rare Condition Mimicking Hepatoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Abrahao-Machado, Lucas F; de Macedo, Fabiane C; Dalence, Carlos; Stambo, Glenn; Abrahao-Machado, Eduarda F; Abrahao-Machado, Elaine C F; Bahrami, Armita; Nascimento, Antonio G

    2015-07-01

    Patients with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) are known to be at an increased risk for childhood malignancies, particularly Wilms tumor and hepatoblastoma. We report a case of genetically confirmed BWS in a 5-month-old girl who presented with a 9.5-cm abdominal mass associated with elevated α-fetoprotein levels. The clinical impression was strongly suggestive of hepatoblastoma. Histologic examination of the surgically excised mass revealed mesenchymal hamartoma of the liver (MHL), a benign hepatic neoplasm. PMID:26203458

  10. Earliest modern human-like hand bone from a new >1.84-million-year-old site at Olduvai in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; Pickering, Travis Rayne; Almécija, Sergio; Heaton, Jason L.; Baquedano, Enrique; Mabulla, Audax; Uribelarrea, David

    2015-01-01

    Modern humans are characterized by specialized hand morphology that is associated with advanced manipulative skills. Thus, there is important debate in paleoanthropology about the possible cause–effect relationship of this modern human-like (MHL) hand anatomy, its associated grips and the invention and use of stone tools by early hominins. Here we describe and analyse Olduvai Hominin (OH) 86, a manual proximal phalanx from the recently discovered >1.84-million-year-old (Ma) Philip Tobias Korongo (PTK) site at Olduvai Gorge (Tanzania). OH 86 represents the earliest MHL hand bone in the fossil record, of a size and shape that differs not only from all australopiths, but also from the phalangeal bones of the penecontemporaneous and geographically proximate OH 7 partial hand skeleton (part of the Homo habilis holotype). The discovery of OH 86 suggests that a hominin with a more MHL postcranium co-existed with Paranthropus boisei and Homo habilis at Olduvai during Bed I times. PMID:26285128

  11. Earliest modern human-like hand bone from a new >1.84-million-year-old site at Olduvai in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; Pickering, Travis Rayne; Almécija, Sergio; Heaton, Jason L; Baquedano, Enrique; Mabulla, Audax; Uribelarrea, David

    2015-01-01

    Modern humans are characterized by specialized hand morphology that is associated with advanced manipulative skills. Thus, there is important debate in paleoanthropology about the possible cause-effect relationship of this modern human-like (MHL) hand anatomy, its associated grips and the invention and use of stone tools by early hominins. Here we describe and analyse Olduvai Hominin (OH) 86, a manual proximal phalanx from the recently discovered >1.84-million-year-old (Ma) Philip Tobias Korongo (PTK) site at Olduvai Gorge (Tanzania). OH 86 represents the earliest MHL hand bone in the fossil record, of a size and shape that differs not only from all australopiths, but also from the phalangeal bones of the penecontemporaneous and geographically proximate OH 7 partial hand skeleton (part of the Homo habilis holotype). The discovery of OH 86 suggests that a hominin with a more MHL postcranium co-existed with Paranthropus boisei and Homo habilis at Olduvai during Bed I times. PMID:26285128

  12. The Measurement of Work Engagement with a Short Questionnaire: A Cross-National Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaufeli, Wilmar B.; Bakker, Arnold B.; Salanova, Marisa

    2006-01-01

    This article reports on the development of a short questionnaire to measure work engagement--a positive work-related state of fulfillment that is characterized by vigor, dedication, and absorption. Data were collected in 10 different countries (N = 14,521), and results indicated that the original 17-item Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) can be…

  13. Comment on {open_quotes}Multicritical Behavior in Coupled Directed Percolation Processes{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Goldschmidt, Y.Y.

    1998-09-01

    A Comment on the Letter by Uwe C. T{umlt a}uber, Martin J. Howard, and Haye Hinrichsen, Phys.thinspthinspRev.thinspthinspLett.thinspthinsp{bold 80}, 2165 (1998). The authors of the Letter offer a Reply. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. The Role of Electronic Reserves in Serving and Shaping New Teaching and Learning Environments in UK Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugdale, Christine

    1999-01-01

    Describes the ResIDe Electronic Reserve at the University of the West of England (UWE), Bristol, an example of an electronic reserve that has been addressing many access problems and supporting different teaching/learning initiatives. Discusses new roles for the ResIDe electronic library, electronic information management, new librarian roles, and…

  15. The struggle with employee engagement: Measures and construct clarification using five samples.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Zinta S; Peters, Janet M; Weston, James W

    2016-09-01

    Among scholarly researchers, the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) is a popular scale for assessing employee or work engagement. However, challenges to the scale's validity have raised major concerns about the measurement and conceptualization of engagement as a construct. Across 4 field samples, we examined 2 measures of engagement, the UWES and the Job Engagement Scale (JES), in both factor structure and patterns of relationships with theoretically hypothesized antecedents and consequences. In a fifth field sample, we examined the construct-level relationships between engagement and related variables, while controlling for sources of measurement error (i.e., item-specific factor, scale-specific factor, random response, and transient). By examining 2 measures, each derived from different theoretical bases, we provide unique insight into the measurement and construct of engagement. Our results show that, although correlated, the JES and UWES are not interchangeable. The UWES, more so than the JES, assesses engagement with overlap from other job attitudes, requiring improvement in the measurement of engagement. We offer guidance as to when to use each measure. Furthermore, by isolating the construct versus measurement of engagement relative to burnout, commitment, stress, and psychological meaningfulness and availability, we determined (a) the engagement construct is not the same as the opposite of burnout, warranting a reevaluation of the opposite-of-burnout conceptualization of engagement; and (b) psychological meaningfulness and engagement are highly correlated and likely reciprocally related, necessitating a modification to the self-role-expression conceptualization of engagement. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27281184

  16. "Either Side of Delphy Bridge": A Deep Mapping Project Evoking and Engaging the Lives of Older Adults in Rural North Cornwall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Jane; Biggs, Iain

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on work to date by an arts practice-led research team exploring older adults' conceptions of, and connectivity with, the physical, social and cultural landscapes in which they locate themselves. The team is based at the Department of Art and Design, University of the West of England (UWE) and has conducted fieldwork,…

  17. Physicists and Physics in Munich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichmann, Jürgen; Eckert, Michael; Wolff, Stefan

    We give a tour of Munich and some outlying sites that focuses on the lives and work of the most prominent physicists who lived in the city, Count Rumford, Joseph Fraunhofer, Georg Simon Ohm, Max Planck, Ludwig Boltzmann, Albert Einstein, Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, Wilhelm Wien, Arnold Sommerfeld, Max von Laue, and Werner Heisenberg. We close with a self-guided tour that describes how to reach these sites in Munich.

  18. In the footsteps of astronomers in Bremen and Lilienthal. (German Title: Auf den Spuren von Astronomen in Bremen und Lilienthal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langkavel, Arno

    When Bremen and Lilienthal are mentioned, people interested in the history of astronomy will first of all remember Wilhelm Olbers (1785-1840) and Johann Hieronymus Schroeter (1745-1816). In addition to them, Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel (1784-1846) and Carl Friedrich Gauß (1777-1855) have also left their traces. Two walks describe the main memorial sites, which are all outdoors and easily accessible to the general public.

  19. Liver transplantation for a giant mesenchymal hamartoma of the liver in an adult: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiang; Cai, Jin-Zhen; Guo, Qing-Jun; Li, Jun-Jie; Sun, Xiao-Ye; Hu, Zhan-Dong; Cooper, David KC; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal hamartomas of the liver (MHLs) in adults are rare and potentially premalignant lesions, which present as solid/cystic neoplasms. We report a rare case of orthotopic liver transplantation in a patient with a giant MHL. In 2013, a 34-year-old female sought medical advice after a 2-year history of progressive abdominal distention and respiratory distress. Physical examination revealed an extensive mass in the abdomen. Computed tomography (CT) of her abdomen revealed multiple liver cysts, with the diameter of largest cyst being 16 cm × 14 cm. The liver hilar structures were not clearly displayed. The adjacent organs were compressed and displaced. Initial laboratory tests, including biochemical investigations and coagulation profile, were unremarkable. Tumor markers, including levels of AFP, CEA and CA19-9, were within the normal ranges. The patient underwent orthotopic liver transplantation in November 2013, the liver being procured from a 40-year-old man after cardiac death following traumatic brain injury. Warm ischemic time was 7.5 min and cold ischemic time was 3 h. The recipient underwent classical orthotopic liver transplantation. The recipient operative procedure took 8.5 h, the anhepatic phase lasting for 1 h without the use of venovenous bypass. The immunosuppressive regimen included intraoperative induction with basiliximab and high-dose methylprednisolone, and postoperative maintenance with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. The recipient’s diseased liver weighed 21 kg (dry weight) and measured 41 cm × 32 cm × 31 cm. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of an MHL. The patient did not experience any acute rejection episode or other complication. All the laboratory tests returned to normal within one month after surgery. Three months after transplantation, the immunosuppressive therapy was reduced to tacrolimus monotherapy, and the T-tube was removed after cholangiography showed no abnormalities. Twelve months

  20. Liver transplantation for a giant mesenchymal hamartoma of the liver in an adult: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Cai, Jin-Zhen; Guo, Qing-Jun; Li, Jun-Jie; Sun, Xiao-Ye; Hu, Zhan-Dong; Cooper, David K C; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2015-05-28

    Mesenchymal hamartomas of the liver (MHLs) in adults are rare and potentially premalignant lesions, which present as solid/cystic neoplasms. We report a rare case of orthotopic liver transplantation in a patient with a giant MHL. In 2013, a 34-year-old female sought medical advice after a 2-year history of progressive abdominal distention and respiratory distress. Physical examination revealed an extensive mass in the abdomen. Computed tomography (CT) of her abdomen revealed multiple liver cysts, with the diameter of largest cyst being 16 cm × 14 cm. The liver hilar structures were not clearly displayed. The adjacent organs were compressed and displaced. Initial laboratory tests, including biochemical investigations and coagulation profile, were unremarkable. Tumor markers, including levels of AFP, CEA and CA19-9, were within the normal ranges. The patient underwent orthotopic liver transplantation in November 2013, the liver being procured from a 40-year-old man after cardiac death following traumatic brain injury. Warm ischemic time was 7.5 min and cold ischemic time was 3 h. The recipient underwent classical orthotopic liver transplantation. The recipient operative procedure took 8.5 h, the anhepatic phase lasting for 1 h without the use of venovenous bypass. The immunosuppressive regimen included intraoperative induction with basiliximab and high-dose methylprednisolone, and postoperative maintenance with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. The recipient's diseased liver weighed 21 kg (dry weight) and measured 41 cm × 32 cm × 31 cm. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of an MHL. The patient did not experience any acute rejection episode or other complication. All the laboratory tests returned to normal within one month after surgery. Three months after transplantation, the immunosuppressive therapy was reduced to tacrolimus monotherapy, and the T-tube was removed after cholangiography showed no abnormalities. Twelve months

  1. Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gwyn P.; Revesz, Peter; Arp, Uwe

    2014-03-01

    Conference Chairs NameOrganization Gwyn Williams Jefferson Lab Peter ReveszCornell High Energy Synchrotron Source Uwe ArpSynchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility Programme Committee NameOrganization Alastair MacDowellAdvanced Light Source Tom ToellnerAdvanced Photon Source Amitava D RoyCenter for Advanced Microstructures and Devices Tom EllisCanadian Light Source Roberta SantarosaLaboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron Jerry (Jerome) HastingsLinac Coherent Light Source Steven HulbertNational Synchrotron Light Source Thomas A RabedeauStanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Mark BissenSynchrotron Radiation Center Gwyn WilliamsJefferson Lab Peter ReveszCornell High Energy Synchrotron Source Uwe ArpSynchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility

  2. Some reflections on the influence of Chinese thought on Jung and his psychological theory.

    PubMed

    Stein, Murray

    2005-04-01

    Jung claimed that Richard Wilhelm, whose masterful translations of Chinese wisdom literature into a European language (German) and thence into Western consciousness have brought Chinese modes of thinking to so many, was one of the most important influences on his own life and work. The contacts between the two men, which took place from the early 1920's until Wilhelm's death in 1930, were few but intense and for Jung decisive in several ways. Wilhelm's translations of the I Ching and The Secret of the Golden Flower opened new avenues for Jung that had far-reaching consequences on his research and writing after 1930. The latter opened the door to the study of alchemy as a key to the archetypal process of individuation as rooted in the collective unconscious. 'Synchronicity' is a term that grew out of his contact with Chinese thought, in particular with the I Ching. From his contact with Chinese thought, additionally, he received confirmation of the view, independently arrived at, that adult psychological development is not linear but rather circular and spiral-like. The letters between Jung and Wilhelm illuminate the great importance Jung ascribed to Wilhelm's contribution toward bridging East and West and the potential value of Chinese philosophy for psychotherapy. PMID:15817043

  3. Employee engagement within the NHS: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Jeve, Yadava Bapurao; Oppenheimer, Christina; Konje, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Employee engagement is the emotional commitment of the employee towards the organisation. We aimed to analyse baseline work engagement using Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) at a teaching hospital. Methods: We have conducted a cross-sectional study within the National Health Service (NHS) Teaching Hospital in the UK. All participants were working age population from both genders directly employed by the hospital. UWES has three constituting dimensions of work engagement as vigor, dedication, and absorption. We conducted the study using UWES-9 tool. Outcome measures were mean score for each dimension of work engagement (vigor, dedication, absorption) and total score compared with control score from test manual. Results: We found that the score for vigor and dedication is significantly lower than comparison group (P< 0.0001 for both). The score for absorption was significantly higher than comparison group (P< 0.0001). However, total score is not significantly different. Conclusion: The study shows that work engagement level is below average within the NHS employees. Vigor and dedication are significantly lower, these are characterised by energy, mental resilience, the willingness to invest one’s effort, and persistence as well as a sense of significance, enthusiasm, inspiration, pride, and challenge. The NHS employees are immersed in work. Urgent need to explore strategies to improve work engagement as it is vital for improving productivity, safety and patient experience PMID:25674571

  4. Relation between microstructural heterogeneous surface layer and nitrogen pressure during sintering in Si3N4-Ml2O3 ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, K.; Onomura, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of N2 pressure (0.1 to 50 MPa) during sintering on the thickness of the microstructurally heterogeneous layer (MHL) formed near the surface of the compact, transverse-rupture strength, were investigated for Si3N4-(10 to 20) mol % MgO-5.5 mol % Al2O3 ceramics. The sintering temperature and time were 1973 K and 3.6 ks, respectively. The N2 gas was introduced into the furnace at about 1273 K. When the compacts were sintered under a certain N2 pressure, for example, about 20 and 7 MPa for 10 and 15 mol% MgO, respectively, the evolutions of N and Si were suppressed. The thickness of the MHL became very small and at the same time the strength of the surface layer of the compact (which was normally less than that of the inside in the case of 0.1 MPa) became nearly the same value as that of the inside. At higher pressure, the strength of both surface layer and the inside decreased considerably. Some discussion was made on these results.

  5. Ultrasensitive Impedimetric Biosensor Fabricated by a New Immobilisation Technique for Parathyroid Hormone.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Hakkı Mevlüt; Yildiz, Kübra; Çakar, Cansu; Aydin, Tuba; Asav, Engin; Sağiroğlu, Ayten; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a novel ultrasensitive and rapid impedimetric biosensor with new immobilisation materials for parathyroid hormone (PTH) with the aim to determine the PTH level in serum for the diagnosis and monitoring of parathyroid diseases such as hyperparathyroidism, adenoma, and thyroid cancer. The interaction between PTH and the biosensor was investigated with an electrochemical method. The biosensor was based on the gold electrode modified by mercaptohexanol (6-MHL). Anti-parathyroid hormone (anti-PTH) was covalently immobilised onto a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) by using epiclorhidrina (EPI) with ethanolamine (EA). The EPI-EA interaction represents the first use of these for the construction of biosensors in published reports. The immobilisation of the anti-PTH was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. After the optimisation studies of immobilisation materials such as 6-MHL, EPI, EA and glutaraldehyde, linearity, repeatability and sensitivity of biosensor were evaluated as the performance of biosensor. PTH was detected within a linear range of 0.1-0.6 pg/ml, and the detection limit was 0.1 fg/ml. The specificity of the biosensor was also investigated. Finally, the described biosensor was used to detect the PTH levels in artificial serum samples. PMID:25935225

  6. Lacustrin magnetic parameters reveal the last 3,000 years environmental variation of the Ilan Plain, northeastern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yin-Sheng; Lee, Teh-Quei

    2015-04-01

    We discuss the paleo-environmental variation of the Ilan Plain in northeastern Taiwan for the last 3,000 years by using lacustrine magnetic records obtained from Meihua Lake (the MHL-5A core; 24° 38.58' N, 121° 43.96' E) and Longtan Lake (the LTL-9C core; 24° 47.70' N, 121° 44.40' E). The magnetic parameters analyzed in the study include magnetic susceptibility (χ), SIRM (saturated isothermal remnant magnetization), ARM (anhysteretic remnant magnetization), ARM/χ, and ARM/SIRM. The most notable feature in the magnetic records of both cores is an anomaly appeared at ~1,800 years. In the MHL-5A core, the parameters representing magnetic abundance variation (χ, SIRM, and ARM) are relatively higher before ~1,800 years and become lower after the time. On the contrary, the magnetic abundance parameters are lower before ~1,800 years but become higher after the time in the LTL-9C core. Besides, for the last ~700 years, the magnetic parameters in the MHL-5A core show a clear period variation. Also in the LTL-9C core, this period variation could be observed though the period is relatively ambiguous. Moreover, the magnetic grain size parameter ARM/SIRM shows that the grain size of magnetic minerals in both cores became finer gradually for the last ~3,000 years. The reason could be preliminary deduced: The Ilan Plain is a flooding plain and the main river in the plain is a braided river, the Lanyang River. Before ~1,800 years, the channel of the Lanyang River should be in the south of the plain (closer to the Meihua Lake). More sediment was brought into the lake by the flooding of the Lanyang River. After ~1,800 years, the channel of the Lanyang River shifted northward (closer to the Longtan Lake), and therefore the input to the Longtan Lake from the flooding might increase. The period variation after ~700 years could be roughly attributed to the rainfall effect. That is, precipitation variation resulting from the influence of the monsoon system might become significant

  7. Collecting Maternal Health Information From HIV-Positive Pregnant Women Using Mobile Phone-Assisted Face-to-Face Interviews in Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Shane; Tollman, Stephen; Richter, Linda; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    2013-01-01

    Background Most of the world’s women living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reside in sub-Saharan Africa. Although efforts to reduce mother-to-child transmission are underway, obtaining complete and accurate data from rural clinical sites to track progress presents a major challenge. Objective To describe the acceptability and feasibility of mobile phones as a tool for clinic-based face-to-face data collection with pregnant women living with HIV in South Africa. Methods As part of a larger clinic-based trial, 16 interviewers were trained to conduct mobile phone–assisted personal interviews (MPAPI). These interviewers (participant group 1) completed the same short questionnaire based on items from the Technology Acceptance Model at 3 different time points. Questions were asked before training, after training, and 3 months after deployment to clinic facilities. In addition, before the start of the primary intervention trial in which this substudy was undertaken, 12 mothers living with HIV (MLH) took part in a focus group discussion exploring the acceptability of MPAPI (participant group 2). Finally, a sample of MLH (n=512) enrolled in the primary trial were asked to assess their experience of being interviewed by MPAPI (participant group 3). Results Acceptability of the method was found to be high among the 16 interviewers in group 1. Perceived usefulness was reported to be slightly higher than perceived ease of use across the 3 time points. After 3 months of field use, interviewer perceptions of both perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness were found to be higher than before training. The feasibility of conducting MPAPI interviews in this setting was found to be high. Network coverage was available in all clinics and hardware, software, cost, and secure transmission to the data center presented no significant challenges over the 21-month period. For the 12 MHL participants in group 2, anxiety about the multimedia capabilities of the phone was

  8. AB100. Phenotypes of primary hyperlipidemia in a Vietnamese referral center

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khanh Ngoc; Vu, Dung Chi; Bui, Thao Phuong; Can, Ngoc Thi Bich; Nguyen, Hoan Thi; Nguyen, Dat Phu

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Primary hyperlipidemia is genetic dyslipoproteinemia. Without any intervention, cardiovascular diseases and acute pancreatitis may be occurred. Detection and appropriate management of pediatric hyperlipidemia can have a significant impact upon the disease course and can prevent complications. The article aims to describe the clinical and biochemical characteristics of hyperlipidemia in Vietnamese children and to evaluate outcome of treatment. Patients and methods From 2007 to 2013, 30 children were diagnosed with primary hyperlipidemia using included and excluded criteria and were treated with diet and/or lipid-lowering drug therapy. Results Among 30 cases from 28 families, 8 patients were mixed hyperlipidemia (MHL), 13 patients were hypertriglyceridemia (HT) and 9 patients were hypercholesterolemia (HC). Mean age of diagnosis was 5.5 years (1 months-16 years). The rate of male/female was 13/17. Clinical manifestations included hepatomegaly (4 cases), xanthemas in the knees and elbows (5 cases), “creamy” blood (21 cases). Twenty cases were asymptomatic. A total of 8/28 patients had family history with hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular diseases. Serum cholesterol level of HC group was 9.2±4 mmol/L. Serum triglyceride level of HT group was 23.6±9.9 mmol/L. MHL group had hypercholesterolemia (12.1±4.5 mmol/L) and HT (20.3±10.5 mmol/L). After interventions, HT group had the best result with serum triglyceride level was 10.1±4.6 mmol/L, next to MHL group with serum cholesterol level was 5.8±1.8 mmol/L, and serum triglyceride level was 9.5±5.2 mmol/L; finally, serum cholesterol level of HC group was 12.4±5.5 mmol/L. Five infants with HT had the best results of treatment: serum triglyceride level decreased from 19-57.6 to 5-10 mmol/L. Two patients with HC had the worsen results (unchanged blood lipid level). Conclusions Primary hyperlipidemia had poor clinical manifestations and good results of treatment. Screening for primary

  9. Crystallography: To Infinity and Beyond…

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Charles

    2014-01-01

    William Henry Bragg moved from Cambridge in Britain to South Australia to take up a professorship at the University of Adelaide in 1885. He brought with him a broad interest in many areas of physics, but when Wilhelm Roentgen discovered X-rays in the 1890s, Bragg's interest was stimulated. William's Australian-born son, Lawrence (WL…

  10. History of experimental psychology from an Estonian perspective.

    PubMed

    Allik, Jüri

    2007-11-01

    A short review of the development of experimental psychology from an Estonian perspective is presented. The first rector after the reopening of the University of Dorpat (Tartu) in 1802, Georg Friedrich Parrot (1767-1852) was interested in optical phenomena which he attempted to explain by introducing the concept of unconscious inferences, anticipating a similar theory proposed by Herman von Helmholtz 20 years later. One of the next rectors, Alfred Wilhelm Volkmann (1800-1878) was regarded by Edwin Boring as one of the founding fathers of the experimental psychology. Georg Wilhelm Struve (1793-1864) played an essential part in solving the problem of personal equations. Arthur Joachim von Oettingen (1836-1920) developed a theory of music harmony, which stimulated his student Wilhelm Friedrich Ostwald (1853-1932) to study colour harmony. Emil Kraepelin (1856-1926), the founder of modern psychiatry, is by far the most important experimental psychologist who has worked in Estonia. His successor Wladimir von Tchisch (1855-1922), another student of Wilhelm Wundt, continued Kraepelin's work in experimental psychology. The lives of Wolfgang Köhler (1887-1967), who was born in Reval (Tallinn), and Oswald Külpe (1862-1915), who graduated from the University of Dorpat, extended the link between the history of experimental psychology and Estonia. Karl Gustav Girgensohn (1875-1925), the founder of the Dorpat School of the psychology of religion, stretched the use of experimental methods to the study of religious experience. PMID:16639614

  11. Hard-luck Scheele

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibb, Bruce C.

    2015-11-01

    Carl Wilhelm Scheele had a hand in the discovery of at least six elements and contributed to the early development of chemistry in numerous other ways. Bruce Gibb looks into Scheele's story and considers why he doesn't get the credit that he deserves.

  12. Zum Ausgleich von generativer und energetischer Sprachbetrachtung (A Comparison of the "Generative" and "Energetic" Views of Language)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisgerber, Leo

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of two basic conceptions: Wilhelm von Humboldt's idea of language as energeia'' existing within and without man, and Noam Chomsky's idea of language generated by the speaker according to an innate apparatus. Revised version of lectures presented at the University of Bonn, West Germany in August 1971. (RS)

  13. Radiation in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhlinger, Ernst; Truemper, Joachim; Weisskopf, Martin

    1992-01-01

    When Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen discovered radiation one hundred years ago, it seemed that what was discovered was one of the rarest and most volatile members of the family of the basic modules of our natural world. Today cosmologists report that a substantial part of the universe's radiation energy consists of X-rays, which travel through cosmic space with the speed of light.

  14. Recent Progress on Certain Quartic Diophantine Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, P. G.

    2008-01-01

    Wilhelm Ljunggren proved many results on quartic Diophantine equations of the form aX4-bY2 = c, with c∈{±1,-2,±4}. Noticeably absent from this set of values of c is c = 2. We describe some recent progress on this problem, and discuss some open problems which require further study.

  15. Proactivity vs Reactivity: Preparing Students for Success with CCSS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Wilhelm has studied the Common Core State Standards and come away with a generally positive opinion. His concern is that now that the Standards are written, we let professional teachers mold them into the best possible practices for teaching their students. With specific advice for working with students--developing background knowledge, making…

  16. MERCURY IN PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS: ESTIMATION OF EMISSIONS FROM PRODUCTION PROCESSING, AND COMBUSTION: PROJECT REPORT/SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-RTP-221 Wilhelm, S.M. Mercury in Petroleum and Natural Gas: Estimation of Emissions from Production Processing, and Combustion. 07/19/2001 The report gives results of an examination of mercury (Hg) in liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons that are produced and/or processed i...

  17. Next Steps in the Journey: Learning to Listen to Student Voices: Teaching with Our Mouths Shut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    According to Wilhelm, a teacher's power lies in learning to work "with" students, starting with listening. He recommends setting up conditions and mechanisms that help you learn from your students what they are learning, what challenges they are facing, and how best to teach them. Through inquiry, the classroom can become a vital and engaging…

  18. Using Irony in Teaching the History of Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, B. Michael

    1999-01-01

    Examines historical ironies and stories with surprise endings about Rene Descartes and Wilhelm Wundt that can enliven history of psychology lectures and make certain concepts more memorable. Explains that this approach does not trivialize psychology's history but adds humor to a subject that students sometimes find dull. (CMK)

  19. Astronomical dilettante or misunderstood genius? On Johann Hieronymus Schroeter's image in the history of science. (German Title: Astronomischer Dilettant oder verkanntes Genie? Zum Bild Johann Hieronymus Schroeters in der Wissenschaftsgeschichte)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oestmann, Günther

    The paper deals with contemporary assessments of Johann Hieronymus Schroeter's (1745-1816) astronomical works - especially by Wilhelm Olbers and Carl Friedrich Gauß - and also later judgements of the scientific importance and significance of his observations voiced by astronomers and historians.

  20. Integrating Fiction and Nonfiction Reading into the Business Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiene, Judy; Pedersen, Erin

    2013-01-01

    One goal of high school teachers is to help students appreciate that reading does not end when they leave the classroom. When students find reading meaningful, they are more likely to see themselves as readers and choose to read long after they leave the classroom setting (Hinchman, Alvermann, Boyd, Brozo, & Vacca, 2003-2004; Wilhelm, 2001).…

  1. [The and beginnings of Chilean endocrinology in the 1920s].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Delgado, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Rejuvenation was a chapter of critical importance for the worldwide development of endocrinology in the 1920s. This work explores the acceptance of these techniques in Chile. Starting in the late 19th century, the Chilean Medical Journal (Revista Médica de Chile) incorporated references to experiments with endocrine gland preparations that were being conducted in Europe at the time. An appropriation of the experiments by the Austrian Eugen Steinach began in 1920, with prominent figures such as the Italian professor Juan Noe Crevani and the young Chilean student Ottmar Wilhelm. Between 1922 and 1924, Wilhelm developed a series of experiments on dogs, bulls, pigs, rats and Welfare Board patients through the so-called Steinach operation, which consisted of the sectioning of the efferent channel in one of the testicles. Professor Noe's scientific patronage policy and Wilhelm's strategy of succession in the field led the latter to hold a chair in the new School of Medicine of Universidad de Concepci6n at the age of 25. From this position, the. figure of Wilhelm was fundamental for the development of a line of endocrinological research that was able to position Universidad de Concepci6n as a scientific development centre, which was strengthened by the arrival of another disciple of Steinach in Chile, the Latvian professor Alejandro Lipschütz. PMID:27363250

  2. Notes on Joseph Fraunhofer's honorary Ph.D. degree from Erlangen, 1822 (German Title: Bemerkungen zur Ehrenpromotion Joseph Fraunhofers 1822 in Erlangen )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventzke, Karl

    In 1822, Joseph Fraunhofer received a honorary Ph.D. degree from Erlangen University. Presumably, this distinction was based on suggestions by Johann Wilhelm Pfaff. Since 1822, Pfaff gave lectures with the inclusion of instruments, which he obtained directly from Fraunhofer, and presumably also included problems of spectral investigation. This contribution analyzes informations which were collected in this regard.

  3. The International Relations of the Struves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, W. R.

    At least 10 astronomers in 5 generations belonged to the Struve dynasty, a family having its origin in Holstein and living in Germany, Russia, the USA and other countries. The best known astronomers among them were Wilhelm (1793-1864), Otto Wilhelm (1819-1905), Hermann (1854-1920), Ludwig (1858-1920), Georg (1886-1933) and Otto Ludwig Struve (1897-1963). After a short account of the family's history, its international relations will be regarded, with emphasis on the following aspects: Nationality/citizenship, places of living and work, personal relations to other astronomers including correspondence and cooperation, travels, languages of publications. Although a comparison of the different members of the family is possible only to a certain degree due to their different role and importance in astronomy, some changes which developed over 150 years can be traced: E.g., Wilhelm Struve published in German, Latin, French, Russian and English, whereas his grandsons and great-grandsons wrote their papers mainly in one language -- German or English. Wilhelm had relatively close relations with French astronomers, whereas his great-grandson Georg was the author of verbal assaults on French scientists. Georg published also heavy criticism of the International Astronomical Union, whereas his cousin Otto Luwig later became IAU's President.

  4. Alphabet Soup: ERP, CT, and ACT for OCD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolin, David F.

    2009-01-01

    The present article comments on the case conference presented in this issue, namely, Himle and Franklin's (Himle & Franklin, 2009) exposure and response prevention (ERP); Chosak and colleagues' (Chosak, Marques, Fama, Renaud, & Wilhelm, 2009) cognitive therapy (CT); and (Twohig, 2009) Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Two questions are…

  5. Explorations in Regional Variation: A Variational Pragmatic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The present article introduces the Special Issue entitled "A Variational Pragmatic Approach to Regional Variation in Language," a collection of papers which celebrates the work of Klaus P. Schneider (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Germany) on the occasion of his 60th birthday.

  6. Speaking Personally--With Borje Holmberg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Distance Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Borje Holmberg is Swedish and has been active in distance education as a theorist and practitioner for more than fifty years. He is the former president of the Wilhelm-Buchner Hochschule, a distance teaching university in Germany. Here, Holmberg is interviewed by William C. Diehl, the Interviews Editor for "The American Journal of Distance…

  7. The Academy and the Engineering Sciences: An Unwelcome Royal Gift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konig, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    On 19 March 1900, at the bicentenary celebrations of the Prussian Academy of Sciences, Kaiser Wilhelm II established three new fellowships in engineering sciences. This was in many aspects an unwanted gift, and one which tested the Academy's relationship between pure and applied science. In the context of contemporary struggles between traditional…

  8. A Poetic Journey: The Transfer and Transformation of German Strategies for Moral Education in Late Eighteenth-Century Dutch Poetry for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parlevliet, Sanne; Dekker, Jeroen J. H.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most popular Dutch educational enlightenment authors was Hieronymus van Alphen. His three volumes of "Little Poems for Children" published in 1778 and 1782 were extremely successful, both in the Netherlands and abroad. Inspired by the German poets Christian Felix Weisse and Gottlob Wilhelm Burmann, Van Alphen brought about an…

  9. Reading Motivation: Exploring the Elementary Gender Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marinak, Barbara A.; Gambrell, Linda B.

    2010-01-01

    In an attempt to more clearly understand the erosion of motivation in some readers, a number of researchers (Mohr, 2006; Smith & Wilhelm, 2002) and organizations (The Education Alliance, 2007) have called for the investigation of gender differences in all readers, including young children. Consequently, this study focused on younger, average…

  10. The Doubling Moment: Resurrecting Edgar Allan Poe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnick, J. Bradley; Mergil, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    This article expands upon Jeffrey Wilhelm's and Brian Edmiston's (1998) concept of a doubling of viewpoints by encouraging middle level students to use dramatization to take on multiple perspectives, to pose interpretive questions, and to enhance critical inquiry from inside and outside of texts. The doubling moment is both the activation of…

  11. Sisyphus at Work: The Leibniz Edition, The Kaiserreich and Divided Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poser, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Despite several attempts, the prolific writings of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz have not yet been brought together in a single edition. Efforts have been hampered by the sheer volume and diversity of the Leibniz estate, and also by changing political circumstances. This paper traces the history of the Leibniz edition as a long-term project of the…

  12. The Origin of the Mole Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    2004-01-01

    German Chemist, August Wilhelm Hofmann first introduced the term "molar" (from the Latin moles, meaning "a large mass") into chemistry, around 1865. The particular use of the term molar gained currency in the physics literature, where it was in common use at least through the 1940s.

  13. The Age for Drama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2006-01-01

    Role-plays and other dramatic activities fulfill tweens' urge to try out different life roles, to explore the world beyond their own reality, and to learn new areas of competence. Wilhelm's research into reading and motivation has shown that students value learning that they can see as immediately meaningful. He argues that drama strategies bring…

  14. Drifting from Slow to "D'oh!": Working Memory Capacity and Mind Wandering Predict Extreme Reaction Times and Executive Control Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McVay, Jennifer C.; Kane, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A combined experimental, individual-differences, and thought-sampling study tested the predictions of executive attention (e.g., Engle & Kane, 2004) and coordinative binding (e.g., Oberauer, Suss, Wilhelm, & Sander, 2007) theories of working memory capacity (WMC). We assessed 288 subjects' WMC and their performance and mind-wandering rates during…

  15. The Rhetoric in Mathematics: Newton, Leibniz, the Calculus, and the Rhetorical Force of the Infinitesimal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, G. Mitchell

    2004-01-01

    This essay investigates the rhetoric surrounding the appearance of the concept of the infinitesimal in the seventeenth-century Calculus of Sir Isaac Newton and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. Although historians often have positioned rhetoric as a supplemental discipline, this essay shows that rhetoric is the "material" out of which a new and powerful…

  16. Photothermal Therapy: Cancer Cell Internalization of Gold Nanostars Impacts Their Photothermal Efficiency In Vitro and In Vivo: Toward a Plasmonic Thermal Fingerprint in Tumoral Environment (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 9/2016).

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Ana; Silva, Amanda K A; Sánchez-Iglesias, Ana; Grzelczak, Marek; Péchoux, Christine; Desboeufs, Karine; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Wilhelm, Claire

    2016-05-01

    Because the ultimate target for photothermal therapy is the cancer cell, heating performances must be evaluated intracellularly. On page 1040 C. Wilhelm and team provide the first in vitro and in vivo photothermal measurements in cancer cells with gold nanostars. They demonstrate that once nanostars are internalized within endosomes, heat generation can change significantly. PMID:27166618

  17. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Western Regional Home Management-Family Economics Educators (25th, Scottsdale, Arizona, November 6-8, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Ruth E., Ed.

    These proceedings consist of 12 presentations, most of which are followed by responses or comments. The papers include: "Integrating Family Economics and Family Counseling" (Hogan; discussants Schnittgrund, Wilhelm); "A Test of the Deacon-Firebaugh Management Model" (Gage, Schmid); "Perceived Income Adequacy and Selected Financial Management…

  18. A Teacher is Forever: The Legacy of Harry Kirke Wolfe (1858-1918).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Ludy T. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This article traces the career of Harry Kirke Wolfe, Nebraska educator and one of the earliest U.S. psychologists to earn a doctorate in psychology from Wilhelm Wundt at Leipzig. Emphasis is placed on Wolfe's blending of psychology and pedagogy, and his qualities as a teacher. (Author/JDH)

  19. Creating "Third Spaces": Promoting Learning through Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Wilhelm offers us a definition of "third spaces" as "more democratic and dialogic spaces than a classroom, as well as a metaphor for a space in which new, hybrid, and challenging discourses and real-world knowledge and applications are created." With helpful background and examples, he urges us to create such spaces for our students, adamant that…

  20. Literacy and Neuroplasticity: Transforming Our Perspectives and Ourselves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Wilhelm applies two of his core beliefs--that anyone can learn the next appropriate concept or process if they are provided with a meaningful situation and proper assistance, and that literacy and the kinds of texts we call literature provide a unique and powerful way of knowing and of transforming the self--to a look at how recent research on the…

  1. Bildung as a Powerful Tool in Modern University Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olesen, Mogens Noergaard

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we will demonstrate how powerful "Bildung" is as a tool in modern university teaching. The concept of "Bildung" was originally introduced by the German philosopher Immanuel Kant (Kant 1787, 1798, 1804) and the Prussian lawyer and politician Wilhelm von Humboldt (Humboldt 1792, Bohlin 2008). From 1810 "Bildung" was a key concept in…

  2. The "Magic" of Music: Archaic Dreams in Romantic Aesthetics and an Education in Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kertz-Welzel, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    The main intent of this article is to describe some opportunities for an education in aesthetics by referring to similarities between intensive experiences of music in the individual life and in the history of aesthetics. Here, the author discusses Romanticism through the writings of Wilhelm Heinrich Wackenroder. Among other things, she discusses…

  3. Determiner Syntax in Middle Low German: Evidence from the "Luebecker Ratsurteile"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gougeon, Elliott E.

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, I take a look at Middle Low German nominal phrases as evidenced in the Lubecker Ratsurteile, a collection of court proceedings published by Wilhelm Ebel in 1955, which cover the years 1421-1550. By digitizing the corpus, I was able to perform a corpus analysis on noun phrases, where I concentrated on determiner use and form,…

  4. Adult Education in the Federal Republic of Germany: Scholarly Approaches and Professional Practice. Monographs on Comparative and Area Studies in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mader, Wilhelm, Ed.

    This monograph offers insight into the development of the conceptual basis, scholarly inquiry, and professional practice of adult education in West Germany from the end of World War II to the German reunification. Introductory materials are an "Introduction" (Wilhelm Mader) and "Translator's Note and Acknowledgements" (Martin Haindorff). Three…

  5. What Teachers Need to Know about Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeff; Smith, Michael W.

    2006-01-01

    Motivation is key to engaging students in meaningful and productive work. Identifying individual students' interests would be ideal, but in the real world, we need to create and sustain "situational interest." Smith and Wilhelm reference their own research as well as other research that is contextually very different to show how the same…

  6. Attitude as Predictor of Success in Online Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cereijo, Maria Victoria Perez

    2006-01-01

    This is the second article in a series of articles published with findings on student perceptions of asynchronous web-based courses (Perez Cereijo, Young, & Wilhelm, 2001). This portion of the study examines the independent relationships between various student characteristics and student's perceived advantages and disadvantages of the…

  7. In Memoriam, Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-01-01

    Charles E. Graham, 2003, Retired Life Member, Tectonophysics, 1953. Robert E. Veiga, 2003, Atmospheric Sciences, 1990. Donald E. White, 2003, AGU Fellow, Volcanology, Geochemistry, Petrology, 1944.Manfred R. Strecker is a prizewinner of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Program for 2004, Germany's most valuable research prize.

  8. How Principals Cultivate Shared Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Do teacher leaders in your school mainly fill the traditional roles of department chair or grade-level representative? Or do they lead their peers in collaborative teams whose primary focus is improving student learning? Terry Wilhelm, director of the School Leadership Center for Riverside County Office of Education in California, says that…

  9. The Genealogy of Judgement: Towards a Deep History of Academic Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The classical conception of academic freedom associated with Wilhelm von Humboldt and the rise of the modern university has a quite specific cultural foundation that centres on the controversial mental faculty of "judgement". This article traces the roots of "judgement" back to the Protestant Reformation, through its heyday as the signature…

  10. From University to Comprehensive Higher Education: On the Widening Gap between "Lehre und Leben."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertilsson, Margareta

    1992-01-01

    The theory of Wilhelm von Humboldt concerning the role of the university is discussed, focusing on four imperatives regulating its activities--unity of research and teaching; the empirical sciences; science and socialization; and science and universal enlightenment. The current status of the university is assessed in relation to these ideals. (MSE)

  11. The Humboldt Legacy: Reflections on the Past, Present, and Future of the European University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nybom, Thorsten

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the uses and distortions that have been made over the years to the ideas about the university that Wilhelm von Humboldt advocated. Points out, however, that there remains much of value in the ideas articulated by Humboldt and his brother Alexander. (SLD)

  12. Academic Freedom: In Justification of a Universal Ideal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karran, Terence

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the justification for, and benefits of, academic freedom to academics, students, universities and the world at large. It surveys the development of the concept of academic freedom within Europe, more especially the impact of the reforms at the University of Berlin instigated by Wilhelm von Humboldt. Following from this, the…

  13. "Bildung" and Intercultural Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohlin, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The concept of "Bildung", sometimes translated as self-cultivation, is located at the core of an influential tradition of educational thought. A key question concerns the relationship between "Bildung" and interculturality. Drawing on Wilhelm von Humboldt and Hans-Georg Gadamer, and on the so-called transformative learning…

  14. Bildung und bildungstheoretische Ueberlegungen zur Grundung der Republik (Education and the Republic--Educational Theorists Reflections on the Foundation of the Republic).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellekamps, Stephanie

    1996-01-01

    Draws on Wilhelm von Humboldt's typology of the active human being to debate the questions whether and how individuals can produce their social and political world. Discusses, with reference to Marie Condorcet and Immanuel Kant, procedures of the public that are necessary prerequisites for actions aimed at forming the world. (DSK)

  15. Linguistic Variability and Intellectual Development. Miami Linguistics Series No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Humboldt, Wilhelm

    Although this edition of Wilhelm von Humboldt's "Linguistic Variability and Intellectual Development" is based entirely on the original German edition, the translators (George C. Buck and Frithjof A. Raven) and the publisher have attempted to clarify certain aspects of this work for the modern-day reader. These features include the addition of…

  16. A Human Achievement: Mathematics without Boundaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzioglu, Tosun

    This paper describes three fundamental principles, dictated by Wilhelm von Humboldt, that were widely adapted as the basic philosophy of higher education in the United States, and proposes to revise the unfulfilled dream of von Humboldt to make it come true. This paper stresses the achievements of humanity not only in technology, health, or the…

  17. "The Lengthened Shadow of One Man": The Public Intellectual and the Founding of Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, John

    1998-01-01

    Identifies five intellectuals who made distinctive contributions to the founding of new universities in England, Germany, and the United States. Institutional and individual biographies profile: Thomas Jefferson (University of Virginia); Wilhelm von Humboldt (University of Berlin); Lord Brougham (University College, University of London); A.D.…

  18. Next Steps in the Journey: Teaching with "Urgency:" A Call for Immediate Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeff, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    With a staggering number of students dropping out of school, widespread below-grade reading proficiency, and PISA results showing a demoralizing lag internationally in math, science, and general problem solving, teachers need to exercise all the control available to them to engage students in meaningful learning. Wilhelm suggests six steps…

  19. Von Steuben and the German Contribution to the American Revolution: A Selective Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krewson, Margrit B.

    This Library of Congress selected bibliography highlights the efforts of Baron Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben, other German and German-American military leaders, and the Hessian auxiliary military forces in assisting the American colonies during the Revolutionary War. The booklet is divided into five parts. Part 1 provides historical information…

  20. Portrayals of Wundt and Titchener in Introductory Psychology Texts: A Content Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, David

    2000-01-01

    Examines the content of introductory psychology books by performing a content analysis on texts from the 1970s and 1990s to determine whether the books incorporated recent historical scholarship in discussions of Wilhelm Wundt and Edward Titchener. Finds that some texts still misrepresent the relation between Wundt and Titchener. (CMK)

  1. Search for doubly charged higgs boson pair production in the decay to mu(+)mu(+)mu(-)mu(-) in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahmed, S N; Ahn, S H; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Arnoud, Y; Askew, A; Asman, B; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Babukhadia, L; Bacon, T C; Baden, A; Baffioni, S; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beauceron, S; Beaudette, F; Begel, M; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Besson, A; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Bhattacharjee, M; Binder, M; Bischoff, A; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Bolton, T A; Bonamy, P; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Boswell, C; Brandt, A; Briskin, G; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Butler, J M; Bystricky, J; Canelli, F; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Casey, D; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Chopra, S; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clark, A R; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Colling, D J; Coney, L; Connolly, B; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Coss, J; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cristetiu, M; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; da Motta, H; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Dean, S; Del Signore, K; Déliot, F; Delsart, P A; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, D; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Fein, D; Feligioni, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisk, H E; Fleuret, F; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Freeman, W; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Gao, M; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Geurkov, G; Ginther, G; Goldmann, K; Golling, T; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Graham, G; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Green, J A; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grinstein, S; Grivaz, J-F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gu, W; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haggerty, H; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hanlet, P; Harder, K; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, C; Hays, J; Hebert, C; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hou, S; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Huang, Y; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Jiang, Y; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnson, P; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kado, M M; Käfer, D; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kau, D; Ke, Z; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Kim, K H; Klima, B; Klute, M; Kohli, J M; Kopal, M; Korablev, V; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Kotwal, A V; Koubarovsky, A; Kouchner, A; Kouznetsov, O; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krane, J; Krishnaswamy, M R; Krzywdzinski, S; Kubantsev, M; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuznetsov, V E; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Leggett, C; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, X; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Lu, J; Lubatti, H J; Lucotte, A; Lueking, L; Luo, C; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Magnan, A-M; Maity, M; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Manankov, V; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Marshall, T; Martens, M; Martin, M I; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; McMahon, T; Meder, D; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A; Meng, X; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Miao, C; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mishra, C S; Mitrevski, J; Mokhov, N; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Mostafa, M; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Nang, F; Narain, M; Narasimham, V S; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Olivier, B; Oshima, N; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padley, P; Papageorgiou, K; Parashar, N; Park, J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, O; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Phaf, L; Piegaia, R; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pope, B G; Popkov, E; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Przybycien, M B; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Reay, N W; Renardy, J-F; Reucroft, S; Rha, J; Ridel, M; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sabirov, B M; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schukin, A; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shephard, W D; Shpakov, D; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skow, D; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Smolek, K; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Song, Y; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sorín, V; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Stanton, N R; Stark, J; Steele, J; Steinbrück, G; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tentindo-Repond, S; Thomas, E; Thooris, B; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torborg, J; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Trippe, T G; Tuchming, B; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Wahl, H D; Walker, R; Wallace, N; Wang, Z-M; Warchol, J; Warsinsky, M; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wegner, M; White, A; White, V; Whiteson, D; Wicke, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wittlin, J; Wlodek, T; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wu, Z; Wyatt, T R; Xu, Q; Xuan, N; Yamada, R; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yen, Y; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zabi, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, B; Zhang, D; Zhang, X; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zheng, H; Zhou, B; Zhou, Z; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zitoun, R; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2004-10-01

    A search for pair production of doubly charged Higgs bosons in the process pp -->H(++)H(--) -->mu(+)mu(+)mu(-)mu(-) is performed with the D0 run II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The analysis is based on a sample of inclusive dimuon data collected at an energy of sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 113 pb(-1). In the absence of a signal, 95% confidence level mass limits of M(H(+/-+/-)(L))>118.4 GeV/c(2) and M(H(+/-+/-)(R))>98.2 GeV/c(2) are set for left-handed and right-handed doubly charged Higgs bosons, respectively, assuming 100% branching into muon pairs. PMID:15524781

  2. Synthesis, Characterization, Spectral Studies and Antifungal Activity of Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) Complexes with 2-(4- Sulphophenylazo)-1,8-Dihydroxy-3,6-Napthalene Disulphonic Acid Trisodium Salt

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Gajanan; Narang, K. K.

    2005-01-01

    Complexes of the type Na6[M(HL)2(H2O)2], where M= Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) and Na3H2L= 2-(4-sulphophenylazo)-1,8-dihydroxy 3,6 naphthalene disulphonic acid trisodium salt, have been synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical (elemental analyses, solubility, electrolytic conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurement) and spectral (UV-Visible, IR, ESR, powder x-ray diffraction) techniques for their structure and studied for their antifungal activity against ten fungi. The anionic 1:2 metal:ligand complexes show octahedral geometry around M(II), a significant antifungal activity against Curvularia lunata and Alternaria triticina and a moderate activity against Alternaria brassicicola, Alternaria brassicae, Alternaria solanae, Curvularia species, Helminthosporium oryzae, Collectotrichum capsici, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium udum. PMID:18365101

  3. Impedance of nanometer thickness ferromagnetic Co40Fe40B20 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Shien Uang; Chou, Tzu Yang; Lo, Chi Kuen

    2011-07-01

    Nanocrystalline Co40Fe40B20 films, with film thickness t f = 100 nm, were deposited on glass substrates by the magnetron sputtering method at room temperature. During the film deposition period, a dc magnetic field, h = 40 Oe, was applied to introduce an easy axis for each film sample: one with h|| L and the other with h|| w, where L and w are the length and width of the film. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), ultrahigh frequency impedance (IM), dc electrical resistivity ( ρ), and magnetic hysteresis loops (MHL) of these films were studied. From the MHL and r measurements, we obtain saturation magnetization 4 πM s = 15.5 kG, anisotropy field H k = 0.031 kG, and r = 168 mW.cm. From FMR, we can determine the Kittel mode ferromagnetic resonance (FMR-K) frequency f FMRK = 1,963 MHz. In the h|| L case, IM spectra show the quasi-Kittel-mode ferromagnetic resonance (QFMR-K) at f 0 and the Walker-mode ferromagnetic resonance (FMR-W) at f n , where n = 1, 2, 3, and 4. In the h|| w case, IM spectra show QFMR-K at F 0 and FMR-W at F n . We find that f 0 and F 0 are shifted from f FMRK, respectively, and f n = F n . The in-plane spin-wave resonances are responsible for those relative shifts. PACS No. 76.50.+q; 84.37.+q; 75.70.-i

  4. Successful Application of a Canadian Mental Health Curriculum Resource by Usual Classroom Teachers in Significantly and Sustainably Improving Student Mental Health Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Kutcher, Stan; Wei, Yifeng; Morgan, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether the significant and substantive findings from a previous study of youth mental health literacy (MHL) could be replicated using the same methods in another population. Method: We examined the impact of a curriculum resource, the Mental Health and High School Curriculum Guide (The Guide), taught by usual classroom teachers on students’ knowledge and attitudes related to mental health and mental illness in Canadian secondary schools. Survey data were collected before, immediately after, and 2 months after implementation of The Guide by teachers in usual classroom teaching. We conducted paired-sample t tests and calculated the Cohen d value to determine outcomes and impact of the curriculum resource application. Results: One hundred fourteen students were matched for analysis of knowledge data and 112 students were matched for analysis of attitude data at pre-intervention, post-intervention, and 2-month follow-up time periods. Following classroom exposure to the curriculum resource, students’ knowledge scores increased significantly and substantively, compared with baseline (P < 0.001, d = 1.11), and this was maintained at 2-month follow-up (P < 0.001, d = 0.91). Similar findings for attitude improvement were found (P < 0.001, d = 0.66), and this improvement was maintained at 2-month follow-up (P < 0.001, d = 0.52). Conclusions: These findings corroborate those from a previous study conducted in a different location. Taken together these results suggest a simple but effective approach to improving MHL in young people by embedding a classroom resource, delivered by usual classroom teachers in usual school settings. PMID:26720827

  5. Complexation of Lanthanides with Glutaroimide-dioxime: Binding Strength and Coordination Modes.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Seraj A; Yang, Yanqiu; Zhang, Zhicheng; Gagnon, Kevin J; Teat, Simon J; Luo, Shunzhong; Rao, Linfeng

    2016-02-01

    The complexation of lanthanides (Nd(3+) and Eu(3+)) with glutaroimide-dioxime (H2L), a cyclic imide dioxime ligand that has been found to form stable complexes with actinides (UO2(2+) and NpO2(+)) and transition metal ions (Fe(3+), Cu(2+), etc.), was studied by potentiometry, absorption spectrophotometry, luminescence spectroscopy, and microcalorimetry. Lanthanides form three successive complexes, M(HL)(2+), M(HL)L, and M(HL)2(+) (where M stands for Nd(3+)/Eu(3+) and HL(-) stands for the singly deprotonated ligand). The enthalpies of complexation, determined by microcalorimetry, show that the formation of these complexes is exothermic. The stability constants of Ln(3+)/H2L complexes are several orders of magnitude lower than that of the corresponding Fe(3+)/H2L complexes but are comparable with that of UO2(2+)/H2L complexes. A structure of Eu(3+)/H2L complex, identified by single-crystal X-ray diffractometry, shows that the ligand coordinates to Eu(3+) in a tridentate mode, via the two oxygen atoms of the oxime group and the nitrogen atom of the imide group. The relocation of protons of the oxime groups (-CH═N-OH) from the oxygen to the nitrogen atom, and the deprotonation of the imide group (-CH-NH-CH-) result in a conjugated system with delocalized electron density on the ligand (-O-N-C-N-C-N-O-) that forms strong complexes with the lanthanide ions. PMID:26765525

  6. Intragroup and intergroup conflict at work, psychological distress, and work engagement in a sample of employees in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsuno, Kanami; Kawakami, Norito; Inoue, Akiomi; Ishizaki, Masao; Tabata, Masaji; Tsuchiya, Masao; Akiyama, Miki; Kitazume, Akiko; Kuroda, Mitsuyo; Shimazu, Akihito

    2009-12-01

    The possible associations of intragroup and intergroup conflict at work with psychological distress and work engagement were investigated in a cross-sectional study in a manufacturing factory in Japan. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to all employees, and 255 responses were returned (a response rate of 84%). Data from 247 workers (187 males and 60 females) with no missing values were analyzed. Intragroup and intergroup conflict at work, psychological distress, and work engagement were measured by the NIOSH-GJSQ, K6, and Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES-9), respectively. An ANCOVA was conducted to compare K6 and UWES-9 scores among the tertiles on intragroup conflict or intergroup conflict scores, adjusting for demographic and occupational variables as well as worksite social support, separately for males and females. Intragroup conflict was associated with greater psychological distress for males (p for trend=0.009). Intergroup conflict was marginally significantly associated with psychological distress for both males and females (p for trend=0.050 and 0.051, respectively). Contrary to expectation, intergroup conflict was significantly associated with greater work engagement for females (p for trend=0.024). For males, intragroup and intergroup conflict at work may increase psychological distress; for females, intergroup conflict may increase both psychological distress and work engagement. PMID:19996540

  7. Forensic seismology and boundary element method application vis-à-vis ROKS Cheonan underwater explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, So Gu

    2013-12-01

    On March 26, 2010 an underwater explosion (UWE) led to the sinking of the ROKS Cheonan. The official Multinational Civilian-Military Joint Investigation Group (MCMJIG) report concluded that the cause of the underwater explosion was a 250 kg net explosive weight (NEW) detonation at a depth of 6-9 m from a DPRK "CHT-02D" torpedo. Kim and Gitterman (2012a) determined the NEW and seismic magnitude as 136 kg at a depth of approximately 8m and 2.04, respectively using basic hydrodynamics based on theoretical and experimental methods as well as spectral analysis and seismic methods. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cause of the UWE via more detailed methods using bubble dynamics and simulation of propellers as well as forensic seismology. Regarding the observed bubble pulse period of 0.990 s, 0.976 s and 1.030 s were found in case of a 136 NEW at a detonation depth of 8 m using the boundary element method (BEM) and 3D bubble shape simulations derived for a 136 kg NEW detonation at a depth of 8 m approximately 5 m portside from the hull centerline. Here we show through analytical equations, models and 3D bubble shape simulations that the most probable cause of this underwater explosion was a 136 kg NEW detonation at a depth of 8m attributable to a ROK littoral "land control" mine (LCM).

  8. Contributions to the History of Astronomy, Vol. 9; (German Title: Beiträge zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 9)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Wolfgang R.; Duerbeck, H. W.; Hamel, Jürgen

    The contributions deal with astronomical events of the past 1000 years. We elucidate the person of the single European observer of the supernova of 1006, and the views of Christoph Scheiner and Otto von Guericke on the structure and substance of the cosmos. A study of the development of the Copernican and the cosmological principles conclude this group of themes. Biographical investigations were carried out on the clockmaker Nikolaus Lilienfeld, the astronomers Johann Wurzelbau, Friedrich Wilhelm Toennies and Boris Karpov as well as the “panbabylonist” Alfred Jeremias. Astronomers can be active also in poetry and fiction. This is shown in the studies of Johann Leonard Rost and Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel. Finally, Johannes Hevelius' Observatory in Danzig/Gdansk, destroyed by a fire in 1679, is reconstructed by means of printed sources, old maps and photographs. The book concludes by short communications, obituaries and book reviews.

  9. The Politics of Memory: Otto Hahn and the Third Reich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sime, Ruth Lewin

    2006-03-01

    As President of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society and its successor, the Max Planck Society, from 1946 until 1960, Otto Hahn (1879 1968) sought to portray science under the Third Reich as a purely intellectual endeavor untainted by National Socialism. I outline Hahn’s activities from 1933 into the postwar years, focusing on the contrast between his personal stance during the National Socialist period, when he distinguished himself as an upright non-Nazi, and his postwar attitude, which was characterized by suppression and denial of Germany’s recent past. Particular examples include Hahn’s efforts to help Jewish friends; his testimony for colleagues involved in denazification and on trial in Nuremberg; his postwar relationships with émigré colleagues, including Lise Meitner; and his misrepresentation of his wartime work in the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry.

  10. Otto Hahn: Responsibility and Repression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Mark

    2006-05-01

    The role that Otto Hahn (1879 1968) played in the discovery of nuclear fission and whether Lise Meitner (1878 1968) should have shared the Nobel Prize for that discovery have been subjects of earlier studies, but there is more to the story. I examine what Hahn and the scientists in his Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry in Berlin-Dahlem did during the Third Reich, in particular, the significant contributions they made to the German uranium project during the Second World War. I then use this as a basis for judging Hahn’s postwar apologia as the last president of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society and first president of its successor, the Max Planck Society.

  11. Helmholtz and the psychophysiology of time.

    PubMed

    Debru, C

    2001-09-01

    After having measured the velocity of the nervous impulse in the 1850s, Helmholtz began doing research on the temporal dimensions of visual perception. Experiments dealing with the velocity of propagation in nerves (as well as with aspects of perception) were carried out occasionally for some fifteen years until their final publication in 1871. Although the temporal dimension of perception seems to have interested Helmholtz less than problems of geometry and space, his experiments on the time of perception were technically rather subtle and seminal, especially compared with experiments performed by his contemporaries, such as Sigmund Exner, William James, Rudolf Hermann Lotze, Ernst Mach, Wilhelm Volkmann, and Wilhelm Wundt. Helmholtz's conception of the temporal aspects of perception reflects the continuity that holds between psychophysiological research and the Kantian philosophical background. PMID:12068897

  12. A 'German world' shared among doctors: a history of the relationship between Japanese and German psychiatry before World War II.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Akira

    2013-06-01

    This article deals with the critical history of German and Japanese psychiatrists who dreamed of a 'German world' that would cross borders. It analyses their discourse, not only by looking at their biographical backgrounds, but also by examining them in a wider context linked to German academic predominance and cultural propaganda before World War II. By focusing on Wilhelm Stieda, Wilhelm Weygandt and Kure Shuzo, the article shows that the positive evaluation of Japanese psychiatry by the two Germans encouraged Kure, who was eager to modernize the treatment of and institutions for the mentally ill in Japan. Their statements on Japanese psychiatry reflect their ideological and historical framework, with reference to national/ethnic identity, academic position, and the relationship between Germany and Japan. PMID:24573258

  13. Hufeland's interest in plant movements.

    PubMed

    Aschoff, J

    1991-01-01

    Christoph Wilhelm Hufeland (1762-1836) was one of the eminent physicians at the time of Goethe. When only 21 years old, he followed his father as a medical practitioner in Weimar. In 1793 he became Professor of Medicine at the University of Jena, from where he moved, in 1801, to Berlin as the physician in ordinary to king Friedrich Wilhelm III, council of state, and Professor at the leading hospital, the Charité. Hufeland pioneered in what today would be called public hygiene. Many of his lectures and publications were addressed to the educated laymen. In his most read book, the 'Makrobiotik', he emphasizes the importance of the 24-h periodicity as a basic unit of biological chronometry. In view of this, Hufeland has become a kind of 'patron saint' to modern chronobiologists. PMID:1760962

  14. The role of tone sensation and musical stimuli in early experimental psychology.

    PubMed

    Klempe, Sven Hroar

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the role of music in early experimental psychology is examined. Initially, the research of Wilhelm Wundt is considered, as tone sensation and musical elements appear as dominant factors in much of his work. It is hypothesized that this approach was motivated by an understanding of psychology that dates back to Christian Wolff 's focus on sensation in his empirical psychology of 1732. Wolff, however, had built his systematization of psychology on Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz, who combined perception with mathematics,and referred to music as the area in which sensation is united with numerical exactitude. Immanuel Kant refused to accept empirical psychology as a science, whereas Johann Friedrich Herbart reintroduced the scientific basis of empirical psychology by, among other things, referring to music. PMID:21462196

  15. Jewish gynecologists in Germany in the first half of the twentieth century.

    PubMed

    Rudloff, Udo; Ludwig, Hans

    2005-10-01

    The political changes in Germany of 1933 led to discrimination, expulsion and emigration of Jewish doctors. This article addresses the memory of gynecologists who were eminent physicians or made fundamental discoveries. Short biographies of Ludwig Fraenkel, Selmar Aschheim, Bernhard Zondek, Ludwig Adler, Robert Meyer and Paul Ferdinand Strassmann highlight their work and their links to the Gynecological Society in Berlin and to the German Society of Gynecology, the foundation of the latter being inspired by Wilhelm Alexander Freund from Strasbourg. PMID:16086229

  16. Olbers studies. With three unpublished manuscripts by Olbers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaki, S. L.

    The name of Wilhelm Olbers (1758 - 1840), a physician-astronomer from Bremen, suddenly moved into the focus of cosmological awareness in the late 1940s. The first to probe into the reason of this development was the author of these studies, by a series of essays on Olbers, most of which have so far appeared only in German, and which are presented in translation here. This volume also publishes for the first time in English three papers left by Olbers in manuscript.

  17. [Bruno Bloch and his students. 1. Bruno Block memorial lecture, 8 November 1991, Zurich].

    PubMed

    Schnyder, U W

    1993-05-01

    To mark the occasion of the 75th anniversary of Bruno Bloch's appointment to the Chair of Dermatology in Zurich, a commemorative lecture was established. The speaker paid tribute to his professional achievements and to the careers of some of his followers (Wilhelm Lutz, Basel; Marion B. Sulzberger, New York; Edwin Ramel, Lausanne; Hubert Jäger, Lausanne; Werner Jadassohn, Geneva; Guido Miescher, Zurich). PMID:8320121

  18. The type specimen of Anoura geoffroyi lasiopyga (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arroyo-Cabrales, Joaquin; Gardner, A.L.

    2003-01-01

    In 1868, Wilhelm Peters described Glossonycteris lasiopyga, based on a specimen provided by Henri de Saussure and collected in Mexico. The type specimen was presumed to be among those housed in the collections of the Zoologisches Museum of the Humboldt Universitat in Berlin, Germany. Our study of one of Saussure?s specimens from Mexico, discovered in the collections of the Museum d?Histoire Naturelle, Geneva, Switzerland, demonstrates that it and not one of the Berlin specimens is the holotype.

  19. Wiener Geologen im Spiegel des Geologenarchivs. Kober - Kieslinger - Ampferer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibold, I.; Seibold, E.

    2001-05-01

    The bulk of the correspondence in the Geologenarchiv comes in two major groups:a) letters relating mainly to professional matters and b) letters containing predominantly personal communication. This will be demonstrated by material relating to the three above mentioned Viennese Geologists: Leopold Kober's letter to Wilhelm Salomon-Calvi and the correspondence between Alois Kieslinger and Eugen Wegmann are mainly professional, whereas Otto Ampferer's letters to the Bavarian glaciologist Edith Ebers are a documentation of personal friendship.

  20. The Statistical Interpretation of Entropy: An Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmberlake, Todd

    2010-11-01

    The second law of thermodynamics, which states that the entropy of an isolated macroscopic system can increase but will not decrease, is a cornerstone of modern physics. Ludwig Boltzmann argued that the second law arises from the motion of the atoms that compose the system. Boltzmann's statistical mechanics provides deep insight into the functioning of the second law and also provided evidence for the existence of atoms at a time when many scientists (like Ernst Mach and Wilhelm Ostwald) were skeptical.

  1. [THE HANOVERIAN SCHOLAR AND THE DOCTOR OF THE PEASANTS].

    PubMed

    Giampietri, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz and Bernardino Ramazzini met in Modena in autumn 1689, and made friends. Rereading their correspondence and finding other coeval documents, the author reconstructs a scientific relation forgotten by historians. They not only discussed on air pollution, artesian wells and barometric forecast, but - more generally - favored the foundation of social medicine on epidemiology. Hence the Leibnizian contribution to the European fortune of Third Hippocrates. PMID:26946810

  2. Study of astrophysics at the ``Babeş-Bolyai'' University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ureche, Vasile; Roman, Rodica

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents the history of the study of astrophysics at the ``Babeş-Bolyai'' University, from 1945 until now. Some special epochs are analyzed and the contributions of professors of astronomy at the study of astrophysics is put in evidence. The continuity of this study and the collaboration of the ``Babeş-Bolyai'' University with the ``Friedrich Wilhelms'' University of Germany, in the field of astrophysics is emphasized.

  3. A fighter for Liberty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alexei

    The paper contains a biography by Ion (Ivan) K. Inculetz (Inculet)(1884-1940), a graduated from the physical-mathematical department of the Sankt-Petersburg University (1911), a secretary of the board of "Nauchnoie Obozrenie" (ed. Wilhelm Bittner), A member of the Sovet in Petrograd in 1917, the first president of the Parliament "Sfatul Tarii" of the Democratic Republic of Moldova, a minister in few Romanian Governements, a member of the Romanian Academy.

  4. [Historical development of anthropology in Basel].

    PubMed

    Bay, R

    1986-12-01

    The author reports on the history of physical anthropology in Basel (Switzerland). The anthropological research activities of Carl Gustav Jung (1794-1864), Wilhelm His-Vischer (1831-1904), Ludwig Rütimeyer (1825-1895), Julius Kollmann (1834-1918), Paul and Fritz Sarasin (P.: 1856-1924; F.: 1859-1942), Felix Speiser (1880-1949) and the author himself (b. 1909) are described in detail. PMID:3548583

  5. A neutron scattering study of the crystal and magnetic structure of Sr2CrOsO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krockenberger, Y.; Reehuis, M.; Tovar, M.; Mogare, K.; Jansen, M.; Alff, L.

    2007-03-01

    Recently, the new osmium-based ferrimagnetic double perovskite Sr2CrOsO6 has been reported to have the highest Curie temperature (˜725 K) within this material class [Y. Krockenberger, K. Mogare, M. Reehuis, M. Tovar, M. Jansen, G. Vaitheeswaran, V. Kanchana, A. Delin, F. Wilhelm, A. Rogalev, A. Winkler, L. Alff, preprint, 2006]. Here, we report details about the crystal and magnetic structure of Sr2CrOsO6 as obtained by neutron powder diffraction.

  6. Superconducting qubits on the way to a quantum processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Frank

    2007-03-01

    generalization of cavity quantum electrodynamics effects [8].[1] M.R. Geller, E.J. Pritchett, A.T. Sornborger, and F.K. Wilhelm quant-ph/0603224 [2] A.G. Fowler, W. Thompson, Z. Yan, A.H. Majedi, and F.K. Wilhelm, in preparation[3] R. de Sousa, K.B. Whaley, F.K. Wilhelm, and J. von Delft, Phys. Rev. Lett 95, 247006 (2005)[5] A.K. Sporl, T. Schulte-Herbrueggen, S.J. Glaser, V. Bergholm, M.J. Storcz, J. Ferber, and F.K. Wilhelm quant-ph/0504202[6] P. Rebentrost, I. Serban, T. Schulte-Herbrueggen, and F.K. Wilhelm, in preparation[7] M. Mariantoni, M.J. Storcz, F.K. Wilhelm, W.D. Oliver, A. Emmert, A. Marx, R. Gross, H. Christ, and E. Solano, cond-mat/0509737[8] I. Serban, E. Solano, F.K. Wilhelm, cond-mat/0606734.

  7. Impact of repeated ivermectin treatments against onchocerciasis on the transmission of loiasis: an entomologic evaluation in central Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Annual community-directed treatment with ivermectin (CDTI) have been carried out since 1999 in the Lekie division (central region of Cameroon where most cases of Loa-related post ivermectin severe adverse events were reported) as part of the joined activities of the African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control (APOC) and Mectizan® Donation Program (MDP). As large-scale administration of ivermetine was demonstrated to be an efficient means to control loiasis transmission, it was hypothesized that CDTI would have lowered or halted the transmission of Loa loa in the Lekie division after 13 years of annual drug administration, indicating a possible reduction in the occurrence of Loa-related post-ivermectin severe adverse events. Methods A 4-month entomologic study was carried out from March to June 2012 in the Lekie division to evaluate the impact of 13 years of CDTI on the transmission of L. loa whose baseline data were recorded in 1999–2000. Results There was a significant reduction in the infection rate for Chrysops silacea and C. dimidiata from 6.8 and 9% in 1999–2000 to 3 and 3.6% in 2012, respectively. The differences in the infective rate (IR) (percentage of flies harboring head L3 larvae), potential infective rate (PIR) (percentage of flies bearing L3 larvae), mean head L3 larvae load (MHL3) (average L3 per infective fly) and mean fly L3 larvae load (MFL3) (average L3 per potentially infective fly) for both C. silacea and C. dimidiata were not significantly different between the two investigation periods. The biting density (BD) was almost three-fold higher in 2012 for C. silacea but not for C. dimidiata. The transmission potential (TP) which is a function of the BD, was higher in the present study than in the baseline investigation for each species. Conclusion The infection rate remaining high, the high TP and the stability observed in the IR, PIR, MHL3 and MFL3 after 13 years of CDTI suggest that transmission of L. loa is still active. This is

  8. Nano-JASMINE: use of AGIS for the next astrometric satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Y.; Gouda, N.; Lammers, U.

    2011-02-01

    The core data reduction for the Nano-JASMINE mission is planned to be done with Gaia's Astrometric Global Iterative Solution (AGIS). The collaboration started at 2007 prompted by Uwe Lammers' proposal. In addition to similar design and operating principles of the two missions, this is possible thanks to the encapsulation of all Gaia-specific aspects of AGIS in a Parameter Database. Nano-JASMINE will be the test bench for Gaia AGIS software. We present this idea in detail and the necessary practical steps to make AGIS work with Nano-JASMINE data. We also show the key mission parameters, goals, and status of the data reduction for the Nano-JASMINE.

  9. Further comment to "Reply to Comment on impact structures in Africa: A review (Short Note)" by Reimold and Koeberl [J. Afr. Earth Sci. 100 (2014) 757-758

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, R. D.; Rabassa, J.; Rocca, M.; González-Guillot, M.; Martínez, O.; Subías, I.; Corbella, H.; Prezzi, C.; Orgeira, M. J.; Ponce, J. F.

    2016-06-01

    In a Comment on Reimold and Koeberl (2014a) to JAES, Acevedo et al. (2014) claimed an impact origin for Bajada del Diablo crater-strewn field (BdD), a remote locality in Central Patagonia. Such genesis had been denied by Reimold and Koeberl (2014a), who rejected its relationship to any impact-cratering process since, in their opinion, Acevedo et al. (2009, 2012, among other papers) had not found direct evidence of impact. Neither Professor Wolf Uwe Reimold nor Professor Christian Koeberl had visited the site nor contacted us before about the nature of our investigations. It would have been nice to exchange information with these researchers, before they so strongly criticized our work, particularly when they have used, unnecessarily, quite offensive and bellicose words, which we believe we do not truly deserve.

  10. Waste, Economists and American Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, Uwe Reinhardt pointed out that sheer bureaucratic waste, particularly in the private sector, accounted for much of the extraordinarily high cost of American health-care. Last year an expert panel of the Institute of Medicine reconfirmed his point, estimating that in 2009, administrative waste accounted for $190 billion out of a total of $765 billion in various forms of waste – 31% of overall American spending on healthcare. Reinhardt recently noted a peculiar schizophrenia among American economists, simultaneously deploring this monumental waste while celebrating the contribution of healthcare, and particularly medical research, to the American economy. The apparent paradox may arise from a confusion between the meanings of “value” in economic and everyday language, and from economists' tendency to create pseudo-aggregates of diverse and non-commensurate entities. PMID:24359713

  11. Sexing Berlin?

    PubMed

    Dahlke, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Berlin has always been a literary space of extremely diverse political and cultural projections. This essay investigates why after the unification of East and West Berlin the city has been imagined as a play zone of sexual self-fulfilment by authors such as Inka Parei, Tanja Dückers, Kathrin Röggla, Judith Hermann and Julia Franck. Have such erotic adventures replaced political vision in our post-utopian decade? What is the purpose of the laboured allegorisation of the fall of the wall in Durs Grünbein's essays or in the novels of Katja Lange-Müller and Thomas Hettche? The sexification of historical and political processes recalls similar stereotypes in the East German literature of the 1980s: the metropolis as a whore in works by Heiner Müller or Wolf Biermann, but also by younger authors of the independent literary scene in Berlin like Uwe Kolbe or Frank-Wolf Matthies. PMID:21186684

  12. Evaluation of interprofessional education: lessons learned through the development and implementation of an interprofessional seminar on team communication for undergraduate health care students in Heidelberg – a project report

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Sarah; Mahler, Cornelia; Krug, Katja; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Schultz, Jobst-Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This project report describes the development, “piloting” and evaluation of an interprofessional seminar on team communication bringing together medical students and Interprofessional Health Care B.Sc. students at the Medical Faculty of Heidelberg University, Germany. Project Description: A five-member interprofessional team collaborated together on this project. Kolb’s experiential learning concept formed the theoretical foundation for the seminar, which explored three interprofessional competency areas: team work, communication and values/ethics. Evaluation for the purposes of quality assurance and future curricula development was conducted using two quantitative measures: descriptive analysis of a standardized course evaluation tool (EvaSys) ANOVA analysis of the German translation of the University of the West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire (UWE-IP-D). Results: The key finding from the standardized course evaluation was that the interprofessional seminars were rated more positively [M=2.11 (1 most positive and 5 most negative), SD=1, n=27] than the monoprofessional seminars [M=2.55, SD=0.98, n=90]. The key finding from the UWE-IP-D survey, comparing pre and post scores of the interprofessional (IP) (n=40) and monoprofessional (MP) groups (n=34), was that significant positive changes in mean scores for both groups towards communication, teamwork and interprofessional learning occurred. Conclusions: Lessons learnt included: a) recognising the benefit of being pragmatic when introducing interprofessional education initiatives, which enabled various logistical and attitudinal barriers to be overcome; b) quantitative evaluation of learning outcomes alone could not explain positive responses or potential influences of interprofessional aspects, which highlighted the need for a mixed methods approach, including qualitative methods, to enrich judgment formation on interprofessional educational outcomes. PMID:27280133

  13. Psychosocial Risk Factors and Musculoskeletal Symptoms among White and Blue-collar Workers at Private and Public Sectors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate musculoskeletal and psychosocial perception and compare these conditions regarding the type of job (white or blue-collar) and the type of management model (private or public). Methods Forty-seven public white-collar (PuWC), 84 private white-collar (PrWC) and 83 blue-collar workers (PrBC) were evaluated. Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) and Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) were applied to evaluate psychosocial factors. Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) was used to assess musculoskeletal symptoms. Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) was measured to evaluate sensory responses. Results According to JCQ, all groups were classified as active profile. There was a significant association between work engagement and workers’ categories (p < 0.05). PrWC workers had the highest scores for all the UWES domains, while PrBC had the lowest ones. PPT showed that PrBC workers had an increased sensitivity for left deltoid (p < 0.01), and for both epicondyles (p < 0.01), when compared to the other groups. PrWC workers had an increased sensitivity for both epicondyles than PuWC (right p < 0.01; left, p = 0.05). There was no significant association in the report of symptoms across the groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion This study showed differences in psychosocial risk factors and musculoskeletal symptoms in workers engaged in different types of jobs and work organization. Personal and work-related characteristics, psychosocial factors and PPT responses were different across workers’ group. Despite all, there was no significant difference in reported symptoms across the groups, possibly indicating that the physical load is similar among the sectors. PMID:25854836

  14. Pinning performance of (Nd0.33Eu0.2Gd0.47)Ba2Cu3Oy single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirsa, M.; Rames, M.; Das, P.; Koblischka, M. R.; Wolf, T.; Hartmann, U.

    2008-02-01

    We present data on the flux pinning performance of a twinned (Nd0.33Eu0.2Gd0.47)Ba2Cu3Oy single crystal with a strip-like surface structure, in the temperature range 65 K to 90 K. The critical current density Jc, the pinning force density F(=BJc), and the logarithmic dynamic relaxation rate Q were determined from the magnetic hysteresis loops (MHLs) measured by vibrating sample magnetometer up to 9 Tesla. At 65 K, the MHL featured a strong second peak with the top slightly depressed by twin plane channeling. This effect continuously decreased with increasing temperature but persisted up to 84 K. The second peak decreased faster with increasing temperature than the central one. None of the Jc(B) and F(B) dependences scaled, let alone in a narrow range of T. This fact, together with the multiple linear character of the Q(B) curve, indicated a strong effect of twin channeling on the crystal's pinning performance. No special effect due to the strip-like structure was recognized.

  15. Thermodynamic and Spectroscopic Studies of Trivalent f -element Complexation with Ethylenediamine- N,N '-di(acetylglycine)- N,N '-diacetic Acid

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Heathman, Colt R.; Grimes, Travis S.; Zalupski, Peter R.

    2016-03-21

    In this study, the coordination behavior and thermodynamic features of complexation of trivalent lanthanides and americium by ethylenediamine-N,N'-di(acetylglycine)-N,N'-diacetic acid (EDDAG-DA) (bisamide-substituted-EDTA) were investigated by potentiometric and spectroscopic techniques. Acid dissociation constants (Ka) and complexation constants (β) of lanthanides (except Pm) were determined by potentiometric analysis. Absorption spectroscopy was used to determine stability constants for the binding of trivalent americium and neodymium by EDDAG-DA under similar conditions. The potentiometry revealed 5 discernible protonation constants and 3 distinct metal–ligand complexes (identified as ML–, MHL, and MH2L+). Time-resolved fluorescence studies of Eu-(EDDAG-DA) solutions (at varying pH) identified a constant inner-sphere hydration number ofmore » 3, suggesting that glycine functionalities contained in the amide pendant arms are not involved in metal complexation and are protonated under more acidic conditions. The thermodynamic studies identified that f-element coordination by EDDAG-DA is similar to that observed for ethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EDTA). However, coordination via two amidic oxygens of EDDAG-DA lowers its trivalent f-element complex stability by roughly 3 orders of magnitude relative to EDTA.« less

  16. DNA Mismatch Repair System: Repercussions in Cellular Homeostasis and Relationship with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Pérezprina, Juan Cristóbal; León-Galván, Miguel Ángel; Konigsberg, Mina

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms that concern DNA repair have been studied in the last years due to their consequences in cellular homeostasis. The diverse and damaging stimuli that affect DNA integrity, such as changes in the genetic sequence and modifications in gene expression, can disrupt the steady state of the cell and have serious repercussions to pathways that regulate apoptosis, senescence, and cancer. These altered pathways not only modify cellular and organism longevity, but quality of life (“health-span”). The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) is highly conserved between species; its role is paramount in the preservation of DNA integrity, placing it as a necessary focal point in the study of pathways that prolong lifespan, aging, and disease. Here, we review different insights concerning the malfunction or absence of the DNA-MMR and its impact on cellular homeostasis. In particular, we will focus on DNA-MMR mechanisms regulated by known repair proteins MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, and MHL1, among others. PMID:23213348

  17. Complexation studies on inositol-phosphates: IV. Ca(II) complexes of myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, L; Schlewer, G; Spiess, B

    1992-01-01

    The stability constants of the complexes formed between Ca2+ and the myo-inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3) were determined by potentiometric titration in two different media and temperature conditions (medium 1: I = 0.1 M But4NBr, 25 degrees C; medium 2: I = 0.2 M KCl, 37 degrees C). Mainly because of the presence of potassium the results obtained in these media show large differences in both the nature and the stability of the complexes. In medium 1, MH2L and M2L species are formed along with the ML and MHL species which also exist in medium 2. In addition, the stability of the latter species decreases by more than one log unit in going from medium 1 to medium 2. In an attempt to assess the biological significance of the metal binding to Ins(1,4,5)P3, the results were compared to the Ca2+-ATP complexes that form in the same media conditions. Taking into account the relative stability of the complexes of both systems, it is likely that the action or metabolism of Ins(1,4,5)P3 may be influenced by coordination of either alkali or alkali-earth cations. PMID:1588343

  18. Elaborated 1H NMR study for the ligitional behavior of two thiosemicarbazide derivatives towards some heavy metals (Sn(II), Sb(III), Pb(II) and Bi(III)), thermal, antibacterial and antifungal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Metwaly, Nashwa M.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2011-10-01

    A new series of heavy metal complexes are prepared. Sn(II), Sb(III), Pb(II) and Bi(III) are the metal ions used in complexation with two thiosemicarbazide ligands. The IR and 1H NMR spectra of the free ligands display their presence in thiole-thione forms coincide with each other. The IR spectra of the complexes support the presence of 2:2 molar ratio (M:HL) with HL 1 ligand and 1:1 beside 1:2 with HL 2. The ligand coordinates as bi molecules in some complexes and displays two tautomer forms at the same complex molecule 1H NMR spectra of Sn(II) and Sb(III) complexes were done and comes coincide with IR data. The electronic spectral analysis displays a lower shift appearance in n → π* charge transfer band in most isolated complexes. As well as, a new band is shinned in visible region with Sb(III), Bi(III) complexes and Sn(II)-HL 2. This band is pointed to its use in spectrophotometric analysis for these metal ions. The TG analysis for all isolated compounds was briefly discussed. The molecular modeling parameters support the stability of thiole form of the free ligands in comparing with their thiones by a small difference. The antibacterial and antifungal activities were studied against some organisms and reveal the priority of most investigated complexes.

  19. Thermodynamic and Spectroscopic Studies of Trivalent f-element Complexation with Ethylenediamine-N,N'-di(acetylglycine)-N,N'-diacetic Acid.

    PubMed

    Heathman, Colt R; Grimes, Travis S; Zalupski, Peter R

    2016-03-21

    The coordination behavior and thermodynamic features of complexation of trivalent lanthanides and americium by ethylenediamine-N,N'-di(acetylglycine)-N,N'-diacetic acid (EDDAG-DA) (bisamide-substituted-EDTA) were investigated by potentiometric and spectroscopic techniques. Acid dissociation constants (K(a)) and complexation constants (β) of lanthanides (except Pm) were determined by potentiometric analysis. Absorption spectroscopy was used to determine stability constants for the binding of trivalent americium and neodymium by EDDAG-DA under similar conditions. The potentiometry revealed 5 discernible protonation constants and 3 distinct metal-ligand complexes (identified as ML(-), MHL, and MH2L(+)). Time-resolved fluorescence studies of Eu-(EDDAG-DA) solutions (at varying pH) identified a constant inner-sphere hydration number of 3, suggesting that glycine functionalities contained in the amide pendant arms are not involved in metal complexation and are protonated under more acidic conditions. The thermodynamic studies identified that f-element coordination by EDDAG-DA is similar to that observed for ethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EDTA). However, coordination via two amidic oxygens of EDDAG-DA lowers its trivalent f-element complex stability by roughly 3 orders of magnitude relative to EDTA. PMID:26930023

  20. Medical Support for Aircraft Disaster Search and Recovery Operations at Sea: the RSN Experience.

    PubMed

    Teo, Kok Ann Colin; Chong, Tse Feng Gabriel; Liow, Min Han Lincoln; Tang, Kong Choong

    2016-06-01

    The maritime environment presents a unique set of challenges to search and recovery (SAR) operations. There is a paucity of information available to guide provision of medical support for SAR operations for aircraft disasters at sea. The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) took part in two such SAR operations in 2014 which showcased the value of a military organization in these operations. Key considerations in medical support for similar operations include the resultant casualty profile and challenges specific to the maritime environment, such as large distances of area of operations from land, variable sea states, and space limitations. Medical support planning can be approached using well-established disaster management life cycle phases of preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery, which all are described in detail. This includes key areas of dedicated training and exercises, force protection, availability of air assets and chamber support, psychological care, and the forensic handling of human remains. Relevant lessons learned by RSN from the Air Asia QZ8501 search operation are also included in the description of these key areas. Teo KAC , Chong TFG , Liow MHL , Tang KC . Medical support for aircraft disaster search and recovery operations at sea: the RSN experience. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2016; 31(3):294-299. PMID:27018529

  1. Position-specific behaviors and their impact on crew performance: Implications for training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, J. Randolph

    1993-01-01

    The present study was motivated by results from a preliminary report documenting the impact of specific crewmembers on overall crew performance (Wilhelm & Law, 1992), and a cross-airline cross-fleet project investigating human factors behaviors of commercial aviation flightcrews (Helmreich, Butler, Whilhelm, & Lofaro, 1992). The purpose of the current investigation is to study how position-specific behaviors impact flightcrew performance, and how these position-specific behaviors differ between two airlines and two flying environments. Implications for training will also be addressed.

  2. ["I would like to so much--but then also; but, but--!!!"--torment of a private lecturer at the beginning of the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Bettin, H; Friedrich, C

    2000-01-01

    The biography of Carl Friedrich August Theodor Kastner (1797-after 1841), the brother of the famous chemist and teacher of Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) Karl Wilhelm Gottlob Kastner (1783-1857), is an interesting example of the difficult situation of outside lecturers at the universities in the first half of the 19th century; a big group of scientists, which are absolutely underrepresented in the source material and in the historiography too. This paper tries to show the facts and the backgrounds for the problems in the career of outside lecturers. PMID:11305171

  3. [The Malady of Emperor Frederick III. and Virchow's diagnostic role].

    PubMed

    Sedivy, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Crownprince Frederick Wilhelm of Prussia was once the hope of the liberal movement in Germany. He embodied and lived a humanistic ideal based on the spirit of the enlightenment. Starting in January 1887 the passionate pipe smoker suffered on an unusual long hoarseness. A polyp of the vocal cord was diagnosed. Although this diagnosis seemed harmless, an odyssee was launched that made history. Rudolf Virchow-the foremost pathologist of that time-was involved in the following histological diagnosis. His role and that of the sprouting histopathology will be presented in this essay. PMID:25925224

  4. Vienna University Observatory and Bruno Thüring (German Title: Die Wiener Universitätssternwarte und Bruno Thüring )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschbaum, Franz; Posch, Thomas; Lackner, Karin

    We investigate Bruno Thüring's political attitude during the time of National Socialism, based on material from the Vienna Observatory archive, and on statements by his contemporaries. The contribution focuses on the filling of astronomy positions in Vienna, and also on the expulsion of Kasimir Graff. A central role is played by Wilhelm Führer, Obersturmführer der Waffen-SS (Senior Storm Leader of the Armed Protection Squad) and chief civil servant in the Reich science ministry. The transcription of an original letter of 1939 by Führer, addressed to Thüring, is given.

  5. Bach and His.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Wyn

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines the career of Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) and the role played by Wilhelm His I (who was, with Albert von Haller, a noted pioneer of physiology) in the exhumation of Bach's remains in 1894. His's examination of these remains allowed the sculptor Carl Seffner to produce the celebrated statue of Bach which stands outside the church of St Thomas in Leipzig, where the composer was employed from 1723 until his death. Modern forensic techniques have recently enabled Bach's image to be reconstructed in even more spectacular detail. PMID:24405850

  6. LSWAVE 2000: Lasers and short-wavelength applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandner, W.

    2001-07-01

    LSWAVE 2000 was organized as a Satellite Workshop to the Seventh International Conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation SRI 2000. It was held on Saturday, August 26, 2000, at the Technische Universität Berlin, and was jointly organized by the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) and the Technical University Berlin (TUB). The organizing committee consisted of Wilhelm Raith (chairman), Wolfgang Sandner, Ingolf Hertel, Manfred Wick, Bernd Winter, Tatjana Gießel, Holger Stiel, Ingo Will, Ursula Bayr (secretary) and Silvia Szlapka (secretary). Continuing information on the Workshop and its proceedings may be found under http://www.mbi-berlin.de/lswave2000/.

  7. On an early proposal for a unified system of units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Kenneth S.

    2015-02-01

    In the present SI system, the units of length and time are related by defining the speed of light as exactly 299,792,458 m/s. In 1857, Wilhelm Weber and Rudolf Kohlrausch proposed a system of units in which the units of length and time were also related by defining a speed, although not the speed of light. The system was extended to include a unit of mass. The Weber-Kohlrausch system was impractical and was apparently never adopted. Nevertheless, it remains of historical interest as an early attempt at a systematic treatment of physical units.

  8. Wundt, Vygotsky and Bandura: a cultural-historical science of consciousness in three acts.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Michel; Robinson, David K; Yasnitsky, Anton

    2010-01-01

    This article looks at three historical efforts to coordinate the scientific study of biological and cultural aspects of human consciousness into a single comprehensive theory of human development that includes the evolution of the human body, cultural evolution and personal development: specifically, the research programs of Wilhelm Wundt, Lev Vygotsky and Albert Bandura. The lack of historical relations between these similar efforts is striking, and suggests that the effort to promote cultural and personal sources of consciousness arises as a natural foil to an overemphasis on the biological basis of consciousness, sometimes associated with biological determinism. PMID:21033206

  9. Recent notes on Tycho Brahe's library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingerich, Owen

    Wilhelm Norlind lists 216 books presumed to have been in Tycho's library, but the actual count must have been much higher. The largest block of surviving books are in the Clementinum in Prague, just over 50 volumes but nearly 100 titles. Tycho tried to acquire books in many ways, and particularly by buying the library of Paul Wittich after the death of this one-time visitor to Hven. This talk will also describe two annotated volumes from Tycho's library that have recently come onto the antiquarian market: Apianus' Astronomicum Caesareum (Ingolstadt, 1540) and Cornelius Gemma's De naturae divinis characterismis (Antwerp, 1575).

  10. A Special Sort of Forgetting: Negation in Freud and Augustine.

    PubMed

    Rosengart, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The development from a positive, dualistic theory of memory and forgetting to a concept of memory that includes forgetting as a variety of remembering is traced in two thinkers. Freud's concept of repression is discussed as a complex negation of both remembering and forgetting, and the development of this construct is shown in his letters to Wilhelm Fliess. A close reading of Augustine of Hippo's Confessions shows a similar concept of a special sort of forgetting, in which what is forgotten is remembered nonetheless. Finally, the limits of the comparison are discussed, and a reading of Freud's "Negation" reveals ways in which the unconscious is fundamentally unlike Augustine's interiority. PMID:27009296

  11. On first looking into auriculo-ventricular asynchrony.

    PubMed

    Breathnach, Caoimhghín S; Moynihan, John B

    2010-05-01

    Walter Gaskell's demonstration in 1882 that it was possible to block the passage of contraction from auricle to ventricle in the frog heart by means of a clamp spurred Joseph Erlanger (1906) to prevent, by similar means, impulse conduction through the bundle of (Wilhelm) His jun. (1893) in the mammalian heart. With a miniaturized polygraph to record the jugular and arterial pulsation, James Mackenzie (1902) displayed various grades of heart block in the human heart. His results were confirmed by Thomas Lewis using Willem Einthoven's (1903) ECG in 1911. But without instrumental help, Robert Spittal (1804-1852) recounted a case of reversible auriculo-ventricular block in 1830. PMID:20180919

  12. The photographers of the Venus transit of 1874 (German Title: Die Photographen des Venusdurchgangs von 1874)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, Hilmar W.

    Apart from the photo-pioneer Hermann Krone from Dresden, little is known about the photographers who took part in the German expeditions for the observation of the Venus transit of 1874. We give a short overview of the photographic methods and instruments employed at that time, present biographic details about O. Eschke, G. Fritsch, C. Kardaetz. F. Stolze, Th. Studer and G. Wolfram, give some details on the expeditions and their final destinations, and show a few rare photographic documents. We also give a transcription of the letters of G. Fritsch written to Wilhelm Foerster in the course of the Persian expedition.

  13. Reform in the garden.

    PubMed

    Wise, M Norton; Wise, Elaine M

    2002-12-01

    English gardens powered by steam engines offer an intriguing view of how technological and scientific progress was naturalized in the landscape of 19th-century Prussia, and in Prussian culture, during the early years of industrial modernization. One such garden is Peacock Island, in the Havel River near Potsdam. A product of the reform era that preceded and followed the Napoleonic Wars, it expressed the goal of Friedrich Wilhelm III and his government to enter into the British system of factory production and world trade. Modern science, as represented especially by Alexander von Humboldt, played a prominent role. PMID:12535923

  14. [The I.G. Farben laboratory at the Günzburg mental hospital. Epilepsy research during the NS-regime and the postwar period].

    PubMed

    Söhner, Felicitas; Winckelmann, Hans-Joachim; Becker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the activities of the I.G. Farben laboratory at the former "Heil- und Pflegeanstalt" Günzburg. This laboratory was established to test the newly developed epilepsy drug "Citrullamon" and its derivatives. Specifically, the type and manner of the various experiments were examined to determine whether the suspicions of unethical human experimentation could be identified. The commercial and medical activities between I.G. Farben and the Heil- und Pflegeanstalt, including the specific roles of the senior physician Wilhelm Leinisch and the I.G. Farben chemist Arno Grosse, are reviewed. PMID:26536788

  15. Production of Penicillic Acid and Ochratoxin A on Poultry Feed by Aspergillus ochraceus: Temperature and Moisture Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, C. W.; Sweeney, J. G.; Robbins, J. D.; Burdick, D.

    1973-01-01

    A strain of Aspergillus ochraceus Wilhelm, isolated from poultry feed, produced both penicillic acid and ochratoxin A. Studies demonstrating the ability of this fungus to colonize poultry feed and produce these two mycotoxins under various temperatures and moistures indicated that the interaction was complex. The optimal temperature for conidial development did not vary with moisture, but accumulation of both toxins did. A combination of low temperature, 15 or 22 C, and low moisture favored the production of penicillic acid, whereas high temperature, 30 C, and high moisture favored the production of ochratoxin A. PMID:4795527

  16. The science of unitary human beings and interpretive human science.

    PubMed

    Reeder, F

    1993-01-01

    Natural science and human science are identified as the bases of most nursing theories and research programs. Natural science has been disclaimed by Martha Rogers as the philosophy of science that undergirds her work. The question remains, is the science of unitary human beings an interpretive human science? The author explores the works of Rogers through a dialectic with two human scientists' works. Wilhelm Dilthey's works represent the founding or traditional view, and Jurgen Habermas' works represent a contemporary, reconstructionist view. The ways Rogerian thought contributes to human studies but is distinct from traditional and reconstructionist human sciences are illuminated. PMID:8455869

  17. Exploring the brain, looking for thoughts: on Asimov's second Fantastic Voyage.

    PubMed

    Cassou-Noguès, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate various concerns which appear in Isaac Asimov's Fantastic Voyage II: Destination Brain. I will disregard his first voyage inside a human body in Fantastic Voyage I, which the author disavows as not being his own work. In contrast, the second voyage is intricate, suggesting problems drawn from a variety of sources. In a nutshell, Asimov's explorers enter the body of a comatose man in order to read his thoughts. The story can be related both to philosophical thought-experiments, such as those of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz and of Herbert Feigl, as well as to personal anxieties peculiar to Asimov. PMID:21936209

  18. Geologic Map of Part of the Western Hellas Planitia, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Wilhelms, Don E.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Rock units were deposited on Mars by meteorite impact, volcanism, wind, flowing water, standing water, and ice, acting separately or in concert. Hellas Planitia, the deepest tract on Mars, is a broad depression lying within the high-rimmed, approximately 2,300-km-wide Hellas impact basin. The basin and the planitia are centered about 250 km east of the southeast corner of the map area. Like other stratigraphy-based planetary mapping (Wilhelms, 1990), we suggest the most likely origins for age relations and morphologies visible in the map area.

  19. [In Process Citation].

    PubMed

    Granada, Miguel A; Lenke, Nils; Roudet, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    We report on a newly discovered letter by Christoph Rothmann, dated July 1st 1584, and addressed to Johann Ernst of Anhalt. The letter supports the earlier assumption that Johann Ernst recommended Rothmann to Landgrave Wilhelm of Hesse, as Rothmann asks for Johann Ernst's help on the matter in this new source. More importantly Rothmann refers to his attempts to make Copernicus' calculations compatible with the Ptolomean model, which demonstrates that already at this stage of his career he was working on such a compromise, and not only after being influenced by Raimarus Ursus or Tycho Brahe, as has been argued by some authors. PMID:25942771

  20. [An internist for psychiatry: Carl August Wunderlich (1815 - 1877)].

    PubMed

    Tölle, R

    2012-10-01

    In 19th century Germany C. A. Wunderlich (1815 - 1877) was one of the most important specialists of internal medicine. In addition he was receptive and alive to psychiatry. He translated an important book and held a lecture on psychiatry. He helped his friend Wilhelm Griesinger in the foundation of zhis career and later published his works. Wunderlich brought forward the principal of "clinical method" in medicine in general and particularly in psychiatry. Wunderlich rendered outstanding services to the development of psychiatry in the 19th century. PMID:22890439

  1. Understanding and Explanation in France: From Maine de Biran's Méthode Psychologique to Durkheim's Les Formes Élémentaires de la vie Religieuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmaus, Warren

    My task here is to compare the ways in which the relations between the human and the natural sciences were conceived in late nineteenth and early twentieth century France and Germany. Historical generalization may be a mug's game. But if I had to generalize, I would say that the French distinguished the human or cultural sciences from the natural sciences only in terms of their subject matters, while the Germans were more likely to try to distinguish them in terms of their goals, methods, foundations, and normative content as well. Although we may be able to find many philosophical positions among the French that resemble certain aspects of the thought of Wilhelm Dilthey, Wilhelm Windelband, or Heinrich Rickert, no one in France held exactly the same combination of philosophical views concerning the human sciences as that held by any of these German thinkers. In particular, no one in France tried to distinguish the human from the natural sciences in terms of understanding versus explanation in the way that Dilthey did. Thus, although there were other disputes in France in regard to the human sciences, such as that between Émile Durkheim and Gabriel Tarde over the role of psychology in sociological explanation, or that between sociologists and philosophers over the methods of ethics, there was no controversy analogous to the conflict among Dilthey, Windelband, and Rickert over the best way to distinguish the human from the natural sciences.

  2. Dilemmas of 19th-century Liberalism among German Academic Chemists: Shaping a National Science Policy from Hofmann to Fischer, 1865-1919.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeffrey Allan

    2015-04-01

    This paper's primary goal is to compare the personalities, values, and influence of August Wilhelm Hofmann and Emil Fischer as exemplars and acknowledged leaders of successive generations of the German chemical profession and as scientists sharing a 19th-century liberal, internationalist outlook from the German wars of unification in the 1860s to Fischer's death in 1919 in the aftermath of German defeat in World War I. The paper will consider the influence of Hofmann and Fischer on the shaping of national scientific institutions in Germany, from founding of the German Chemical Society in 1867 to the first institutes of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society founded in 1911, their academic leadership in other areas including the shaping of a successful academic-industrial symbiosis in organic chemistry, and finally their response to war as a force disruptive of scientific internationalism. All of these developments posed serious dilemmas, exacerbated by emerging strains of nationalism and anti-Semitism in German society. Whereas Hofmann's lifework came to a relatively successful end in 1892, Fischer was not so fortunate, as the war brought him heavy responsibilities and terrible personal losses, but with no German victory and no peace of reconciliation--a bleak end for Fischer and the 19th-century liberal ideals that had inspired him. PMID:26104166

  3. The place of the 17th century in Jung's encounter with China.

    PubMed

    Cambray, Joe

    2005-04-01

    After recounting several dreams and related alchemical interests of Jung's tied to the 17(th) century, a contextualizing look at select scientific and philosophical developments of that century is presented. Several precursors of the contemporary debates on the mind/body relation are noted, with special reference to the work of Antonio Damasio. This in turn leads to a reconsideration of the work of the 17(th) century polymath Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, which Jung read as a major precursor to his formulation of synchronicity (via Leibniz's concept of 'pre-established harmony'). Leibniz was the first philosopher to articulate the mind/body relationship in terms of supervenience, sharing an accord with those contemporary philosophers and scientists who see the mind as being an emergent property of the body-brain. Similarly, these ideas are also consistent with a reformulation of synchronicity in terms of emergence. Tracing Leibniz's interest in China reveals another set of links to Jung and to emergentism. Jung's use of Taoist concepts in developing the synchronicity principle is well known. According to scholars, Leibniz was the first major Western intellect to study the I-Ching, through the assistance of a Jesuit missionary in Beijing, Fr. Joachim Bouvet. Some details of the Leibniz-Bouvet correspondence are discussed here. Despite Helmut Wilhelm's presenting aspects of this correspondence at an Eranos conference, Jung does not appear to have integrated it into his writing on synchronicity--a possible reason for this omission is suggested. PMID:15817042

  4. Structure and Dynamics of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang; Wagner, William (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    For the meeting of the AAS/SPD in Albuquerque, NM, I organized a Topical Session of the AAS on Structure and Dynamics of Chromospheres. The grant support was used to bring to the US two of the speakers from abroad. I had invited them for presentations at the Session: Dr. Klaus Wilhelm, the former PI of the SUMER instrument on SOHO, from the Max-Planck Institut in Lindau, Germany, and Dr. Sirajul Hasan, from the Indian Institute of Astrophysics in Bangalore, India. Both speakers preceded their trip to the AAS meeting with a stay at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, where they interacted with members of the Solar and Stellar Physics division. The highlights of the visits were the talks at the AAS/SPD meeting, in which six invited speakers told the audience of astronomers about current problems in solar physics and their relation to stellar problems. An important result of the visits is a paper by Dr. Wilhelm and me on 'Observations of the upper solar chromosphere with SUMER on SOHO', which has been submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics for publication.

  5. A Diversity of Divisions: Tracing the History of the Demarcation between the Sciences and the Humanities.

    PubMed

    Bouterse, Jeroen; Karstens, Bart

    2015-06-01

    Throughout history, divides between the sciences and the humanities have been drawn in many different ways. This essay shows that the notion of a divide became more urgent and pronounced in the second half of the nineteenth century. While this shift has several causes, the essay focuses on the rise of the social sciences, which is interpreted as posing a profound challenge to the established disciplines of the study of humankind. This is demonstrated by zooming in on linguistics, one of the key traditional disciplines of the humanities. Through the assumption of a correspondence between mental and linguistic categories, psychology became of central importance in the various conceptions of linguistics that emerged in the nineteenth century. Both linguistics and psychology were very much engaged in a process of discipline formation, and opinions about the proper directions of the fields varied considerably. Debates on these issues catalyzed the construction of more radical divisions between the sciences and the humanities. Both Wilhelm Dilthey's dichotomy between understanding and explanation and Wilhelm Windelband's dichotomy between nomothetic and idiographic sciences respond to these debates. While their constructions are often lumped together, the essay shows that they actually meant very different things and have to be treated accordingly. PMID:26353439

  6. BepiColombo mission to be presented to the media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    After a competitive phase started in 2001, ESA has awarded Astrium the prime contract to build BepiColombo. The contract signature ceremony will take place in presence of the Prime Minister of Baden Württemberg (Germany), Dr. Guenther Oettinger, and will mark the kick-off of the industrial development of the spacecraft. BepiColombo will be launched in 2013. It consists of two spacecraft - an orbiter for planetary investigation, led by ESA, and one for magnetospheric studies, led by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The satellite duo will reach Mercury in 2019 after a six-year journey towards the inner Solar System, to make the most extensive and detailed study of Mercury ever attempted. The press event will feature a thorough presentation of the mission and its objectives, as well as the technical challenges that Astrium will have to address. Such challenges derive from the difficulty of reaching, surviving and operating in the harsh environment of a planet so close to Sun, making of BepiColombo one of the most complex long-term planetary projects undertaken by ESA so far. Media interested to attend are invited to register by the reply form attached below. Visit of Prime Minister Guenther Oettinger and BepiColombo Contract Signature Event programme 18 January 2008, h 10:30 Astrium Friedrichshafen, Germany Claude-Dornier-Straße, 88090 Immenstaad Building 8, Room "Meersburg" 10:30 Check-in 11:00 Welcome and introduction, Uwe Minne, Astrium, Director of Earth Observation and Science, Head of Friedrichshafen Site 11:05 BepiColombo in the context of the ESA Science Programme, Jacques Louet, ESA Head of Science Projects Departments 11:10 BepiColombo's scientific objectives, Johannes Benkhoff, ESA, BepiColombo Project Scientist 11:20 The BepiColombo mission, Jan van Casteren, ESA, BepiColombo Project Manager 11:30 BepiColombo's technical challenges, Rainer Best, Astrium, BepiColombo Project Manager 11:40 Q&A 12:00 Buffet lunch 13:00 Arrival of Prime

  7. Burnout Subtypes and Absence of Self-Compassion in Primary Healthcare Professionals: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Marin, Jesus; Zubiaga, Fernando; Cereceda, Maria; Piva Demarzo, Marcelo Marcos; Trenc, Patricia; Garcia-Campayo, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary healthcare professionals report high levels of distress and burnout. A new model of burnout has been developed to differentiate three clinical subtypes: ‘frenetic’, ‘underchallenged’ and ‘worn-out’. The aim of this study was to confirm the validity and reliability of the burnout subtype model in Spanish primary healthcare professionals, and to assess the explanatory power of the self-compassion construct as a possible protective factor. Method The study employed a cross-sectional design. A sample of n = 440 Spanish primary healthcare professionals (214 general practitioners, 184 nurses, 42 medical residents) completed the Burnout Clinical Subtype Questionnaire (BCSQ-36), the Maslach Burnout Inventory General Survey (MBI-GS), the Self-Compassion Scale (SCS), the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS). The factor structure of the BCSQ-36 was estimated using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) by the unweighted least squares method from polychoric correlations. Internal consistency (R) was assessed by squaring the correlation between the latent true variable and the observed variables. The relationships between the BCSQ-36 and the other constructs were analysed using Spearman’s r and multiple linear regression models. Results The structure of the BCSQ-36 fit the data well, with adequate CFA indices for all the burnout subtypes. Reliability was adequate for all the scales and sub-scales (R≥0.75). Self-judgement was the self-compassion factor that explained the frenetic subtype (Beta = 0.36; p<0.001); isolation explained the underchallenged (Beta = 0.16; p = 0.010); and over-identification the worn-out (Beta = 0.25; p = 0.001). Other significant associations were observed between the different burnout subtypes and the dimensions of the MBI-GS, UWES and PANAS. Conclusions The typological definition of burnout through the BCSQ-36 showed good structure and appropriate internal consistence

  8. An evaluation of the use of microcomputer-based laboratory instruction on middle school students' concept attainment and attitudes towards computer-based instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osio, Sergio Albina

    The advent of instructional technology has become an integral part of the learning process, thought by many to be a vital component in the reform of science instruction. Microcomputer-Based Laboratory (MBL) is an instructional technology environment in which a computer is connected through its Universal Serial Box (USB) port or an interface (for older models) with sensors to control the experiment, collect data, and generate and interpret graphs. In this study, MBL tools and instructions were used to design an instructional program that integrated ideas in teaching thinking skills so that middle school students from varying levels of differentiated achievement could categorize and create concepts grounded on the Concept Attainment Model of teaching. Data were collected and analyzed based on the procedures of a one-group pretest-posttest experimental design and two research questions. The study provided a quantitative correlation of variables such as MBL to students' pretest-posttest total scores; pretest-posttest total scores to the levels of differentiated achievement and treatment groups. Likewise, a modified student-computer-attitude survey was administered to evaluate students' attitude toward the use of computer technologies. The research findings revealed a 9.1% increase in test scores in the three concepts of investigation; multiple increases in test scores in the three levels of differentiated achievement (22.2% for regular science group, 6.2% for accelerated science group students, and 1% for sheltered science group); and 11.1% mean difference between the MHL group and traditional laboratory group. Simultaneously, participants showed a positive significance of 77% feeling of comfort and confidence towards the use of computer technologies. Eventually, the great potential of MBL technology could play an important role in the reform of science education in the schools of the second largest Unified School District in the country today.

  9. REMEDIATION OF NITRATE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER USING A BIOBARRIER

    SciTech Connect

    B. STRIETELMEIR; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    A biobarrier system has been developed for use in remediating shallow alluvial groundwater. This barrier is made from highly porous materials that are relatively long-lasting, carbon-based (to supply a limiting nutrient in nitrate destruction, in most cases), and extremely inexpensive and easy to emplace. In a series of laboratory studies, we have determined the effectiveness of this barrier at destroying nitrate and perchlorate in groundwater from Mortandad Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This groundwater was obtained from a monitoring well, MCO-5, which is located in the flowpath of the discharge waters from the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). Water with elevated nitrate levels has been discharged from this plant for many years, until recently when the nitrate levels have been brought under the discharge limits. However, the historical discharge has resulted in a nitrate plume in the alluvial groundwater in this canyon. The LANL Multi-Barrier project was initiated this past year to develop a system of barriers that would prevent the transport of radionuclides, metals, colloids and other contaminants, including nitrate and perchlorate, further down the canyon in order to protect populations down-gradient. The biobarrier. will be part of this Multi-Barrier system. We have demonstrated the destruction of nitrate at levels up to 6.5-9.7 mhl nitrate (400-600 mg/L), and that of perchlorate at levels of about 4.3 {micro}M perchlorate (350 ppb). We have quantified the populations of microorganisms present in the biofilm that develops on the biobarrier. The results of this research will be discussed along with other potential applications of this system.

  10. Thermodynamics of lanthanide and uranyl complexes with tetrahydrofuran-2,3,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid (THFTCA).

    SciTech Connect

    Morss, L. R.; Nash, K. L.; Tennessee Technological Univ.

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of an investigation of the thermochemistry of the complexation of La{sup 3+} Nd{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+}, and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} by tetrahydrofuran-2,3,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid (THFTCA). This predisposed structural analog to oxydiacetic acid (ODA) has been previously shown both to exhibit greater sensitivity to lanthanide cation radius than complexes with the unconstrained ODA and to form anomalously weak complexes with UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. Our purpose is to interpret these observations in terms of the balance between enthalpy and entropy contributions to the overall complexation thermodynamics. Enthalpies have been calculated from titration calorimetry experiments both for the protonation of the free ligand and for the formation of selected 1:1 and 1:2 complexes in pH 2-3 acidic media (I = 0.1 M). The complexation entropies for the lanthanide complexes have been calculated using the previously reported stability constants for the MH{sub 2}L{sup +}, MHL, and M(H{sub 2}L){sup 2-}. The stability constants for the uranyl complexes have been determined by potentiometric titration and these values used to calculate the thermodynamic parameters. Complexation enthalpies for the 1:1 lanthanide-THFTCA complexes (MH{sub 2}L{sup +} species) are nearly identical to those of the lanthanide ODA complexes. Therefore, the size-selectivity observed in the lanthanide-THFTCA complexes arises from the complexation entropy. The comparative weakness of the uranyl complexes with THFTCA also is accounted for thermodynamically in the entropy term. Calculations based on an electrostatic model for complexation entropy and molecular mechanics modeling are used to help interpret the experimental results.

  11. Satellite Hyperspectral Imaging Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanoni, Vicki; Stanley, Tom; Blonski, Slawomir; Cao, Changyong; Gasser, Jerry; Ryan, Robert; Zanoni, Vicki; Stanley, Tom

    1999-01-01

    Simulations of generic pushbroom satellite hyperspetral sensors have been performed to evaluate the potential performance and validation techniques for satellite systems such as COIS (NEMO), Warfighter-1 (OrbView-4), and Hyperion (EO-1). The simulaitons start with a generation of synthetic scenes form material maps of studied terrain. Scene-reflected radiance is corrected for atmospheric effects and convolved with sensor spectral response uwing MODTRAN 4 radiance and transmission calculations. Scene images are further convolved with point spread functions derived from Optical Transfer Functions (OTF's) of the sensor system. Photon noise and detector/electronics noise are added to the simulated images, which are also finally quantized to the sensor bit resolution. Studied scenes include bridges and straight roads used for evaluation of sensor spatial resolution, as well as fields of minerals, vegetation, and manmade materials used for evaluation of sensor radiometric response and sensitivity. The scenes are simulated with various seasons and weather conditions. Signal-to-noise ratos and expected performance are estimated for typica satellite system specifications and are discussed for all the scenes.

  12. Automated visual inspection for polished stone manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Melvyn L.; Smith, Lyndon N.

    2003-05-01

    Increased globalisation of the ornamental stone market has lead to increased competition and more rigorous product quality requirements. As such, there are strong motivators to introduce new, more effective, inspection technologies that will help enable stone processors to reduce costs, improve quality and improve productivity. Natural stone surfaces may contain a mixture of complex two-dimensional (2D) patterns and three-dimensional (3D) features. The challenge in terms of automated inspection is to develop systems able to reliably identify 3D topographic defects, either naturally occurring or resulting from polishing, in the presence of concomitant complex 2D stochastic colour patterns. The resulting real-time analysis of the defects may be used in adaptive process control, in order to avoid the wasteful production of defective product. An innovative approach, using structured light and based upon an adaptation of the photometric stereo method, has been pioneered and developed at UWE to isolate and characterize mixed 2D and 3D surface features. The method is able to undertake tasks considered beyond the capabilities of existing surface inspection techniques. The approach has been successfully applied to real stone samples, and a selection of experimental results is presented.

  13. Enhanced magneto-ionic switching of interface anisotropy in Pt/Co/GdOx films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Aik Jun; Mann, Max; Bauer, Uwe; Beach, Geoffrey

    Voltage control of magnetic anisotropy is of great interest for reducing the switching energy barrier in spintronic devices. It has recently been shown that electric field-driven oxygen ion migration near the interface of ferromagnet/oxide bilayers can lead to very large changes in magnetic anisotropy at elevated temperature. Here, we examine magneto-ionic switching in ultrathin Pt(3nm)/Co(0.9nm)/GdOx(tox) /Au(tAu) films with perpendicular anisotropy, in which the GdOx layer and gate structure are optimized for efficient room-temperature oxygen conduction. We study voltage-induced switching dynamics as a function of the GdOx stoichiometry and the thickness of the Au gate layer. We find that for optimally oxidized GdOx, a positive bias voltage applied to the Au electrode results in a transition from PMA to in-plane magnetization, and at zero bias, the PMA spontaneously returns. The rate of this transition depends on the thickness of the Au gate which suggests that the rate-limiting step is removal and reintroduction of oxygen by gate voltage. This toggling of PMA under positive bias does not require oxidation of the Co layer, in contrast to earlier work by Uwe et al . We demonstrate that by optimizing the electrode materials, extremely fast room-temperature switching can be achieved in these devices.

  14. Is workaholism good or bad for employee well-being? The distinctiveness of workaholism and work engagement among Japanese employees.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Akihito; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the empirical distinctiveness of workaholism and work engagement by examining their relationships with well-being in a sample of 776 Japanese employees. We expected that workaholism is associated with unwell-being (i.e., high psychological distress and physical complaints, low job and family satisfaction, and low job performance), whereas work engagement is associated with well-being. Well-validated questionnaires were used to measure workaholism (DUWAS), work engagement (UWES), and well-being (BJSQ, HPQ). Structural Equation Modeling showed that, as expected, workaholism was positively associated with ill-health (i.e., psychological distress and physical complaints) and negatively associated with life satisfaction (i.e., job and family satisfaction) and job performance. In contrast, work engagement was negatively associated with ill-health and positively associated with life satisfaction and job performance. These findings suggest that workaholism and work engagement are two different kinds of concepts, which are negatively and positively related to various indicators of well-being, respectively. PMID:19834258

  15. Why Japanese workers show low work engagement: An item response theory analysis of the Utrecht Work Engagement scale

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    With the globalization of occupational health psychology, more and more researchers are interested in applying employee well-being like work engagement (i.e., a positive, fulfilling, work-related state of mind that is characterized by vigor, dedication, and absorption) to diverse populations. Accurate measurement contributes to our further understanding and to the generalizability of the concept of work engagement across different cultures. The present study investigated the measurement accuracy of the Japanese and the original Dutch versions of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (9-item version, UWES-9) and the comparability of this scale between both countries. Item Response Theory (IRT) was applied to the data from Japan (N = 2,339) and the Netherlands (N = 13,406). Reliability of the scale was evaluated at various levels of the latent trait (i.e., work engagement) based the test information function (TIF) and the standard error of measurement (SEM). The Japanese version had difficulty in differentiating respondents with extremely low work engagement, whereas the original Dutch version had difficulty in differentiating respondents with high work engagement. The measurement accuracy of both versions was not similar. Suppression of positive affect among Japanese people and self-enhancement (the general sensitivity to positive self-relevant information) among Dutch people may have caused decreased measurement accuracy. Hence, we should be cautious when interpreting low engagement scores among Japanese as well as high engagement scores among western employees. PMID:21054839

  16. Genome Sequence of Rickettsia bellii Illuminates the Role of Amoebae in Gene Exchanges between Intracellular Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Hiroyuki; La Scola, Bernard; Audic, Stéphane; Renesto, Patricia; Blanc, Guillaume; Robert, Catherine; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Raoult, Didier

    2006-01-01

    The recently sequenced Rickettsia felis genome revealed an unexpected plasmid carrying several genes usually associated with DNA transfer, suggesting that ancestral rickettsiae might have been endowed with a conjugation apparatus. Here we present the genome sequence of Rickettsia bellii, the earliest diverging species of known rickettsiae. The 1,552,076 base pair–long chromosome does not exhibit the colinearity observed between other rickettsia genomes, and encodes a complete set of putative conjugal DNA transfer genes most similar to homologues found in Protochlamydia amoebophila UWE25, an obligate symbiont of amoebae. The genome exhibits many other genes highly similar to homologues in intracellular bacteria of amoebae. We sought and observed sex pili-like cell surface appendages for R. bellii. We also found that R. bellii very efficiently multiplies in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells and survives in the phagocytic amoeba, Acanthamoeba polyphaga. These results suggest that amoeba-like ancestral protozoa could have served as a genetic “melting pot” where the ancestors of rickettsiae and other bacteria promiscuously exchanged genes, eventually leading to their adaptation to the intracellular lifestyle within eukaryotic cells. PMID:16703114

  17. The Lettau-Schwerdtfeger Balloon Experiment: Measurement of Turbulence via Austausch Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, John M.

    1997-11-01

    In the early 1930s, Heinz Lettau and Werner Schwerdtfeger made direct measurements of air motion in the lowest 4 km of the troposphere by using the manned free balloon as an instrumented platform. The experiment was motivated by Wilhelm Schmidt's and Ludwig Prandtl's work on Austausch (exchange) theory in the second and third decades of the twentieth century. As a prelude to investigating the Lettau-Schwerdtfeger experiment, historical developments that had bearing on the field program are reviewed. Following this review, the experiment is analyzed by 1) documenting the scientific goals, 2) discussing the strategy for data collection, 3) examining one flight in detail (the flight of 25 February 1934), and 4) summarizing results from the experiment. The paper ends with a retrospective view of Austausch theory.

  18. Jung's quest for the Aurora consurgens.

    PubMed

    Haaning, Aksel

    2014-02-01

    The paper focuses on the year 1929 when Jung published 'A European commentary' to Richard Wilhelm's German translation of the Taoist text The Secret of the Golden Flower. This shows that Jung had already started on the track of European alchemy by following up Conrad Waldkirch's preface in Artis Auriferae (1593); and it raises the question of whether this could be the possible missing link to Jung's subsequent research in Alchemy and Hermetic Philosophy in the years to come. It is argued that here was the beginning of Jung's quest for the Aurora consurgens, the publication of which concludes the Mysterium Conuinctionis more than twenty years later. It is further maintained that this choice of the Aurora is a profound expression of Jung's ambition to revitalize the past from within the individual, and helps explain Jung's deep concern with the welfare and future of modern society. PMID:24467350

  19. Synchronicity and the I Ching: Jung, Pauli, and the Chinese woman.

    PubMed

    Zabriskie, Beverley

    2005-04-01

    The capacity of the human mind to discover and invent both imagistic analogies and mathematical structures to represent reality is strikingly juxtaposed in the ancient Chinese text of the I Ching. Its emphasis on containing all sorts of opposites and its plastic appeal to multi-valenced experience has kept it alive through millennia and across cultures. Jung was introduced to its Taoist wisdom by the Sinologist Richard Wilhelm. The Nobel Laureate quantum physicist Wolfgang Pauli became familiar with its philosophy and mathematics through his reading of Schopenhauer and Leibniz. In their correspondence about the nature of the unconscious and synchronicity, Pauli and Jung also exchanged their musings on Pauli's dreams of a Chinese woman, her role in his psyche and his scientific theories(1). PMID:15817044

  20. Neurosciences and research on chemical weapons of mass destruction in Nazi Germany.

    PubMed

    Schmaltz, Florian

    2006-09-01

    As a side-product of industrial research, new chemical nerve agents (Tabun, Sarin, Soman) superior to those available to the Allied Forces were discovered in Nazi Germany. These agents were never used by Germany, even though they were produced at a large scale. This article explores the toxicological and physiological research into the mechanisms of action of these novel nerve agents, and the emergence of military research objectives in neurophysiological and neurotoxicological research. Recently declassified Allied military intelligence files document secret nerve agent research, leading to intensified research on anticholinesterase agents in the peripheral and the central nervous system. The article discusses the involvement of IG Farben scientists, educational, medical and military institutions, and of Nobel Prize laureate Richard Kuhn, director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Medical Research. PMID:16887760

  1. Contributions to the History of Astronomy, Vol. 8 (German Title: Beiträge zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 8)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Wolfgang R.; Hamel, Jürgen

    The contributions span a time interval of more than 450 years. There are biographical investigations on Georg Joachim Rheticus, C.W.A. von Wahl and K.F. Heym, investigation on a reprint of a chapter of the principal work of Nicolaus Copernicus, on Christoph Scheiner and the "camera obscura", and, with respect to the history of timekeeping, on the "big Nuremberg clock". 19th century topics are: a contribution on the honorary doctorate of Joseph Fraunhofer, and on the construction of a lunar globe by Wilhelmine Witte, while the report on Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel and the cholera pandemia in Königsberg in the year 1831 gives a view into everyday life of scientists. 20th century topics are: the contributions on Bruno Thüring in Vienna and his relations with national socialism, as well as on Arthur Beer, Albert Einstein and the Warburg library. The book concludes by short communications, obituaries and book reviews.

  2. Discovery of the sinus node by Keith and Flack: on the centennial of their 1907 publication.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Mark E; Hollman, Arthur

    2007-10-01

    In 1839, Jan Evangelista Purkinje discovered a net of gelatinous fibres in the subendocardium of the heart. Walter Gaskell in the 1880s observed that the impulse of the heart began in the sinus venosus, and that this region had the most rhythmic ability. A conducting bundle between the atrium and the ventricle was found by Wilhelm His, Jr in 1893. In 1906, Sunao Tawara found a "complex knoten" of tissue at the proximal end of the His bundle. He concluded that this was the inception of an electrical conducting system which continued from the AV node through the bundle of His, divided into the bundle branches, and terminated as the Purkinje fibres. The collaboration of Arthur Keith and Martin Flack led to discovery of the sinus node, finalising the discovery of the electrical system of the heart and providing an anatomical answer to the baffling mystery: "Why does the heart beat?" PMID:17890694

  3. Discovery of the sinus node by Keith and Flack: on the centennial of their 1907 publication

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Mark E; Hollman, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    In 1839, Jan Evangelista Purkinje discovered a net of gelatinous fibres in the subendocardium of the heart. Walter Gaskell in the 1880s observed that the impulse of the heart began in the sinus venosus, and that this region had the most rhythmic ability. A conducting bundle between the atrium and the ventricle was found by Wilhelm His, Jr in 1893. In 1906, Sunao Tawara found a “complex knoten” of tissue at the proximal end of the His bundle. He concluded that this was the inception of an electrical conducting system which continued from the AV node through the bundle of His, divided into the bundle branches, and terminated as the Purkinje fibres. The collaboration of Arthur Keith and Martin Flack led to discovery of the sinus node, finalising the discovery of the electrical system of the heart and providing an anatomical answer to the baffling mystery: “Why does the heart beat?” PMID:17890694

  4. [Schelling and experiential science].

    PubMed

    Breidbach, Olaf

    2004-01-01

    Schelling's philosophy of nature is shown to be part of the scientific discussions of his day, not set apart from it. His terminology describing the potentialities and polarities of nature was formed during Schelling's collaboration with the physicist Johann Wilhelm Ritter. This scientist adopted the schema Schelling had developed for the categorization of natural phenomena to describe the peculiar facts that interested him in his area of research. Thus Ritter was able to develop a classification of the various phenomena of animal galvanism. Thus it can be shown that the idealistic "Naturphilosophie" was part of the scientific culture of about 1800. It is to be interpreted as philosophy of science and has to be evaluated not only in a philosophically systematic way but in particular in its influence on the way scientific categories were ordered at the time. Thereby it can be shown that the idealistic vocabulary had close correspondence to French morphology and English Natural Theology. PMID:15730143

  5. Letter to the Editor: Recent advances in research on cognition and emotion in OCD: a review.

    PubMed

    Anholt, Gideon E; Kalanthroff, Eyal

    2013-12-01

    Cognitive theories of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) ascertain that catastrophic (mis)interpretations of normally occurring intrusive thoughts are causal to the onset and maintenance of OCD. Recently, Calkins, Berman and Wilhelm have highlighted research validating the cognitive model. However, the current comment article stresses various findings that challenge basic premises of the cognitive theory. Moreover, a review of clinical studies investigating cognitive and behavioral therapies for OCD questions the added value of cognitive interventions over and above behavior therapy consisting of exposure and response prevention for this disorder. We suggest an alternative, potentially more useful route of investigation, stressing executive (dis)functions as the cause of OCD patients to (automatically) act on internal and external stimuli. We further suggest that dysfunctional beliefs proposed as paramount in the pathogenesis of OCD according to the cognitive model may be less important and specific than formerly believed. PMID:24146274

  6. The Hopkins rod-lens system.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2007-06-01

    Surgeons have always been ready to adapt advances in technology into their practice. The discovery by Wilhelm Roentgen of X-rays in 1885 was applied within weeks of its publication to the diagnosis of fractures and the location of foreign bodies. The development of the electric light bulb by Edison enabled Max Nitze, Professor of Urology in Berlin, to develop the electrically illuminated cystoscope, which he patented in 1877. By 1911, Hugh Young used a cystoscope with a punch device to perform transurethral prostatectomy. Rapidly other electrically lit 'scopes' were introduced--the gastroscope, bronchoscope, thoracoscope and so on. All had two problems: they were rigid instruments and lacked really brilliant illumination. PMID:17598677

  7. The first demonstration of lactic acid in human blood in shock by Johann Joseph Scherer (1814–1869) in January 1843

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, T. C.; van der Hoven, B.; Bakker, J.

    2007-01-01

    Lactic acid was first found and described in sour milk by Karl Wilhelm Scheele (1742–1786) in 1780. The German physician–chemist Johann Joseph Scherer (1841–1869) demonstrated the occurrence of lactic acid in human blood under pathological conditions in 1843 and 1851. In this article we honour the forgotten observations by Scherer and describe the influence of Scherer's finding on further research on lactic acid at the end of the 19th century. We conclude that Scherer's 1843 case reports should be cited as the first description of lactic acid in human blood after death and also as the first demonstration of lactic acid as a pathological finding in septic and haemorrhagic shock. Carl Folwarczny was, in 1858, the first to demonstrate lactic acid in blood in a living patient. PMID:17661014

  8. Stepping through science's door: C. W. Scheele, from pharmacist's apprentice to man of science.

    PubMed

    Fors, Hjalmar

    2008-03-01

    This reinterpretation of Carl Wilhelm Scheele's (1742-86) early life and career analyses the social interplay between Scheele and other chemists who were active in eighteenth-century Sweden. It is argued that Scheele, a rather lowly journeyman working in peripheral pharmacies, had to work hard and traverse several geographical and social boundaries to gain a foothold in the scientific community. Eventually, Scheele's skilful analysis of the mineral magnesia nigra would establish him as one of the pivotal Swedish chemists. However, this happened only after Scheele had managed to prove himself as a knowledgeable chemist who did not threaten the authority of certain socially superior colleagues. When Scheele had gained a place in the scientific community, the exchange logic of the eighteenth-century republic of letters permitted him to trade experimental results for other kinds of resources. Hence, he gained in both social status, economic prosperity and scientific prominence in a relatively short time. PMID:18831153

  9. Conception and development of the Second Life® Embryo Physics Course.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Richard

    2013-06-01

    The study of embryos with the tools and mindset of physics, started by Wilhelm His in the 1880s, has resumed after a hiatus of a century. The Embryo Physics Course convenes online allowing interested researchers and students, who are scattered around the world, to gather weekly in one place, the virtual world of Second Life®. It attracts people from a wide variety of disciplines and walks of life: applied mathematics, artificial life, bioengineering, biophysics, cancer biology, cellular automata, civil engineering, computer science, embryology, electrical engineering, evolution, finite element methods, history of biology, human genetics, mathematics, molecular developmental biology, molecular biology, nanotechnology, philosophy of biology, phycology, physics, self-reproducing systems, stem cells, tensegrity structures, theoretical biology, and tissue engineering. Now in its fifth year, the Embryo Physics Course provides a focus for research on the central question of how an embryo builds itself. PMID:23586840

  10. ["Could not therefore the earth globe also be a large tourmaline?" A crystal, Lichtenberg and the polarity discussion before 1800].

    PubMed

    Wiesenfeldt, Gerhard; Breidbach, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the debate on one particular phenomenon of the research into electrical charge distribution prior to 1800: the description and interpretation of polarities observed on the tourmaline. We show that in the second half of the eighteenth century this crystal became a model to distinguish and categorize different qualities of charges (electric and magnetic fluids). It will become clear that the polarity detected on the tourmaline became a key concept for eighteenth century natural philosophy, which relied on analogizing operations. We illustrate this concentrating on Lichtenbergs first lecture at the Göttingen academy of science in 1778. Thus the concept of polarity is already a central ordering category before the beginnings of the speculative enterprise of idealistic Naturphilosophy. Consequently, the physicist Johann Wilhelm Ritter, who can be positioned in that context, consciously adheres to the experimental research tradition of polarities portrayed in this paper. PMID:23155759

  11. Radiation and health*

    PubMed Central

    Lindell, B.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation has been a source of fascination and concern ever since Wilhelm Konrad Röntgen discovered X-rays on 8 November 1895. Over the years, health workers as well as the public have been concerned about medical uses of X-rays, the presence of radon in buildings, radioactive waste from nuclear power stations, fallout from nuclear test explosions, radioactive consumer products, microwave ovens, and many other sources of radiation. Most recently, the tragic accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station in the USSR, and the subsequent contamination over most of Europe, has again wakened interest and concern and also reminded us about a number of misconceptions about radiation. This article describes the essentials about radiation (especially ionizing radiation) and its health effects. PMID:3496982

  12. The Politics of Forgetting: Otto Hahn and the German Nuclear-Fission Project in World War II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sime, Ruth Lewin

    2012-03-01

    As the co-discoverer of nuclear fission and director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry, Otto Hahn (1879-1968) took part in Germany`s nuclear-fission project throughout the Second World War. I outline Hahn's efforts to mobilize his institute for military-related research; his inclusion in high-level scientific structures of the military and the state; and his institute's research programs in neutron physics, isotope separation, transuranium elements, and fission products, all of potential military importance for a bomb or a reactor and almost all of it secret. These activities are contrasted with Hahn's deliberate misrepresentations after the war, when he claimed that his wartime work had been nothing but "purely scientific" fundamental research that was openly published and of no military relevance.

  13. A history of erotic philosophy.

    PubMed

    Soble, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This essay historically explores philosophical views about the nature and significance of human sexuality, starting with the Ancient Greeks and ending with late 20th-century Western philosophy. Important figures from the history of philosophy (and theology) discussed include Sappho, Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, St. Jerome, the Pelagians, St. Thomas Aquinas, Michel de Montaigne, Rene Descartes, Thomas Hobbes, David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Søren Kierkegaard, Arthur Schopenhauer, Jeremy Bentham, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Sigmund Freud, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Wilhelm Reich, and Herbert Marcuse. Contemporary philosophers whose recent work is discussed include Michel Foucault, Thomas Nagel, Roger Scruton, Karol Wojtyla (Pope John Paul II), Catharine MacKinnon, Richard Posner, and John Finnis. To show the unity of the humanities, the writings of various literary figures are incorporated into this history, including Mark Twain, Arthur Miller, James Thurber, E. B. White, Iris Murdoch, and Philip Roth. PMID:19308838

  14. Mars water discoveries - implications for finding ancient and current life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Mark

    2015-11-01

    There is some wonderful synchronicity right now for those interested in the search for water and life on Mars. Foremost is the recent announcement by NASA and the publication of a study using spectral imaging which definitively proves that there is seasonal, flowing briny water at a number of locations on Mars (see Fig. 1) (Ojha et al., 2015). This caps some 15 years of accumulating evidence that what was previously considered impossible is actually occurring on the Red Planet. "Water is essential to life as we know it," write Lujendra Ojha, Mary Beth Wilhelm, and their co-authors. "The presence of liquid water on Mars today has astrobiological, geologic, and hydrologic implications and may affect future human exploration".

  15. Elevational gradient of Hemiptera (Heteroptera, Auchenorrhyncha) on a tropical mountain in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Stephen W.; Soulier-Perkins, Adeline

    2015-01-01

    Malaise trap sampling of Hemiptera (Heteroptera; Auchenorrhyncha) was conducted at 500 m intervals along an elevational gradient from 200 m to 3,700 m on the east slope of Mount Wilhelm, Madang Province, Papua New Guinea. Hemiptera had a decrease in morphospecies richness and overall abundance with increasing elevation, however, the Heteroptera did not exhibit either pattern. A few species were relatively abundant at each elevation, whereas the majority of species were represented by ≤5 specimens. Morphospecies richness of Auchenorrhyncha, Cicadomorpha, Fulgoromorpha, Cicadellidae, Cixiidae, and Derbidae also decreased with increasing elevation but abundance decline was not significant due to the large number of specimens captured at 200 m relative to those captured at higher elevations. The percentage of Cicadomorpha specimens decreased with increasing elevation relative to that of the Fulgoromorpha which increased with increasing elevation. Environmental factors that may influence patterns of species richness along the elevational gradient are discussed. PMID:26056617

  16. Parallax: The Race to Measure the Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshfeld, A. W.

    2001-05-01

    The new book "Parallax: The Race to Measure the Cosmos" chronicles the centuries-long struggle to secure the first distance to a star through detection of stellar parallax. Beginning with the naked-eye attempts of Tycho Brahe and proceeding through the telescopic studies of Robert Hooke, James Bradley, and William Herschel, all three of whom employed observational strategies suggested by Galileo, the effort to measure stellar parallax gained momentum in the early 19th century with dramatic improvements in telescope technology by German craftsmen such as Joseph Fraunhofer. Three near-contemporaneous announcements of stellar parallaxes were made in the late 1830s by Thomas Henderson (Alpha Centauri), Wilhelm Struve (Vega), and Friedrich Bessel (61 Cygni). By consensus of the astronomical community, Bessel was credited with the first successful measurement of a star's distance. With its biographical focus, "Parallax: The Race to Measure the Cosmos" highlights the human dimensions of scientific achievement.

  17. Images and Meaning-Making in a World of Resemblance: The Bavarian-Saxon Kidney Stone Affair of 1580

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    This article de-constructs and re-constructs the dynamic of a sixteenth-century political dispute between the Catholic Bavarian Duke Wilhelm V and the Protestant Saxon Elector August I. By focusing on the visual imagery which ignited the dispute, the paper explores sixteenth-century ‘ways of seeing’ and the epistemic role realistic images played in the production of knowledge about the natural world. While the peculiar dynamic of the affair is based on a specific understanding of the evidential role of images, the paper also argues that the wider socio-cultural context, in particular certain strategies of truth-telling, provide further clues as to the dynamic and closure of the affair. PMID:26290618

  18. Gauß' Theoria motus: Entstehung, Quellen, Rezeption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, K.

    Die Entstehung von Gauß' Theoria motus steht in engem Zusammenhang mit den Ereignissen der Jahre 1801 und 1802: Giuseppe Piazzi hatte erstmals die Ceres beobachtet; diese konnte auf Grund der Berechnungen von Gauß um die Jahreswende 1801/2 sowohl von Franz Xaver von Zach als auch von Wilhelm Olbers wiederentdeckt werden. Gauß hatte seine Theoria motus auf der Basis der Keplerschen Gesetze, als Zweikörperproblem, behandelt. Er war sich aber sehr wohl darüber im klaren, daß diese Betrachtungsweise nur Bahnen liefern würde, die nur für relativ kurze Zeit mit den Beobachtungen übereinstimmen würden. Um den so errechneten Bahnen dennoch eine länger währende Gültigkeit zu ermöglichen, berücksichtigte er im letzten Kapitel seiner Theoria motus die unweigerlich auftretenden Störungen.

  19. Charge-state-dependent energy loss of slow ions. I. Experimental results on the transmission of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Richard A.; Gruber, Elisabeth; Smejkal, Valerie; Facsko, Stefan; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2016-05-01

    We report on energy loss measurements of slow (v ≪v0 ), highly charged (Q >10 ) ions upon transmission through a 1-nm-thick carbon nanomembrane. We emphasize here the scaling of the energy loss with the velocity and charge exchange or loss. We show that a weak linear velocity dependence exists, whereas charge exchange dominates the kinetic energy loss, especially in the case of a large charge capture. A universal scaling of the energy loss with the charge exchange and velocity is found and discussed in this paper. A model for charge-state-dependent energy loss for slow ions is presented in paper II in this series [R. A. Wilhelm and W. Möller, Phys. Rev. A 93, 052709 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.052709].

  20. A triboelectric closed loop band system for the generation of x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cleve, E.; Lucas, B.; Ganlieli, Z.; Wong, E. W.; Cortes, P.; Mehta, N.; Cuadra, D.; Fong, J.; Hansen, S.; Kotowski, A.; Camara, C. G.

    2015-08-01

    X-ray have been commercially produced using the same basic design since their discovery by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895, for which he was awarded the first Nobel prize in physics. This technology requires high voltage elements, ultra high vacuum tubes, and high voltage electronics. The vacuum and high voltage drive up the price of x-ray technology and in order to bring down the cost, a brand new way to produce x-rays is needed. In 2008 Carlos Camara, Juan Escobar, Jonathan R. Hird, and Seth Putterman1 discovered that by pealing scotch tape in a vacuum you could create enough x-rays to take an x-ray radiograph of a finger. This lead to the formation of Tribogenics and the development of the rod and band x-ray architecture.

  1. [The brain anatomy reflected in the first 50 volumes of the Anatomischer Anzeiger (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schierhorn, H

    1981-01-01

    On the occasion of the edition of the 150th volume of the Anatomischer Anzeiger a survey is given on some important papers in neuroanatomy and especially brain research, published in the first 50 volumes of this journal. Such excellent workers in neuroscience as Albert Koelliker, Wilhelm His, Camillo Golgi, Carl Weigert, Aleksander Dogiel,Santiago Ramón y Cajal, Ludwig Edinger, Ferdinand Hochstetter, Fridtjof Nansen, Adolf Wallenberg, Theodor Ziehen, Stephan von Apáthy, Michael von Lenhossék, Gheorghe Marinesco, Korbinian Brodmann, Max Bielschowsky, Oskar Vogt, Grafton Elliot Smith, Giuseppe Levi, Cornelius Ariëns Kappers and many others are contributors to the Anatomischer Anzeiger during the first 32 years of its existence (1886-1918). In particular the long-lasting struggle for a general acceptance of the "neurone doctrine" (Neurohenlehre) is reflected by the Anatomischer Anzeiger before and after the turn of century. PMID:7030138

  2. [Oskar Vogt (1870-1959). Hypnotist and brain researcher, husband of Cecile Vogt (1875-1962)].

    PubMed

    V Stuckrad-Barre, S; Danek, A

    2004-10-01

    Oskar Vogt (1870-1955) and his wife Cecile (1875-1962) were neurologists and neuroanatomists with a strong interest in the cytoarchitectonics and myeloarchitectonics of the brain and in the functional anatomy of the basal ganglia. In the 1920s, Vogt created a multi-disciplinary brain research institute, the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut fur Hirnforschung in Berlin-Buch, with divisions for e.g. neuroanatomy, neurohistology, neurophysiology, neurochemistry, and genetics. Oskar Vogt's scientific activities are discussed briefly with special regard to his former co-worker Brodmann. After being dismissed from office by the Nazi government in 1937, the Vogts continued their work in a privately funded institute in Neustadt, in the Black Forest. PMID:15300318

  3. Scientific Psychology in the 18th Century: A Historical Rediscovery.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Katharina A; Pfister, Roland

    2016-05-01

    As early as 1783, the almost forgotten philosopher, metaphysicist, and psychologist Ferdinand Ueberwasser (1752-1812) designated himself "Professor für empirische Psychologie und Logik" (professor of empirical psychology and logic) at the University of Münster, Germany. His position was initiated and supported by the minister and educational reformer Franz von Fürstenberg (1729-1810), who considered psychology a core scientific discipline that should be taught at each school and university. At the end of the 18th century, then, psychology seems to have been on the verge of becoming an independent academic discipline, about 100 years before Wilhelm Wundt founded the discipline's first official laboratory. It seems surprising that Ueberwasser's writings-including a seminal textbook on empirical psychology-have been almost entirely overlooked in most historical accounts. We focus on this important founding moment of psychological science and on the circumstances that eventually brought this seminal development to a halt. PMID:27217252

  4. The "Jews" of the antifascist left: homosexuality and socialist resistance to Nazism.

    PubMed

    Oosterhuis, H

    1995-01-01

    In the early 1930s, German Social Democrats and Communists seized upon the homosexual orientation of some Nazi leaders, especially Ernst Röhm, with the aim of discrediting the entire National Socialist movement. In Western Europe as well as the Soviet Union, there was a general tendency among socialists in the 1930s to identify homosexuality with Nazism. Antifascist leftists created the impression that homosexuality was widespread in Nazi organizations. Such socialist theorists as Wilhelm Reich tended to view homosexuality sociologically and psychologically as a typical rightist, nationalist, and above all fascist aberration. Leftist aversion to homosexuality was not only an expression of political opportunism. Prejudices against homosexuality were part and parcel of socialist thinking and became even more deep-rooted among leftists as a consequence of the ideological and moral confrontation with National Socialism. Against the presumed immortality and perversion of the Nazis, the antifascists stressed their own rationality and purity. PMID:8666756

  5. Students explore history of the Göttingen Institute of Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Joachim R. R.

    The Institute of Geophysics at the University of Gottingen, Germany has a long tradition that began long before its official founding in January 1898. Its history goes back to at least 1756, to the work on geophysical problems by Tobias Meyer, Carl-Friedrich GauS, and Wilhelm Weber. At the beginning of the 20th century, the first director of the institute, Emil Wiechert, established a seismological working group that was a worldwide leader in this type of research for the next 10 to 12 years. In those golden years of seismology at Gottingen, famous students and co-workers of Wiechert such as G. H. Angenheister, L. Geiger, B. Gutenberg, L. Mintrop, and K. Zoeppritz made fundamental discoveries.

  6. Charge-state-dependent energy loss of slow ions. II. Statistical atom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Richard A.; Möller, Wolfhard

    2016-05-01

    A model for charge-dependent energy loss of slow ions is developed based on the Thomas-Fermi statistical model of atoms. Using a modified electrostatic potential which takes the ionic charge into account, nuclear and electronic energy transfers are calculated, the latter by an extension of the Firsov model. To evaluate the importance of multiple collisions even in nanometer-thick target materials we use the charge-state-dependent potentials in a Monte Carlo simulation in the binary collision approximation and compare the results to experiment. The Monte Carlo results reproduce the incident charge-state dependence of measured data well [see R. A. Wilhelm et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 052708 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.052708], even though the experimentally observed charge exchange dependence is not included in the model.

  7. [On the road to a new humanity: the reception of psychoanalysis in the early Kinderladen movement].

    PubMed

    Kauders, Anthony D

    2014-01-01

    In the late 1960s a group of students in West Germany founded the so-called Kinderläden (day care centers) in order to experiment with new forms of early childhood education. Members of the early Kinderladen movement in particular pursued a radically utopian approach that, they hoped, would engender new human beings. With the aid of psychoanalytic writings, especially those of Wilhelm Reich, they sought to create subjects that would overcome repressive bourgeois norms and live out their sexuality freely. This reliance on Reich entailed a new interpretation of the "base", as psychoanalytic drive theory supplanted Marxist theory. As such, the early Kinderladen ac- tivists regarded the "basis" of society in biological, psychological, and pedagogic rather than economic terms. PMID:25872313

  8. [The "diagnosis" in the light of Charles S. Peirce, Sherlock Holmes, Sigmund Freud and modern neurobiology].

    PubMed

    Adler, R H

    2006-05-10

    A diagnostic hypothesis is a causa ficta. It is an assumption, suitable to explain phenomena, which are not yet proven to be the only and valid explanation of the observed. One of Wilhelm Hauff's faitales illustrates how a hypothesis is generated. It is based on the interpretation of signs. Signs are of an ikonic, an indexical or a symbolic nature. According to S. Peirce, a hypothesis is created by abduction, to Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes by immersion into thoughts, and to S. Freud by free floating attention. The three procedures are alike. Neurobiological structures and functions, which correspond to these processes, are described; especially the emotional-implicite memory. The technique of hypothesis-generation is meaningful to clinical medicine. PMID:16722205

  9. [The case of Sefeloge: a contribution to the history of forensic psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Haack, K; Herpertz, S C; Kumbier, E

    2007-05-01

    In 1850 the mentally disordered Sergeant Maximilian Joseph Sefeloge (1821-1859) tried to assassinate the Prussian King Friedrich Wilhelm IV (1795-1861). Besides clarification of the political background to the assassination, the question of the delinquent's criminal responsibility has been posed from the very beginning. For the first time Sefeloge's case is examined from a medicohistorical perspective. Due to the importance of the circumstances, a forensic scientist and three well-known psychiatrists made this forensic examination. These medical professionals seemed particularly competent because of their common experience with psychiatric patients. This unique case from nineteenth century Germany is exemplary in that the psychiatrist was generally accepted as an expert witness to evaluate crimes in the context of unclear mental conditions. From there the development of forensic psychiatry could proceed without hindrance. PMID:17574489

  10. ["As we're not willing to hang and behead and not able to deport...". On Emil Kraepelin's influence on Franz von Liszt].

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Recla, A; Steinberg, H

    2008-03-01

    Emil Kraepelin started his scientific career with a pamphlet demanding complete restructure of German penal law. It is well known that Kraepelin was a recipient of Cesare Lombroso's theses on degeneration and atavism. Therefore his demand for a correctional law completely replacing penal law is easily understood. Still undiscussed however is the question of whether Kraepelin's brochure had a decisive effect on German criminal law, especially on the so-called Marburg Program of Franz von Liszt, still viewed as the first emergence of modern criminal law and policies in Germany. Examination of this shows that despite major theoretical faults, Kraepelin came to conclusions that correspond remarkably with von Liszt's. Special focus should be directed on the psychologist Wilhelm Wundt, who criticised Kraepelin's juridical attempt in a very kind yet fundamental way, and on the relationship that existed between Kraepelin and von Liszt. PMID:18299812

  11. Barrow, Leibniz and the geometrical proof of the fundamental theorem of the calculus.

    PubMed

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2014-07-01

    In 1693, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz published in the Acta Eruditorum a geometrical proof of the fundamental theorem of the calculus. It is shown that this proof closely resembles Isaac Barrow's proof in Proposition 11, Lecture 10, of his Lectiones Geometricae, published in 1670. This comparison provides evidence that Leibniz gained substantial help from Barrow's book in formulating and presenting his geometrical formulation of this theorem. The analysis herein also supports the work of J. M. Child, who in 1920 studied the early manuscripts of Leibniz and concluded that he had frequently copied his diagrams from Barrow's book, but without acknowledgement. It is also shown that the diagram of Leibniz associated with his 1693 proof has often been reproduced with errors that make some aspects of his text difficult to comprehend. PMID:24908795

  12. The tragic and the metaphysical in philosophy and psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Stolorow, Robert D; Atwood, George E

    2013-06-01

    This article elaborates a claim, first introduced by Wilhelm Dilthey, that metaphysics represents an illusory flight from the tragedy of human finitude. Metaphysics, of which psychoanalytic metapsychologies are a form, transforms the unbearable fragility and transience of all things human into an enduring, permanent, changeless reality, an illusory world of eternal truths. Three "clinical cases" illustrate this thesis in the work and lives of a philosopher and two psychoanalytic theorists: Friedrich Nietzsche and his metaphysical doctrine of the eternal return of the same, Sigmund Freud and his dual instinct theory, and Heinz Kohut and his theoretical language of the self. It is contended that the best safeguard against the pitfalls of metaphysical illusion lies in a shared commitment to reflection on the constitutive contexts of all our theoretical ideas. PMID:23638662

  13. Summary and Outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poprawe, Reinhart

    Wilhelm von Humboldt (1767-1835) recognized the necessity of the coherence of research and education about 200 years ago. Today we see a third component coming in simultaneously: innovation. Not that this third aspect gained key importance only recently, but the demands for handling the increasing complexity of innovation have grown dramatically. Innovations need vertically structured processes, i.e., from simultaneous consideration of the product definition, the market, and recognition of relevant technologies all the way to the related fundamental research. The deeper the consideration, the greater the sustainability of the innovation. By definition, an innovation is first of all something new. There is still no scale to measure innovation, but it seems reasonable to define an innovation as any new process, technology, or product that leads to a quantitative economical benefit.

  14. The origin of the vertebrate skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivar, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The anatomy of the human and other vertebrates has been well described since the days of Leonardo da Vinci and Vesalius. The causative origin of the configuration of the bones and of their shapes and forms has been addressed over the ensuing centuries by such outstanding investigators as Goethe, Von Baer, Gegenbauer, Wilhelm His and D'Arcy Thompson, who sought to apply mechanical principles to morphogenesis. However, no coherent causative model of morphogenesis has ever been presented. This paper presents a causative model for the origin of the vertebrate skeleton, based on the premise that the body is a mosaic enlargement of self-organized patterns engrained in the membrane of the egg cell. Drawings illustrate the proposed hypothetical origin of membrane patterning and the changes in the hydrostatic equilibrium of the cytoplasm that cause topographical deformations resulting in the vertebrate body form.

  15. How Einstein made asymmetry disappear: symmetry and relativity in 1905

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Giora; Goldstein, Bernard R.

    2005-07-01

    Contents: I. Introduction II. Einstein's usages of the term symmetry in 1905 1. The dissertation (April 1905) Case 1: isotropy Case 2: analogy Case 3: geometrical usage 2. "On the electrodynamics of moving bodies" (June 1905) Case 1: indifference Case 2: two algebraic usages Case 3: physical usage Case 4: algebraic usage Case 5: rejecting asymmetry 3. The central claim: making asymmetry disappear by appealing to a physical argument 4. Conclusion III. Background. The term symmetry and its "relatives": duality, parallelism, and reciprocity 1. Heinrich Hertz (1857-1894) 2. Oliver Heaviside (1850-1925) 3. August Föppl (1854-1924) 4. Emil Wiechert (1861-1928) 5. Wilhelm Wien (1864-1928) 6. Hendrik Antoon Lorentz (1853-1928) 7. Summary

  16. Nursing knowledge and human science: ontological and epistemological considerations.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, G J; Cody, W K

    1992-01-01

    This article examines the meaning of human science in relation to extant nursing knowledge. The origins of the human science tradition are traced to the philosopher Wilhelm Dilthey, who challenged the dominance of the positivist perspective for generating knowledge of the human lifeworld. Specific ontological and epistemological criteria for human science are proposed. Four nursing frameworks, Paterson and Zderad's humanistic nursing, Newman's model of health as expanding consciousness, Watson's human science and human care, and Parse's theory of human becoming, are found to have consistencies and inconsistencies with the human science tradition. It is proposed that the human science perspective is present in and will continue to be reflected in the evolution of nursing science. PMID:1584506

  17. Gradiva: freud, fetishism, and Pompeian Fantasy.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, John

    2013-10-01

    This paper is a critical reconsideration of Freud's analysis (1907) of Wilhelm Jensen's novella Gradiva: A Pompeian Fantasy (1903). Freud's interest was aroused by the parallels between Jensen's presentation of dreams and Freud's model of dream formation just published in The Interpretation of Dreams (1900). Freud also acclaims Jensen's presentation of the formation and "cure" of his protagonist's delusion about a marble bas-relief of a woman walking. This paper argues for the centrality of the phenomenon of fetishism, briefly considered but excluded from Freud's analysis. The fantasy of Gradiva as "the necessary conditions for loving" (Freud 1910, pp. 165-166) is also a key thesis of the essay, which makes use of the newly translated Freud-Jensen correspondence contained in this article's Appendix. PMID:24194488

  18. Withstanding trauma: the significance of Emma Eckstein's circumcision to Freud's Irma dream.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, Carlo

    2013-07-01

    The author considers the medical rationale for Wilhelm Fliess's operation on Emma Eckstein's nose in February 1895 and interprets the possible role that this played in Freud's dream of Irma's injection five months later. The author's main argument is that Emma likely endured female castration as a child and that she therefore experienced the surgery to her nose in 1895 as a retraumatization of her childhood trauma. The author further argues that Freud's unconscious identification with Emma, which broke through in his dream of Irma's injection with resistances and apotropaic defenses, served to accentuate his own "masculine protest". The understanding brought to light by the present interpretation of Freud's Irma dream, when coupled with our previous knowledge of Freud, allows us to better grasp the unconscious logic and origins of psychoanalysis itself.(1.) PMID:23824652

  19. [Ophthalmologists in the proximity of Adolf Hitler].

    PubMed

    Rohrbach, J M

    2012-10-01

    Adolf Hitler met or at least knew about 5 ophthalmologists. The chair of ophthalmology in Berlin, Walther Löhlein, personally examined Hitler's eyes at least two times. The chair of ophthalmology in Breslau, Walter Dieter, developed "air raid protection spectacles" with the aid of high representatives of the NS-system and probably Adolf Hitler himself. Heinrich Wilhelm Kranz became rector of the universities of Giessen and Frankfurt/Main. He was known as a very strict advocate of the NS-race hygiene. Werner Zabel made plans for Hitler's diet and tried to interfere with Hitler's medical treatment. Finally, Hellmuth Unger was an influential representative of the medical press and a famous writer. Three of his novels with medical topics were made into a film which Hitler probably saw. Hitler had, so to say, a small "ophthalmological proximity" which, however, did not play a significant role for himself or the NS-state. PMID:22664943

  20. X-rays for medical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessenbruch, A.

    1995-11-01

    1995 is the centenary of the discovery of X-rays by the German physicist Wilhelm C Rontgen. In the past hundred years, the new rays have developed from being unknown to finding application in many walks of life, not least in medicine. This is so much so that in common speech the word `x-ray` refers not to a form of radiation but to an X-ray photograph taken for the purposes of diagnosis (as in: `I had an X-ray done to see if my leg was broken`). X-rays are now used routinely, and they are used both for diagnosis and for therapy. This paper will give an outline of the use of X-rays in medicine throughout our present century.

  1. Instead of Erklären and Verstehen: William James on Human Understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, David E.

    Perhaps more than any other American psychologist and philosopher, William James (1842-1910) was intimately familiar with contemporary European thought and debate, including the discussion of Erklären and Verstehen advanced by Wilhelm Dilthey (1833-1911) and others around the turn of the twentieth century. Even before this discussion was initiated, James had been dealing with related issues, pondering alternative solutions, and formulating his own original views on human understanding. These views coalesced in a distinctive approach to cognition. Fundamental to this approach was a belief in possibility and probability as innate features of the physical as well as mental manifestations of the universe. Also fundamental was a conviction that understanding is understanding, regardless of its viewpoint, object, or label as either "descriptive" or "explanatory."

  2. Hermann von Helmholtz and his students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Joseph F.

    1989-01-01

    During the years 1871-1888, when Hermann von Helmholtz was professor of physics at the University of Berlin, physicists from all over the world flocked to Berlin to study and do research with him. Among these were the German physicists Max Planck, Heinrich Kayser, Eugen Goldstein, Wilhelm Wien, and Heinrich Hertz, and Americans Henry Rowland, A. A. Michelson, and Michael Pupin. Examples of Helmholtz's scientific and personal interactions with these students and research associates show why he is justly considered the outstanding physics mentor of the 19th century. Both his ideas and his students played a major role in the development of physics in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

  3. "Cosmomorphistic geometry" in the unconscious geometry of Johannes Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Adolf

    Some mathematical aspects of the Music theory by Johannes Kepler are discussed, paying a special attention to the book "De harmonice mundi". Other scientists interested in Music theory are mentioned throughout the paper: The Pythagorean school, Klaudios Ptolemaios, Leonard Euler, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Christian von Goldbach, Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholz, Karl Friedrich Gauss. The relation with the ancient chinese schools of cosmography has been discussed: From the the Pythagorean to the ancient Chinese schools of cosmography we find arithmo-geometrical applications of numbers which are emblematic, hold meaning or represent the essence of things, the author writes. It was Johannes Kepler who taught us this "transconstructive method" of forming classical and ancient begginings of structuralistic thinking into a system from which deductions can readily be made.

  4. ["Even electricity cannot work wonders!". Neglected achievements by German psychiatrists around 1880 in the treatment of depressions and psychoses].

    PubMed

    Steinberg, H

    2014-07-01

    Parallel to the recent reneurobiologization of psychiatry as a subject, therapies based on electricity and elektrcomagnetism are returning to mental health care. Around 1880, the application of brain stimulating treatment on patients was particularly popular among German psychiatrists. This fact has largely been ignored in historical psychiatric research as present day practices, in particular deep brain stimulation (DBS), have frequently been seen solely within the tradition of brain surgery. Against this background the present study aims to revive the first trials of non-surgical electrical brain stimulation on depressive and psychotic patients, highlighting a 2-part study published by Wilhelm Tigges. It was Tigges along with Rudolph Gottfried Arndt and Wilhelm Erb who tried to establish clear rules on the most beneficial application methods and doses. Interestingly, Tigges's therapy was successful in cases of severe depression with chronification potential, i.e. precisely the clinical picture for which brain stimulation therapies are reserved today as a last option and ascribed an easing and even curing potential. Trigges also found that electricity produced almost no positive effect whatsoever with madly insane patients and hence anticipated the current non-application of DBS on these patients. After 1890 electrotherapeutic approaches in psychiatry were marginalized, first and foremost as no clear and reliable rules could be verified for their application, nor could their mode of action be fully explained. The success of electrotherapy in psychiatry was also restricted due to limitations of the time, namely (1) electrophysiology only emerging as a discipline, (2) the electrophysical medical apparatus industry only beginning to be established and (3) the lack of generally accepted guidelines and electrotherapy restriction to individual, barely generalizable experience (eclecticism). Present day applications of electricity, mainly DBS, have overcome these

  5. Lunar Impact Basins: Stratigraphy, Sequence and Ages from Superposed Impact Crater Populations Measured from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fassett, C. I.; Head, J. W.; Kadish, S. J.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2012-01-01

    Impact basin formation is a fundamental process in the evolution of the Moon and records the history of impactors in the early solar system. In order to assess the stratigraphy, sequence, and ages of impact basins and the impactor population as a function of time, we have used topography from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to measure the superposed impact crater size-frequency distributions for 30 lunar basins (D = 300 km). These data generally support the widely used Wilhelms sequence of lunar basins, although we find significantly higher densities of superposed craters on many lunar basins than derived by Wilhelms (50% higher densities). Our data also provide new insight into the timing of the transition between distinct crater populations characteristic of ancient and young lunar terrains. The transition from a lunar impact flux dominated by Population 1 to Population 2 occurred before the mid-Nectarian. This is before the end of the period of rapid cratering, and potentially before the end of the hypothesized Late Heavy Bombardment. LOLA-derived crater densities also suggest that many Pre-Nectarian basins, such as South Pole-Aitken, have been cratered to saturation equilibrium. Finally, both crater counts and stratigraphic observations based on LOLA data are applicable to specific basin stratigraphic problems of interest; for example, using these data, we suggest that Serenitatis is older than Nectaris, and Humboldtianum is younger than Crisium. Sample return missions to specific basins can anchor these measurements to a Pre-Imbrian absolute chronology.

  6. [Conception of the history of science in the interpretation of Bogdan Suchodolski].

    PubMed

    Lietz, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    In the article is presented the conception of the history of science in the interpretation of Bogdan Suchodolski. Having described the conception of the history of science created by George Sarton (1884-1956), whose thought was influenced by positivistic philosophy of August Comte, the idea of the history of science of Johan Nordstr6m (1891-1967), who was inspired by the system of Wilhelm Dilthey, and the materialistic conception of the history of science, which was represented, among others, by John Desmond Bernal (1901-1971), the author is making an attempt at revealing to what extent Bogdan Suchodolski was inspired by the above-mentioned visions of the history of science. Having defined the history of science as the history of scientific activity of people and their consciousness formed by the activity, Bogdan Suchodolski applied in the field of his own conception of the history of science the ideas that were put forward by German thinkers and philosophers, and were connected with a way of understanding culture as the constant development of national awareness, which can be exemplified with different dimensions of culture. Undoubtedly, identifying the history of Polish science with constitutive element of the history of national culture and paying attention to the conceptions tending not only to explaining, but also understanding phenomena, B. Suchodolski was influenced by Alfred Vierkandt's and Wilhelm Dilthey's thought. The present article includes several reflections on the conception of the history of science, which was created by B. Suchodolski. Among others, we can find here detailed information on how B. Suchodolski understood: the history of science, its subject, aim and methodology; its status in modern social consciousness and as the history of truth; relations between history of science and theory of science and scientific policy, history of science and the problem of unity and diversity of scientific thinking, history of science and ideas, history of

  7. The I Ching and the psyche-body connection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shirley S Y

    2005-04-01

    Carl G. Jung's fateful meeting with Richard Wilhelm in 1929 has helped to build a bridge of depth psychological understanding between the East and the West. When Jung emerged from his 'confrontation with the unconscious', he felt validated by Wilhelm in his discovery of the healing power of medieval alchemical symbolism for the European psyche. Analytical psychology however offers a scientific, psychological understanding of Chinese wisdom as contained in the I Ching and Taoist alchemy. The Taoist alchemical tradition (also known as the Inner Elixir tradition of which 'The Secret of the Golden Flower' is a sample text) is based on the premise that psychological experience of the Tao can be achieved through mental and physiological means such as breathing and meditative techniques, gymnastics, dietary regimens such as fasting, consumption of medicinal herbs and minerals, and special sexual practices. This tradition incorporates the I Ching and traditional Chinese medicine in the alchemical opus. Taoist alchemy assumes the primacy of the physical body in the process of self-realization. The psychological and cosmic forces of the trigrams of the I Ching are stored in the internal organs of the body and are the basic material for the experience of Tao. The internal organs are the foundation of the material and subtle bodies and through cultivation, the body becomes spiritualized as the spirits are embodied. The body as a reflection of the entire cosmos becomes the residence of the gods. The realization of a new consciousness is symbolized by the hexagram Fu, meaning rebirth. The Chinese notion of Tao coincides with Jung's postulation of the unus mundus, the unity of existence which underlies the duality of psyche and matter, the psycho-physical background of existence. In this light, in the world of inner experience, East and West follow similar paths symbolically. PMID:15817045

  8. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and antimicrobial activity of mono-, bi- and tri-nuclear metal complexes of a new Schiff base ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebl, Magdy; Khalil, Saied M. E.; Ahmed, Saleh A.; Medien, Hesham A. A.

    2010-09-01

    Condensation of o-acetoacetylphenol and 1,2-diaminopropane in 1:1 molar ratio under condition of high dilution yielded the mono-condensed dibasic Schiff base ligand with a N 2O 2 donors. The mono-condensed ligand has been used for further condensation with 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzaldehyde to obtain the new asymmetrical dicompartmental Schiff base ligand, H 3L, with N 2O 3 donors. The structure of the ligand was elucidated by analytical and spectroscopic tools (IR, 1H and 13C NMR spectra) which indicated that the coordinating sites are oxygen atoms of the phenolic OH groups, nitrogen atoms of the azomethine groups and the oxygen atom of the ketonic group. Reactions of the ligand with metal salts yielded mono- and homo-bi-nuclear complexes formulated as [M(HL)], where M dbnd Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II), [Fe(H 2L)Cl 2(H 2O)]ṡ2½H 2O, [Fe 2(HL)(ox)Cl 3(H 2O) 2]ṡ5H 2O, [UO 2(H 2L)(OAc)(H 2O) 2], [VO(H 3L)(SO 4)(H 2O)]ṡH 2O, [M 2(L)Cl(H 2O) 2]ṡ½H 2O, where M dbnd Co(II) and Ni(II) and [Cu(H 2L)Cl]. The mononuclear Ni(II) complex, [Ni(HL)], was used to synthesize homo- and hetero-bi- and tri-nuclear complexes with the molecular formulae [Ni 2(L)Cl(H 2O) 2], [Ni 2(L) 2FeCl(H 2O)]ṡH 2O and [Ni 2(HL) 2CoCl 2]. The structures of the complexes were characterized by various techniques such as elemental and thermal analyses, IR, 1H and 13C NMR, mass and electronic spectra as well as conductivity and magnetic moment measurements. Square-planar and octahedral geometries are suggested for the Cu(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes, octahedral geometry for the Fe(III) and VO 2+ complexes while uranium(VI) ion is octa-coordinated in its complex. The Schiff base and its metal complexes were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against Gram positive bacteria ( Staphylococcus aureus), Gram negative bacteria ( Escherichia coli) and fungi ( Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus). The ligand and some of its complexes were found to be biologically active.

  9. Media event at ESOC: closest encounter between ESA's comet chaser Rosetta and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-02-01

    The critical close swingby of Mars is needed to use the gravity of Mars to modify the spacecraft’s speed and direction. Rosetta will emerge from its martian encounter pointed towards its next target, Earth ! It arrives for a second swingby of our home planet on 13 November (the first having already taken place on 4 March 2005). To take advantage of this upcoming closest of encounters with the Red Planet, Rosetta’s instruments - as well as those on its lander - will be switched on over predefined time slots to perform a series of scientific observations, including planetary imaging. Flight controllers at ESA’s European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) have already set everything ready for this crucial manoeuvre. Launched on 2 March 2004 on an Ariane 5 rocket, Rosetta is the first probe ever designed to enter orbit around a comet’s nucleus and release a lander onto its surface. Arriving at comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014, the probe will take over a year to conduct a thorough scientific study of this remnant of the primitive nebula which gave birth to our solar system some 4.6 billion years ago. By the end of its epic journey, Rosetta will have performed three Earth and one Mars swingbys in all. It will also have studied asteroids Steins and Lutetia, in September 2008 and July 2010 respectively. Media representatives wishing to follow this Rosetta Mars swingby from the ESOC control centre in Darmstadt/Germany are requested to complete and return the attached reply form. For further information, please contact : ESA Communication Department Media Relations Office Tel: +33(0)1.53.69.7155 Fax: +33(0)1.53.69.7690 Programme Rosetta Mars swingby 25 February 2007, 2 a.m. start 02:00 - Doors open & Filming opportunity in Mission Control Room 02:40 - Welcome by David Southwood, ESA Director of Science Programme 02:50 - Rosetta Mars swingby the manoeuvres and flight dynamics, Uwe Feucht, Head of Flight Dynamics Division/Team 03:00 - En route science, first images

  10. PREFACE: XV International Conference on Electrical Bio-Impedance (ICEBI) & XIV Conference on Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pliquett, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    . Structures down to sub-micrometer range and complex impedance measurements tools integrated at single chips are now affordable. Moreover, the introduction of alternative signals and data processing algorithms focuses on very fast and parallel electrical characterization which in turn pushes this technique to new applications and markets. Electrical impedance tomography today yields pictures in real time with a resolution that was impossible 10 years ago. The XVth International Conference on Electrical Bio-Impedance in conjunction with the XIVth Electrical Impedance Tomography ICEBI/EIT 2013 organized by the Institute for Bioprocessing and Analytical Measurement Techniques, Heilbad Heiligenstadt, Germany, together with the EIT-group at the University of Göttingen, Germany, brings world leading scientists in these fields together. It is a platform to present the latest developments in instrumentation and signal processing but also points to new applications, especially in the field of biosensors and non-linear phenomena. Two Keynote lectures will extend the view of the participants above the mainstream of bio-impedance measurement. Friederich Kremer (University of Leipzig) delivers the plenary lecture on broad bandwidth dielectric spectroscopy. New achievements in the research of ligand gated ionic channels will be presented by Klaus Benndorf (University of Jena). Leading scientists in the field of bio-impedance measurement, such as, Sverre Grimnes, Orjan Martinsen, Andrea Robitzki, Richard Bayford, Jan Gimsa and Mart Min will give lectures for students but also more experienced scientists in a pre-conference tutorial which is a good opportunity to learn or refresh the basics. List of committees Conference Chair Dr Uwe Pliquett Professor Dieter Beckmann Institut für Bioprozess- und Analysenmesstechnik eV, Rosenhof, Heilbad Heiligenstadt, Germany Technical Program Chair Maik Hiller Conventus Congressmanagement & Marketing GmbH, Carl-Pulfrich-Str. 1 - 07745 Jena Pre

  11. PREFACE: XV International Conference on Electrical Bio-Impedance (ICEBI) & XIV Conference on Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pliquett, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    . Structures down to sub-micrometer range and complex impedance measurements tools integrated at single chips are now affordable. Moreover, the introduction of alternative signals and data processing algorithms focuses on very fast and parallel electrical characterization which in turn pushes this technique to new applications and markets. Electrical impedance tomography today yields pictures in real time with a resolution that was impossible 10 years ago. The XVth International Conference on Electrical Bio-Impedance in conjunction with the XIVth Electrical Impedance Tomography ICEBI/EIT 2013 organized by the Institute for Bioprocessing and Analytical Measurement Techniques, Heilbad Heiligenstadt, Germany, together with the EIT-group at the University of Göttingen, Germany, brings world leading scientists in these fields together. It is a platform to present the latest developments in instrumentation and signal processing but also points to new applications, especially in the field of biosensors and non-linear phenomena. Two Keynote lectures will extend the view of the participants above the mainstream of bio-impedance measurement. Friederich Kremer (University of Leipzig) delivers the plenary lecture on broad bandwidth dielectric spectroscopy. New achievements in the research of ligand gated ionic channels will be presented by Klaus Benndorf (University of Jena). Leading scientists in the field of bio-impedance measurement, such as, Sverre Grimnes, Orjan Martinsen, Andrea Robitzki, Richard Bayford, Jan Gimsa and Mart Min will give lectures for students but also more experienced scientists in a pre-conference tutorial which is a good opportunity to learn or refresh the basics. List of committees Conference Chair Dr Uwe Pliquett Professor Dieter Beckmann Institut für Bioprozess- und Analysenmesstechnik eV, Rosenhof, Heilbad Heiligenstadt, Germany Technical Program Chair Maik Hiller Conventus Congressmanagement & Marketing GmbH, Carl-Pulfrich-Str. 1 - 07745 Jena Pre

  12. CRISPR System Acquisition and Evolution of an Obligate Intracellular Chlamydia-Related Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Claire; Cissé, Ousmane H; Rusconi, Brigida; Kebbi-Beghdadi, Carole; Croxatto, Antony; Goesmann, Alexander; Collyn, François; Greub, Gilbert

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a new Chlamydia-related organism, Protochlamydia naegleriophila KNic, was discovered within a Naegleria amoeba. To decipher the mechanisms at play in the modeling of genomes from the Protochlamydia genus, we sequenced the full genome of Pr. naegleriophila, which includes a 2,885,090 bp chromosome and a 145,285 bp megaplasmid. For the first time within the Chlamydiales order, we describe the presence of a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system, the immune system of bacteria, located on the chromosome. It is composed of a small CRISPR locus comprising eight repeats and associated cas-cse genes of the subtype I-E. A CRISPR locus is also present within Chlamydia sp. Diamant, another Pr. naegleriophila strain, suggesting that the CRISPR system was acquired by a common ancestor of Pr. naegleriophila, after its divergence from Pr. amoebophila. Both nucleotide bias and comparative genomics approaches identified probable horizontal gene acquisitions within two and four genomic islands in Pr. naegleriophila KNic and Diamant genomes, respectively. The plasmid encodes an F-type conjugative system highly similar to 1) that found in the Pam100G genomic island of Pr. amoebophila UWE25 chromosome, as well as on the plasmid of Rubidus massiliensis and 2) to the three genes remaining in the chromosome of Parachlamydia acanthamoebae strains. Therefore, this conjugative system was likely acquired on an ancestral plasmid before the divergence of Parachlamydiaceae Overall, this new complete Pr. naegleriophila genome sequence enables further investigation of the dynamic processes shaping the genomes of the family Parachlamydiaceae and the genus Protochlamydia. PMID:27516530

  13. PREFACE: International Conference on Many Particle Spectroscopy of Atoms, Molecules, Clusters and Surfaces (MPS2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancarani, Lorenzo Ugo

    2015-04-01

    This volume contains a collection of contributions from the invited speakers at the 2014 edition of the International Conference on Many Particle Spectroscopy of Atoms, Molecules, Clusters and Surfaces held in Metz, France, from 15th to 18th July 2014. This biennial conference alternates with the ICPEAC satellite International Symposium on (e,2e), Double Photoionization and Related Topics, and is concerned with experimental and theoretical studies of radiation interactions with matter. These include many-body and electron-electron correlation effects in excitation, and in single and multiple ionization of atoms, molecules, clusters and surfaces with various projectiles: electrons, photons and ions. More than 80 scientists, from 19 different countries around the world, came together to discuss the most recent progress on these topics. The scientific programme included 28 invited talks and a poster session extending over the three days of the meeting. Amongst the 51 posters, 11 have been selected and were advertised through short talks. Besides, Professor Nora Berrah gave a talk in memory of Professor Uwe Becker who sadly passed away shortly after co-chairing the previous edition of this conference. Financial support from the Institut Jean Barriol, Laboratoire SRSMC, Groupement de Recherche THEMS (CNRS), Ville de Metz, Metz Métropole, Conseil Général de la Moselle and Région Lorraine is gratefully acknowledged. Finally, I would like to thank the members of the local committee and the staff of the Université de Lorraine for making the conference run smoothly, the International Advisory Board for building up the scientific programme, the sessions chairpersons, those who gave their valuable time in carefully refereeing the articles of this volume and last, but not least, all participants for contributing to lively and fruitful discussions throughout the meeting.

  14. PREFACE: 17th Pan-American Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Conference SRI2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gwyn P.; Revesz, Peter; Arp, Uwe

    2014-03-01

    These proceedings are a collection of the articles presented at the seventeenth Pan-American Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Conference SRI2013, held on the campus of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), located in Gaithersburg, Maryland, United States of America, 19-21 June, 2013. SRI2013 was jointly hosted by the Cornell University Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), and the Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF III) at NIST. This meeting's focus was clearly on instrumentation, thus fulfilling the intent of this SRI meeting series, which was initiated at NIST, then the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), in 1979. SRI2013 hosted more than 150 delegates, despite the new US governmental travel restrictions. This proceedings series aims to be an essential reference work for practitioners in the field. It primarily documents the evolution and development of techniques, but also recent scientific advances, that were presented during the two and a half days of the conference. We are extremely thankful to all the authors who contributed to making these proceedings a volume of reference as well as to the reviewers for their careful reading and constructive recommendations for improving the articles. Great thanks go to Robert Dragoset at NIST, for creating and maintaining the conference website and generating the conference logo. We are also thankful for the excellent support we received from the Conference Program at NIST, especially Kathy Kilmer and Angela Ellis. And we would like to dedicate these proceedings to the memory of Kathy Kilmer, who passed away on 15 October, 2013. NIST will not be the same without her. The Co-Editors: Uwe Arp (SURF/NIST) Peter Reversz (CHESS) Gwyn P Williams (Jefferson Lab)

  15. Summary of initial results from the Magnetized Dusty Plasma Experiment (MDPX) device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Edward

    2015-11-01

    Dusty (or complex) plasmas are four-component plasma systems consisting of electrons, ions, neutral atoms and charged, solid particulates. These particulates, i.e., the ``dust,'' become charged through interactions with the surrounding plasma particles and are therefore fully coupled to the background. The study of dusty plasmas began with astrophysical studies and has developed into a distinct area of plasma science with contributions to industrial, space, and fundamental plasma science. However, the vast majority of the laboratory studies are performed without the presence of a magnetic field. This is because, compared to the masses of the electrons and ions, the dust particles are significantly more massive and therefore the charge-to-mass ratio of the dust is very small. As a result, large (B > 1 T) magnetic fields are required to achieve conditions in which the dynamics of electrons, ions, and dust particles are dominated by the magnetic field. This presentation will provide a brief description of the design of the large bore (50 cm diameter x 158 cm long), multi-configuration, 4-Tesla class, superconducting magnet and integrated plasma chamber optimized for the study of dusty plasmas at high magnetic field - the MDPX device. The presentation will then focus on initial results of measurements made using MDPX - including observations of a new type of imposed ordered structures formed by the dust particles in a magnetized plasma, E x B driven flows of the particles, and observations of instabilities. This work is a collaboration of the author with Uwe Konopka (Auburn), Robert L. Merlino (Univ. of Iowa), Marlene Rosenberg (UCSD), and the MDPX team at Auburn University. Construction of the MDPX device was supported by the NSF-MRI program. Operations are supported by the NSF and DOE.

  16. Chlamydia trachomatis Transports NAD via the Npt1 ATP/ADP Translocase

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Derek J.; Fernández, Reinaldo E.

    2013-01-01

    Obligate intracellular bacteria comprising the order Chlamydiales lack the ability to synthesize nucleotides de novo and must acquire these essential compounds from the cytosol of the host cell. The environmental protozoan endosymbiont Protochlamydia amoebophila UWE25 encodes five nucleotide transporters with specificities for different nucleotide substrates, including ATP, GTP, CTP, UTP, and NAD. In contrast, the human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis encodes only two nucleotide transporters, the ATP/ADP translocase C. trachomatis Npt1 (Npt1Ct) and the nucleotide uniporter Npt2Ct, which transports GTP, UTP, CTP, and ATP. The notable absence of a NAD transporter, coupled with the lack of alternative nucleotide transporters on the basis of bioinformatic analysis of multiple C. trachomatis genomes, led us to re-evaluate the previously characterized transport properties of Npt1Ct. Using [adenylate-32P]NAD, we demonstrate that Npt1Ct expressed in Escherichia coli enables the transport of NAD with an apparent Km and Vmax of 1.7 μM and 5.8 nM mg−1 h−1, respectively. The Km for NAD transport is comparable to the Km for ATP transport of 2.2 μM, as evaluated in this study. Efflux and substrate competition assays demonstrate that NAD is a preferred substrate of Npt1Ct compared to ATP. These results suggest that during reductive evolution, the pathogenic chlamydiae lost individual nucleotide transporters, in contrast to their environmental endosymbiont relatives, without compromising their ability to obtain nucleotides from the host cytosol through relaxation of transport specificity. The novel properties of Npt1Ct and its conservation in chlamydiae make it a potential target for the development of antimicrobial compounds and a model for studying the evolution of transport specificity. PMID:23708130

  17. Distinción Empírica Entre Engagement y Trabajolismo en Enfermeras Hospitalarias de Japón: Efecto Sobre la Calidad del Sueño y el Desempeño Laboral

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Kazumi; Shimazu, Akihito; Kawakami, Norito; Takahashi, Masaya; Nakata, Akinori; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.

    2016-01-01

    Objetivo El objetivo de este estudio es demostrar la distinción entre engagement y trabajolismo, estudiando su relación con la calidad del sueño y el desempeño laboral. Método Un total de 447 enfermeras de 3 hospitales de Japón fueron entrevistadas mediante un cuestionario autoadministrado que incluía la escala Utrecht (UWES, Utrecht Work Engagement Scale), la Escala de Adicción al Trabajo Holandesa (DUWAS, Dutch Workaholism Scale), preguntas sobre la calidad del sueño (7 ítems) con respecto a (1) dificultad para conciliar el sueño, (2) dificultad para mantener el sueño, (3) despertar temprano por la mañana, (4) dormirse o tomar siestas durante el día, (5) somnolencia diurna excesiva en el trabajo, (6) dificultad para despertarse por la mañana, y (7) despertar cansado en la mañana, y el Cuestionario sobre Salud y Desempeño (CSD) de la Organización Mundial de la Salud. Resultados Los modelos de ecuaciones estructurales demostraron que el engagement se relaciona positivamente con la calidad del sueño y el rendimiento laboral, mientras que el trabajolismo tiene una relación negativa con la calidad del sueño y el desempeño laboral. Conclusión Los resultados indican que el engagement y el trabajolismo son conceptualmente diferentes. El primero tiene una connotación positiva, mientras que el segundo se asocia de manera negativa al bienestar (buena calidad del sueño y buen rendimiento en el trabajo). PMID:26752805

  18. CRISPR System Acquisition and Evolution of an Obligate Intracellular Chlamydia-Related Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Bertelli, Claire; Cissé, Ousmane H.; Rusconi, Brigida; Kebbi-Beghdadi, Carole; Croxatto, Antony; Goesmann, Alexander; Collyn, François; Greub, Gilbert

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a new Chlamydia-related organism, Protochlamydia naegleriophila KNic, was discovered within a Naegleria amoeba. To decipher the mechanisms at play in the modeling of genomes from the Protochlamydia genus, we sequenced the full genome of Pr. naegleriophila, which includes a 2,885,090 bp chromosome and a 145,285 bp megaplasmid. For the first time within the Chlamydiales order, we describe the presence of a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system, the immune system of bacteria, located on the chromosome. It is composed of a small CRISPR locus comprising eight repeats and associated cas-cse genes of the subtype I-E. A CRISPR locus is also present within Chlamydia sp. Diamant, another Pr. naegleriophila strain, suggesting that the CRISPR system was acquired by a common ancestor of Pr. naegleriophila, after its divergence from Pr. amoebophila. Both nucleotide bias and comparative genomics approaches identified probable horizontal gene acquisitions within two and four genomic islands in Pr. naegleriophila KNic and Diamant genomes, respectively. The plasmid encodes an F-type conjugative system highly similar to 1) that found in the Pam100G genomic island of Pr. amoebophila UWE25 chromosome, as well as on the plasmid of Rubidus massiliensis and 2) to the three genes remaining in the chromosome of Parachlamydia acanthamoebae strains. Therefore, this conjugative system was likely acquired on an ancestral plasmid before the divergence of Parachlamydiaceae. Overall, this new complete Pr. naegleriophila genome sequence enables further investigation of the dynamic processes shaping the genomes of the family Parachlamydiaceae and the genus Protochlamydia. PMID:27516530

  19. Holocene geological records of flood regime in French Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, Fabien; Wilhelm, Bruno; Giguet-Covex, Charline; Jenny, Jean-Philippe; Fouinat, Laurent; Sabatier, Pierre; Debret, Maxime; Révillon, Sidonie; Chapron, Emmanuel; Revel, Marie

    2014-05-01

    records represent the only way to reconstruct long-term trends in flood regimes, more efforts must still be pursued to get a more complete image of this complexity and further improve climate models. 1. Chapron et al. The Holocene 12, 177-185 (2002) 2. Arnaud et al. Quat. Sci. Rev. 51, 81-92 (2012) 3. Debret et al. Quat. Sci. Rev. 29, 2185-2200 (2010) 4. Arnaud et al. The Holocene 15, 420-428 (2005) 5. Revel-Rolland et al. Chem. Geol. 224, 183-200 (2005) 6. Wilhelm et al. Clim. Change 113, 563-581 (2012) 7. Giguet-Covex et al. Quat. Res. 77, 12-22 (2012) 8. Wilhelm et al. Quat. Res. 78, 1-12 (2012) 9. Wilhelm et al. J. Quat. Sci. 28, 189-199 (2013)

  20. Paperless or vanishing society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner Luke, Joy

    2002-06-01

    In the 1940s color photography became available and within a few years, extremely popular. As people switched from black and white photographs made with the old metallic silver process to the new color films, pictures taken to record their lives and families began a slow disappearing act. The various color processes, coupled with the substrates they were printed on, affected their longevity, but many color photographs taken from the late 1950s through the 1970s, and even into the 1980s, faded not only when exposed to the light, but also when stored in the dark. Henry Wilhelm's excellent book 'The Permanence and Care of Color Photographs' documents this history in detail. Today we are making another transition in the storage of pictures and information. There are questions about the longevity of different types of digital storage, and also of the images printed by various types of inkjet printers, or by laser printers using colored toners. Very expensive and very beautiful works of art produced on Iris printers are appearing in art exhibitions. Some of these are referred to as Giclee prints and are offered on excellent papers. Artists are told the prints will last a lifetime; and if by change they don't it is only necessary to make another print. Henry Wilhelm has begun to test and rate these images for lightfastness; however, his test method was developed for examining longevity in colored photographs. It is of interest to find out how these prints will hold up in the tests required for fine art materials. Thus far companies producing digital inks and printers have not invested the time and money necessary to develop an American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard method for evaluating the lightfastness of digital prints. However, it is possible to use ASTM D 5383, Standard Practice for Visual Determination of the Lightfastness of Art Materials by Art Technologists, to pinpoint colors that will fade in a short time, even though the test is not as

  1. Historical perspective on developmental concepts and terminology.

    PubMed

    Opitz, John M; Neri, Giovanni

    2013-11-01

    In their ontogeny and phylogeny all living beings are historical entities. The revolution in biology of the 18th and 19th centuries that did away with the scala naturae according to which we humans, the acme of creation, "made a little lower than the angels," also led to the gradual realization that a humble one-celled protist ("protoctist"), such as Entamoeba histolytica of ill repute [Margulis and Chapman, ] has the same 4-billion-year phylogeny as that of Homo sapiens, vivid testimony to common ancestry and the relatedness of all living beings on earth. The group of medical geneticists who assembled at the NIH, Bethesda, MD this January to address terms pertaining to human ontogeny, did so in the long tradition of Sydenham, Linnaeus, Meckel, Geoffroy St-Hilaire père et fils, Wilhelm His and so many others before who had over the previous two centuries wrestled as earnestly as they could with concepts of "classification" and nomenclature of developmental anomalies. The prior massive need for classification per se in medical morphology has diminished over the years in favor of ever more sophisticated understanding of pathogenesis and cause through experimental biology and genetics; however, in the winter of 2013 it was still found prudent to respect terminological precedent on general terms while recognizing recent advances in developmental pathology requiring clarification and definition of special terms. Efforts along similar lines instigated by the German Society of Anatomists at their first meeting in Leipzig in 1887 culminated, after intense years of work by hundreds of experts and consultants under the goad of Wilhelm His, in the Basel Nomina Anatomica [BNA, His (1895)]. His, himself, stated prefatorily that the BNA had no legislative weight, only an evanescent consensus of many to be amended in the future as needed and indicated. Without hubris, no one before or after will do the same. The more substantial the consensus the more permanent the structure

  2. The State of the Art of Medical Imaging Technology: from Creation to Archive and Back

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaohong W; Qian, Yu; Hui, Rui

    2011-01-01

    Medical imaging has learnt itself well into modern medicine and revolutionized medical industry in the last 30 years. Stemming from the discovery of X-ray by Nobel laureate Wilhelm Roentgen, radiology was born, leading to the creation of large quantities of digital images as opposed to film-based medium. While this rich supply of images provides immeasurable information that would otherwise not be possible to obtain, medical images pose great challenges in archiving them safe from corrupted, lost and misuse, retrievable from databases of huge sizes with varying forms of metadata, and reusable when new tools for data mining and new media for data storing become available. This paper provides a summative account on the creation of medical imaging tomography, the development of image archiving systems and the innovation from the existing acquired image data pools. The focus of this paper is on content-based image retrieval (CBIR), in particular, for 3D images, which is exemplified by our developed online e-learning system, MIRAGE, home to a repository of medical images with variety of domains and different dimensions. In terms of novelties, the facilities of CBIR for 3D images coupled with image annotation in a fully automatic fashion have been developed and implemented in the system, resonating with future versatile, flexible and sustainable medical image databases that can reap new innovations. PMID:21915232

  3. Analytical psychology and Daoist inner alchemy: a response to C.G. Jung's 'Commentary on The Secret of the Golden Flower'.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Caifang Jeremy

    2009-09-01

    This paper provides a historical, religious-philosophical context for the study of the Daoist text known as The Secret of the Golden Flower. An updated study is conducted into the controversy over the source of the text including the editions translated by Richard Wilhelm and Thomas Cleary. The main teachings of the text and the basics of two major denominations of Daoism are introduced to ground later critiques of Jung's commentary. The psychodynamics of analytical psychology, especially those concerned with integration of unconscious contents and the realization of the self (individuation) are compared with the psycho-spiritual dynamics of integration in Eastern spirituality based on the Golden Flower text. The paper concludes that it was amiss for Jung to have equated the Western 'unconscious' with states of higher consciousness in Eastern meditation practices, although his claim that Eastern higher consciousness is characterized by a nebulous state of non-intentionality does raise questions about the appropriateness of calling Eastern meditative states 'consciousness'. A new concept is required to characterize the special qualities of this psychic state shared generally by Eastern spiritual traditions and a more meaningful comparison may be found in Jung's concept of the self. PMID:19765138

  4. Helgoland und die Erforschung der marinen Benthosalgen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollenhauer, D.; Lüning, K.

    1988-09-01

    Early phycological research on the island of Helgoland was performed by amateur phycologists from the adjacent coastal regions of Germany (Bremen, Hamburg, Lower Saxony and Schleswig-Holstein). These pioneers were followed by professionals, and by collectors from the mainland universities, particularly from Berlin. This second phase group includes the naturalist Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg, the zoologists Johannes Müller, Ernst Haeckel and Anton Dohrn, and the botanists Alexander Braun, Nathanael Pringsheim, and Ferdinand Cohn. The leading marine phycologist in Germany, towards the end of the 19th century, was Johannes Reinke, who finally worked at the University of Kiel. Paul Kuckuck's doctoral thesis had been supervised by Reinke who recommended him for the post of the first curator of botany at the Biological Station of Helgoland, which was founded in 1892. Kuckuck worked on the island from 1892 to 1914. After World War I, and after Kuckuck's untimely death, Wilhelm Nienburg became the second curator of botany on Helgoland, from 1921 to 1923. The next permanent phycologist on the island, from 1925 to 1936, was Ernst Schreiber. He was followed in 1936 by Peter Kornmann, who retired in 1972 but still continues as a research worker, together with Paul-Heinz Sahling, who started to work as a technical assistant under the guidance of Ernst Schreiber in 1927.

  5. ["W. Bölsche's precious book". Freud and German evolutionism in the beginning of the 20th century].

    PubMed

    Amouroux, Rémy

    2004-01-01

    Wilhelm Bölsche (1861-1939) is the author of a poetic history of the evolution of love entitled Das Liebesleben in der Natur (1898-1903). This work, inspired by the writings of biologist Ernst Haeckel, was greatly successful in Germany at the beginning of the 20th century. Freud kept a copy of the three volumes in his London library and cites the text in his lectures on an Introduction to psychoanalysis. Bölsche develops an Entwicklungsgeschichte (history of evolution) of the distinguishing sexuality of several types of love (oral, anal and urinary). In addition, he describes the "zoological reactionary" homosexual and ties this sexual behaviour to the history of the development of anal sexuality. This paper will address an excerpt on this topic from Bölsche's text that has been translated for the occasion. The task at hand is to prepare the ground for a study of German evolutionism, both popular and scientific, and its ties to psychoanalysis. PMID:15368944

  6. Haeckel's ABC of evolution and development.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Michael K; Keuck, Gerhard

    2002-11-01

    One of the central, unresolved controversies in biology concerns the distribution of primitive versus advanced characters at different stages of vertebrate development. This controversy has major implications for evolutionary developmental biology and phylogenetics. Ernst Haeckel addressed the issue with his Biogenetic Law, and his embryo drawings functioned as supporting data. We re-examine Haeckel's work and its significance for modern efforts to develop a rigorous comparative framework for developmental studies. Haeckel's comparative embryology was evolutionary but non-quantitative. It was based on developmental sequences, and treated heterochrony as a sequence change. It is not always clear whether he believed in recapitulation of single characters or entire stages. The Biogenetic Law is supported by several recent studies -- if applied to single characters only. Haeckel's important but overlooked alphabetical analogy of evolution and development is an advance on von Baer. Haeckel recognized the evolutionary diversity in early embryonic stages, in line with modern thinking. He did not necessarily advocate the strict form of recapitulation and terminal addition commonly attributed to him. Haeckel's much-criticized embryo drawings are important as phylogenetic hypotheses, teaching aids, and evidence for evolution. While some criticisms of the drawings are legitimate, others are more tendentious. In opposition to Haeckel and his embryo drawings, Wilhelm His made major advances towards developing a quantitative comparative embryology based on morphometrics. Unfortunately His's work in this area is largely forgotten. Despite his obvious flaws, Haeckel can be seen as the father of a sequence-based phylogenetic embryology. PMID:12475051

  7. Leibniz's Observations on Hydrology: An Unpublished Letter on the Great Lombardy Flood of 1705.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Lloyd; Church, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Although the historical reputation of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716) largely rests on his philosophical and mathematical work, it is widely known that he made important contributions to many of the emerging but still inchoate branches of natural science of his day. Among the many scientific papers Leibniz published during his lifetime are ones on the nascent science we now know as hydrology. While Leibniz's other scientific work has become of increasing interest to scholars in recent years, his thinking about hydrology has been neglected, despite being relatively broad in extent, including as it does papers on the 'raising of vapours' and the formation of ice, as well as the separation of salt and fresh water. That list can now be extended still further following the discovery of a previously unpublished letter of Leibniz's on the causes of the devastating Lombardy flood of October and November 1705. This letter, which will be the focus of our paper, reveals the depth of Leibniz's understanding of key hydrological processes. In it, he considers various mechanisms for the flood, such as heavy rains on high ground, underwater earthquakes, and a mountain collapse. Over the course of the paper we examine each of these mechanisms in depth, and show that Leibniz was in the vanguard of hydrological thinking. We also show that the letter contains one of the first scholarly attempts to apply aspects of the still-forming notion of the hydrological cycle to account for a flood event. PMID:26221837

  8. From ‘Nerve Fiber Regeneration’ to ‘Functional Changes’ in the Human Brain—On the Paradigm-Shifting Work of the Experimental Physiologist Albrecht Bethe (1872–1954) in Frankfurt am Main

    PubMed Central

    Stahnisch, Frank W.

    2016-01-01

    Until the beginning 1930’s the traditional dogma that the human central nervous system (CNS) did not possess any abilities to adapt functionally to degenerative processes and external injuries loomed large in the field of the brain sciences (Hirnforschung). Cutting-edge neuroanatomists, such as the luminary Wilhelm Waldeyer (1836–1921) in Germany or the Nobel Prize laureate Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852–1934) in Spain, debated any regenerative and thus “plastic” properties in the human brain. A renewed interest arose in the scientific community to investigate the pathologies and the healing processes in the human CNS after the return of the high number of brain injured war veterans from the fronts during and after the First World War (1914–1918). A leading research center in this area was the “Institute for the Scientific Study of the Effects of Brain Injuries,” which the neurologist Ludwig Edinger (1855–1918) had founded shortly before the war. This article specifically deals with the physiological research on nerve fiber plasticity by Albrecht Bethe (1872–1954) at the respective institute of the University of Frankfurt am Main. Bethe conducted here his paradigmatic experimental studies on the pathophysiological and clinical phenomena of peripheral and CNS regeneration. PMID:26941616

  9. [The centennial of oxygen-therapy (1902 - 2002)--reassessing its history. Part I: "The long way of oxygen"--from its discovery to its implementation as a rational therapy in anaesthesia and emergency-medicine].

    PubMed

    Strätling, M; Schmucker, P

    2002-12-01

    This historical survey in two parts analyses the history of inhalative oxygen therapy and its interactions with the history of anaesthesiology. For this purpose, we will start with illustrating "the long way of oxygen" from its first isolation by Carl Wilhelm Scheele (1772) and Joseph Priestley (1774) to its breakthrough for therapeutic application in the 20th century. We will show that the two main factors delaying the successful implementation of a truly rational oxygen therapy were of technical nature: The complicated and costly production of the gas and insufficient means to apply it continuously and with reliable and sufficient dosages to the patients. Both problems could not be satisfactorily solved until 1902. From this year on, however, the "Linde Process" allowed cheap mass-production of oxygen. Simultaneously, various inventions of modern pressure gas technology allowed to solve the application problems. Here, a special significance is to be awarded to pressure reducing valves. These were first introduced into medical technology by Draeger Inc. (Lübeck/Germany) on a significant scale, proving particularly successful in anaesthesia and rescue-devices (e. g. in the "Roth-Draeger Anaesthesia Apparatus" [1902]). Critically discussing earlier research on the history of oxygen therapy, we therefore propose a historical reassessment, accepting the year 1902 as the internationally decisive "turning point" towards the development of modern oxygen therapy. PMID:12469283

  10. Fritz Reiche and German Refugee Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bederson, Benjamin

    2003-04-01

    Fritz Reiche (1883-1969) was a distinguished theoretical physicist, a student and colleague of Wilhelm Roentgen, Max Planck, Fritz Haber, Rudolf Ladenburg, James Franck, Max Born, Max von Laue and other early luminaries. He was coauthor of the famous Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule, and author of the seminal book The Quantum Theory, first published in 1920. He was one of the last Jewish physicists to leave Germany during the Nazi period, in 1941. In his book "Heisenberg's War" Thomas Powers relates that Reiche bore news of German work on nuclear fission, in a message from Friedrich Houtermans to Wigner and others in Princeton, where Reiche lived in Einstein's home during the summer of 1941. Reiche's son Hans later claimed that this incident played a significant role in convincing Einstein to write that letter to President Roosevelt. In this talk I will relate the difficulties Reiche experienced, first in leaving Germany and then in reestablishing his physics career in the US. He finally obtained an adjunct position at NYU where he served until his retirement. The role played by the renowned Emergency Committee in Aid of Displaced Foreign Scholars will be discussed. The particular role played by Ladenburg, who was instrumental in obtaining a small grant for Reiche permitting him to obtain a US visa, in helping many physicists leave Nazi Germany and occupied countries, will also be described.

  11. Tungsten Isotopes, Formation of the Moon, and Lopsided Addition to Earth and Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2015-06-01

    Two studies use vast improvements in measuring tungsten (W) isotopic composition to show that the Moon has a higher 182W/184W ratio than does the modern terrestrial mantle. The studies, done by Mathieu Touboul and colleagues at the University of Maryland, USA and Thomas Kruijer and colleagues at Westfalische Wilhelms University, Munster, Germany, required developing improved isotope separation and measurement techniques in order to make the measurements accurate and precise enough to see the small difference between lunar and terrestrial samples. The Moon has 182W/184W about 25 parts per million higher than the Earth. This is consistent with an interesting story told in both papers: the Moon and Earth both had the same W isotopic composition after the giant impact that formed the Moon, but the Earth acquired a disproportionate amount of chondritic material afterwards, which decreased the terrestrial 182W/184W value. The idea is consistent with current models of the numbers of projectiles that could have intersected the Earth-Moon system as planetary accretion was winding down. The implication is that immediately after the Moon formed it had the same tungsten isotopic composition as the Earth, an important fact that models for the giant impact origin of the Moon must explain.

  12. A review of the history of U.S. radiation protection regulations, recommendations, and standards.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cynthia Gillian

    2005-02-01

    Shortly after the discovery of x rays by Wilhelm Konrad Roentgen in 1895, and the isolation of the element radium by Pierre and Marie Curie three years later, the fascination with and potential for an array of uses of ionizing radiation in medicine, science, and technology was born. As with any new technology, there was a need to balance both the beneficial and potential detrimental effects of uses of these new technologies for the advancement of humankind. In the early days, radiation hazards were not well understood. Over the decades increasing concerns in the scientific community and lay population demanded that standardized guidance and recommendations be developed for the use of ionizing radiation. Today, U.S. radiation protection standards and recommendations to protect the occupational worker, members of the general public, and the environment are numerous and complex. This review summarizes the history of the development and application of radiation protection standards and regulations to assure the safe use of radiation and radioactive materials. The evolution and roles of international and national scientific recommending and regulatory organizations that shape U.S. radiation protection policy are described and discussed. PMID:15650586

  13. A review of the history of U.S. radiation protection regulations, recommendations, and standards.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cynthia G

    2005-06-01

    Shortly after the discovery of x rays by Wilhelm Konrad Roentgen in 1895, and the isolation of the element radium by Pierre and Marie Curie three years later, the fascination with and potential for an array of uses of ionizing radiation in medicine, science, and technology was born. As with any new technology, there was a need to balance both the beneficial and potential detrimental effects of uses of these new technologies for the advancement of humankind. In the early days, radiation hazards were not well understood. Over the decades increasing concerns in the scientific community and lay population demanded that standardized guidance and recommendations be developed for the use of ionizing radiation. Today, U.S. radiation protection standards and recommendations to protect the occupational worker, members of the general public, and the environment are numerous and complex. This review summarizes the history of the development and application of radiation protection standards and regulations to assure the safe use of radiation and radioactive materials. The evolution and roles of international and national scientific recommending and regulatory organizations that shape U.S. radiation protection policy are described and discussed. PMID:15891462

  14. Theory and practice of dressed coherent states in circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Frank; Govia, Luke C. G.

    In the dispersive regime of qubit-cavity coupling, classical cavity drive populates the cavity, but leaves the qubit state unaffected. However, the dispersive Hamiltonian is derived after both a frame transformation and an approximation. Therefore, to connect to external experimental devices, the inverse frame transformation from the dispersive frame back to the lab frame is necessary. We show that in the lab frame the system is best described by an entangled state known as the dressed coherent state, and thus even in the dispersive regime, entanglement is generated between the qubit and the cavity. Also, we show that further qubit evolution depends on both the amplitude and phase of the dressed coherent state. This provides a limitation to readout in the dispersive regime. We show that only in the limit of infinite measurement time is this protocol QND, as the formation of a dressed coherent state in the qubit-cavity system applies an effective rotation to the qubit state. We show how this rotation can be corrected by a unitary operation, leading to improved qubit initialization by measurement and unitary feedback.] L.C.G. Govia and F.K. Wllhelm Phys. Rev. Applied 4, 054001 (2015) LC.G. Govia and F.K. Wilhelm, arXiv:1506.04997 Supported by the ARO under contract W911NF-14-1-0080 and the European Union through ScaleQIT. LCGG acknowledges support from NSERC through an NSERC PGS-D.

  15. Directionality Effect in Double Conditionals.

    PubMed

    Espino, Orlando; Sánchez-Curbelo, Isana; Bolaños-Medina, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Directionality effect in deductive reasoning is a very well-known phenomenon that shows that the percentage of forward or backward inferences that participants make depends on the conditional form used. A new extension of the semantic hypothesis (Oberauer & Wilhelm, 2000) is presented to explain the directionality effect in double conditionals with different directionality. This hypothesis claims that the directional effect depends on which term plays the role of relatum. It also makes several novel claims which have been confirmed in three experiments: Experiments 1 and 2 showed there were more forward than backward inferences when the end-term that played the role of relatum was in the first premise, experiment 1: t (45) = 2.73, p < .01, experiment 2: t (38) = 12.06, p < .05, but there were more backward than forward inferences when the end-term that played the role of relatum was in the second premise, experiment 1: t (45) = 2.84, p < .01, experiment 2: t (38) = 2.21, p < .04. Experiment 3 showed that there was no directional effect when both end-terms played the role of relatum, t (34) = 1.39, p = .17, or when both middle-terms (or neither of the end-terms) played the role of relatum, t (34) = .78, p = .44. These experiments confirmed the predictions of the new extension of the semantic hypothesis. PMID:26239471

  16. G. F. Parrot and the theory of unconscious inferences.

    PubMed

    Allik, Jüri; Konstabel, Kenn

    2005-01-01

    In 1839, Georg Friedrich Parrot (1767-1852) published a short note about a peculiar visual phenomenon--the diminishing of the size of external objects situated at a relatively small distance from the window of a fast-moving train. For the explanation of this illusion, Parrot proposed a concept of unconscious inferences, a very rapid syllogistic conclusion from two premises, which anticipated the revival of Alhazen's theory of unconscious inferences by Hermann von Helmholtz, Wilhelm Wundt, and John Stuart Mill. He also advanced the notion that the speed of mental processes is not infinitely high and that it can be measured by means of systematic experimentation. Although Parrot was only partly correct in the description of the movement-induced changes of the perceived size, his general intention to understand basic mechanisms of the human mind was in harmony with the founding ideas of experimental psychology: it is possible to study the phenomena of the mind in the same general way that the physical world is studied, either in terms of mechanical or mathematical laws. PMID:16196051

  17. The birth of experimental psychology in Germany between psychophysical methods and physiological theories.

    PubMed

    Sinatra, Maria

    2006-01-01

    In 1879 Wundt's laboratory of psychology was opened in Leipzig, and it has been the landmark ever since for the beginning of modern experimental psychology. Its founder, Wilhelm Maximilian Wundt, was the first to successfully demarcate the areas of scientific psychology as being distinct from either physiology or philosophy, thus guaranteeing the survival of psychology, which was regarded as an autonomous discipline set upon a secure institutional framework. This paper attempts to clarify the basic facts and concepts related to the roots of scientific psychology in Germany, i.e., the context in which the "Founding Father" worked, as well as of those predecessors who proposed the topics and apparatus of his laboratory. Attention will be paid in particular to the psychophysical methods of Weber and Fechner, especially in regard to colour perception. In this context, an outline is presented of the history of reaction time experiments in astronomy, physiology, and psychology, and of the role played by the scientific instruments. It is shown how the methodology of physics and physiology contributed to the emancipation of scientific psychology and to the formation of its orientation. PMID:19569432

  18. [The nasal speculum. Its historical development and remarks on the history of rhinoscopy].

    PubMed

    Rauchfuss, A

    1985-11-01

    The examination of the nose has been known to the ancient Egyptian medical doctors (Papyrus Ebers), and is exactly described by Hippocrates (460-377 B. C.). It has been performed in direct sunlight until the 13th century when candle light was recommended by Arnold de Villanova. However, G. C. Arranzi, in the 15th century, used a glass flask, filled with water, directing candle light through it into the patient's nose. The first endoscopic lamps appeared during the 18th century. The nasal speculum was first mentioned by Guy de Chauliac (13th century) and was illustrated for the first time by Arcolano (14th century). Fabricius Hildanus (1560-1634) constructed an aural speculum which was nearly identical to the nasal specula of today. It was developed further by Peret (18th century) and Wilhelm Kramer (1801-1875) to the type of nasal speculum which is still. Predecessors of the nasal speculum are specula which were in use for the examination of the vagina and the anus. The eldest specimens were found in Pompeji, the city that was destroyed in 76 A. D. These specula consisted of two or three blades which opened by pressure or by means of a crank. The prototype of these specula is a tubular speculum as described by the so-called Ayurvedic doctors of ancient Indian medicine (Ayurveda of Suşruta ca. 500 B. C.). PMID:3908856

  19. From Rational Numbers to Dirac's Bra and Ket: Symbolic Representation of Physical Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, Salvo

    2002-05-01

    Beginning at least in the nineteenth century, symbols used by physicists in their equations interacted with their physical concepts. In the 1850s, Wilhelm Eduard Weber introduced a more rational order into symbolization by adopting an absolute system of units, and thus expressing electrodynamic laws in the form of algebraic equations instead of proportionality relationships, the formerly accepted representation of physical laws. In the 1860s, James Clerk Maxwell made a further advance by using dimensional quantities, and more complex symbolic forms such as gradient, convergence, rotor, and the like, in his electromagnetic and kinetic theories. In the twentieth century, Werner Heisenberg, Max Born, Erwin Schrödinger, and others introduced new symbols for complex numbers, operators, and matrices, thus passing from the representation of metrical properties of physical systems to higher-level mathematical objects. This process was enhanced in modern theoretical physics through the introduction of matrices, creation and destruction operators, Paul A. M. Dirac's q and c numbers, and so on. In the 1930s, Dirac radicalized this transformation of symbols, being aware of the profound modification in the method and scope of the mathematical-physical relationship it entailed.

  20. The history of tissue tension.

    PubMed

    Peters, W S; Tomos, A D

    1996-06-01

    In recent years the phenomenon of tissue tension and its functional connection to elongation growth has regained much interest. In the present study we reconstruct older models of mechanical inhomogenities in growing plant organs, in order to establish an accurate historical background for the current discussion. We focus on the iatromechanic model developed in Stephen Hales' Vegetable Staticks, Wilhelm Hofmeister's mechanical model of negative geotropism, Julius Sachs' explanation of the development of tissue tension, and the differential-auxin-response-hypothesis by Kenneth Thimann and Charles Schneider. Each of these models is considered in the context of its respective historic and theoretical environment. In particular, the dependency of the biomechanical hypotheses on the cell theory and the hormone concept is discussed. We arrive at the conclusion that the historical development until the middle of our century is adequately described as a development towards more detailed explanations of how differential tensions are established during elongation growth in plant organs. Then we compare with the older models the structure of more recent criticism of hormonal theories of tropic curvature, and particularly the epidermal-growth-control hypothesis of Ulrich Kutschera. In contrast to the more elaborate of the older hypotheses, the recent models do not attempt an explanation of differential tensions, but instead focus on mechanical processes in organs, in which tissue tension already exists. Some conceptual implications of this discrepancy, which apparently were overlooked in the recent discussion, are briefly evaluated. PMID:11541099

  1. The state of the art of medical imaging technology: from creation to archive and back.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaohong W; Qian, Yu; Hui, Rui

    2011-01-01

    Medical imaging has learnt itself well into modern medicine and revolutionized medical industry in the last 30 years. Stemming from the discovery of X-ray by Nobel laureate Wilhelm Roentgen, radiology was born, leading to the creation of large quantities of digital images as opposed to film-based medium. While this rich supply of images provides immeasurable information that would otherwise not be possible to obtain, medical images pose great challenges in archiving them safe from corrupted, lost and misuse, retrievable from databases of huge sizes with varying forms of metadata, and reusable when new tools for data mining and new media for data storing become available. This paper provides a summative account on the creation of medical imaging tomography, the development of image archiving systems and the innovation from the existing acquired image data pools. The focus of this paper is on content-based image retrieval (CBIR), in particular, for 3D images, which is exemplified by our developed online e-learning system, MIRAGE, home to a repository of medical images with variety of domains and different dimensions. In terms of novelties, the facilities of CBIR for 3D images coupled with image annotation in a fully automatic fashion have been developed and implemented in the system, resonating with future versatile, flexible and sustainable medical image databases that can reap new innovations. PMID:21915232

  2. Are the alleged remains of Johann Sebastian Bach authentic?

    PubMed

    Zegers, Richard H C; Maas, Mario; Koopman, A Ton G; Maat, George J R

    2009-02-16

    A skeleton alleged to be that of Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) was exhumed from a graveyard in Leipzig, Germany, in 1894, but its authenticity is not established. In 1895, anatomist Wilhelm His concluded from his examination of the skeleton and reconstruction of the face that it most likely belonged to Bach. In 1949, surgeon Wolfgang Rosenthal noticed exostoses on the skeleton and on x-rays of 11 living organists and proposed a condition, Organistenkrankheit, which he interpreted as evidence that the skeleton was Bach's. However, our critical assessment of the remains analysis raises doubts: the localisation of the grave was dubious, and the methods used by His to reconstruct the face are controversial. Also, our study of the pelvic x-rays of 12 living professional organists failed to find evidence for the existence of Organistenkrankheit. We believe it is unlikely that the skeleton is that of Bach; techniques such as DNA analysis might help resolve the question but, to date, church authorities have not approved their use on the skeleton. PMID:19220191

  3. Industrial Efficiency and Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Crowden, G. P.

    1930-01-01

    The problems of industrial efficiency and fatigue offer increasing scope for the use of that special knowledge of human life with which medical men are equipped by their training. Success and prosperity of industry depend as much on health and efficiency of workers as on the efficiency of machines. Impetus given by European War to study of this human factor; national necessity led to establishment of Health of Munition Workers Committee which later developed into the Industrial Fatigue Research—now the Industrial Health Research—Board of the Medical Research Council. In Germany extensive investigations are now pursued at the Kaiser-Wilhelm Institut für Arbeitsphysiologie, at Dortmund, into such problems as relationship of age to capacity for heavy muscular work, influence of diet and nutrition on human efficiency, and optimum height of stairs up which loads have to be carried; new system of training apprentices developed in Germany since the war. Factors influencing efficiency and capacity for work of employees may be placed in two general groups, intra-factory conditions, and extra-factory conditions. Many of these factors have been investigated in this country and in America. In particular, the effect of the environmental conditions of temperature, humidity and air-movement on human efficiency has been studied: but much remains to be done. PMID:19987375

  4. Genetics of the Steller's Sea Cow (Hydrodamalis gigas): A Study of Ancient Bone Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crerar, Lorelei D.

    Georg Wilhelm Steller was born 100 years before Darwin in 1709 and he was part of a vast exploration fifty years before Lewis and Clark explored America. Steller was important to the study of marine mammals because he was the only naturalist to see and describe the great northern sea cow ( Hydrodamalis gigas). Knowledge of an extinct population can be used to aid the conservation of a current population. Extraction of DNA from this extinct animal was performed in order to determine the population structure of the Steller's sea cow. A test was also developed that can definitively state whether or not a random bone sample came from H. gigas. This test could be used by the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to examine material distributed in the North Pacific to determine whether samples are legally traded extinct Steller's sea cow or illegally traded extant marine mammal species protected under the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA).

  5. The Beginning of Variable star astronomy in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsoldos, Endre

    Variable star astronomy began in Hungary as elsewhere: new objects have been recognized in the sky. Comets appeared in 16th - 17th century chronicles. The first mention of the new star of 1572 seems to be the "Prognosticon" of Wilhelm Misocacus, printed in 1578. New stars were discussed in the 17th century by Jesuits as well as Protestants. The work of Jacob Schnitzler is especially interesting from this point. The Cartesians dealt with new stars with less enthusiasm, they hardly mentioned them. The beginning of the 19th century saw the development of science in Hungarian, variable stars, however, were left out. The birth of variable star astronomy might be linked to the Ógyalla Observatory, originally a private observatory of Miklós Konkoly Thege. The 1885 supernova in the Andromeda Nebula were observed there, as well as the spectra of a few interesting variable stars. Theoretical astrophysics also has its beginnings in Ógyalla through the work of Radó Kövesligethy. Professional variable star astronomy started here in the early 20th century through the work of Antal Tass

  6. The Munsell Color System: a scientific compromise from the world of art.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Sally

    2014-09-01

    Color systems make accurate color specification and matching possible in science, art, and industry by defining a coordinate system for all possible color perceptions. The Munsell Color System, developed by the artist Albert Henry Munsell in the early twentieth century, has influenced color science to this day. I trace the development of the Munsell Color System from its origins in the art world to its acceptance in the scientific community. Munsell's system was the first to accurately and quantitatively describe the psychological experience of color. By considering the problems that color posed for Munsell's art community and examining his diaries and published material, I conclude that Munsell arrived at his results by remaining agnostic as to the scientific definition of color, while retaining faith that color perceptions could be objectively quantified. I argue that Munsell was able to interest the scientific community in his work because color had become a controversial topic between physicists and psychologists. Parts of Munsell's system appealed to each field, making it a workable compromise. For contrast, I suggest that three contemporary scientists with whom Munsell had contact--Wilhelm Ostwald, Ogden Rood, and Edward Titchener--did not reach the same conclusions in their color systems because they started from scientific assumptions about the nature of color. PMID:25812356

  7. The 25-foot Reflector of Johann H. Schröter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lühning, Felix

    In 1797 Johann Hieronymus Schröter (1745-1816), who was a keen amateur astronomer, built a 25-foot reflecting telescope which was at that time %highly regarded greatly admired in the astronomical world. Schröter, who had started his observations with minor instruments in 1782, was in correspondence with Sir William (Wilhelm) Herschel from whom he also got his first telescope mirrors. Later he began building copies of Herschelian telescopes. %[this means only one mirror]. Thus his biggest instrument, the 25-foot reflector, was in its optical parts largely inspired by Herschel, but the unusual mounting was developed by Schröter himself, who tried to find a new construction which seemed to him more practical for his purposes. Especially for the International Scientific Conference of the Astronomische Gesellschaft the author has built not only a 1:200 scale model of the former `Amtsgarten' in Lilienthal where Schröter had once erected his various instruments, but also a 1:25 scale reconstruction of the famous 25-foot reflector. With the help of these models the author in his lecture will give a description of the Schröter observatory, especially of the 25-foot telescope: how it was used, what observations were made with it, what defects it had and what improvements later became necessary.

  8. From fire in the belly to a boiling heart: fuel for participatory research.

    PubMed

    Hijane, Karima; Heyman, Carly; Bell, Maureen; Busby, Mary Beth

    2008-01-01

    It has been said that governmental bureaucracies lack the animating life force that is normally provided by the human conscience. Research efforts that include patients and their representatives in the planning and regulatory process can add back this animating life force, a force Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche describes "... that your self be in your deed as the mother is in her child-let that be your word concerning virtue." This paper comprises our invited introductory remarks as patient activists at this symposium, entitled "The Menstrual Cycle and Adolescent Health" and held in Potomac, Maryland in mid October 2007. Attendees included patients, patient advocates, and experts from a variety of fields and disciplines. While our stories have their share of pain, that pain developed into a passion to help others in similar circumstances. A consortium of passionate community activists interested in the menstrual cycle could play the role as a "governmental conscience" around this issue. Developing a community consortium initiated via partnerships between patient advocates and investigators could direct more attention and funding toward menstrual cycle research. PMID:18574202

  9. [Étienne Destot (1864-1918): the first radioanatomist in Lyon, France].

    PubMed

    Viard, B; Trost, O; Trouilloud, P; Salomon, C

    2014-03-01

    Destot was born in Dijon, France, in 1864. He began his education in Burgundy, then he started his preclinical curriculum in Lyon, France, from 1884. He had to leave Lyon, and spent some times in Algeria to treat a tuberculosis. He came back in Lyon as a resident in 1886. Destot worked as an assistant in the laboratory of anatomy of Leo Testut in 1880. His thesis, in 1892, analyzed mortality in the departments of surgery of the Lyon hospitals. The polemical results he presented compromised his surgical career. He went on as prosector by Leo Testut, and then became electrician-physician in 1895 (electrotherapy and galvanotherapy). Étienne Destot of Lyon, France, developed in 1895 the first radiography room ever at the Hôtel-Dieu of Lyon, France. Wilhelm Röntgen discovered the X-rays in the same year, and Destot felt his discovery could revolutionize the approach of anatomy and traumatology. He studied wrist, ankle and calcaneus fractures, and described a new anatomy: "traumatic anatomy". For example, he focused on the posterior talar surface hollow in posterior tarsus fractures. He proposed the term of "thalamus" for this articular surface; this term is nowadays widely used by the clinicians. He introduced the term of "third malleolus" to describe the posterior part of the distal extremity of the tibia. He was the first author to analyze the normal and pathological movements of the scaphoid bone and the lunatum in wrist extension. PMID:24646447

  10. Survey of viral populations within Lake Michigan nearshore waters at four Chicago area beaches

    PubMed Central

    Sible, Emily; Cooper, Alexandria; Malki, Kema; Bruder, Katherine; Watkins, Siobhan C.; Fofanov, Yuriy; Putonti, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    In comparison to the oceans, freshwater environments represent a more diverse community of microorganisms, exhibiting comparatively high levels of variability both temporally and spatially Maranger and Bird, Microb. Ecol. 31 (1996) 141–151. This level of variability is likely to extend to the world of viruses as well, in particular bacteria-infecting viruses (bacteriophages). Phages are known to influence bacterial diversity, and therefore key processes, in environmental niches across the globe Clokie et al., Bacteriophage 1 (2011) 31–45; Jacquet et al., Adv. Ocean Limn. 1 (2010) 97–141; Wilhelm and Suttle, Bioscience 49 (1999) 781–788; Bratback et al., Microb. Ecol. 28 (1994) 209–221. Despite their prevalence and likely critical role in freshwater environments, very few viral species have been characterized. Metagenomic approaches, however, have allowed for a glimpse into phage diversity. We collected surface water samples from four Chicago area beaches – Gillson Park, Montrose Beach, 57th Street Beach, and Calumet Beach – every two weeks from May 13 through August 5, 2014. Sampling was conducted with four biological replicates for each sampling date and location, resulting in 112 samples. DNA isolated from each of the individual samples for a given collection date/location was pooled together, with one exception – Calumet Beach on August 5, 2014 – in which each biological replicate was sequenced individually. Raw sequence data is available via NCBI’s SRA database (part of BioProject PRJNA248239). PMID:26380839

  11. Subsurface density mapping of the earth with cosmic ray muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki K. M.

    2013-10-01

    Since its original discovery by Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen in 1895, one of the directions of researchers pursued was an application of x-ray radiography to larger objects, while the advent of high voltage x-ray tubes allowed radiographs of industrial objects to be produced in a reasonable amount of time. In spite of the great motivation we have to survey the earth's interior, we now know that x rays are not sufficiently penetrative to successfully target geophysical objects. Our current knowledge about the cross sections of the muon with matter solves the problem about this x-ray's inspectable size limit. These particles do not interact strongly with matter, and those with relativistic momentum travel long distances penetrating deep into rock. By tracking the ray paths of the muon after passing through the object, the method gives researchers the ability to study the earth in new ways. The purpose of this article is to review recent progress in probing the earth's interior with muons.

  12. Fedor Krause: the first systematic use of X-rays in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Elhadi, Ali M; Kalb, Samuel; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Agrawal, Abhishek; Preul, Mark C

    2012-08-01

    Within a few months of Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen's discovery of x-rays in 1895, Fedor Krause acquired an x-ray apparatus and began to use it in his daily interactions with patients and for diagnosis. He was the first neurosurgeon to use x-rays methodically and systematically. In 1908 Krause published the first volume of text on neurosurgery, Chirurgie des Gehirns und Rückenmarks (Surgery of the Brain and Spinal Cord), which was translated into English in 1909. The second volume followed in 1911. This was the first published multivolume text totally devoted to neurosurgery. Although Krause excelled in and promoted neurosurgery, he believed that surgeons should excel at general surgery. Importantly, Krause was inclined to adopt technology that he believed could be helpful in surgery. His 1908 text was the first neurosurgical text to contain a specific chapter on x-rays ("Radiographie") that showed roentgenograms of neurosurgical procedures and pathology. After the revolutionary discovery of x-rays by Röntgen, many prominent neurosurgeons seemed pessimistic about the use of x-rays for anything more than trauma or fractures. Krause immediately seized on its use to guide and monitor ventricular drainage and especially for the diagnosis of tumors of the skull base. The x-ray images contained in Krause's "Radiographie" chapter provide a seminal view into the adoption of new technology and the development of neurosurgical technique and are part of neurosurgery's heritage. PMID:22853835

  13. From Gauß to Biermann: Highlights from the first 117 years of publications in Astronomische Nachrichten/Astronomical Notes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Berlepsch, R.; Strassmeier, K. G.

    2009-06-01

    We present facsimiles of some of the scientifically and historically most relevant papers published in Astronomische Nachrichten/Astronomical Notes (AN) between 1821 and 1938. Almost all of these papers were written and printed in German and it is sometimes not completely straightforward to find these original works and then to cite the historically correct version, e.g. in case of a series of articles or editorial letters. It was common during the early years that many contributions were made in form of letters to the editor. We present a summary for these original works with an English translation of their titles. Among the highlights are the originals of the discovery of stellar parallaxes by Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel, the discovery of the solar cycle by Heinrich Schwabe, the discovery of the planet Neptune by Johann Gottfried Galle, the first ever measured stellar radial velocity by Hermann Vogel, the discovery of radio emission from the Sun by Wilsing and Scheiner, the first ever conducted photoelectric photometry of stars by Paul Guthnick and up to the pioneering work by Karl Schwarzschild, Ejnar Hertzsprung, Erwin Finlay Freundlich and others. As a particular gimmick we present the still world record holding shortest paper ever published; by Johannes Hartmann in AN 226, 63 (1926) on Nova Pictoris. Our focus is on contributions in the early years and published until 1938 near the verge of the second world war.

  14. From 'Nerve Fiber Regeneration' to 'Functional Changes' in the Human Brain-On the Paradigm-Shifting Work of the Experimental Physiologist Albrecht Bethe (1872-1954) in Frankfurt am Main.

    PubMed

    Stahnisch, Frank W

    2016-01-01

    Until the beginning 1930's the traditional dogma that the human central nervous system (CNS) did not possess any abilities to adapt functionally to degenerative processes and external injuries loomed large in the field of the brain sciences (Hirnforschung). Cutting-edge neuroanatomists, such as the luminary Wilhelm Waldeyer (1836-1921) in Germany or the Nobel Prize laureate Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934) in Spain, debated any regenerative and thus "plastic" properties in the human brain. A renewed interest arose in the scientific community to investigate the pathologies and the healing processes in the human CNS after the return of the high number of brain injured war veterans from the fronts during and after the First World War (1914-1918). A leading research center in this area was the "Institute for the Scientific Study of the Effects of Brain Injuries," which the neurologist Ludwig Edinger (1855-1918) had founded shortly before the war. This article specifically deals with the physiological research on nerve fiber plasticity by Albrecht Bethe (1872-1954) at the respective institute of the University of Frankfurt am Main. Bethe conducted here his paradigmatic experimental studies on the pathophysiological and clinical phenomena of peripheral and CNS regeneration. PMID:26941616

  15. The Kaiser's cancer revisited: was Virchow totally wrong?

    PubMed

    Cardesa, Antonio; Zidar, Nina; Alos, Llucia; Nadal, Alfons; Gale, Nina; Klöppel, Günter

    2011-06-01

    On 15 June 1888, the German Emperor, Kaiser Friedrich III, died of laryngeal cancer. Three biopsies of his laryngeal lesion had been taken by the British laryngologist, Morel Mackenzie, in 1887 and diagnosed by Rudolf Virchow as "pachydermia verrucosa laryngis", confirming Mackenzie's assessment that the Kaiser's disease was benign. A fourth specimen coughed up by the patient was considered by Virchow to be nondiagnostic. A further specimen expectorated by the patient 3 months before his death was diagnosed as carcinoma by Wilhelm Waldeyer. The autopsy revealed squamous carcinoma in the larynx with a cervical lymph node metastasis. The discrepancies between the initial diagnoses and the final outcome of the Kaiser's disease gave rise to a never-ending medical controversy. Our investigations on this historical case were limited to the official German documents and publications and their English translations and to subsequent literature sources of the time, after having received confirmation that the histological slides and Virchow's original reports had been lost. Based on current surgical pathology knowledge, we propose that the tumour that challenged the diagnostic skills of the founder of pathology was hybrid verrucous carcinoma (HVC), an extremely rare, metastasizing variant of verrucous carcinoma (VC) composed of pure VC mixed with clusters of conventional squamous cell carcinoma. As we see it now, Virchow was therefore not totally wrong. Our retrospective evaluation suggests that Virchow's detailed description of the Kaiser's cancer preceded the paper that contributed to the full understanding of HVC of the larynx by 110 years. PMID:21494762

  16. General physiology, experimental psychology, and evolutionism. Unicellular organisms as objects of psychophysiological research, 1877-1918.

    PubMed

    Schloegel, Judy Johns; Schmidgen, Henning

    2002-12-01

    This essay aims to shed new light on the relations between physiology and psychology in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by focusing on the use of unicellular organisms as research objects during that period. Within the frameworks of evolutionism and monism advocated by Ernst Haeckel, protozoa were perceived as objects situated at the borders between organism and cell and individual and society. Scholars such as Max Verworn, Alfred Binet, and Herbert Spencer Jennings were provoked by these organisms to undertake experimental investigations situated between general physiology and psychology that differed from the physiological psychology advocated by Wilhelm Wundt. Some of these investigations sought to locate psychological properties in the molecular structure of protoplasm; others stressed the existence of organic and psychological individuality in protozoa. In the following decades, leading philosophers such as Friedrich Nietzsche, Charles Sanders Peirce, and Henri Bergson, as well as psychological researchers like Sigmund Freud, integrated the results of these investigations into their reflections on such problems as the nature of the will, the structure of the ego, and the holistic nature of the reactions of organisms to their environment. PMID:12664793

  17. A reality check on Hardy-Weinberg.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alan E; Seneta, Eugene

    2013-08-01

    G. H. Hardy (1877-1947) and Wilhelm Weinberg (1862-1937) had very different lives, but in the minds of geneticists, the two are inextricably linked through the ownership of an apparently simple law called the Hardy-Weinberg law. We demonstrate that the simplicity is more apparent than real. Hardy derived the well-known trio of frequencies {q 2, 2pq, p 2} with a concise demonstration, whereas for Weinberg it was the prelude to an ingenious examination of the inheritance of twinning in man. Hardy's recourse to an identity relating to the distribution of types among offspring following random mating, rather than an identity relating to the mating matrix, may be the reason why he did not realize that Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium can be reached and sustained with non-random mating. The phrase 'random mating' always comes up in reference to the law. The elusive nature of this phrase is part of the reason for the misunderstandings that occur but also because, as we explain, mathematicians are able to use it in a different way from the man-in-the-street. We question the unthinking appeal to random mating as a model and explanation of the distribution of genotypes even when they are close to Hardy-Weinberg proportions. Such sustained proportions are possible under non-random mating. PMID:23769204

  18. Evolution of Medical Imaging and Computational Demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deans, Stanley R.

    2000-11-01

    The first medical images produced using x-rays appeared less than a year after the discovery of x-rays by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895. For over a century x-ray projection radiography has been and continues to be the most widely used diagnostic imaging modality. For over seventy years mathematics and computational methods were used in a general way for image processing and analysis. The really challenging mathematical and computational problems did not emerge until the 1970s with the beginning of computed tomography (CT) to produce images popularly known as CAT (computer-assisted tomography) scans. This was followed rapidly by positron-emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) emerged in the 1980s and is in many ways the most informative medical imaging methodology. Computer-based mathematical methods are fundamental to the success of these imaging modalities, and are increasingly important in several other novel imaging techniques. The technologies involved in each modality are competely different, have varying diagnostic value, and are described by different fundamental equations. The common underlying theme is that of the reconstruction of important characteristics of medical interest from indirect measurements. Several of these methodologies for visualizing internal body anatomy and function will be discussed and related to the evolution of computational capabilities. This brings out aspects of these biomedical imaging technologies where a deeper understanding is needed, and to frontiers where future advances are likely to come from continued research in physics jointly with the mathematical sciences.

  19. [Relationship between Copenhagen and Göttingen regarding earth magnetism].

    PubMed

    Reich, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Hans Christian Oersted is mostly known as the discoverer of electromagnetism and for being one of the physicists who were deeply influenced and fascinated by the romantic natural philosophy. In this article another side of Oersted is presented. What is underestimated until now is Oersted's contribution to the research of geomagnetism. Oersted stood in close contact with Carl Friedrich Gauss and Wilhelm Weber, whom he visited in 1834 in Göttingen. Oersted's aim was to learn the new developments in geomagnetism. Afterwards he was crucial in the building of a new magnetic observatory in Copenhagen as well as a second one with better equipment. Oersted formed a huge team for magnetic observations and the gathered data were sent to Gauss and Weber who published them. The correspondence between Oersted, Gauss and Weber was mostly dedicated to the transmission of these data, details about instruments and the best way of building a magnetic observatory. Unfortunately, Gauss and Weber had to stop their very successful collaboration in 1843, because Weber belonged to the Göttingen Seven and later on Oersted stopped his observations, because he had lost his partners in this research project. PMID:24195332

  20. Contributions to the History of Astronomy, Vol. 11. (German Title: Beiträge zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Wolfgang R.; Duerbeck, H. W.; Hamel, Jürgen

    2011-08-01

    The contributions deal with astronomical concepts, historical observatories and biographical studies. Newly found copies of Copernicus' principal work are described, the development of the concepts "sphaera" and "orbis coelestis" from ancient times via Copernicus to Kepler is investigated. The concept of harmonical cosmology of Kepler and A. Kircher is analyzed in a major paper. A rediscovered letter by Kepler is interpreted. Other papers deal with the university observatory of Bützow (Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania), the observatories installed in Strasbourg in the 17th and early 19th centuries, and the Jesuit observatory which existed in Graz (Styria) in the 18th century, as well as the unrealized plans for an observing station of Vienna University Observatory in the 1940s. Einstein's thoughts about Friedmann's cosmological papers are presented. Biographical sketches on Philipp Feselius (1565-1610), Ferdinand Adolph Freiherr von Ende (1760-1816), Wilhelm Ebert (1871-1916) and Karl Julius Lohnert (1885-1944) are supplemented by an analysis of the social background of the important Astronomers of the 20th century. The claim that Jupiter's moons were described already 105 years before Galilei is contradicted in a discussion. The book concludes by short communications, obituaries and book reviews.

  1. ["Fabulous things". Drug narratives about coca and cocaine in the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Wahrig, Bettina

    2009-12-01

    This contribution focuses on the history of Coca leaves and Cocaine in the second half of 19th century Europe. Even though, to date, no direct link has been established between the activities of the Milano physician Paolo Mantegazza, and the Göttingen chemist Friedrich Wöhler, it is not a mere coincidence that both published their findings in the same year, namely, 1859. Mantegazza authored the first treatise claiming that Coca had psychoactive qualities and touted its broad therapeutic faculties; he claimed that it should be introduced into European pharmacotherapy. In Wöhler's laboratory, cocaine was isolated from leaves by his pupil Alfred Niemann; later, Wilhelm Lossen refined and corrected Niemann's results. Narratives about medicinal drugs often streamline history into a story that starts with multiple meanings and impure matters and ends with well-defined substances, directed at clear-cut diseases and symptoms. In the case of Coca, however, the pure substance triggered no such process well into the 1880s, whereas the leaves continued to circulate as an exotic, pluripotent drug whose effects where miraculous and yet difficult to establish. PMID:20481059

  2. Geodetic documents in the Gotha library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopf, Cornelia; Schwarz, Oliver

    Until 1800, there existed only rough maps in the dukedoms Gotha-Altenburg and Weimar based on a net of geographical positions measured by simple instruments. After Franz Xaver von Zach had made his first astronomical observations to determine geographical coordinates he realised that these old maps had an accuracy of at best some minutes of arc. The king of Prussia, Friedrich Wilhelm III (1797-1840), asked Zach in October 1802 to accept the direction of the measurement of the territories around Erfurt and the Eichsfeld. In this situation it was obvious for Zach to consider a survey of Thuringia and a great measurement of degree similar to the French model. His ideas were promoted by the duke of Sachsen-Gotha-Altenburg, Ernst II (1772-1804). Zach planned to perform his survey in four degrees of latitude and six degrees of longitude with respect to the Seeberg observatory. The measurements had to cross over the borderlines of several countries. The documents in the Forschungs- and Landesbibliothek prove that the diplomatic preparations for the survey got on until the end of 1803. Zach obtained passports and grants to pass and to survey some territories (Hessen-Kassel, Hannover, Coburg-Saalfeld, Braunschweig, Sachsen). Their governments had exchanged diplomatic notes on this topic. The death of Ernst II in 1804, the consequences of the war (battle of Jena and Auerstedt in 1806) and Zach's resignation as director of the Seeberg observatory led to the end of the survey.

  3. Basic versus applied research: Julius Sachs (1832–1897) and the experimental physiology of plants

    PubMed Central

    Kutschera, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The German biologist Julius Sachs was the first to introduce controlled, accurate, quantitative experimentation into the botanical sciences, and is regarded as the founder of modern plant physiology. His seminal monograph Experimental-Physiologie der Pflanzen (Experimental Physiology of Plants) was published 150 y ago (1865), when Sachs was employed as a lecturer at the Agricultural Academy in Poppelsdorf/Bonn (now part of the University). This book marks the beginning of a new era of basic and applied plant science. In this contribution, I summarize the achievements of Sachs and outline his lasting legacy. In addition, I show that Sachs was one of the first biologists who integrated bacteria, which he considered to be descendants of fungi, into the botanical sciences and discussed their interaction with land plants (degradation of wood etc.). This “plant-microbe-view” of green organisms was extended and elaborated by the laboratory botanist Wilhelm Pfeffer (1845–1920), so that the term “Sachs-Pfeffer-Principle of Experimental Plant Research” appears to be appropriate to characterize this novel way of performing scientific studies on green, photoautotrophic organisms (embryophytes, algae, cyanobacteria). PMID:26146794

  4. Johannsen's criticism of the chromosome theory.

    PubMed

    Roll-Hansen, Nils

    2014-01-01

    The genotype theory of Wilhelm Johannsen (1857-1927) was an important contribution to the founding of classical genetics. This theory built on Johannsen's experimental demonstration that hereditary change is discontinuous, not continuous as had been widely assumed. Johannsen is also known for his criticism of traditional Darwinian evolution by natural selection, as well as his criticism of the classical Mendelian chromosome theory of heredity. He has often been seen as one of the anti-Darwinians that caused the "eclipse of Darwinism" in the early 20th century, before it was saved by the Modern Synthesis. This article focuses on Johannsen's criticism of the chromosome theory. He was indeed skeptical of the notion of the chromosomes as the sole carriers of heredity, but he praised the mapping of Mendelian genes on the chromosomes as a major step forward. Johannsen objected that these genes could not account for the whole of heredity, and that the stability of the genotype depended on much more than the stability of Mendelian genes. For Johannsen, the genotype, as a property of the whole organism, was the fundamental and empirically well-established entity. PMID:25345701

  5. Neuropathology in Germany during World War II: Julius Hallervorden (1882-1965) and the Nazi programme of 'euthanasia'.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J T

    2007-05-01

    In Germany, during World War II, more than 120,000 handicapped children and adults were murdered for the convenience of the State. To gain scientific knowledge, the brains of many of these patients were examined by German neuropathologists. Some 698 of these specimens were examined in the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut für Hirnforschung in Berlin-Buch by Julius Hallervorden, whose career is reviewed together with that of his superior, Hugo Spatz. Hallervorden also oversaw the examination of cases of mental handicap by W-J Eiche at a laboratory at the Hospital Brandenburg-Gorden. Also in Berlin was Berthold Ostertag, neuropathologist at the Rudolf-Virchow-Hospital, who examined cases from the Children's Ward at Wiesengrund. Smaller but significant numbers of brains were examined in Munich, Heidelberg, Hamburg and Schleswig. Some brains of similar origin were examined in Vienna and in Lubliniecz. Jürgen Peiffer has estimated that German neuropathologists examined 2097 brains arising from the Nazi Programme of 'Euthanasia'. PMID:17551614

  6. Previously Unrecognized Large Lunar Impact Basins Revealed by Topographic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Herbert V.

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of a large population of apparently buried impact craters on Mars, revealed as Quasi- Circular Depressions (QCDs) in Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data [1,2,3] and as Circular Thin Areas (CTAs) [4] in crustal thickness model data [5] leads to the obvious question: are there unrecognized impact features on the Moon and other bodies in the solar system? Early analysis of Clementine topography revealed several large impact basins not previously known [6,7], so the answer certainly is "Yes." How large a population of previously undetected impact basins, their size frequency distribution, and how much these added craters and basins will change ideas about the early cratering history and Late Heavy Bombardment on the Moon remains to be determined. Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data [8] will be able to address these issues. As a prelude, we searched the state-of-the-art global topographic grid for the Moon, the Unified Lunar Control Net (ULCN) [9] for evidence of large impact features not previously recognized by photogeologic mapping, as summarized by Wilhelms [lo].

  7. About the specialized myocardial conducting tissue.

    PubMed

    de Micheli Serra, Alfredo; Iturralde Torres, Pedro; Aranda Fraustro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The chronological succession of discoveries on the location and structure of the atrio-ventricular conducting system are described. The starting point of this system is located in the sinus atrial node, identified by the English scientists A. Keith and M. W. Flack in 1907. The atrioventricular conducting system was pointed out by the Swiss physician Wilhelm His Jr. in 1893. The atrioventricular node (AV) was first identified by the Japanese pathologist Sumao Tawara and his German professor Ludwig Aschoff in 1906. Likewise the structure and routes of the three internodal bundles are described. These bundles include: Bachmann's bundle (1916) connecting the right with the left atrium and the AV node; the middle Wenckebach's bundle (1910) and the posterior or Thörel's bundle (1910), extending from the region of the sinus atrial node towards the posterior margin of the AV node. Lastly, the ventricular left and right conduction systems are detailed. These include the main trunk and their peripheral subdivisions with respective networks. Regarding the controversial existence of the left middle subdivision, it can exist in animal and human hearts. Nevertheless, an intermediate left septal network of specialized fibers seems to act as a functional equivalent of this subdivision. PMID:23680040

  8. Survey of viral populations within Lake Michigan nearshore waters at four Chicago area beaches.

    PubMed

    Sible, Emily; Cooper, Alexandria; Malki, Kema; Bruder, Katherine; Watkins, Siobhan C; Fofanov, Yuriy; Putonti, Catherine

    2015-12-01

    In comparison to the oceans, freshwater environments represent a more diverse community of microorganisms, exhibiting comparatively high levels of variability both temporally and spatially Maranger and Bird, Microb. Ecol. 31 (1996) 141-151. This level of variability is likely to extend to the world of viruses as well, in particular bacteria-infecting viruses (bacteriophages). Phages are known to influence bacterial diversity, and therefore key processes, in environmental niches across the globe Clokie et al., Bacteriophage 1 (2011) 31-45; Jacquet et al., Adv. Ocean Limn. 1 (2010) 97-141; Wilhelm and Suttle, Bioscience 49 (1999) 781-788; Bratback et al., Microb. Ecol. 28 (1994) 209-221. Despite their prevalence and likely critical role in freshwater environments, very few viral species have been characterized. Metagenomic approaches, however, have allowed for a glimpse into phage diversity. We collected surface water samples from four Chicago area beaches - Gillson Park, Montrose Beach, 57th Street Beach, and Calumet Beach - every two weeks from May 13 through August 5, 2014. Sampling was conducted with four biological replicates for each sampling date and location, resulting in 112 samples. DNA isolated from each of the individual samples for a given collection date/location was pooled together, with one exception - Calumet Beach on August 5, 2014 - in which each biological replicate was sequenced individually. Raw sequence data is available via NCBI's SRA database (part of BioProject PRJNA248239). PMID:26380839

  9. Stephan Mueller (1930”1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Kenneth H.; Ansorge, Joerg

    Stephan Mueller, professor emeritus at the Institute of Geophysics at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich and highly respected leader of international geoscience, died February 17, 1997. His untimely death, due to pneumonia following intestinal surgery, came just 18 months after his retirement from the ETH Chair of Geophysics and Directorship of the Swiss Seismological Service. He is survived by his wife, Doris, two sons, and six grandchildren. Mueller received a diploma in physics at the University of Stuttgart in 1957 and an M.S. in electrical engineering from Columbia University in New York in 1959. As an undergraduate at Stuttgart, he was influenced by seismologist Wilhelm Hillerand geophysics quickly became his major academic and career objective. After receiving a 1954-1955 German Academic Interchange Scholarship at Columbia, Mueller sought out Maurice Ewing and his group at Lamont Geological Observatory, where Mueller's enthusiasm for geophysics was strongly encouraged. While at Lamont, he participated in the first U.S. deep-sea geophysical expedition in the Mediterranean Sea during the summer of 1956 aboard the RV Vema.

  10. Validation of a two-step quality control approach for a large-scale human urine metabolomic study conducted in seven experimental batches with LC/QTOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Demetrowitsch, Tobias J; Petersen, Beate; Keppler, Julia K; Koch, Andreas; Schreiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias; Schwarz, Karin

    2015-01-01

    After his study of food science at the Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms University of Bonn, Tobias J Demetrowitsch obtained his doctoral degree in the research field of metabolomics at the Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel. The present paper is part of his doctoral thesis and describes an extended strategy to evaluate and verify complex or large-scale experiments and data sets. Large-scale studies result in high sample numbers, requiring the analysis of samples in different batches. So far, the verification of such LC-MS-based metabolomics studies is difficult. Common approaches have not provided a reliable validation procedure to date. This article shows a novel verification process for a large-scale human urine study (analyzed by a LC/QToF-MS system) using a two-step validation procedure. The first step comprises a targeted approach that aims to examine and exclude statistical outliers. The second step consists of a principle component analysis, with the aim of a tight cluster of all quality controls and a second for all volunteer samples. The applied study design provides a reliable two-step validation procedure for large-scale studies and additionally contains an inhouse verification procedure. PMID:25558939

  11. Basic versus applied research: Julius Sachs (1832-1897) and the experimental physiology of plants.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The German biologist Julius Sachs was the first to introduce controlled, accurate, quantitative experimentation into the botanical sciences, and is regarded as the founder of modern plant physiology. His seminal monograph Experimental-Physiologie der Pflanzen (Experimental Physiology of Plants) was published 150 y ago (1865), when Sachs was employed as a lecturer at the Agricultural Academy in Poppelsdorf/Bonn (now part of the University). This book marks the beginning of a new era of basic and applied plant science. In this contribution, I summarize the achievements of Sachs and outline his lasting legacy. In addition, I show that Sachs was one of the first biologists who integrated bacteria, which he considered to be descendants of fungi, into the botanical sciences and discussed their interaction with land plants (degradation of wood etc.). This "plant-microbe-view" of green organisms was extended and elaborated by the laboratory botanist Wilhelm Pfeffer (1845-1920), so that the term "Sachs-Pfeffer-Principle of Experimental Plant Research" appears to be appropriate to characterize this novel way of performing scientific studies on green, photoautotrophic organisms (embryophytes, algae, cyanobacteria). PMID:26146794

  12. ["Directed perception", "mood", "social reinforcement". Sketches towards the historical semantics of Ludwik Fleck's Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact].

    PubMed

    Bauer, Julian

    2014-01-01

    This article analyses three basic concepts of Ludwik Fleck's Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact. It shows first that Fleck's notion of "directed perception" is closely linked to Jakob von Uexküll's writings on the "Umwelt" of animals and humans. The article then proposes to regard the epistemological debates surrounding parapsychology as an important testing ground for the Fleckian concept of „mood“ and his concomitant hypotheses about „the tenacity of systems of opinion and the harmony of illusions". It finally argues that Fleck's modification of Wilhelm Jerusalem's idea of the "social consolidation" of knowledge helps us to understand the indebtedness of Fleck towards early functionalist sociology as well as his strong belief in "specific historical laws governing the development of ideas"The historical semantics of Fleck's works hence proves that his insights are neither marginal nor revolutionary but rather deeply rooted within scientific traditions from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. PMID:24407936

  13. [Psychoanalysis and engagement: Otto Fenichel and the political Freudians].

    PubMed

    Fisher, D J

    1988-01-01

    This essay is a critique of Russell Jacoby's The repression of psychoanalysis: Otto Fenichel and the political Freudians (New York, Basic Books, 1983), translated into French by P.U.F. Jacoby depicts Fenichel and his circle of colleagues as political Freudians whose early years were decisively colored by radical youth movements, leftwing politics, the early inspiration of the Russian Revolution, a serious immersion in Marxist culture, a commitment to either socialist or communist parties, and a desire to integrate classical psychoanalysis into a a broader framework of Marxist social theorizing. He centers his book around the archival discovery of the Rundbriefe, 119 circular letters written during Fenichel's exile from 1934 to 1945. He discusses the impact of Wilhelm Reich's ideas and career on the Fenichel circle. Fascism and exile from Europe shattered the lives and commitments of the political Freudians. This essay focuses on Jacoby's use and abuse of the concepts of Americanization, medicalization, the competition from the neo-Freudians, and the apparent silence and "self-repression" of this group's past and leftwing identity once in America. It concludes with a critical analysis of Fenichel's psychoanalytic ethic, which, while engagé, was not Marxist. Fenichel was oriented toward contributing to both psychoanalytic practice and theory. His ethic precluded the intrusion of politics into clinical work, supervision, and teaching. PMID:11640268

  14. A Marble Embryo: Meanings of a Portrait from 1900

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Portraits of scientists use attributes of discovery to construct identities; portraits that include esoteric accessories may fashion identities for these too. A striking example is a marble bust of the anatomist Wilhelm His by the Leipzig sculptor Carl Seffner. Made in 1900, it depicts the founder of modern human embryology looking down at a model embryo in his right hand. This essay reconstructs the design and viewing of this remarkable portrait in order to shed light on private and public relations between scientists, research objects and audiences. The bust came out of a collaboration to model the face of the composer Johann Sebastian Bach and embodies a shared commitment to anatomical exactitude in three dimensions. His’s research agendas and public character explain the contemplative pose and unprecedented embryo model, which he had laboriously constructed from material a midwife supplied. The early contexts of display in the His home and art exhibitions suggest interpretive resources for viewers and hence likely meanings. Seffner’s work remains exceptional, but has affinities to portraits of human embryologists and embryos produced since 1960. Embryo images have acquired such controversial prominence that the model may engage us more strongly now than it did exhibition visitors around 1900. PMID:22606754

  15. Validity of the Rey Visual Design Learning Test in primary and secondary school children.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, P; Van Klink, M

    2007-01-01

    The Rey Visual Design Learning Test (Rey, 1964, cited in Spreen & Strauss, 1991, Wilhelm, 2004) assesses immediate memory span, new learning, delayed recall and recognition for nonverbal material. Two studies are presented that focused on the construct validity of the RVDLT in primary and secondary school children. In the first study, primary school children performed the RVDLT and the Biber Figural Learning Test, as well as the WISC-R Block design Test, Boston Naming Test, and the Trailmaking Test, to assess discriminant validity. In the second study, the age range was expanded and the subtest Visual Reproductions of the Wechsler Memory Scale with a Delayed recall phase was used to assess the construct validity. A test for visual-motor integration and a test for attention, concentration, and speed of information processing were also added to complete the test battery for assessing discriminant validity. Moderate to high correlations were found between scores on the RVDLT and the tests used to assess construct validity. The correlational pattern of RVDLT scores and the scores on the discriminant tests is discussed. PMID:17364565

  16. The plant breeding industry after pure line theory: Lessons from the National Institute of Agricultural Botany.

    PubMed

    Berry, Dominic

    2014-06-01

    In the early twentieth century, Wilhelm Johannsen proposed his pure line theory and the genotype/phenotype distinction, work that is prized as one of the most important founding contributions to genetics and Mendelian plant breeding. Most historians have already concluded that pure line theory did not change breeding practices directly. Instead, breeding became more orderly as a consequence of pure line theory, which structured breeding programmes and eliminated external heritable influences. This incremental change then explains how and why the large multi-national seed companies that we know today were created; pure lines invited standardisation and economies of scale that the latter were designed to exploit. Rather than focus on breeding practice, this paper examines the plant varietal market itself. It focusses upon work conducted by the National Institute of Agricultural Botany (NIAB) during the interwar years, and in doing so demonstrates that, on the contrary, the pure line was actually only partially accepted by the industry. Moreover, claims that contradicted the logic of the pure line were not merely tolerated by the agricultural geneticists affiliated with NIAB, but were acknowledged and legitimised by them. The history of how and why the plant breeding industry was transformed remains to be written. PMID:24650856

  17. Simultaneous gates in frequency-crowded multilevel systems using fast, robust, analytic control shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theis, L. S.; Motzoi, F.; Wilhelm, F. K.

    2016-01-01

    We present a few-parameter ansatz for pulses to implement a broad set of simultaneous single-qubit rotations in frequency-crowded multilevel systems. Specifically, we consider a system of two qutrits whose working and leakage transitions suffer from spectral crowding (detuned by δ ). In order to achieve precise controllability, we make use of two driving fields (each having two quadratures) at two different tones to simultaneously apply arbitrary combinations of rotations about axes in the X -Y plane to both qubits. Expanding the waveforms in terms of Hanning windows, we show how analytic pulses containing smooth and composite-pulse features can easily achieve gate errors less than 10-4 and considerably outperform known adiabatic techniques. Moreover, we find a generalization of the WAHWAH (Weak AnHarmonicity With Average Hamiltonian) method by Schutjens et al. [R. Schutjens, F. A. Dagga, D. J. Egger, and F. K. Wilhelm, Phys. Rev. A 88, 052330 (2013)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.052330 that allows precise separate single-qubit rotations for all gate times beyond a quantum speed limit. We find in all cases a quantum speed limit slightly below 2 π /δ for the gate time and show that our pulses are robust against variations in system parameters and filtering due to transfer functions, making them suitable for experimental implementations.

  18. August Rauber (1841-1917): from the primitive streak to Cellularmechanik.

    PubMed

    Brauckmann, Sabine

    2006-01-01

    In the early 19th century Karl Ernst von Baer initiated a new research program searching for the mechanisms by which an egg transforms itself into an embryo. August Rauber (1841-1917) took up this challenge. He considered the phylogenetic principle as the right tool to explain the similitude of embryogenetic processes. In extending Baer's approach, he combined comparative embryology and histology in his studies of avian and mammalian embryos. His earlier work demonstrated that the two-layered chick embryo is a modified gastrula and not a "disc" as Wilhelm His had claimed. From the 1880s onwards, he concentrated on the issue of how the development of germ layers is related to tissue differentiation. To address this, he studied the blastopore, epiblast, primitive streak, teratology and the relative importance of nucleus and cytoplasm in heredity. This paper reconstructs some of Rauber's work and concludes that his observations and reflections constituted a new approach combining embryology and histology with "phylogenetic" reasoning. PMID:16586344

  19. Steppe lion remains imported by Ice Age spotted hyenas into the Late Pleistocene Perick Caves hyena den in northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diedrich, Cajus G.

    2009-05-01

    Upper Pleistocene remains of the Ice Age steppe lion Panthera leo spelaea (Goldfuss, 1810) have been found in the Perick Caves, Sauerland Karst, NW Germany. Bones from many hyenas and their imported prey dating from the Lower to Middle Weichselian have also been recovered from the Perick Cave hyena den. These are commonly cracked or exhibit deep chew marks. The absence of lion cub bones, in contrast to hyena and cave bear cub remains in the Perick Caves, and other caves of northern Germany, excludes the possibility that P. leo spelaea used the cave for raising cubs. Only in the Wilhelms Cave was a single skeleton of a cub found in a hyena den. Evidence of the chewing, nibbling and cracking of lion bones and crania must have resulted from the importation and destruction of lion carcasses (4% of the prey fauna). Similar evidence was preserved at other hyena den caves and open air sites in Germany. The bone material from the Perick and other Central European caves points to antagonistic hyena and lion conflicts, similar to clashes of their modern African relatives.

  20. Introduction to Adaptive Methods for Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, Kenneth; Estep, Don; Hansbo, Peter; Johnson, Claes

    Knowing thus the Algorithm of this calculus, which I call Differential Calculus, all differential equations can be solved by a common method (Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz, 1646-1719).When, several years ago, I saw for the first time an instrument which, when carried, automatically records the number of steps taken by a pedestrian, it occurred to me at once that the entire arithmetic could be subjected to a similar kind of machinery so that not only addition and subtraction, but also multiplication and division, could be accomplished by a suitably arranged machine easily, promptly and with sure results. For it is unworthy of excellent men to lose hours like slaves in the labour of calculations, which could safely be left to anyone else if the machine was used. And now that we may give final praise to the machine, we may say that it will be desirable to all who are engaged in computations which, as is well known, are the managers of financial affairs, the administrators of others estates, merchants, surveyors, navigators, astronomers, and those connected with any of the crafts that use mathematics (Leibniz).

  1. [Stahl, Leibniz, Hoffmann and breathing].

    PubMed

    Carvallo, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    At the beginning of the XVIII th century, Wilhelm Gottfried Leibniz and Friedrich Hoffmann criticize Georg Ernst Stahl's medical theory. They differenciate between unsound and true reasonings. Namely, they validate Stahl's definition of breath but extracting it from its animist basis and placing it in an epistemology obeying to the principle of sufficient reason and to the mechanical model. The stahlian discovery consists in understanding breath as a calorific ventilation against the ancient conception; the iatromechanists recognize its accuracy, but they try then to transpose it to a mechanical model of ventilation. Using it in a different epistemological context implies that they analyze the idea of discovery "true" in its contents, but "wrong" in its hypothesis. It impels to examine the epistemology of medical knowledge, as science and therapeutics, and in its links with the other scientific theories. Thus, if Leibniz as philosopher and Hoffmann as doctor consider Stahl's animism so important, it is because its discoveries question the fundamental principles of medicine. PMID:17153053

  2. Solar Coronal Plumes and the Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Bhola N.; Wilhelm, Klaus

    2015-03-01

    The spectral profiles of the coronal Ne viii line at 77 nm have different shapes in quiet-Sun regions and Coronal Holes (CHs). A single Gaussian fit of the line profile provides an adequate approximation in quiet-Sun areas, whereas, a strong shoulder on the long-wavelength side is a systematic feature in CHs. Although this has been noticed since 1999, no physical reason for the peculiar shape could be given. In an attempt to identify the cause of this peculiarity, we address three problems that could not be conclusively resolved, in a review article by a study team of the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) (Wilhelm et al. 2011): (1) The physical processes operating at the base and inside of plumes, as well as their interaction with the Solar Wind (SW). (2) The possible contribution of plume plasma to the fast SW streams. (3) The signature of the First-Ionization Potential (FIP) effect between plumes and inter-plume regions (IPRs). Before the spectroscopic peculiarities in IPRs and plumes in Polar Coronal Holes (PCHs) can be further investigated with the instrument Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), it is mandatory to summarize the results of the review to place the spectroscopic observations into context. Finally, a plume model is proposed that satisfactorily explains the plasma flows up and down the plume field lines and leads to the shape of the neon line in PCHs.

  3. Explaining History. Hippolyte Taine's Philosophy of Historical Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Philipp

    Historians of European historiography have often characterized Hippolyte Taine (1828-1893) as an adherent of the positivist school of thought, typical for the development of a scientific culture in Western Europe that differed from its German counterpart.1 In accordance with that view, Wilhelm Dilthey grouped him together with other scholars like John Stuart Mill and Herbert Spencer against who Dilthey tried to develop his conception of the human sciences based on the notion of "verstehen" (see Dilthey [1924] 1957, 139ff.). Dilthey understood Taine as proposing to analyze the human mind by identifying its individual components and then explaining their meaning by laws of their relation. He argued that such an approach might be adequate for the natural sciences, but neglected the fact that an analysis of the mind had to start from a given psychological connection that was prior to any definition of particular phenomena. From Dilthey's point of view, applying Taine's theory to historical studies only made them look more objective while actually Taine was unaware of just following the prevailing convictions of his time (idem, 191f.).

  4. Ludwig: the physiologist.

    PubMed

    Valentinuzzi, Max; Beneke, Klaus; Gonzalez, German

    2012-01-01

    The thought reproduced in the above epigraph is taken from an article by Thurau et al. [1], who attribute it to Arthur Schopenhauer (17881860), an outstanding philosopher and author of the far-reaching piece Die Welt als Wille und Vorstellung (The World as Will and Representation). In German, it would perhaps read as etwas denken, das niemand vorher gedacht hat, während etwas sehen, was jeder sieht. We could not assert whether Schopenhauer really said that, but it should not be at all surprising if it were, because it sounds simple, perhaps even naïve, and very deep, indeed. It fits perfectly to Carl Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwigs personality (18161895), whom we will look at as physiologist in this second note. Yes, second note-because in the first one [2], we looked at him as bioengineer. A third and last Retrospectroscope column completing this series will deal with his wonderful and always humble and generous activities as teacher. PMID:23014707

  5. Skulls, brains, and memorial culture: on cerebral biographies of scientists in the nineteenth century.

    PubMed

    Hagner, Michael

    2003-06-01

    In this paper, I will argue that the scientific investigation of skulls and brains of geniuses went hand in hand with hagiographical celebrations of scientists. My analysis starts with late-eighteenth century anatomists and anthropologists who highlighted quantitative parameters such as the size and weight of the brain in order to explain intellectual differences between women and men and Europeans and non-Europeans, geniuses and ordinary persons. After 1800 these parameters were modified by phrenological inspections of the skull and brain. As the phrenological examination of the skulls of Immanuel Kant, Wilhelm Heinse, Arthur Schopenhauer and others shows, the anthropometrical data was interpreted in light of biographical circumstances. The same pattern of interpretation can be found in non-phrenological contexts: Reports about extraordinary brains were part of biographical sketches, mainly delivered in celebratory obituaries. It was only in this context that moral reservations about dissecting the brains of geniuses could be overcome, which led to a more systematic investigation of brains of geniuses after 1860. PMID:12940262

  6. Experimental Testing of Water Disinfection Models under Varying Hydraulic and Kinetic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Edmilson C; Rauen, William B; Fonseca, Ismênia; Figueiredo, Iene

    2016-06-01

    The concomitant effects of hydraulics and reaction kinetics on the disinfection efficiency (DE) of Chlorine Contact Tank (CCT) setups were experimentally assessed, to test the predictive-ability of first order kinetics models: Chick-Watson (C-W), C-t rule and Wehner-Wilhelm (W-W). Prototype tests were conducted using river water characterised for quality parameters, chlorine demand and inactivation rates of total and thermotolerant coliform. Poor, average and superior CCT baffling conditions were assessed by tracer experimentation and for their DE under three chlorine dosages. The models' DE predictive-ability was comparable and high for superior baffling, but decreased differently with the hydraulic efficiency (maximum errors of +15.3% with W-W, +26.0% with C-W and -36.6% with C-t). The positive bias shown by W-W renders it unsafe for CCT design, so the results favoured the C-t rule as the preferred analytical tool of comparable complexity. Potential refinements to these models that could lead to operational savings are identified. PMID:26773311

  7. Reinventing machines: the transmission history of the Leibniz calculator.

    PubMed

    Morar, Florin-Stefan

    2015-03-01

    This paper argues that we should take into account the process of historical transmission to enrich our understanding of material culture. More specifically, I want to show how the rewriting of history and the invention of tradition impact material objects and our beliefs about them. I focus here on the transmission history of the mechanical calculator invented by the German savant Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. Leibniz repeatedly described his machine as functional and wonderfully useful, but in reality it was never finished and didn't fully work. Its internal structure also remained unknown. In 1879, however, the machine re-emerged and was reinvented as the origin of all later calculating machines based on the stepped drum, to protect the priority of the German Leibniz against the Frenchman Thomas de Colmar as the father of mechanical calculation. The calculator was later replicated to demonstrate that it could function 'after all', in an effort to deepen this narrative and further enhance Leibniz's computing acumen. PMID:25833800

  8. "Imitation of similar beings": social mimesis as an argument in evolutionary theory around 1900.

    PubMed

    Willer, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The article analyzes imitation as both a fascinating and irritating phenomenon in "classical" evolutionary theory. Evolutionists situate imitation on the threshold between the natural and the socio-cultural, hence between the animal and the human. This intermediate position can be regarded as a symptom for the unresolved and maybe unresolvable problem of intentionality and teleology in nature. To elaborate this problem, I examine the ways in which imitation was conceived of by the German Africologist Wilhelm Bleek in his treatise On the Origin of Language and by Charles Darwin in The Descent of Man. Bleek and Darwin share a high esteem of imitation, which they see as the mainspring of human mental capacities, including language. But at the same time, imitation for them is the epitome of a low level of consciousness, embodied in the figures of the idiot, the savage, and the ape. Thus, the problem of similarity comes to the fore: similarity produced by imitation, but also being at the basis of every act of imitation. This problem is further evidenced with a side glance on Darwin's remarks about mimicry in The Origin of Species. The article closes with a literary reading of Franz Kafka's Report to an Academy, in which imitation and similarity represent survival strategies and motivate a strange shift from ape to man. PMID:20210109

  9. George A. Kolstad (1919-1996)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luth, W.; Heiken, G.; Weill, D.; Wang, H.; Gilbert, C.; Mitterer, R.; Duba, A.; Goldstein, N.

    George A. Kolstad, creator and leader of the U.S. Department of Energy's Geosciences Research Program, died of an aneurysm August 7, 1996, in Baltimore, Md. He is survived by Chris, his wife of 52 years, three children, Martha Rae Kolstad Wilhelm of Grinnell, Iowa, Charles D. Kolstad of Santa Barbara, Calif., and Peter K. Kolstad, of Los Angeles, Calif., and four grandchildren. George is also survived by three brothers and a sister.George was born in Elmira, N.Y., on December 10, 1919. Following high school graduation in 1937, he worked at Eastman Kodak while enrolled in night courses at the Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Rochester. He entered Bates College in 1939 and completed his B.S. in physics and mathematics in 1943. During World War II, he worked on piezo-electricity, radar countermeasures, and information flow from radar systems in combat environments. Following his Ph.D. in physics at Yale and brief service on the faculty there, he joined the Atomic Energy Commission in 1950. He began a career of fostering and nurturing basic research efforts, first in physics and mathematics, and then in the geosciences. He was a guest staff member at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, Copenhagen, in 1956-1957, and served as a trustee of Bates College from 1958 to 1964.

  10. Variants of Aspergillus alutaceus var. alutaceus (formerly Aspergillus ochraceus) with altered ochratoxin a production

    SciTech Connect

    Chelack, W.S.; Borsa, J.; Szekely, J.G. ); Marquardt, R.R.; Frohlich, A.A. )

    1991-09-01

    The present studies, using Asperigillus alutaceus var. alutaceus Berkeley et Curtis (formerly A. ochraceus Wilhelm) NRRL 3174 along with three other wild-type strains, were undertaken in an attempt to understand the effects of irradiation and other treatments on mycotoxin production in grain. Bedford barley was inoculated with spores of NRRL 3174, gamma irradiated, and incubated at 28C and 25% moisture. After 10 days of incubation, two colony types, ocher (parental) and yellow (variant), were isolated from the grain. Further culturing of the yellow variant resulted in the spontaneous appearance of a white variant that exhibited greatly enhanced fluorescence under UV light. In subsequent work, we have also isolated variants producing a soluble red pigment. In addition, in model experiments involving irradiation (1 kGy) of pure cultures, induction frequencies ranging between 2 and 4% (survival basis) were observed for the yellow and red variants. Inoculation of these variants into wheat and incubation for 14 days at 28C and 32% moisture resulted in ochratoxin A production in the relative amounts of 0.09:1:4.6:9.3 for the red, ocher (parental), yellow, and white variants, respectively. Additional characteristics of these isolates are described. Confirmation that the white high-ochratoxin-A-producing variants were derived from the parental strain was demonstrated by obtaining revertant sectors in monoclonal cultures of the variants.

  11. Historicism and neo-Kantianism.

    PubMed

    Beiser, Fred

    2008-12-01

    This article treats the conflict between historicism and neo-Kantianism in the late nineteenth century by a careful examination of the writings of Wilhelm Windelband, the leader of the Southwestern neo-Kantians. Historicism was a profound challenge to the fundamental principles of Kant's philosophy because it seemed to imply that there are no universal and necessary principles of science, ethics or aesthetics. Since all such principles are determined by their social and historical context, they differ with each culture and epoch. Windelband attempted to respond to the challenge of this relativism by either broadening Kantian principles, so that they could accommodate the results of historicism, or by reformulating Kantian principles, so that they were impregnable to historical change. The article examines both aspects of Windelband's strategy in some detail, noting the many changes and different formulations in his views. A final section considers some of the difficulties of Windelband's strategy and concludes that, despite its heroic efforts, it was a failure. PMID:19391374

  12. The Berlin Poliklinik: psychoanalytic innovation in Weimar Germany.

    PubMed

    Danto, E A

    1999-01-01

    After Freud proposed in 1918 the creation of "institutions or out-patient clinics [where] treatment will be free," Max Eitingon, Ernst Simmel, and other progressive psychoanalysts founded the Berlin Poliklinik, a free outpatient clinic. Guided by Weimar Republic principles of "radical functionalism," the Poliklinik and its companion inpatient service, the Schloss Tegel Sanatorium, pioneered treatment and training methodologies still used--and still debated--today. Their funding strategies, statistics, and approaches to clinical problems like length of treatment tell the history of an innovative psychoanalytic institute where men and women were generally treated in equal numbers and patients (ranging in occupational status from unemployed to professional) of all ages were treated free. Franz Alexander, Karl Abraham, Theresa Benedek, Paul Federn, Otto Fenichel, Edith Jacobson, Karen Horney, Erich Fromm, Helene Deutsch, Hanns Sachs, Sándor Radó, Hermine von Hug-Hellmuth, Wilhelm Reich, Annie Reich, and Melanie Klein all worked at the Poliklinik, and from there initiated decades of original clinical theory, practice, and education. PMID:10650563

  13. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, M

    1994-01-01

    Historical sociobiographic accounts on members of the scientific and technical professions in the years of the Weimar Republic and after, are as yet scarce. This applied notably to women in the scientific community. Having formally been admitted to academic studies at German Universities only in 1908, their claims of wanting to apply their newly gained knowledge and to pursue academic careers were still not unquestioned by society. The social and cognitive integration of "the female" in male dominated science organisation, especially in the natural sciences and their kin fields in industry, remains problematic to-day. Isolde Hausser, daughter of the ambitious but little succesful inventor-entrepreneur Hermann Ganswindt, took her doctoral degree in physics at Berlin University in 1914, then worked as head of a group at a "Telefunken" laboratory for vacuum tubes till 1929, before she became research scientist at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg. There she worked on photoerythemaes and the formation of pigment and discovered the specific action of longwave ultraviolet. She contributed important results to our knowledge on the constitution and the behaviour of organic compounds by modern physical methods. She died of cancer on 5th October 1951. PMID:11640803

  14. Mathematics Ab Ovo: Hans Driesch and Entwicklungsmechanik.

    PubMed

    Priven, Silvia Waisse; Alfonso-Goldfarb, Ana M

    2009-01-01

    One of the factors leading to the creation of embryology as a modern discipline at the end of the 19th century was Wilhelm Roux's formulation of the program of Entwicklungsmechanik (developmental mechanics). A look into the work of Hans Driesch, an equal contributor to developmental mechanics, may shed further light on this process. For Roux, developmental mechanics was an anatomical science, but for Driesch it was associated with a mathematical and physical approach to the natural world. Likewise, Roux used the concept of mechanics as an analogy, but Driesch used it literally. Driesch's generation had been trained in a pedagogic context that emphasized mathematics and physics, which may explain why he went a step further than Roux to state that a true "mechanics" of development required the reduction of morphogenetic problems to the known laws of physics. It is argued here that this difference in background is behind the enthusiastic adoption and further development of Roux's program by Driesch's generation, a generation that conceived Entwicklungsmechanik to be the reduction of embryological processes to "the laws of matter in motion." This same mathematical and physical mindset would underscore Driesch's later construction of entelechy as a regulating factor in embryogenesis, through mathematical analysis grounded on the notion of mathematical functions. PMID:19835266

  15. Biology and war--American biology and international science.

    PubMed

    Fangerau, Heiner

    2007-01-01

    The German-born American scientist Jacques Loeb (1859-1924) was one of the most important promoters of experimental biology around 1900. He was best known for his physico-chemical explanations of psychological processes and his biotechnological approach to artificial parthenogenesis. At the start of the First World War, Loeb was deeply troubled by the deterioration of the international scientific community and the growing alienation of his German and American colleagues. The aim of this paper is to examine Jacques Loeb's activities aimed at advancing scientific internationalism before, during, and after the war. Loeb, for example, tried to negotiate the publication of German authors in American journals during the war, at a time when this was categorically rejected by publishers. Immediately after the war, he tried to create a specific system aimed at disseminating scientific literature and funding selected European colleagues, in order to overcome what he considered reactionary and hegemonic forces within German scientific institutions. His correspondence with eminent scientists from all over the world (amongst them Albert Einstein, Richard Goldschmidt, Otto Meyerhof, Otto Warburg, Paul Ehrlich, Wolfgang Ostwald, Wilhelm Roux, and Ross Harrison) will serve as a source for the analysis. Special emphasis will be placed on the question how Jacques Loeb integrated epistemology, his particular world view, and his social commitment into the workings of his own life and how he tried to extend his scientific goal of controlling biological systems to the sphere of international science. PMID:18822662

  16. [Temperament and affective disorders--historical basis of current discussion].

    PubMed

    Ehrt, U; Brieger, P; Marneros, A

    2003-06-01

    The history of the temperament concept begins in ancient Greece. The humoral theory remained influential over the centuries. At the beginning of the 20 th century, both Wilhelm Wundt and his pupil Emil Kraepelin formulated new aspects. Wundt described two dimensions: "speed of variability of emotions" and "intensity of emotions". Kraepelin observed four fundamental states (depressive, manic, irritable and cyclothymic), which he linked to manic-depressive illness. Since then different lines of temperament research have evolved: (1) psychiatric-psychopathological theories (e. g. Ewald, Kretschmer and Sheldon), which tend to see temperament as a dilution of full-blown affective disorders; (2) neurobiological theories (e. g. Pavlov, Eysenck and Gray), which understand temperament as determined by underlying neurobiological processes - especially levels of arousal; and (3) developmental theories (e. g. Chess & Thomas, Rothbart and Kagan), which derived their temperament concept from early childhood observations. Recent theories (e. g. those of Cloninger or Akiskal) combine different aspects. After reviewing the historical temperament concepts we present underlying factors which are linked to affective disorders (such as emotional reactivity, cyclicity or trait affectivity). Finally, we illustrate the importance of temperament concepts for research in affective disorders. PMID:12796852

  17. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Schott, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Viktor von Weizsäcker (1886-1957) founded his concept of medical anthropology as a clinician educated in internal medicine and neurology. He tried to broaden natural scientific medicine psychosomatically focussing on the "sick human". The natural scientific approach would exclude subjectivity, and therefore he propagated the "introduction of the subject' (Einführung des Subjekts) into the life sciences. His own sensory physiological experiments and Sigmund Freud's psychoanalysis inspired him essentially since the 1920s. In his main work Der Gestaltkreis (gestalt circle) published in 1940 he stressed the "entity of perceiving and moving" (Einheit von Wahrnehmen und Bewegen) in regard to relevant aspects of medicine. In 1932, Weizsäcker became a member of the Heidelberg Academy of Sciences, whose president he was from 1947 till 1949; 1942 he became a member of the Leopoldina. Primarily his merits as a neurologist were highly appreciated. His medical anthropology was not relevant for his election by the two academies. Nevertheless, there was a certain repudiation against the objectivistic and materialistic Weltanschauung within the scientific community. So, Paracelsus and Goethe were highly estimated as natural philosophical guides for own conceptions. This was especially evident for the circle around Wilhelm Troll and Karl Lothar Wolf in Halle, both members of the Leopoldina, who were fascinated by Goethe's concept of "Gestalt". Weizsäcker's lecture on "Gestalt und Zeit" in Halle in 1942 fitted in the concept of those natural scientists. PMID:27514115

  18. Perfect in Every Sense. Scientific Iconography on an Equation Clock by Jost Bürgi and the Self-Understanding of the Astronomers at the Kassel Court in the Late 1580s.

    PubMed

    Gaulke, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    At the center of this article is an iconographic analysis of the eight silver reliefs on the sides of a table clock made in 1591 by Jost Burgi, the court clockmaker of Landgrave Wilhelm iv of Hessen-Kassel. The reliefs present an astronomical ancestral picture gallery, running from the Patriarchs of the Old Testament to Copernicus. The author argues that the "storyboard" for this sequence of images must have been conceived down to its smallest details by the Kassel court astronomer Christoph Rothmann; indeed, many of the scenes shown, along with many particular details depicted within them, are literally described in Rothmann's never-published manuscript Observationes stellarum fixarum of 1589. The final section of the essay compares these reliefs to the images created for Tycho Brahe at his Uraniborg and Stjerneborg observatories. The author concludes that the sequence of the reliefs in Kassel, culminating in the representation of Copernicus and his world view, is a reflection of the acrimonious debate extending over many years between the heliocentrist Rothmann and the geo-heliocentrist Brahe regarding the veracity of the heliocentric world view. PMID:26495584

  19. The discovery and rediscovery of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Sternbach, George L; Varon, Joseph

    2005-02-01

    The therapeutic use of oxygen was pioneered in the early 20(th) century by the respiratory physiologist John Scott Haldane. His work followed Claude Bernard's description of the toxic effects of carbon monoxide. Haldane, having also observed the effects of carbon monoxide poisoning, became aware of the therapeutic benefits of oxygen in this condition. He was also an advocate of oxygen as a therapeutic agent in other respiratory illness, and made efforts to define how the gas could best be administered. The history of identification of oxygen as a chemical element is convoluted. In the 17(th) century, the controversial John Mayow suggested that only a portion of air was necessary for sustaining life. Mayow's work was largely overlooked during his lifetime, and his insight was subsequently eclipsed by the phlogiston theory, an erroneous concept widely believed for nearly a century after his death. This theory was ultimately disproved by Joseph Priestley in 1774. Although the point of primacy is somewhat contentious, Priestley shares the distinction of discovering elemental oxygen with Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier, the French chemist, and Carl Wilhelm Scheele, the Swedish apothecary. PMID:15707822

  20. [Is it Possible to Experiment with Thought? Ernst Mach's Notion of Thought Experiment and its Pedagogical Context around 1900. ].

    PubMed

    Bauer, Julian

    2015-03-01

    Is it Possible to Experiment with Thought? Ernst Mach's Notion of Thought Experiment and its Pedagogical Context around 1900. The article tries to establish the crucial importance of the pedagogical dimension of Ernst Mach's ideas on experimenting with thought. The focus on contemporary pedagogics demonstrates, first, that Mach's didactic approach to physics is part of a much broader stream of pedagogical writings that transcends national and disciplinary borders and comprises a diversity of authors, e.g. Wilhelm Jerusalem, William James or Alfred N. Whitehead; second, that the much-heralded controversy between Mach and the French philosopher of science Pierre Duhem about thought experiments does not only revolve around epistemological issues but rather stems from their antagonist vision of teaching physics; and finally, third, that G. Stanley Hall's psychogenetic theory of pedagogics bears a strong resemblance with the evolutionary naturalism of Machian epistemology and helps explaining key tenets of Mach's conception of thought experiment. By establishing a broad convergence between the work of all these authors despite their different academic upbringing, background and nationality the article argues for a complex and historically fine-grained vision of the relations between natural, social and human sciences going beyond dichotomies like 'Erklären' and 'Verstehen' or the 'Two Cultures'. PMID:26140512

  1. Superabsorbing, Artificial Metal Films Constructed from Semiconductor Nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Park, Junghyun; Esfandyarpour, Majid; Pecora, Emanuele F; Kik, Pieter G; Brongersma, Mark L

    2016-06-01

    In 1934, Wilhelm Woltersdorff demonstrated that the absorption of light in an ultrathin, freestanding film is fundamentally limited to 50%. He concluded that reaching this limit would require a film with a real-valued sheet resistance that is exactly equal to R = η/2 ≈ 188.5Ω/□, where [Formula: see text] is the impedance of free space. This condition can be closely approximated over a wide frequency range in metals that feature a large imaginary relative permittivity εr″, that is, a real-valued conductivity σ = ε0εr″ω. A thin, continuous sheet of semiconductor material does not facilitate such strong absorption as its complex-valued permittivity with both large real and imaginary components preclude effective impedance matching. In this work, we show how a semiconductor metafilm constructed from optically resonant semiconductor nanostructures can be created whose optical response mimics that of a metallic sheet. For this reason, the fundamental absorption limit mentioned above can also be reached with semiconductor materials, opening up new opportunities for the design of ultrathin optoelectronic and light harvesting devices. PMID:27149008

  2. Freud's struggle with misogyny: homosexuality and guilt in the dream of Irma's injection.

    PubMed

    Lotto, D

    2001-01-01

    The highly condensed dream element trimethylamin is central to the dream of Irma's injection. After a brief review of the medical literature on timethylamine (TMA), it is suggested that two important meanings of this chemical and its properties lie in its disguised reference to disparaging views of women, as well as to Freud's homosexual connection to Wilhelm Fliess. Freud's misogynistic and homosexual impulses were stimulated by Fliess's recent surgical error committed while operating on Freud's patient Emma Eckstein. Evidence is presented that the collaboration between Freud and Fliess in performing an aggressive act toward a woman was for Freud an enactment of a childhood situation in which he and his nephew John had ganged up on John's sister Pauline. The later relationship between Freud, Jung, and Sabina Spielrein is seen as an additional reenactment of this childhood triangle. An examination of Freud's associations to and analysis of the Irma dream, as well as some of his later relationships with women, indicates that guilt and the wish to make reparation were also prominent themes in Freud's inner life. PMID:11809024

  3. [The history of medical physics and biophysics at the Humboldt University in Berlin].

    PubMed

    Schneck, P

    2001-01-01

    The present Institute of Medical Physics and Biophysics (former Institute of Radiation Research) was established on September 1st in 1923 by Walter Friedrich (1883-1968). It was after the Institute in Frankfurt A.M. (founded by Friedrich Dessauer in 1921) - the second Institute of its kind in Germany. As a physicist who wrote his dissertation under Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, he did research together with a Gynecologist in Friedburg on problems of radiation therapy and the prevention of radiation injuries. Thus Friedrich became one of the first German Biomedical Physicists and was appointed to a professorship at the university of Berlin and its faculty of medicine. The paper gives a survey of the history of the Institute of Radiation Research in the twenties, in the time of Nazi-rule, the period after the World War II and in the era of GDR until 1990 and up to the present time. The succession of directorship of the Institute and the main research subjects in medical physics and biophysics have been sketched. PMID:11710396

  4. Karl Knorre - First Astronomer of the Nicolaev Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G.; Pinigin, G.

    Karl Friedrich Knorre was born 28th March 1801 in family of the professor of astronomy of Dorpat university Ernst Knorre. During education in the Dorpat university he got acquantance with the future director of Pulkovo observatory Wilhelm Struve. According passion of K. Knorre for astronomy W. Struwe recommended him to the director position of planned naval observatory in Nikolaev. From the foundation of Nikolaev naval and later astronomical observatory in 1821 K. Knorre was a first director. He made star position observations with the meridian circle, worked as a teacher of astronomy for sea navigators, compiled the fifth page of star map of the Berlin Academy of sciences and headed by all hydrographic determinations on the sea of Asov and Black sea. After 50 years K. Knorre retired 1871 from the Directorship of the Nikolaev observatory and moved to Berlin. Nikolaev astronomical observatory arranges the international scientific conference devoted to the 180 anniversary of NAO and 200's birthday of Karl Friedrich Knorre in 2001.

  5. Dynamic Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, B. N.; Parker, Foreword by E. N.

    2007-07-01

    Foreword E. N. Parker; 1. Dynamic Sun: an introduction B. N. Dwivedi; 2. Solar models: structure, neutrinos and helioseismological properties J. N. Bahcall, S. Basu and M. H. Pinsonneault; 3. Seismic Sun S. M. Chitre and H. M. Antia; 4. Rotation of the solar interior J. Christensen-Dalsgaard and M. J. Thompson; 5. Helioseismic tomography A. G. Kosovichev; 6. The solar dynamo as a model of the solar cycle A. R. Choudhuri; 7. Spectro-polarimetry J. O. Stenflo; 8. Solar photosphere and convection Å. Nordlund; 9. The dynamics of the quiet solar chromosphere W. Kalkofen, S. S. Hasan and P. Ulmschneider; 10. Heating of the solar chromosphere P. Ulmschneider and W. Kalkofen; 11. The solar transition region O. Kjeldseth-Moe; 12. Solar magnetohydrodynamics E. R. Priest; 13. Solar activity Z. Švestka; 14. Particle acceleration A. G. Emslie and J. A. Miller; 15. Radio observations of explosive energy releases on the Sun M. R. Kundu and S. M. White; 16. Coronal oscillations V. M. Nakariakov; 17. Probing the Sun's hot corona K. J. H. Phillips and B. N. Dwivedi; 18. Vacuum-ultraviolet emission line diagnostics for solar plasmas B. N. Dwivedi, A. Mohan and K. Wilhelm; 19. Solar wind E. Marsch, W. I. Axford and J. F. McKenzie; 20. Solar observing facilities B. Fleck and C. U. Keller; Index.

  6. Dynamic Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, B. N.; Parker, Foreword by E. N.

    2003-05-01

    Foreword E. N. Parker; 1. Dynamic Sun: an introduction B. N. Dwivedi; 2. Solar models: structure, neutrinos and helioseismological properties J. N. Bahcall, S. Basu and M. H. Pinsonneault; 3. Seismic Sun S. M. Chitre and H. M. Antia; 4. Rotation of the solar interior J. Christensen-Dalsgaard and M. J. Thompson; 5. Helioseismic tomography A. G. Kosovichev; 6. The solar dynamo as a model of the solar cycle A. R. Choudhuri; 7. Spectro-polarimetry J. O. Stenflo; 8. Solar photosphere and convection Å. Nordlund; 9. The dynamics of the quiet solar chromosphere W. Kalkofen, S. S. Hasan and P. Ulmschneider; 10. Heating of the solar chromosphere P. Ulmschneider and W. Kalkofen; 11. The solar transition region O. Kjeldseth-Moe; 12. Solar magnetohydrodynamics E. R. Priest; 13. Solar activity Z. Švestka; 14. Particle acceleration A. G. Emslie and J. A. Miller; 15. Radio observations of explosive energy releases on the Sun M. R. Kundu and S. M. White; 16. Coronal oscillations V. M. Nakariakov; 17. Probing the Sun's hot corona K. J. H. Phillips and B. N. Dwivedi; 18. Vacuum-ultraviolet emission line diagnostics for solar plasmas B. N. Dwivedi, A. Mohan and K. Wilhelm; 19. Solar wind E. Marsch, W. I. Axford and J. F. McKenzie; 20. Solar observing facilities B. Fleck and C. U. Keller; Index.

  7. The pharmacy in Gersfeld/Rhoen and Veit Jakob Metz (1792-1866).

    PubMed

    Petroianu, G A

    2016-05-01

    A "Privileg" for a pharmacy in Gersfeld (Rhoen) was issued October 26, 1788 by the ruler of Gersfeld, the Reichsfreiherr Amand von Ebersberg (1747- 1803), to Peter Franz Wilhelm Feuchter (1766-1835). Feuchter was not only a dedicated pharmacist but also scholarly active both by publishing and by serving on various journal editorial boards. Vitus Jacobus Metz (1792-1866) was accepted 1808 as an apprentice in the pharmacy and later enjoyed private lessons from Feuchter (until around 1813, when he gave up the study of pharmacy to pursue medical studies in Würzburg). This major decision was possibly influenced by Metz experiencing the outcome of a dispute between pharmacist Feuchter and the physician Andreas Laubreis (*1778), dispute with an outcome favoring the physician. As a physician Metz great achievement was to establish 1830 the Mariannen-Institut, the lying-in asylum in Aachen, Bendelstrasse, the first such institution in Germany. How revolutionary and way ahead of its time the Mariannen-Institut really was can only be understood considering that it took over half a century until a similar institution, the second one in Germany, opened in Düsseldorf. With this short contribution we attempt to shed some light on the life and family of Veit Jakob Metz from Römershag (Bad Brückenau) and on the Gersfeld pharmacy, the place that played such a major role in shaping his personality. PMID:27348975

  8. Anniversary Paper: Image processing and manipulation through the pages of Medical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Armato, Samuel G. III; Ginneken, Bram van

    2008-10-15

    The language of radiology has gradually evolved from ''the film'' (the foundation of radiology since Wilhelm Roentgen's 1895 discovery of x-rays) to ''the image,'' an electronic manifestation of a radiologic examination that exists within the bits and bytes of a computer. Rather than simply storing and displaying radiologic images in a static manner, the computational power of the computer may be used to enhance a radiologist's ability to visually extract information from the image through image processing and image manipulation algorithms. Image processing tools provide a broad spectrum of opportunities for image enhancement. Gray-level manipulations such as histogram equalization, spatial alterations such as geometric distortion correction, preprocessing operations such as edge enhancement, and enhanced radiography techniques such as temporal subtraction provide powerful methods to improve the diagnostic quality of an image or to enhance structures of interest within an image. Furthermore, these image processing algorithms provide the building blocks of more advanced computer vision methods. The prominent role of medical physicists and the AAPM in the advancement of medical image processing methods, and in the establishment of the ''image'' as the fundamental entity in radiology and radiation oncology, has been captured in 35 volumes of Medical Physics.

  9. Anniversary paper: image processing and manipulation through the pages of Medical Physics.

    PubMed

    Armato, Samuel G; van Ginneken, Bram

    2008-10-01

    The language of radiology has gradually evolved from "the film" (the foundation of radiology since Wilhelm Roentgen's 1895 discovery of x-rays) to "the image," an electronic manifestation of a radiologic examination that exists within the bits and bytes of a computer. Rather than simply storing and displaying radiologic images in a static manner, the computational power of the computer may be used to enhance a radiologist's ability to visually extract information from the image through image processing and image manipulation algorithms. Image processing tools provide a broad spectrum of opportunities for image enhancement. Gray-level manipulations such as histogram equalization, spatial alterations such as geometric distortion correction, preprocessing operations such as edge enhancement, and enhanced radiography techniques such as temporal subtraction provide powerful methods to improve the diagnostic quality of an image or to enhance structures of interest within an image. Furthermore, these image processing algorithms provide the building blocks of more advanced computer vision methods. The prominent role of medical physicists and the AAPM in the advancement of medical image processing methods, and in the establishment of the "image" as the fundamental entity in radiology and radiation oncology, has been captured in 35 volumes of Medical Physics. PMID:18975696

  10. Determinism and probability in the development of the cell theory.

    PubMed

    Duchesneau, François

    2012-09-01

    A return to Claude Bernard's original use of the concept of 'determinism' displays the fact that natural laws were presumed to rule over all natural processes. In a more restricted sense, the term boiled down to a mere presupposition of constant determinant causes for those processes, leaving aside any particular ontological principle, even stochastic. The history of the cell theory until around 1900 was dominated by a twofold conception of determinant causes. Along a reductionist trend, cells' structures and processes were supposed to be accounted for through their analysis into detailed partial mechanisms. But a more holistic approach tended to subsume those analytic means and the mechanism involved under a program of global functional determinations. When mitotic and meiotic sequences in nuclear replication were being unveiled and that neo-Mendelian genetics was being grafted onto cytology and embryology, a conception of strict determinism at the nuclear level, principally represented by Wilhelm Roux and August Weismann, would seem to rule unilaterally over the mosaic interpretation of the cleavage of blastomeres. But, as shown by E.B. Wilson, in developmental processes there occur contingent outcomes of cell division which observations and experiments reveal. This induces the need to admit 'epigenetic' determinants and relativize the presumed 'preformation' of thedevelopmental phases by making room for an emergent order which the accidental circumstances of gene replication would trigger on. PMID:22542690

  11. The magic of dioxygen.

    PubMed

    Sosa Torres, Martha E; Saucedo-Vázquez, Juan P; Kroneck, Peter M H

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen has to be considered one of the most important elements on Earth. Earlier, some dispute arose as to which of the three scientists, Carl Wilhelm Scheele (Sweden), Joseph Priestley (United Kingdom) or Antoine Lavoisier (France), should get credit for the air of life.Today it is agreed that the Swede discovered it first, the fire air in 1772. The British chemist published it first, the dephlogisticated air in 1775, and the Frenchman understood it first, the oxygen in 1775-1778. Surely, there is credit enough for all three to split the "Nobel Prize" awarded by Carl Djerassi and Roald Hoffmann in their play Oxygen. Molecular oxygen means life. So-called aerobes - these include humans, animals, and plants - need O2 to conserve the energy they have to gain from their environment. Eliminate O2 and these organisms cannot support an active lifestyle. What makes dioxygen that special? It is a non-metal and oxidizing agent that readily reacts with most elements to form compounds, notably oxides. From a biological point of view, the most important compound of course is water, H2O, which provides an excellent solvent for biomolecules. It influences the climate of the Earth, and it is the source of almost all of the molecular oxygen in the atmosphere. PMID:25707464

  12. [German neurology and neurologists during the Third Reich: brain research and "euthanasia"].

    PubMed

    Martin, M; Karenberg, A; Fangerau, H

    2016-08-01

    The connection between systematic killing of the mentally ill and disabled, euphemistically called "euthanasia" in the National Socialism ideology, and German brain research has been thoroughly investigated and in detail; however, the impact of this criminal nexus on the image and self-perception of German neurologists as well as the status of neurology as a medical discipline is still the subject of controversial debates.Between 1939 and 1945 the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute (KWI) in Berlin along with other research centres were insofar enmeshed in the "euthanasia" program as brains of killed patients were dissected in the guise of "concomitant research" in order to generate medical knowledge. Affected were mainly individuals suffering from oligophrenia, early childhood brain atrophy, cerebral palsy and epilepsy. According to current historical research, collegial networks were instrumental in receiving brains of killed patients. Furthermore, civil research units were supplemented by military ones at the KWI. These, too, were concerned with the collection of medical knowledge, for instance on injuries of the brain and spinal cord. The historical approach to consider the Nazi organizations and medicine as "resources for each other" seems, therefore, at least in part applicable to neurology. PMID:27357455

  13. Regional scale assessment of soil predictors of groundwater phosphate (P) levels in acidic sandy agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabilde, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    could be indirect through mutual relations with groundwater level. Indeed, a shallower groundwater level (MHL or MLL) corresponded with higher phosphate concentrations (r = -0.126, τ = -0.107, P<0.01, n = 1028). The shortened distance between 0-90 cm soil PO4‑ and the groundwater logically explains this positive relation. In sum, factors other than soil P status more strongly determine groundwater PO4‑ concentrations but extensive observational datasets are much needed to unravel such indirect mediating effects of edaphic parameters. Structural equation modeling for example could be used to understand the practical importance of individual soil, management and hydrological potential predictors of groundwater PO4.

  14. Mesozoic and Cenozoic vertical movements in the Atlas system (Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia): An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lamotte, Dominique Frizon; Leturmy, Pascale; Missenard, Yves; Khomsi, Sami; Ruiz, Geoffrey; Saddiqi, Omar; Guillocheau, Francois; Michard, André

    2009-09-01

    -trending rift system developed contemporaneously (Sirt rifting), normal to the general trend of the Atlas System. The general inversion and orogenesis of the Atlas System occurred during two distinct episodes, Middle-Late Eocene-Oligocene and Late Miocene-Pliocene, respectively, whereas during the intervening period, the Africa-Europe convergence was mainly accommodated in the Rif-Tell system. Inversion tectonics and crustal thickening may account for the moderate uplift of the eastern Atlas System, not for the high elevation of the western mountain ranges (Middle Atlas, High Atlas, Anti-Atlas). In line with previous authors, we ascribe part of the recent uplift of the latter regions to the occurrence of a NE-trending, high-temperature mantle anomaly, here labelled the Moroccan Hot Line (MHL), which is also marked by a strip of late Miocene-Quaternary alkaline magmatism and significant seismicity.

  15. SIMMAX: A modern analog technique to deduce Atlantic sea surface temperatures from planktonic foraminifera in deep-sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflaumann, Uwe; Duprat, Josette; Pujol, Claude; Labeyrie, Laurent D.

    1996-02-01

    leave the system.) (Paper 95PA01743,SIMMAX: A modern analog technique to deduce Atlantic sea surfacetemperatures from planktonic foraminifera in deep-sea sediments, UwePflaumann, Josette Duprat, Claude Pujol, and Laurent D. Labeyrie).Diskette may be ordered from American Geophysical Union, 2000Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009; Payment mustaccompany order.

  16. Speedy Mic's Photograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-12-01

    Using observations from ESO's VLT, astronomers were able for the first time to reconstruct the site of a flare on a solar-like star located 150 light years away. The study of this young star, nicknamed 'Speedy Mic' because of its fast rotation, will help scientists better understand the youth of our Sun. ESO PR Photo 53/07 ESO PR Photo 53/07 Mapping Spots on Speedy Mic The astronomers [1] observed the star BO Microscopii [2] during two consecutive nights in October 2006, simultaneously with the UVES spectrograph on ESO's Very Large Telescope and ESA's XMM-Newton X-ray satellite. Using a technique called 'Doppler imaging' [3], the astronomers reconstructed images of the surface of the star, detecting the presence of several spots. A few are near the visible pole, while most spots are asymmetrically distributed at mid-latitudes. "The image we could secure of Speedy Mic is, given its distance, a real achievement, that allows us to localise for the first time ever the source of a flare and its surrounding," says Uwe Wolter, lead author of the paper relating the discovery. The X-ray observations indeed identified several flares, which are sudden and vast releases of energy. For one of them, the astronomers could pinpoint its origin on the surface of the star. The flare, lasting about 4 hours, was a hundred times more energetic than a large solar flare and considerably larger than solar coronal loops. The surprising finding, the team says, was the location of the flare. Contrary to our Sun, the site of the observed flare does not correspond to the detected spots [4]. "Interestingly, the flare occurs on a rather inconspicuous portion of the star's surface, away from the main concentration of activity in terms of dark spots," explains Wolter. Speedy Mic is a very young star: with an age of only about 30 million years, it is roughly 150 times younger than the Sun. "It is very likely that our young Sun was a fast rotator as well," says Wolter. "Studying Speedy Mic is thus

  17. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from the 20th Micromechanics Europe Workshop (MME 09) (Toulouse, France, 20-22 September 2009) Selected papers from the 20th Micromechanics Europe Workshop (MME 09) (Toulouse, France, 20-22 September 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    submitted papers. Their high levels of quality and considerable quantity serve as the foundation of this workshop's success. I'm also grateful to all the Program Committee members (Professor Miko Elwenspoek, Dr Martin Hill and Dr Uwe Schnakenberg) who gave their valuable time to review these numerous papers. I am proud to present 20 high-quality papers from MME 2009, selected through the regular review procedure of IOP Publishing, for their novelty and relevance to Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. These papers give a good overview of the topics presented during the workshop (microtechnology, characterization, sensors and actuators). I would also like to express my gratitude to Professor Robert Puers for advising on paper selection and to Dr Ian Forbes for coordinating this special section with the IOP Publishing office. I hope you enjoy reading this selection of papers.

  18. Austrian Carbon Calculator (ACC) - modelling soil carbon dynamics in Austrian soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedy, Katrin; Freudenschuss, Alexandra; Zethner, Gehard; Spiegel, Heide; Franko, Uwe; Gründling, Ralf; Xaver Hölzl, Franz; Preinstorfer, Claudia; Haslmayr, Hans Peter; Formayer, Herbert

    2014-05-01

    Austrian Carbon Calculator (ACC) - modelling soil carbon dynamics in Austrian soils. The project funded by the Klima- und Energiefonds, Austrian Climate Research Programme, 4th call Authors: Katrin Sedy, Alexandra Freudenschuss, Gerhard Zethner (Environment Agency Austria), Heide Spiegel (Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety), Uwe Franko, Ralf Gründling (Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research) Climate change will affect plant productivity due to weather extremes. However, adverse effects could be diminished and satisfying production levels may be maintained with proper soil conditions. To sustain and optimize the potential of agricultural land for plant productivity it will be necessary to focus on preserving and increasing soil organic carbon (SOC). Carbon sequestration in agricultural soils is strongly influenced by management practice. The present management is affected by management practices that tend to speed up carbon loss. Crop rotation, soil cultivation and the management of crop residues are very important measures to influence carbon dynamics and soil fertility. For the future it will be crucial to focus on practical measures to optimize SOC and to improve soil structure. To predict SOC turnover the existing humus balance model the application of the "Carbon Candy Balance" was verified by results from Austrian long term field experiments and field data of selected farms. Thus the main aim of the project is to generate a carbon balancing tool box that can be applied in different agricultural production regions to assess humus dynamics due to agricultural management practices. The toolbox will allow the selection of specific regional input parameters for calculating the C-balance at field level. However farmers or other interested user can also apply their own field data to receive the result of C-dynamics under certain management practises within the next 100 years. At regional level the impact of predefined changes in agricultural management

  19. Assessment of economically optimal water management and geospatial potential for large-scale water storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weerasinghe, Harshi; Schneider, Uwe A.

    2010-05-01

    Assessment of economically optimal water management and geospatial potential for large-scale water storage Weerasinghe, Harshi; Schneider, Uwe A Water is an essential but limited and vulnerable resource for all socio-economic development and for maintaining healthy ecosystems. Water scarcity accelerated due to population expansion, improved living standards, and rapid growth in economic activities, has profound environmental and social implications. These include severe environmental degradation, declining groundwater levels, and increasing problems of water conflicts. Water scarcity is predicted to be one of the key factors limiting development in the 21st century. Climate scientists have projected spatial and temporal changes in precipitation and changes in the probability of intense floods and droughts in the future. As scarcity of accessible and usable water increases, demand for efficient water management and adaptation strategies increases as well. Addressing water scarcity requires an intersectoral and multidisciplinary approach in managing water resources. This would in return safeguard the social welfare and the economical benefit to be at their optimal balance without compromising the sustainability of ecosystems. This paper presents a geographically explicit method to assess the potential for water storage with reservoirs and a dynamic model that identifies the dimensions and material requirements under an economically optimal water management plan. The methodology is applied to the Elbe and Nile river basins. Input data for geospatial analysis at watershed level are taken from global data repositories and include data on elevation, rainfall, soil texture, soil depth, drainage, land use and land cover; which are then downscaled to 1km spatial resolution. Runoff potential for different combinations of land use and hydraulic soil groups and for mean annual precipitation levels are derived by the SCS-CN method. Using the overlay and decision tree algorithms

  20. [Romanticism in German medicine in the light of home historiography of 1802-1945].

    PubMed

    Plonka-Syroka, B

    1998-01-01

    The German non-materialist medicine of the first half of the 19th century is presently a subject of advanced historical studies, carried out in Europe and USA. Until the mid-20th century, however, it was only the German authors who produced literature dedicated to the above-mentioned medicine. The purpose of this study is to present to the Polish reader the main trends in the German medical historiography that have been taking up the subject for 150 years. The historians of German medicine distinguished trends in the post-war period as the studies of the history of their native medical historiography developed. A Polish historian taking up the task of characterizing of the main methodological trends in German medical historiography is faced with the necessity to take position on the findings of German authors who took up the above-mentioned subject earlier. In my studies I worked mainly on the findings of the following authors: Nelly Tsouyopoulos, Urban Wiesing and Hans-Uwe Lammel. They served me as a guide to the old historical-medical literature that I managed to reach in the libraries of Dresden and Leipzig. Some of the German studies (H. Haeser, J. Petersen) were translated to Polish language and in those cases I leaned on the Polish translators. In this study I discuss the following methodological trends in historiography of German medicine of the 1st half of the 19th century: eclectic trends, philosophical trends, positivistic trends, neo-romantic trends, and social-cultural trends. I also present the analysis of theories of the most important representatives of the trends. Thanks to this I could reconstruct the process of shaping of the discussed epoch image in the light of various concepts of its description. As a result different characteristics of the epoch were grasped although the factography level they referred to was common. This study outlines also further developoment of the historiography of the discussed subject in the second half of the 20th

  1. Effects of climate change on water demand and water availability for power plants - examples for the German capital Berlin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voegele, Stefan; Koch, Hagen; Grünewald, Uwe

    2010-05-01

    Effects of climate change on water demand and water availability for power plants - examples for the German capital Berlin Stefan Vögelea, Hagen Kochb&c, Uwe Grünewaldb a Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Energy Research - Systems Analysis and Technology Evaluation, D-52425 Jülich, Germany b Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus, Chair Hydrology and Water Resources Management, P.O. Box. 101 344, D-03013 Cottbus, Germany c Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Research Domain Climate Impacts and Vulnerabilities, P.O. Box 601203, D-14412 Potsdam, Germany Numerous power plants in Europe had to be throttled in the summer months of the years 2003 and 2006 due to water shortages and high water temperatures. Therefore, the effects of climate change on water availability and water temperature, and their effects on electric power generation in power plants have received much attention in the last years. The water demand of a power plant for cooling depends on the temperature of the surface waters from which the cooling water is withdrawn. Furthermore, air temperature and air humidity influence the water demand if a cooling tower is used. Beside climatic parameters, the demand for water depends on economic and technological factors as well as on the electricity demand and the socio-political framework. Since the different systems are connected with certain levels of uncertainty, scenarios of socio-economic development and climate change should be used in analyses of climate change on power plants and to identify adaptation measures. In this presentation the effects of global change, comprising technological, socio-economic and climate change, and adaptation options to water shortages for power plants in the German capital Berlin in the short- and long-term are analysed. The interconnection between power plants, i.e. water demand, and water resources management, i.e. water availability, is described in detail. By changing the cooling system of power

  2. Citations Prize 2009 Citations Prize 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2009-12-01

    Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat who was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winning co-authors each receive a certificate. Photograph of the 2009 Citations Prize winners Some of the winning authors with their certificates, and Christian Morel with the Rotblat Medal, at the award ceremony in Orsay, near Paris. From left to right are Corinne Groiselle, Lydia Maigne, David Brasse, Irène Buvat, Dimitris Visvikis, Giovanni Santin, Uwe Pietrzyk, Pierre-François Honore, Christian Morel, Sébastien Jan and Arion Chatziioannou. The winner of the 2009 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous 5 years (2004-2008) is GATE: a simulation toolkit for PET and SPECT Authors: S Jan, G Santin, D Strul, S Staelens, K Assié, D Autret, S Avner, R Barbier, M Bardiès, P M Bloomfield, D Brasse, V Breton, P Bruyndonckx, I Buvat, A F Chatziioannou, Y Choi, Y H Chung, C Comtat, D Donnarieix, L Ferrer, S J Glick, C J Groiselle, D Guez, P-F Honore, S Kerhoas-Cavata, A S Kirov, V Kohli, M Koole, M Krieguer, D J van der Laan, F Lamare, G Largeron, C Lartizien, D Lazaro, M C Maas, L Maigne, F Mayet, F Melot, C Merheb, E Pennacchio, J Perez, U Pietrzyk, F R Rannou, M Rey, D R Schaart, C R Schmidtlein, L~Simon, T Y Song, J-M Vieira, D Visvikis, R Van de Walle, E Wieörs and C Morel Reference: S Jan et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 4543-61 Since its publication in 2004 this article has received over 200 citations. This extremely high figure is a testament to the great influence and usefulness of the work to the nuclear medicine community. More discussion of the winning paper can be found on

  3. EDITORIAL 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, Tito; Hidalgo, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    rotation with direct impact in the control of turbulent transport. Moreover, Jügen Nührenberg showed that a number of other properties of the magnetic field can also be optimized simultaneously, allowing high equilibrium and stability limits to be achieved and thus opening up a route to an inherently steady-state fusion reactor. The ideas of Allen Boozer and Jürgen Nührenberg have revolutionized stellarator research. They have already partially been confirmed on the W7-AS and HSX stellarators, and provide the basis for the world's largest stellarator under construction, Wendelstein 7-X. The award of the 2010 Hannes Alfvén Prize to these two leading scientists underlines the development of understanding and transfer of knowledge in plasma physics. Invited papers by Allen Boozer and Jürgen Nührenberg are published as articles 124002 and 124003 in this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. The Plasma Physics Innovation Prize 2010 The 2010 Plasma Physics Innovation Prize of the European Physical Society is awarded to Uwe Czarnetzki (Professor, Ruhr-Universität Bochum) for his outstanding contributions in the discovery of the electrical asymmetry effect, its scientific characterization and for its development up to the level of successful industrial application. photo of Uwe Czarnetzki Uwe Czarnetzki. The energy of ions impacting surfaces during plasma processing is crucial in determining both the properties of materials being deposited by plasmas and for the control of the etching of thin films. The independent control of the ion energy and the plasma density has been the object of intense industrial research. Current technologies for modifying the ion energy rely on the geometry of the plasma processing chamber or on applying low and high frequency RF power that is not phase locked. These techniques are either not applicable to some situations or have only been partially successful. The electrical asymmetry effect allows the ion energy and plasma

  4. 3d morphometric analysis of lunar impact craters: a tool for degradation estimates and interpretation of maria stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivaldi, Valerio; Massironi, Matteo; Ninfo, Andrea; Cremonese, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    In this study we have applied 3D morphometric analysis of impact craters on the Moon by means of high resolution DTMs derived from LROC (Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera) NAC (Narrow Angle Camera) (0.5 to 1.5 m/pixel). The objective is twofold: i) evaluating crater degradation and ii) exploring the potential of this approach for Maria stratigraphic interpretation. In relation to the first objective we have considered several craters with different diameters representative of the four classes of degradation being C1 the freshest and C4 the most degraded ones (Arthur et al., 1963; Wilhelms, 1987). DTMs of these craters were elaborated according to a multiscalar approach (Wood, 1996) by testing different ranges of kernel sizes (e.g. 15-35-50-75-100), in order to retrieve morphometric variables such as slope, curvatures and openness. In particular, curvatures were calculated along different planes (e.g. profile curvature and plan curvature) and used to characterize the different sectors of a crater (rim crest, floor, internal slope and related boundaries) enabling us to evaluate its degradation. The gradient of the internal slope of different craters representative of the four classes shows a decrease of the slope mean value from C1 to C4 in relation to crater age and diameter. Indeed degradation is influenced by gravitational processes (landslides, dry flows), as well as space weathering that induces both smoothing effects on the morphologies and infilling processes within the crater, with the main results of lowering and enlarging the rim crest, and shallowing the crater depth. As far as the stratigraphic application is concerned, morphometric analysis was applied to recognize morphologic features within some simple craters, in order to understand the stratigraphic relationships among different lava layers within Mare Serenitatis. A clear-cut rheological boundary at a depth of 200 m within the small fresh Linnè crater (diameter: 2.22 km), firstly hypothesized

  5. TYCHO Brahe's Empiric Methods, His Instruments, His Sudden Escape from Denmark and a New Theory About His Death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thykier, C.

    1992-07-01

    Tycho Brahe (1546-1601) was born a noble being, a son of Otto Brahe, and a member of the Royal Danish Council. Very early he developed a great interest in science and especially astronomy. In 1575 Tycho visited the learned Prince Wilhelm II in Kassel. Here he was inspired by the famous instrument maker Burgi to build new precise astronomical instruments, and on the recommendation of Wilhelm King Frederic II of Denmark was given the island Hven (which at that time belonged to Denmark) as an entailed estate. At 26 years old, Tycho became famous for his work DE NOVA STELLA on the supernova that brightened up in 1572, and since this phenomenon kept its position fixed among the stars, it immediately invalidated the Aristotelian dogma of the invariability of the fixed-star world. In 1577 Tycho observed the great comet and followed its celestial motion by means of a quadrant and a sextant. He then came to the conclusion that the comet orbit moved far out among the planets, in contradiction to the Aristotelian dogma of the crystal spheres for the planets. However, Tycho's great contribution to science was his construction of the observatory buildings Uraniborg and Stjerneborg ("Star Castle") with their equipment of ancient sighting instruments and his use of these instruments without telescopes for observations of the planets over a period of almost 20 years. Tycho's work is collected in 15 volumes, OPERA OMNIA by J. L. E. Dreyer. Tycho also mapped Hven correctly and he triangulated both sides of Oresund relative to Hven. When Tycho moved to Prague in 1599 he lived there for a couple of years and met Kepler who became his assistant and collaborator. Kepler was the one who analyzed Tycho's material and derived the Keplerian laws for the motions of the planets. On this basis Newton derived the law of gravitation. Tycho Brahe has been considered the father of modern empirical science. In 1596 he was accused of negligence of his administrative duties and several other things

  6. Boguslawsky crater, Moon: Geology of the Luna-Glob Landing Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesinger, Harald; Ivanov, Mikhail; Hendrik Paskert, Jan; Bauch, Karin; Howes van der Bogert, Carolyn

    2014-05-01

    associated with small impact craters (mostly <500 m diameter) can be up to 45 degrees. Using LRO Diviner data, our thermal model [4] indicates several areas with higher thermal inertia and, thus, rock abundances. However, many of those areas likely can be attributed to temperature differences caused by insufficient topographic correction. However, we found several areas with high rock abundances that are clearly not affected by topography and are associated with the morphologically freshest craters. Manual boulder counts for those areas on LRO NAC images confirm a large number of boulders on the surface. For example, in an area of about 4 km2, we counted more than 16,000 boulders between ~0.5 m and up to 13 m in size around a small crater at the eastern edge of the western landing ellipse. References: [1] Neukum et al. (2001), Space Sci. Rev. 96; [2] Wilhelms (1987) USGS Prof. Paper 1348; [3] Wilhelms et al. (1979) USGS I-1162; [4] Bauch et al. (2014), Submitted to PSS.

  7. Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, Dan

    2011-01-31

    Procurement Performance Measure. A performance level of 'A-' was achieved in 2010 for Integrated Safety, Health and Environmental Protection. As reported in Site Environmental Reports for prior years, the Laboratory's Environmental Management System (EMS) has been integrated into the Laboratory's Integrated Safety Management System since 2005. The integration of EMS into the way the Laboratory does business allows the Laboratory to systematically review, address and respond to the Laboratory's environmental impacts. The Laboratory's EMS was audited in April 2009 by DOE-CH. There were four 'Sufficiently in Conformity' findings as a result of the audit. All four findings were tracked in the Laboratory's corrective action database for completion. Beryllium was used routinely at Ames Laboratory in the 1940's and 1950's in processes developed for the production of highly pure uranium and thorium in support of the historic Manhattan Project. Laboratory metallurgists also worked on a process to produce pure beryllium metal from beryllium fluoride. In the early 1950's, beryllium oxide powder was used to produce shaped beryllium and crucibles. As a result of that work, beryllium contamination now exists in many interstitial spaces (e.g., utility chases) and ventilation systems in Wilhelm, Spedding and Metals Development buildings. Extensive characterization and remediation efforts have occurred in 2009 and 2010 in order to better understand the extent of the contamination. Analysis of extensive sampling data suggests that a fairly wide dispersion of beryllium occurred (most likely in the 1950's and 60's) in Wilhelm Hall and in certain areas of Spedding Hall and Metals Development. Area air-sampling results and work-area surface characterizations indicate the exposure potential to current workers, building visitors and the public remains extremely low. This information is now used to guide cleaning efforts and to provide worker protection during remodeling and maintenance activities

  8. BOOK REVIEW: Astronomie von Olbers bis Schwarzschild. Nationale Entwicklungen und internationale Beziehungen im 19. Jahrhundert (Acta Historica Astronomiae Vol. 16)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.; Dick, W. R.; Hamel, J.

    2002-12-01

    The 14th volume of the Acta Historica Astronomiae is the Proceedings of a Colloquium International Relationships in Astronomy (in German) organised by the History of Astronomy Section of the Astronomische Gesellschaft held on September 18 in Lilienthal, Germany. The book contains 13 articles on astronomical topics covering the 19th and 20th centuries. The first paper is by Guenther Oestmann and deals with contemporary assessments of Johann Hieronymus Schroeter's (1745-1816) astronomical works and with later judgements of the scientific importance and significance of his observations as seen by astronomers and historians. This report is complemented by a second article on Schroeter's 25-ft reflector in Lilienthal near Bremen. To this end, author Felix Luehning has constructed a scale model of the telescope, and shows how the building of a model brings a deeper understanding of function and handling of this instrument. This brings us to a third paper on telescope building in Lilienthal: Hans-Joachim Leue describes the cooperation of Johann Hieronymus Schroeter and Johann Gottlieb Schrader in developing a white reflecting metal alloy for use as telescope mirror. The fourth article, by Klaus Schillinger, describes on the basis of archival documents the aquisition history of the Herschel telescopes, including telescope quality check, repair and building. Memorial sites referring to Wilhelm Olbers, Johann Hieronymus Schroeter, Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel and Carl Friedrich Gauss are described by Arno Langkavel in two walks outlined in the very last paper of this book. Peter Brosche, in the fifth paper, discusses the rediscovery of Ceres in December1801, a discovery that was the result of the combined efforts of a theoretician (Gauss) and an observer (Zach). Juergen Hamel's paper is based on previously unused archival sources and discusses the outstanding role played by H. C. Schumacher (1780-1850, editor of the Astronomische Nachrichten) in the communication between

  9. Why does the heart beat? The discovery of the electrical system of the heart.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Mark E; Grove, Daniel; Upshaw, Charles B

    2006-06-13

    Why does the heart beat? This question--known as the myogenic versus neurogenic theory--dominated cardiac research in the 19th century. In 1839, Jan Evangelista Purkinje discovered gelatinous fibers in the ventricular subendocardium that he thought were muscular. Walter Gaskell, in 1886, demonstrated specialized muscle fibers joining the atria and ventricles that caused "block" when cut and found that the sinus venosus was the area of first excitation of the heart. By examining serial embryologic sections, Wilhelm His, Jr, showed that a connective tissue sheet became a bundle connecting the upper and lower cardiac chambers, the bundle of His. Sunao Tawara traced the atrioventricular (AV) bundle of His backward to find a compact node of fibers at the base of the atrial septum and forward where it connected with the bundles of cells discovered by Purkinje in 1839. Tawara concluded that this "AV connecting system" originated in the AV node, penetrated the septum as the His bundle, and then divided into left and right bundle branches that terminated in the Purkinje fibers. Martin Flack and Arthur Keith studied the conduction system of a mole and found a structure in the sinoauricular junction that histologically resembled the AV node. They felt that this was where "the dominating rhythm of the heart normally begins" and named it the sinoauricular node in 1907. The ECG of Einthoven soon brought a new understanding to the complex electrical system that makes the heart beat. In 2006 and 2007, we celebrate the 100th anniversaries of the publication of the exciting discovery of the AV and sinus nodes, truly landmarks in our understanding of cardiac structure and physiology. PMID:16769927

  10. A history of normal plates, tables and stages in vertebrate embryology.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, Nick

    2007-01-01

    Developmental biology is today unimaginable without the normal stages that define standard divisions of development. This history of normal stages, and the related normal plates and normal tables, shows how these standards have shaped and been shaped by disciplinary change in vertebrate embryology. The article highlights the Normal Plates of the Development of the Vertebrates edited by the German anatomist Franz Keibel (16 volumes, 1897-1938). These were a major response to problems in the relations between ontogeny and phylogeny that amounted in practical terms to a crisis in staging embryos, not just between, but (for some) also within species. Keibel's design adapted a plate by Wilhelm His and tables by Albert Oppel in order to go beyond the already controversial comparative plates of the Darwinist propagandist Ernst Haeckel. The project responded to local pressures, including intense concern with individual variation, but recruited internationally and mapped an embryological empire. Though theoretically inconclusive, the plates became standard laboratory tools and forged a network within which the Institut International d'Embryologie (today the International Society of Developmental Biologists) was founded in 1911. After World War I, experimentalists, led by Ross Harrison and Viktor Hamburger, and human embryologists, especially George Streeter at the Carnegie Department of Embryology, transformed Keibel's complex, bulky tomes to suit their own contrasting demands. In developmental biology after World War II, normal stages-reduced to a few journal pages-helped domesticate model organisms. Staging systems had emerged from discussions that questioned the very possibility of assigning an embryo to a stage. The historical issues resonate today as developmental biologists work to improve and extend stage series, to make results from different laboratories easier to compare and to take individual variation into account. PMID:17183461

  11. Achievements of Polish doctors in gastrodiaphanoscopy at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries

    PubMed Central

    Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata; Pozowski, Andrzej; Kuciel-Lewandowska, Jadwiga

    2013-01-01

    Diaphanoscopy/transillumination, the method of shining a bright light through tissues, was devised in the mid-19th century and developed after the invention of the light bulb by T.A. Edison. Benjamin Milliot was the first to examine the stomach by means of an incandescent platinum wire. The experiments conducted by Max Einhorn using a device consisting of a Nelaton catheter with an inserted light bulb, were valuable. In Poland the method of gastrodiaphanoscopy was popularized by Teodor Heryng, Mikołaj Rejchman and by Warsaw doctors. They used a diaphanoscope consisting of a gutta-percha probe distally equipped with a metal attachment with a light bulb hidden in it and with a so-called cooling device. The examination would usually be conducted in the standing position after the stomach had been filled with water. Light patches corresponding to the stomach’s lower and side boundaries would be obtained. Rejchman’s observation, that such a contractile and flexible organ as the stomach, changing its volume and position, is bound to change its light image, was correct. Heryng’s and Rejchman’s research inspired the foreign researchers Renvier, Leopold Kuttner and John Jacobson. Extensive research was subsequently conducted by C.A. Meltzing and Wilhelm Schwartz. Diaphanoscopy would also be performed by Walery Jaworski, the pioneer of gastrology. He was particularly interested in transillumination of the stomach, peritoneum and omentum tumours. Eugeniusz Kozierowski, a practicing physician from Gorlice, diagnosed neoplastic pylorostenosisusing this method. Gastrodiaphanoscopy is a historical method, now of no value against gastroendoscopy and the state-of-the-art methods of image diagnostics. PMID:24868282

  12. Swedish Chemists and Discovery of the Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Volker

    1996-10-01

    All of the elements not already known from antiquity were discovered in Europe and North America. So which country ranks number one on the discovery list? The question occurred to me while leafing through reference 1 in search of thermodynamic data on silicon. Never having seen such a tabulation, I wondered if it might prove useful in teaching. The question has a sports-related flavor that will appeal to many students. Personally, I picked England or Germany for #1. The actual result is surprising. The ranking considering only up to atomic number 103 is as follows: Note: Where two or more independent discoveries have been made, each country is credited. In the "others" category Austria and Denmark each has two discoveries. The remaining countries, with one each, are Finland, Italy, Mexico, Poland, Romania, Russia, and Spain. The high place for the USA is primarily due to the work done at Berkeley and Los Alamos on the transuranics. Without these discoveries, the US would have tied with Switzerland at three elements. Perhaps the most interesting aspect of this tabulation is that Swedish chemists have discovered the most elements. Four chemists alone account for twelve of the 20 discoveries: Baron Jöns Jakob Berzelius (1779-1848) is credited with four elements. His pupil, friend, and assistant, Carl Gustav Mosander (1797-1858) discovered three. P. T. Cleve also found three elements and Karl Wilhelm Scheele (1742-1786) discovered two. Biographical research on the Swedish chemists is a suitable assignment at the introductory level. Reasons for the predominance of Swedish chemists presents a challenging student research topic in the history of chemistry. Another interesting question at the introductory level is, transuranics aside, who discovered the most elements? At the more advanced level the question becomes, why? Literature Cited: 1. Emsley, J. The Elements; Clarendon: Oxford, 1989.

  13. A conversation with Paul Greengard. Interview by Eric J Nestler.

    PubMed

    Greengard, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Paul Greengard was born in New York City in 1925. After completing high school, he served three years in the US Navy during World War II and then completed his bachelor's degree at Hamilton College where he majored in physics and mathematics. He obtained a PhD in biophysics from Johns Hopkins University in 1953 and pursued postdoctoral training with Wilhelm Feldberg at the National Institute for Medical Research in England. After eight years as head of biochemistry at Geigy, and sabbaticals at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Vanderbilt University, he joined the Yale University faculty as a full professor of pharmacology in 1968. While he was at Yale, Greengard's laboratory performed groundbreaking research, which demonstrated a role for cyclic nucleotides, protein kinases and protein phosphatases, and their protein substrates in the regulation of synaptic transmission. In 1983, Greengard moved to The Rockefeller University, where he has since served as the Vincent Astor Professor and Head of the Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience. Greengard's paradigm-shifting research has continued at Rockefeller and has informed our understanding and possible treatment of a host of brain disorders, including schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and depression. He is the author of more than 950 research articles and reviews. Greengard has received numerous awards and honors, including the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2000, the Metropolitan Life Foundation Award for Medical Research, The National Academy of Sciences Award in Neuroscience, the Ralph W. Gerard Prize in Neuroscience for the Society for Neuroscience, and the Karolinska Institutet's Bicentennial Gold Medal. He is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. The following interview was conducted on May 29, 2012. PMID:23294305

  14. The beginnings of Acta Neurochirurgica and the work of Fritz Loew, chief editor from 1958 - 1997. An historical vignette.

    PubMed

    Reulen, Hans-Jürgen; Collmann, Hartmut

    2012-07-01

    Acta Neurochirurgica was founded in 1950, in the difficult time after World War II, by Mario Milletti (Bologna) and Wolfram Sorgo (Innsbruck), and published by Springer press, Vienna. From the beginning the new journal was conceived as an international journal with an impressive list of outstanding neurosurgeons in the editorial board. Only a few years later the issues appeared at irregular intervals due to individual problems of both editors. Wilhelm Tönnis took the initiative to keep the journal alive, when he asked-in consent with Springer press-his staff member Fritz Loew to continue the editorial work and to assemble a new prestigious editorial board. Loew succeeded with both tasks and remained editor-in-chief for nearly 38 years. Initially, all papers were published in the native languages of the authors: English, French, German, Italian and Spanish. With ongoing time the journal accepted manuscripts in English only. The slow progress of this process exemplifies the slow integration of the European countries. In 1971, at the founding meeting of the European Association of Neurosurgical Societies (EANS) in Prague, Acta Neurochirurgica became the official organ of the EANS. Right from the beginning of Acta Neurochirurgica, Supplement volumes were added. Also, the book series Advances and Technical Standards in Neurosurgery is an offspring of Acta Neurochirurgica. Acta Neurochirurgica has become one of the most important neurosurgical journals worldwide. This historical sketch is based on an interview with Fritz Loew, now 91 years old, to which data from the available literature and the Archives of German Neurosurgery, as well as personal information by several colleagues were added. PMID:22581432

  15. Localization of Membrane Proteins in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 (Radial Asymmetry in the Photosynthetic Complexes).

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, D. M.; Troyan, T. A.; Sherman, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Localization of membrane proteins in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 was determined by transmission electron microscopy utilizing immunocytochemistry with cells prepared by freeze-substitution. This preparation procedure maintained cellular morphology and permitted detection of cellular antigens with high sensitivity and low background. Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 is a unicellular cyanobacterium with thylakoids organized in concentric layers toward the periphery of the cell. Cytochrome oxidase was localized almost entirely in the cytoplasmic membrane, whereas a carotenoprotein (P35) was shown to be a cell wall component. The major photosystem II (PSII) proteins (D1, D2 CP43, and CP47) were localized throughout the thylakoids. Proteins of the Cyt b6/f complex were found to have a similar distribution. Thylakoid luminal proteins, such as the Mn-stabilizing protein, were located primarily in the thylakoid, but a small, reproducible fraction was found in the outer compartment. The photosystem I (PSI) reaction center proteins and the ATP synthase proteins were found associated mostly with the outermost thylakoid and with the cytoplasmic membrane. These results indicated that the photosynthetic apparatus is not evenly distributed throughout the thylakoids. Rather, there is a radial asymmetry such that much of the PSI and the ATPase synthase is located in the outermost thylakoid. The relationship of this structure to the photosynthetic mechanism is discussed. It is suggested that the photosystems are separated because of kinetic differences between PSII and PSI, as hypothesized by H.-W. Trissl and C. Wilhelm (Trends Biochem Sci [1993] 18:415-419). PMID:12232325

  16. The Progress of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Arthur

    2015-10-01

    Introduction; 1. Scope of lectures. State of physics in 1875. Science of energy. Theory of gases. Elastic solid theory of light. Maxwell's theory of electricity. Training of students. Maxwell's view. Accurate measurement and discovery of Argon. German methods. Kirchhoff's laboratory. Wilhelm Weber's laboratory. The two laboratories of Berlin. Laboratory instruction at Manchester. Position of physics in mathematical tripos at Cambridge. Todhunter's views. The Cavendish laboratory. Spectrum analysis. The radiometer. Theory of vortex atom; 2. Action at a distance. Elastic solid of theory of light. Maxwell's theory of electrical action. Electro-magnetic theory. Verification of electromagnetic theory by Hertz. Electro-magnetic waves. Wireless telegraphy. First suggestion of molecular structure of electricity. Early experiments in the electric discharge through gases. Kathode rays. Works of Goldstein and Crookes. Hittorf's investigations. Own work on the discharge through gases. Ionization of gases. Magnetic deflexion of kathode rays. J. J. Thomson's experiments. Measurement of atomic charge; 3. Roentgen's discovery. Theories of Roentgen rays. Ionizing power of Roentgen rays. Conduction of electricity through ionized gases. Discovery of radio-activity. Discovery of radium. Magnetic deflexion of rays emitted by radio-active bodies. Discovery of emanations. Theory of radio-active change. Decay of the atom. Connexion between helium and the a ray. Helium produced by radium. Strutt's researches on helium accumulated in rocks. Electric inertia. Constitution of atom. J. J. Thomson's theory of Roentgen radiation. The Michelson-Morley experiment. Principle of relativity. The Zeeman effect. Other consequences of electron theory. Contrast between old and modern school of physics; 4. Observational sciences. Judgment affected by scale. Terrestrial magnetism. Existence of potential. Separation of internal and external causes. Diurnal variation. Magnetic storms. Their causes. Solar

  17. [Non-union in os scaphoideum and its surgical treatment: overview of literature].

    PubMed

    Manák, P; Drác, P

    2004-01-01

    Authors present an overview of surgical methods used for the treatment of os scaphoideum with a focus on currently most frequent operations. In the period between January 1998 and March 2004, the authors performed 100 operations on the scaphoid bone, of this 54times primary fixation and 46times surgery for non-union in 42 patients. The most frequent method was resection of non-union, implantation of tri-cortical bone graft and internal fixation (17times). This method is considered by the authors optimal in non-unions in the middle third of the bone without signs of avascular necrosis of the roximal pole. In 8 patients with signs of avascular necrosis of the proximal pole and in non-unions in the proximal third, reconstruction was done by vascularized bone graft after Zaidemberg. In case of the finding of a minimal sclerotic line without deformation or shortening of the bone the method of choice was compression of the non-union by a screw (Herbert screw, HBS, Synthes screw) in 8 patients. Intramedullary cancellous bone graft and internal fixation was used in 8 patients. However, the authors do not consider it as an optimal treatment as it does not guarantee preservation of the length of the bone until the healing of the non-union. This surgery was used by the authors only as an alternative when it was not possible to choose another method. Extirpation of the distal scaphoid bone (twice) and proximal carpectomy (twice, of this once together with the dennervation after Wilhelm) were performed in non-unions with marked osteoarthritic changes of the radiocarpal joint. In one patient the proximal pole was excised and replaced by tendon graft. The authors do not have experience in limited intercarpal arthrodesis, but most other authors currently prefer proximal carpectomy to this technically demanding operation. PMID:15600129

  18. An early work [1910-1913] in Biological Psychology by pioneer psychiatrist, criminologist and philosopher José Ingenieros, M.D. (1877-1925) of Buenos Aires.

    PubMed

    Triarhou, Lazaros C; del Cerro, Manuel

    2006-04-01

    One of the earliest recorded works in Biological Psychology was published in 1910 by Argentine psychiatrist José Ingenieros (1877-1925), Professor of Experimental Psychology at the Faculty of Philosophy and Letters of the University of Buenos Aires. Ingenieros, a multifaceted personality and prolific author and educator famous for his lapidary aphorisms, has been considered a 'luminary' for generations. Trained as a physician, he was the first scientist to establish a comprehensive psychological system in Latin America. His long list of publications includes more than 300 titles generally divided in two periods: studies in mental pathology and criminology (1897-1908) and studies in philosophy, psychology and sociology (1908-1925). His works were never made particularly available to English-speaking audiences, despite the fact that certain of his books are still best-sellers in the Spanish-speaking world. We present an overview of Ingenieros' life and work, and a detailed account of his profoundly interesting work Principios de Psicología Biológica, in which he analyzes the development, evolution and social context of mental functions. We also provide an English translation of the Introduction contributed by Nobel laureate Wilhelm Ostwald (1853-1932) to the 1922 German edition of the work, pertinent to the energetic principles Ingenieros used and the study of Psychology as a natural science. It is a hope, 80 years after Ingenieros' parting, to bibliographically resurrect this champion of reason, who, until now, has not been given his due placement in the international psychological and biomedical literature. PMID:16188365

  19. A North Adriatic centenarian: The marine research station at Rovinj

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavodnik, D.

    1995-03-01

    The institute in Rovinj was founded in 1891 as the field station of the Berlin Aquarium. It soon gained in scientific importance. From 1911, it was governed by various scientific bodies, such as the ‘Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften’, the ‘Reale Comitato Talassografico Italiano’, and the ‘Jugoslavenska Akademija znanosti i umjetnosti’. At present, it is a department of the ‘Ruđer Bo\\vsković’ Institute, called the ‘Center for Marine Research Rovinj’. In the past hundred years, the Rovinj station experienced several ascents and declines in its development: both in the First and Second World Wars the station's scientific equipment, research vessels, library and reference collections were dispersed, and from 1945 1948 the station was closed. But in “happier” periods, rich support by the state and international bodies favoured the increase in research facilities and promoted interest among visiting scientists. The station has always been involved in studies of the Adriatic Sea, especially in its northern part. It contributed much to general knowledge of oceanography, of the physics and chemistry of the sea, but its paramount contribution is to various disciplines of marine biological sciences. Applied research, however, was most oriented to fisheries biology, especially shellfish culture, to resource studies, and, recently, to toxicology, bacteriology, eutrophication and pollution monitoring. The international approach in science and applied research was always favoured. At present, the Center is well equipped for complex coastal and offshore field- and laboratory research, and maintains facilities for graduate and postgraduate teaching. Scientific dissemination is also promoted by the public aquarium and professional meetings.

  20. Passive versus active local microrheology in mammalian cells and amoebae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riviere, C.; Gazeau, F.; Marion, S.; Bacri, J.-C.; Wilhelm, C.

    2004-12-01

    We compare in this paper the rotational magnetic microrheology detailed by Marion et al [18] and Wilhelm et al [19] to the passive tracking microrheology. The rotational microrheology has been designed to explore, using magnetic rotating probes, the local intracellular microenvironment of living cells in terms of viscoelasticity. Passive microrheology techniques is based on the analysis of spontaneous diffusive motions of Brownian probes. The dependence of mean square displacement (MSD) with the time then directly reflects the type of movement (sub-, hyper- or diffusive motions). Using the same intracellular probes, we performed two types of measurements (active and passive). Based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, one should obtain the same information from the both techniques in a thermally equilibrium system. Interestingly, our measurements differ, and the discordances directly inform on active biological processes, which add to thermally activated fluctuations in our out-of equilibrium systems. In both cell models used, mammalian Hela cells and amoebae Entamoeba Histolytica, a hyper-diffusive regime at a short time is observed, which highlights the presence of an active non-thermal driving force, acting on the probe. However, the nature of this active force in mammalian cells and amoebae is different, according to their different phenotypes. In mammalian cells active processes are governed by the transport, via molecular motors, on the microtubule network. In amoebae, which are highly motile cells free of microtubule network, the active processes are dominated by strong fluxes of cytoplasm driven by extension of pseudopodia, in random directions, leading to an amplitude of motion one order of magnitude higher than for mammalian cells. Figs 7, Refs 32.

  1. Angelo Mosso and muscular fatigue: 116 years after the first Congress of Physiologists: IUPS commemoration.

    PubMed

    Di Giulio, Camillo; Daniele, Franca; Tipton, Charles M

    2006-06-01

    At the first International Congress of Physiologists in Basel, Switzerland, the Italian physiologist Angelo Mosso (1846-1910) discussed his findings on muscular fatigue while demonstrating the functioning of an ergograph (work recorder). One hundred sixteen years later, Mosso's career, scientific accomplishments, and legacy in the study of muscular fatigue were commemorated at the 2005 International Congress of Physiological Sciences. After receiving his degree in Medicine and Surgery from Turin, Italy, in 1870, Mosso was able to study and interact with renowned physiologists as Wilhelm Ludwig, Du Bois-Reymond, Hugo Kronecker, and Etienne Marey. By 1879, he was Professor of Physiology at the University in Turin, where he conducted research pertaining to blood circulation, respiration, physical education, high-altitude physiology, and muscular fatigue. Using tracings from the ergograph (concentric contractions of the flexor muscles of the middle finger that were volitionally or electrically stimulated), he was able to characterize muscle fatigue and to associate its occurrence with central or peripheral influences. He demonstrated that exercise would increase muscular strength and endurance while prolonging the occurrence of fatigue, which he postulated was a chemical process that involved the production of toxic substances such as carbonic acid. The phenomenon of contracture was described, and his collective studies led to the formulation of laws pertaining to exhaustion and to the 1891 publication of La Fatica (Fatigue). Besides La Fatica, Mosso will be remembered as a scientist with a love for physiology, a concern for the social welfare of his countrymen, and as one who sought to integrate physiological, philosophical, and psychological concepts in his experimental studies. PMID:16709733

  2. 'There's the record, closed and final': Rough for Theatre II as Psychiatric Encounter.

    PubMed

    Heron, Jonathan; Broome, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    A co-authored collaboration between a theatre practitioner and a clinical psychiatrist, this paper will examine Rough for Theatre II (RFTII) and Beckett's demonstration of the way records are used to understand the human subject. Using Beckett's play to explore interdisciplinary issues of embodiment and diagnosis, the authors will present a dialogue that makes use of the 'best sources' in precisely the same manner as the play's protagonists. One of those sources will be Beckett himself, as Heron will locate the play in its theatrical context through reflections upon his own practice (with Fail Better Productions, UK) as well as recent studies such as Beckett, Technology and the Body (Maude 2009) and Performing Embodiment in Samuel Beckett's Drama (McMullan 2010); another source will be the philosopher Wilhelm Windleband, whose 1901 History of Philosophy was read and noted upon by Beckett in the 1930s, as Broome will introduce a philosophical and psychiatric context to the exchange. Windelband is now a neglected figure in philosophy; but as one of the key figures of Neo-Kantianism in the late 19(th) century, his work was an important impetus to that of Rickert, Weber and Heidegger. Specifically, Windelband gives us the distinction between idiographic and nomothetic understanding of individuals, an approach that is of relevance to the psychiatric encounter. This academic dialogue will consider tensions between subjectivity and objectivity in clinical and performance practice, while examining Beckett's analysis of the use of case notes and relating them back to Windelband's ideas on the understanding of others. The dialogue took place in 2011 at the University of Warwick, and has since been edited by the authors. PMID:26892329

  3. [On the centennial of Ernst von Bergmann's death].

    PubMed

    Czymek, R; Düsel, W

    2007-03-01

    "dear aunt lina. i do not know any big letters yet, but i want to thank you in small letters for the beautiful pens. say hello to grandpa and to everybody. yours truly, ernst." These are the first surviving written words of Ernst von Bergmann. Between them and his last words about his suspected colon cancer on 25 March 1907 ("I diagnosed this 5 years ago, and now it has come to pass.") lie many years in a vigorous life characterised by untiring activity and creativity, self-discipline, and care for patients and his family. They were years of enormous success in surgery and private happiness but also of professional setbacks and tragic family loss. Ernst von Bergmann became a leading German surgeon not only because of his surgical and scientific achievements, particularly in the fields of asepsis and war surgery, but also due to his exemplary character, reliability, engaging personality, and commitment to medical training in various medical societies. Of these, the German Society of Surgery is most indebted to him. After assuming a chair in surgery in 1882, he continued to play a leading role in this society, not least as its five-time president from 1888 to 1890 and in 1896 and 1900. A worthy successor to Bernhard von Langenbeck, he was a full professor at the Berlin University Hospital for 25 years. He also taught at the Medical and Surgical Academy for the Military after being appointed there by Emperor Wilhelm I on 16 November 1882. This position was important to him and corresponded to his patriotic views. PMID:17287931

  4. Development of a Three-Dimensional Finite Element Chest Model for the 5(th) Percentile Female.

    PubMed

    Kimpara, Hideyuki; Lee, Jong B; Yang, King H; King, Albert I; Iwamoto, Masami; Watanabe, Isao; Miki, Kazuo

    2005-11-01

    Several three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) models of the human body have been developed to elucidate injury mechanisms due to automotive crashes. However, these models are mainly focused on 50(th) percentile male. As a first step towards a better understanding of injury biomechanics in the small female, a 3D FE model of a 5(th) percentile female human chest (FEM-5F) has been developed and validated against experimental data obtained from two sets of frontal impact, one set of lateral impact, two sets of oblique impact and a series of ballistic impacts. Two previous FE models, a small female Total HUman Model for Safety (THUMS-AF05) occupant version 1.0Beta (Kimpara et al. 2002) and the Wayne State University Human Thoracic Model (WSUHTM, Wang 1995 and Shah et al. 2001) were integrated and modified for this model development. The model incorporated not only geometrical gender differences, such as location of the internal organs and structure of the bony skeleton, but also the biomechanical differences of the ribs due to gender. It includes a detailed description of the sternum, ribs, costal cartilage, thoracic spine, skin, superficial muscles, intercostal muscles, heart, lung, diaphragm, major blood vessels and simplified abdominal internal organs and has been validated against a series of six cadaveric experiments on the small female reported by Nahum et al. (1970), Kroell et al. (1974), Viano (1989), Talantikite et al. (1998) and Wilhelm (2003). Results predicted by the model were well-matched to these experimental data for a range of impact speeds and impactor masses. More research is needed in order to increase the accuracy of predicting rib fractures so that the mechanisms responsible for small female injury can be more clearly defined. PMID:17096277

  5. Carl Ludwig: the man, his time, his influence.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, H G

    1996-01-01

    Carl Ludwig (1816-1895) was the driving force in the foundation and development of scientifically based and experimentally oriented physiology against natural philosophy and vitalism that prevailed during the first quarter of the 19th century in Germany. He was the representative of a small group of young, highly talented and dynamic physiologists aiming at implementing the laws of physics and chemistry as the only active forces in physiologic processes. These "organic physicists" included Emil du Bois-Reymond (1818-1896), Ernst Brücke (1819-1892), and Hermann Helmholz (1821-1894). Carl Ludwig wrote the program of this group in the form of a textbook of physiology that was considered revolutionary, provocative and premature. His academic life, his inventions and discoveries, his scientific achievements, his influence and his personality are reviewed. Since every person can be viewed only in the context of his time, the political background, the economic and social situation, the conditions for science and research as well as the cultural climate that were characteristic for the decisive years of Carl Ludwig are described to some extent. It is shown that Carl Ludwig and his contemporary organic physicists lived and grew into a science- and research-oriented period which had been prepared and paved by men like Johannes Evangelista Purkinje (1787-1869), Ernst Heinrich Weber (1795-1878), Alfred Wilhelm Volkmann (1800-1877), Johannes Müller (1801-1858) and Gustav Theodor Fechner (1801-1887). They benefited from this enormous scientific development and contributed to it to a large and significant extent so that it ultimately turned out to be the most productive and influential period in the history of German physiology. Some of the numerous scholars who had studied with Carl Ludwig carried his approach to physiology into the 20th century: Adolf Fick (1829-1901), Otto Frank (1865-1944), Iwan Petrowitsch Pawlow (1849-1936) and Henry Pickering Browditch (1840-1911). PMID

  6. Alternative E ammonia feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, M.J.; Wright, R.A.

    1999-07-01

    Power plants are using more Ammonia for increasing precipitator and baghouse efficiency, for SCR and SNCR processes, and for controlling acid stack plumes and dewpoint corrosion. These simple systems inject ammonia and air into the furnace or the precipitator or baghouse inlet ductwork. The common feedstocks in use today are Anhydrous ammonia [NH{sub 3}] and Aqueous ammonia [NH{sub 4}OH], both defined as poison gases by US authorities and most Western nations. Storage and handling procedures for these products are strictly regulated. Wilhelm Environmental Technologies Inc. is developing use of solid, formed or prilled Urea [CO(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}] as the feedstock. When heated in moist air, Urea sublimes to ammonia [NH{sub 3}] and carbon dioxide [CO{sub 2}]. Urea is stored and handled without restrictions or environmental concerns. Urea is a more expensive feedstock than NH{sub 3}, but much less expensive than [NH{sub 4}OH]. The design, and operating results, of a pilot system at Jacksonville Electric St. John's River Plant [Unit 2] are described. The pilot plant successfully sublimed Urea up to 100 pounds/hour. Further testing is planned. Very large ammonia use may favor NH{sub 3}, but smaller quantities can be produced at attractive prices with Urea based ammonia systems. Storage costs are far less. Many fluidized-bed boilers can use pastille or solid urea metered directly into the existing cyclones for NO{sub x} control. This is more economical than aqueous ammonia or aqueous urea based technology.

  7. Modeling closure of the Pd-Ag system in iron meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Orman, J.; Matthes, M.; Fischer-Gödde, M.; Krawczynski, M. J.; Kleine, T.

    2015-12-01

    J.A. Van Orman1, M. Matthes2, M. Fischer-Godde2, M.J. Krawczynski3, T. Kleine21 Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (james.vanorman@case.edu) 2 Westfalische Wilhelms-Universitat Muenster, 48149 Muenster, Germany 3 Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 The short-lived Pd-107/Ag-107 system can provide constraints on the timing of assembly and cooling of iron meteorite parent bodies, but to interpret the dates derived from this system it is necessary to understand the closure conditions. Palladium is strongly enriched in the metal phases, and sulphide (troilite) is the primary sink for radiogenic silver. Closure of the system hence depends primarily on the transfer of Ag-107 from metal to troilite. Because cation diffusion in troilite is extremely rapid, Ag-107 transfer is likely to be controlled by diffusion through the metal. Sugiura and Hoshino (2003) estimated a closure temperature of ~1100 K for the Pd/Ag system in iron meteorites under the assumption that the diffusion rate of Ag in the metal is similar to that of Ni diffusion in taenite. Here we consider the problem in more detail, utilizing constraints on Ag diffusion in taenite and kamacite from the metallurgical literature to numerically model diffusive exchange between metal and troilite with simultaneous radiogenic ingrowth. The process is complicated by exsolution of the metal into bcc kamacite and fcc taenite phases during cooling. We will discuss approaches to the treatment of this issue and their influence on the derived closure temperatures. Sugiura N., Hoshino H. (2003) Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 38, 117-143.

  8. A history of normal plates, tables and stages in vertebrate embryology

    PubMed Central

    HOPWOOD, NICK

    2006-01-01

    Developmental biology is today unimaginable without the normal stages that define standard divisions of development. This history of normal stages, and the related normal plates and normal tables, shows how these standards have shaped and been shaped by disciplinary change in vertebrate embryology. The article highlights the Normal Plates of the Development of the Vertebrates edited by the German anatomist Franz Keibel (16 volumes, 1897–1938). These were a major response to problems in the relations between ontogeny and phylogeny that amounted in practical terms to a crisis in staging embryos, not just between, but (for some) also within species. Keibel’s design adapted a plate by Wilhelm His and tables by Albert Oppel in order to go beyond the already controversial comparative plates of the Darwinist propagandist Ernst Haeckel. The project responded to local pressures, including intense concern with individual variation, but recruited internationally and mapped an embryological empire. Though theoretically inconclusive, the plates became standard laboratory tools and forged a network within which the Institut International d’Embryologie (today the International Society of Developmental Biologists) was founded in 1911. After World War I, experimentalists, led by Ross Harrison and Viktor Hamburger, and human embryologists, especially George Streeter at the Carnegie Department of Embryology, transformed Keibel’s complex, bulky tomes to suit their own contrasting demands. In developmental biology after World War II, normal stages—reduced to a few journal pages—helped domesticate model organisms. Staging systems had emerged from discussions that questioned the very possibility of assigning an embryo to a stage. The historical issues resonate today as developmental biologists work to improve and extend stage series, to make results from different laboratories easier to compare and to take individual variation into account. PMID:17183461

  9. The evaluation of surface recombination velocity from normal-collector geometry electron-beam-induced current line scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, Keung L.

    1994-02-01

    There are two well-known point source-based methods for the evaluation of the surface recombination velocity s from normal-collector geometry electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) line scans. The first was proposed by Jastrzebski, Lagowski, and Gatos [Appl. Phys. Lett. 27, 537 (1975)], the second was by Watanabe, Actor, and Gatos (WAG) [IEEE Trans. Electron Dev. ED-24, 1172 (1977)]. Scheer, Wilhelm, and Lewerenz [J. Appl. Phys. 66, 5412 (1989)] were unsuccessful in using the first method to extract s from their EBIC data. Hakimzadeh, Möller, and Bailey [J. Appl. Phys. 72, 2919 (1992)] applied the second method to evaluate s from their EBIC data without accounting for the mismatch between the theoretical requirement and the experimental condition relating to source size and electron penetration depth at which the WAG expression is to be evaluated. In this article these two methods are evaluated and their applicability to both point and extended-source data is examined quantitatively. Their limitations and shortcomings led us to suggest a way to extend the applicability of the WAG expression to include extended sources and to formulate two new Gaussian source-based methods to evaluate the surface recombination velocity. A number of computed curves are provided to facilitate the application of these proposed new methods to GaAs and other semiconductors with diffusion lengths in the range of 0.5-3.0 μm and (surface recombination velocity/diffusion coefficient) values in the range of 103-106 cm-1.

  10. Neurology outside Paris following Charcot.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Thierry; Clarac, François; Petit, Henri; Broussolle, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    The Middle Ages saw the development of numerous universities in the different provinces that later became the kingdom of France. In 1794, Napoleon I established 3 medical schools in Paris, Montpellier and Strasbourg, which were transformed into medical faculties in 1808. France had always been a highly centralized country, but during the 19th century, this trend started to change with the creation of medical faculties in Nancy (1872), Lille (1877), Lyon (1878), Bordeaux (1879), Toulouse (1891), Algiers (1910) and Marseille (1930). Following the creation of the 12 foundation courses, specialized chairs were progressively established in Paris, but for a long time this remained restricted to the French capital. However, with the emergence of medicine as an academic discipline in several towns outside Paris, came the development of neurology. This was greatly influenced by former students of Jean-Martin Charcot, local personalities, and the interactions between the two. Leading figures included Albert Pitres in Bordeaux, Léon Ingelrans in Lille, Eugène Devic and Jules Froment in Lyon, Lucien Cornil in Marseille, Joseph Grasset in Montpellier, and Marcel Riser in Toulouse. The interaction between French and Germanic medical communities also developed at this turbulent time under the influence of several great physicians such as Wilhelm Waldeyer, Adolf Kussmaul, and later Jean Alexandre Barré in Strasbourg, and Hippolyte Bernheim in Nancy. There are a number of other university towns outside Paris in which the development of neurology was probably influenced by the same interactions with psychiatry. It would be worth carrying out a thorough analysis of these towns in order to present an exhaustive overview of the development of neurology in France. PMID:20938155

  11. Some Historical Points of Interest in Göttingen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, Klaus

    The Georgia Augusta University of Göttingen, founded in 1737, was a child of the Enlightenment, and the new sciences have always played a major role here.1 Among the teachers of physics, physical chemistry, astronomy, and related subjects we find Johann Christian Polykarp Erxleben, Georg Christoph Lichtenberg, Johann Tobias Mayer, Carl Friedrich Gauss, Johann B. Listing, Wilhelm Eduard Weber, Woldemar Voigt, Friedrich Kohlrausch, Eduard Riecke, Walther Nernst and Peter Debye — the last two subsequently moved on to Berlin. In the 1920s, physics students were jestingly referred to as “Frankierte, Bornierte und Polierte” (loosely translated as stamped, limited and polished), in allusion to their teachers, the theoretical physicist Max Born and the experimentalists James Franck and Robert Wichard Pohl, the first two being important figures in the history of quantum theory, the third, one of the founding fathers of experimental solid state physics.2 The National Socialist’s rise to power had a devastating effect on this world-renowned center for physics and mathematics. Most of its high-caliber scientists either were dismissed on the basis of the racist “Law for the Restoration of the Professional Civil Service” or themselves felt compelled to emigrate: About a dozen members of the physics faculty, including Born and Franck, and ten from the mathematics faculty left Göttingen.3 After the war, Richard Becker, who in 1936 had received a compulsory order to take the chair for theoretical physics vacant since Born’s emigration, and Friedrich Hund, who was also an enthusiastic historian of science, distinguished themselves as physics teachers there but the university as a whole never recovered its international standing of before 1933 (see Figs. 1 and 2).

  12. Magnetic Anomalies Within Lunar Impact Basins: Constraints on the History of the Lunar Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, N. C.; Hood, L. L.

    2011-12-01

    Previous work has shown that lunar crustal magnetization has a combination of origins including shock remanent magnetization in transient magnetic fields and thermoremanent magnetization in a steady core dynamo magnetic field (e.g., Hood and Artemieva, Icarus, 2008; Richmond and Hood, JGR, 2008; Garrick-Bethell et al., Science, 2009; Hood, Icarus, 2011). In particular, magnetic anomalies within the interiors of lunar impact basins and large craters provide a potentially valuable means of constraining the history of the former dynamo (Halekas et al., MAPS, 2003; Hood, 2011). These anomalies likely have a thermoremanent origin owing to high subsurface temperatures reached at the time of impact and therefore require a long-lived, steady magnetic field to explain their magnetization. Central anomalies have previously been confirmed to be present using Lunar Prospector magnetometer (LP MAG) data within several Nectarian-aged basins (Moscoviense, Mendel-Rydberg, Crisium, and Humboldtianum), implying that a dynamo existed during this lunar epoch (Hood, 2011). Here, we further analyze low altitude LP MAG data for several additional basins, ranging in age from Nectarian to Imbrian. Results indicate that magnetic anomalies with a probable basin-related origin are present within at least two additional Nectarian-aged basins (Serenitatis and Humorum) and one Imbrian-aged basin (Schrodinger). No discernible anomalies are present within the largest Imbrian-aged basins, Imbrium and Orientale. While there is uncertainty regarding the age of the Schrodinger basin, it has been reported to be slightly more recent than Imbrium (Wilhelms, 1984). Our initial interpretation is therefore that a dynamo likely existed during the Imbrian epoch. The absence of anomalies within Imbrium and Orientale can be explained by insufficient conditions for acquisition of strong magnetization (e.g., inadequate concentrations of efficient remanence carriers) following these relatively large impacts.

  13. Application of two quality indices as monitoring and management tools of rivers. Case study: the Imera Meridionale River, Italy.

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Giuseppe; Lo Giudice, Rosa

    2010-04-01

    On the basis of the European Water Framework Directive (2000/60), the water resources of the member states of the European Community should reach good quality standards by 2015. Although such regulations illustrate the basic points for a comprehensive and effective policy of water monitoring and management, no practical tools are provided to face and solve the issues concerning freshwater ecosystems such as rivers. The Italian government has developed a set of regulations as adoption of the European Directive but failed to indicate feasible procedures for river monitoring and management. On a local scale, Sicilian authorities have implemented monitoring networks of watersheds, aiming at describing the general conditions of rivers. However, such monitoring programs have provided a relatively fragmentary picture of the ecological conditions of the rivers. In this study, the integrated use of environmental quality indices is proposed as a methodology able to provide a practical approach to river monitoring and management. As a case study, the Imera Meridionale River, Sicily's largest river, was chosen. The water quality index developed by the U.S. National Sanitation Foundation and the floristic quality index based on the Wilhelm method were applied. The former enabled us to describe the water quality according to a spatial-temporal gradient, whereas the latter focused on the ecological quality of riparian vegetation. This study proposes a holistic view of river ecosystems by considering biotic and abiotic factors in agreement with the current European regulations. How the combined use of such indices can guide sustainable management efforts is also discussed. PMID:20204635

  14. Rht-1 and Ppd-D1 associations with height, GA sensitivity, and days to heading in a worldwide bread wheat collection.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Edward P; Boulton, Margaret I; Al-Kaff, Nadia; Balfourier, Francois; Bordes, Jacques; Greenland, Andy J; Powell, Wayne; Mackay, Ian J

    2013-09-01

    Reduced height (Rht)-1 and Photoperiod (Ppd) have major effects on the adaptability of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) to specific environments. Ppd-D1a is a photoperiod insensitive allele that reduces time to flowering. The gibberellin (GA) insensitive alleles Rht-B1b and Rht-D1b shorten plant stature and were important components of the 'green revolution'. Two additional Rht-B1 alleles were recently identified that contain a 160 or 197 bp insertion upstream of the coding region and may affect plant height or GA sensitivity Wilhelm et al. (Theor Appl Gen doi: 10.1007/s00122-013-2088-7 , 2013b). We determined the frequency of the five alleles in a worldwide core collection of 372 wheat accessions (372CC) and estimated their effects on height, days to heading, and GA sensitivity when the collection was grown in pots outdoors or in the glasshouse. This revealed that each allele was widespread geographically with frequencies ranging from 0.12 to 0.25. Ppd-D1a was associated with significant (p ≤ 0.05) reductions in days to heading and height relative to photoperiod sensitive Ppd-D1b. Relative to wild type, Rht-B1b and Rht-D1b each resulted in significant reductions in height (approximately 30 %) and GA sensitivity. The 160 and 197 bp alleles were associated with significant height reductions of 18 and 12 %, respectively, and with non-significant reductions in GA sensitivity relative to wild type. Two statistical methods were developed and used to estimate GA sensitivity of the 372CC accessions, but novel GA insensitive alleles were not identified. Further characterization of the Rht-B1 insertion alleles is required, but our results suggest these may enable fine adjustments in plant height. PMID:23722594

  15. Protein Crystallography from the Perspective of Technology Developments

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Heng; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Liljas, Anders; Xiao, Junyu; Dong, Yuhui

    2015-01-01

    Early on, crystallography was a domain of mineralogy and mathematics and dealt mostly with symmetry properties and imaginary crystal lattices. This changed when Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen discovered X-rays in 1895, and in 1912 Max von Laue and his associates discovered X-ray irradiated salt crystals would produce diffraction patterns that could reveal the internal atomic periodicity of the crystals. In the same year the father-and-son team, Henry and Lawrence Bragg successfully solved the first crystal structure of sodium chloride and the era of modern crystallography began. Protein crystallography (PX) started some 20 years later with the pioneering work of British crystallographers. In the past 50-60 years, the achievements of modern crystallography and particularly those in protein crystallography have been due to breakthroughs in theoretical and technical advancements such as phasing and direct methods; to more powerful X-ray sources such as synchrotron radiation (SR); to more sensitive and efficient X-ray detectors; to ever faster computers and to improvements in software. The exponential development of protein crystallography has been accelerated by the invention and applications of recombinant DNA technology that can yield nearly any protein of interest in large amounts and with relative ease. Novel methods, informatics platforms, and technologies for automation and high-throughput have allowed the development of large-scale, high efficiency macromolecular crystallography efforts in the field of structural genomics (SG). Very recently, the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources and its applications in protein crystallography have shown great potential for revolutionizing the whole field again in the near future. PMID:25983389

  16. [Developments in neurophysiology in the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Hess, C W

    1994-04-19

    The rise of neurophysiology in the 19th century was kindled by Luigi Aloysius Galvani's revolutionary claim for animal electricity at the end of the preceding century. He was first challenged by Allessandro Giuseppe Antonio Anastasio Volta who showed that the muscle twitch in Galvani's experiment was the result of electric stimulation rather than of an enabled biological current. The controversy between Galvani and Volta became a predominant and stimulating issue among the scientists of the early century and found its ultimate elucidation only 40 years later by the pioneering work of Carlo Matteucci of Pisa and Emil Heinrich Du Bois-Reymond of Berlin, who both deserve the reknown as founders of modern neurophysiology. As the first influential promoter and mastermind of the experimental physiology, François Magendie of Paris primarily investigated the nervous system and inaugurated the lesion experiments to clarify specific functions of neural structures. Johannes Müller founded the German school of physiology with its eminent neurophysiological offspring: Du Bois-Reymond, Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz, and Eduard Friedrich Wilhelm Pflüger. It was Helmholtz's merit to have for the first time precisely assessed the motor conduction velocity by measuring the time interval between two different stimulation sites of the sciatic nerve of the frog. In their brilliant work published in 1870 Gustav Theodor Fritsch and Eduard Hitzig demonstrated that appropriately located focal electrical stimulation of the exposed cortex of dogs induces movement of the contralateral limbs and unequivocally disproved the then prevailing dogma of holistic capacity of the hemispheres, which denied localised functions within the cortex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8191189

  17. German Emergency Care in Neurosurgery and Military Neurology during World War II, 1939-1945.

    PubMed

    Stahnisch, Frank W

    2016-01-01

    A critical analysis of the historical involvement of neurology and neurosurgery in military emergency care services enables us to better contextualize and appreciate the development of modern neurology at large. Wartime neurosurgery and civil brain science during the German Nazi period tightly coalesced in examining the specific injury types, which military neurosurgeons such as Wilhelm Toennis, Klaus Joachim Zuelch, and Georg Merrem encountered and treated based on their neurophysiological understanding gained from earlier peacetime research. Collaborative associations with Dr. Toennis in particular proved to be highly beneficial to other military neurologists and neurosurgeons during World War II and beyond. This article also discusses the prewar developments and considers the fate of German neurosurgeons and military neurologists after the war. The envisaged dynamic concepts of fast action, reaction, and recycling, which contemporary physicians had intensively studied in the preceding scientific experiments in their neurophysiological laboratories, had already been introduced into neurological surgery during the interwar period. In retrospect, World War II emergency rescue units greatly strengthened military operations through an active process of 'recycling' indispensable army personnel. Neurosurgical emergency chains thereby introduced another decisive step in the modernization of warfare, in that they increased the momentum of military mobility in the field. Notwithstanding the violence of warfare and the often inhumane ways in which such knowledge in the field of emergency neurology was gained, the protagonists among the group of experts in military neurology and neurosurgery strongly contributed to the postwar clinical neuroscience community in Germany. In differing political pretexts, this became visible in both East Germany and West Germany after the war, while the specific military and political conditions under which this knowledge of emergency medicine

  18. Achievements of Polish doctors in gastrodiaphanoscopy at the turn of the 19(th) and 20(th) centuries.

    PubMed

    Kierzek, Andrzej; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata; Pozowski, Andrzej; Kuciel-Lewandowska, Jadwiga

    2013-01-01

    Diaphanoscopy/transillumination, the method of shining a bright light through tissues, was devised in the mid-19(th) century and developed after the invention of the light bulb by T.A. Edison. Benjamin Milliot was the first to examine the stomach by means of an incandescent platinum wire. The experiments conducted by Max Einhorn using a device consisting of a Nelaton catheter with an inserted light bulb, were valuable. In Poland the method of gastrodiaphanoscopy was popularized by Teodor Heryng, Mikołaj Rejchman and by Warsaw doctors. They used a diaphanoscope consisting of a gutta-percha probe distally equipped with a metal attachment with a light bulb hidden in it and with a so-called cooling device. The examination would usually be conducted in the standing position after the stomach had been filled with water. Light patches corresponding to the stomach's lower and side boundaries would be obtained. Rejchman's observation, that such a contractile and flexible organ as the stomach, changing its volume and position, is bound to change its light image, was correct. Heryng's and Rejchman's research inspired the foreign researchers Renvier, Leopold Kuttner and John Jacobson. Extensive research was subsequently conducted by C.A. Meltzing and Wilhelm Schwartz. Diaphanoscopy would also be performed by Walery Jaworski, the pioneer of gastrology. He was particularly interested in transillumination of the stomach, peritoneum and omentum tumours. Eugeniusz Kozierowski, a practicing physician from Gorlice, diagnosed neoplastic pylorostenosisusing this method. Gastrodiaphanoscopy is a historical method, now of no value against gastroendoscopy and the state-of-the-art methods of image diagnostics. PMID:24868282

  19. Two manic-depressives, two tyrants, two world wars.

    PubMed

    Lieb, Julian

    2008-01-01

    Napoleon Bonaparte, Adolph Hitler and Joseph Stalin were tyrants who attained absolute power, and misused it in a gargantuan fashion, leaving in his wake a trail of hatred, devastation and death. All made war on their perceived enemies and on their own countrymen. In "A Brotherhood of Tyrants: Manic Depression and Absolute power" (1994) Amherst, Prometheus Books, D. Jablow Hershman and I expose manic-depressive disorder as the force that drove them to absolute power and the terrible abuse of it. We uncover manic-depressive disorder as a hidden cause of dictatorship, mass killing and war, and show how the psychopathology of the disorder can be a key factor in the political pathology of tyranny. In our earlier "The Key To Genius: Manic-Depression and the Creative Life" (1998) Amherst Prometheus Books we catalog the role of the disorder in the lives and careers of Isaac Newton, Ludwig von Beethoven, Charles Dickens, Vincent van Gogh and other creative geniuses. Thus manic-depressive disorder is variable to the extreme of paradox. Key to the destroyers is an indifference to the suffering of others, a need to control everyone and everything, a resistance to reason, and grandiose and paranoid delusions. The paranoid and grandiose delusions of manic-depressives are as infectious and as virulent as a deadly microbe, and can easily infect those in thrall to the host figure. It is a phenomenon known as "induced psychosis" and its imprint is often to be seen on the world stage. In this article I will add Kaiser Wilhelm to the list of manic-depressive warmongers, and passages from Robert Payne's "The Life and Death of Adolph Hitler" that are not only pathognomonic of manic-depressive disorder, but of the mixed variant. PMID:17881137

  20. [Protestant clergymen among Hahnemann's clientele. Patient histories in letters].

    PubMed

    Kreher, Simone; Schlott, Melanie; Schlott, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    As part of the research project, developments in the history of science and in the regional and ecclesiastic history of the late feudal petty state of Köthen-Anhalt have been assessed and numerous documents of the Nagel and Mühlenbein family histories examined that place the transcribed patient letters of the two Protestant clergymen within the context of the Hahnemann Archives. These findings complement and extend previous insights into Hahnemann's Köthen clientele, especially when it comes to the structure and milieu of the local clerical elite. Inspired by the interpretive methods of sequential textual analysis, form and content of the letters of the two clergymen and their relatives were also investigated as methodically structured lines of communication. The body of sources published here presents--embedded in the body-image (of sickness and health) prevalent at the time--the medical cultures of educated patients as well as the increasingly professionalized medical practices of Samuel Hahnemann in a flourishing urban doctor's surgery. The correspondence between the pastors Albert Wilhelm Gotthilf Nagel (1796-1835) and August Carl Ludwig Georg Mühlenbein (1797-1866), presented here in a standard edition, has been investigated at Fulda University as part of the project 'Homöopathisches Medicinieren zwischen alltäglicher Lebensführung und professioneller Praxis' ('Homeopathic medicine between everyday use and professional practice'). Of the altogether 78 transcribed documents, 53 are letters written by either of the two pastors, 16 are patient journals by Samuel Hahnemann, 9 letters by the pastors' wives and Mühlenbein's mother. The two series of letters, originally composed between 1831 and 1833 in old German cursive script, can now be used as sources for research into the history of homeopathy. PMID:27263219

  1. Eight sages over five centuries share oxygen's discovery.

    PubMed

    Severinghaus, John W

    2016-09-01

    During the last century, historians have discovered that between the 13th and 18th centuries, at least six sages discovered that the air we breathe contains something that we need and use. Ibn al-Nafis (1213-1288) in Cairo and Michael Servetus (1511-1553) in France accurately described the pulmonary circulation and its effect on blood color. Michael Sendivogius (1566-1636) in Poland called a part of air "the food of life" and identified it as the gas made by heating saltpetre. John Mayow (1641-1679) in Oxford found that one-fifth of air was a special gas he called "spiritus nitro aereus." Carl Wilhelm Scheele (1742-1786) in Uppsala generated a gas he named "fire air" by heating several metal calcs. He asked Lavoisier how it fit the phlogiston theory. Lavoisier never answered. In 1744, Joseph Priestley (1733-1804) in England discovered how to make part of air by heating red calc of mercury. He found it brightened a flame and supported life in a mouse in a sealed bottle. He called it "dephlogisticated air." He published and personally told Lavoisier and other chemists about it. Lavoisier never thanked him. After 9 years of generating and studying its chemistry, he couldn't understand whether it was a new element. He still named it "principe oxigene." He was still not able to disprove phlogiston. Henry Cavendish (1731-1810) made an inflammable gas in 1766. He and Priestley noted that its flame made a dew. Cavendish proved the dew was pure water and published this in 1778, but all scientists called it impossible to make water, an element. In 1783, on June 24th, Lavoisier was urged to try it, and, when water appeared, he realized that water was not an element but a compound of two gases, proving that oxygen was an element. He then demolished phlogiston and began the new chemistry revolution. PMID:27458241

  2. Ages of Lunar Light Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesinger, Harald; Howes van der Bogert, Carolyn; Thiessen, Fiona; Robinson, Mark

    2013-04-01

    light plains are necessary to corroborate this preliminary observation. In general, our new absolute model ages are similar to model ages derived for light plains north of Mare Frigoris (3.65-4.0 Ga) [6], light plains within the SPA basin (3.43-3.81 Ga) [7], and light plains in the surroundings of the Orientale and Imbrium basins (3.8-4.3 Ga) [8]. The ages are not only similar, but also show similar ranges. While our model ages vary by about 300 Ma, model ages of [6,7] exhibit ranges of ~350 Ma and ~380 Ma, respectively. Ages of [8] show a somewhat wider range of ~500 Ma. From this wide range in ages it has been concluded that a formation of the light plains by a single event (i.e., Orientale or Imbrium) is unlikely [6-8]. References: [1] Wilhelms and McCauley (1971), USGS I-703; [2] Stuart-Alexander (1978), USGS I-1047; [3] Wilhelms et al. (1979), USGS I-1162; [4] Scott et al. (1977), USGS I-1034; [5] Wilhelms and El-Baz (1977), USGS I-948; [6] Köhler et al. (2000), LPSC 31, #1822; [7] Thiessen et al. (2012), LPSC 43, #2060; [8] Neukum (1977b), Moon 17, 383-393.

  3. Inertial wave beams and inertial wave modes in a rotating cylinder with time-modulated rotation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borcia, Ion D.; Ghasemi V., Abouzar; Harlander, Uwe

    2014-05-01

    shift towards higher frequencies. This frequency shift is due to the reduction of the effective resonance volume that results from the existence of a Stokes boundary layer at the outer librating wall. Due to the symmetry of the forcing not all possible modes can be excited. It is shown that only symmetric modes with respect to the rotation axis exist. From a fundamental perspective, the study might help to understand better inertial mode excitation in librating planets and moons where inertial waves are emitted from critical points on the inner or outer spherical boundary. Recently, Zhang et al. (2013) pointed out the resonance should not occur in symmetric librating bodies without precession. We will discuss how this assumption depends on the boundary conditions. It might turn out that even when the projection of the Euler (or Poincare) force on the modes is zero, the projection of the excited wave beams on the modes is non-zero. K. Zhang, K. H. Chan, X. Liao, and J. M. Aurnou. The non-resonant response of fluid in a rapidly rotating sphere undergoing longitudinal libration, J. Fluid Mech.,720, 212-235, 2013. I. D. Borcia and U. Harlander. Inertial waves in a rotating annulus with inclined inner cylinder, Theoret. Comp. Fluid Dynamics, 27, 397-413, 2013. I. D. Borcia, A. Ghasemi V., and U. Harlander. Inertial wave mode excitation inside a rotating cylindrical container with librating walls, submitted to Fluid Dyn. Res.,2013. M. Klein, T. Seelig, M. V. Kurgansky, A. Ghasemi V., I. D. Borcia, A. Will, E. Schaller, C. Egbers, and Uwe Harlander. Inertial wave excitation and focusing in a liquid bounded by a frustum and a cylinder, submitted to J. Fluid Mech., 2013.

  4. An Imminent Revolution in Modeling Interactions of Ice Sheets With Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, T.

    2008-12-01

    Modeling continental ice sheets was inaugurated by meteorologists William Budd and Uwe Radok, with mathematician Richard Jenssen, in 1971. Their model calculated the thermal and mechanical regime using measured surface accumulation rates, temperatures, and elevations, and bed topography. This top-down approach delivered a basal thermal regime of temperatures or melting rates for an assumed basal geothermal heat flux. When Philippe Huybrechts and others incorporated time, largely unknownpast surface conditions had a major effect on present basal thermal conditions. This approach produced ice-sheet models with only a slow response to external forcing, whereas the glacial geological record and climate records from ice and ocean cores show that ice sheets can have rapid changes in size and shape independent of external forcing. These top-down models were wholly inadequate for reconstructing former ice sheets at the LGM for CLIMAP in 1981. Ice-sheet areas,elevations, and volumes provided the albedo, surface topography, and sea-surface area as input to climate models. A bottom-up model based on dated glacial geology was developed to provide the areal extent and basal thermal regime of ice sheets at the LGM. Basal thermal conditions determined ice-bed coupling and therefore the elevation of ice sheets. High convex ice surfaces for slow sheet flow lower about 20 percent when a frozen bed becomes thawed. As further basal melting drowns bedrock bumps that "pin" basal ice, the ice surface becomes concave in fast stream flow that ends as low floating ice shelves at marine ice margins. A revolution in modeling interactions between glaciation, climate, and sea level is driven by new Greenland and Antarctic data from Earth-orbiting satellites, airborne and surface traverses, and deep drilling. We anticipate continuous data acquisition of surface albedo, accumulation/ablation rates, elevations, velocities, and temperatures over a whole ice sheet, mapping basal thermal conditions

  5. PREFACE: 17th International Conference on Recent Progress in Many-Body Theories (MBT17)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinholz, Heidi; Boronat, Jordi

    2014-08-01

    imaginative use and development of the Monte-Carlo approach and for his ground-breaking contributions to superconductivity. The Kümmel Award went to Max Metlitski (UC Santa Barbara) for remarkable advances in the theory of quantum criticality in metals. The nominations for the Kümmel Award were of such high standard that the Committee announced Honourable Mentions to Martin Eckstein (MPDS/U Hamburg, Germany) for his leading contributions in the development of non-equilibrium dynamical mean field theory, Emanuel Gull (U Michigan, USA) for the development of the Continuous-Time Auxiliary-Field Quantum Monte Carlo Method and for its use in understanding the interplay of the pseudogap and superconductivity in the Hubbard model and Kai Sun (U Michigan, USA) for seminal contributions to the theory of topological effects in strongly correlated electron systems. The Conference continues the series of conferences held before in Trieste, Italy (1979); Oaxtapec, Mexico (1981); Odenthal-Altenberg, Germany (1983); San Francisco, USA (1985); Oulu, Finland (1987); Arad, Israel (1989); Minneapolis, USA (1991); Schloé Segau, Austria (1994); Sydney, Australia (1997); Seattle, USA (1999); Manchester, UK (2001); Santa Fe, USA (2004); Buenos Aires, Argentina (2005); Barcelona, Spain (2007); Columbus, USA (2009) and Bariloche, Argentina (2011). It has been a great pleasure to prepare for the conference. We thank the IAC and in particular Susana Hernandez and David Neilson as well as the International Programme Committee for their great support and advice. Many more people have been involved locally in organizing this international meeting and thanks goes to them, in particular to the members of the LOC Sonja Lorenzen, Dieter Bauer, Niels-Uwe Bastian, Marina Hertzfeldt, Volker Mosert and Gerd Röpke. The next meeting will take place in Buffalo, USA in 2015 and we look forward to yet another exciting exchange on Recent Progress in Many-Body Theories. Heidi Reinholz and Jordi Boronat Guest editors

  6. PREFACE: International Symposium on (e,2e), Double Photoionization and Related Topics & 15th International Symposium on Polarization and Correlation in Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicholas L. S.; deHarak, Bruno A.

    2010-01-01

    44 submitted posters covered recent advances in these topics. These proceedings present papers on 35 of the invited talks. The Local Organizers gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences, and the University of Kentucky Department of Physics and Astronomy. We also thank Carol Cotrill, Eva Ellis, Diane Yates, Sarah Crowe, and John Nichols, of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky for their invaluable assistance in the smooth running of the conferences; Oleksandr Korneta for taking the group photograph; and Emily Martin for helping accompanying persons. Nicholas L S Martin University of Kentucky Bruno A deHarak Illinois Wesleyan University International Scientific Organizing Committee Co-Chairs Don Madison (USA)Klaus Bartschat (USA) Members Lorenzo Avaldi (Italy)Nils Andersen (Denmark) Jamal Berakdar (Germany)Uwe Becker (Germany) Michael Brunger (Australia)Igor Bray (Australia) Greg Childers (USA)Nikolay Cherepkov (Russia) JingKang Deng (China)Albert Crowe (UK) Alexander Dorn (Germany)Danielle Dowek (France) Jim Feagin (USA)Oscar Fojon (Argentina) Nikolay Kabachnik (Russia)Tim Gay (USA) Anatoli Kheifets (Australia)Alexei Grum-Grzhimailo (Russia) George King (UK)Friedrich Hanne (Germany) Tom Kirchner (Germany)Alan Huetz (France) Azzedine Lahmam-Bennani (France)Morty Khakoo (USA) Julian Lower (Australia)Birgit Lohmann (Australia) William McCurdy (USA)Bill McConkey (Canada) Andrew Murray (UK)Rajesh Srivastava (India) Bernard Piraux (Belgium)Al Stauffer (Canada) Tim Reddish (Canada)Jim Williams (Australia) Roberto Rivarola (Argentina)Akira Yagishita (Japan) Michael Schulz (USA)Peter Zetner (Canada) Anthony Starace (USA)Joachim Ullrich (Germany) Giovanni Stefani (Italy)Erich Weigold (Australia) Masahiko Takahashi (Japan) Conference photograph

  7. PREFACE: First Latin-American Conference on Bioimpedance (CLABIO 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertemes Filho, Pedro

    2012-12-01

    . In making this conference possible, we want to acknowledge our deep appreciation for the financial support of FAPESC (Foundation for Research and Innovation of Santa Catarina), CAPES (Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Level -or Education- Personnel) and also express our sincere thanks to the many individuals who contributed their time and diligence to making this conference possible. Our special thanks go to the Santa Catarina State University for contributing time and effort to organizing the conference. We also wish to express our thanks to Professors Ana Watanabe and Fabricio Noveletto for helping with the registration process, the conference desk and the diverse and sundry details that are the part of any event of this kind. We would like also to thank all of the invited speakers and the members of the Program Committee, and wopuld like to express our gratitude to the Technological Institute of Joinville (FITEJ) for their technical co-sponsorship. We very much appreciate Orjan Martinsen, Uwe Pliquett, Fernando Martinez Seoane, Raul Gonzalez Lima, Marcio Nogueira de Souza and Carlos Augusto Gonzalez Correa for delivering keynote talks at the conference. And we would like to extend an enthusiastic round of thanks to all of our conference authors for their excellent contributions; to all the session chairs for their effort and enthusiasm; and to all the International Program Committee members and referees for their time and expertise in the paper review. Particular thanks go to Emiliano Amarante Veiga and other members of the CLABIO2012 Secretariat and organizing team for their time and outstanding work. List of committees General Chair Professor Pedro Bertemes Filho (Santa Catarina State University) Pedro Bertemes Filho Technical Program Chairs Dr Marcio Nogueira de Souza (Rio de Janeiro Federal University) Local Arrangement Chair Professor Aleksander Paterno (Santa Catarina State University) Professor Fabrício Noveletto (Santa Catarina State University

  8. PREFACE: 15th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Castillo, D.; Blaschke, D.; Kekelidze, V.; Matveev, V.; Sorin, A.

    2016-01-01

    acknowledge support from the JINR Dubna, the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, the Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung via the Heisenberg-Landau program, the Ministerstwo Nauki i Szkolnistwa Wyższego via the Bogoliubov-Infeld program, the LOEWE program via HIC for FAIR, the Helmholtz Association with their centres DESY, FZ Jülich, GSI Darmstadt, HZ Dresden-Rossendorf, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and the Helmholtz Institutes in Mainz and Jena via the HISS programme. We thank the IAC for their help and advice in planning the conference, and we are grateful to the members of the Local Organisation Committee for their help in during the conference as well as to Niels-Uwe Bastian, Alexandra Friesen, Mark Alexander Kaltenborn and Irina Pirozhenko for their assistance in preparing these Proceedings.

  9. Rosetta spacecraft meets asteroid Steins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-08-01

    :00, Building D ESA-ESOC Robert-Bosch Strasse 5, 64293 Darmstadt, Germany 11:00 - Doors open 12:00 - Welcome and introduction, by David Southwood, Director of Science and Robotic Exploration, ESA 12:10 - Rosetta: the status of the mission, by Gerhard Schwehm, Rosetta Mission Manager & Head of Solar System Science Operations Division, ESA 12:20 - Rosetta and the study of asteroids, by Rita Schulz, Rosetta Project Scientist, ESA 12:30 - The fly-by of Steins - stretching Rosetta’s limits, by Andrea Accomazzo, Rosetta Spacecraft Operations Manager, ESA 12:40 - Steins: first images and results, by Uwe Keller, OSIRIS camera Principal Investigator, Max Planck Institut für Sonnensystemforschung 12:50 - ESA’s plans for asteroid and space debris monitoring, by Gaele Winters, Director of Operations and Infrastructure, ESA 13:00 - Questions & Answers session 13:20 - Interview opportunities 15:00 - End of event

  10. These are two images of the inner coma of Comet Hyakutake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    jets toward the upper right, and the thin straight particle trail pointing toward the lower left. The trail was a permanent feature of the comet around the time of its close approach to the earth in late March and early April. Also barely visible just beyond the lower left end of the trail are two of the many condensations which were seen to travel slowly down the tail are are believed to be clumps of material released from the nucleus. The inner white region of the blue image appears to show that the hydrogen atoms like the dust might be preferentially ejected toward the sunward or day side of the nucleus. However, this is not true. The asymmetric ultraviolet radiation pattern is produced by a roughly spherical distribution of hydrogen atoms because they are so efficient at scattering the incoming solar ultraviolet light. The atoms on the sunward side actually shadow the atoms on the tailward or night side of the coma. The same detailed model analysis of the coma which explains the expansion of the hydrogen atoms in the coma also explains the appearance of the image. The team was lead by Michael Combi, The University of Michigan, and included Michael Brown, California Institute of Technology, Paul Feldman, Johns Hopkins University, H. Uwe Keller of the Max Planck Institute, Lindau, Robert Meier of the Naval Research Laboratory, and William Smyth of Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Credit: M.R. Combi (The University of Michigan)

  11. Process and Effects Evaluation of a Digital Mental Health Intervention Targeted at Improving Occupational Well-Being: Lessons From an Intervention Study With Failed Adoption

    PubMed Central

    Ermes, Miikka

    2016-01-01

    Background Digital interventions have the potential to serve as cost-effective ways to manage occupational stress and well-being. However, little is known about the adoption of individual-level digital interventions at organizations. Objectives The aim of this paper is to study the effects of an unguided digital mental health intervention in occupational well-being and the factors that influence the adoption of the intervention. Methods The intervention was based on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and its aim was to teach skills for stress management and mental well-being. It was delivered via a mobile and a Web-based app that were offered to employees of two information and communication technology (ICT) companies. The primary outcome measures were perceived stress and work engagement, measured by a 1-item stress questionnaire (Stress) and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES-9). The intervention process was evaluated regarding the change mechanisms and intervention stages using mixed methods. The initial interviews were conducted face-to-face with human resource managers (n=2) of both companies in August 2013. The participants were recruited via information sessions and email invitations. The intervention period took place between November 2013 and March 2014. The participants were asked to complete online questionnaires at baseline, two months, and four months after the baseline measurement. The final phone interviews for the volunteer participants (n=17) and the human resource managers (n=2) were conducted in April to May 2014, five months after the baseline. Results Of all the employees, only 27 (8.1%, 27/332) took the app into use, with a mean use of 4.8 (SD 4.7) different days. In the beginning, well-being was on good level in both companies and no significant changes in well-being were observed. The activities of the intervention process failed to integrate the intervention into everyday activities at the workplace. Those who took the app into

  12. EDITORIAL: New developments for Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics New developments for Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS--> Pallab Bhattacharya,

  1. Initial Mapping of Mercury's Crustal Magnetic Anomalies: Relationship to the Caloris Impact Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, L. L.

    2015-12-01

    78 low-altitude orbit passes of MESSENGER calibrated magnetometer data from August and September of 2014 have been applied to produce approximate maps of the crustal magnetic field covering latitudes of 50-80N and longitudes of 160-320E. Only anomalies with wavelengths < 215 km were mapped and amplitudes were adjusted for differences in spacecraft altitude using an equivalent source dipole technique. Maps of the radial field component show that the strongest large-scale anomalies are located in the western part of the mapped region just north and northeast of the 1550-km diameter Caloris impact basin centered at 164E, 30N. When adjusted to a common altitude of ~ 40 km, the strongest single anomaly (~170E, 60N; > 6 nT) lies over a smooth plains unit that extends north-northeastward from Caloris. A second anomaly (185E, 53N, > 5 nT) lies on the Odin Formation, interpreted as Caloris ejecta (e.g., Guest and Greeley, USGS, 1983). As previously reported by Johnson et al. (Science, 2015), a third anomaly (~ 212E, 61N, > 5 nT) also lies over a smooth plains unit, Suisse Planitia. Most smooth plains units on Mercury may have a volcanic origin (Denevi et al., JGR, 2013). However, as discussed by the latter authors, a subset of the smooth plains occur in an annulus around Caloris and could have an impact-related origin, involving fluidized basin ejecta deposition (Wilhelms, Icarus, 1976). A similar origin is widely accepted for the lunar Cayley smooth plains, which dominate the geology near the Apollo 16 landing site where the strongest surface magnetic fields were measured and which correlate best with orbital anomalies on the lunar near side (Halekas et al., JGR, 2001). Two of the remaining three anomalies (220E, 68N, > 4 nT; 234E, 77N, > 5 nT) lie over an older intermediate plains unit with an uncertain interpretation, possibly consisting of impact basin and crater ejecta as well as volcanic materials (Grolier and Boyce, USGS, 1984). In view of the proximity of the

  2. Land-atmosphere interactions in a changing climate: An overview of the GLACE-CMIP5 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seneviratne, S. I.; Wilhelm, M.; Stanelle, T.; Hurk, B. V. D.; Hagemann, S.; Berg, A. M.; Cheruy, F.; Higgins, M.; Lorenz, R.; Meier, A.; Brovkin, V.; Claussen, M.; Ducharne, A.; Dufresne, J. L.; Findell, K. L.; Ghattas, J.; Lawrence, D. M.; Malyshev, S.; Pitman, A. J.; Rummukainen, M.; Smith, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Land-Atmosphere Climate Experiment-Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (GLACE-CMIP5) is a multimodel experiment investigating the impact of soil moisture-climate feedbacks in CMIP5 simulations (Seneviratne et al. 2013). This experiment builds upon previous studies investigating the role of soil moisture-atmosphere interactions for seasonal forecasting (Koster et al. 2004) and for regional climate projections (Seneviratne et al. 2006). A total of 6 modeling groups took part in the experiment (CESM, EC-EARTH, GFDL, IPSL, MPI-ESM, and more recently ACCESS). The results reveal that projected soil moisture changes by the end of the 21st century substantially impact climate in several regions on both hemispheres, both under present and future climate conditions. Strong and consistent effects are found on temperature, especially for extremes (about 1- 1.5K for mean temperature and 2- 2.5K for extreme daytime temperature). In the Northern Hemisphere, effects on mean and heavy precipitation are also found in most models, but the results are less consistent than for temperature. A direct scaling between soil moisture induced changes in evaporative cooling and resulting changes in temperature mean and extremes is found in the simulations. Further results from more recent analyses, especially regarding impacts on extremes will be discussed. The presentation will also address the implications of these results for climate extremes attribution and climate change adaptation, as well as follow-up activities under CMIP6. References: Koster, R.D., et al., 2004: Science, 305, 1138-1140. Koster, R.D., et al., 2010: Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L02402, doi:10.1029/2009GL041677. Seneviratne, S.I., D. Lüthi, M. Litschi, and C. Schär, 2006: Nature, 443, 205-209.Seneviratne, S.I., M. Wilhelm, T. Stanelle, B.J.J.M. van den Hurk, S. Hagemann, A. Berg, F. Cheruy, M.E. Higgins, A. Meier, V. Brovkin, M. Claussen, A. Ducharne, J.-L. Dufresne, K.L. Findell, J. Ghattas, D

  3. [Obstetrics--a gear in the machinery of history].

    PubMed

    Schaller, A

    1998-01-01

    , the later Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria, the first of the four 'salt princes'. The later Emperor Wilhelm II of Prussia was delivered by Eduard Arnold Martin the Elder, the obstetrician of Princess Victoria, the eldest daughter of Queen Victoria; the breech presentation became even more complicated by the raised arms of the child. Both latter monarchs had been 'asphyctic' after their birth. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was also among those who were apparently dead after their birth. PMID:9658713

  4. "Close relationships and self-regulation: How relationship satisfaction facilitates momentary goal pursuit": Correction to Hofmann et al. (2015).

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    Reports an error in "Close relationships and self-regulation: How relationship satisfaction facilitates momentary goal pursuit" by Wilhelm Hofmann, Eli J. Finkel and Gráinne M. Fitzsimons (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2015[Sep], Vol 109[3], 434-452). In the article, Study 2: Experimental Manipulation of SRS, the Results section, the Hypothesis testing subsection, second sentence, an incorrect t value is reported. The t value reported t(193)=0.40, p .084 for the self-reported goal focus should have been t(193)=1.74, p=.084. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2015-28933-001.) In the new millennium, scholars have built a robust intersection between close-relationships research and self-regulation research. However, virtually no work has investigated how the most basic and broad indicator of relationship quality, relationship satisfaction, affects self-regulation and vice versa. In the present research, we show that higher relationship satisfaction promotes a motivational mind-set that is conducive for effective self-regulation, and thus for goal progress and performance. In Study 1-a large-scale, intensive experience sampling project of 115 couples (total N = 230)-we closely tracked fluctuations in state relationship satisfaction (SRS) and 4 parameters of effective self-regulation according to our conceptual model. Dyadic process analyses showed that individuals experiencing higher SRS than they typically do exhibited higher levels of (a) perceived control, (b) goal focus, (c) perceived partner support, and (d) positive affect during goal pursuit than they typically exhibit. Together, these 4 self-regulation-relevant variables translated into higher rates of daily progress on specific, idiographic goals. In Study 2 (N = 195), we employed a novel experimental manipulation of SRS, replicating the link between SRS and parameters of effective self-regulation. Taken together, these findings suggest that momentary increases

  5. Behavioral Sexual Dimorphism in School-Age Children and Early Developmental Exposure to Dioxins and PCBs: A Follow-Up Study of the Duisburg Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ranft, Ulrich; Wittsiepe, Jürgen; Kasper-Sonnenberg, Monika; Fürst, Peter; Krämer, Ursula; Seitner, Gabriele; Wilhelm, Michael

    2013-01-01

    , Wittsiepe J, Kasper-Sonnenberg M, Fürst P, Krämer U, Seitner G, Wilhelm M. 2014. Behavioral sexual dimorphism in school-age children and early developmental exposure to dioxins and PCBs: a follow-up study of the Duisburg Cohort. Environ Health Perspect 122:292–298; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306533 PMID:24273228

  6. Physically plausible prescription of land surface model soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, Mathias; Orth, René; Thiery, Wim; Seneviratne, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    Land surface hydrology is an important control of surface weather and climate, especially under extreme dry or wet conditions where it can amplify heat waves or floods, respectively. Prescribing soil moisture in land surface models is a valuable technique to investigate this link between hydrology and climate. It has been used for example to assess the influence of soil moisture on temperature variability, mean and extremes (Seneviratne et al. 2006, 2013, Lorenz et al., 2015). However, perturbing the soil moisture content artificially can lead to a violation of the energy and water balances. Here we present a new method for prescribing soil moisture which ensures water and energy balance closure by using only water from runoff and a reservoir term. If water is available, the method prevents soil moisture decrease below climatological values. Results from simulations with the Community Land Model (CLM) indicate that our new method allows to avoid soil moisture deficits in many regions of the world. We show the influence of the irrigation-supported soil moisture content on mean and extreme temperatures and contrast our findings with that of earlier studies. Additionally, we will assess how long into the 21st century the new method will be able to maintain present-day climatological soil moisture levels for different regions. Lorenz, R., Argüeso, D., Donat, M.G., Pitman, A.J., den Hurk, B.V., Berg, A., Lawrence, D.M., Chéruy, F., Ducharne, A., Hagemann, S. and Meier, A., 2015. Influence of land-atmosphere feedbacks on temperature and precipitation extremes in the GLACE-CMIP5 ensemble. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres. Seneviratne, S.I., Lüthi, D., Litschi, M. and Schär, C., 2006. Land-atmosphere coupling and climate change in Europe. Nature, 443(7108), pp.205-209. Seneviratne, S.I., Wilhelm, M., Stanelle, T., Hurk, B., Hagemann, S., Berg, A., Cheruy, F., Higgins, M.E., Meier, A., Brovkin, V. and Claussen, M., 2013. Impact of soil moisture

  7. Improving the Inventory of Large Lunar Basins: Using LOLA Data to Test Previous Candidates and Search for New Ones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H. V.; Meyer, H. M.; Romine, G. C.

    2012-01-01

    Topography and crustal thickness data from LOLA altimetry were used to test the validity of 98 candidate large lunar basins derived from photogeologic and earlier topographic and crustal thickness data, and to search for possible new candidates. We eliminate 23 previous candidates but find good evidence for 20 new candidates. The number of basins greater than 300 km diameter on the Moon is almost certainly a factor 2 (maybe 3?) larger than the number of named features having basin-like topography. Unified Lunar Control Net 2005 data [1] and model crustal thickness data [2] were previously used to search for possible previously unrecognized large lunar impact basins [3,4]. An inventory of 98 candidate topographic basins greater than 300 km in diameter was found [5]. This includes 33 named features (only those having basin-like topography) out of the 45 listed by Wilhelms [6], 38 additional Quasi-Circular Depressions (QCDs) found in the ULCN2005 topography, and 27 Circular Thin Areas (CTAs) found in model crustal thickness data [2]. Most named features and additional QCDs have strong CTA signatures, but there may be a class of CTAs that are not easily recognized in the old and low resolution ULCN2005 topography. Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data have recently become publically available. We used these data to (a) refine the center and ring diameters of known basins, (b) test the viability of the candidate basins previously found (as described above), and (c) search for additional candidate basins not revealed by the earlier lower resolution data. We used the LOLA topography directly but also a recent new model crustal thickness data that includes Kaguya gravity data [7]. We repeated a Topographic Expression (TE) and a Crustal Thickness Expression (CTE) scoring exercise originally done with the basins found in ULCN and earlier model crustal thickness data [5]. Each candidate was scored on a scale from 0 (no topographic basin or circular thin area signature) to

  8. The human volatilome: volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath, skin emanations, urine, feces and saliva.

    PubMed

    Amann, Anton; Costello, Ben de Lacy; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen; Buszewski, Bogusław; Pleil, Joachim; Ratcliffe, Norman; Risby, Terence

    2014-09-01

    Breath analysis is a young field of research with its roots in antiquity. Antoine Lavoisier discovered carbon dioxide in exhaled breath during the period 1777-1783, Wilhelm (Vilém) Petters discovered acetone in breath in 1857 and Johannes Müller reported the first quantitative measurements of acetone in 1898. A recent review reported 1765 volatile compounds appearing in exhaled breath, skin emanations, urine, saliva, human breast milk, blood and feces. For a large number of compounds, real-time analysis of exhaled breath or skin emanations has been performed, e.g., during exertion of effort on a stationary bicycle or during sleep. Volatile compounds in exhaled breath, which record historical exposure, are called the 'exposome'. Changes in biogenic volatile organic compound concentrations can be used to mirror metabolic or (patho)physiological processes in the whole body or blood concentrations of drugs (e.g. propofol) in clinical settings-even during artificial ventilation or during surgery. Also compounds released by bacterial strains like Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Streptococcus pneumonia could be very interesting. Methyl methacrylate (CAS 80-62-6), for example, was observed in the headspace of Streptococcus pneumonia in concentrations up to 1420 ppb. Fecal volatiles have been implicated in differentiating certain infectious bowel diseases such as Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter, Salmonella and Cholera. They have also been used to differentiate other non-infectious conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, alterations in urine volatiles have been used to detect urinary tract infections, bladder, prostate and other cancers. Peroxidation of lipids and other biomolecules by reactive oxygen species produce volatile compounds like ethane and 1-pentane. Noninvasive detection and therapeutic monitoring of oxidative stress would be highly desirable in autoimmunological, neurological, inflammatory diseases and cancer

  9. Cultivating the cortex in German neuroanatomy.

    PubMed

    Hagner, M

    2001-12-01

    anatomical examinations of so-called elite brains and the brains of criminals, they made concrete suggestions for eugenics and the breeding of "one-sidedly gifted leaders." Given the remarkable popularity of the Vogts around 1930, their program is an important example of the hubris of predicting and guiding future developments on the basis of scientific authority. It can be regarded as an ironic nemesis that the Vogts - never sympathizing with the political aims of the National Socialists - were forced to finish their careers as influential Kaiser Wilhelm scientists in Nazi-Germany. PMID:12174862

  10. [Quo vadis cardiologia? Or: An nescis, mi fili, quantilla prudentia mundus regatur? (Pope Julius III)].

    PubMed

    Kübler, W

    2003-02-01

    In order to recognize and to solve problems, a look in the future is essential despite many uncertainties. Besides sound bed side-teaching, the main aim in the education of the students should be to acquire self-responsiveness and an attitude of permanent learning. It is more than doubtful whether the high expectations of health politicians will be met to limit the cost of in-patient treatment by introducing diagnosis-related groups in combination with evidence-based medicine, as this method has several severe limitations in order to fulfill this duty. The new financial system based on diagnosis-related groups will be in favor of private investors compared to the government-dependent university hospitals. The changing population pyramid implies not only higher costs but in addition severe medical problems. Within the changing society, alterations in the patient's behavior are to be expected. Several factors will contribute to make the doctor's profession less attractive. In the developing countries a rapid increase in the non-communicative diseases, i.e., in coronary heart disease, has to be expected. Apart from the prolongation of life - especially during its terminal phase - it is mainly the allocation of resources between industrialized and developing countries which will determine the ethical discussion. Germany has lost its leading position of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century in medical sciences. This was based on the liberal university system introduced by Wilhelm von Humboldt. Several pioneering innovations of German cardiologists during the 20th century have not strengthened German industry - in contrast to the situation in the 19th century. The general conditions in Germany, which are not research oriented, have prompted the majority of the pharmaceutical firms to transfer their research activities into foreign countries. In addition Germany's cardiological research has lost basic sciences partners for clinically orientated basic research, as

  11. Fire-air and dephlogistication. Revisionisms of oxygen's discovery.

    PubMed

    Severinghaus, John W

    2003-01-01

    Americans are taught that Joseph Priestley discovered oxygen in 1774 and promptly brought that news to Lavoisier. Lavoisier proved that air contained a new element, oxygen, which combined with hydrogen to make water. He disproved the phlogiston theory but Priestley called it dephlogisticated air until his death 30 years later. Scandanavians learn that a Swedish apothecary Carl Wilhelm Scheele beat Priestley by 2 years but was deprived of credit because Lavoisier denied receiving a letter Scheele later claimed to have sent in September 1774 describing his 1772 discovery of "fire air". His claim was unconfirmed because Scheele first published his work in 1777. However, Scheele's missing letter was made public in 1992 in Paris, 218 years late, and now resides at the French Academie de Sciences. Lavoisier received it on Oct 15, 1774. His guilt was kept secret in the effects of Madame Lavoisier. He failed on several occasions to credit either Priestley or Scheele for contributing to the most important discovery in the history of science. Priestley was a teacher, political philosopher, essayist, Unitarian minister and pioneer in chemical and electrical science. He discovered 9 gases including nitrous oxide. He invented soda water, refrigeration, and gum erasers for which he coined the term "rubber". He discovered photosynthesis. He was humorless, argumentative, brilliant and passionate, called a "furious free-thinker". While his liberal colleagues Josiah Wedgwood, Erasmus Darwin, James Watts, and others of the Lunar Society were celebrating the 2nd anniversary of the French revolution, a Birmingham mob, supported by the royalists and the established church, destroyed Priestley's home, laboratory and church. Driven from England, he emigrated to Pennsylvania where he built a home and laboratory and collected a 1600 volume library, then among the largest in America. He is regarded as a founder of liberal Unitarian thinking. He was friend and correspondent of Thomas

  12. Elemental Constituents of Particulate Matter and Newborn’s Size in Eight European Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Marie; Gehring, Ulrike; Beelen, Rob; Wang, Meng; Giorgis-Allemand, Lise; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Basagaña, Xavier; Bernard, Claire; Cirach, Marta; Forastiere, Francesco; de Hoogh, Kees; Gruzieva, Olena; Hoek, Gerard; Jedynska, Aleksandra; Klümper, Claudia; Kooter, Ingeborg M.; Krämer, Ursula; Kukkonen, Jaakko; Porta, Daniela; Postma, Dirkje S.; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; van Rossem, Lenie; Sunyer, Jordi; Sørensen, Mette; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Vrijkotte, Tanja G. M.; Wilhelm, Michael; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Pershagen, Göran; Brunekreef, Bert; Kogevinas, Manolis; Slama, Rémy

    2015-01-01

    , van Rossem L, Sunyer J, Sørensen M, Tsai MY, Vrijkotte TG, Wilhelm M, Nieuwenhuijsen MJ, Pershagen G, Brunekreef B, Kogevinas M, Slama R. 2016. Elemental constituents of particulate matter and newborn’s size in eight European cohorts. Environ Health Perspect 124:141–150; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409546 PMID:26046983

  13. Long-term trends of hypoxia in the coastal zone, north-western Baltic proper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrén, Thomas; Norbäck Ivarsson, Lena; Andrén, Elinor

    2015-04-01

    ., Lysiak-Pastuszak, E., Remeikaite-Nikien, N., Walve, J., Wilhelms, S., Zillén, L. 2011. Hypoxia Is Increasing in the Coastal Zone of the Baltic Sea. Environmental Science & Technology 45, 6777-6783. Zillén, L., Conley, D.J., Andrén, T., Andrén, E. & Björck, S. 2008. Past occurrences of hypoxia in the Baltic Sea and the role of climate variability, environmental change and human impact. Earth Science Reviews 91, 77-92.

  14. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John T.

    Mauro Dorato's new book is subtitled "An Introduction to the History and Philosophy of Laws of Nature". This is a bit misleading: a reader previously unacquainted with any of the literature on the topic of laws of nature and related problems in the philosophy of science will find much of the book prohibitively challenging. But the book does aim for the kind of breadth and generality that one would expect from an introduction to the subject, and it serves well as a compact overview of the issues, views, arguments, and counter-arguments that have shaped the contemporary philosophical debate on laws of nature. Almost no important facet of the debate goes untouched. There are chapters or sections on: recent scholarship on the history of the notion of a law and its role in the study of nature; the characteristics of the things called "laws" in a wide range of sciences; the relations among laws, algorithmic compressibility of information, and the theory of measurement; the puzzling question of why so many laws of nature should be mathematical in form; regularity theories of laws; the universals approach to laws; the necessitarian approach to laws; skeptical eliminativism about laws; non-reductive realism about laws; the question of the supervenience of laws on non-nomic facts; the relations of laws to counterfactuals, causality, dispositions, explanation, chance, symmetry, and necessity; ceteris paribus clauses; the evolutionary contingency thesis and the question of biological laws; Wilhelm Dilthey and the alleged distinction between "nomothetic" sciences and "historical" ones; the question of psychophysical laws and the relation between this question and the problems of mental causation and free will; even the connection between the issue of psychophysical laws and Gibson's ecological theory of perception. This is an impressive range of topics, especially considering that they are all treated in only 174 pages. One result is that not all of them are treated with as

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Astronomie und Anschaulichkeit. Die Bilder der populaeren Astronomie des 19. Jahrhunderts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, H. W.; Utzt, S.

    2004-12-01

    Today, popularisation of science also means "pretty pictures": images that accompany articles in magazines and webpages, or are squeezed between the covers of so-called coffee-table books, and the reviewer pleads guilty to having added to this growing pile. But how did this "disease" came into existence? Susanne Utzt, a manager, journalist and student in the history of sciences, has dedicated her master thesis to the investigation of the growing influence of such pictures in the popularisation of astronomy. She has analyzed French and German popular texts by Arago, Guillemin, Flammarion, as well as Littrow, Maedler and Max Wilhelm Meyer that mainly appeared in the second half of the 19th century. Earlier astronomy books just had a few foldout pages with mathematical figures, as the author exemplifies by Littrow's first edition of "Die Wunder des Himmels" of 1834-36. But Flammarion with his "Astronomie Populaire", changed everything: 51 "art pages" and more than 300 figures in the text made it a true picture book, and about a third of Utzt's work is dedicated to its analysis. (In passing, it should be noted that the first 1880 edition of Flammarion's book did not yet contain the "art pages"; the author quotes such pages and text figures according to a German edition of 1907). Besides sober diagrams illustrating the solar system, and telescope drawings showing planetary surfaces and the structure of the solar photosphere, Flammarion includes poetic illustrations like a couple at the seashore at sunset; a scene showing dying Copernicus, already flanked by two angels, as he receives a copy of his De Revolutionibus; or a painting showing a flock of mammoths in an ancient landscape. In most cases, the images are chosen to illustrate the text, but sometimes the text "makes a detour" to permit the inclusion of a pretty picture. Flammarion's book contains drawings illustrating the sphericity of the earth, which appeared in almost identical form in Apian's Cosmography of

  16. Orbiting observatory SOHO finds source of high-speed "wind" blowing from the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-02-01

    ranging from 30,000 km/h at the surface to over 3 million km/h, the solar wind "grows" much faster than grass". "Looking at the spot where the solar wind actually appears is extremely important", says co-author Dr. Philippe Lemaire of the Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale in Orsay, France. The Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) spectrometer on SOHO detected the solar wind by observing the ultraviolet spectrum over a large area of the solar north polar region. The SUMER instrument was built under the leadership of Dr. Klaus Wilhelm at the Max-Planck-Institut für Aeronomie in Lindau, Germany, with key contributions from the Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale in Orsay, France, the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, and the University of California at Berkeley, with financial support from German, French, US and Swiss national agencies. "Identification of the detailed structure of the source region of the fast solar wind is an important step in solving the solar wind acceleration problem. We can now focus our attention on the plasma conditions and the dynamic processes seen in the corners of the magnetic field structures", says Dr. Wilhelm, also co-author of the Science paper. A spectrum results from the separation of light into its component colours, which correspond to different wavelengths. Blue light has a shorter wavelength and is more energetic than red. A spectrum is similar to what is seen when a prism separates white light into a rainbow of distinct colours. By analysing light this way, astronomers learn a great deal about the object emitting the light, such as its temperature, chemical composition, and motion. The ultraviolet light observed by SUMER is actually invisible to the human eye and cannot penetrate the Earth's atmosphere. The hot gas in the solar wind source region emits light at certain ultraviolet wavelengths. When the hot gas flows towards Earth, as it does in the solar wind, the wavelengths of the

  17. Inventory of Multiring Basins on the Moon After the Clementine Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spudis, P. D.

    1995-09-01

    topography for a basin is that of the degraded Lomonosov-Fleming basin [3,6]. This feature appears as a quasi-circular, smooth plateau of nearly constant elevation about 500 km across. Such an expression is likely caused by infilling of the basin with ancient mare basalts, covered by highland plains and reexposed as the ejecta of dark halo impact craters [7,8]. This interpretation is supported by the mafic signature of the plains in this region in the Clementine global color image [9] and the presense of elevated amounts of iron in the highland crust here [10]. The altimetry data also show many depressions that are likely to be previously unrecognized basins. For example, depressions near the crater Darwin (20 degrees S, 70 degrees W; basin about 300 km diameter), eastern Mare Frigoris (55 degrees N, 30 degrees W; basin about 700 km across), and east of Mare Humboldtianum (60 degrees N, 130 degrees E; basin about 400 km diameter) are probably degraded impact basins. To date, over 45 basins and their rings have been mapped on the Moon and the relief and volumes of the basins have been measured. Work continues on the analysis of this numerical data, which should give insight into the processes of basin formation and planetary evolution. References: [1] Wilhelms D. E. (1987) USGS Prof. Pap. 1348, 302 pp. [2] Spudis P. D. (1993) Geology of Multi-Ring Impact Basins, Cambridge Univ., 263 pp. [3] Nozette S. et al. (1994) Science, 266, 1835. [4] Zuber M. T. et al. (1994) Science, 266, 1839. [5] Spudis P. D. et al. (1994) Science, 266, 1848. [6] Wilhelms D. and El-Baz F. (1977) USGS Map I-948. [7] Schultz P. H. and Spudis P. D. (1979) Proc. LPSC 10th, 2899. [8] Schultz P. H. and Spudis P. D. (1982) Nature, 302, 233. [9] Lucey P. G. et al. (1994) Science, 266, 1855. [10] Lucey P. G. et al. (1995) Science, 268, 1150.

  18. Once a myth, now an object of study - How the perception of comets has changed over the centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-02-01

    In February 2004, Rosetta will be setting off on its long journey through our solar system to meet up with Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. It will take the European Space Agency (ESA) space probe ten years to reach its destination. The comet, which moves in an elliptical orbit around the Sun, will at rendezvous be some 675 million kilometres from the Sun, near the point in its orbit farthest from the Sun. The meeting point was not chosen at random: at this point the comet is still barely active, it is still in fact a frozen lump of ice and interplanetary dust, in all probability the matter from which our solar system emerged four and a half billion years ago. Rosetta’s job is to find out more about these strange bodies that travel through our solar system. As it moves on, the comet will begin to change. As it approaches the Sun, it will - like all comets - become active: in the warmth of the Sun’s rays, the ices evaporate, tearing small dust particles from the surface. This produces the comet head (the coma) and tail. Only these two phenomena are visible from Earth. The comet nucleus itself is far too tiny - Churyumov-Gerasimenko measures about 4 kilometres across - to be viewed from Earth. As Dr Uwe Keller of the Max Planck Institute for Aeronomy in Kaltenburg-Lindau, the scientist responsible for the Osiris camera carried by Rosetta, explains, “Formation of the coma and tail during solar flyby skims several metres of matter off the comet’s surface. In the case of a small comet like Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the shrinkage is a good 1% each time round.” As it flies past the Sun every 6.6 years it can look forward to a short future, especially on a cosmic timescale. Comets - a mystical view Visible cometary phenomena have fascinated human beings from time immemorial - and frightened them too. Even today mystical explanations prevail among some of the Earth’s peoples. The Andaman islanders, a primitive people living in the Gulf of Bengal, see comets as burning

  19. PREFACE: Continuum Models and Discrete Systems Symposia (CMDS-12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2011-09-01

    Bardhan, Davide Bigoni, Andrej Cherkaev, Hikaru Kawamura, Subhasish Mazumder, Srutarshi Pradhan, Jacques Prost, Sriram Ramaswamy, Ping Sheng, Asok K Sen) were unable to contribute to this proceedings volume; on the other hand, although Kamal could not participate in the symposium, he contributed to the proceedings volume. We are grateful to Lucilla de Arcangelis, Kamal K Bardhan, Abhik Basu, Jayanta K Bhattacharjee, Andrej Cherkaev, Yilong Han, Alex Hansen, Takahiro Hatano, Esin Inan, Hikaru Kawamura, Pradeep K Mohanty, Akio Nakahara, Surajit Sengupta, Ping Sheng, Sujata Tarafdar and Uwe Tauber for reviewing the papers submitted to this proceedings volume. We would like to take this opportunity to thank all the members of the organizing committee and acknowledge the financial support received from the Centre for Applied Mathematics and Computational Science, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata. We look forward to meeting you all at the next event in this series, CMDS 13, to be held in 2014/2015 in Utah, USA. Bikas K ChakrabartiChairman of CMDS 12Kolkata, 8 August 2011 Editors of the proceedings Abhik Basu abhik.basu@saha.ac.inBikas K Chakrabarti bikask.chakrabarti@saha.ac.inAnjan Kumar Chandra anjan.chandra@saha.ac.inSaha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Sector-I, Block - AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064, India

  20. Once a myth, now an object of study - How the perception of comets has changed over the centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-02-01

    In February 2004, Rosetta will be setting off on its long journey through our solar system to meet up with Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. It will take the European Space Agency (ESA) space probe ten years to reach its destination. The comet, which moves in an elliptical orbit around the Sun, will at rendezvous be some 675 million kilometres from the Sun, near the point in its orbit farthest from the Sun. The meeting point was not chosen at random: at this point the comet is still barely active, it is still in fact a frozen lump of ice and interplanetary dust, in all probability the matter from which our solar system emerged four and a half billion years ago. Rosetta’s job is to find out more about these strange bodies that travel through our solar system. As it moves on, the comet will begin to change. As it approaches the Sun, it will - like all comets - become active: in the warmth of the Sun’s rays, the ices evaporate, tearing small dust particles from the surface. This produces the comet head (the coma) and tail. Only these two phenomena are visible from Earth. The comet nucleus itself is far too tiny - Churyumov-Gerasimenko measures about 4 kilometres across - to be viewed from Earth. As Dr Uwe Keller of the Max Planck Institute for Aeronomy in Kaltenburg-Lindau, the scientist responsible for the Osiris camera carried by Rosetta, explains, “Formation of the coma and tail during solar flyby skims several metres of matter off the comet’s surface. In the case of a small comet like Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the shrinkage is a good 1% each time round.” As it flies past the Sun every 6.6 years it can look forward to a short future, especially on a cosmic timescale. Comets - a mystical view Visible cometary phenomena have fascinated human beings from time immemorial - and frightened them too. Even today mystical explanations prevail among some of the Earth’s peoples. The Andaman islanders, a primitive people living in the Gulf of Bengal, see comets as burning

  1. "Heart" of Herschel to be presented to media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-09-01

    instruments were designed and built by consortia of scientists and institutes, with their own national funding. The Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) was developed under the coordination of the MPE, Germany; the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) was developed under the coordination of the Cardiff University (United Kingdom); the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) was developed under the coordination of the SRON institute (The Netherlands). For more information ESA Media Relations Office Tel: +33(0)1.53.69.7299 Fax: +33(0)1.53.69.7690 Herschel Press Day at Astrium, Friedrichshafen, Germany 19 September 2007 Claude-Dornier-Strasse 88090 Immenstaad 09:00 h Arrival at Astrium /Check-in / Transfer to Building 8 / Room Meersburg (5 th floor) 09:30 h Welcome, by Uwe Minne, Director of Earth Observation and Science, Astrium 09:35 h ESA and Astronomy: looking forward, by Jacques Louet, Head of Scientific Projects Department, ESA 09:45 h Herschel/Planck mission overview, by Thomas Passvogel, ESA Herschel/Planck Project Manager 09:55 h The Herschel scientific mission, by Göran Pilbratt, ESA Herschel Project Scientist 10:05 h Q & A followed by coffee break 10:30 h Herschel spacecraft overview, by Jean-Jacques Julliet, Director of European Science and Optical Observation Programmes, Thales Alenia Space 10:40 h The ‘cool’ heart of Herschel, by Wolfgang Fricke, Herschel Project Manager, Astrium 10:50 h The PACS instrument, by Albrecht Poglitsch, Principal Investigator, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (MPE) 11:00 h The SPIRE instrument, by Matthew Griffin, Principal Investigator, Cardiff University 11:10 h The HIFI instrument, by Thijs de Graauw, Principal Investigator, Netherlands Institute for Space Research (SRON) 11:20 h Q & A, Individual Interviews 12:15 h Transfer to Integration Centre 12:30 h Warm / Cold Buffet on Visitoŕs Galaxy Build up of three different visitor groups Check-in into cleanroom Photo

  2. EDITORIAL: Extreme Ultraviolet Light Sources for Semiconductor Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attwood, David

    2004-12-01

    filaments, for both Xe and Sn. The embodiment of electrical discharge plasmas and laser-produced plasmas into commercially available EUV sources, with EUV powers that project to suitable levels, is presented in the fifth paper by Uwe Stamm of XTREME Technologies in Göttingen. For discharge produced plasmas, thermal loading and electrode erosion are significant issues. Vladimir Borisov and his colleagues, at the Troitsk Institute outside Moscow, address these issues and provide novel ideas for the multiplexing of several discharge plasmas feeding a single optical system. Igor Fomenkov and his colleagues at Cymer in San Diego describe issues associated with a dense plasma focus pinch, including a comparison of operations with both positive and negative polarity. In the eighth paper, Malcolm McGeoch of Plex in Massachusetts provides a theoretical description of the vaporization and ionization of spherical tin droplets in discharge plasma. Together this cluster of papers provides a broad review of the current status of high power EUV plasma sources for semiconductor manufacturing. This very current topic, of intense interest worldwide, is considered further in a book [4] of collected papers to become available in mid-2005. Additionally, a special journal issue emphasizing coherent EUV sources, albeit at lower average powers, is soon to appear [5]. References [1] http://public.itrsr.net [2] Attwood D 2000 Soft X-Rays and Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation: Principles and Applications (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) www.coe.Berkeley.edu/AST/sxreuv [3] Moore G E 1965 Cramming More Components onto Integrated Circuits Electronics Magazine 114 Moore G E 1995 Lithography and the Future of Moore's Law SPIE 243 2 [4] Bakshi V ed 2005 EUV Sources for Lithography (Bellingham WA:SPIE) at press [5] IEEE J. Special Topics in Quantum Electronics, Short Wavelength and EUV Lasers 10 Dec 2004 at press

  3. Comet Hyakutake C/1996 B2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    spiral jets toward the upper right, and the thin straight particle trail pointing toward the lower left. The trail was a permanent feature of the comet around the time of its close approach to the Earth in late March and early April. Also barely visible just beyond the lower left end of the trail are two of the many condensations which were seen to travel slowly down the tail are believed to be clumps of material released from the nucleus.

    The inner white region of the blue image appears to show that the hydrogen atoms like the dust might be preferentially ejected toward the sunward or day side of the nucleus. However, this is not true. The asymmetric ultraviolet radiation pattern is produced by a roughly spherical distribution of hydrogen atoms because they are so efficient at scattering the incoming solar ultraviolet light. The atoms on the sunward side actually shadow the atoms on the tailward or night side of the coma. The same detailed model analysis of the coma which explains the expansion of the hydrogen atoms in the coma also explains the appearance of the image.

    The team was lead by Michael Combi, The University of Michigan, and included Michael Brown, California Institute of Technology, Paul Feldman, Johns Hopkins University, H. Uwe Keller of the Max Planck Institute, Lindau, Robert Meier of the Naval Research Laboratory, and William Smyth of Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science.

    This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  4. Evolution of the Foucault-Secretan reflecting telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, William

    2016-08-01

    Léon Foucault developed the silvered-glass reflecting telescope in collaboration with the instrument maker Marc Secretan. Almost immediately, they began selling 4- and 8-(French)-inch Newtonian telescopes in wooden tubes to amateurs. Several 4-inch examples have survived. As Foucault attempted to make larger diameters he moved from spherical to paraboloidal mirrors and developed tests to determine the errors of the surfaces he was polishing, of which the knife-edge test is the most informative and sensitive. The errors were then corrected with retouches locales, i.e. local repolishing. He also introduced the concept of pouvoir optique, or optical power, to characterize the performance of his mirrors. He made several professional reflecting telescopes, culminating in the 80-cm instrument now at the Marseilles Observatory. A number of his instruments are illustrated in physics textbooks of the time. Foucault predominantly adopted an f/6 focal ratio with a prism secondary close to the prime focus and a microscope-like eyepiece assembly to bring the image to the observer. In 1865, with Marc's son Auguste, Foucault announced a metal-mounted 10-cm alt-az amateur instrument, which soon became available in larger sizes and with equatorial mounts. Several examples survive. In 1866 the head of the Secretan workshop, Wilhelm Eichens, split from the firm. Marc died in 1867, followed by Foucault in 1868. Foucault's pupil Adolphe Martin published some of Foucault's mirror- and lens-making secrets. Martin worked with both Eichens and, episodically, the Secretan firm; but though able to figure small mirrors he proved incapable of finishing 80- and 120-cm ones begun under Foucault destined for the Toulouse and Paris Observatories. Auguste Secretan associated with Paul and Prosper Henry for mirror figuring. The Secretan offering of silvered-glass telescopes reached its apogee in 1874 with advertised diameters from 10 to 80 cm. Auguste died that year and the firm was taken over by

  5. Two millennia of torrential activity reconstructed from alpine lake sediments: towards regional patterns of extreme precipitation changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, B.; Arnaud, F.; Giguet-Covex, C.; Sabatier, P.; Crouzet, C.; Delannoy, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    different times depending on the site location (i.e. north-western or southern French Alps). In the north, peaks of flood frequency match well with high summer temperatures, while in the south they seem to be associated to solar maxima and negative phases of the North Atlantic Oscillation. Furthermore, the most extreme events occur during the warm Medieval Climate Anomaly (800-1300 AD) in the north while in the south the intensity of these events increases during the cold LIA period. Our results reveal major differences in the evolutions of the torrential-flood activity at a regional scale. This suggests that extreme precipitations over this part of the Alps are influenced by different forcing factors. In the north-western French Alps, warming seems to plays an important role, favouring the increase of both flood frequency and intensity at a pluri-decadal time scale. Inversely, at the same time scale, in the Southern French Alps, flood frequency and intensity seem to be strongly linked to meso-scale atmospheric circulations in relation to the North Atlantic Oscillation (see abstract from Wilhelm et al. in session CL4.3 for details). Our study hence suggests one should expect a generalised decrease of torrential flood frequency all around the Alps. However, in northern French Alps only, an increase in torrential flood intensity is expected by analogy with the MWP pattern.

  6. BOOK REVIEW Analytical and Numerical Approaches to Mathematical Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, John M.

    2007-08-01

    The 319th Wilhelm-and-Else-Heraeus Seminar 'Mathematical Relativity: New Ideas and Developments' took place in March 2004. Twelve of the invited speakers have expanded their one hour talks into the papers appearing in this volume, preceded by a foreword by Roger Penrose. The first group consists of four papers on 'differential geometry and differential topology'. Paul Ehrlich opens with a very witty review of global Lorentzian geometry, which caused this reviewer to think more carefully about how he uses the adjective 'generic'. Robert Low addresses the issue of causality with a description of the 'space of null geodesics' and a tentative proposal for a new definition of causal boundary. The underlying review of global Lorentzian geometry is continued by Antonio Masiello, looking at variational approaches (actually valid for more general semi-Riemannian manifolds). This group concludes with a very clear review of pp-wave spacetimes from José Flores and Miguel Sánchez. (This reviewer was delighted to see a reproduction of Roger Penrose's seminal (1965) picture of null geodesics in plane wave spacetimes which attracted him into the subject.) Robert Beig opens the second group 'analytic methods and differential equations' with a brief but careful discussion of symmetric (regular) hyperbolicity for first (second) order systems, respectively, of partial differential equations. His description is peppered with examples, many specific to relativstic continuum mechanics. There follows a succinct review of linear elliptic boundary value problems with applications to general relativity from Sergio Dain. The numerous examples he provides are thought-provoking. The 'standard cosmological model' has been well understood for three quarters of a century. However recent observations suggest that the expansion in our Universe may be accelerating. Alan Rendall provides a careful discussion of the changes, both mathematical and physical, to the standard model which might be needed

  7. Viscoelastic Relaxation of Lunar Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohit, P. S.; Phillips, R. J.

    2004-12-01

    The large lunar impact basins provide a unique glimpse into early lunar history. Here we investigate the possibility that the relief of the oldest lunar basins (with the exception of South-Pole Aitken) has decayed through viscous relaxation. We identify nine ancient multi-ring basins with very low relief and low-amplitude Bouguer and free-air gravity anomalies. The characteristics of these basins are consistent with either 1) relaxation of topographic relief by ductile flow (e.g. Solomon et al., 1982) or 2) obliteration of basin topography during crater collapse immediately following impact. Both scenarios require that the basins formed early in lunar history, when the Moon was hot. The latter possibility appears to be unlikely due to the great topographic relief of South Pole-Aitken basin (SPA), the largest and oldest impact basin on the Moon (with the possible exception of the putative Procellarum basin; Wilhelms, 1987). On the other hand, the thin crust beneath SPA may not have allowed ductile flow in its lower portions, even for a hot Moon, implying that a thicker crust is required beneath other ancient basins for the hypothesis of viscous relaxation to be tenable. Using a semi-analytic, self-gravitating viscoelastic model, we investigate the conditions necessary to produce viscous relaxation of lunar basins. We model topographic relaxation for a crustal thickness of 30 km, using a dry diabase flow law for the crust and dry olivine for the mantle. We find that the minimum temperature at the base of the crust (Tb) permitting nearly complete relaxation of topography by ductile flow on a timescale < 108 yrs is 1400 K, corresponding to a heat flow of 55mW/m2, into the crust. Ductile flow in the lower crust becomes increasingly difficult as the crustal thickness decreases. The crust beneath SPA, thinned by the impact, is only 15-20 km thick and would require Tb ≥ 1550 K for relaxation to occur. The fact that SPA has maintained high-amplitude relief suggests that

  8. The implications of Chang'e-3 VIS/NIR Imaging Spectrometer in-situ analysis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Meijuan; Zhang, Hongbo; Su, Yan; Liu, Bin; Zhao, Shu; Xue, Xiping

    2015-04-01

    believe that at least the identification of the minerals gives us valuable imformation about the landing site. References: [1] Liu B. (2014). RAA, 14, 1578-1594. [2] Thiessen F. et al., (2014). Planetary and Space Science, 104, 244-252. [3]Yamamoto S. et al., (2010). Nat. Geosci. 3, 533-536. [4] Tong S. et al,. (2013). Icarus 222, 401-410. [5] Wilhelm D.E., and McCauley J.F. (1971). 1-703. U.S. Geol. Surv., Washington D.C. [6] Li C.L. et al., (2014). RAA, 14, 1514-1529. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the CHANG'E-3 funding from Chinese Lunar Exploration Program, undertaken by the China National Space Administration (CNSA). This work is also supported by the NSFC program (41490633).

  9. Improved Digitization of Lunar Mare Ridges with LROC Derived Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, J. M.; Robinson, M. S.; Watters, T. R.; Bowman-Cisneros, E.; Enns, A. C.; Lawrence, S.

    2011-12-01

    in some cases, the lengths and orientations of previously digitized ridges were different than those of the ridges digitized in this study. This method of multi-map digitizing allows for a greater accuracy in spatial characterization of mare ridges than previous methods. We intend to map mare ridges on a global scale, creating a more comprehensive ridge map due to higher resolution. References Cited: [1] Schultz P.H. (1976) Moon Morphology, 308. [2] Wilhelms D.E. (1987) USGS Prof. Paper 1348, 5A-B. [3] Carr, M.H. (1966) USGS Geologic Atlas of the Moon, I-498. [4] Robinson M.S. (2010) Space Sci. Rev., 150:82. [5] Scholten F. et al. (2011) LPSC XLII, 2046. [6] Fielder G. and Kiang T. (1962) The Observatory: No. 926, 8. [7] Watters T.R. and Konopliv A.S. (2001) Planetary and Space Sci. 49. 743-748. [8] Aubele J.C. (1988) LPSC XIX, 19.

  10. Light Plains in the South-Pole Aitken Basin: Surface Ages and Mineralogical Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiessen, F.; Hiesinger, H.; van der Bogert, C. H.; Pasckert, J. H.; Robinson, M. S.

    2012-04-01

    3 spectra from small impact craters on light plains show characteristic absorption bands for pyroxene. We conclude that light plains are unlikely to have formed by the Imbrium and Orientale impacts due to the range of surface ages and the compositional differences. Nevertheless, these impacts together with secondary cratering and sedimentation from regional and local impacts may have played an important role in forming these plains. An endogenic origin can still not be excluded due to the mare-like composition of some light plains. [1] Wilhelms D.E. (1970) Astrogeol. Stud. Ann. Prog. Report, 13-28. [2] Young J.W. (1972) NASA Apollo 16 Prelim. Sci. Rep., 5-1-5-6. [3] Neukum, G. (1977) The Moon 17, 383-393. [4] Neukum G. et al. (1975) The Moon 12, 201-229. [5] Lucey P.G. et al. (2000) J. Geophys. Res. 105, 20,297-20,305.

  11. [Emil Kraepelin: a pioneer of modern psychiatry. On the occasion of the hundred and fiftieth anniversary of his birth].

    PubMed

    Géraud, M

    2007-09-01

    psychiatry (1920) taking into account the social aspects (). From the therapeutic and institutional viewpoints, Kraepelin remained faithful throughout his life to the no-restraint practice by abolishing any restraint methods wherever he worked; by establishing a trust-based relationship with the patients; by allowing the patients to correspond and by opening the institution to visitors. Additionally, he participated actively in the struggle against alcoholism and syphilis. He is also one of the initiators of cross-cultural psychiatry (). Although he lead a medical career, Kraepelin was also interested in experimental psychology, and he thought of his works in that area as more important than his clinical achievements. He was closely connected with Wilhelm Wundt with whom he worked (at the Institute of Psychology of Leipzig where Kraepelin was one of the first medical doctors to collaborate with Wundt) and then exchanged letters. Some of his experimental works, including the elaboration of series of tests aimed at studying the psychic effects of certain substances, herald the advent of psychopharmacology. Lastly, his Memoirs and Poems give insight on the intimate person of Kraepelin, as well as putting his affective life in perspective. PMID:18033143

  12. Moon 101: Introducing Students to Lunar Science and Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaner, A. J.; Shipp, S. S.; Allen, J. S.; Kring, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Moon 101 is designed with the purpose of familiarizing students with lunar geology and exploration. Armed with guiding questions, students read articles covering various lunar science topics and browse images from past and current lunar missions to familiarize themselves with available lunar data sets. Moon 101 was originally created for high school students preparing to conduct open-inquiry, lunar research. Most high school students' knowledge of lunar science is limited to lunar phases and tides, and their knowledge of lunar exploration is close to non-existent. Moon 101 provides a summary of the state of knowledge of the Moon's formation and evolution, and the exploration that has helped inform the lunar science community. Though designed for high school students, Moon 101 is highly appropriate for the undergraduate classroom, especially at the introductory level where resources for teaching lunar science are scarce. Moon 101 is comprised of two sections covering lunar science (formation and geologic evolution of the Moon) and one section covering lunar exploration. Students read information on the formation and geologic evolution of the Moon from sources such as the Planetary Science Research Discoveries (PSRD) website and the USGS professional paper A Geologic History of the Moon by Wilhelms. While these resources are not peer-reviewed journals, the information is presented at a level more advanced than articles from newspapers and popular science magazines. This ensures that the language is accessible to students who do not have a strong lunar/planetary science background, or a strong science background in general. Formation readings include information on older and current formation hypotheses, including the Giant Impact Hypothesis, the Magma Ocean hypothesis, and the age of the lunar crust. Lunar evolution articles describe ideas such as the Late Heavy Bombardment and geologic processes such as volcanism and impact cratering. After reading the articles

  13. PREFACE: 13th International Conference on Muon Spin Rotation, Relaxation and Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-12-01

    The 13th International Conference on Muon Spin Rotation, Relaxation and Resonance (μSR2014) organized by the Laboratory for Muon Spin Spectroscopy, Paul Scherrer Institute in collaboration with the University of Zurich and the University of Fribourg, was held in Grindelwald, Switzerland from 1st to 6th June 2014. The conference provided a forum for researchers from around the world with interests in the applications of μSR to study a wide range of topics including condensed matter physics, materials and molecular sciences, chemistry and biology. Polarized muons provide a unique and versatile probe of matter, enabling studies at the atomic level of electronic structure and dynamics in a wide range of systems. The conference was the thirteenth in a series, which began in Rorschach in 1978 and it took place for the third time in Switzerland. The previous conferences were held in Cancun, Mexico (2011), Tsukuba, Japan (2008), Oxford, UK (2005), Williamsburg, USA (2002), Les Diablerets, Switzerland (1999), Nikko, Japan (1996), Maui, USA (1993), Oxford, UK (1990), Uppsala, Sweden (1986), Shimoda, Japan (1983), Vancouver, Canada (1980), and Rorschach, Switzerland (1978). These conference proceedings contain 67 refereed publications from presentations covering magnetism, superconductivity, chemistry, semiconductors, biophysics and techniques. The conference logo, displayed in the front pages of these proceedings, represents both the location of μSR2014 in the Alps and the muon-spin rotation technique. The silhouette represents the famous local mountains Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau as drawn by the Swiss painter Ferdinand Hodler and the apple with arrow is at the same time a citation of the Wilhelm Tell legend and a remembrance of the key role played by the muon spin and the asymmetric muon decay (which for the highest positron energy has an apple like shape). More than 160 participants (including 32 registered as students and 13 as accompanying persons) from 19 countries

  14. Planetary Geologic Mapping Handbook - 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, K. L.; Skinner, J. A.; Hare, T. M.

    2009-01-01

    . Terrestrial geologic maps published by the USGS now are primarily digital products using geographic information system (GIS) software and file formats. GIS mapping tools permit easy spatial comparison, generation, importation, manipulation, and analysis of multiple raster image, gridded, and vector data sets. GIS software has also permitted the development of project-specific tools and the sharing of geospatial products among researchers. GIS approaches are now being used in planetary geologic mapping as well (e.g., Hare and others, 2009). Guidelines or handbooks on techniques in planetary geologic mapping have been developed periodically (e.g., Wilhelms, 1972, 1990; Tanaka and others, 1994). As records of the heritage of mapping methods and data, these remain extremely useful guides. However, many of the fundamental aspects of earlier mapping handbooks have evolved significantly, and a comprehensive review of currently accepted mapping methodologies is now warranted. As documented in this handbook, such a review incorporates additional guidelines developed in recent years for planetary geologic mapping by the NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics (PGG) Program s Planetary Cartography and Geologic Mapping Working Group s (PCGMWG) Geologic Mapping Subcommittee (GEMS) on the selection and use of map bases as well as map preparation, review, publication, and distribution. In light of the current boom in planetary exploration and the ongoing rapid evolution of available data for planetary mapping, this handbook is especially timely.

  15. Evidence from Impact Crater Observations for Few Large Impacts on the Moon 0.8-1.7 Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchoff, M. R.; Bottke, W. F.; Marchi, S.; Chapman, C. R.; Enke, B.

    2012-12-01

    assumptions about how craters degrade. In addition, when our crater ages are combined with others determined (e.g., Copernicus, Tycho, King; [5-9]), we preliminarily observe a relative lull in lunar impact cratering for ~0.8-1.7 Ga. Intriguingly, this interval appears to roughly coincide with a period on Earth called the "boring billion" [10], when the evolution of life appears to have been stagnant and oceans were euxinic (poorly mixed, largely starved of oxygen). We speculate that absence of major terrestrial impacts may have surprising implications for the history of life and our biosphere. References: [1] Neukum, G., et al. (2001) SSR 96, 55-86. [2] Wilhelms, D.E. (1987) Geologic History of the Moon USGS, Paper 1348. [3] Marchi, S., et al. (2009) AJ 137, 4936-4948. [4] Ryder, G., et al. (1991) Geology 19, 143-146. [5] Neukum, G. and B. König (1976). Lunar Sci. VII. Proc., 2867-2881. [6] Hiesinger, H., et al. (2012) JGR 117, E00H10, doi: 10.1029/2011je003935. [7] van der Bogert, C.H., et al. (2010). LPSC XLI. Abst. #2165. [8] McEwen, A.S., et al. (1993) JGR 98, 17207-17231. [9] Ashley, J.W., et al. (2011). 42nd LPSC, Abst. #2437. [10] Holland, H.D. (2006) Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 361, 903-915.

  16. Analysis of the Plasma-Coma of Comet P/Halley by Image Processing Techniques of Bochum's Photoplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelzke, Marcos Rincon

    1996-10-01

    Photographic and photoelectric observations of comet P/Halley's ion gas coma from CO+ at 4250A were part of the Bochum Halley Monitoring Program, conducted from 1986 February 17, to April 17 at the European Southern Observatory on La Silla (Chile). In this spectral range it is possible to watch the continuous formation, motion and expansion of plasma structures. To observe the morphology of these structures 32 CO$^+$ photos (glass plates) from P/Halley's comet have been analysed. They have a field of view of 28 degrees 6 X 28 degrees 6 and were obtained from 1986 March 29, to April 17 with exposure times between 20 and 120 minutes. All photos were digitized with a PDS 2020 GM (Photometric Data System) microdensitometer at the Astronomisches Institut der Westfalischen Wilhelms-Universitat in Munster (one pixel = 25 microns X 25 microns approximately 46 arcsec 88 X 46 arcsec 88). After digitization the data were reduced to relative intensities, and the part with proper calibrations were also converted to absolute intensities, expressed in terms of column densities using the image data systems MIDAS (Munich Image Data Analysis System; ESO - Image Processing Group, 1988) and IHAP (Image Handling And Processing; Middleburg, 1983). With the help of the Stellingwerf-Theta-Minimum-Method (Stellingwerf, 1978) a period of (2.22 +/- 0.09) days results from analysis of structures in the plasma-coma by subtracting subsequent images. The idea behind subtracting subsequent images is that rotation effects are only 10% phenomena on gas distribution. Difference images are than used to supress the static component of the gas cloud. The CO+ column density data (in molecules cm^-2) were compared with the data of CN column density from Schulz (1990) in all common days. The results show that the relations between CO+ and CN in average column density values (N_CO^+ /N_CN) are 11.6 for a circular slit with average diameter (Phi) of 6 arcminute 1 which corresponds to a distance from the

  17. Analyse der Plasmakoma des Kometen P/Halley mittels Bildverarbeitung der Bochumer Photoplatten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelzke, M. R.

    1993-12-01

    Photographic and photoeletric observations of comet P/Halley's ion gas coma from CO+ at 4250 A were part of the Bochum Halley Monitoring Program, conducted from 1986 February 17, to April 17 at the European Southern Observatory on La Silla (Chile). In this spectral range it is possible to watch the continuous formation, motion and expansion of plasma structures. To observe the morphology of these structures 32 CO+ photos (glass plates) from P/Halley's comet have been analysed. They have a field of view of 28.6 X 28.6 degrees and were obtained from 1986 March 29, to April 17 with exposure times between 20 and 120 minutes. All photos were digitized with a PDS 2020 GM (Photometric Data System) microdensitometer at the Astronomisches Institut der Westfalischen Wilhelms-Universitaet in Muenster (one pixel = 25 X 25 microns approximately 46.88 X 46.88 arcsec). After digitization the data were reduced to relative intensities, and the part with proper calibrations were also converted to absolute intensities, expressed in terms of column densities using the image data systems MIDAS (Munich Image Data Analysis System; ESO - Image Processing Group, 1988) and IHAP (Image Handling And Processing; Middleburg, 1983). With the help of the Stellingwerf-Theta-Minimum-Method (Stellingwerf, 1978) a period of (2.22 +/- 0.09) days result from analysis of structures in the plasma-coma by subtracting subsequent images. The idea behind subtracting subsequent images is that rotation effects are only 10% phenomena on gas distribution. Difference images are than used to supress the static component of the gas cloud. The CO+ column density data (in molecules cm^-2) were compared with the data of CN column density from Schulz (1990) in all common days. The results show that the relations between CO+ and CN in average column density values (N_CO^+/N_CN) are 11.6 for a circular slit with average diameter (Phi) of 6.1 arcminute which corresponds to a distance from the nucleus (rho) equal to 6.3 X

  18. Land-atmosphere interactions and climate change: Recent results and new perspectives (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seneviratne, S. I.; Davin, E. L.; Greve, P.; Gudmundsson, L.; Guillod, B.; Hirschi, M.; Mittelbach, H.; Mueller, B.; Mystakidis, S.; Orlowsky, B.; Orth, R.; Wilhelm, M.

    2013-12-01

    simulations. Manuscript in preparation. Seneviratne, S.I., D. Lüthi, M. Litschi, and C. Schär, 2006: Land-atmosphere coupling and climate change in Europe. Nature, 443, 205-209. Seneviratne, S.I., T. Corti, E.L. Davin, M. Hirschi, E.B. Jaeger, I. Lehner, B. Orlowsky, and A.J. Teuling, 2010: Investigating soil moisture-climate interactions in a changing climate: A review. Earth-Science Reviews, 99, 3-4, 125-161, doi:10.1016/j.earscirev.2010.02.004. Seneviratne, S.I., M. Wilhelm, T. Stanelle, B.J.J.M. van den Hurk, S. Hagemann, A. Berg, F. Cheruy, M.E. Higgins, A. Meier, V. Brovkin, M. Claussen, A. Ducharne, J.-L. Dufresne, K.L. Findell, J. Ghattas, D.M. Lawrence, S. Malyshev, M. Rumukainen, and B. Smith, 2013: Impact of soil moisture-climate feedbacks on CMIP5 projections: First results from the GLACE-CMIP5 experiment. Submitted to Geophys. Res. Lett.

  19. The Lassell Massif - a Silicic Lunar Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, J.; Robinson, M. S.; Stopar, J. D.; Glotch, T. D.; Hawke, B. R.; Lawrence, S. J.; Jolliff, B. L.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Paige, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    within the structure. The Lassell massif is thus a volcanic construct with a range of silica concentrations. Based on landform morphology, some deposits appear enriched enough in silica to affect magma viscosity, the character of extrusion, and edifice construction. Stratigraphic relationships between the massif and surrounding deposits suggest that at least some volcanic activities associated with the massif occurred after mare emplacement. Together with volcanic features in the surrounding region, a compositionally and temporally complex volcanic history is supported for this portion of Mare Nubium. Magma production, extrusion, and timing of emplacement models would benefit from petrologic studies of new samples returned from this region. References: [1] Hagerty J. J. et al., (2006) JGR 111 (E06002). [2] Wagner R. et al., (2010) JGR 115 (E06015). [3] Wood C. A. and Head III J. W. (1975) Conf. on Origins of Mare Basalts, Lunar Sci. Inst., Houston, TX. [4] Whitaker E. A. (1972) Apollo 16 Prelim. Sci. Rpt. NASA SP-315, pp. 29-104 to 29-105. [5] Jolliff B. L. et al., (1991) Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. XXI, 101-118. [6] Glotch T. D. et al., (2010) Science 329, 1510-1513. [7] Greenhagen B. T. et al., (2010) Science 329, 1507-1509. [8] Glotch T. D. et al., (2011) GRL, 38(L21204). [9] Jolliff B. L. et al., (2011) Nat Geosci. 4. [10] Robinson M. S. et al., (2010) Space Sci. Rev. 150(1-4), 81-124. [11] Wilhelms D. E. (1972) USGS Map I-722.

  20. A True Proteus: A history of energy conservation in German science and culture, 1847-1914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegener, F. D. A.

    2009-11-01

    This thesis follows the career of the law of energy conservation in German science and culture between 1847 and 1914. There is an interesting contrast between the initial reception of Hermann Helmholtz’ 1847 treatise ‘Über die Erhaltung der Kraft’, which was rejected by the editor of the Annalen der Physik, and its later status as a classic of science. ‘Energy’ was the shared concept of the disciplines. It was used by physiologists, physicists, psychologists, sociologists and philosophers. Moreover, the law of energy conservation also made a huge cultural impact. The period around 1900 has justly been called an energetic era. Why did the law of energy conservation become such a universal success? The obvious way to explain this success would be to say: because it is true, and subsequently comment upon its great scientific value. This thesis adopts a different perspective. It adopts Wittgenstein’s definition of meaning as use in language. Consequently, the meaning of the law is only referred to in relation to the way in which it was put to use in communicative practice. From this perspective it is immediately evident that the understanding of the law of energy conservation was subject to considerable change. Helmholtz initially conceptualized the law in terms of atoms and forces; Gustav Kirchhoff and Ernst Mach, rejected atoms and forces as hypothetical entities and they preferred to use the more mundane concept of work instead; Wilhelm Ostwald, finally, thought of energy as an immaterial substance. This thesis meticulously follows the changes in use and understanding to which the law was subject as it penetrated German science and culture. Communication and interests, rather than natural essences, are the central explanatory concepts of the thesis. From 1847 onwards Helmholtz and Du Bois-Reymond actively sought to spread the law of energy conservation among their colleagues and the general public. They told their fellow physiologists, for example, that